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Sample records for air dried soil

  1. Effects of Soil and Air Drying Methods on Soil Plasticity of Different Cities of Pakistan

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    Aashan Ijaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atterberg Limits were initially defined in 1911, by Albert Atterberg, a Swedish scientist. Their purposes are to classifying cohesive soils and determine engineering properties of soils. According to ASTM, all the soils tested by Atterberg limits should be oven dried, it is because drying the soils in different degree will alter their properties significantly. Some of the physical properties of soils will undergo changes that appear to be permanent. Therefore, the soil samples should be in natural or air-dried form. However, in reality, due to time constraint and other factors, many will run the tests by using soil samples that are prepared by oven drying method. They assumed that there is no difference between the results of two types of drying method. However, in reality, the properties of soil will be affected and thus give a misleading result. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of two drying methods, air-drying method and oven drying method, on the soil plasticity. Six soil samples from different cities were tested. These tests include sieve analysis, specific gravity test, hydrometer analysis, Plastic limit and liquid limit test. Conclusively, the oven drying method could not replace the air-drying method in soil preparation for both Atterberg limits tests.

  2. Effects of Air-Drying on the Inorganic Phosphorus Forms in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ke; TANG Yan; WANG Xiao-li; LU Hai-ming; ZHAO Hai-tao

    2005-01-01

    After 90 day's cultivation of five different plants (rye grass, lupin, buckwheat, rape and amaranth) in three soils (Yellow brown soil, Paddy soil and Red soil), fresh soil samples were collected and inorganic phosphorus (Pi) fractions were measured before and after air-drying. The results clearly indicated that the total Pi and their composition differed significantly among soil types. The air-drying process increased the total Pi in yellow brown soil and in paddy soil, while decreased that in red soil. The total Pi could vary to 70% of that before air-drying. The Pi forms in different soils changed to different extent after air-drying. As to yellow brown soil, Al-P decreased, while O-P and Ca-P increased; as to paddy soil, Al-P and Ca-P increased, while Fe-P and O-P remained; as to red soil, Al-P and Fe-P increased, Ca-P remained and O-P reduced obviously. Growth of different plants in soils had effects on Pi forms during the process of air-drying. Therefore, for chemical study of soil phosphorus, application of fresh soil samples can provide more reliable results.

  3. Air temperature evolution during dry spells and its relation to prevailing soil moisture regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    The complex interplay between land and atmosphere makes accurate climate predictions very challenging, in particular with respect to extreme events. More detailed investigations of the underlying dynamics, such as the identification of the drivers regulating the energy exchange at the land surface and the quantification of fluxes between soil and atmosphere over different land types, are thus necessary. The recently started DROUGHT-HEAT project (funded by the European Research Council) aims to provide better understanding of the processes governing the land-atmosphere exchange. In the first phase of the project, different datasets and methods are used to investigate major drivers of land-atmosphere dynamics leading to droughts and heatwaves. In the second phase, these findings will be used for reducing uncertainties and biases in earth system models. Finally, the third part of the project will focus on the application of the previous findings and use them for the attribution of extreme events to land processes and possible mitigation through land geoengineering. One of the major questions in land-atmosphere exchange is the relationship between air temperature and soil moisture. Different studies show that especially during dry spells soil moisture has a strong impact on air temperature and the amplification of hot extremes. Whereas in dry and wet soil moisture regimes variations in latent heat flux during rain-free periods are expected to be small, this is not the case in transitional soil moisture regimes: Due to decreasing soil moisture content latent heat flux reduces with time, which causes in turn an increase in sensible heat flux and, subsequently, higher air temperatures. The investigation of air temperature evolution during dry spells can thus help to detect different soil moisture regimes and to provide insights on the effect of different soil moisture levels on air temperature. Here we assess the underlying relationships using different observational and

  4. Leaching heavy metals from the surface soil of reclaimed tidal flat by alternating seawater inundation and air drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-Hong; Liu, Zhen-Ling; Li, Qu-Sheng; Yang, Ping; Wang, Li-Li; He, Bao-Yan; Xu, Zhi-Min; Ye, Jin-Shao; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-08-01

    Leaching experiments were conducted in a greenhouse to simulate seawater leaching combined with alternating seawater inundation and air drying. We investigated the heavy metal release of soils caused by changes associated with seawater inundation/air drying cycles in the reclaimed soils. After the treatment, the contents of all heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, and Cu), except Zn, in surface soil significantly decreased (P removal rates ranging from 10% to 51%. The amounts of the exchangeable, carbonate, reducible, and oxidizable fractions also significantly decreased (P heavy metals. Measurement of diffusive gradients in thin films indicated that seawater inundation significantly increased the re-mobility of heavy metals. During seawater inundation, iron oxide reduction induced the release of heavy metals in the reducible fraction. Decomposition of organic matter, and complexation with dissolved organic carbon decreased the amount of heavy metals in the oxidizable fraction. Furthermore, complexation of chloride ions and competition of cations during seawater inundation and/or leaching decreased the levels of heavy metals in the exchangeable fraction. By contrast, air drying significantly enhanced the concentration of heavy metals in the exchangeable fraction. Therefore, the removal of heavy metals in the exchangeable fraction can be enhanced during subsequent leaching with seawater.

  5. Biomassa microbiana em amostras de solos secadas ao ar e reumedecidas Microbial biomass in air dried and rewetted soil samples

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    Antônio Samarão Gonçalves

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a viabilidade do condicionamento de amostras como terra fina secada ao ar (TFSA por curto período, para a determinação do carbono da biomassa microbiana (BMS-C, pelo método da fumigaçãoextração, e verificar a respiração microbiana basal (RB do solo. O condicionamento como TFSA, procedendo-se à fumigação para a análise da BMS-C imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento, proporcionou valores de BMS-C para os solos Podzólicos, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo álico e Orgânico, semelhantes aos valores dos seus controles. Os solos Glei Pouco Húmico e Vertissolo apresentaram valores de BMS-C similares aos do controle a partir de 24 horas de incubação; o solo Planossolo arenoso apresentou valores similares aos do controle com 72 horas, e a Rendizina, com 168 horas de incubação. Na maioria dos solos, a RB determinada na TFSA apresentou valores maiores do que os do tratamento-controle, quando avaliada imediatamente ou 24 horas após o reumedecimento a 60% da capacidade máxima de retenção de água, seguida de queda e manutenção em níveis semelhantes ao do controle nos períodos subseqüentes. O précondicionamento, de curta duração, como TFSA, é promissor para a determinação da BMS-C, quando níveis e períodos adequados de reumedecimento são adotados.The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization of short term air dried soil samples in a determination of soil microbial biomass (SMB-C, by a fumigationextraction method, and soil microbial basal respiration (BR. Zero time or 24 hours rewetting incubation period before fumigation procedure gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for the Podzolic soils, Allic RedYellow Latosol and Organic soil. Low Humic Gley and Vertisol soils gave values of SMB-C similar to those of the control for periods of incubation equal or higher than 24 hours. Planosol (sandy soil and Rendzina soils gave values of SMB-C similar to the

  6. Nature of organo-mineral particles across density fractions in a volcanic-ash soil: air-drying and sonication effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, R.; Kajiura, M.; Shirato, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interactions of plant- and microbially-derived organic matter with mineral phases exert significant controls on the stabilization of organic matter (OM) as well as other biogeochemical processes in soil. Density fractionation techniques have been successful in distinguishing soil organo-mineral particles of different degrees of microbial alteration, turnover rate of C, mineral associations. A major methodological difference among the density fractionation studies is the choice of sample pre-treatment. Presence or absence of sonication to disrupt and disperse soil particles and aggregates is a particularly important choice which could significantly alter the nature and distribution of organo-mineral particle and thus the resultant elemental concentration in each density fraction. Soil moisture condition (air-dry vs. field-moist) may also have strong impact especially for soils rich in Fe oxides/hydroxides and/or poorly-crystalline minerals that are prone for (possibly irreversible) aggregation. We thus tested these two effects on the concentration and distribution of C, N, and extractable phases of Fe and Al (by pyrophosphate and acid oxalate) across six density fractions (from 2.5 g/cm^3) using a surface-horizon of volcanic-ash soil which contained large amounts of poorly-crystalline minerals and organo-metal complexes. Compared to field-moist sample, air-drying had little effects on the elemental concentration or distribution across the fractions. In contrast, sonication on air-dried sample at each density cutoff during fractionation process caused significant changes. In addition to well-known increase in low-density material due to the liberation of plant detritus upon aggregate disruption, we found clear increase in C, N, and metals in 2.0-2.3 g/cm^3 fraction, which was largely compensated by the reduction in 1.8-2.0 g/cm^3 and, to a less extent, 2.3-2.5 g/cm^3 particles. Overall, sonication led to the redistribution of C and N by 15-20% and that of poorly

  7. Microbial growth responses upon rewetting dry soil

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    Meisner, Annelein; Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Increased rainfall and drought periods are expected to occur with current climate change, leading to fluctuations in soil moisture. Changes in soil moisture are known to affect carbon cycling. A pulse of carbon dioxide release (respiration) is often observed after rewetting a dry soil and a drying threshold is observed before this pulse emerges. Increased microbial activity is often assumed to be the cause for the pulse in respiration. Yet, the microbial growth responses that underlie this pulse are often not studied. The following questions will be addressed in this presentation. 1) Do fungal and bacterial growth explain the pulse in respiration upon rewetting a dry soil? 2) How does microbial growth respond to different drying intensities before rewetting? To answer the research questions, soils from Sweden, U.K. and Greenland were put in microcosms, air-dried for four days, a prolonged period or to different moisture content before rewetting. We measured soil respiration, fungal growth rates and/or bacterial growth rates at high temporal resolution during one week after rewetting. Our results suggest that the respiration pulse upon rewetting dry soil is not due to high microbial growth rates. During the first hours after rewetting, bacterial and fungal growth rates were low whereas the respiration rates were high. As such, there was a decoupling between the pulse in respiration and microbial growth rates. Two patterns of bacterial growth were observed upon rewetting the three different soils. In "pattern 1", bacteria started growing immediately in a linear pattern up to values similar as the moist control. In "pattern 2", bacteria started growing exponentially after a lag period of no growth with a second pulse of respiration occurring at the start of bacterial growth. Manipulating the drying intensity changed the patterns. Soils with "pattern 1" were changed to "pattern 2" when subjected to more extensive drying periods whereas soils with "pattern 2" were

  8. Soil methane oxidation in both dry and wet temperate eucalypt forests shows a near-identical relationship with soil air-filled porosity

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    Fest, Benedikt J.; Hinko-Najera, Nina; Wardlaw, Tim; Griffith, David W. T.; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2017-01-01

    Well-drained, aerated soils are important sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4) via the process of CH4 oxidation by methane-oxidising bacteria (MOB). This terrestrial CH4 sink may contribute towards climate change mitigation, but the impact of changing soil moisture and temperature regimes on CH4 uptake is not well understood in all ecosystems. Soils in temperate forest ecosystems are the greatest terrestrial CH4 sink globally. Under predicted climate change scenarios, temperate eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia are predicted to experience rapid and extreme changes in rainfall patterns, temperatures and wild fires. To investigate the influence of environmental drivers on seasonal and inter-annual variation of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange, we measured soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange at high-temporal resolution (Ecological Research site, 1700 mm yr-1). Both forest soil systems were continuous CH4 sinks of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Victoria and -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Tasmania. Soil CH4 uptake showed substantial temporal variation and was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both forest sites. Soil CH4 uptake increased when soil moisture decreased and this relationship explained up to 90 % of the temporal variability. Furthermore, the relationship between soil moisture and soil CH4 flux was near-identical at both forest sites when soil moisture was expressed as soil air-filled porosity (AFP). Soil temperature only had a minor influence on soil CH4 uptake. Soil nitrogen concentrations were generally low and fluctuations in nitrogen availability did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either forest site. Our data suggest that soil MOB activity in the two forests was similar and that differences in soil CH4 exchange between the two forests were related to differences in soil moisture and thereby soil gas diffusivity. The differences between forest sites and the variation in soil CH4 exchange over time could be explained by soil AFP as an indicator of soil moisture

  9. Carrageenan drying with dehumidified air: drying characteristics and product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djaeni, M.; Sasongko, S.B.; Prasetyaningrum, Aji A A.A.; Jin, X.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Applying dehumidified air is considered as an option to retain quality in carrageenan drying. This work concerns the effects of operational temperature, air velocity, and carrageenan thickness on the progress of drying and product quality when using dehumidified air. Final product quality and progre

  10. Convective Air Drying Characteristics for Thin Layer Carrots

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    Ionut Dumitru Velescu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carrot is one of the most commonly used vegetables for human nutrition due to high vitamin and fibre content. Drying is one of the oldest methods of food preservation, and it represents a very important aspect of food processing. Sun drying is the most common method used to preserve agricultural products in most tropical countries; this technique is extremely weather dependent, and has the problems of contamination with dust, soil, sand particles and insects. Also, the required drying time can be quite long. Therefore, using solar and hot-air dryers, which are far more rapid, providing uniformity and hygiene are inevitable for industrial food drying processes. Aim: This paper presents a kinetic study of convective drying without pre-treatment of carrot. The effects of the temperature of the drying agent, the speed of the drying agent and the thickness of the kinetics of drying the sample of carrots were investigated. Materials and methods: The experiments were carried out with the aid of an installation for drying food products, that is capable of ensuring the temperature of the drying agent (air in the range of +25 ... +125 °C. The drying process was conducted at temperature of 45 °C in first hour of process, 2 hours at 55 °C, and 3 hours at 60 °C. The air velocity was setup  at 1.0 - 2.5 m/s. Carrots were divided into segments of a thickness of 0.4 cm. Two mathematical models available in the literature were fitted to the experimental data. Results: The drying rate increases with temperature and decreases with the sample diameter. The Page model is given better prediction than the Henderson and Pabis model and satisfactorily described drying characteristics of carrot slices. Conclusions: The most important characteristics of carrot required for simulation and optimization of the drying were studied. The values of calculated effective diffusivity for drying at 45, 55 and 60oC of air temperature and 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 m

  11. High strength air-dried aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  12. Design of dry barriers for containment of contaminants in unsaturated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia); Thomson, B.M.; Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A dry barrier is a region of very dry conditions in unsaturated soil that prevents vertical migration of water created by circulating dry air through the formation. Dry soil creates a barrier to vertical water movement by decreasing the soil`s hydraulic conductivity, a concept also used in capillary barriers. A dry barrier may be a viable method for providing containment of a contaminant plume in a setting with a thick unsaturated zone and dry climate. The principal factors which determine the feasibility of a dry barrier include: (1) an and environment, (2) thick vadose zone, and (3) the ability to circulate air through the vadose zone. This study investigated the technical and economic considerations associated with creating a dry barrier to provide containment of a hypothetical 1 ha aqueous contaminant plume. The concept appears to be competitive with other interim containment methods such as ground freezing.

  13. Effect of air drying on speciation of heavy metals in flooded rice paddies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Wang; Biao Huang; Yan Bing Qi; Wen You Hu; Wei Xia Sun

    2012-01-01

    Flooded soil samples were collected in the typical area of the Yangtze Delta Region; fractions of heavy metals in flooded and air dried samples were measured with BCR sequential extraction method and atomic absorption spectrometry.In flooded soils,fractions of heavy metals increased in the order of acid soluble < oxidizable < reducible < residual.The acid soluble and reducible fractions significantly decreased but residual fraction significantly increased when the samples were air dried.The data obtained from air dried soil samples could not accurately represent the speciation of heavy metals in flooded field conditions.

  14. Drier for air-drying coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micciche, F.; Oostveen, E.A.; Linde, van der R.; Haveren, van J.

    2003-01-01

    The invention pertains to a drier composition for air-drying alkyd-based coatings, inks, or floor coverings, comprising a combination of the following components: a) a transition metal salt with the formula: (Me )( X )m in which Me is the transition metal; X represents a coordinating ligand; and k-

  15. Role of Soil Microstructure in Microbially-mediated Drying Resistance

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    Cruz, B. C.; Shor, L. M.; Gage, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The retention of soil moisture between rainfall or irrigation events is imperative to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Amplified weather conditions are expected to result in widespread reduction in soil moisture. Extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by soil bacteria have the ability to influence soil moisture by (i) retaining water directly within the hydrogel matrix, and (ii) promoting an aggregated soil structure. We have developed microfluidic devices that emulate realistic soil microstructures and enable direct observation of EPS production and drying resistance. The objective of this study was to compare moisture retention in emulated soil micromodels containing different soil microstructures. "Aggregated" devices contain a greater number of small (100 μm) pores, while "non-aggregated" devices contained more intermediate-sized (30-100 μm) pores. Particle-size distributions, similar to a sandy loam, were identical in both cases. Dilute suspensions of either of two strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti were introduced into replicate micromodels: one strain produced EPS ("EPS+") and the other did not produce EPS ("EPS-"). Loaded micromodels were equilibrated at saturated conditions, then dried at 83% RH for several days. Direct observation showed micro-scale patterns of air infiltration. The rate and extent of moisture loss was determined as a function of bacterial strain and microstructure aggregation state. Results showed devices loaded with EPS+ bacteria retained moisture longer than devices loaded with EPS- bacteria. Moisture retention by EPS+ bacteria was enhanced in aggregated versus non-aggregated microstructures. This work illustrates how moisture retention in soil is the result of microbial processes acting within pore-scale soil microstructures. Validated microfluidics-based approaches may help quantitatively link pore-scale phenomena to ecosystem function.

  16. Drying characteristics of ultrasound assisted hot air drying of Flos Lonicerae

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, YUNHONG; Sun, Yue; Miao, Shuai; Li, Fang; Luo, Denglin

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound assisted hot air drying of Flos Lonicerae was investigated in this study. The effects of drying parameters such as ultrasonic radiation distance, ultrasonic power and drying temperature on drying characteristics were discussed. The results showed that ultrasound application has positive and significant effects on hot air drying. Shortening ultrasonic radiation distance is beneficial to improve both ultrasonic energy efficiency and drying rate. Higher ultrasonic power had more posit...

  17. Biomassa microbiana em amostras umedecidas após secagem ao ar de solos de toposeqüência de pastagens Microbial biomass in air dried and moisturized soil samples from toposequences of pasture

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    Antonio Samarão Gonçalves

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Neste experimento avaliou-se o carbono da biomassa microbiana do solo (C-BMS em diferentes solos sob topossequência de pastagem e a viabilidade de utilizar amostras condicionadas na forma de terra fina seca ao ar (TFSA. Observou-se para C-BMS, separação dos conteúdos entre os diferentes tipos de solo. A época de inverno favoreceu a C-BMS, elevando-se em 60% em relação ao verão. Na comparação realizada entre os solos preparados na forma de TFSA e com a metodologia de fumigação-extração não se detectou diferença significativa, encontrando-se correlações significativas para os dois métodos de preparo das amostras, o que estabelece um panorama promissor no uso desta metodologia, embora seja necessário maior aprofundamento neste aspecto.In this experiment we evaluated microbial biomass carbon (C-SMB from different soils under toposequences of pasture and the viability of the use of air dried soil samples (ADSS. C-SMB showed separation of values between different soil types. Winter season favored C-SMB being 60% higher in relation to summer. In comparison between the two soil sample preparation methods, ADSS and the classical one, there was no statistical. Significant correlations were observed between the two methods. This gives a positive perspective to the use of this new approach, even thought more study is necessary.

  18. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  19. Do we know how plants sense a drying soil?

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    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of crop growth and yield in dry areas is largely due to stomatal closure in response to dry soil, which decreases photosynthesis. However, the mechanism that causes stomatal closure in a drying soil is a controversial issue. Experienced and respected plant physiologists around the world have different views about the primary sensor of soil water shortage in plants. The goal of this review is to present a chronological synthesis about the evidence of the possible candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. Hydraulic signals in the leaves as the mechanism that causes stomatal closure dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the 70?s and the early 80?s. In the middle 80?s, studies suggested that stomatal conductance is better correlated with soil and root water status than with leaf water status. Thus, chemical signals produced in the roots dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the late 80?s and early 90?s. During the second half of the 90?s, however, studies provided evidence that hydraulic signals in the leaves are still better candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. After more than 60 years of studies in plant-water relations, the question raised in the title still has no unanimous answer. This controversial issue is a good research rationale for the current generation of plant physiologists.

  20. Application of Dry Air Drying Techniques on West-East Gas Pipeline Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoJianguo; XieLigong; DaiZongyu

    2004-01-01

    Based on the pre-eommissioning requirements of gas pipeline, the basic principles and influential factors of dry air drying adopted in long distance gas pipelines, and states in detail the technological flow and the equipment required, etc. are introduced, which will have practical significance in drying operation on gas pipeline.

  1. Nutritional responses to soil drying and rewetting cycles under partial root-zone drying irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Jensen, Christian Richardt; Liu, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    signaling that regulates stomatal aperture. PRI induced soil DRW cycles and more soil water dynamics in the root zone enhance soil nutrient mineralization process and thus increase the bioavailability of soil nutrients, resulting in improved nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake, in which soil microbial...... processes play a key role. Studies investigating how soil DRW cycles and water dynamics under PRI on nutrient transport in soil solution, soil microbe mediated P transformation, interactions between phytohormones and nutrient uptake, root morphological and architectural traits for nutrient acquisition...... and their bioavailability. Partial root-zone drying irrigation (PRI) irrigates half of the soil zone, while the other half is allowed to dry, and the two halves is alternately irrigated. PRI outweighs conventional deficit irrigation in further improving water use efficiency (WUE) by enhancing the root-to-shoot chemical...

  2. Machine Learning Assessments of Soil Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E. J.; Minsker, B. S.; Wenzel, C.; Gilmore, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural activities require the use of heavy equipment and vehicles on unpaved farmlands. When soil conditions are wet, equipment can cause substantial damage, leaving deep ruts. In extreme cases, implements can sink and become mired, causing considerable delays and expense to extricate the equipment. Farm managers, who are often located remotely, cannot assess sites before allocating equipment, causing considerable difficulty in reliably assessing conditions of countless sites with any reliability and frequency. For example, farmers often trace serpentine paths of over one hundred miles each day to assess the overall status of various tracts of land spanning thirty, forty, or fifty miles in each direction. One means of assessing the moisture content of a field lies in the strategic positioning of remotely-monitored in situ sensors. Unfortunately, land owners are often reluctant to place sensors across their properties due to the significant monetary cost and complexity. This work aspires to overcome these limitations by modeling the process of wetting and drying statistically - remotely assessing field readiness using only information that is publically accessible. Such data includes Nexrad radar and state climate network sensors, as well as Twitter-based reports of field conditions for validation. Three algorithms, classification trees, k-nearest-neighbors, and boosted perceptrons are deployed to deliver statistical field readiness assessments of an agricultural site located in Urbana, IL. Two of the three algorithms performed with 92-94% accuracy, with the majority of misclassifications falling within the calculated margins of error. This demonstrates the feasibility of using a machine learning framework with only public data, knowledge of system memory from previous conditions, and statistical tools to assess "readiness" without the need for real-time, on-site physical observation. Future efforts will produce a workflow assimilating Nexrad, climate network

  3. Simultaneous Preservation of Soil Structural Properties and Phospholipid Profiles: A Comparison of Three Drying Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.J.DEACON; D.V.GRINEV; J.W.CRAWFORD; J.HARRIS; K.RITZ; I.M.YOUNG

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to simultaneously preserve evidence of interactions between the biological community and soil structural properties of a soil in as near an intact (natural) state as possible.Three dehydration techniques were implemented and assessed for their ability to minimise disruption of both biological and physical properties of the same arable soil sample.Dehydration techniques applied until samples were at constant weight were i) air-drying at 20℃ (AD); ii)-80℃ freeze for 24 h,followed by freeze-drying (-80FD); and iii) liquid nitrogen snap freeze,followed by freeze-drying(LNFD) and were compared to a moist control.Physical structure was determined and quantified in three dimensions using X-ray computed tomography and microbial phenotypic community composition was assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiling.This study confirms that any form of dehydration,when preparing soil for simultaneous biological and physical analysis,will alter the soil physical properties,and cause some change in apparent community structure.Freeze-drying (both the LNFD and -80FD treatments) was found to minimise disruption (when compared to the moist control soil) to both the soil physical properties and the community structure and is a preferable technique to air-drying which markedly alters the size and character of the pore network,as well as the phenotypic profile.The LNFD was the preferred treatment over the -80FD treatment as samples show low variability between replicates and a fast turn-around time between samples.Therefore snap freezing in liquid nitrogen,followed by freeze drying is the most appropriate form of dehydration when two sets of data,both physical and biological,need to be preserved simultaneously from a soil core.

  4. Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Pedogenic Processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. E.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; Zent, A. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADVs) located in the Transantarctic Mountains are the coldest and driest locations on Earth. The mean annual air temperature is -20 C or less and the ADVs receive 100mm or less of precipitation annually in the form of snow. The cold and dry climate in the ADVs is one of the best terrestrial analogs for the climatic conditions on Mars [2]. The soils in the ADVs have been categorized into three soil moisture zones: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous. The subxerous zone is a coastal region in which soils have ice-cemented permafrost relatively close to the surface. Moisture is available in relatively large amounts and soil temperatures are above freezing throughout the soil profile (above ice permafrost) in summer months. The xerous zone, the most widespread of the three zones, is an inland region with a climate midway between the subxerous and ultraxerous. The soils from this zone have dry permafrost at moderate depths (30-75cm) but have sufficient water in the upper soil horizons to allow leaching of soluble materials. The ultraxerous zone is a high elevation zone, where both temperature and precipitation amounts are very low resulting in dry permafrost throughout the soil profile. The three moisture regime regions are similar to the three microclimatic zones (coastal thaw, inland mixed, stable upland) defined by Marchant and Head.

  5. Effects of heating the inlet air with a burner when natural air drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, W.F.; Lischynski, D.E.; Wassermann, J.D.; Frehlich, G.E.; Sokhansanj, S.

    1987-03-01

    During the 1985 and 1986 harvest seasons in Saskatchewan, cool and humid conditions reduced the performance of natural air drying systems for grains. This prompted many producers to consider supplemental heat when natural air drying. Research was conducted to investigate the implications of supplemental heating during grain drying and to develop recommendations about adding supplemental heat. Field tests were performed to compare drying time, energy consumption, quality of work, and ease of operation with different supplemental heat strategies. A computer model was developed to simulate adding supplemental heat during natural air drying, and the simulation was verified by comparing the computer simulation results with those obtained in the field tests. Natural air drying without heat was found to be more economical than with heat in the early fall. In late fall, drying costs by both methods were nearly equal but higher than in early fall. It is therefore recommended to attempt to complete all drying in early fall using natural air. If the harvest is delayed to late fall, natural air drying or supplemental heat drying can both be used. However, by adding supplemental heat, there is a very good chance of completing drying in the fall. Drying by natural air would likely have to be completed in the spring. 30 refs., 15 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Dynamics of convective hot air drying of filiform Lagenaria siceraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Aishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a laboratory convective hot air dryer was used for the thin-layer drying of filiform Lagenaria siceraria and the influences of the drying temperature and air velocity on the drying process were investigated. The drying temperature and the air velocity were varied in the range of 60-80°C and 0.6-1.04 m•s-1, respectively. The experimental data of moisture ratio of filiform Lagenaria siceraria were used to fit the mathematical models, and the dynamics parameters such as convective heat transfer coefficient α and mass transfer coefficient kH were calculated. The results showed that the drying temperature and air velocity influenced the drying process significantly. The Logarithmic model showed the best fit to experimental drying data. It was also found that, the air velocity and the drying temperature influence notable on both of the convective heat transfer coefficient α and the mass transfer coefficient kH. With the increase of hot air velocity from 0.423 to 1.120 ms-1, the values of α varied from 111.3 to 157.7 W•m-2•K-1, the values of kH varied from 13.12 to 18.58 g•m-2• s-1•ΔH-1. With the increase of air temperature from 60 to 80°C, the values of α varied between 150.2 and 156.9 W•m-2•K-1, the values of kH varied between 18.26 and 18.75 g•m-2•s-1•ΔH-1.

  7. On the effectiveness of dry drainage in soil salinity control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JingWei; ZHAO LiRong; HUANG JieSheng; YANG JinZhong; VINCENT Bernard; BOUARFA Sami; VIDAL Alain

    2009-01-01

    Dry drainage is thought to be a potential approach to control soil salinity.This study took the Hetao Irrigation District as an example and evaluated the effectiveness of dry drainage by using remote sensing, a conceptual model and a field experiment.Archived remote sensing images from 1973-2006 were used to delineate the temporal and spatial change of soil salinity.The conceptual water and salt balance model was used to evaluate the role of dry drainage in removing excess salt from the irrigated land.The field experiment was performed to get field validation and give more accurate estimation.The results show that dry drainage did contribute to remove excess salt from the irrigated land and succeed in controlling soil salinity in the Hetao Irrigation District.it can be taken as an alternative approach in (semi-)arid area where artificial drainage is not applicable.

  8. On the effectiveness of dry drainage in soil salinity control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VINCENT; Bernard; BOUARFA; Sami; VIDAL; Alain

    2009-01-01

    Dry drainage is thought to be a potential approach to control soil salinity. This study took the Hetao Irrigation District as an example and evaluated the effectiveness of dry drainage by using remote sensing, a conceptual model and a field experiment. Archived remote sensing images from 1973―2006 were used to delineate the temporal and spatial change of soil salinity. The conceptual water and salt balance model was used to evaluate the role of dry drainage in removing excess salt from the irrigated land. The field experiment was performed to get field validation and give more accurate estimation. The results show that dry drainage did contribute to remove excess salt from the irrigated land and succeed in controlling soil salinity in the Hetao Irrigation District. It can be taken as an alternative approach in (semi-)arid area where artificial drainage is not applicable.

  9. Characterization of Thin Layer Hot Air Drying of Celery Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The hot air drying characteristics of celery root were evaluated in a laboratory scale dryer at the drying temperatures of 50, 60, 70 and 80°C. The effect of hot air drying on drying time, drying rate, moisture content, moisture ratio and effective moisture diffusivity of celery root was investigated. Fifteen thin layer drying models were fitted by using experimental drying data. The fitting effect of model predictions was evaluated by using the values of coefficient of determination, sum squared error, root mean square error and chi-square. The results showed fitting accuracy of model 15 (Hii et al.,2009 gave a better fit for all drying conditions applied. The average values of effective moisture diffusivities of celery root ranged from 1.957×10-9 to 9.016×10-9 within the given drying temperature range. With in a certain temperature range (50-70°C, the average effective moisture diffusivities of celery root increased with increased temperature. The activation energy was estimated as 21.817 KJ/mol using an exponential expression based on the Arrhenius equation.

  10. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  11. Determination of the most economical drying schedule and air velocity in softwood drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salin, J.G.

    2001-12-01

    Simulation models for conventional softwood drying have been available and have also been used by kiln operators for many years. For instance models for Scots pine and Norway spruce, dried at temperatures below about 80 deg C, are in use in Sweden, Finland and Norway. These models predict drying rates as a function of climate (schedule) and air velocity. The models thus give a direct basis for calculation of instantaneous energy demand for moisture evaporation and ventilation. There is further a direct relationship between the air velocity in the space between the board layers in the kiln stack and the electrical power demand by the circulation fans. Finally, the smaller energy consumption associated with heat losses through kiln walls and the accumulated heat in timber etc. can be estimated with sufficient accuracy. Instantaneous energy costs can thus be calculated for each part of a drying schedule. Capital costs associated with kiln investment and maintenance, personnel, insurance etc can be accounted for as an hourly cost, which is basically independent of whether timber is dried fast or slowly. A slow drying process thus accumulates more capital costs per m 3 timber. In this way it is possible to calculate the total instantaneous drying cost (Euro/m{sup 3}/h or Euro/m3/MC%) and the overall total cost (Euro or Euro/m{sup 3}). Some results obtained with a simulation model equipped with such a cost calculation are presented in the paper. A rapidly increasing drying cost is seen when the final MC is lowered. By minimising the instantaneous cost, an optimal drying schedule can be determined for a given fixed air velocity. Finally an optimal air velocity - constant or varying - can be found in the same way.

  12. Microbial community composition of transiently wetted Antarctic Dry Valley soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Neiderberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the summer months, wet (hyporheic soils associated with ephemeral streams and lake edges in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (DV become hotspots of biological activity and are hypothesized to be an important source of carbon and nitrogen for arid DV soils. Recent research in the DV has focused on the geochemistry and microbial ecology of lakes and arid soils, with substantially less information being available on hyporheic soils. Here we determined the unique properties of hyporheic microbial communities, resolved their relationship to environmental parameters and to compared them to archetypal arid DV soils. Generally, pH increased and chlorophyll a concentrations decreased along transects from wet to arid soils (9.0 to ~7.0 for pH and ~0.8 to ~ 5 µg/cm3 for chlorophyll a, respectively. Soil water content decreased to below ~3% in the arid soils. Community fingerprinting-based principle component analyses revealed that bacterial communities formed distinct clusters specific to arid and wet soils; however, eukaryotic communities that clustered together did not have similar soil moisture content nor did they group together based on sampling location. Collectively, rRNA pyrosequencing indicated a considerably higher abundance of Cyanobacteria in wet soils and a higher abundance of Acidobacterial, Actinobacterial, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira and Planctomycetes in arid soils. The two most significant differences at the genus level were Gillisia signatures present in arid soils and chloroplast signatures related to Streptophyta that were common in wet soils. Fungal dominance was observed in arid soils and Viridplantae were more common in wet soils. This research represents an in-depth characterization of microbial communities inhabiting wet DV soils. Results indicate that the repeated wetting of hyporheic zones has a profound impact on the bacterial and eukaryotic communities inhabiting in these areas.

  13. Drying kinetics, rehydration and colour characteristics of convective hot-air drying of carrot slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymaz, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    The effects of air drying temperature, slice thickness and pre-treatment application on the drying kinetics of carrot slices during convective drying in the range 50-70 °C were investigated. Results indicated that drying time, rehydration ratio and colour characteristics of carrot slices were more affected by drying air temperature, followed by pre-treatment applications. Five thin-layer drying models were applied to describe the drying kinetics. Midilli et al. model was the best model to characterize the drying kinetics of carrot slices. The moisture effective diffusivity calculated from the second Fick's law of diffusion ranged from 3.46 × 10-10 to 1.02 × 10-9 m2/s. The values of activation energy determined from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, ln( D eff ) versus 1/(T + 273.15), were 35.53, 43.42, and 37.75 kJ/mol for blanch, potas and control samples, respectively.

  14. Drying kinetics, rehydration and colour characteristics of convective hot-air drying of carrot slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymaz, İbrahim

    2016-03-01

    The effects of air drying temperature, slice thickness and pre-treatment application on the drying kinetics of carrot slices during convective drying in the range 50-70 °C were investigated. Results indicated that drying time, rehydration ratio and colour characteristics of carrot slices were more affected by drying air temperature, followed by pre-treatment applications. Five thin-layer drying models were applied to describe the drying kinetics. Midilli et al. model was the best model to characterize the drying kinetics of carrot slices. The moisture effective diffusivity calculated from the second Fick's law of diffusion ranged from 3.46 × 10-10 to 1.02 × 10-9 m2/s. The values of activation energy determined from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, ln(D eff ) versus 1/(T + 273.15), were 35.53, 43.42, and 37.75 kJ/mol for blanch, potas and control samples, respectively.

  15. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the coarser (content. Further, compaction effort was much significant

  16. Drying kinetics and mathematical modeling of hot air drying of coconut coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, J A K M; Amarasinghe, A D U S

    2016-01-01

    Drying kinetics of coir pith was studied and the properties of compressed coir pith discs were analyzed. Coir pith particles were oven dried in the range of temperatures from 100 to 240 °C and the rehydration ability of compressed coir pith was evaluated by finding the volume expansion. The optimum drying temperature was found to be 140 °C. Hot air drying was carried out to examine the drying kinetics by allowing the coir pith particles to fluidize and circulate inside the drying chamber. Particle motion within the drying chamber closely resembled the particle motion in a flash dryer. The effective moisture diffusivity was found to increase from 1.18 × 10(-8) to 1.37 × 10(-8) m(2)/s with the increase of air velocity from 1.4 to 2.5 m/s respectively. Correlation analysis and residual plots were used to determine the adequacy of existing mathematical models for describing the drying behavior of coir pith. The empirical models, Wang and Singh model and Linear model, were found to be adequate for accurate prediction of drying behavior of coir pith. A new model was proposed by modifying the Wang and Singh model and considering the effect of air velocity. It gave the best correlation between observed and predicted moisture ratio with high value of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and lower values of root mean square error, reduced Chi square (χ(2)) and mean relative deviation (E%).

  17. Sorptivity and liquid infiltration into dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Patricia J.; Ivanov, Vladimir; Germaine, John T.

    2005-10-01

    The sorptivity S quantifies the effect of capillarity on liquid movement in a porous material. For liquid infiltration into an initially dry material, S is a parameter that is contingent on both liquid and material properties as well as the maximum liquid content behind the infiltrating front, θm. Scaling analyses are used to derive a dimensionless, intrinsic sorptivity S∗ that is constant for different liquids, Miller-similar materials and different values of θm. The analyses confirm that S is dependent on β1/2, where β = cos ϕ is a measure of the wettability of the liquid. They also indicate a power law relationship between S and Se(av), the average liquid saturation behind the infiltrating front. Seventeen water and eleven Soltrol 220 horizontal infiltration experiments are reported in uniform, dry sand. Test results show that water is partially wetting in the sand. They also confirm that S∝Se(av)d, where d = 3.2 for the experimental conditions. The usefulness of a general, dimensionless Boltzmann variable is demonstrated to normalize infiltration profiles for the different liquids. An approximate method for sorptivity calculation is shown to provide an accurate estimate of S∗.

  18. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-05

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  19. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  20. Relationship soil-water-plant after the dry season in dry Mediterranean areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, P.; Jiménez-Donaire, V.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Preliminary studies have determined the existence of a pluviometric gradient around Mediterranean system, which varies from 240 to 1 100 mm mean annual rainfall. This gradient has an incidence in the physical, chemical and hydrological properties in soils with the same litology. Empiric results conclude that humid eco-geomorphological systems are controlled by biotic processes, whereas in arid eco-geomorphological systems, are abiotic factors which have more importance in soil degradation processes. The study area of the present work is located in Málaga (Andalusia, Spain), in the southern part of the Natural Park "Sierra Tejeda, Almijara y Alhama". There, the mean annual temperature is around 18 °C and the mean rainfall is 650 mm. Predominant vegetation corresponds to the termomediterranean serie Smilaci Mauritanicae-Querceto Rotundifoliae Sigmetum, typical of basic soils. The aim of this study is to analyse the immediate hydrological response of the soil under different vegetation covers, through the analysis of certain properties, all this, under subhumid ombrotipe. A random choice of ten representative plants has been done. These plants, with different sizes, were located in the same Southern slope. The soil samples were taken right beside the plant log, and also within a distance of 0.4 to 1 metre from them, depending on the plant size. The sampling was carried out between the end of the dry season and the beginning of the wet one, after a 20% of the mean annual rainfall had rained. The physical, chemical and hydrological analyzes -both in the field and the laboratory- were: exchange-base, total carbon, cation exchange capacity, soil infiltration capacity, salt content, hydrophobia, organic matter, soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, wetting profile in bared soil, wetting profile under vegetation cover (shrubland), and p.H. Literature reveals that rainfall affects significantly the edafogenetic factors, regarding the pluviometric gradient level. In the

  1. Dry coolers and air-condensing units (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, O. O.; Anan'ev, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of factors affecting the growth of shortage of freshwater is performed. The state and dynamics of the global market of dry coolers used at electric power plants are investigated. Substantial increase in number and maximum capacity of air-cooled condensers, which have been put into operation in the world in recent years, are noted. The key reasons facilitating the choice of developers of the dry coolers, in particular the independence of the location of thermal power plant from water sources, are enumerated. The main steam turbine heat removal schemes using air cooling are considered, their comparison of thermal efficiency is assessed, and the change of three important parameters, such as surface area of heat transfer, condensate pump flow, and pressure losses in the steam exhaust system, are estimated. It is shown that the most effective is the scheme of direct steam condensation in the heat-exchange tubes, but other schemes also have certain advantages. The air-cooling efficiency may be enhanced much more by using an air-cooling hybrid system: a combination of dry and wet cooling. The basic applied constructive solutions are shown: the arrangement of heat-exchange modules and the types of fans. The optimal mounting design of a fully shopassembled cooling system for heat-exchange modules is represented. Different types of heat-exchange tubes ribbing that take into account the operational features of cooling systems are shown. Heat transfer coefficients of the plants from different manufacturers are compared, and the main reasons for its decline are named. When using evaporative air cooling, it is possible to improve the efficiency of air-cooling units. The factors affecting the faultless performance of dry coolers (DC) and air-condensing units (ACU) and the ways of their elimination are described. A high velocity wind forcing reduces the efficiency of cooling systems and creates preconditions for the development of wind-driven devices. It is noted that

  2. The effect of pretreatments on air drying characteristics of persimmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiray, Engin; Tulek, Yahya

    2017-01-01

    In this study, whole and peeled persimmons were dried in the ranges of 55-75 °C of drying temperature in a hot air dryer. The effect of drying temperature and pretreatments on the drying characteristics was determined. Immersing in a solution of 20 % sucrose resulted in an increase in the drying rate of persimmons. A non-linear regression procedure was used to fit five thin-layer drying models available in the literature to the experimental moisture loss data. The Page and Modified Page models have shown a better fit to the experimental drying data as compared to other models. The effective diffusivity was determined to be 9.237 × 10-10-10.395 × 10-10 m2 s-1 for the blanched persimmons and 7.755 × 10-10-9.631 × 10-10 m2 s-1 for immersed sucrose solution persimmons. The activation energies for diffusion were calculated to be 56.09 kJ mol-1 (for blanched) and 10.28 kJ mol-1 (for immersed sucrose solution).

  3. Drying Strategy of Shrimp using Hot Air Convection and Hybrid Infrared Radiation/Hot Air Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawan TIRAWANICHAKUL

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the research was to study the effect of drying temperatures using infrared irradiation and electric heating convection on dehydration and was to investigate the effect of drying conditions on the quality of the shrimp. Two sizes of fresh shrimp (100 shrimp/kg and 200 shrimp/kg with initial moisture content of 270 - 350 % dry-basis were dried under various conditions while the final moisture content of dried shrimp was in ranges between 20 and 25 % dry-basis. Hot air flow rates of 1.0 -   1.2 m/s, drying temperatures of 40 - 90 °C and infrared intensities of 1,785.7 - 3,571.4 W/m2 were used in these experiments. The experimental results showed that the rate of moisture content transfer of both sizes of shrimps decreased exponentially with drying time while increasing drying temperature significantly affected to the drying kinetics and quality of the shrimps. Effective diffusion coefficients of both shrimps were determined by a diffusion model forming a finite cylindrical shape was in order of 10-7 m2/s and this effective diffusion coefficient value was relatively dependent on the drying temperature compared to the initial moisture content. The quality analysis of dried shrimp using an infrared source and electric heating source found that the redness value (Hunter a-value of dried samples using hybrid infrared radiation and electric heating had a higher colour uniformity than other drying methods. Additionally, shrinkage and rehydration properties were insignificantly different for all drying strategies (p < 0.05 and drying using infrared radiation had higher drying rates compared to electric heat convection, corresponding to relatively low drying times.

  4. Soil Drying Effects on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N.; Risk, D.; Kayler, Z. E.; Rugh, W.; Mix, A. C.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opportunity to distinguish fast- responding plant C from slower-responding soil C pools, which under steady-state conditions may be too similar isotopically to partition. Monitoring the isotopic composition of soil respiration over a period of changing moisture conditions is potentially a useful approach for characterizing plant contributions to soil respiration. But this partitioning hinges on the assumption that any change in the isotopic signature of soil respiration is solely due to recent photosynthetic discrimination, and that post-photosynthetic processes, such as microbial respiration, do not discriminate as moisture decreases. The purpose of the present study is to test the assumption that δ13CO2 from microbial respiration remains static as soil dries. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments employing different techniques to isolate microbial respiration from root respiration. The first involves removing roots from soil, and showed that when roots are present, respiration from dry soil is enriched in 13C relative to moist soil, but when roots are absent, respiration is isotopically similar from moist and dry soils. This indicates that rhizospheric respiration changes isotopically with moisture whereas soil microbial respiration does not. In contrast, a second experiment in which soil columns without plants were monitored as they dried, showed respiration from very dry soil to be enriched by 8‰ relative to moist soil. However, simulations with an isotopologue-based soil gas diffusion model demonstrate that at least a portion of the apparent enrichment is due to non-steady state gas transport processes. Careful sampling methodologies which prevent or account for non

  5. The Impact of Dry Saharan Air on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The controversial role of the dry Saharan Air Layer (SAL) on tropical storm intensification in the Atlantic will be addressed. The SAL has been argued in previous studies to have potential positive influences on storm development, but most recent studies have argued for a strong suppressing influence on storm intensification as a result of dry air, high stability, increased vertical wind shear, and microphysical impacts of dust. Here, we focus on observations of Hurricane Helene (2006), which occurred during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities (NAMMA) experiment. Satellite and airborne observations, combined with global meteorological analyses depict the initial environment of Helene as being dominated by the SAL, although with minimal evidence that the SAL air actually penetrated to the core of the disturbance. Over the next several days, the SAL air quickly moved westward and was gradually replaced by a very dry, dust-free layer associated with subsidence. Despite the wrapping of this very dry air around the storm, Helene intensified steadily to a Category 3 hurricane suggesting that the dry air was unable to significantly slow storm intensification. Several uncertainties remain about the role of the SAL in Helene (and in tropical cyclones in general). To better address these uncertainties, NASA will be conducting a three year airborne campaign called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3). The HS3 objectives are: To obtain critical measurements in the hurricane environment in order to identify the role of key factors such as large-scale wind systems (troughs, jet streams), Saharan air masses, African Easterly Waves and their embedded critical layers (that help to isolate tropical disturbances from hostile environments). To observe and understand the three-dimensional mesoscale and convective-scale internal structures of tropical disturbances and cyclones and their role in intensity change. The mission objectives will be achieved using

  6. Spatial variability of soils in a seasonally dry tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, Hebbalalu; Dattaraja, Handanakere; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Soil structures communities of plants and soil organisms in tropical forests. Understanding the controls of soil spatial variability can therefore potentially inform efforts towards forest restoration. We studied the relationship between soils and lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in a seasonally dry tropical forest in southern India. We extensively sampled soil (available nutrients, Al, pH, and moisture), rocks, relief, woody vegetation, and spatial variation in fire burn frequency in a permanent 50-ha plot. Lower elevation soils tended to be less moist and were depleted in several nutrients and clay. The availability of several nutrients was, in turn, linked to whole-rock chemical composition differences since some lithologies were associated with higher elevations, while the others tended to dominate lower elevations. We suggest that local-scale topography in this region has been shaped by the spatial distribution of lithologies, which differ in their susceptibility to weathering. Nitrogen availability was uncorrelated with the presence of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species. No effect of burning on soil parameters could be discerned at this scale.

  7. Air-drying kinetics affect yeast membrane organization and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemetais, Guillaume; Dupont, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is a key structure for the survival of cells during dehydration. In this study, we focused on the concomitant changes in survival and in the lateral organization of the PM in yeast strains during desiccation, a natural or technological environmental perturbation that involves transition from a liquid to a solid medium. To evaluate the role of the PM in survival during air-drying, a wild-type yeast strain and an osmotically fragile mutant (erg6Δ) were used. The lateral organization of the PM (microdomain distribution) was observed using a fluorescent marker related to a specific green fluorescent protein-labeled membrane protein (Sur7-GFP) after progressive or rapid desiccation. We also evaluated yeast behavior during a model dehydration experiment performed in liquid medium (osmotic stress). For both strains, we observed similar behavior after osmotic and desiccation stresses. In particular, the same lethal magnitude of dehydration and the same lethal kinetic effect were found for both dehydration methods. Thus, yeast survival after progressive air-drying was related to PM reorganization, suggesting the positive contribution of passive lateral rearrangements of the membrane components. This study also showed that the use of glycerol solutions is an efficient means to simulate air-drying desiccation.

  8. Soil macrofauna (invertebrates of Kazakhstanian Stipa lessingiana dry steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragina Tatyana М.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stipa lessingiana steppes used to be prevalent on the dry Trans-Ural denudation plains, particularly, on the Sub-Ural and the Turgay Plateau. But, most of them have been lost because they were plowed up during the Virgin Land campaign in the second part of 20th century. This paper presents a detailed study of the faunistic composition and the structure of soil-dwelling invertebrate communities (macrofauna of a temperate-dry bunch feather grass steppe in the Turgai Plateau (Northern-Turgai physical-geographical province of steppe Kazakhstan, Kostanay Oblast. The study site is located in the territory of the Naurzum State Nature Reserve, a part of the UNESCO World Heritage site “Saryarka Steppe and Lakes of Northern Kazakhstan”, where remnants of Virgin S. lessingiana steppes have been preserved to the present day. This region is the driest and most continental in climate of all the dry steppes of Kazakhstan. The total abundance and biomass of soil invertebrate communities in the investigated site were lower than in the northern and western steppe areas. Soil invertebrates are among the major components that determine the functioning of terrestrial natural ecosystems.

  9. Transcriptional response of nitrifying communities to wetting of dry soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placella, Sarah A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-05-01

    The first rainfall following a severe dry period provides an abrupt water potential change that is both an acute physiological stress and a defined stimulus for the reawakening of soil microbial communities. We followed the responses of indigenous communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to the addition of water to laboratory incubations of soils taken from two California annual grasslands following a typically dry Mediterranean summer. By quantifying transcripts for a subunit of bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenases (amoA) and a bacterial nitrite oxidoreductase (nxrA) in soil from 15 min to 72 h after water addition, we identified transcriptional response patterns for each of these three groups of nitrifiers. An increase in quantity of bacterial amoA transcripts was detectable within 1 h of wet-up and continued until the size of the ammonium pool began to decrease, reflecting a possible role of transcription in upregulation of nitrification after drought-induced stasis. In one soil, the pulse of amoA transcription lasted for less than 24 h, demonstrating the transience of transcriptional pools and the tight coupling of transcription to the local soil environment. Analysis of 16S rRNA using a high-density microarray suggested that nitrite-oxidizing Nitrobacter spp. respond in tandem with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria while nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospina spp. and Nitrospira bacteria may not. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers may respond slightly later than bacterial ammonia oxidizers but may maintain elevated transcription longer. Despite months of desiccation-induced inactivation, we found rapid transcriptional response by all three groups of soil nitrifiers.

  10. Dry heat effects on survival of indigenous soil particle microflora and particle viability studies of Kennedy Space Center soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschmeyer, O. R.; Pflug, I. J.; Gove, R.; Heisserer, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on attempts to obtain data concerning the dry heat resistance of particle microflora in Kennedy Space Center soil samples. The in situ dry heat resistance profiles at selected temperatures for the aggregate microflora on soil particles of certain size ranges were determined. Viability profiles of older soil samples were compared with more recently stored soil samples. The effect of increased particle numbers on viability profiles after dry heat treatment was investigated. These soil particle viability data for various temperatures and times provide information on the soil microflora response to heat treatment and are useful in making selections for spacecraft sterilization cycles.

  11. The analysis of thermal calculation for air stove drying system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the existing calculation of heat for a coal-fired hot-blast furnace. By utilizing the standard method of heat calculation for boilers, considering the relation between the theoretical combustion temperature and the excess air coefficient of the boiler, combining some operational parameters of a coal-fired powder hot-blast furnace, the heat calculation of iron ore concentrating dry combustion on a coal-fired hot stove is discussed. It is used to prevent coke and optimize combustion. It also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of flue gas recirculation systems. The conclusion will show the practical applications of this.

  12. Soil water repellency in north-eastern Greece with adverse effects of drying on the persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziogas, A.K.; Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many soils may be water repellent to some degree, challenging the common perception that soil water repellency is only an interesting aberration. When dry, water repellent soils resist or retard water infiltration into the soil matrix. Soil water repellency often leads to the development of unstable

  13. The role of soil air composition for noble gas tracer applications in tropical groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Simon; Jenner, Florian; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese; Peregovich, Bernhard; Machado, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved noble gases (NGs) in groundwater provide a well-established tool for paleo temperature reconstruction. However, reliable noble gas temperature (NGT) determination needs appropriate assumptions or rather an exact knowledge of soil air composition. Deviations of soil air NG partial pressures from atmospheric values have already been found in mid latitudes during summer time as a consequence of subsurface oxygen depletion. This effect depends on ambient temperature and humidity and is thus expected to be especially strong in humid tropical soils, which was not investigated so far. We therefore studied NGs in soil air and shallow groundwater near Santarém (Pará, Brazil) at the end of the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Soil air data confirms a correlation between NG partial pressures, the sum value of O2+CO2 and soil moisture contents. During the rainy season, we find significant NG enhancements in soil air by up to 7% with respect to the atmosphere. This is twice as much as observed during the dry season. Groundwater samples show neon excess values between 15% and 120%. Nearly all wells show no seasonal variations of excess air, even though the local river level seasonally fluctuates by about 8 m. Assuming atmospheric NG contents in soil air, fitted NGTs underestimate the measured groundwater temperature by about 1-2° C. However, including enhanced soil air NG contents as observed during the rainy season, resulting NGTs are in good agreement with local groundwater temperatures. Our presented data allows for a better understanding of subsurface NG variations. This is essential with regard to NG tracer applications in humid tropical areas, for which reliable paleoclimate data is of major importance for modern climate research.

  14. Effect of green roofs on air temperature; measurement study of well-watered and dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcerova, Anna; van de Ven, Frans; Wang, Mengyu; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Rapid urbanization and increasing number and duration of heat waves poses a need for understanding urban climate and ways to mitigate extremely high temperatures. One of repeatedly suggested and often investigated methods to moderate the so called urban heat island are green roofs. This study investigates several extensive green roofs in Utrecht (NL) and their effect on air temperature right above the roof surface. Air temperature was measured 15 and 30 cm above the roof surface and also in the substrate. We show that under normal condition is air above green roof, compared to white gravel roof, colder at night and warmer during day. This suggest that green roofs might help decrease air temperatures at night, when the urban heat island is strongest, but possibly contribute to high temperatures during daytime. We also measured situation when the green roofs wilted and dried out. Under such conditions green roof exhibits more similar behavior to conventional white gravel roof. Interestingly, pattern of soil temperature remains almost the same for both dry and well-prospering green roof, colder during day and warmer at night. As such, green roof works as a buffer of diurnal temperature changes.

  15. Gaseous fuels production from dried sewage sludge via air gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Gasification is a perspective alternative method of dried sewage sludge thermal treatment. For the purpose of experimental investigations, a laboratory fixed-bed gasifier installation was designed and built. Two sewage sludge (SS) feedstocks, taken from two typical Polish wastewater treatment systems, were analysed: SS1, from a mechanical-biological wastewater treatment system with anaerobic stabilization (fermentation) and high temperature drying; and (SS2) from a mechanical-biological-chemical wastewater treatment system with fermentation and low temperature drying. The gasification results show that greater oxygen content in sewage sludge has a strong influence on the properties of the produced gas. Increasing the air flow caused a decrease in the heating value of the produced gas. Higher hydrogen content in the sewage sludge (from SS1) affected the produced gas composition, which was characterized by high concentrations of combustible components. In the case of the SS1 gasification, ash, charcoal, and tar were produced as byproducts. In the case of SS2 gasification, only ash and tar were produced. SS1 and solid byproducts from its gasification (ash and charcoal) were characterized by lower toxicity in comparison to SS2. However, in all analysed cases, tar samples were toxic.

  16. Phenome data - Air-drying stress - DGBY | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us DG...cavenging systems are not necessary for air-drying stress tolerance. Data file File name: CSV: dg...by_air_drying_stress.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/dgby/LATEST/dgby_air_d...biosciencedbc.jp/archive/dgby/LATEST/Air-drying_stress.xls File size: 676KB Simple search URL http://togodb....biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/dgby_air_drying_stress#en Data acquisition method Ye

  17. Hot air injection for removal of dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid contaminants from low-permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, F.C.

    1996-08-01

    The performance of soil vapor extraction systems for the recovery of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds is potentially enhanced by the injection of heated air to increase soil temperatures. The soil temperature increase is expected to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) performance by increasing target compound vapor pressures and by increasing soil permeability through drying. The vapor pressure increase due to temperature rise relieves the vapor pressure limit on the feasibility of soil vapor extraction. However, the system still requires an air flow through the soil system to deliver heat and to recover mobilized contaminants. Although the soil permeability can be increased through drying, very low permeability soils and low permeability soils adjacent to high permeability air flow pathways will be treated slowly, if at all. AR thermal enhancement methods face this limitation. Heated air injection offers advantages relative to other thermal techniques, including low capital and operation costs. Heated air injection is at a disadvantage relative to other thermal techniques due to the low heat capacity of air. To be effective, heated air injection requires that higher air flows be established than for steam injection or radio frequency heating. Heated air injection is not economically feasible for the stratified soil system developed as a standard test for this document. This is due to the inability to restrict heated air flow to the clay stratum when a low-resistance air flow pathway is available in the adjoining sand. However, the technology should be especially attractive, both technically and economically, for low-volatile contaminant recovery from relatively homogeneous soil formations. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Hot air drying characteristics of mango ginger: Prediction of drying kinetics by mathematical modeling and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Thirupathihalli Pandurangappa Krishna; Manohar, Balaraman

    2014-12-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada) was dried in a through-flow dryer system at different temperatures (40-70 °C) and air velocities (0.84 - 2.25 m/s) to determine the effect of drying on drying rate and effective diffusivity. As the temperature and air velocity increased, drying time significantly decreased. Among the ten different thin layer drying models considered to determine the kinetic drying parameters, semi empirical Midilli et al., model gave the best fit for all drying conditions. Effective moisture diffusivity varied from 3.7 × 10(-10) m(2)/s to 12.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s over the temperature and air velocity range of study. Effective moisture diffusivity regressed well with Arrhenius model and activation energy of the model was found to be 32.6 kJ/mol. Artificial neural network modeling was also employed to predict the drying behaviour and found suitable to describe the drying kinetics with very high correlation coefficient of 0.998.

  19. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of a Consolidated Dry Storage Module for CANDU Spent Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Gon; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Cho, Chun Hyung; Lee, Heung Young [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Sup; Jeong, In Su; Kim, Jong Soo [KONES Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The MACSTOR/KN-400 module has been developed as an effective alternative to the existing stand alone concrete canister for dry storage of CANDU spent fuel. The structure is a concrete monolith of 21.67 m long and 12.66 m wide and has a height equal to 7.518 m including the bottom slab. Inside of the concrete module are built 40 storage cylinders accommodating ten 60- bundle dry storage baskets, which are suspended from the top slab and eventually constrained at 10 cm above the bottom slab with horizontal seismic restraints. The main cooling process of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module is by air convection through air inlets and outlets. The civil design parameters, with respect to meteorological and seismic loads applied to the module are identical to those specified for the Wolsung CANDU 3 and 4 plants except for local geologic characteristics. As per USNRC SRP Section 3.7.2 and current US practices, Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) effect shall be considered for all structures not supported by a rock or rock-like soil foundation materials. An SSI is a very complicated phenomenon of the structure coupled with the soil medium that is usually semi-infinite in extent and highly nonlinear in its behavior. And the effect of the SSI is noticeable especially for stiff and massive structures resting on relatively soft ground. Thus the SSI effect has to be considered in the seismic design of MACSTOR/KN-400 module resting on soil medium. The scope of the this paper is to carry out a seismic SSI analysis of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module, in order to show how much the SSI gives an effect on the structural responses by comparing with the fixed-base analysis.

  20. Industrial through-air drying of nonwovens and paper: Basic principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watzi, A.; Rueckert, M. [Fleissner GmbH and Co., Frankfurt (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The requirements for drying and thermobonding equipment working on the basis of the hot air flow-through system vary considerably due to the large variety of nonwovens qualities, production methods and required production speeds. It is therefore necessary to construct diverse drying systems in order to be able to offer appropriate machines for the desired purposes. Optimum heat and mass transfer from the penetrating air to the permeable material to be dried is ensured by through-air drying. Following Hans Fleissner`s invention of the through-air system for drying of textiles and its practical application in the perforated drum dryer for more than 50 years a second engineering breakthrough for the paper and nonwovens industry has been achieved by Gerold Fleissner with the high-tech through-air drum. This paper presents various possibilities of air flow through the material and provide criteria to facilitate selection of the proper drying system.

  1. The inlfuence of soil drying- and tillage-induced penetration resistance on maize root growth in a clayey soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Li-rong; HE Yang-bo; CHEN Jia-zhou

    2016-01-01

    Soil drying may induce a number of stresses on crops. This paper investigated maize (Zea maysL.) root growth as affected by drought and soil penetration resistance (PR), which was caused by soil drying and tilage in a clayey red soil. Com-pared with conventional tilage (C) and deep tilage (D), soil compaction (P) and no-til (N) signiifcantly increased soil PR in the 0–15 cm layer. The PR increased dramaticaly as the soil drying increased, particularly in soil with a high bulk density. Increased soil PR reduced the maize root mass density distribution not only in the vertical proifle (0–20 cm) but also in the horizontal layer at the same distance (0–5, 5–10, 10–15 cm) from the maize plant. With an increase in soil PR in pots, the maize root length, root surface area and root volume signiifcantly decreased. Speciifcaly, the maize root length declined exponentialy from 309 to 64 cm per plant with an increase in soil PR from 491 to 3370 kPa; the roots almost stopped elon-gating when the soil PR was larger than 2200 kPa. It appeared that ifne roots (<2.5 mm in diameter) thickened when the soil PR increased, resulting in a larger average root diameter. The average root diameter increased linearly with soil PR, regardless of soil irrigation or drought. The results suggest that differences in soil PR caused by soil drying is most likely responsible for inconsistent root responses to water stress in different soils.

  2. 干旱季节不同耕作制度下红壤栕魑飽大气连续体水流阻力变化规律%VARIATION OF HYDRAULIC RESISTANCES IN RED SOIL-CROP-AIR CONTINUUMS IN DIFFERENT FARMING SYSTEMS IN DRY SEASON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 丁献文; 张桃林; 赵其国

    2001-01-01

    Estimation of hydraulic resistances of soil-plant-climate continuum (SPAC) is important both for describing water movement in the continuum and for adopting practical water-saving measures in agriculture to find the solutions to seasonal drought in the area of Red Soil of China. The diurnal variation of stomatal resistance of crops in dry season was observed and its relation to transpiration rate and water potentials of crop leaf and soil in different farming systems was also studied. Results indicated that stomatal resistance and transpiration rate were different for each crop in different farming systems. Stomatal resistance was related to soil water potentials within the soil layers of 70cm. The hydraulic resistances of the leaf-air interface in SPACs ranged from 109 to 1010 S, which was 1000 times higher than those of crop body. The resistance of crop body was 100 times as much as that within the soil layer of 70cm. In dry season, soil resistance increased with the depletion of soil water.Resistance of crop body fell in the order: soybean>peanut>corn>sweet potato, which experienced dramatically diurnal variation except that of sweet potato. Resistance of crop also varied with cropping systems.%确定水流阻力不仅有助于定量土壤栕魑飽大气连续体(SPAC)描述的水分传输过程,而且对建立减少水流阻力的节水农业措施,解决红壤区季节性干旱有重要意义。本文研究了不同耕作制度下作物气孔阻力日变化及其与蒸腾速率、土壤基质势、作物叶水势的关系,并分析了水流阻力的分布及其日变化规律。结果表明气孔阻力和蒸腾速率受作物种类和耕作制度影响,气孔阻力随着70cm土层以上土壤基质势的变化而变化;SPAC中叶气系统水流阻力为109~1010 S,是作物体水流阻力的1000倍,而后者又是70cm以上土层土壤水流阻力的100倍;作物体水流阻力大小顺序为:大豆>花生>玉米>甘薯,

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF MICROWAVE AND AIR DRYING CONDITIONS OF QUINCE (CYDONIA OBLONGA, MILLER USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Baltacioglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of slice thickness of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller , microwave incident power and air drying temperature on antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of quince were investigated during drying in microwave and air drying. Optimum conditions were found to be: i for microwave drying, 285 W and 4.14 mm thick (maximum antioxidant activity and 285 W and 6.85 mm thick (maximum total phenolic content, and ii for air drying, 75 ºC and 1.2 mm thick (both maximum antioxidant activity and total phenolic content. Drying conditions were optimized by using the response surface methodology. 13 experiments were carried out considering incident microwave powers from 285 to 795 W, air temperature from 46 to 74 ºC and slice thickness from 1.2 to 6.8 mm.

  4. High Temperature Convective Drying of a Packed Bed with Humid Air at Different Humidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sghaier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Drying a packed bed of porous particle at high temperature with varying humidity of hot air is an attractive process. Despite, many researches on experimental and simulation on a fixed bed drying at low and average temperature are proposed. Few studies showed drying at high temperature with humid air or using superheated steam. The latest is compared to dry air. Approach: In this study, we show an experimental and numerical study of humid air drying of a fixed bed of moist porous alumina particles. The air velocity, the air temperature and the vapor pressure were varied from 1.7-2.3 m.sec-1, 120-160°C and 0.1-0.65 bar, respectively and the experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure. Then a mathematical describing heat and mass transfer during drying is developed. This model is based on the averaging volume approach using two scale changes. Results: From the experimental works, the solid temperature and the bed moisture content have been presented at different drying conditions. The previous results show that an increase in humidity leads to an increase of the wet bulb temperature and a decrease in the drying time. At the same drying temperature, the variation in the gas velocity affects also the drying time. In addition, we note that the drying time increases if the bed depth increases. The predicted results deduced from the developed model were compared with the experiment. Conclusion: The experimental and predicted results obtained from this study describing drying of a packed bed illustrate clearly the effect of the air humidity on the drying kinetics.

  5. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  6. Effects of Composted and Thermally Dried Sewage Sludges on Soil and Soil Humic Acid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.M.FERN(A)NDEZ; N.SENESI; C.PLAZA; G.BRUNETTI; A.POLO

    2009-01-01

    The effect of annual additions of composted sewage sludge (CS) and thermally dried sewage sludge (TS) at 80 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties was investigated for three years in a field experiment under semiarid conditions.Humie acids (HAs) isolated by conventional procedures from CS,TS,and unamended (SO) and sludge amended soils were analysed for elemental (C,H,N,S and O) and acidic functional groups (carboxylic and phenolic) and by ultraviolet-visible,Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies.With respect to CS,TS had similar pH and total P and K contents,larger dry matter,total organic C,total N.and C/N ratio and smaller ash content and electrical conductivity.Amendment with both CS and TS induced a number of modifications in soil properties,including an increase of pH,electrical conductivity,total organic C,total N,and available P.The CS-HA had greater O,total acidity,carboxyl,and phenolic OH group contents and smaller C and H contents than TS-HA.The CS-HA and TS-HA had larger N and S contents,smaller C,O and acidic functional group contents,and lower aromatic polycondensation and humification degrees than SO-HA.Amended soil-HAs showed C,H,N and S contents larger than SO-HA,suggesting that sludge HAs were partially incorporated into soil HAs.These effects were more evident with increasing number of sludge applications.

  7. Optimization of Microwave-Osmotic Pretreatment of Apples with Subsequent Air-Drying for Preparing High-Quality Dried Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Azarpazhooh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prepared apple (Red Gala cylinders were subjected to microwave-osmotic dehydration treatment under continuous flow medium spray (MWODS conditions and then air-dried to a final 20% moisture content. The dried samples were evaluated for color and textural properties, and rehydration capacity. The MWODS pretreatments were based on a central composite rotatable design and a response surface methodology using five levels of sucrose concentration, temperature, and contact time at a constant flow rate of 2800 mL/min. The air-drying was carried out at 60°C, 15±1% relative humidity, and 0.64±0.02 m/s air velocity. The results were compared to untreated air-dried (AD (worst-case scenario and freeze-dried (FD (best-case scenario apples without the MWODS treatment. Color properties were affected regardless of the type of treatment. Conventional AD apples were darker in color, whereas MWODS-treated samples were lighter with higher L∗ and b∗ values, higher Hue and Chroma values but lower a∗ value and ΔE. Further the color parameters of MWODS-treated samples were closer or equal to the FD apples. The texture properties were also affected by the osmotic variables with MWODS treatment resulting in softer and chewier products. The AD samples were hard, and FD apples were brittle.

  8. Soil Effects on Forest Structure and Diversity in a Moist and a Dry Tropical Forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peña-Claros, M.; Poorter, L.; Alarcon, A.; Blate, G.; Choque, U.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Justiniano, J.; Leaño, C.; Licona, J.C.; Pariona, W.; Putz, F.E.; Quevedo, L.; Toledo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil characteristics are important drivers of variation in wet tropical forest structure and diversity, but few studies have evaluated these relationships in drier forest types. Using tree and soil data from 48 and 32 1 ha plots, respectively, in a Bolivian moist and dry forest, we asked how soil co

  9. Seasonal variation in soil and plant water potentials in a Bolivian tropical moist and dry forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.; Iraipi, J.; Bongers, F.; Poorter, L.

    2010-01-01

    We determined seasonal variation in soil matric potentials (¿soil) along a topographical gradient and with soil depth in a Bolivian tropical dry (1160 mm y-1 rain) and moist forest (1580 mm y-1). In each forest we analysed the effect of drought on predawn leaf water potentials (¿pd) and drought resp

  10. Airless drying: energy savings are not just hot air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Joyce

    1994-07-01

    The airless dryer provides substantial energy cost and drying time savings and sometimes product quality benefits. Originally developed and applied to laundry tumble drying, the technique was subsequently adapted as a batch process for brick drying and drying of ceramic slurries in trays. Most recently, the process has been extended to a large scale, continuous dryer which should allow the airless drying of minerals and many other materials, almost certainly with similar advantages. This feature outlines the principles of the airless dryer and illustrates with some case histories the economies which can be achieved. (Author)

  11. Contrasting Hydraulic Strategies during Dry Soil Conditions in Quercus rubra and Acer rubrum in a Sandy Site in Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia E. Thomsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Correlation analyses were carried out for the dynamics of leaf water potential in two broad-leaf deciduous tree species in a sandy site under a range of air vapor pressure deficits and a relatively dry range of soil conditions. During nights when the soil is dry, the diffuse-porous, isohydric and shallow-rooted Acer rubrum does not recharge its xylem and leaf water storage to the same capacity that is observed during nights when the soil is moist. The ring-porous, deep-rooted Quercus rubra displays a more anisohydric behavior and appears to be capable of recharging to capacity at night-time even when soil moisture at the top 1 m is near wilting point, probably by accessing deeper soil layers than A. rubrum. Compared to A. rubrum, Q. rubra displays only a minimal level of down-regulation of stomatal conductance, which leads to a reduction of leaf water potential during times when vapor pressure deficit is high and soil moisture is limiting. We determine that the two species, despite typically being categorized by ecosystem models under the same plant functional type—mid-successional, temperate broadleaf—display different hydraulic strategies. These differences may lead to large differences between the species in water relations, transpiration and productivity under different precipitation and humidity regimes.

  12. Effect of Turmerin on Endothelial Denudation by Air Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Markov

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this study is to determine if arterial endothelial injury can be attenuated by local application of 80 μg/ml turmerin at the site of injury and by oral administration of the same dose. Anesthetized Lewis rats (n =12 weighing 200 ± 4.0 gms randomly were assigned to two groups. After 5 min of air drying a segment of right carotid artery, six rats were treated locally 80μg/ml with turmerin and the rest were treated with 0.9% NaCl. Turmerin was then administered by gavage (80 μg every 24 hrs for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed on day 14 and the carotid artery removed from the injured site for histological analysis and serum collected for lipid peroxidation analysis by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA and conjugated dienes. This study showed no proliferation in the intima of one rat out of six rats treated with turmerin while there was significant variation between the treated rats and the controls. MDA for control was 0.593±0.02 nanomoles/ml while turmerin was 0.187±0.04 (p≤0.01; conjugated diene for control was 0.402±0.03 nanomoles/ml while turmerin was 0.212±0.04 nanomoles/ml (p ≤0.05. Although there was significant reduction in serum peroxidation activity, the histological findings indicate that attenuation of carotid artery injury may involve other factors than decreased lipid peroxidation.

  13. Effect of wetting-drying cycles on soil desiccation cracking behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Chao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding the desiccation cracking process is essential in analysing drought effects on soil hydraulic and mechanical properties through consideration of the atmosphere-ground interaction. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the consequence of wetting-drying cycles on the initiation and propagation characteristics of desiccation cracks on soil surface. Initially saturated slurry specimens were prepared and subjected to five subsequent wetting-drying cycles. Image processing technique was employed to quantitatively analyze the morphology characteristics of crack patterns formed during each drying path. The results show that the desiccation cracking behaviour of soil is significantly affected by the wetting-drying cycles. Before the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the surface crack ratio and the average crack width increases while the average clod area decreases with increasing the number of wetting-drying cycles. The number of intersections and crack segments per unit area reaches the peak values after the second wetting-drying cycle. After the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the effect of increasing wetting-drying cycles on crack patterns is insignificant. Moreover, it is observed that the applied wetting-drying cycles are accompanied by a continual reconstruction of soil structure. The initial homogenous slurry structure is completely replaced with aggregated structure after the third cycles, and a significant increase in the inter-aggregate porosity can be observed.

  14. Effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene and carotenoid content of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, A; Tiwari, B K; Tuohy, M G; O'Donnell, C P; Brunton, N

    2011-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and carotenoid compounds of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs was investigated. Ultrasound pretreatment followed by hot air drying (UPHD) at the highest amplitude and treatment time investigated resulted in higher retention of polyacetylenes and carotenoids in dried carrot discs than blanching followed by hot air drying. Freeze dried samples had a higher retention of polyacetylene and carotenoid compounds compared to hot air dried samples. Color parameters were strongly correlated with carotenoids (p<0.05). This study shows that ultrasound pretreatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching treatment in the drying of carrots.

  15. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lv, Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  16. Reduced heat stress in offices in the tropics using solar powered drying of the supply air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsen, L; Santos, A M B

    2002-12-01

    Many solutions to indoor climate problems known from developed countries may have prohibitive installation and running costs in developing countries. The purpose was to develop a low-cost solution to heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on solar powered drying of supply air. Dry supply air may facilitate personal cooling by increased evaporation of sweat. Heat acclimatized people with efficient sweating may in particular benefit from this cooling. A prototype solar powered supply system for dried-only air was made. Air from the system was mixed with room air, heated to six different combinations of temperature and humidity and led to Personal Units for Ventilation and Cooling (PUVAC) in six cubicles simulating office workplaces. A total of 123 heat acclimatized subjects were exposed 45 min in each of the cubicles. A model for the combined effect of operative temperature of room, moisture content of room air, temperature of supply air and moisture content of supply air was developed based on the experiments. Reduction of moisture content in the supply air by 1.6 g/kg had the same effect as lowering the operative temperature by 1 degree C. The solar-powered system for supplying dry air is a low-cost alternative to traditional air conditioning in hot and humid regions.

  17. Hot air drying of apple slices: dehydration characteristics and quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the drying characteristics and quality attributes of apple slices. The samples were dried at different air temperature levels (50, 60 and 70 °C) and a constant air velocity (1.5 m s-1). It was observed that the drying air temperature affected the dehydration rate significantly. The usefulness of eight different mathematical models to simulate the experimental drying curves was evaluated and the Midilli model provided the best simulation of the samples drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivity was determined to be 7.03 × 10-10, 8.48 × 10-10 and 1.08 × 10-9 m2 s-1 for drying air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C, respectively. The shrinkage values of the dried samples at air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C were 74.70, 82.35 and 80.78 %, respectively. The maximum value of rehydration ratio (4.527) and also the minimum value of ∆E (11.27) were obtained for the slices dried at 70 °C.

  18. Effects of warm air-drying and spreading on resin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, D; Williams, P T; Kasloff, Z

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect on resin-to-enamel bonding produced by warm air from a hair dryer, and to correlate changes in resin bond strength with resin tag structure. Herculite-XR resin composite and Bondlite bonding resin were used. The three technique variables were the type of air used for drying, air dryer distance, and drying and spreading time. Control samples were dried and the bonding resin spread with a dental air syringe, whereas warm air from a hair dryer was used on the experimental samples. The bond strength (MPa) was determined in shear at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Following bond strength evaluation, the teeth were immersed in 10% HCl for enamel dissolution and the resin tag structure was examined with the SEM. ANOVA analyses of shear bond strengths were performed. Warm air-drying and spreading for 15 seconds at 6 cm and 5 seconds at 6 cm respectively, produced statistically greater shear bond strengths (x = 20.4 +/- 4.4 MPa, P less than 0.05). The other drying time/distance combinations, including the control (x = 14.4 +/- 3.3 MPa), were not statistically different. Differences in resin tag structure were qualitatively evident under the SEM, with sharp tags produced by the warm air-drying and spreading techniques, compared to the blunt tags created by syringe air-drying and spreading. Warm air-drying and spreading significantly improved the bond strength. No apparent correlation exists between bond strength and tag length.

  19. Comparing the VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Scots pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Anne-Marja; Pasanen, Pertti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air-dried Scots pine wood and from heat-treated Scots pine wood were compared with GC-MS analysis. Air-dried wood blocks released about 8 times more total VOCs than heat-treated (24 h at 230°C) ones. Terpenes were clearly the main compound group in the air-dried wood samples, whereas aldehydes and carboxylic acids and their esters dominated in the heat-treated wood samples. Only 14 compounds out of 41 identified individual compounds were found in both wood samples indicating considerable changes in VOC emission profile during heat-treatment process. Of individual compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and hexanal were the most abundant ones in the air-dried wood. By contrast, in the heat-treated wood 2-furancarboxaldehyde, acetic acid and 2-propanone were the major compounds of VOC emission. Current emission results reveal that significant chemical changes have occurred, and volatile monoterpenes and other low-molecular-weight compounds have evaporated from the wood during the heat-treatment process when compared to air-dried wood. Major chemical changes detected in VOC emissions are explained by the thermal degradation and oxidation of main constituents in wood. The results suggest that if heat-treated wood is used in interior carpentry, emissions of monoterpenes are reduced compared to air-dried wood, but some irritating compounds might be released into indoor air.

  20. Change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Humidicola grass (Brachiaria humidicola) grown in Ban Thon soil series (infertility soil) as a function of growth age. One rai (0.16 ha) of two-year-old pasture of fertilised Humidicola grass was uniformly cut and the regrowth samples were collected every twenty days. The samples were subjected to analysis for dry matter content and nutritive composition, i.e. crude protein, ash, calcium, phosphor...

  1. Quantification of hysteresis effects on a soil subjected to drying and wetting cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafraf, Samia; Guellouz, Lamia; Guiras, Houda; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative description of soil hysteretic response during drying-wetting cycles is required to improve prediction of the soil water retention model. The objective of the study is to quantify the degree of hysteresis, which is helpful to evaluate the precision of soil water flow calculation. A new procedure to quantify the degree of hysteresis is presented. The Arya-Paris model allows assessment of hysteresis effects from initial drying curves, dynamic contact angles, degree of hysteresis value, and maximum difference value between drying and subsequent wetting curves. The experimental results show that the degree of hysteresis varies with the particle size, bulk density, void ratio, initial water content, and contact angle of the soil. The new findings can be very useful in modelling soil water flows.

  2. Enhanced soil moisture drying in transitional regions under a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shanjun; Huang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed global trends of soil moisture for the period 1948-2010 using the Global Land Data Assimilation System data set. Soil moisture was dominated by negative trends, with pronounced drying over East Asia and the Sahel. Spatial analysis according to climatic region revealed that the most obvious drying occurred over transitional regions between dry and wet climates. The noticeable drying first took place in the humid transitional regions and extended to the dry transitional regions, beginning in the 1980s. The variability of soil moisture was notably related to the changes in precipitation and temperature, but with different roles. For the global average, precipitation had a dominant effect on the variability of soil moisture at interannual to decadal time scales, but temperature was the main cause of the long-term trend of soil moisture on the whole. The enhanced soil drying in the transitional regions was primarily caused by global warming, which is illustrated by regression analysis and the land surface model.

  3. Soil Air Regime of Corn Field Under Plastic Mulching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYONG-XIANG; LIUXIAO-YI; 等

    1995-01-01

    The effects of plastic mulching on soil aeration at the soil depth of 0-100 cm were studied in a corn field.The results indicated that the CO2 concentration of unmulched soil in the 0-100 cm layer ranged from 0.001 to 0.016 m3/m3,and that of mulched oil 0.002 to 0.018m3/m3,about 32,39% higher than the former on the average.Such a CO2 concentration in the soil air is still sutiable for crop growth.The O2 concentration was inversely correlated with CO2 concentration in the soil air (unmulching r=-0.92,mulching r=-0.79*).O2 concentration raged from 0.11 to 0.17m3/m3 in the mulched soil and 0.13 to 0.18m3/m3 in the unmulched soil.By contrast,N2 concentration in soil air remained relatively steady,with no difference between the two treatments.The relationship between the soil respiratory intensity and the depth of a soil layer appeard to be a power function.At the layer of 0-20cm,the soil respiration intensity in the mulched soil was obviously higher than that in the unmulched.Plastic mulching could also affect soil structure.In comparison with the unmulched soil,the content of >0.25mm aggregate and 0.05-0.001mm microaggregate in the mulched soil was reduced by 82.1% and 35.8%,respectively;the soil total porotity,gaseous phase rate and aeration porosity in the depth of 10-20cm were reduced by 2.85%,19.89%and 26.54% respectively ,but contrary at the depth of 0-10cm.

  4. Anti-Browning of Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus Slices by Glutathione during Hot Air Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqiang Xia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Browning of mushroom tends to occur during hot air drying due to Poly Phenol Oxidase (PPO, while glutathione is known for its ability to inhibit the activity of PPO and browning. In this study, the efficacy of glutathione in inhibiting browning on mushroom slices was estimated. Browning of mushroom slices treated with glutathione was monitored during hot air drying. PPO activity in mushroom was inhibited by 98.2 with 0.08% glutathione. Compared with the control, mushroom slices treated with glutathione showed no browning during hot air drying. These results indicate that application of glutathione is a promising method of Anti-browning of mushroom by glutathione during hot air drying.

  5. Microbial responses to carbon and nitrogen supplementation in an Antarctic dry valley soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dennis, P. G.; Sparrow, A. D.; Gregorich, E. G.;

    2013-01-01

    The soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys are exposed to extremely dry and cold conditions. Nevertheless, they contain active biological communities that contribute to the biogeochemical processes. We have used ester-linked fatty acid (ELFA) analysis to investigate the effects of additions of carbon a...

  6. Tomato yield responses to soil-incorporated dried distillers grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dried distiller's grains (DDGs) are a coproduct of dry-grind corn ethanol production, most of which are used for animal feed, and are sold for under $150/metric ton. Developing higher-value uses for DDGs can increase the profitability of corn-based ethanol. Although DDGs applied directly to a pott...

  7. Robust Vacuum-/Air-Dried Graphene Aerogels and Fast Recoverable Shape-Memory Hybrid Foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenwei; Qiu, Ling; Zhang, Baoqing; Li, Dan; Liu, Chen-Yang

    2016-02-17

    New graphene aerogels can be fabricated by vacuum/air drying, and because of the mechanical robustness of the graphene aerogels, shape-memory polymer/graphene hybrid foams can be fabricated by a simple infiltration-air-drying-crosslinking method. Due to the superelasticity, high strength, and good electrical conductivity of the as-prepared graphene aerogels, the shape-memory hybrid foams exhibit excellent thermotropical and electrical shape-memory properties, outperforming previously reported shape-memory polymer foams.

  8. Microencapsulation using an oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Benjamin O; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Wang, Weixing; Spiller, David G; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2011-08-07

    We describe the first example of a tri-phasic oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'. The method combines highly stable oil-in-water emulsions prepared using branched copolymer surfactants, with aqueous droplet encapsulation using 'dry water' technology.

  9. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  10. Mercury Exchange at the Air-Water-Soil Interface: An Overview of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengman Fang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to assess the present knowledge about the methods of determining mercury (Hg exchange at the air-water-soil interface during the past 20 years. Methods determining processes of wet and dry removal/deposition of atmospheric Hg to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, as well as methods determining Hg emission fluxes to the atmosphere from natural surfaces (soil and water are discussed. On the basis of the impressive advances that have been made in the areas relating to Hg exchange among air-soil-water interfaces, we analyzed existing problems and shortcomings in our current knowledge. In addition, some important fields worth further research are discussed and proposed.

  11. Drying/rewetting cycles of the soil under alternate partial root-zone drying irrigation reduce carbon and nitrogen retention in the soil-plant systems of potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yanqi; Yan, Fei; Liu, Fulai

    2013-01-01

    Dry/wet cycles of soil may stimulate mineralization of soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) leading to increased N bioavailability to plants but potentially also increased C and N losses. We investigated the effects of partial root-zone drying (PRD) and deficit irrigation (DI) on C and N...... for five weeks. For each N rate, the PRD and DI plants received a same amount of water, which allowed re-filling one half of the PRD pots close to full water holding capacity. The results showed that plant dry biomass, plant water use, and water use efficiency were increased with increasing N....... However, owing to substantial decreases of C and N contents in the soil, the amounts of C and N retained in the soil–plant systems were lower in PRD than in DI. Although the C gain in the soil–plant systems of potato was positive due to production of plant biomass, the dry/wet cycles of the soil under...

  12. Drying kinetics of apricot halves in a microwave-hot air hybrid oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horuz, Erhan; Bozkurt, Hüseyin; Karataş, Haluk; Maskan, Medeni

    2017-01-01

    Drying behavior and kinetics of apricot halves were investigated in a microwave-hot air domestic hybrid oven at 120, 150 and 180 W microwave power and 50, 60 and 70 °C air temperature. Drying operation was finished when the moisture content reached to 25% (wet basis) from 77% (w.b). Increase in microwave power and air temperature increased drying rates and reduced drying time. Only falling rate period was observed in drying of apricot halves in hybrid oven. Eleven mathematical models were used for describing the drying kinetics of apricots. Modified logistic model gave the best fitting to the experimental data. The model has never been used to explain drying behavior of any kind of food materials up to now. Fick's second law was used for determination of both effective moisture diffusivity and thermal diffusivity values. Activation energy values of dried apricots were calculated from Arrhenius equation. Those that obtained from effective moisture diffusivity, thermal diffusivity and drying rate constant values ranged from 31.10 to 39.4 kJ/mol, 29.56 to 35.19 kJ/mol, and 26.02 to 32.36 kJ/mol, respectively.

  13. STATISTIC MODELING OF DRYING KINETHIC OF SPINACH LEAVES USING MICROWAVE AND HOT AIR METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Nouri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The target of this study was to model of spinach leaves drying using microwave and hot air dryer. This test performed in combination treatment of temperatures (50°C, 60°C, and 70°C and microwave (90, 180, 360, 600 and 900w in 3 replications. Sample moisture measured within drying. All the results were fitted and analyzed with 8 mathematical models base on 3 parameters including determination (R2, Chi square(X2, root mean square errors(RSME. Results also revealed that temperature and microwave power effectively reduce the drying time when increase. Drying occurs in degrading stage; moreover the comparison of results exhibited that Page and Two sentences models were fitted appropriately to estimate moisture changing and drying description. Regarding all the results, it is cleared that microwave method is an appropriate method in spinach drying as a result of reducing drying temperature and its high efficiency.

  14. Empirical Modeling on Hot Air Drying of Fresh and Pre-treated Pineapples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanongkankit Yardfon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to study drying kinetics and determine empirical model of fresh pineapple and pre-treated pineapple with sucrose solution at different concentrations during drying. 3 mm thick samples were immersed into 30, 40 and 50 Brix of sucrose solution before hot air drying at temperatures of 60, 70 and 80°C. The empirical models to predict the drying kinetics were investigated. The results showed that the moisture content decreased when increasing the drying temperatures and times. Increase in sucrose concentration led to longer drying time. According to the statistical values of the highest coefficients (R2, the lowest least of chi-square (χ2 and root mean square error (RMSE, Logarithmic model was the best models for describing the drying behavior of soaked samples into 30, 40 and 50 Brix of sucrose solution.

  15. Mathematical Modeling and Effect of Various Hot-Air Drying on Mushroom (Lentinus edodes)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui; XIA Chun-yan; TAN Yu-rong; CHEN Long; MING Jian

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the characteristics and drying process of mushroom (Lentinus edodes) by 6 different hot-air drying methods namely isothermal drying, uniform raise drying, non-uniform raise drying, uniform intermittent drying, non-uniform intermittent drying and combined drying. The chemical composition (dry matter, ash, crude protein, crude fat, total sugars, dietary ifber, and energy), color parameters (L, a*, b*, c*, and h0) and rehydration capacities were determined. Among all the experiments, non-uniform intermittent drying reached a better comprehensive results due to the higher chemical composition, better color quality associated with high bright (26.381±5.842), high color tone (73.670±2.975), low chroma (13.349±3.456) as well as the highest rehydration (453.76%weigh of dried body). Nine kinds of classical mathematical model were used to obtained moisture data and the Midili-kucuk model can be described by the drying process with the coefifcient (R2 ranged from 0.99790 to 0.99967), chi-square (χ2 ranged from 0.00003 to 0.00019) and root mean square error (RMSE ranged from 0.000486 to 0.0012367).

  16. Organochlorine pesticides in soils of Mexico and the potential for soil-air exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Fiona [Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 6248 Eighth Line, Egbert, Ontario L01 1N0 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alegria, Henry A. [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Geography, University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 140 7th Ave. S., St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States); Bidleman, Terry F., E-mail: terry.bidleman@ec.gc.c [Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 6248 Eighth Line, Egbert, Ontario L01 1N0 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    The spatial distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in soils and their potential for soil-air exchange was examined. The most prominent OCs were the DDTs (Geometric Mean, GM = 1.6 ng g{sup -1}), endosulfans (0.16 ng g{sup -1}), and toxaphenes (0.64 ng g{sup -1}). DDTs in soils of southern Mexico showed fresher signatures with higher F{sub DDTe} = p,p'-DDT/(p,p'-DDT + p,p'-DDE) and more racemic o,p'-DDT, while the signatures in the central and northern part of Mexico were more indicative of aged residues. Soil-air fugacity fractions showed that some soils are net recipients of DDTs from the atmosphere, while other soils are net sources. Toxaphene profiles in soils and air showed depletion of Parlar 39 and 42 which suggests that soil is the source to the atmosphere. Endosulfan was undergoing net deposition at most sites as it is a currently used pesticide. Other OCs showed wide variability in fugacity, suggesting a mix of net deposition and volatilization. - Chemical profiles of residues and soil-air fugacities are used to assess the potential of soil as a source of organochlorine pesticides to the air of Mexico.

  17. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make

  18. Treatment of air dried archaeological wool textiles from waterlogged environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, Annemette Bruselius

    2014-01-01

    expanded the fibers and the yarn increased in size, resulting in more flexible and less brittle textiles. This property was kept when the textiles were dried by stepwise dehydration in ethanol, acetone, and white spirit with a final treatment in 5% lanolin. Preliminary tests on brittle textiles can...

  19. Influence of forced air volume on water evaporation during sewage sludge bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Zheng, Guo-Di; Liu, Hong-Tao; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Mechanical aeration is critical to sewage sludge bio-drying, and the actual water loss caused by aeration can be better understood from investigations of the relationship between aeration and water evaporation from the sewage sludge bio-drying pile based on in situ measurements. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of forced air volume on the evaporation of water from a sewage sludge bio-drying pile. Dewatered sewage sludge was bio-dried using control technology for bio-drying, during which time the temperature, superficial air velocity and water evaporation were measured and calculated. The results indicated that the peak air velocity and water evaporation occurred in the thermophilic phase and second temperature-increasing phase, with the highest values of 0.063 ± 0.027 m s(-1) and 28.9 kg ton(-1) matrix d(-1), respectively, being observed on day 4. Air velocity above the pile during aeration was 43-100% higher than when there was no aeration, and there was a significantly positive correlation between air volume and water evaporation from day 1 to 15. The order of daily means of water evaporation was thermophilic phase > second temperature-increasing phase > temperature-increasing phase > cooling phase. Forced aeration controlled the pile temperature and improved evaporation, making it the key factor influencing water loss during the process of sewage sludge bio-drying.

  20. The effect of air temperature on the sappan wood extract drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaeni, M.; Triyastuti, M. S.; Asiah, N.; Annisa, A. N.; Novita, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The sappan wood extract contain natural colour called brazilin that can be used as a food colouring and antioxidant. The product is commonly found as a dry extract powder for consummer convenience. The spray dryer with air dehumidification can be an option to retain the colour and antioxidant agent. This paper discusses the effect of air temperature on sappan wood extract drying that was mixed with maltodextrin. As responses, the particle size, final moisture content, and extract solubility degradation were observed. In all cases, the process conducted in temperature ranging 90 - 110°C can retain the brazilin quality as seen in solubility and particle size. In addition, the sappan wood extract can be fully dried with moisture content below 2%. Moreover, with the increase of air temperature, the particle size of dry extract can be smaller.

  1. Study on lycopene and antioxidant contents variations in tomatoes under air-drying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C-H; Liu, Y-C

    2007-11-01

    Effects of factors such as tomato cultivars, drying temperatures (40, 80, and 120 degrees C), and drying time (0 to 240 min) on tomato lycopene and the major antioxidant contents (MACs, herein as the sum of total phenolics and total flavonoids) during an air-drying process were investigated. The results showed that lycopene contents increased under all the drying temperatures during the first 60 min. However, the red tomato cultivars, that is, HR, SN, and TTL, exhibited a significant decrease in lycopene contents under 120 degrees C after drying for 75 min. According to the experimental data, an MAC threshold value of 500 mg/100 g dry matter of tomato is proposed. When the MAC is lower than this value during air-drying, lycopene contents in all tomato cultivars would drop rapidly. In addition, the tomatoes in yellow color group, containing more MACs initially and retaining more MACs under air-drying at 40 to 80 degrees C, are proposed to be the proper tomato cultivars for thermal processing.

  2. Soil Geochemical Control Over Nematode Populations in Bull Pass, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poage, M. A.; Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Wall, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys occupy the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and are characterized by climatic conditions among the most extreme on Earth. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, some soils of the dry valleys host simple low-diversity ecosystems dominated by microbes and several taxa of metazoans, predominantly nematodes. Distributions, abundance, and diversity of these biota appear to be related to the highly variable soil geochemistry (pH, conductivity, nitrate, sulfate, chloride) of the dry valleys. Bull Pass is a glacially carved valley within the dry valleys. An ancient lake margin near the valley floor creates a continuous gradient spanning the full range of geochemical parameters found across the entire McMurdo Dry Valleys system. This unique setting provides the opportunity to systematically investigate the soil geochemical control on local biodiversity and establish, on the spatial scale of hundreds of meters, correlations between nematode populations and individual geochemical parameters that have application at the regional scale. We measured soil geochemistry and nematode population data from a 1500-meter transect across this ancient lake margin. There were significant negative correlations between live nematode abundance and concentrations of soil nitrate, sulfate and chloride as well as total soil salinity, consistent with recent laboratory experiments showing strong salinity inhibition of nematode survival. A logistical regression analysis based on a compilation of published datasets from across the dry valleys was designed to calculate the probably of live nematode populations occurring given a particular soil chemistry, using the dataset from the Bull Pass transect as a case study to field-test the model. Small-scale chemical and biological gradients can provide insights on the distribution of soil biota at much larger regional scales.

  3. Analysis and Modeling of Wangqing Oil Shale Drying Characteristics in a Novel Fluidized Bed Dryer with Asynchronous Rotating Air Distributor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ning; Zhou Yunlong; Miao Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In order to replace the conventional distributor, a novel asynchronous rotating air distributor, which can optimize the drying ability of lfuidized bed and strengthen the drying performance of oil shale particles, is creatively designed in this study. The rotating speed of the asynchronous rotating air distributor with an embedded center disk and an encircling disk is regulated to achieve the different air supply conditions. The impacts of different drying conditions on the drying characteristic of Wangqing oil shale particles are studied with the help of electronic scales. The dynamics of experimental data is analyzed with 9 common drying models. The results indicate that the particles distribution in lfuidized bed can be improved and the drying time can be reduced by decreasing the rotating speed of the embedded center disk and increasing the rotating speed of the encircling disk. The drying process of oil shale particles involves a rising drying rate period, a constant drying rate period and a falling drying rate period. Regulating the air distributor rotating speed reasonably will accelerate the shift of particles from the rising drying rate period to the falling drying rate period directly. The two-term model ifts properly the oil shale particles drying simulation among 9 drying models at different air supply conditions. Yet the air absorbed in the particles’ pores is diffused along with the moisture evaporation, and a small amount of moisture remains on the wall of lfuidized bed in each experiment, thus, the values of drying simulation are less than the experimental values.

  4. Gamma ray computed tomography to evaluate wetting/drying soil structure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz F. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: lfpires@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, Osny O.S. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Reichardt, Klaus [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2005-04-01

    Wetting and drying (W-D) cycles can cause strong modifications of the structure of a soil, especially in pore distribution, which reflects the temporal and spatial distribution of soil water and, consequently, these processes can affect soil water and nutrient retention and movement. These alterations have important practical consequences when calculating soil water storages and matric potentials, widely used in irrigation management. The present paper has as objective to use gamma ray computed tomography (GCT) as a tool to investigate possible modifications in soil structure induced by W-D cycles and to analyze how these alterations can affect soil water retention. The GCT scanner used was a first generation system with a fixed source-detector arrangement, with a radioactive gamma ray source of {sup 241}Am. Soil samples were taken from profiles of three different soils characterized as Xanthic Ferralsol (Fx), Eutric Nitosol (Ne) and Rhodic Ferralsol (Fr). Eighteen samples (50 cm{sup 3}), six from each soil, were submitted to none (T{sub 0}), three (T{sub 1}) and nine (T{sub 2}) wetting/drying cycles. Based on image analysis it was possible to detect modifications in soil structure in all samples after wetting/drying cycles for all treatments. Tomographic unit profiles of the samples permitted to identify an increase on soil porosity with the increase in the number of wetting/drying cycles and it was also possible to quantify the average porosity values. The statistical test (Duncan test) indicates that there are significant differences between treatments for all samples at the 5% significance level.

  5. Analysis of air-conditioning and drying processes using spreadsheet add-in for psychrometric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Diemuodeke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A spreadsheet add-in for the psychrometric data at any barometric pressure and in the air-conditioning and drying temperatureranges was developed using appropriate correlations. It was then used to simulate and analyse air-conditioning and dryingprocesses in the Microsoft Excel environment by exploiting its spreadsheet and graphic potentials. The package allowsone to determine the properties of humid air at any desired state, and to simulate and analyse air-conditioning as well asdrying processes. This, as a teaching tool, evokes the intellectual curiosity of students and enhances their interest and abilityin the thermodynamics of humid-air processes.

  6. Variation in ultrasonic frequency and time as pre-treatments to air-drying of carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable drying is an alternative method to curb post harvest decay of vegetables and a process to produce dried vegetables, which can be directly consumed or used as ingredients for the preparation of soups, stews, baby foods, cakes, puddings, and many other foods. In this study, the effect of ultrasound frequency and sonication time as pre-treatment prior to air drying at 70°C at an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, on carrot drying kinetics, flavour, colour, and non-enzymatic browning was investigated using a 3-level factorial response surface method. The result showed that an increase in sonication frequency and time did not significantly increase moisture diffusivity but in comparison with the control, water diffusivity increased after ultrasound application and the overall drying time was reduced. Application of the ultrasound pre-treatment in distilled water resulted in water gain and sugar loss, indicating that the ultrasonic pre-treatment can be an important step to produce low sugar content dried products. The brightness and redness to yellowness values of the ultrasonically pre-treated dried carrots were better than those without ultrasound application. In comparison with the flavour of the control, the ultrasound pre-treated samples recorded higher flavour response signals, indicating that the application of ultrasound improved the flavour of the dried carrot. The variation in sonication frequency and time did not significantly affect the non-enzymatic browning index of the dried products but were better than the control.

  7. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  8. Modeling Soil Water Retention Curves in the Dry Range Using the Hygroscopic Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    curves of soils and to predict SWRCs at the dry end using the hygroscopic water content at a relative humidity of 50% (θRH50). The Oswin model yielded satisfactory fits to dry-end SWRCs for soils dominated by both 2:1 and 1:1 clay minerals. Compared with the Oswin model, the Campbell and Shiozawa model......Accurate information on the dry end (matric potential less than −1500 kPa) of soil water retention curves (SWRCs) is crucial for studying water vapor transport and evaporation in soils. The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of the Oswin model for describing the water adsorption...... combined with the Kelvin equation (CS-K) produced better fits to dry-end SWRCs of soils dominated by 2:1 clays but provided poor fits for soils dominated by 1:1 clays. The shape parameter α of the Oswin model was dependent on clay mineral type, and approximate values of 0.29 and 0.57 were obtained...

  9. Copper pollution decreases the resistance of soil microbial community to subsequent dry-rewetting disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Hu, Hang-Wei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Dry-rewetting (DW) disturbance frequently occurs in soils due to rainfall and irrigation, and the frequency of DW cycles might exert significant influences on soil microbial communities and their mediated functions. However, how microorganisms respond to DW alternations in soils with a history of heavy metal pollution remains largely unknown. Here, soil laboratory microcosms were constructed to explore the impacts of ten DW cycles on the soil microbial communities in two contrasting soils (fluvo-aquic soil and red soil) under three copper concentrations (zero, medium and high). Results showed that the fluctuations of substrate induced respiration (SIR) decreased with repeated cycles of DW alternation. Furthermore, the resistance values of substrate induced respiration (RS-SIR) were highest in non-copper-stressed (zero) soils. Structural equation model (SEM) analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial communities determined the changes of RS-SIR in both soils. The rate of bacterial community variance was significantly lower in non-copper-stressed soil compared to the other two copper-stressed (medium and high) soils, which might lead to the higher RS-SIR in the fluvo-aquic soil. As for the red soil, the substantial increase of the dominant group WPS-2 after DW disturbance might result in the low RS-SIR in the high copper-stressed soil. Moreover, in both soils, the bacterial diversity was highest in non-copper-stressed soils. Our results revealed that initial copper stress could decrease the resistance of soil microbial community structure and function to subsequent DW disturbance.

  10. Retrofitting Air Conditioning and Duct Systems in Hot, Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, C.; Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

    2012-07-01

    This technical report describes CARB's work with Clark County Community Resources Division in Las Vegas, Nevada, to optimize procedures for upgrading cooling systems on existing homes in the area to implement health, safety, and energy improvements. Detailed monitoring of five AC systems showed that three of the five systems met or exceeded air flow rate goals.

  11. Soil temperature prediction from air temperature for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, D.; Kundu, D. K.; Pal, Soumen; Pal, Susanto; Chakraborty, A. K.; Jha, A. K.; Mazumdar, S. P.; Saha, R.; Bhattacharyya, P.

    2017-01-01

    Soil temperature is an important factor in biogeochemical processes. On-site monitoring of soil temperature is limited in spatiotemporal scale as compared to air temperature data inventories due to various management difficulties. Therefore, empirical models were developed by taking 30-year long-term (1985-2014) air and soil temperature data for prediction of soil temperatures at three depths (5, 15, 30 cm) in morning (0636 Indian standard time) and afternoon (1336 Indian standard time) for alluvial soils in lower Indo-Gangetic plain. At 5 cm depth, power and exponential regression models were best fitted for daily data in morning and afternoon, respectively, but it was reverse at 15 cm. However, at 30 cm, exponential models were best fitted for both the times. Regression analysis revealed that in morning for all three depths and in afternoon for 30 cm depth, soil temperatures (daily, weekly, and monthly) could be predicted more efficiently with the help of corresponding mean air temperature than that of maximum and minimum. However, in afternoon, prediction of soil temperature at 5 and 15 cm depths were more precised for all the time intervals when maximum air temperature was used, except for weekly soil temperature at 15 cm, where the use of mean air temperature gave better prediction.

  12. SLOPE LITHOLOGIC PROPERTY, SOIL MOISTURE CONDITION AND REVEGETATION IN DRY-HOT VALLEY OF JINSHA RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Dong-hong; ZHOU Hong-yi; YANG Zhong; ZHANG Xin-bao

    2005-01-01

    The dry-hot valley of the Jinsha River is one of the typical eco-fragile areas in Southwest China, as well as a focus ofrevegetation study in the upper and middle reaches of the Changjiang River. Due to its extremely dry and hot climate, severely degraded vegetation and the intense soil and water loss, there are extreme difficulties in vegetation restoration in this area and no great breakthrough has ever been achieved on studies of revegetation over the last several decades. Through over ten years' research conducted in the typical areas-the Yuanmou dry-hot valley, the authors found that the lithologic property is one of the crucial factors determining soil moisture conditions and vegetation types in the dry-hot valley, and the rainfall infiltration capability is also one of the key factors affecting the tree growth. Then the revegetation zoning based on different slopes was conducted and revegetation patterns for different zones were proposed.

  13. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  14. Nitrogen mineralization from anaerobically digested centrifuge cake and aged air-dried biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kuldip; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Cox, Albert E; Granato, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to estimate nitrogen (N) mineralization of anaerobically digested centrifuge cake from the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant (SWRP) and Calumet Water Reclamation Plant (CWRP), lagoon-aged air-dried biosolids from the CWRP, and Milorganite at three rates of application (0, 12.5 and 25 Mg ha(-1)). The N mineralized varied among biosolids as follows: Milorganite (44%) > SWRP centrifuge cake (35%) > CWRP centrifuge cake (31%) > aged air-dried (13%). The N mineralized in the SWRP cake (32%) and CWRP aged air-dried biosolids (12%) determined from the 15N study were in agreement with the first study. The N mineralization value for centrifuge cake biosolids observed in our study is higher than the value given in the Part 503 rule and Illinois Part 391 guidelines. These results will be used to fine-tune biosolids application rate to match crop N demand without compromising yield while minimizing any adverse effect on the environment.

  15. Solar air heaters for industrial drying; Aquecedor solar de ar para secagem industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Everaldo Mendes [Governo do Estado da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Secretaria de Planejamento e Gestao

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to encourage the use of solar energy in industrial drying of fruits, with the producers poles, at the same time, promote the rational use of energy for heat, or replacing the hydroelectric and oil derivatives for this purpose. This study is presented in the following chapters: availability of solar energy; details of constructive solar heated air; drying fruit; market. (author)

  16. The volatile oil composition of fresh and air-dried buds of Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S A; ElSohly, M A

    1996-01-01

    The composition of the steam-distilled volatile oil of fresh and air-dried, indoor-grown marijuana was studied by GC/FID and GC/MS. In all, 68 components were detected of which 57 were fully identified. Drying of the plant material had no effect on the qualitative composition of the oil and did not affect the ability of individuals familiar with marijuana smell to recognize the odor.

  17. Changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes in the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, I. N.; Novikova, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term studies of changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes of the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts (deep plowing, surface leveling, irrigation, and post-irrigation use) have been performed on the Privolzhskaya sand ridge and the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains. The natural morphology of solonetzic soils was strongly disturbed during their deep ameliorative plowing. At present, the soil cover consists of solonetzic agrozems (Sodic Protosalic Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), textural (clay-illuvial) calcareous agrozems (Eutric Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), agrosolonetzes (Endocalcaric Luvisols (Loamic, Aric, Cutanic, Protosodic), agrochestnut soils (Eutric Cambisols (Siltic, Aric)), and meadowchestnut soils (Haplic Kastanozems). No features attesting to the restoration of the initial profile of solonetzes have been found. The dynamics of soluble salts and exchangeable sodium differ in the agrosolonetzes and solonetzic agrozems. A rise in pH values takes place in the middle part of the soil profiles on the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains.

  18. Microwave drying of granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug: a promising alternative to fluid bed and hot air oven drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Sze Nam; Johansen, Anne Lene; Gu, Li; Karlsen, Jan; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2005-07-01

    The impact of microwave drying and binders (copolyvidone and povidone) on the degradation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and physical properties of granules were compared with conventional drying methods. Moist granules containing ASA were prepared using a high shear granulator and dried with hot air oven, fluid bed or microwave (static or dynamic bed) dryers. Percent ASA degradation, size and size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules were determined. Granules dried with the dynamic bed microwave dryer showed the least amount of ASA degradation, followed by fluid bed dryer, static bed microwave oven and hot air oven. The use of microwave drying with a static granular bed adversely affected ASA degradation and drying capability. Dynamic bed microwave dryer had the highest drying capability followed by fluid bed, static bed microwave dryer and conventional hot air oven. The intensity of microwave did not affect ASA degradation, size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules. Mixing/agitating of granules during drying affected the granular physical properties studied. Copolyvidone resulted in lower amount of granular residual moisture content and ASA degradation on storage than povidone, especially for static bed microwave drying. In conclusion, microwave drying technology has been shown to be a promising alternative for drying granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug.

  19. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  20. Research on Air-dried Density and Mechanical Properties of Moso Bamboo from Different Plantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to further research bamboo cultivation and expand its application field, air-dried density and mechanical properties of Moso bamboo from the 2 plantations under the same site condition were measured and analyzed by using the national standard The Testing Methods for Physical and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo (GB / T 15780-1995). And the single linear regression analysis was carried out. The results showed that air-dried density and mechanical properties of the 2 kinds of Moso bamboo increase with...

  1. Mathematical Modeling on Combined Mid-infrared and Hot Air Drying of Beef Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lei Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the drying models and characteristics of Combined Mid-Infrared and Hot Air (CMIHA drying BEEF MEAT (BM, a laboratory scale CMIHA dryer was applied to the treatment of BM samples in a temperature range from 40-70°C, with air velocity of 1m/s and mid-infrared of 2.8-3.1 m. Microsoft visual C sharp (C# was used to develop a Moisture Prediction System (MPS to digitize the prediction process. The results indicated that the Modified Henderson and Pabis model could present better predictions for the moisture transfer than others and the MPS could predict the moisture ratio through the whole drying process conveniently. Besides, higher temperature could accelerate effective diffusivities to increase drying rate, thus shorten the drying time. The activation energy of BM dried with CMIHA was 32.83 kJ/mol. All of these could be used in the design and operation of the combination drying beef meat.

  2. Release of aged 14C-atrazine residues from soil facilitated by dry-wet cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Yu, K.; Koeppchen, S.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent dry-wet cycles may have an important effect on soil structure and aged pesticide residues release (1). A laboratory study was conducted to assess the maximum potential of water extractable aged atrazine residues influenced by soil drying and wetting. The used soil was obtained from an outdoor lysimeter (gleyic cambisol; Corg: 1.45%), containing environmentally aged (22 years) 14C-atrazine residues. For the experiment, soil from 0-10 cm depth was used since most residual 14C activity was previously found in this layer (2,3). Triplicate soil samples with a residual water content of approx. 8% were either dried (45° C) prior water addition or directly mixed with distilled water (soil+water: 1+2, w:w). The samples were shaken (150 rmp, 60 min, at 21° C), centrifuged (approx. 2000 g), and the supernatants were filtered. Water-extracted residual 14C activity was detected via liquid scintillation counter. The total water-extracted 14C activity (the amount of residual 14C activity in a sample equals 100%) was significantly higher (p

  3. Resource Limitations on Soil Microbial Activity in an Antarctic Dry Valley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparrow, Asley; Gregorich, Ed; Hopkins, David

    2011-01-01

    Although Antarctic dry valley soils function under some of the harshest environmental conditions on the planet, there is significant biological activity concentrated in small areas in the landscape. These productive areas serve as a source of C and N in organic matter redistributed to the surroun......Although Antarctic dry valley soils function under some of the harshest environmental conditions on the planet, there is significant biological activity concentrated in small areas in the landscape. These productive areas serve as a source of C and N in organic matter redistributed...... to the surrounding biologically impoverished soils. We conducted a 3-yr replicated field experiment involving soil amendment with C and N in simple (glucose and NH4Cl) and complex (glycine and lacustrine detritus) forms to evaluate the resource limitations on soil microbial activity in an Antarctic dry valley....... The respiratory response for all substrates was slow, with a significant but weak response to NH4Cl, followed by a more widespread response to all substrates after 2 yr and in laboratory incubations conducted 3 yr after substrate addition. This response suggests that the soil microbial community is N limited and...

  4. Green ambrosia for Soil- Dry Cow Dung Powder: Rhexistasy to Biostasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Barot, Nisha

    2013-04-01

    "Greener ambrosia for Soil - Dry cow dung powder: Rhexistasy to Biostasy" Pedosphere, the soil with its biotic and abiotic component, is produced by lithosphere`s interactions with atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. The theory of Biorhexistasy proposed by pedologist H. Erhart [1], describes two crucial climatic phases of soil i.e. Biostasy, period of soil formation and Rhexistasy, periods of soil erosion. Humus, the organic matter in soil, permits better aeration, enhances the absorption and releases nutrients, and makes the soil less susceptible to leaching and erosion [2], thus the agent of soil`s vitality. Mismanagement of soil, leads to the degradation of millions of acres of land through erosion, compaction, salinization and acidification. Among these threats salinity is a major abiotic stress reducing the yield of wide variety of crops all over the world [3]. It is been proved that Humic Acid (HA) treatment can ameliorate the deleterious effects of salt stress by increasing root growth, altering mineral uptake, and decreasing membrane damage, thus inducing salt tolerance in plants [4]. HA can be inexpensively incorporated into soils via different biowastes. Dry cow dung powder (DCP), is naturally available bio-organic, complex, polymorphic humified fecal matter, enriched with minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, bile pigments, aliphatic - aromatic species such as HA, Fulvic Acid (FA) etc [5]. The microbial consortium enables DCP with considerable potentials for biodegradation and biotransformation of even saline soil and further contributes to many biogeochemical processes, boosting humus content of soil. Due to unambiguous biological, microbiological as well as chemical inert properties of DCP, it has been successfully utilized as a fertilizer and soil conditioner since ages in India, one of the leading agrarian countries of the world. Thus we summarize that DCP is one of the best contenders for the biostasy and desaliner of soil, aptly, soil`s

  5. Foliar loading and metabolic assimilation of dry deposited nitric acid air pollutants by trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Pamela E; Cook, Hillary; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Heath, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Dry deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO(3)) is a major contributor to eutrophication of natural ecosystems. Although soil fertilization by nitrogen deposition is considered to be the primary pathway for changes in plant nutrient status and shifts in ecological structure, the aerial portion of plants offer many times the surface area in which to collect atmospheric HNO(3). As much as 60% of deposited nitrogen may be retained in the canopy and not land on the soil surface below. Although uptake and assimilation appears to contribute to retention, only a small percentage of dry deposition is recovered in assimilated N pools. To test the importance of biological activity on the process and measurements of dry deposition, we used controlled environmental chambers to compare deposition to living and freeze-dried foliage of four tree species using (15)N-labeled HNO(3). In living trees, assimilation was determined by (15)N incorporation into free amino acids and proteins in leaves and roots. From 10% to 60% of the retained HNO(3) was incorporated into the biologically active nitrogen pool. The remainder was bound to foliar surfaces in an insoluble form in either living or freeze-dried foliage. The importance of the boundary layer conditions emerged as a primary factor controlling dry deposition characteristics and measurements.Trade names and commercial enterprises or products are mentioned solely for information. No endorsements by the U.S. Department of Agriculture are implied.

  6. Effect of microwave and air drying of parboiled rice on stabilization of rice bran oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizk, Laila F.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Two rice varieties, Giza 175 (short grain and Giza 181 (long grain were partDoiled by soaking the grains at room temperature for 20 hours and steaming for 15 min then dried either at room temperature or by microwave. The results indicated that air and microwave drying significantly increased oil extraction in both rice bran varieties. Parboiling followed by air or microwave drying produced a slight change on protein, fiber and ash content of rice bran and reduced the development of free fatty acids (F.F.A. In oil bran. Microwave samples have less F.F.A. content than the corresponding samples air dried. Oils from the cold stored rice bran presented lower F.F.A. than the corresponding oil bran stored at room temperature. The ratio between total unsaturated fatty acids and total saturated ones (Tu/Ts decreased after air and microwave drying. Results also show that air drying increased the ratio of total hydrocarbons and total sterols (Tu/Ts in both varieties while microwave decreased it.

    Dos variedades de arroz, Giza 175 (grano corto y Giza 181 (grano largo se precocieron mediante la puesta en remojo de los granos a temperatura ambiente durante 20 horas y cocimiento al vapor durante 15 minutos, luego se secaron a temperatura ambiente o por microondas. Los resultados indicaron que el secado al aire y en microondas aumentó significativamente la extracción del aceite en ambas variedades de salvado de arroz. El precocido seguido del secado al aire o en microondas produjo un cambio pequeño en el contenido en proteína, fibra y ceniza y redujo el desarrollo de ácidos grasos libres (F.F.A. en el aceite de salvado. Las muestras secadas en microondas tuvieron un menor contenido en F.F.A. que las muestras correspondientes al secado en aire. Aceites de salvado de arroz almacenado en frió presentaron menor F.F.A. que los almacenados a temperatura ambiente. La relación entre ácidos grasos insaturados totales y los saturados totales (Tu/Ts disminuy

  7. Preliminary Study on Biological Characteristics of Degraded Soil Ecosystems in Dry Hot Valley of the Jinsha River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Distribution characteristics of soil animals, microorganisms and enzymatic activity were studied in thedry red soil and Vertisol ecosystems with different degradation degrees in the Yuanmou dry hot valley of theJinsha River, China. Results showed that Hymenoptera, Araneae and Collembola were the dominant groupsof soil animals in the plots studied. The numbers of groups and individuals and density of soil animals in thedry red soil series were higher than those in the Vertisol series, and the numbers of individuals and density ofsoil animals decreased with the degree of soil degradation. Bacteria dominated microbiocoenosis not only inthe dry red soils but also in the Vertisols. Microbial numbers of the dry red soil series were higher than thoseof Vertisol series, and decreased with the degree of soil degradation. The activities of catalase, invertase,urease and alkaline phosphatase declined with the degradation degree and showed a significant decline withdepth in the profiles of both the dry red soils and the Vertisols, but activities of polyphenol oxidase andacid and neutral phosphatase showed the same tendencies only in the Vertisols. It was concluded that thecharacteristics of soil animals, microorganisms and enzymatic activity could be used as the bio-indicators toshow the degradation degree of the dry red soils and Vertisols. Correlation among these soil bio-indicatorswas highly significant.

  8. Microbial Biomass C,N and P in Disturbed Dry Tropical Forest Soils, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.SINGH; D.P.SINGH; A.K.KASHYAP

    2010-01-01

    Variations in microbial biomass C(MB-C),N(MB-N)and P(MB-P)along a gradient of different dominant vegetation covers(natural forest,mixed deciduous forest,disturbed savanna and grassland ecosystems)in dry tropical soils of Vindhyan Plateau,India were studied from January 2005 to December 2005.The water holding capacity,organic C,total N,total P and soil moisture content were comparatively higher in forest soils than in the savanna and grassland sites.Across different study sites the mean annual MB-C,MB-N and MB-P at 0-15 cm soil depth varied from 312.05 ± 4.22to 653.40 ± 3.17,32.16 ± 6.25 to 75.66 ± 7.21 and 18.94 ± 2.94 to 30.83 ± 23.08 μg g-1 dry soil,respectively.At all the investigated sites,the maximum MB-C,MB-N and MB-P occurred during the dry period(summer season)and the minimum in wet period(rainy season).In the present study,soil MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were higher at the forest sites compared to savanna and grassland sites.The differences in MB-C,MB-N and MB-P were significant(P mixed deciduous forest > savanna > grassland.The results suggested that deforestation and land use practices(conversion of forest into savanna and grassland)caused the alterations in soil properties,which as a consequence,led to reduction in soil nutrients and MB-C,MB-N and MB-P in the soil of disturbed sites(grassland and savanna)compared to undisturbed forest ecosystems.

  9. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, M.C. [Envirogen, Inc., Canton, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  10. DMS pulse and COS valley: the effect of simulated rainfall on sulfur gas exchange in dry soils of uncultivated marine terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Khan, M. H.; Barnash, K.; Vollering, J.; Rhew, R.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfur compounds regulate climate by affecting cloud dynamics and reducing the amount of solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface. Quantifying the terrestrial-atmosphere exchanges of sulfur has been challenging as only some of the controlling factors are known. In general, oxic soils are observed to act as a sink of reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), while anoxic soils tend to act a source. Changes in soil moisture are therefore expected to greatly influence the direction of net gas fluxes of RSCs. Here we report the effect of simulated rainfall on soil samples from uncultivated marine terraces near Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A (37.0°N, 122°W). Soils were collected in the dry season of a Mediterranean-type climate and air dried before the analysis. The rate of production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a compound known to be produced by phytoplankton and bacteria, increased dramatically in the first hours after water addition, tapering off over a few days. A concurrent pulse in microbial respiration (as CO_2) was observed. Soils that experience lengthy dry periods, such as those from arid and Mediterranean climates, have been shown to exhibit increases of carbon mineralization after rain events due to a combination of released soil organic matter and increased microbial activity. Conversely, production of carbonyl sulfide (COS), the most abundant reduced sulfur compound in the atmosphere, decreased immediately upon wetting the soil, perhaps due to isolation of the soil atmosphere from the headspace by water. These simultaneous processes after the addition of water can transform a soil in the bulk oxic state into a net source of RSCs in a relatively short span of time.

  11. Thin layer convective air drying of wild edible plant (Allium roseum) leaves: experimental kinetics, modeling and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haj Said, Leila; Najjaa, Hanen; Farhat, Abdelhamid; Neffati, Mohamed; Bellagha, Sihem

    2015-06-01

    The present study deals with the valorization of an edible spontaneous plant of the Tunisian arid areas: Allium roseum. This plant is traditionally used for therapeutic and culinary uses. Thin-layer drying behavior of Allium roseum leaves was investigated at 40, 50 and 60 °C drying air temperatures and 1 and l.5 m/s air velocity, in a convective dryer. The increase in air temperature significantly affected the moisture loss and reduced the drying time while air velocity was an insignificant factor during drying of Allium roseum leaves. Five models selected from the literature were found to satisfactorily describe drying kinetics of Allium roseum leaves for all tested drying conditions. Drying data were analyzed to obtain moisture diffusivity values. During the falling rate-drying period, moisture transfer from Allium roseum leaves was described by applying the Fick's diffusion model. Moisture diffusivity varied from 2.55 × 10(-12) to 8.83 × 10(-12) m(2)/s and increased with air temperature. Activation energy during convective drying was calculated using an exponential expression based on Arrhenius equation and ranged between 46.80 and 52.68 kJ/mol. All sulfur compounds detected in the fresh leaves were detected in the dried leaves. Convective air drying preserved the sulfur compounds potential formation.

  12. Soil moisture prediction to support management in semiarid wetlands during drying episodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilera, Héctor; Moreno, Luis; Wesseling, Jan G.; Jiménez-Hernández, María E.; Castaño, Silvino

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands supported by groundwater in semiarid regions are extremely vulnerable to the impacts of droughts, particularly anthropized systems. During drying periods, soil water content arises as the controlling factor for environmental and ecological disturbances such as the spread of invasive plan

  13. SOLAR DRYING KINETICS OF DATE PALM FRUITS ASSUMING A STEP-WISE AIR TEMPERATURE CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELGHANI BOUBEKRI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drying using a step-wise temperature change was studied considering the case of indirect solar drying of the date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L.. The followed procedure consists of building drying kinetics by stages of temperatures resulting from drying, in constant conditions, of the same variety of dates from Algerian and Tunisian origin. A law of daily temperature variation prevailed by 60°C, was deduced from a statement of temperature collected on a laboratory solar dryer prototype. Two drying curve equation models were used and some comparisons were discussed. The results obtained for dates from the two origins highlighted different response times by changing the air temperature and showed the possibility of reaching a fruit with standard moisture content in only one day of drying on the basis of initial water contents ranging from 0.40 to 0.65. This moisture range is in practice allotted to rehydrated dates by water immersion in order to enhance their quality. Experiments conducted in a laboratory solar drier under temperatures oscillating around 50°C and 60°C led to the same end up regarding the drying time ensuring a visually appreciable fruit quality. Results obtained by a simple sensorial test revealed a better quality of date fruits treated by solar drying comparing to those issued from industrial heat treatment units.

  14. Long-Term Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Microbial Communities in Dry Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Mortimer, Monika; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of engineered carbonaceous nanomaterials (ECNMs) on soil microbial communities, especially when compared to possible effects of natural or industrial carbonaceous materials. To address these issues, we exposed dry grassland soil for 1 year to 1 mg g(-1) of either natural nanostructured material (biochar), industrial carbon black, three types of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or graphene. Soil microbial biomass was assessed by substrate induced respiration and by extractable DNA. Bacterial and fungal communities were examined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Microbial activity was assessed by soil basal respiration. At day 0, there was no treatment effect on soil DNA or T-RFLP profiles, indicating negligible interference between the amended materials and the methods for DNA extraction, quantification, and community analysis. After a 1-year exposure, compared to the no amendment control, some treatments reduced soil DNA (e.g., biochar, all three MWCNT types, and graphene; P < 0.05) and altered bacterial communities (e.g., biochar, carbon black, narrow MWCNTs, and graphene); however, there were no significant differences across the amended treatments. These findings suggest that ECNMs may moderately affect dry soil microbial communities but that the effects are similar to those from natural and industrial carbonaceous materials, even after 1-year exposure.

  15. Economical analysis of the spray drying process by pre-dehumidification of the inlet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeira, A.N.; Camargo, J.R. [University of Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2009-07-01

    Spray drying is a dehumidification process by atomization in a closed chamber that aims to remove moisture of a product by heat and mass transfer from the product's contained water to the air that, in this process is previously heated. This paper presents a case study for an industry that produces food ingredients. The current process applied in the product to heat the air can uses one of these two systems: a direct heating process that burns liquid petroleum gas in contact with the inlet air or indirect heating that uses a heat exchanger which heat the air. This heating system consumes 90% of the total process energy. However, this inlet air can reach the dehumidifier with high moisture from the atmosphere condition requesting, in this case, more energy consumption according to the year's seasons. This paper promotes a utilization study of the current process through the installation of a pre-dehumidification device of the inlet air and shows a study to three different dehumidification systems that means by refrigeration, adsorption and actual comparing their performance in an energetic and economical point of view. The goals of this study are to analyze the capacity of moisture removing of each removing device, the influence of moisture variation of the inlet air in the process as well as the economic impact of each device in the global system. It concludes that the utilization of dehumidification devices can eliminate the heating system reducing this way the energy consumption. Moreover it promotes the increasing of moisture gradient between the inlet air and the product optimizing the drying process and increasing the global energy efficiency in the global system. Choosing the most appropriate system for the pre-dehumidification device depends on the desired initial and final moisture content of the product, but applying pre-dehumidifiers at the inlet air promotes an energetic optimization in the spray drying process. (author)

  16. Hyperventilation with cold versus dry air in 2- to 5-year-old children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim G; Bisgaard, Hans

    2005-01-01

    -subject SDs (SDw). The challenge sequence was randomly assigned. A comparator challenge was performed 1 hour later if the first challenge gave a change of 3 SDw or more. Forty 2- to 5-year-old children with asthma were included. Responsiveness to cold versus dry air showed significant, but weak, correlation...... (r(2) = 0.34, p

  17. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42%. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  18. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  19. Humidifying system design of PEMFC test platform based on the mixture of dry and wet air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiancai Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the present humidifying system of PEMFC test platform, a novel design based on dry and wet air mixture is proposed. Key parameters are calculated, and test platform is built. Three experiments are implemented to test the performance of proposed design. Results show that the new design can meet the requirements, and realize the quick response and accurate control.

  20. Shakedown modeling of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowamooz Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to model the behavior of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles because they alter significantly their hydro-mechanical behavior and therefore cause a huge differential settlement on shallow foundations of the structure. A simplified model based on the shakedown theory (Zarka method has been developed in this study for unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles. This method determines directly the stabilized limit state and consequently saves the calculation time. The parameters of the proposed shakedown-based model are calibrated by the suction-controlled oedometer tests obtained for an expansive soil compacted at loose and dense initial states, and then validated for the same soil compacted at intermediate initial state by comparing the model predictions with the experimental results. Finally, the finite element equations for the proposed shakedown model are developed and these equations are implemented in the finite element code CAST3M to carry out the full-scale calculations. A 2D geometry made up of the expansive soil compacted at the intermediate state is subjected to successive extremely dry and wet seasons for the different applied vertical loads. The results show the swelling plastic deformations for the lower vertical stresses and the shrinkage deformations for the higher vertical stresses.

  1. Coffee husk associated with firewood as fuel for indirect heating of drying air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Edney Alves; Silva, Juarez de Sousa e; Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Oliveira Filho, Delly [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola; Donzeles, Sergio Mauricio Lopes [Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria de Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Vicosa, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work was the performance analysis of a furnace, burning coffee husk associated with firewood to heat the drying air passing through a heat exchanger. For the analysis the temperature variation, the combustion quality, the heat losses and the furnace thermal efficiency were all monitored. Results showed that the furnace average efficiency was 58.3% and the heat losses in the exhaust were 24.3%. The presence of carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases (average 2982.8 ppm) had proven incomplete combustion, and suggesting that the combustion gases can not be used to directly drying of foods. Despite of indirect heating, the presented thermal efficiency indicates that the burning of coffee husks is one economic alternative for air heating in grain drying or in other agricultural processes. (author)

  2. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying pulse dynamics of soil respiration in tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Bonnie G.; Powers, Jennifer S.

    2016-10-01

    Tropical dry forests are already undergoing changes in the quantity and timing of rainfall, but there is great uncertainty over how these shifts will affect belowground carbon (C) cycling. While it has long been known that dry soils quickly release carbon dioxide (CO2) upon rewetting, the mechanisms underlying the so-called ‘Birch effect’ are still debated. Here, we quantified soil respiration pulses and their biotic predictors in response to simulated precipitation events in a regenerating tropical dry forest in Costa Rica. We also simulated the observed rewetting CO2 pulses with two soil carbon models: a conventional model assuming first-order decay rates of soil organic matter, and an enzyme-catalyzed model with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. We found that rewetting of dry soils produced an immediate and dramatic pulse of CO2, accompanied by rapid immobilization of nitrogen into the microbial biomass. However, the magnitude of the rewetting CO2 pulse was highly variable at fine spatial scales, and was well correlated with the size of the dissolved organic C pool prior to rewetting. Both the enzyme-catalyzed and conventional models were able to reproduce the Birch effect when respiration was coupled directly to microbial C uptake, although models differed in their ability to yield realistic estimates of SOC and microbial biomass pool sizes and dynamics. Our results suggest that changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall events in tropical dry forests will exert strong influence on ecosystem C balance by affecting the dynamics of microbial biomass growth.

  3. Impact of drying-rewetting events on the response of soil microbial functions to dairyfibre and Miscanthus biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnett, Sam; Vink, Stefanie; Baker, Kate; Saghir, Muhammad; Hornung, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Biochar application has been shown to positively affect soil microbial functions such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, increasing water/nutrient availability and increasing crop yields in tropical regions (Lehmann & Joseph, 2009). Understanding the dynamics of biochar application to soil microbial processes is critical for ensuring that soil quality, integrity and sustainability of the soil sub-system are maintained for crop growth. The aim of this British Ecological Society (BES) funded study was to examine the effect of two types of biochar on soil physicochemistry, GHG production, soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass in typical agricultural soil types and whether the effects were altered by drying, rewetting and flooding events. Miscanthus and dairyfibre (a mixture of straw and manure) feedstocks from Harper Adams University were pyrolyzed by Aston University at 450 °C using 100 kg/hr pyroformer technology. Two sieved soil types (sandy loam and clay loam) were mixed with dry biochar to produce 2 and 10 % w/w treatments for comparison with controls and maintained at 15 °C in temperature controlled incubators. At 0, 22, 44, 80, 101, and 114 days, soil was collected for determination of heterotrophic respiration, and microbial biomass by substrate-induced respiration (SIR), by gas headspace incubation and analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) by gas chromatography. Soil was sampled for the determination of water-extractable carbon, pH, and extracellular enzyme activities. Soil samples were maintained at field gravimetric water content between 0 and 44 days; air dried between 44 and 80 days; rewetted between 80 and 101 days; and flooded between 101 to 114 days. Results showed that the impact of biochar on soil microbial processes was dependent on biochar type and soil type, the level of biochar application and changes in soil moisture. Biochar affected soil pH particularly within the dairyfibre treatments, potentially due to the

  4. Characterization of a halotolerant-psychroloterant bacterium from dry valley Antarctic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K J; Leschine, S B; Huguenin, R L

    1983-01-01

    The saline soils of the ice free dry valleys of Victoria Land, Antarctica may provide the closest analog on Earth to Martian conditions. We have initiated a study aimed at examining microbial adaptations to the harsh environment of these dry valley soils. In this report we describe the characterization of one bacterium, strain A4a, isolated from Taylor Valley soil. Strain A4a was an obligately aerobic, orange-pigmented, Gram-positive coccus that grew over wide ranges of both temperature (0 degrees C-40 degrees C) and sodium chloride concentration (0-2.0M). The optimal temperature for growth at all NaCl concentrations was 25 degrees C. Phospholipid composition and guanine plus cytosine content of the DNA of the isolate indicate a close relation to the genus Planococcus.

  5. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (Rs is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss, as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration.

  6. Influence of disturbance on soil respiration in biologically crusted soil during the dry season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tian-shan; Jia, Xin; Qin, Shu-gao; Shao, Chen-xi; Liu, Jia-bin; Lai, Zong-rui; Fa, Ke-yu

    2013-01-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss), as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60-70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q 10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration.

  7. Long Term Effects of Farming System on Soil Water Content and Dry Soil Layer in Deep Loess Proifle of Loess Tableland in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li-ping; LIU Wen-zhao

    2014-01-01

    Soil water is strongly affected by land use/cover in the Loess Plateau in China. Water stored in thick loessal soils is one of the most important resources regulating vegetation growth. However, soil water in the deep loess proifle, which is critical for maintaining the function of the“soil water pool”is rarely studied because deep proifle soil samples are dififcult to collect. In this study, four experimental plots were established in 2005 to represent different farming systems on the Changwu Tableland:fallow land, fertilized cropland, unfertilized cropland, and continuous alfalfa. The soil water content in the 15-m-deep loess proifles was monitored continuously from 2007 to 2012 with the neutron probe technique. The results showed that temporal variations in soil water proifles differed among the four farming systems. Under fallow land, the soil water content increased gradually over time, ifrst in the surface layers and later in the deep soil layers. In contrast, the soil water content decreased gradually under continuous alfalfa. The distributions of soil water in deep soil layers under both fertilized and unfertilized cropland were relatively stable over time. Thus farming system signiifcantly affected soil water content. Seven years after the start of the experiment, the soil water contents in the 15-m-deep proifles averaged 23.4%under fallow land, 20.3%under fertilized cropland, 21.6%under unfertilized cropland, and 16.0%under continuous alfalfa. Compared to measurements at the start of the experiment, both fallow land and unfertilized cropland increased soil water storage in the 15-m loess proifles. In contrast, continuous alfalfa reduced soil water storage. Fertilized cropland has no signiifcant effect on soil water storage. These results suggest that deep soil water can be replenished under the fallow and unfertilized farming systems. Dry soil layers (i.e., those which have soil water content less than the stable ifeld water capacity) in the subsoil

  8. Antioxidant activity changes during hot-air drying of Moringa oleifera leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwat Wangcharoen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dried Moringa oleifera leaf powder in capsule is now a popular food supplement in Thailand. To investigate its health benefits, antioxidant activities of M. oleifera leaves (3 varieties: Num Phrae, Ang Thong and PKM1 during drying in hot-air oven at 50C and 100C were studied by 3 different methods, viz. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and ABTS radical cation decolourisation, together with the determination of total phenolic content and browning pigment formation. It was found that the antioxidant activities and total phenolic content tend to decrease in the early stage of drying and then increase in the later stage, and that the dried leaves still have at least 60% of antioxidant activities compared to fresh leaves.

  9. Dry air effects on the copper oxides sensitive layers formation for ethanol vapor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labidi, A., E-mail: Ahmed_laabidi@yahoo.fr [URPSC (UR 99/13-18) Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, Universite de Carthage, BP 51, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Bejaoui, A.; Ouali, H. [URPSC (UR 99/13-18) Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, Universite de Carthage, BP 51, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Akkari, F. Chaffar [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et Materiaux Semi-conducteurs, ENIT, Universite de Tunis el Manar, BP 37, Le belvedere 1002, Tunis (Tunisia); Hajjaji, A.; Gaidi, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et de technologies de l' energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Kanzari, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et Materiaux Semi-conducteurs, ENIT, Universite de Tunis el Manar, BP 37, Le belvedere 1002, Tunis (Tunisia); Bessais, B. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et de technologies de l' energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Maaref, M. [URPSC (UR 99/13-18) Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, Universite de Carthage, BP 51, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2011-09-15

    The copper oxide films have been deposited by thermal evaporation and annealed under ambient air and dry air respectively, at different temperatures. The structural characteristics of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction. They showed the presences of two hydroxy-carbonate minerals of copper for annealing temperatures below 250 deg. C. Above this temperature the conductivity measurements during the annealing process, show a transition phase from metallic copper to copper oxides. The copper oxides sensitivity toward ethanol were performed using conductivity measurements at the working temperature of 200 deg. C. A decrease of conductivity was observed under ethanol vapor, showing the p-type semi-conducting characters of obtained copper oxide films. It was found that the sensing properties of copper oxide toward ethanol depend mainly on the annealing conditions. The best responses were obtained with copper layers annealed under dry air.

  10. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 1. Dry deposition of analog soils on microbial colonies and survival under Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Doug W.

    2012-11-01

    Six Mars analog soils were created to simulate a range of potentially biotoxic geochemistries relevant to the survival of terrestrial microorganisms on Mars, and included basalt-only (non-toxic control), salt, acidic, alkaline, aeolian, and perchlorate rich geochemistries. Experiments were designed to simulate the dry-deposition of Mars soils onto spacecraft surfaces during an active descent landing scenario with propellant engines. Six eubacteria were initially tested for tolerance to desiccation, and the spore-former Bacillus subtilis HA101 and non-spore former Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 were identified to be strongly resistant (HA101) and moderately resistant (29212) to desiccation at 24 °C. Furthermore, tests with B. subtilis and E. faecalis demonstrated that at least 1 mm of Mars analog soil was required to fully attenuate the biocidal effects of a simulated Mars-normal equatorial UV flux. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted under simulated Martian conditions of 6.9 mbar, -10 °C, CO2-enriched anoxic atmosphere, and a simulated equatorial solar spectrum (200-1100 nm) with an optical depth of 0.1. For B. subtilis, the six analog soils were found, in general, to be of low biotoxicity with only the high salt and acidic soils exhibiting the capacity to inactivate a moderate number of spores (faecalis to the analog soils was more dramatic with between two and three orders of magnitude reductions in viable cells for most soils, and between six and seven orders of magnitude reductions observed for the high-salt soil. Results suggest that Mars soils are likely not to be overtly biotoxic to terrestrial microorganisms, and suggest that the soil geochemistries on Mars will not preclude the habitability of the Martian surface.

  11. Photon yields from nitrogen gas and dry air excited by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagano, M; Sakaki, N; Ando, K

    2003-01-01

    In order to detect ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECR), atmospheric fluorescence light from the trajectory of the extensive air shower may be measured by mirror-photosensor systems. In this type of experiment the photon yield from electrons exciting air of various densities and temperatures is most fundamental information for estimating the primary energy of UHECR. An experiment has been undertaken using a Sr90 $\\beta$ source to study the pressure dependence of photon yields, and the life times of the excited states, for radiation in nitrogen and dry air. The photon yield between 300 nm and 406 nm in air excited by 0.85 MeV electrons is 3.734+-0.148 (+-13.2 % systematic) photons per meter at 1000 hPa and 20 $^{\\circ}$C. The air density and temperature dependence is given for application to UHECR observations.

  12. New species of ice nucleating fungi in soil and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gray D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere (1,2). Several types of PBAP have been identified as ice nuclei (IN) that can initiate the formation of ice at relatively high temperatures (3, 4). The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is due to a surface protein on the outer cell membrane that catalyses ice formation, for which the corresponding gene has been identified and detected by DNA analysis (3). Fungal spores or hyphae can also act as IN, but the biological structures responsible for their IN activity have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, properties, and effects of fungal IN in the atmosphere have neither been characterized nor quantified. Recent studies have shown that airborne fungi are highly diverse (1), and that atmospheric transport leads to efficient exchange of species among different ecosystems (5, 6). The results presented in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. 2012 (7) clearly demonstrate the presence of geographic boundaries in the global distribution of microbial taxa in air, and indicate that regional differences may be important for the effects of microorganisms on climate and public health. DNA analyses of aerosol samples collected during rain events showed higher diversity and frequency of occurrence for fungi belonging to the Sordariomycetes, than samples that were collected under dry conditions (8). Sordariomycetes is the class that comprises known ice nucleation active species (Fusarium spp.). By determination of freezing ability of fungal colonies isolated from air samples two species of ice nucleation active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators were found. By DNA-analysis they were identified as Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum. Both fungi belong to the phylum Ascomycota, produce fluorescent spores in the range of 1-4 µm in diameter, and induced freezing at -4 and

  13. Drying Characteristics and Product Quality of Lemon Slices Dried with Hot Air Circulation Oven and Hybrid Heatpump Dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hong Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, drying characteristics and product quality of Coulomb-force-assisted heatpump and oven dried lemon slices were studied. Lemon slices with 3 mm thickness each, were dried using oven and Coulomb-force-assisted-heatpump dryer with and without auxiliary heater at different drying conditions. It was found that the drying rate of the lemon slices dried by all drying methods showed only falling rate states, which indicates the drying kinetics were controlled by internal moisture diffusion. Oven drying of lemon slices at 60°C showed the highest drying rate among all, followed by oven dried slices at 50°C, Coulomb-force-heater-assisted-heatpump (CF-HT-HP dried slices at 31°C, Coulomb-force-assisted-heatpump (CF-HP dried slices at 22°C, oven dried slices at 40°C and heatpump dried slices at 22°C. The average effective moisture diffusivity value for the slices dried with these drying methods was found in the range of 16.2 to 63.8´10-4 mm2min-1. In terms of quality assessment, CF-HP dried lemon slices retained the highest amount of Vitamin C as compared to the lemon slices dried by other drying methods. However, it retained relatively lower amount of total phenolic content (TPC as compared to oven dried products. Among of all, CF-HP drying method produced dried lemon slices with the highest Vitamin C (6.74 mg AA / g dry weight whereas oven dried lemon slices at 50°C preserved most of the TPC in the dried slices, which recorded as 13.76 mg GA / g dry weight.

  14. Evaluation of background soil and air polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations on a hill at the outskirts of a metropolitan city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, S Levent; Saral, Arslan; Güneş, Gülten; Karadeniz, Aykut

    2016-07-01

    Air and soil sampling was conducted inside a forested area for 22 months. The sampling location is situated to the north of a metropolitan city. Average atmospheric gas and particle concentrations were found to be 180 and 28 pg m(-3) respectively, while that of soil phase was detected to be 3.2 ng g(-1) on dry matter, The congener pairs of PCB#4-10 had the highest contribution to each medium. TEQ concentration was 0.10 pg m(-3), 0.07 pg m(-3), 21.92 pg g(-1), for gas, particle and soil phases, respectively. PCB#126 and PCB#169 contributed to over 99% of the entire TEQ concentrations for each medium. Local sources were investigated by conditional probability function (CPF) and soil/air fugacity. Landfilling area and medical waste incinerator, located to the 8 km northeast, contributed to ambient concentrations, especially in terms of dioxin-like congeners. The industrial settlement (called Dilovasi being to the east southeast of 60 km distant) contributed from southeast direction. Further sources were identified by potential source contribution function (PSCF). Sources at close proximity had high contribution. Air mass transportation from Aliaga industrial region (being to the southwest of 300 km distant) moderately contributed to ambient concentrations. Low molecular weight congeners were released from soil body. 5-CBs and 6-CBs were close to equilibrium state between soil/air interfaces. PCB#171 was close to equilibrium and PCB#180 was likely to evaporate from soil, which constitute 7-CBs. PCB#199, representing 8-CBs deposited to soil. 9-CB (PCB#207) was in equilibrium between soil and air phases.

  15. Chemistry and Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; Zent, A. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) comprise the largest ice-free region of Antarctica. Precipitation almost always occurs as snow, relative humidity is frequently low, and mean annual temperatures are about -20 C. The ADV soils have previously been categorized into three soil moisture regimes: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous, based on elevation and climate influences. The subxerous regime is predominately a coastal zone soil, and has the highest average temperature and precipitation, while the ultraxerous regime occurs at high elevation (>1000 m) and have very low temperature and precipitation. The amounts and types of salts present in the soils vary between regions. The nature, origin and significance of salts in the ADV have been previously investigated. Substantial work has focused on soil formation in the ADVs, however, little work has focused on the mineralogy of secondary alteration phases. The dominant weathering process in the ADV region is physical weathering, however, chemical weathering has been well documented. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemistry and mineralogy, including the alteration mineralogy, of soils from two sites, a subxerous soil in Taylor Valley, and an ultraxerous soil in University Valley. The style of aqueous alteration in the ADVs may have implications for pedogenic processes on Mars.

  16. Short-term dynamics of culturable bacteria in a soil amended with biotransformed dry olive residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, J A; Pascual, J; González-Menéndez, V; Sampedro, I; García-Romera, I; Bills, G F

    2014-03-01

    Dry olive residue (DOR) transformation by wood decomposing basidiomycetes (e.g. Coriolopsis floccosa) is a possible strategy for eliminating the liabilities related to the use of olive oil industry waste as an organic soil amendment. The effects of organic fertilization with DOR on the culturable soil microbiota are largely unknown. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to measure the short-term effects of DOR and C. floccosa-transformed DOR on the culturable bacterial soil community, while at the same time documenting the bacterial diversity of an agronomic soil in the southeastern Iberian Peninsula. The control soil was compared with the same soil treated with DOR and with C. floccosa-transformed DOR for 0, 30 and 60 days. Impact was measured from total viable cells and CFU counts, as well as the isolation and characterization of 900 strains by fatty acid methyl ester profiles and 16S rRNA partial sequencing. The bacterial diversity was distributed between Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Sphingobacteria and Cytophagia. Analysis of the treatments and controls demonstrated that soil amendment with untransformed DOR produced important changes in bacterial density and diversity. However, when C. floccosa-transformed DOR was applied, bacterial proliferation was observed but bacterial diversity was less affected, and the distribution of microorganisms was more similar to the unamended soil.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Hot Air Drying Kinetics of Momordica Charantia Slices and Its Color Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presented the drying characteristics of fresh Momordica Charantia slices at different drying temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80°C and different thicknesses (0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 cm. Three mathematical models including Page, Henderson and Pabis and Wang and Singh equations were compared and discussed. The results showed that the Page model provided the best correlation capacity with the decision coefficient R2 of 0.998. The color change of Momordica Charantia slices during hot air drying at different temperatures were also studied by the measuring of color parameters such as the values of Hunter L* (whiteness/darkness, a* (redness/greenness and b* (yellowness/blueness. The total color change (ΔE of the samples was observed to increase as drying temperature increased. The results show that the color ofMomordica Charantia slices changed sharply when temperature was higher than about 70°C. The study could provide theoretical bases of the equipment design and process optimization for hot air drying of Momordica Charantia

  18. Impact of varying storm intensity and extended dry periods on grassland soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenstein, John D.; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E.; Moran, M. Susan

    2014-05-01

    Intra-annual precipitation patterns are expected to shift toward more intense storms and longer dry periods due to changes in climate within the next decades. Using MODIS satellite-derived plant growth data from 2000-2012, this study quantified the relationship between extreme precipitation patterns, annual soil moisture, and plant growth at nine grassland sites across the southern United States. Across all sites, total precipitation was strongly linked to surface soil moisture (at 5-cm depth), and in turn, soil moisture was strongly related to MODIS-based estimates of above-ground net primary production (ANPP). In fact, soil moisture was a better predictor of ANPP than was total precipitation. Results showed a fundamental difference in the response to altered precipitation patterns between mesic and semiarid grasslands. Soil moisture in mesic grasslands decreased with an increase of high-intensity storms, and semi-arid grassland soil moisture decreased with longer dry periods. This was explained in relation to general climate patterns in these two precipitation regimes. The soil moisture at mesic sites tends to reside closer to field capacity than soil moisture at semiarid sites. So, for semiarid sites, storm events of any size will impact soil moisture; whereas for mesic sites, high intensity storms result in greater runoff than low intensity storms, and less impact on soil moisture. In this field study, the length of consecutive dry days (CDD) had a significant impact on soil moisture only at semiarid sites. This was attributed to the fact that the variation in length of CDD was naturally low at mesic sites and not variable year-to-year, in contrast to the high variability of CDD at semiarid sites. For semiarid sites, long periods of CDD decreased the mean annual soil moisture regardless of the total precipitation throughout the year. Our decision to use soil moisture measured at 5-cm depth was largely based on the fact that the currently orbiting Soil Moisture

  19. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  20. A novel method for air drying aloe leaf slices by covering with filter papers as a shrink-proof layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S A; Baek, J H; Lee, S J; Choi, S Y; Hur, W; Lee, S Y

    2009-01-01

    To prevent the shrinkage of aloe vera slices during air drying, a method utilizing a shrink-proof layer was developed. The sample was configured of whole leaf aloe slices, where 1 side or both sides were covered with filter papers as shrink-proof layers. After air drying by varying the air temperature and the slice thickness, the drying characteristics, as well as several quality factors of the dried aloe vera leaf slices, were analyzed. In the simulation of the drying curves, the modified Page model showed the best fitness, representing a diffusion-controlled drying mechanism. Nonetheless, there was a trace of a constant-rate drying period in the samples dried by the method. Shrinkage was greatly reduced, and the rehydration ratios increased by approximately 50%. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that the surface structure of original fibrous form was well sustained. FT-IR characteristics showed that the dried samples could sustain aloe polysaccharide acetylation. Furthermore, the functional properties of the dried slices including water holding capacity, swelling, and fat absorption capability were improved, and polysaccharide retention levels increased by 20% to 30%. Therefore, we concluded that application of shrink-proof layers on aloe slices provides a novel way to overcome the shrinkage problems commonly found in air drying, thereby improving their functional properties with less cost. Practical Application: This research article demonstrates a novel air drying method using shrink-proof layers to prevent the shrinkage of aloe slices. We analyzed extensively the characteristics of shrinkage mechanism and physical properties of aloe flesh gels in this drying system. We concluded that this method can be a beneficial means to retain the functional properties of dried aloe, and a potential alternative to freeze drying, which is still costly.

  1. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Li-Jun, E-mail: lijunwang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Fu-Shen [School of Material Science Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chou, Kuo-Chih [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t{sub d} between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions.

  2. Reduced heat stress in offices in the tropics using solar powered drying of the supply air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsen, Lars; Santos, A M B

    2002-01-01

    Many solutions to indoor climate problems known from developed countries may have prohibitive installation and running costs in developing countries. The purpose was to develop a low-cost solution to heat stress in a hot and humid environment based on solar powered drying of supply air. Dry supply...... combinations of temperature and humidity and led to Personal Units for Ventilation and Cooling (PUVAC) in six cubicles simulating office workplaces. A total of 123 heat acclimatized subjects were exposed 45 min in each of the cubicles. A model for the combined effect of operative temperature of room, moisture...

  3. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  4. Morphological, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of dry tropical shallow reservoirs in the Southern Mexican Highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis ARREDONDO-FIGUEROA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry, sediment and soil chemical characteristics of eleven dry tropical shallow reservoirs situated in Southern Mexican Highlands were studied. The reservoirs are located at 1104 to 1183 meters above sea level in a sedimentary area. Seventeen morphometric and eight sediment and soil chemical parameters were measured. The results of the morphometric parameters showed that these reservoirs presented a soft and roughness bottom, with an ellipsoid form and a concave depression that permit the mix up of water and sediments, causing turbidity and broken thermal gradients; their slight slopes allowed the colonization of submerged macrophyte and halophyte plants and improved the incidence of sunlight on water surface increasing evaporation and primary productivity. Dry tropical shallow reservoirs have fluctuations in area, and volume according to the amount of rainfall, the effect of evaporation, temperature, lost volume for irrigation, and other causes. The sand-clay was the most important sediment texture and their values fluctuated with the flooded periods. The concentration-dilution cycle showed a direct relationship in the percentage of organic matter in the soil as well as with pH, soil nitrogen and phosphorus. El Tilzate, El Candelero and El Movil were related by the shore development and high concentrations of organic matter and nitrogen in the soil. Finally, we emphasize the importance of this study, in relation to possible future changes in morphometrical parameters as a consequence of human impact.

  5. GEMAS: Colours of dry and moist agricultural soil samples of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Martin; Fabian, Karl; Reimann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    High resolution HDR colour images of all Ap samples from the GEMAS survey were acquired using a GeoTek Linescan camera. Three measurements of dry and wet samples with increasing exposure time and increasing illumination settings produced a set of colour images at 50μm resolution. Automated image processing was used to calibrate the six images per sample with respect to the synchronously measured X-Rite colorchecker chart. The calibrated images were then fit to Munsell soil colours that were measured in the same way. The results provide overview maps of dry and moist European soil colours. Because colour is closely linked to iron mineralogy, carbonate, silicate and organic carbon content the results can be correlated to magnetic, mineralogical, and geochemical properties. In combination with the full GEMAS chemical and physical measurements, this yields a valuable data set for calibration and interpretation of visible satellite colour data with respect to chemical composition and geological background, soil moisture, and soil degradation. This data set will help to develop new methods for world-wide characterization and monitoring of agricultural soils which is essential for quantifying geologic and human impact on the critical zone environment. It furthermore enables the scientific community and governmental authorities to monitor consequences of climatic change, to plan and administrate economic and ecological land use, and to use the data set for forensic applications.

  6. Modeling evaporation processes in a saline soil from saturation to oven dry conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal, suction and osmotic gradients interact during evaporation from a salty soil. Vapor fluxes become the main water flow mechanism under very dry conditions. A coupled nonisothermal multiphase flow and a reactive transport model of a salty sand soil was developed to study such an intricate system. The model was calibrated with data from an evaporation experiment (volumetric water content, temperature and concentration. The retention curve and relative permeability functions were modified to simulate oven dry conditions. Experimental observations were satisfactorily reproduced, which suggests that the model can be used to assess the underlying processes. Results show that evaporation is controlled by heat, and limited by salinity and liquid and vapor fluxes. Below evaporation front vapor flows downwards controlled by temperature gradient and thus generates a dilution. Vapor diffusion and dilution are strongly influenced by heat boundary conditions. Gas diffusion plays a major role in the magnitude of vapor fluxes.

  7. Temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity measured in seasonally dry sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, Aura; Brevik, Eric C.; Giráldez, Juan V.; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Soil is spatially heterogeneous due to differences in parent material, climate, topography, time and management practices. The use of non-invasive and non-contact geophysical methods facilitates the exploration of natural landscapes or cropped areas. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors which measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) express soil spatial variability in terms of spatial soil ECa variability. In an agricultural context, knowledge and understanding of the soil spatial variability will allow us to delimit areas where precision agriculture techniques could be used to improve management practices. These practices enhance soil and water conservation, especially for sandy soils in Mediterranean climates where soils are dry for substantial periods of time. The first objective of this work was to apply principal component analysis (PCA) to see if a temporally stable component could be found. The second objective was to see if temporal stability information acquired from several ECa surveys could be used to better interpret results of a single survey in terms of relationships between ECa and soil water content (SWC). The experimental catchment, "La Manga", is located in SW Spain and covers 6.7 ha of a rainfed olive orchard. Soil profile samples were collected at 41 locations on a pseudo-regular grid. Samples were analyzed in the laboratory for soil texture, stone content, and bulk density (ρb). The catchment was sampled for gravimetric SWC at the 0-0.1 and 0.1-0.2 m depth intervals at the same 41 locations on 18 occasions. At the same 41 locations ECa was measured during 9 of the 18 SWC surveys using a DUALEM-21S EMI sensor. In addition, 7 field-wide ECa surveys were conducted. Soil ECa values were used to delimit three areas in the orchard, based on the spatial distribution of the first principal component (PC), which represented the spatial ECa pattern. Soil properties were studied within each area, and using analysis of variance

  8. Electro-Hydrodynamics and Kinetic Modeling of Dry and Humid Air Flows Activated by Corona Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Sarrette, J.; Eichwald, O.; Marchal, F.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work is devoted to the 2D simulation of a point-to-plane Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) powered by a DC high voltage supply. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The study compares the results obtained in dry air and in air mixed with a small amount of water vapour (humid air). The simulation involves the electro-dynamics, chemical kinetics and neutral gas hydrodynamics phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge lasts about one hundred of a nanosecond while the post-discharge occurring between two successive discharges lasts one hundred of a microsecond. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral dry or humid air flow initially polluted with 400 ppm of NO. After 5 ms, the time corresponding to the occurrence of 50 successive discharge/post-discharge phases, a higher NO removal rate and a lower ozone production rate are found in humid air. This change is due to the presence of the HO2 species formed from the H primary radical in the discharge zone.

  9. Electro-Hydrodynamics and Kinetic Modeling of Dry and Humid Air Flows Activated by Corona Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.SARRETTE; O.EICHWALD; F.MARCHAL; O.DUCASSE; M.YOUSFI

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the 2D simulation of a point-to-plane Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) powered by a DC high voltage supply.The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz.The study compares the results obtained in dry air and in air mixed with a small amount of water vapour (humid air).The simulation involves the electro-dynamics,chemical kinetics and neutral gas hydrodynamics phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation.Each discharge lasts about one hundred of a nanosecond while the post-discharge occurring between two successive discharges lasts one hundred of a microsecond.The ACDR is crossed by a lateral dry or humid air flow initially polluted with 400 ppm of NO.After 5 ms,the time corresponding to the occurrence of 50 successive discharge/post-discharge phases,a higher NO removal rate and a lower ozone production rate are found in humid air.This change is due to the presence of the HO2 species formed from the H primary radical in the discharge zone.

  10. Study on Longitudinal Gas Permeability of Air-dried Masson Pine Sapwood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhuqiang; ZHANG Lifei; GUAN Ning; CHEN Guihua

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of the longitudinal gas permeability was made for air-dried sapwood specimens from Masson pine(Pinus massoniana).Results showed that air-dried Masson pine sapwood was one of the most permeable softwoods.The investigated specimens had an average longitudinal gas permeability of 4.60 ×10-13m3/m.and the permeability ranged from 1.06×10-13 to 1.12 ×10-12m3/m.The Kruskal-Wallis Test indicated that,generally,there was no correlation between the longitudinal gas permeability and the trees from which specimens were prepared,and tree height had no significant effect on the longitudinal gas permeability.

  11. [Possible mechanisms of aftereffects of GSM electromagnetic radiation on air-dry seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, T V; Veselovskiĭ, V A

    2012-01-01

    Some physical treatments, such as microwave- and gamma-radiation and magnetic field, induce long-term transition of air-dry seeds from the fraction of strong seeds into the weak seed fraction, due to non-enzymatic hydrolysis ofbiomacromolecules. These physical factors make water molecules more active, which is followed by the release of water molecules from the hydration layer, disturbance of this layer structure, further activation of water molecules by means of the "domino effect," and accumulation of hydrolysis products.

  12. Soil emissions of nitric oxide in a seasonally dry tropical forest of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Riley, Ralph; Matson, Pamela A.; Garcia-Mendez, Georgina; Maass, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Soil emissions of NO were measured at the Chamela Biological Station, Mexico, using soil covers and a field apparatus of NO detection based on CrO3 conversion of NO to NO2 and detection of NO2 by chemiluminescence with Luminol. Mean NO fluxes from forest soils ranged from 0.14 to 0.52 ng NO-N/sq cm/hr during the dry season and from 0.73 to 1.27 ng NO-N/sq cm/hr during the wet season. A fertilized floodplain pasture exhibited higher fluxes, but an unfertilized upland pasture, which represents the fastest growing land use in the region, had flux rates similar to the forest sites. Wetting experiments at the end of the dry season caused large pulses of NO flux, equaling 10 percent to 20 percent of the estimated annual NO emissions of 0.5-1.0 kg N/ha from the forest sites. Absence of a forest canopy during the dry season and the first wet season rain probably results in substantial NO(x) export from the forest system that may be important to regional atmospheric chemical processes. Wetting experiments during the wet season and a natural rain event had little or no stimulatory effect on NO flux rates.

  13. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  14. Modeling evaporation processes in a saline soil from saturation to oven dry conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal, suction and osmotic gradients interact during evaporation from a salty soil. Vapor fluxes become the main water flow mechanism under very dry conditions. A coupled nonisothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport model was developed to study mass and energy transfer mechanisms during an evaporation experiment from a sand column. Very dry and hot conditions, including the formation of a salt crust, necessitate the modification of the retention curve to represent oven dry conditions. Experimental observations (volumetric water content, temperature and concentration profiles were satisfactorily reproduced using mostly independently measured parameters, which suggests that the model can be used to assess the underlying processes. Results show that evaporation concentrates at a very narrow front and is controlled by heat flow, and limited by salinity and liquid and vapor fluxes. The front divides the soil into a dry and saline portion above and a moist and diluted portion below. Vapor diffusses not only upwards but also downwards from the evaporation front, as dictated by temperature gradients. Condensation of this downward flux causes dilution, so that salt concentration is minimum and lower than the initial one, just beneath the evaporation front. While this result is consistent with observations, it required adopting a vapor diffusion enhancement factor of 8.

  15. Heavy metal speciation and risk assessment in dry land and paddy soils near mining areas at Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Erxi; Hou, Jing; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soils has been a long-standing environmental problem in many parts of the world, and poses enormous threats to ecosystem and human health. Speciation of heavy metals in soils is crucial to assessing environmental risks from contaminated soils. In this study, total concentrations and speciation of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were measured for agricultural soils near mines along the Diaojiang River in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomy Region, China. The sources of heavy metals in soils also were identified to assess their effect on speciation distribution of soil heavy metals. Furthermore, the speciation distribution of Cd and Zn, main soil heavy metal pollutants, in dry land and paddy soils were compared. Results showed that there were two severely polluted regions near mine area reaching alarming pollution level. As, Cd, Pb, and Zn were more affected by mining activities, showing very strong pollution level in soils. The mean percentage of exchangeable and carbonate fraction was highest and up to 46.8 % for Cd, indicating a high environmental risk. Greater bioavailable fractions of As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn were found in soils heavily polluted by mining activities, whereas Cr and Ni as geogenic elements in the stable residual fraction. In addition, in the dry land soils, reducible fraction proportion of Cd was higher than that in the paddy soils, whereas exchangeable and carbonate fraction of Cd was lower than that in the paddy soils. Oxidizable fraction of Zn was higher in the paddy soils than that in the dry land soils. The results indicate that the sources of soil heavy metals and land types affect heavy metal speciation in the soil and are significant for environmental risk assessment of soil heavy metal pollutions.

  16. Regional Simulation of Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics for Dry Farmland in East China by Coupling a 1:500 000 Soil Database with the Century Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shi-Hang; SHI Xue-Zheng; ZHAO Yong-Cun; D.C.WEINDORF; YU Dong-Sheng; XU Sheng-Xiang; TAN Man-Zhi; SUN Wei-Xia

    2011-01-01

    Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) in agricultural soils influence soil quality and greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. Dry farmland covers more than 70% of the whole cropland area in China and plays an important role in mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In this study, 4 109 dry farmland soil polygons were extracted using spatial overlay analysis of the soil layer (1:500 000) and the land use layer (1:500 000) to support Century model simulations of SOC dynamics for dry farmland in Anhui Province, East China from 1980 to 2008. Considering two field-validation sites,the Century model performed relatively well in modeling SOC dynamics for dry farmland in the province. The simulated results showed that the area-weighted mean soil organic carbon density (SOCD) of dry farmland increased from 18.77 Mg C ha-1 in 1980 to 23.99 Mg C ha-1 in 2008 with an average sequestration rate of 0.18 Mg C ha-1 year-1. Approximately 94.9% of the total dry farmland area sequestered carbon while 5.1% had carbon lost. Over the past 29 years, the net SOC gain in dry farmland soils of the province was 19.37 Tg, with an average sequestration rate of 0.67 Tg C year-1 Augmentation of SOC was primarily due to increased consumption of nitrogen fertilizer and farmyard manure. Moreover,SOC dynamics were highly differentiated among dry farmland soil groups. The integration of the Century model with a fine-scale soil database approach could be conveniently utilized as a tool for the accurate simulation of SOC dynamics at the regional scale.

  17. Suspension and resuspension of dry soil indoors following track-in on footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew; Johnson, David L

    2012-06-01

    Contamination of the indoor environment by tracked-in outdoor soil has the potential to pose a significant human health threat through exposure to hazardous soil constituents. The indoor distribution of (contaminated) soil following ingress is important when evaluating exposure risk. Here, the time evolution of size-resolved airborne particulate matter aerosolized as a result of mechanical (i.e., footfall or step-on) impacts on a floor surface with a layer of dry soil was investigated using laser particle counters. Suspended particle levels were recorded after step-on impacts that aerosolized soil particles at a single contact point by the action of a human tester who followed a pre-determined walking pattern. The experimental design presumed that the floor area immediately upon entrance indoors is the location of maximum deposition of outdoor soil transferred on footwear. The suspension of soil resulting from the first step-on floor contact and the subsequent resuspension of soil resulting from additional step-on events were quantified by various arrangements of four laser particle counters. Step-on impacts produced a transient increase in particle levels at various lateral distances and heights from the contact point. Also, with increasing distance and height from the step-on contact point, the level of suspended particles after successive step-on events decreased markedly. The results suggested that a lateral component of the dispersion process was more significant than a vertical one under these experimental conditions. A wall jet effect created by the impact of the footfalls on the floor surface was considered responsible for the apparent greater lateral dispersion of the soil particles.

  18. Relating trends in land surface-air temperature difference to soil moisture and evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Karen; Taylor, Chris; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Ghent, Darren; Harris, Phil; Remedios, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is central to both physical and biogeochemical processes within the Earth System. Drying of soils leads to evapotranspiration (ET) becoming limited or "water-stressed" and is accompanied by rises in land surface temperature (LST), land surface-air temperature difference (delta T), and sensible heat flux. Climate models predict sizable changes to the global water cycle but there is variation between models in the time scale of ET decay during dry spells. The e-stress project is developing novel satellite-derived diagnostics to assess the ability of Earth System Models (ESMs) to capture behaviour that is due to soil moisture controls on ET. Satellite records of LST now extend 15 years or more. MODIS Terra LST is available from 2000 to the present and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) LST record runs from 1995 to 2012. This paper presents results from an investigation into the variability and trends in delta T during the MODIS Terra mission. We use MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua LST and ESA GlobTemperature ATSR LST with 2m air temperatures from reanalyses to calculate trends in delta T and "water-stressed" area. We investigate the variability of delta T in relation to soil moisture (ESA CCI Passive Daily Soil Moisture), vegetation (MODIS Monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and precipitation (TRMM Multi-satellite Monthly Precipitation) and compare the temporal and spatial variability of delta T with model evaporation data (GLEAM). Delta T anomalies show significant negative correlations with soil moisture, in different seasons, in several regions across the planet. Global mean delta T anomaly is small (magnitude mostly less than 0.2 K) between July 2002 and July 2008 and decreases to a minimum in early 2010. The reduction in delta T anomaly coincides with an increase in soil moisture anomaly and NDVI anomaly suggesting an increase in evapotranspiration and latent heat flux with reduced sensible heat flux. In conclusion there have been

  19. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization.

  20. Changes in viscoelastic properties of longan during hot-air drying in relation to its indentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatuphong Varith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in viscoelastic properties are related to the indentation of whole longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour. in the drying process. The objective of this research is to determine parameters from a creep test to characterise the viscoelastic properties of on-progress dried longan. During 65C hot-air drying, the whole longan was sampled every 2 hours to perform the creep test with a constant stress of 44 kPa using a texture analyser. Viscoelastic properties, viz. retardation time (ret, instantaneous compliance (J0, retarded compliance (J1, creep compliance (J, Newtonian viscosity (0, and modulus of elasticity (E were analysed using the four-element Burger’s model. The ret and E decreased linearly as the moisture content decreased from approximately 70% to 64-57%, then they linearly increased as the moisture content further decreased to 11%. The J and J1 increased linearly and then decreased linearly as the moisture content decreased, showing the transition moisture content of 64%. The J0 decreased as the moisture content decreased. There was no marked change in , thus it was not involved in the indentation of dried longan. The moisture content of 64-57% was found to be the critical range leading to the indentation of longan during the drying process.

  1. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - I: Air pollution and deposition in a desert environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations and atmospheric dry deposition were monitored seasonally at the Salton Sea, southern California. Measurements of ozone (O 3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) were performed using passive samplers. Deposition rates of NO 3-, NH4+, Cl-, SO 42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ to creosote bush branches and nylon filters as surrogate surfaces were determined for one-week long exposure periods. Maximum O3 values were recorded in spring with 24-h average values of 108.8 ??g m-3. Concentrations of NO and NO2 were low and within ranges of the non-urban areas in California (0.4-5.6 and 3.3-16.2 ??g m-3 ranges, respectively). Concentrations of HNO3 (2.0-6.7 ??g m-3) and NH 3 (6.4-15.7 ??g m-3) were elevated and above the levels typical for remote locations in California. Deposition rates of Cl-, SO42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ were related to the influence of sea spray or to suspended soil particles, and no strong enrichments caused by ions originated by human activities were detected. Dry deposition rates of NO3- and NH4+ were similar to values registered in areas where symptoms of nitrogen saturation and changes in species composition have been described. Deposition of nitrogenous compounds might be contributing to eutrophication processes at the Salton Sea. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Air Temperature and Pretreatment Solutions on Drying Time, Energy Consumption and Organoleptic Properties of Sour Cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Gazor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pretreatment solution (no treatment, boiling water, salty boiling water, ethil oleat on drying time of sour cherry were studied experimentally. The thin layer drying of sour cherries was carried out at three air temperatures of 50, 60, 70°C and with constant airflow velocity of 1 m/s. Drying kinetic, energy consumption and organoleptic properties as taste, visual color and texture were evaluated in dried fruits. Results of experiments showed that pretreatment solutions and air temperatures had significant effect on drying time and organoleptic properties of dried sour cherry. Using of pretreatment solution is necessary before drying process. It reduced drying time up to 80% and energy saving was approximately 83% in comparison with no treatment samples. Results of this research indicated that using of salty boiling water as pretreatment and temperature of 50°C in sour cherry drying process cause the best result in drying time and organoleptic evaluation such as taste quality, visual color and texture suitability of dried fruit. In addition, energy consumption for drying reduced noticeably when sour cherry was pretreated with salty boiling water.

  3. Influence of Air Temperature and Pretreatment Solutions on Drying Time, Energy Consumption and Organoleptic Properties of Sour Cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Gazor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pretreatment solution (no treatment, boiling water, salty boiling water, ethil oleat on drying time of sour cherry were studied experimentally. The thin layer drying of sour cherries was carried out at three air temperatures of 50, 60, 70°C and with constant airflow velocity of 1 m/s. Drying kinetic, energy consumption and organoleptic properties as taste, visual color and texture were evaluated in dried fruits. Results of experiments showed that pretreatment solutions and air temperatures had significant effect on drying time and organoleptic properties of dried sour cherry. Using of pretreatment solution is necessary before drying process. It reduced drying time up to 80% and energy saving was approximately 83% in comparison with no treatment samples. Results of this research indicated that using of salty boiling water as pretreatment and temperature of 50°C in sour cherry drying process cause the best result in drying time and organoleptic evaluation such as taste quality, visual color and texture suitability of dried fruit. In addition, energy consumption for drying reduced noticeably when sour cherry was pretreated with salty boiling water.

  4. Differences between soybean genotypes in physiological response to sequential soil drying and rewetting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md; Mokter; Hossain; Xueyi; Liu; Xusheng; Qi; Hon-Ming; Lam; Jianhua; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Soybean genotypes show diverse physiological responses to drought, but specific physiological traits that can be used to evaluate drought tolerance have not been identified. In the present study we investigated physiological traits of soybean genotypes under progressive soil drying and rewetting, using a treatment mimicking field conditions.After a preliminary study with eight soybean genotypes, two drought-tolerant genotypes and one susceptible genotype were grown in the greenhouse and subjected to water restriction. Leaf expansion rate, gas exchange, water relation parameters, total chlorophyll(Chl), proline contents of leaves, and root xylem p H were monitored in a time course, and plant growth and root traits were measured at the end of the stress cycle. Drought-tolerant genotypes maintained higher leaf expansion rate, net photosynthetic rate(Pn), Chl content,instantaneous water use efficiency(WUEi), % relative water content(RWC), water potential(ψw), and turgor potential(ψp) during progressive soil drying and subsequent rewetting than the susceptible genotypes. By contrast, stomatal conductance(gs) and transpiration rate(Tr)of tolerant genotypes declined faster owing to dehydration and recovered more sharply after rehydration than the same parameters in susceptible ones. Water stress caused a significant increase in leaf proline level and root xylem sap p H of both genotypes but tolerant genotypes recovered to pre-stress levels more quickly after rehydration. Tolerant genotypes also produced longer roots with higher dry mass than susceptible genotypes. We conclude that rapid perception and adjustment in response to soil drying and rewetting as well as the maintenance of relatively high Pn, %RWC, and root growth constitute the mechanisms by which drought-tolerant soybean genotypes cope with water stress.

  5. Numerical-analytical investigation into impact pipe driving in soil with dry friction. Part I: Nondeformable external medium

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrova, Nadezhda

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on propagation of longitudinal waves in an elastic pipe partly embedded in a medium with dry friction. Mathematical formulation of the problem on the impact pipe driving into the soil is based on the model of longitudinal vibration of an elastic rod with taking into account lateral resistance. The lateral resistance of soil is described by the law of the contact dry friction. Numerical and analytical solutions to problems on longitudinal impulse loading of a pipe are compared.

  6. [Effects of mulching and fertilization on winter wheat field soil moisture in dry highland region of Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Zi-Hui; Chen, Hui-Lin; Wang, Zhao-Hui

    2009-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted in a winter wheat field in Weibei dry highland region of Loess Plateau to study the effects of different mulching and fertilization treatments on soil moisture regime. The treatments were 1) no fertilization, 2) conventional fertilization, 3) recommended fertilization, 4) recommended fertilization + manure, 5) recommended fertilization + plastic mulch on soil ridges, 6) recommended fertilization + plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows, and 7) recommended fertilization + straw mulch on entire plot. Soil moisture content was determined regularly with a neutron probe. Among the treatments, recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows in dry season (spring) resulted in the greatest increase of soil water storage and maintained the storage to the critical stage crops needed, followed by recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges. These two treatments could store more precipitation in field, and would benefit the development of rainfed agriculture in dry highland region of Loess Plateau. As for recommended fertilization plus manure, it had the least increase of soil water storage, with a difference of 48.2 mm to the recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows in dry season.

  7. Episodic soil succession on basaltic lava fields in a cool, dry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, K.L.; McDaniel, P.A.; Phillips, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Holocene- to late Pleistocene-aged lava flows at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve provide an ideal setting to examine the early stages of soil formation under cool, dry conditions. Transects were used to characterize the amount and nature of soil cover on across basaltic lava flows ranging in age from 2.1 to 18.4 ka. Results indicate that on flows soils (Folists in Soil Taxonomy) are the dominant soil type, providing an areal coverage of up to ∼25%. On flows ≥13.9 ka, deeper mineral soils including Entisols, Aridisols, and Mollisols become dominant and the areal extent increases to ≥95% on flows older than 18.4 ka. These data suggest there are two distinct pedogenic pathways associated with lava flows of the region. The first pathway is illustrated by the younger flows, where Folists dominate. In the absence of a major source of loess, relatively little mineral material accumulates and soils provide only minor coverage of the lava flows. Our results indicate that this pathway of soil development has not changed appreciably over the past ∼10 ka. The second pedogenic pathway is illustrated by the flows older than 13.9 ka. These flows have been subject to deposition of large quantities of loess during and after the last regional glaciation, resulting in almost complete coverage. Subsequent pedogenesis has given rise to Aridisols and Mollisols with calcic and cambic horizons and mollic epipedons. This research highlights the importance of regional climate change on the evolution of Craters of the Moon soilscapes.

  8. Nitrate Accumulation in Soil Profile of Dry Land Farming in Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jun; HAO Ming-De; SHAO Ming-An

    2003-01-01

    A long-term fertilizer experiment on dry land of the Loess Plateau, northwest China, has been conducted since 1984 to study the distribution and accumulation of NO3-N down to a depth of 400 cm in the profile of a coarse-textured dark loessial soil after continuous winter wheat cropping. Thirteen fertilizer treatments consisted of four levels of N and P applied alone or in combination. Annual N and P (P2O5) rates were 0,45, 90, 135 and 180 kg ha-1. After 15 successive cropping cycles, the soil samples were taken from each treatment for analysis of NO3-N concentration. The results showed that NO3-N distribution in the soil profile was quite different among the treatments. The application of fertilizer N alone resulted in higher NO3-N concentration in the soil profile than the combined application of N and P, showing that application of P could greatly reduce the NO3-N accumulation. With an annual application of 180 kg N ha-1 alone, a peak in NO3-N accumulation occurred at 140 cm soil depth, and the maximum NO3-N concentration in the soils was 67.92 mg kg-1. The amount of NO3-N accumulated in the soil profile decreased as the cumulative N uptake by the winter wheat increased. Application of a large amount of N resulted in lower N recoveries in winter wheat and greater NO3-N accumulation in soil profile. NO3-N did not enter underground water in the study region; therefore, there is no danger of underground water pollution. Amount of NO3-N accumulation can be predicted by an equation according to annual N and P rates based on the results of this experiment.

  9. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  10. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  11. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Knappová

    Full Text Available The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood.The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities.The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data indicate that changes

  12. Startup of air-cooled condensers and dry cooling towers at low temperatures of the cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Shifrin, B. A.; Yankov, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of startup and performance of air-cooled condensers (ACC) and dry cooling towers (DCT) at low cooling air temperatures are considered. Effects of the startup of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures are described. Different options of the ACC heating up are analyzed, and examples of existing technologies are presented (electric heating, heating up with hot air or steam, and internal and external heating). The use of additional heat exchanging sections, steam tracers, in the DCT design is described. The need for high power in cases of electric heating and heating up with hot air is noted. An experimental stand for research and testing of the ACC startup at low temperatures is described. The design of the three-pass ACC unit is given, and its advantages over classical single-pass design at low temperatures are listed. The formation of ice plugs inside the heat exchanging tubes during the start-up of ACC and DCT at low cooling air temperatures is analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of the steam flow rate, steam nozzle distance from the heat-exchange surface, and their orientation in space on the metal temperature were collected, and test results are analyzed. It is noted that the surface temperature at the end of the heat up is almost independent from its initial temperature. Recommendations for the safe start-up of ACCs and DCTs are given. The heating flow necessary to sufficiently heat up heat-exchange surfaces of ACCs and DCTs for the safe startup is estimated. The technology and the process of the heat up of the ACC with the heating steam external supply are described by the example of the startup of the full-scale section of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures of the cooling air, and the advantages of the proposed start-up technology are confirmed.

  13. Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Dependence on Entrained Dry Air Sources and Probability Density Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.; Niu, S.; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In situ aircraft cumulus observations from the RACORO field campaign are used to estimate entrainment rate for individual clouds using a recently developed mixing fraction approach. The entrainment rate is computed based on the observed state of the cloud core and the state of the air that is laterally mixed into the cloud at its edge. The computed entrainment rate decreases when the air is entrained from increasing distance from the cloud core edge; this is because the air farther away from cloud edge is drier than the neighboring air that is within the humid shells around cumulus clouds. Probability density functions of entrainment rate are well fitted by lognormal distributions at different heights above cloud base for different dry air sources (i.e., different source distances from the cloud core edge). Such lognormal distribution functions are appropriate for inclusion into future entrainment rate parameterization in large scale models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that probability density functions of entrainment rate have been obtained in shallow cumulus clouds based on in situ observations. The reason for the wide spread of entrainment rate is that the observed clouds are affected by entrainment mixing processes to different extents, which is verified by the relationships between the entrainment rate and cloud microphysics/dynamics. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentration due to the dilution and evaporation in entrainment mixing processes. The entrainment rate is positively correlated with relative dispersion (i.e., ratio of standard deviation to mean value) of liquid water content and droplet size distributions, consistent with the theoretical expectation that entrainment mixing processes are responsible for microphysics fluctuations and spectral broadening. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with vertical velocity and dissipation rate because entrainment

  14. Complex sources of air-soil-water pollution processes in the Miyun reservoir region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Dongzhen; XU; Xiangde; LIU; Xiaoduan; XU; Qing; DING

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive impact of atmospheric dry deposition and wet deposition and the pollution sources of farmlands, mining areas, and towns along the Baihe River on the water quality of Miyun reservoir is investigated from the angle of the complex sources of air-soil-water pollution processes, in the context of the 1990-2001 precipitation chemical data at Shangdianzi station--a WMO regional background air pollution monitoring station 15 km far from the Miyun reservoir, in conjunction with the atmospheric dry deposition and wet deposition data of the 2002-2003 Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Field Experiment (BECAPEX). Analysis results suggest that the major ions in precipitation in the Miyun reservoir region in this period were SO, NO, NH and Ca2+; wet acid deposition quantity of Miyun reservoir in the summer half year (April to September) was greater than the quantity in the winter half year (October to March), and the annual wet acid deposition in the reservoir exhibited a rising trend with the mean 1038.45 t, the maximum 1766.31 t occurred in 1996, and the minimum 604.02 t in 1994; the long-term averaged pH of atmospheric precipitation in the Miyun reservoir region was 5.20, i.e. weakly acidic, and the interannual variation of pH values displayed a falling trend. pH values of water body at various depths in the Miyun reservoir were all greater than 7.0, but they exhibited vertical and horizontal nonhomogeneity, and at the same region pH decreased vertically with depth; the 2002 and 2003 annual dustfalls in the Miyun reservoir were 13513.08 t and 3577.64 t, respectively, and the spring dustfall was the number one in a year, accounting for the 61.91% and 44.56% of the annual totals of 2002 and 2003, respectively. Because the atmospheric dry deposition and wet depositions contain multiple types heavy metal elements and harmful elements, they to some extent exacerbated the eutrophication, acidification and potential heavy metal pollution of the reservoir water

  15. Thermoelectric Air/Soil Energy-Harvesting Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Lawrence, Eric

    2005-01-01

    A proposed thermoelectric device would exploit natural temperature differences between air and soil to harvest small amounts of electric energy. Because the air/soil temperature difference fluctuates between nighttime and daytime, it is almost never zero, and so there is almost always some energy available for harvesting. Unlike photovoltaic cells, the proposed device could operate in the absence of sunlight. Unlike a Stirling engine, which could be designed to extract energy from the air/soil temperature difference, the proposed device would contain no moving parts. The main attractive feature of the proposed device would be high reliability. In a typical application, this device would be used for low-power charging of a battery that would, in turn, supply high power at brief, infrequent intervals for operating an instrumentation package containing sensors and communication circuits. The device (see figure) would include a heat exchanger buried in soil and connected to a heat pipe extending up to a short distance above the ground surface. A thermoelectric microgenerator (TEMG) would be mounted on top of the heat pipe. The TEMG could be of an advanced type, now under development, that could maintain high (relative to prior thermoelectric generators) power densities at small temperature differentials. A heat exchanger exposed to the air would be mounted on top of the TEMG. It would not matter whether the air was warmer than the soil or the soil warmer than the air: as long as there was a nonzero temperature difference, heat would flow through the device and electricity would be generated. A study of factors that could affect the design and operation of the device has been performed. These factors include the thermal conductances of the soil, the components of the device, the contacts between the components of the device, and the interfaces between the heat exchangers and their environments. The study included experiments that were performed on a model of the device

  16. Forest structure, diversity and soil properties in a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Nirmal Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Structure, species composition, and soil properties of a dry tropical forest in Rajasthan Western India, were examined by establishment of 25 plots. The forest was characterized by a relatively low canopy and a large number of small-diameter trees. Mean canopy height for this forest was 10 m and stands contained an average of 995 stems ha-1 (= 3.0 cm DBH; 52% of those stems were smaller than 10 cm DBH. The total basal area was 46.35 m2ha-1, of which Tectona grandis L. contributed 48%. The forest showed high species diversity of trees. 50 tree species (= 3.0 cm DBH from 29 families were identified in the 25 sampling plots. T. grandis (20.81% and Butea monosperma (9% were the dominant and subdominant species in terms of importance value. The mean tree species diversity indices for the plots were 1.08 for Shannon diversity index (H´, 0.71 for equitability index (J´ and 5.57 for species richness index (S´, all of which strongly declined with the increase of importance value of the dominant, T. grandis. Measures of soil nutrients indicated low fertility, extreme heterogeneity. Regression analysis showed that stem density and the dominant tree height were significantly correlated with soil pH. There was a significant positive relationship between species diversity index and soil available P, exchangeable K+, Ca2+ (all p values < 0.001 and a negative relationship with N, C, C:N and C:P ratio. The results suggest that soil properties are major factors influencing forest composition and structure within the dry tropical forest in Rajasthan.

  17. Occurrence and quantitative microbial risk assessment of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in soil and air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paola Balderrama-Carmona

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Soil and air inhalation and/or ingestion are important vehicles for these parasites. To our knowledge, the results obtained in the present study represent the first QMRAs for cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis due to soil and air inhalation/ingestion in Mexico. In addition, this is the first evidence of the microbial air quality around these parasites in rural zones.

  18. Microbial diversity of a Mediterranean soil and its changes after biotransformed dry olive residue amendment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Siles

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin has been identified as a biodiversity hotspot, about whose soil microbial diversity little is known. Intensive land use and aggressive management practices are degrading the soil, with a consequent loss of fertility. The use of organic amendments such as dry olive residue (DOR, a waste produced by a two-phase olive-oil extraction system, has been proposed as an effective way to improve soil properties. However, before its application to soil, DOR needs a pre-treatment, such as by a ligninolytic fungal transformation, e.g. Coriolopsis floccosa. The present study aimed to describe the bacterial and fungal diversity in a Mediterranean soil and to assess the impact of raw DOR (DOR and C. floccosa-transformed DOR (CORDOR on function and phylogeny of soil microbial communities after 0, 30 and 60 days. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that bacterial diversity was dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, while 28S-rRNA gene data revealed that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota accounted for the majority of phyla in the fungal community. A Biolog EcoPlate experiment showed that DOR and CORDOR amendments decreased functional diversity and altered microbial functional structures. These changes in soil functionality occurred in parallel with those in phylogenetic bacterial and fungal community structures. Some bacterial and fungal groups increased while others decreased depending on the relative abundance of beneficial and toxic substances incorporated with each amendment. In general, DOR was observed to be more disruptive than CORDOR.

  19. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai;

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... region-water retention curve increased with increasing biochar rates....

  20. Field controlled experiments of mercury accumulation in crops from air and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Zhenchuan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Xiaoshan, E-mail: zhangxsh@rcees.ac.cn [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Wang Zhangwei, E-mail: wangzhw@rcees.ac.cn [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Ci Zhijia [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Field open top chambers (OTCs) and soil mercury (Hg) enriched experiments were employed to study the influence of Hg concentrations in air and soil on the Hg accumulation in the organs of maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Results showed that Hg concentrations in foliages were correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with air Hg concentrations but insignificantly correlated with soil Hg concentrations, indicating that Hg in crop foliages was mainly from air. Hg concentrations in roots were generally correlated with soil Hg concentrations (p < 0.05) but insignificantly correlated with air Hg concentrations, indicating that Hg in crop roots was mainly from soil. No significant correlations were found between Hg concentrations in stems and those in air and soil. However, Hg concentrations in upper stems were usually higher than those in bottom stems, implying air Hg might have stronger influence than soil Hg on stem Hg accumulation. - Highlights: > Hg accumulation in crop organs was studied by OTCs and soil Hg enriched experiments. > Hg accumulation in foliages and roots was mainly from air and soil, respectively. > Air Hg had stronger influence than soil Hg on stem Hg accumulation. > Foliar Hg concentrations showed the trend of increase over growth stages. - Capsule Mercury accumulated in the aboveground organs of crop was mainly from the air.

  1. Comparative study of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying and isothermal heat treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Amdadul; Aldred, Peter; Chen, Jie; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-11-15

    The extent and nature of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying environments was measured and analysed using single droplet drying. A custom-built, single droplet drying instrument was used for this purpose. Single droplets having 5±0.1μl volume (initial droplet diameter 1.5±0.1mm) containing 10% (w/v) WPI were dried at air temperatures of 45, 65 and 80°C for 600s at constant air velocity of 0.5m/s. The extent and nature of denaturation of WPI in isothermal heat treatment processes was measured at 65 and 80°C for 600s and compared with those obtained from convective air drying. The extent of denaturation of WPI in a high hydrostatic pressure environment (600MPa for 600s) was also determined. The results showed that at the end of 600s of convective drying at 65°C the denaturation of WPI was 68.3%, while it was only 10.8% during isothermal heat treatment at the same medium temperature. When the medium temperature was maintained at 80°C, the denaturation loss of WPI was 90.0% and 68.7% during isothermal heat treatment and convective drying, respectively. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction of WPI was found to be more stable in the convective drying conditions than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, especially at longer drying times. The extent of denaturation of WPI in convective air drying (65 and 80°C) and isotheral heat treatment (80°C) for 600s was found to be higher than its denaturation in a high hydrostatic pressure environment at ambient temperature (600MPa for 600s).

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF COAL DRY BENEFICIATION WITH AIR-DENSE MEDIUM FLUIDIZED BED IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingru Chen; Lubin Wei

    2005-01-01

    In China more than two-thirds of available coal reserves are in arid areas, where, to beneficiate the run-of-mine coal,there is not enough water resource required by conventional processing. Developing efficient dry beneficiation technology is of great significance for efficient coal utilization in China, notably the clean coal technology (CCT). The dry coal beneficiation technology with air-dense medium fluidized bed utilizes air-solid suspension as beneficiating medium whose density is consistent for beneficiation, similar in principle to the wet dense medium beneficiation using liquid-solid suspension as separating medium. The heavy portion in feedstock whose density is higher than the density of the fluidized bed will sink, whereas the lighter portion will float, thus stratifying the feed materials according to their density.In order to obtain efficient dry separation in air-dense medium fluidized bed, stable fluidization with well dispersed micro-bubbles must be achieved to ensure low viscosity and high fluidity. The pure buoyancy of beneficiation materials plays a main role in fluidized bed, and the displaced distribution effect should be restrained. The displaced distribution effects include viscosity displaced distribution effect and movement displaced distribution effect. The former is caused by viscosity of the fluidized bed. It decreases with increasing air flow velocity. Movement displaced distribution effect will be large when air flow rate is too low or too high. If medium particle size distribution and air flow are well controlled, both displaced distribution effects could be controlled effectively. A beneficiation displaced distribution model may be used to optimize beneficiation of feedstock with a wide particle size distribution and multiple components in the fluidized bed. The rheological characteristics of fluidized beds were studied using the falling sphere method. Experimental results indicated that the fluidized bed behaves as a Bingham fluid

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF COAL DRY BENEFICIATION WITH AIR-DENSE MEDIUM FLUIDIZED BED IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingru; Chen; Lubin; Wei

    2005-01-01

    In China more than two-thirds of available coal reserves are in arid areas, where, to beneficiate the run-of-mine coal,there is not enough water resource required by conventional processing. Developing efficient dry beneficiation technology is of great significance for efficient coal utilization in China, notably the clean coal technology (CCT). The dry coal beneficiation technology with air-dense medium fluidized bed utilizes air-solid suspension as beneficiating medium whose density is consistent for beneficiation, similar in principle to the wet dense medium beneficiation using liquid-solid suspension as separating medium. The heavy portion in feedstock whose density is higher than the density of the fluidized bed will sink, whereas the lighter portion will float, thus stratifying the feed materials according to their density.In order to obtain efficient dry separation in air-dense medium fluidized bed, stable fluidization with well dispersed micro-bubbles must be achieved to ensure low viscosity and high fluidity. The pure buoyancy of beneficiation materials plays a main role in fluidized bed, and the displaced distribution effect should be restrained. The displaced distribution effects include viscosity displaced distribution effect and movement displaced distribution effect. The former is caused by viscosity of the fluidized bed. It decreases with increasing air flow velocity. Movement displaced distribution effect will be large when air flow rate is too low or too high. If medium particle size distribution and air flow are well controlled, both displaced distribution effects could be controlled effectively. A beneficiation displaced distribution model may be used to optimize beneficiation of feedstock with a wide particle size distribution and multiple components in the fluidized bed. The rheological characteristics of fluidized beds were studied using the falling sphere method. Experimental results indicated that the fluidized bed behaves as a Bingham fluid

  4. Determination of soil conservation effects on shadow price of soil quality in dry-farmed wheat in Iran (a case study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S S; Ghorbani, M; Ghahremanzadeh, M

    2008-02-01

    This study attempts to measure the effects of soil conservation practices on soil quality in dry-farmed wheat in Iran (Zanjan province) using a bio-economic production function. Because of the nature of data (panel data) and information used in this study, error components approach (REM method) was used for estimating the production functions. The results indicate that the shadow price increases with soil depth and its magnitude is greater 72% in average--in conserved soils compared to non-conserved ones. In fact the results support the effectiveness of soil conservation in improving physical, chemical and biochemical properties of soil which contributes to sustainable agriculture. Finally, soil conservation benefits were estimated to be about 29.98 dollar pre hectare. That may be use for extension, payment of green subsidy, investment and adoption of new technologies for soil conservation. In this way, it will increase the real value of farm and farmer's welfare.

  5. Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-08-01

    In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

  6. Analysis and simulation of the drying-air heating system of a Brazilian powdered milk plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Ribeiro Jr.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at simulating air-heating systems, two algorithms were developed for the calculation of finned elliptical-tube heat exchangers, whose basic difference lies in the kind of hot fluid employed: saturated steam or hot liquid. In both cases, a crossflow unit, in which the cold fluid is mixed and always flows on the shell side, is considered. The hot fluid may exhibit multiple passes in the tubes and is assumed unmixed, except for the region between the passes. A comparison between calculated results and operating data on industrial exchangers indicated the adequacy of the algorithms developed. The codes were then introduced into the ASPEN Plus shell, enabling simulation of the steady-state operation of the whole drying-air heating system of a powdered milk plant. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of this system was conducted for one of its operating parameters and the existence of an optimal value for this variable was clearly shown.

  7. Analysis of Phthalate Esters in Air, Soil and Plants in Plastic Film Greenhouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The phthalate esters such as DMP, DEP, DBP and DEHP in air, soil and plant samples in plastic film greenhouse were clean up with fine silica gel column and determined with HPLC. It was found that the concentrations of PEs in air and soil samples in plastic film greenhouse are much higher than those of contrast samples. But concentrations of PEs in plants in plastic film greenhouse are not remarkably affected by the pollution of air and soil.

  8. Modeling relationship between runoff and soil properties in dry-farming lands, NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Vaezi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of transformation of rainfall into runoff over a catchment is very complex and exhibits both temporal and spatial variability. However, in a semi-arid area this variability is mainly controlled by the physical and chemical properties of the soil surface. Developing an accurate and easily-used model that can appropriately determine the runoff generation value is of strong demand. In this study a simple, an empirically based model developed to explore effect of soil properties on runoff generation. Thirty six dry-farming lands under follow conditions in a semi-arid agricultural zone in Hashtroud, NW Iran were considered to installation of runoff plots. Runoff volume was measured at down part of standard plots under natural rainfall events from March 2005 to March 2007. Results indicated that soils were mainly clay loam having 36.7% sand, 31.6% silt and 32.0% clay, and calcareous with about 13% lime. During a 2-year period, 41 natural rainfall events produced surface runoff at the plots. Runoff was negatively (R2=0.61, p<0.001 affected by soil permeability. Runoff also significantly correlated with sand, coarse sand, silt, organic matter, lime, and aggregate stability, while its relationship with very fine sand, clay, gravel and potassium was not significant. Regression analysis showed that runoff was considerably (p<0.001, R2=0.64 related to coarse sand, organic matter and lime. Lime like to coarse sand and organic matter positively correlated with soil permeability and consequently decreased runoff. This result revealed that, lime is one of the most important factors controlling runoff in soils of the semi-arid regions.

  9. Short-term impact of dry olive mill residue addition to soil on the resident microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Inmaculada; Giubilei, Mariangela; Cajthaml, Tomas; Federici, Ermanno; Federici, Federico; Petruccioli, Maurizio; D'annibale, Alessandro

    2009-12-01

    The short-term response of the resident soil bacterial and fungal communities to the addition of 5% (w/w) of either dry olive mill residue (DOR), DOR treated with Phlebia sp. (PTDOR) or DOR previously extracted with water (WEDOR) was investigated. As opposed to bacteria, the diversity of fungi increased upon the amendments as assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rDNA. Over the first 30 days, phospholipid fatty acids analyses indicated a gradual decrease in the relative abundances of gram(+) bacteria (from 44.8% to 37.9%) and a concomitant increase of gram(-) bacteria (from 37.3% to 51.2%) in DOR-amended soil. A considerable increase in the fungal/bacterial ratio was observed after 7 days in DOR, WEDOR and PTDOR-amended soils with respect to the control (0.316, 0.165 and 0.265, respectively, vs. 0.011). The overall microbial activity was stimulated by the amendments as indicated by the higher activity levels of both dehydrogenase and fluorescein diacetate hydrolase. These results indicate that DOR at the application level examined is not toxic on soil microorganisms.

  10. Modeling relationship between runoff and soil properties in dry-farming lands, NW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, A. R.; Bahrami, H. A.; Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Mahdian, M. H.

    2010-04-01

    The process of transformation of rainfall into runoff over a catchment is very complex and exhibits both temporal and spatial variability. However, in a semi-arid area this variability is mainly controlled by the physical and chemical properties of the soil surface. Developing an accurate and easily-used model that can appropriately determine the runoff generation value is of strong demand. In this study a simple, an empirically based model developed to explore effect of soil properties on runoff generation. Thirty six dry-farming lands under follow conditions in a semi-arid agricultural zone in Hashtroud, NW Iran were considered to installation of runoff plots. Runoff volume was measured at down part of standard plots under natural rainfall events from March 2005 to March 2007. Results indicated that soils were mainly clay loam having 36.7% sand, 31.6% silt and 32.0% clay, and calcareous with about 13% lime. During a 2-year period, 41 natural rainfall events produced surface runoff at the plots. Runoff was negatively (R2=0.61, pfactors controlling runoff in soils of the semi-arid regions.

  11. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength.

  12. Effects of Savanna trees on soil nutrient limitation and carbon-sequestration potential in dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    limitation and thus in C mineralization and sequestration. The effects on soil respiration are present, even under strong water scarcity. Therefore, the capability of a savanna ecosystem to act as a C sink during dry season is mainly (directly and indirectly) dependent on the spatial abundance of trees.

  13. Predicting Soil-Air and Soil-Water Transport Properties During Soil Vapor Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe

    designing and operating remediation systems. Simple and accurate models for estimating soil properties from soil parameters that are easy to measure are useful in connection with preliminary remedial investigations and evaluation of remedial technologies. In this work simple models for predicting transport...

  14. Effect of dry spells and soil cracking on runoff generation in a semiarid micro watershed under land use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Julio Cesar Neves; de Andrade, Eunice Maia; Guerreiro, Maria João Simas; Medeiros, Pedro Henrique Augusto; de Queiroz Palácio, Helba Araújo; de Araújo Neto, José Ribeiro

    2016-10-01

    Soil and water resources effective management and planning in a river basin rely on understanding of runoff generation processes, yield, and their relations to rainfall. This study analyzes the effects of antecedent soil moisture in an expansive soil and the influence of dry spells on soil cracking, runoff generation and yield in a semiarid tropical region in Brazil subject to land use change. Data were collected from 2009 to 2013 in a 2.8 ha watershed, totaling 179 natural rainfall events. In the first year of study (2009), the watershed maintained a typical dry tropical forest cover (arboreal-shrub Caatinga cover). Before the beginning of the second year of study, gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth) was cultivated after slash and burn of native vegetation. Gamba grass land use was maintained for the rest of the monitoring period. The occurrence of dry spells and the formation of cracks in the Vertisol soil were the most important factors controlling flow generation. Dry spells promoted crack formation in the expansive soil, which acted as preferential flow paths leading to high initial abstractions: average conditions for runoff to be generated included soil moisture content above 20%, rainfall above 70 mm, I30max above 60 mm h-1 and five continuous dry days at the most. The change of vegetation cover in the second year of study did not alter significantly the overall conditions for runoff initiation, showing similar cumulative flow vs. rainfall response, implying that soil conditions, such as humidity and cracks, best explain the flow generation process on the semiarid micro-scale watershed with Vertisol soil.

  15. Solar Park Impacts on Air and Soil Microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, A.; Ostle, N. J.; Whitaker, J.

    2015-12-01

    The drive towards low carbon energy sources and increasing energy demand has resulted in a rapid rise in solar photovoltaics across the world. A substantial proportion of photovoltaics are large-scale ground-mounted systems, solar parks, causing a notable land use change. While the impacts of photovoltaic panel production and disposal have been considered, the consequences of the operation of solar parks on the hosting landscape are poorly resolved. Here, we present data which demonstrates that a solar park sited on permanent grassland in the UK significantly impacted the air and soil microclimate. Specifically, we observed (1) cooler soil under the photovoltaic panels during the summer and between the photovoltaic panel rows during the winter; (2) dampening of the diurnal variation in air temperature and absolute humidity from the spring to the autumn; (3) lower photosynthetically active radiation and a lower direct:diffuse under the panels; and (4) reduced wind speed between the panel rows and substantially reduced wind speeds under the panels. Further, there were differences in vegetation type and productivity and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the centrality of climate on ecosystem function, quantifying the microclimatic impacts of this emerging land use change is critical. We anticipate these data will help develop understanding of effects in other climates, under different solar park designs and the implications for the function and service provision of the hosting landscape.

  16. Environmental application of nanotechnology: air, soil, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rusul Khaleel; Hayyan, Maan; AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Adeeb; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2016-07-01

    Global deterioration of water, soil, and atmosphere by the release of toxic chemicals from the ongoing anthropogenic activities is becoming a serious problem throughout the world. This poses numerous issues relevant to ecosystem and human health that intensify the application challenges of conventional treatment technologies. Therefore, this review sheds the light on the recent progresses in nanotechnology and its vital role to encompass the imperative demand to monitor and treat the emerging hazardous wastes with lower cost, less energy, as well as higher efficiency. Essentially, the key aspects of this account are to briefly outline the advantages of nanotechnology over conventional treatment technologies and to relevantly highlight the treatment applications of some nanomaterials (e.g., carbon-based nanoparticles, antibacterial nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanoparticles) in the following environments: (1) air (treatment of greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols via adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, thermal decomposition, and air filtration processes), (2) soil (application of nanomaterials as amendment agents for phytoremediation processes and utilization of stabilizers to enhance their performance), and (3) water (removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, pathogens through adsorption, membrane processes, photocatalysis, and disinfection processes).

  17. Dry Pressed Holey Graphene Composites for Li-air Battery Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Steven; Lin, Yi; Hu, Liangbing

    Graphene is considered an ``omnipotent'' material due to its unique structural characteristics and chemical properties. By heating graphene powder in an open-ended tube furnace, a novel compressible carbon material, holey graphene (hG), can be created with controlled porosity and be further decorated with nanosized catalysts to increase electrocatalytic activity. All hG-based materials were characterized using various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to obtain morphological, topographical, and chemical information as well as to identify any disordered/crystalline phases. In this work, an additive-free dry press method was employed to press the hG composite materials into high mass loading mixed, sandwich, and double-decker Li-air cathode architectures using a hydraulic press. The sandwich and double-decker (i.e. Big Mac) cathode architectures are the first of its kind and can be discharged for more than 200 hours at a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2. The scalable, binderless, and solventless dry press method and unique Li-air cathode architectures presented here greatly advance electrode fabrication possibilities and could promote future energy storage advancements. Support appreciated from the NASA Internships Fellowships Scholarships (NIFS) Program.

  18. 香菜热风干燥的试验研究%Experimental Study on Hot Air Drying of Coriander

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵昆; 赵士杰; 滕竹竹

    2016-01-01

    首先通过试验分析了漂烫预处理对香菜热风干燥特性的影响,然后用单因素试验设计方法探讨热风温度、热风速度和铺料层厚度对香菜热风干燥特性的影响,之后又对香菜干制品进行复水试验,得出了香菜干制品在不同干燥条件下的复水特性.结果表明:热风温度越高,热风速度越大,铺料层厚度越小,干燥速率越大,干燥过程所需时间越短;但是,过高的热风温度、热风速度和过小的铺料层厚度都会降低香菜干制品的复水性能.%In this paper, the effect of blanching pretreatment on drying characteristics of coriander was investigated through the experiment.The impacts of hot air temperature, hot air velocity and thickness of materials on the hot air dr-ying characteristics of coriander were investigated by single factor experiment design, and the rehydration test further ob-tained the rehydration characteristics of dried materials under different drying conditions.The results show that higher hot air temperature, faster hot air velocity and smaller thickness of the material will cause greater drying rate and shorten the whole drying time.However, too high hot air temperature, hot air velocity and too small thickness of the material layer can reduce the rehydration capacity of the dried coriander.

  19. Effects of Soil Moisture on Dynamic Distribution of Dry Matter Between Winter Wheat Root and Shoot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-yuan; LIU Xiao-ying; LUO Yuan-pei

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic relationship of dry matter accumulation and distribution between winter wheatroot and shoot was studied under different soil water conditions. The dry matter accumulation in root wasgreatly influenced by water stress, so as to the final root weight of the treatment with 40 % field moisturecapacity (FMC) was less than 1/4 of that of the treatment with 80 % FMC on average. Water stress duringthe 3-leaf stage to the tillering stage had the greatest influence on root, and the influence of water stressduring the jointing stage to the booting stage on shoot was greater than root. However, water stress duringthe tillering stage to the booting stage had a balanced effect on root and shoot, and the proportion of drymatter that distributed to root and shoot was almost the same after rewatering. Water recovery during thejointing stage to booting stage could promote R/S, but the increasing degree was related to the duration ofwater limitation. Soil water condition had the lowest effect on R/S during the flowering stage to the fillingstage and the maximal effect on R/S during the jointing stage to the heading stage, R/S of 40% FMCtreatment was 20.93 and 126.09 % higher than that of 60 % FMC and 80 % FMC treatments respectivelyat this period.

  20. Change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeerasak Chobtang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the change in dry matter and nutritive composition of Humidicola grass (Brachiaria humidicola grown in Ban Thon soil series (infertility soil as a function of growth age. One rai (0.16 ha of two-year-old pasture of fertilised Humidicola grass was uniformly cut and the regrowth samples were collected every twenty days. The samples were subjected to analysis for dry matter content and nutritive composition, i.e. crude protein, ash, calcium, phosphorus, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, and acid detergent lignin. The results showed that while the yields of available forage and leaves increased curvilinearly (quadratic, p<0.05, the stem yield increased linearly (p<0.05 over sampling dates. The highest biomass accumulation rate was numerically observed between 40-60 days of regrowth. The concentrations of crude protein, ash, calcium and phosphorus decreased curvilinearly (quadratic, p<0.05 with advancing maturity and reached the lowest flat after 60 days of regrowth. The cell wall components, i.e. NDF, ADF and ADL, increased over the experimental period and reached the highest plateau at 40 days of regrowth. It was concluded that Humidicola grass should be grazed or preserved at the regrowth age of not over 60 days to maximise the utilisation of the grass.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Drying Kinetics of Bird’s Eye Chilies in a Convective Hot-Air Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongdej LIMPAIBOON

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The drying kinetics of red bird’s eye chilies and the color of the product were investigated in a laboratory scale hot-air dryer under 3 air temperatures of 55, 60 and 65 °C. The 6 mathematical models (Lewis model; Page model; Henderson and Pabis model; Logarithmic model; Modified Page model; and Wang and Singh model were used to fit the experimental data obtained in order to estimate the moisture ratio as the function of drying time. The results showed that operating temperature enhanced the kinetics of the drying of chilies; the drying times of chilies at 55, 60 and 65 °C were 510, 360 and 330 min, respectively. The experimental drying curves obtained at all operating conditions took place in the falling rate period. Comparing the dried products, it was observed that the red bird’s eye chilies dried at a lower temperature had higher Hunter L (lightness, a* (redness and b* (yellowness values. The experimental data were fitted to different drying models. The performance of these models was investigated by comparing the determination of coefficient (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE between the observed and predicted moisture ratios. Among the 6 mathematical models, the Wang and Singh model satisfactorily described the drying kinetics of chilies.

  2. Seismic Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of a Consolidated Dry Storage Module for CANDU Spent Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Gon; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Ke Hyung; Lee, Heung Young; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Sup; Jeong, In Su [KONES Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The MACSTOR/KN-400 module has been developed as an effective alternative to the existing stand alone concrete canister for dry storage of CANDU spent fuel. The structure is a concrete monolith of 21.67 m long and 12.66 m wide and has a height equal to 7.518 m including the bottom slab. Inside the concrete module consists of 40 storage cylinders accommodating ten 60-bundle dry storage baskets, which are suspended from the top slab and eventually restrained at 10 cm above the bottom slab with horizontal seismic restraints. The main cooling process of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module shall be by air convection through air inlets and outlets. The civil design parameters, with respect to meteorological and seismic loads applied to the module are identical to those specified for the Wolsung CANDU 3 and 4 plants, except for local site characteristics required for soilstructure interaction (SSI) analysis. It is required for the structural integrity to fulfill the licensing requirements. As per USNRC SRP Section 3.7.2, it shall be reviewed how to consider the phenomenon of coupling of the dynamic response of adjacent structures through the soil, which is referred to as structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI). The presence of closely spaced multiple structural foundations creates coupling between the foundations of individual structures . Some observations of the actual seismic response of structures have indicated that SSSI effects do exist, but they are generally secondary for the overall structural response motions. SSSI effects, however, may be important for a relatively small structure which is to be close to a relatively large structure, while they may be generally neglected for overall structural response of a large massive structure, such as nuclear power plant. As such the scope of the present paper is to carry out a seismic SSSI analysis in case of the MACSTOR/KN- 400 module, in order to investigate whether or not SSSI effect shall be included in the overall seismic

  3. Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, S; Rajagopalan, M; Abraham, J P; Balakrishnan, D; Umadevi, A G

    2012-11-01

    Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ∼25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1). The significant radionuclides being (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1) and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg(-1). The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed.

  4. Density-Corrected Models for Gas Diffusivity and Air Permeability in Unsaturated Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) and air permeability (ka) and their variations with air-filled porosity (e) in soil is critical for simulating subsurface migration and emission of climate gases and organic vapors. Gas diffusivity and air permeability measurements from Danish soil...... in subsurface soil. The data were regrouped into four categories based on compaction (total porosity F 0.4 m3 m-3) and soil texture (volume-based content of clay, silt, and organic matter 15%). The results suggested that soil compaction more than soil type was the major control on gas...... diffusivity and to some extent also on air permeability. We developed a density-corrected (D-C) Dp(e)/Do model as a generalized form of a previous model for Dp/ Do at -100 cm H2O of matric potential (Dp,100/Do). The D-C model performed well across soil types and density levels compared with existing models...

  5. Experimental Study on Ginger Hot Air Drying%生姜热风干燥试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涛; 赵士杰; 冉雪

    2014-01-01

    First, the temperature of hot air , speed of hot air and thickness of slice are elected as the ginger dryer ’ s in-fluencing factors in this experiment to carry the ginger dryer and dynamic experiment .According to test, the curve of drying characteristics and drying rate of ginger hot air dryer are obtained .After the ginger hot air dryer test , the ginger rehydration test further obtained the relationships between the rehydration characteristics and drying conditions of ginger in different drying conditions .The hot air temperature is higher , hot air speeds greater , slice thickness as small as ginger dry faster , higher drying efficiency , but rehydration of dried increase decrease with increasing temperature and wind speed .%通过选取热风温度、热风速度和切片厚度作为生姜干燥的影响因素进行生姜干燥动力学试验,得到了生姜热风干燥的干燥特性曲线和干燥速率曲线。热风干燥后对干品进行复水试验,从而进一步得出了不同干燥条件下的生姜干品复水特性与干燥条件的关系:热风温度越高,热风速度越大,切片厚度越小,生姜干燥速度越快,干燥效率也越高;但干品的复水特性随温度的升高和风速的增大反而降低。

  6. Thresholds in soil response to water stress: intensity and duration of dry-wet cycles induce differential soil C and bacterial diversity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisermann, Aurore; Nunan, Naoise; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Terrat, Sébastien; Lata, Jean-Christophe

    2013-04-01

    After the wetting of dry soils, a CO2 flush (known as the 'Birch effect') is often observed. Although the Birch effect can often result in large CO2 fluxes, the process is not sufficiently well understood to predict its intensity. In particular, the impact of dry-wet cycles on microbial communities is poorly understood, as are the consequences of the possible changes for soil functioning. Using microcosm-based experiments, we investigated different climate change scenarios, such as drying periods of different durations (with co-variation of drying intensity and drought duration) and different rainfall intensities. The effects of four dry-wet cycles on the (i) immediate intensity of the Birch effect, (ii) rate of return to basal C mineralisation (functional resilience), (iii) total amount of CO2 released during a 5-month incubation and (iv) the dynamics of bacterial diversity were determined. Bacterial diversity was measured by pyrosequencing. The CO2 flush increased as a function of drying intensity, drought duration and wetting intensity but was not affected by the number of dry-wet cycles. However, the functional resilience was slower after the first dry-wet cycle than subsequent cycles, suggesting an adaptation of the microbial communities to water-stress. However, this was not associated with a higher stability of bacterial community since the pyrosequencing data showed that drying decreased bacterial diversity after each dry-wet cycle, but only if a threshold of minimal moisture is exceeded. These modifications were permanent over the long term and suggest that the communities were characterised by functional redundancy. Moderate droughts had no effect on overall CO2 emissions but severe droughts led to a lower loss of soil C due to the absence of mineralisation during the longer periods of desiccation that was not compensated by over-mineralisation during Birch effect. The study highlighted moisture threshold beyond which it can be observed a Birch effect and

  7. Tree species effects on pathogen-suppressive capacities of soil bacteria across two tropical dry forests in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklund, Kristen; Powers, Jennifer; Kinkel, Linda

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotic-producing bacteria in the genus Streptomyces can inhibit soil-borne plant pathogens, and have the potential to mediate the impacts of disease on plant communities. Little is known about how antibiotic production varies among soil communities in tropical forests, despite a long history of interest in the role of soil-borne pathogens in these ecosystems. Our objective was to determine how tree species and soils influence variation in antibiotic-mediated pathogen suppression among Streptomyces communities in two tropical dry forest sites (Santa Rosa and Palo Verde). We targeted tree species that co-occur in both sites and used a culture-based functional assay to quantify pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities beneath 50 focal trees. We also measured host-associated litter and soil element concentrations as potential mechanisms by which trees may influence soil microbes. Pathogen-suppressive capacities of Streptomyces communities varied within and among tree species, and inhibitory phenotypes were significantly related to soil and litter element concentrations. Average proportions of inhibitory Streptomyces in soils from the same tree species varied between 1.6 and 3.3-fold between sites. Densities and proportions of pathogen-suppressive bacteria were always higher in Santa Rosa than Palo Verde. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in the potential for antibiotic-mediated disease suppression is shaped by tree species, site, and soil characteristics, which could have significant implications for understanding plant community composition and diversity in tropical dry forests.

  8. Hydromechanical behavior of a quasi-saturated compacted soils on drying-wetting paths-experimental and numerical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriantrehina Soanarivo Rinah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation funded by the French National Project “Terredurable”, which is devoted to the study of soils in quasi-saturated state. The experimental study is focused on the behavior of compacted soils on drying-wetting paths and the macroscopic effect of the drying path on shrinkage and cracking. Furthermore, a protocol for image analysis of crack in drying tests was developed. Two approaches are used for the measurement of surface strains and identification of the ultimate stress before the formation of the first crack, using VIC-2D software, and for the monitoring of crack evolution, using ImageJ software. The aim of the numerical approach is to reproduce the drying experiments with a finite difference code (FLAC 3D, in order to understand the stress conditions that can explain crack initiation, without modeling the crack formation itself.

  9. Nitrogen supply modulates the effect of changes in drying-rewetting frequency on soil C and N cycling and greenhouse gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Lourdes; Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Roales, Javier; Gallardo, Antonio; Lovett, Gary M; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    Climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are two of the most important global change drivers. However, the interactions of these drivers have not been well studied. We aimed to assess how the combined effect of soil N additions and more frequent soil drying-rewetting events affects carbon (C) and N cycling, soil:atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange, and functional microbial diversity. We manipulated the frequency of soil drying-rewetting events in soils from ambient and N-treated plots in a temperate forest and calculated the Orwin & Wardle Resistance index to compare the response of the different treatments. Increases in drying-rewetting cycles led to reductions in soil NO3- levels, potential net nitrification rate, and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange, and increases in NH4+ and total soil inorganic N levels. N-treated soils were more resistant to changes in the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles, and this resistance was stronger for C- than for N-related variables. Both the long-term N addition and the drying-rewetting treatment altered the functionality of the soil microbial population and its functional diversity. Our results suggest that increasing the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles can affect the ability of soil to cycle C and N and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange and that the response to this increase is modulated by soil N enrichment.

  10. Numerical-analytical investigation into impact pipe driving in soil with dry friction. Part II: Deformable external medium

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrova, Nadezhda

    2013-01-01

    Under analysis is travel of P-waves in an elastic pipe partly embedded in soil with dry friction. The mathematical formulation of the problem on impact pipe driving in soil is based on the model of axial vibration of an elastic bar, considering lateral resistance described using the law of solid dry friction. The author solves problems on axial load on pipe in interaction with external elastic medium, and compares the analytical and numerical results obtained with and without accounting for the external medium deformability.

  11. Transient Load Following and Control Analysis of Advanced S-CO2 Power Conversion with Dry Air Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycles are under development as advanced energy converters for advanced nuclear reactors, especially the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). The use of dry air cooling for direct heat rejection to the atmosphere ultimate heat sink is increasingly becoming a requirement in many regions due to restrictions on water use. The transient load following and control behavior of an SFR with an S-CO2 cycle power converter utilizing dry air cooling have been investigated. With extension and adjustment of the previously existing control strategy for direct water cooling, S-CO2 cycle power converters can also be used for load following operation in regions where dry air cooling is a requirement

  12. Urban air temperature anomalies and their relation to soil moisture observed in the city of Hamburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wiesner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of the urban air temperature for the city of Hamburg is analyzed based upon a one-year dataset of meteorological and pedological measurements. As local air temperature anomalies are subject to land-use and surface cover, they are monitored by a network of measurement stations within three different urban structures. Mean annual temperature deviations are found to be +1.0K$+1.0\\,\\text{K}$ for inner city sites and +0.25K$+0.25\\,\\text{K}$ to -0.2K$-0.2\\,\\text{K}$ for suburban sites compared to a rural reference. The nocturnal urban heat island (UHI is identified and averages +1.7K$+1.7\\,\\text{K}$ at the inner city stations, +0.7K$+0.7\\,\\text{K}$ at a suburban district housing area and +0.3K$+0.3\\,\\text{K}$ at a nearby green space. The observed UHI effect is most prominent when the wind speed is low (≤2ms-1$\\leq2\\,\\text{ms}^{-1}$ and the sky is only partly cloudy (≤6∕8th$\\leq6/8^{\\text{th}}$. In spring 2011 an average inner city UHI of up to +5.2K$+5.2\\,\\text{K}$ is observed during situations matching these conditions, while the extraordinary dry fall of 2011 lead to remarkably high air temperature differences at all observed stations. As expected, no evidence for a significant impact of topsoil moisture on nighttime UHI effect is found. The analysis of air temperature anomalies during daytime results in an annual mean deviation of -0.5K$-0.5\\,\\text{K}$ above unsealed, vegetated surfaces from a sealed site during days with a turbulent mixing induced by wind speed >2ms-1$>2\\,\\text{ms}^{-1}$. Here, there is an indication for a relation between the water content of upper soil layers and the warming of air: 11 to 17 % of the variance of the diurnal air temperature span is found to be explained by the soil water content for selected relevant days.

  13. Dry sliding wear behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 杨德庄; 武万良; 杨士勤

    2002-01-01

    The dry sliding wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy sliding against GCr15 steel under different velocities(between 0.2 and 1.2 m/s)and applied loads(from 30 to 90 N)were tested using a pin-on-disk tester in air. The wear occurred on both surfaces of the tested couplings. The wear rate of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy ranged from 23.0 to 123.8 mg/km. The wear of Ti-6Al-4V samples was in severe wear. The wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V samples increased with the increasing of load and shows a minimum on the curves of wear rate versus sliding velocity. SEM morphologies of worn surfaces and debris were observed. Phases in the debris were analyzed by means of XRD spectra.

  14. Does the soil-air-plant pathway contribute to the PCB contamination of apples from allotment gardens?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, M.; Moering, J.; Amelung, W. [Dept. of Soil Science, Inst. of Ecology, Berlin Univ. of Tech. (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) like PCBs in plants poses a risk to humans and animals as it determines an exposure through the terrestrial food chain. A number of studies have shown that the transfer from the atmosphere is the dominant pathway for an uptake of POPs by aboveground parts of plants, in which dry gaseous as well as wet and dry particulate deposition are involved. The relative contribution of the different pathways to the overall deposition depends strongly on the physical-chemical properties of the compounds, but also on microclimatic conditions and characteristics of the plant, which both contribute to diffusive resistance at the its surface. In contrast, root uptake and translocation in the shoot is probably much less important for these highly hydrophobic compounds, although there are contradicting results in the literature. While the air-plant distribution of POPs received increasing attention, the importance of the soilair- plant pathway has rarely been studied. It is not known whether the volatilisation of POPs from contaminated soils and subsequent deposition to plants may be a significant source compared to ''background'' deposition in the field, as well as a deposition of contaminated soil dust raised by wind or rain splash. Particularly the latter pathway can hardly be assessed under exposure chamber conditions; instead a field study is required despite the increased overall complexity, which renders process identification more difficult. The objective of our study was to assess whether the local soil contamination (soil-air-plant pathway) could contribute to the PCB contamination of apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at an allotment garden site additionally to background deposition (air-plant pathway).

  15. Transmission of Curing Light through Moist, Air-Dried, and EDTA Treated Dentine and Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Uusitalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study measured light transmission through enamel and dentin and the effect of exposed dentinal tubules to light propagation. Methods. Light attenuation through enamel and dentin layers of various thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm was measured using specimens that were (1 moist and (2 air-dried (n=5. Measurements were repeated after the specimens were treated with EDTA. Specimens were transilluminated with a light curing unit (maximum power output 1869 mW/cm2, and the mean irradiance power of transmitting light was measured. The transmission of light through teeth was studied using 10 extracted intact human incisors and premolars. Results. Transmitted light irradiance through 1 mm thick moist discs was 500 mW/cm2 for enamel and 398 mW/cm2 for dentin (p<0.05. The increase of the specimen thickness decreased light transmission in all groups (p<0.005, and moist specimens attenuated light less than air-dried specimens in all thicknesses (p<0.05. EDTA treatment increased light transmission from 398 mW/cm2 to 439 mW/cm2 (1 mm dentin specimen thickness (p<0.05. Light transmission through intact premolar was 6.2 mW/cm2 (average thickness 8.2 mm and through incisor was 37.6 mW/cm2 (average thickness 5.6 mm. Conclusion. Light transmission through enamel is greater than that through dentin, probably reflecting differences in refractive indices and extinction coefficients. Light transmission through enamel, dentin, and extracted teeth seemed to follow Beer-Lambert’s law.

  16. Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

  17. Autotrophic component of soil respiration is repressed by drought more than the heterotrophic one in dry grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; Papp, Marianna; Pintér, Krisztina; Fóti, Szilvia; Posta, Katalin; Eugster, Werner; Nagy, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Summer droughts projected to increase in central Europe due to climate changes strongly influence the carbon cycle of ecosystems. Persistent respiration activities during drought periods are responsible for a significant carbon loss, which may turn the ecosystem from a sink into a source of carbon. There are still gaps in our knowledge regarding the characteristic changes taking place in the respiration of the different components of the ecosystem in response to drought events.In the present study, we combined a physical separation of soil respiration components with continuous measurements of soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic (13C) signals at a dry grassland site in Hungary. The physical separation of soil respiration components was performed by means of inox meshes and tubes inserted into the soil. The root-excluded and root- and mycorrhiza-excluded treatments served to measure the isotopic signals of the rhizospheric, mycorrhizal fungi and heterotrophic components, respectively.In the dry grassland investigated in the study the three components of the soil CO2 efflux decreased at different rates under drought conditions. During drought the contribution made by the heterotrophic components was the highest (54 ± 8 %; mean ±SE). Rhizospheric component was the most sensitive to soil drying with its relative contribution to the total soil respiration dropping from 66 ± 7 (non-stressed) to 35 ± 17 % (mean ±SE) under drought conditions. According to our results the heterotrophic component of soil respiration is the major contributor to the respiration activities during drought events in the dry grassland ecosystem studied.

  18. High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Lowenstein

    2005-12-19

    Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create

  19. Impact of Different Methodologies on the Detection of Point Mutations in Routine Air-dried Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, C; Münz, S; Krogdahl, A

    2013-01-01

    promising approach for molecular FNA diagnostics. The objective of this methodological study was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, and KRAS mutations from routine air-dried thyroid FNA smears, and to find an optimal method for detecting these mutations in FNA samples. DNA...... was extracted from 110 routine air-dried FNA smears and the corresponding surgically obtained formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The presence of BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, and KRAS mutations was assessed by real-time PCRs and high resolution melting analysis, and/or pyrosequencing in comparison to real-time PCRs...

  20. Threshold criteria for heavy metals in the soils of hazard-free dry fruit production regions of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianguang; LIU Yufang; GUO Suping; LI Baoguo; ZHOU Junyi; WANG Wenjiang

    2007-01-01

    Determination of proper threshold criteria for heavy metals in soils is an important basis for hazard-free dry fruit production in China.Based on the detection of heavy metal contents in soils in this study,it is initially concluded that the soils for dry fruit production in China are suitable for hazard-free growing.Moreover,the soil safety qualification for dry fruit production is much better than that in some developed countries or regions,which might help our production have a competitive advantage on the international market.However,soil Cr contents in the country are slightly higher,so that it is necessary to take steps to control any contamination during the whole chain of production.The following threshold criteria for heavy metals in soils is suggested according to physical,ecological and economical considerations:Hg 0.15 mg/kg;As 20mg/kg;Pb 50mg/kg;Cd 0.30 mg/kg and Gr 200 mg/kg.

  1. Soil-Air Partitioning of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Total Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Zhang; Erping Bi; Honghan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Soil-air partitioning is an important diffusive process that affects the environmental fate of organic compounds and human health. In this review, factors affecting the soil-air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and total dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (p,p’-and o,p’-isomers of DDT, DDD, and DDE) are discussed. Hydrophobicity is an important factor that influences soil-air partition coefficients (KSA), and its effect can be explained through enthalpy of phase change for soil-air partitioning transfer (ΔHSA). For more hydrophobic compounds, a sharp increase in the KSA of PCBs and organochlorines can be seen in the early aging period. During the aging period, the temperature has a significant effect on the more hydrophobic organic compounds. The content and properties of soil or-ganic matter influence the KSA of the target compounds. Generally, KSA decreases with increasing rela-tive humidity in soils. The linear trend between KSA and temperature (T) changes at 0 °C. Freezing the air or soil in experiments would change the research results. On the basis of factors influencing soil-air partitioning, a multipleparameter (T, organic carbon fraction (fOC), and octanol-air partition coefficient (KOA)) model is put forward to predict the KSA values for PCBs and total DDTs.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of polyurethane aged in dry and wet air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Tian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures of Estane 5703 aged at 70°C in dry and wet air have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The samples were swollen in deuterated toluene for enhancing the contrast. The scattering data show the characteristic domain structure of polyurethanes consisting of soft and hard segments. Debye-Anderson-Brumberger function used with hard sphere structure factor, and the Teubner-Strey model are used to analyze the two-phase domain structure of the polymer. The combined effects of temperature and humidity have a strong disruption effect on the microstructures of Estane. For the sample aged at 70°C in wet air for 1 month, the domain size, described by the correlation length, increases from 2.3 to 3.8 nm and their distance, expressed by hard-sphere interaction radius, increases from 8.4 to 10.6 nm. The structure development is attributed to degradation of polymer chains as revealed by gel permeation chromatography. The hydrolysis of ester links on polymer backbone at 70°C in the presence of water humidity is the main reason for the changes of the microstructure. These findings can contribute to developing predictive models for the safety, performance, and lifetime of polyurethanes.

  3. Wheel traffic effect on air-filled porosity and air permeability in a soil catena across the wheel rut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    The impact of wheel traffic on soil physical properties is usually quantified by randomly collecting soil cores at specific depths below the wheeled surface. However, modeling studies as well as few measurements indicated a non-uniform stress distribution in a catena across the wheel rut, which m...... provide better resolution on information about traffic induce changes on soil physical properties. Key words: Compaction, Shear stress, Soil catena, Air permeability, Air-filled porosity...... might induce different effects on soil physical properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of vehicle traffic on soil physical properties and air permeability by systematic collection of samples in a transect running from the center to the outside of the wheel rut. A field...... catena running from center of the wheel rut to un wheeled part of the field ( 0, 20, 40, 50,60 and 400 cm horizontal distance). We measured water retention and air permeability (ka) at -30, -100 and -300 hPa matric potentials. At -100 hPa, we obtained consistently lower air filled under the wheel rut...

  4. Air-drying of cells, the novel conditions for stimulated synthesis of triacylglycerol in a Green Alga, Chlorella kessleri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuma Shiratake

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol is used for the production of commodities including food oils and biodiesel fuel. Microalgae can accumulate triacylglycerol under adverse environmental conditions such as nitrogen-starvation. This study explored the possibility of air-drying of green algal cells as a novel and simple protocol for enhancement of their triacylglycerol content. Chlorella kessleri cells were fixed on the surface of a glass fibre filter and then subjected to air-drying with light illumination. The dry cell weight, on a filter, increased by 2.7-fold in 96 h, the corresponding chlorophyll content ranging from 1.0 to 1.3-fold the initial one. Concomitantly, the triacylglycerol content remarkably increased to 70.3 mole% of fatty acids and 15.9% (w/w, relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, like in cells starved of nitrogen. Reduction of the stress of air-drying by placing the glass filter on a filter paper soaked in H2O lowered the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 26.4 mole% as to total fatty acids. Moreover, replacement of the H2O with culture medium further decreased the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 12.2 mole%. It thus seemed that severe dehydration is required for full induction of triacylglycerol synthesis, and that nutritional depletion as well as dehydration are crucial environmental factors. Meanwhile, air-drying of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells increased the triacylglycerol content to only 37.9 mole% of fatty acids and 4.8% (w/w, relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, and a marked decrease in the chlorophyll content, on a filter, of 33%. Air-drying thus has an impact on triacylglycerol synthesis in C. reinhardtii also, however, the effect is considerably limited, owing probably to instability of the photosynthetic machinery. This air-drying protocol could be useful for the development of a system for industrial production of triacylglycerol with appropriate selection of the

  5. Air-drying of cells, the novel conditions for stimulated synthesis of triacylglycerol in a Green Alga, Chlorella kessleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratake, Takuma; Sato, Atsushi; Minoda, Ayumi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Triacylglycerol is used for the production of commodities including food oils and biodiesel fuel. Microalgae can accumulate triacylglycerol under adverse environmental conditions such as nitrogen-starvation. This study explored the possibility of air-drying of green algal cells as a novel and simple protocol for enhancement of their triacylglycerol content. Chlorella kessleri cells were fixed on the surface of a glass fibre filter and then subjected to air-drying with light illumination. The dry cell weight, on a filter, increased by 2.7-fold in 96 h, the corresponding chlorophyll content ranging from 1.0 to 1.3-fold the initial one. Concomitantly, the triacylglycerol content remarkably increased to 70.3 mole% of fatty acids and 15.9% (w/w), relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, like in cells starved of nitrogen. Reduction of the stress of air-drying by placing the glass filter on a filter paper soaked in H2O lowered the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 26.4 mole% as to total fatty acids. Moreover, replacement of the H2O with culture medium further decreased the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 12.2 mole%. It thus seemed that severe dehydration is required for full induction of triacylglycerol synthesis, and that nutritional depletion as well as dehydration are crucial environmental factors. Meanwhile, air-drying of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells increased the triacylglycerol content to only 37.9 mole% of fatty acids and 4.8% (w/w), relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, and a marked decrease in the chlorophyll content, on a filter, of 33%. Air-drying thus has an impact on triacylglycerol synthesis in C. reinhardtii also, however, the effect is considerably limited, owing probably to instability of the photosynthetic machinery. This air-drying protocol could be useful for the development of a system for industrial production of triacylglycerol with appropriate selection of the algal species.

  6. A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tims S.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ~1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.

  7. The influence of soils on heterotrophic respiration exerts a strong control on net ecosystem productivity in seasonally dry Amazonian forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Melton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Net ecosystem productivity of carbon (NEP in seasonally dry forests of the Amazon varies greatly between sites with similar precipitation patterns. Correctly modeling the NEP seasonality with terrestrial ecosystem models has proven difficult. Previous modelling studies have mostly advocated incorporating processes that act to reduce water stress on gross primary productivity (GPP during the dry season such as including deep soils and roots, plant-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil moisture, and increased dry season leaf litter generation which reduces leaf age and thus increases photosynthetic capacity. Recent observations, however, indicate that seasonality in heterotrophic respiration also contributes to the observed seasonal cycle of NEP. Here, we use the dynamic vegetation model CLASS-CTEM – without deep soils or roots, hydraulic redistribution of soil moisture or increased dry season litter generation – at two Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment (LBA sites (Tapajós km 83 and Jarú Reserve. These LBA sites exhibit opposite seasonal NEP cycles despite similar meteorological conditions. Our simulations are able to reproduce the observed NEP seasonality at both sites. Simulated GPP, heterotrophic respiration, latent and sensible heat fluxes, litter fall rate, soil moisture and temperature, and basic vegetation state are also compared with available observation-based estimates which provide confidence that the model overall behaves realistically at the two sites. Our results indicate that appropriately representing the influence of soil texture and depth, through soil moisture, on seasonal patterns of GPP and, especially, heterotrophic respiration is important to correctly simulating NEP seasonality.

  8. Spray washing, absorbent cornstarch powder, and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled transport cage flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler transport cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Allowing feces to dry is an effective but slow and logistically impractical means to kill Campylobacter in soiled transport cages. ...

  9. A determination of the greenhouse parameter for dry and unpolluted air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penaloza M, Marcos A. [Universidad de Los Andes, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Merida, (Venezuela)

    1996-04-01

    The relative extinction of solar and infrared radiation by dry and clean air molecules, has been estimated through a theoretical determination of the ratio referred ordinarily as the Greenhouse Parameter (GP). In a first approach, it was calculated assuming that terrestrial air only consists of a simple mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. The method used here is based on the application, in an inverse procedure, of an homogeneous, plane-parallel, and time-independent grey model, which employs the Eddington approximation as a solution to the radiative transfer equation, both in the solar and the infrared spectral regions and, which has the GP value as an input free parameter. The best value of the GP was estimated calibrating the local temperature profile for four types of uniform surface (snow, desert, vegetation and ocean), with average albedos known in these spectral regions, adopting air surface temperature values which were chosen for an assumed micro or local climatological environment according to an average radiative criterion. With this result, it was possible for an estimation of the infrared opacity for the air layer implicated in this model and also the mean extinction coefficient in this spectral range to be calculated. The results predicted are compared with results obtained indirectly from the data provided by other authors. Although its validation is constrained solely to the radiative model applied it seems that the value of the GP obtained is more accurate than the one initially available. [Spanish] La extincion relativa de radiacion por moleculas de aire limpio y seco, tanto en la region espectral solar como en la infrarroja, ha sido estimada a traves del calculo teorico de un parametro conocido en general como Parametro de Invernadero (PI). En una primera aproximacion, este parametro fue calculado considerando el aire terrestre como una mezcla simple de oxigeno y nitrogeno solamente. El metodo usado aqui se baso en la aplicacion, bajo un

  10. Experimental Study of Cowpeas Hot Air Drying%豇豆热风干燥实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段罗佳; 赵士杰; 杜文亮; 周超

    2015-01-01

    通过对豇豆进行恒温干燥与变温干燥这两种不同的干燥方式,研究了豇豆在不同预处理方式、温度和风速下的热风干燥特性,并绘制了湿基含水率曲线和干燥速率曲线。结果表明:恒温干燥时,温度及风速是影响干燥的主要因素,长度影响干燥程度较小;变温干燥时,豇豆色泽及表面质量比恒温干燥时要好。%The experiments were carried out cowpea drying with variable temperature and thermostat drying .Under different pretreatments, temperature and wind speed ,researching of cowpea hot air drying characteristics and drawing wet basis moisture content and drying rate curves .The results showed that:at a constant temperature drying , temperature and wind speed on the drying effects of greater , but length the impact is relatively small .When the variable temperature dr-ying , color and surface quality is better than constant dry .

  11. Daily and seasonal variations in radon activity concentration in the soil air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műllerová, Monika; Holý, Karol; Bulko, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentration in the soil air in the area of Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics (FMPI) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, has been continuously monitored since 1994. Long-term measurements at a depth of 0.8 m and short-term measurements at a depth of 0.4 m show a high variability in radon activity concentrations in the soil. The analysis of the data confirms that regular daily changes in radon activity concentration in the soil air depend on the daily changes in atmospheric pressure. It was also found that the typical annual courses of the radon activity concentration in the soil air (with summer minima and winter maxima) were disturbed by mild winter and heavy summer precipitation. Influence of precipitation on the increase in the radon activity concentration in the soil air was observed at a depth of 0.4 m and subsequently at a depth of 0.8 m.

  12. Estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability from soil physical properties using state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe; Møldrup, Per; Nielsen, Don

    2003-01-01

    field were used. Multiple regression and ARIMA models yielded similar prediction accuracy, whereas state-space models generally gave significantly higher accuracy. State-space modeling suggested K-S at a given location could be predicted using nearby values of K-S, k(a100) and air-filled porosity......Estimates of soil hydraulic conductivity (K) and air permeability (k(a)) at given soil-water potentials are often used as reference points in constitutive models for K and k(a) as functions of moisture content and are, therefore, a prerequisite for predicting migration of water, air, and dissolved...... and gaseous chemicals in the vadose zone. In this study, three modeling approaches were used to identify the dependence of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-S) and air permeability at -100 cm H2O soil-water potential (k(a100)) on soil physical properties in undisturbed soil: (i) Multiple regression, (ii...

  13. Soil erosion risk evaluation using GIS in the Yuanmou County,a dry-hot valley of Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to sustainable agriculture. Evaluating regional erosion risk is increasingly needed by national and in-ternational environmental agencies. This study elaborates a model (using spatial principal component analysis [SPCA]) method for the evaluation of soil erosion risk in a representative area of dry-hot valley (Yuanmou County) at a scale of 1:100,000 using a spatial database and GIS. The model contains seven factors: elevation, slope, annual precipitation, land use, vegetation, soil, and population density. The evaluation results show that five grades of soil erosion risk: very low, low, medium, high, and very high. These are divided in the study area, and a soil erosion risk evaluation map is created. The model may be applicable to other areas of China because it utilizes spatial data that are generally available.

  14. Wood anatomical responses of oak saplings exposed to air warming and soil drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, P; Heller, O; Cherubini, P; Rigling, A; Arend, M

    2013-01-01

    Water is vital for plant performance and survival. Its scarcity, induced by a seasonal decline in soil water availability or an increase of evaporative demand, can cause failures of the water conducting system. An adequate tolerance to drought and the ability to acclimate to changing hydraulic conditions are important features for the survival of long-lived woody plants in dry environments. In this study we examine secondary growth and xylem anatomical acclimation of 6 year old saplings of three European oak species (Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens) during the third consecutive year of exposure to soil drought and/or air warming (from 2007 to 2009). Intra-annual pinning was applied to mark the development of the formation of the annual ring 2009. Vessel size, parenchyma cell density and fiber size produced at different time of the growing season 2009 were compared between drought and warming treatments and species. Drought reduced secondary growth and induced changes in xylem structure while air warming had little effect on wood anatomical traits. Results indicate that drought-exposed saplings adjust their xylem structure to improve resistance and repairing abilities after cavitation. All species show a significant radial growth reduction, a reduced vessel size with diminished conductivity and a slightly increased density of parenchyma cells. Comparisons between species fostered our understanding of the relationship between the inter-specific xylem hydraulic plasticity and the ecological response to drought. The stronger changes observed for Q. robur and Q. petraea indicate a lower drought tolerance than Q. pubescens.

  15. SOLAR DRYING KINETICS OF DATE PALM FRUITS ASSUMING A STEP-WISE AIR TEMPERATURE CHANGE

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELGHANI BOUBEKRI; HOCINE BENMOUSSA; DJAMAL MENNOUCHE

    2009-01-01

    The effect of drying using a step-wise temperature change was studied considering the case of indirect solar drying of the date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L.). The followed procedure consists of building drying kinetics by stages of temperatures resulting from drying, in constant conditions, of the same variety of dates from Algerian and Tunisian origin. A law of daily temperature variation prevailed by 60°C, was deduced from a statement of temperature collected on a laboratory solar dry...

  16. A model on the effect of temperature and moisture on pollen longevity in air-dry storage environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, T.D.; Ellis, R.H.; Buitink, J.; Walters, J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Crane, J.

    1999-01-01

    Data on the survival of pollen ofTypha latifoliaL. stored for up to 261 d over seven different saturated salt solutions (providing 0.5 to 66% relative humidity) and six different constant temperatures (from −5 to +45 °C) were analysed to quantify the effect of air-dry storage environment on pollen l

  17. Soil dehydrogenase in a land degradation-rehabilitation gradient: observations from a savanna site with a wet/dry seasonal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Ryoichi; Ranamukhaarachchi, Senaratne Leelananda

    2009-01-01

    Soil dehydrogenase activity is a good indicator of overall microbial activity in soil, and it can serve as a good indicator of soil condition. However, seasonal changes in soil moisture content may have an effect on soil dehydrogenase activity, making an accurate assessment of soil condition difficult. In this study, we attempted to determine the significance of soil dehydrogenase activity for assessing soil condition, and we attempted to find a way to account for the influence of soil moisture content on soil dehydrogenase activity.' Soils were sampled in dry evergreen forest (original vegetation), bare ground (severely degraded) and Acacia plantation plots established on bare ground in 1986 and 1987 in Sakaerat, Thailand. Soil physico-chemical characteristics and dehydrogenase activity in the Acacia plantation soil had few differences from those in the evergreen forest soil. Soil dehydrogenase activity varied significantly between the bare ground and the forests regardless of the season (wet or dry), while the season did not produce a significant variation in soil dehydrogenase activity, as determined by repeated measures analysis of variance (p=0.077). The physico-chemical data provided the first principal component as a good measure of soil fertility. Values of soil dehydrogenase activity significantly correlated to scores of the soil samples of the first principal component (R=0.787, pThailand.

  18. Regional Differences and Characteristics of Soil Organic Carbon Density Between Dry Land and Paddy Field in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; RUI Wen-yi; BIAN Xin-min; ZHANG Wei-jian

    2007-01-01

    Study on the regional characteristics of soil organic carbon (SOC) density in farmland will not only contribute greatly to the technique of soil productivity enhancement, but also give evidences of technique selection and policy making for carbon sequestration in soils. Based on the second national soil survey of China, the situation of SOC density in the plow layer of farmland was analyzed under different land use patterns. Results showed that SOC density in the plow layer was about 3.15 kg m-2 in average ranging from 0.81 to 12.68 kg m-2. The highest density was found in the southeastern region with an average of 3.63 kg m-2, while the lowest occurring in the northwestern region with an average of 3.00 kg m-2. The variation coefficient of SOC density in the plow layer of farmland was 57%, which was 35% lower than that of non-farmland soils. Compared to SOC density in the dry land, SOC density in paddy soils was 13% higher with a lower variation coefficient between different regions. In addition, the relationships between the climatic factors (annual average temperature and precipitation) and SOC density were lower in farmland than those in non-farmland soils, as well as lower in paddy soils than those in dry land of farmland. These results suggest that anthropogenic disturbances have great impacts on SOC density in farmland soils, especially in paddy soils, indicating that Chinese rice cropping may contribute greatly to the SOC stability and sequestration in paddy field.

  19. Soil-based filtration technology for air purification: potentials for environmental and space life support application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Bohn, Hinrich

    Soil biofiltration, also known as Soil bed reactor (SBR), technology was originally developed in Germany to take advantage of the diversity in microbial mechanisms to control gases producing malodor in industrial processes. The approach has since gained wider international acceptance and seen numerous improvements, for example, by the use of high-organic compost beds to maximize microbial processes. This paper reviews the basic mechanisms which underlay soil processes involved in air purification, advantages and limitations of the technology and the cur-rent research status of the approach. Soil biofiltration has lower capital and operating/energetic costs than conventional technologies and is well adapted to handle contaminants in moderate concentrations. The systems can be engineered to optimize efficiency though manipulation of temperature, pH, moisture content, soil organic matter and airflow rates. SBR technology was modified for application in the Biosphere 2 project, which demonstrated in preparatory research with a number of closed system testbeds that soil could also support crop plants while also serving as soil filters with air pumps to push air through the soil. This Biosphere 2 research demonstrated in several closed system testbeds that a number of important trace gases could be kept under control and led to the engineering of the entire agricultural soil of Biosphere 2 to serve as a soil filtration unit for the facility. Soil biofiltration, coupled with food crop produc-tion, as a component of bioregenerative space life support systems has the advantages of lower energy use and avoidance of the consumables required for other air purification approaches. Expanding use of soil biofiltration can aid a number of environmental applications, from the mitigation of indoor air pollution, improvement of industrial air emissions and prevention of accidental release of toxic gases.

  20. Hydraulic conductivity of active layer soils in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica: Geological legacy controls modern hillslope connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Logan M.; Levy, Joseph S.

    2017-04-01

    Spatial variability in the hydraulic and physical properties of active layer soils influences shallow groundwater flow through cold-desert hydrological systems. This study measures the saturated hydraulic conductivity and grain-size distribution of 90 soil samples from the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica-primarily from Taylor Valley-to determine what processes affect the spatial distribution of saturated hydraulic conductivity in a simple, mineral-soil-dominated natural hillslope laboratory. We find that the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the grain-size distribution of soils are organized longitudinally within Taylor Valley. Soils sampled down-valley near the coast have a higher percentage of fine-sized sediments (fine sand, silt, clay) and lower saturated hydraulic conductivities than soils collected up-valley near Taylor Glacier (1.3 × 10- 2 vs. 1.2 × 10- 1 cm/s). Soils collected mid-valley have intermediate amounts of fines and saturated hydraulic conductivity values consistent with a hydrogeologic gradient spanning the valley from high inland to low near the coast. These results suggest the organization of modern soil properties within Taylor Valley is a relict signature from past glaciations that have deposited soils of decreasing age toward the mouth of the valley, modified by fluvial activity acting along temporal and microclimate gradients.

  1. Modeling of Efficient Hot Air Drying of Apple Snails (Pomacea canaliculata for Use as a Fishmeal Protein Substitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Luo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Snails are a kind of important aquatic products and dehydration is the main technique in production of snail meal. Apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata dehydration meets both the demand for a fishmeal substitute in aquaculture and invasive species control in agriculture. In this study, we investigated the percentage of the nutritive material, examined the drying characteristics at 60, 80, 100 and 120°C, respectively, established a drying kinetics model and explored the effect of body morphology on drying efficiency. The results showed that the wet weight percentage of the soft parts was 46.61±6.18%. The drying efficiency was significantly improved with an increase of drying temperature from 60 to 120°C. The drying time increased rapidly when the final moisture content approached its equilibrium value. The Hii et al. model was selected as the best model to describe the drying curves (R2>0.99. It provided a relatively accurate prediction between the requirements of moisture content and drying time. There were statistically significant differences (p<0.01 in the drying time at 10.0 and 1.0% moisture content level among the four temperature groups. The drying efficiency was significantly correlated to the mass of the soft parts. It was found that 100°C was an appropriate temperature to effectively dehydrate the fresh apple snails, whereas 60°C was not suitable when air velocity ≤0.5 m/s. This study explored an integrated approach to efficiently dehydrate snails for snail meal production, which will benefit both aquaculture and agriculture.

  2. Diversity of soil fungi in dry deciduous forest of Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats of southern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shivakumar P.Banakar; B.Thippeswamy; B.V.Thirumalesh; K.J.Naveenkumar

    2012-01-01

    We assessed soil fungal diversity in the dry deciduous forest of a Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary of the Western Ghats (210.31 m a.s.(l).; N 13°44′ and E75°37′).Soil samples were collected by random mixed sampling during winter (November,2008),summer (March,2009) and monsoon (August,2009) seasons,and physico-chemical parameters were recorded.During winter,summer,and monsoon seasons,49,45 and 49of fungal species belongs to 20,18 and 19 of genera were isolated,respectively.Isolated soil fungi were mainly of the Mitosporic fungi,followed by Zygomycotina,Ascomycotina,Oomycotina and Coelomycetes.Indices of diversity,dominance and fisher alpha during winter,summer and monsoon seasons were 3.756,3.638 and 3.738 (H′),0.9737,0.9694and 0.9726 (1-D) and 18.84,29.83 and 19.46 (α),respectivelv.Spearman's (r) correlation coefficient of fungal population with physicochemical parameters of soils showed significantly positive and negative correlations (p<0.01) during winter,summer and monsoon seasons.Physico-chemical soil parameters played an important role in the occurrence,diversity,distribution,and relative abundance of fungal species in the tropical dry deciduous forest soil.

  3. Taxonomic and functional diversity of soil and hypolithic microbial communities in Miers Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are an extreme polar desert. Mineral soils support subsurface microbial communities and translucent rocks support development of hypolithic communities on ventral surfaces in soil contact. Despite significant research attention relatively little is known about taxonomic and functional diversity or their inter-relationships. Here we report a combined diversity and functional interrogation for soil and hypoliths of the Miers Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The study employed 16S rRNA fingerprinting and high throughput sequencing combined with the GeoChip functional microarray. The soil community was revealed as a highly diverse reservoir of bacterial diversity dominated by actinobacteria. Hypolithic communities were less diverse and dominated by cyanobacteria. Major differences in putative functionality were that soil communities displayed greater diversity in stress tolerance and recalcitrant substrate utilization pathways, whilst hypolithic communities supported greater diversity of nutrient limitation adaptation pathways. A relatively high level of functional redundancy in both soil and hypoliths may indicate adaptation of these communities to fluctuating environmental conditions.

  4. Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Soil and Hypolithic Microbial Communities in Miers Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sean T. S.; Lacap-Bugler, Donnabella C.; Lau, Maggie C. Y.; Caruso, Tancredi; Rao, Subramanya; de los Rios, Asunción; Archer, Stephen K.; Chiu, Jill M. Y.; Higgins, Colleen; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Hopkins, David W.; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are an extreme polar desert. Mineral soils support subsurface microbial communities and translucent rocks support development of hypolithic communities on ventral surfaces in soil contact. Despite significant research attention, relatively little is known about taxonomic and functional diversity or their inter-relationships. Here we report a combined diversity and functional interrogation for soil and hypoliths of the Miers Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The study employed 16S rRNA fingerprinting and high throughput sequencing combined with the GeoChip functional microarray. The soil community was revealed as a highly diverse reservoir of bacterial diversity dominated by actinobacteria. Hypolithic communities were less diverse and dominated by cyanobacteria. Major differences in putative functionality were that soil communities displayed greater diversity in stress tolerance and recalcitrant substrate utilization pathways, whilst hypolithic communities supported greater diversity of nutrient limitation adaptation pathways. A relatively high level of functional redundancy in both soil and hypoliths may indicate adaptation of these communities to fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:27812351

  5. EFFECT OF AIR-DRYING ON DEMINERALIZED AND ON SOUND CORONAL HUMAN DENTIN - A STUDY ON DENSITY AND ON LESION SHRINKAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARENDS, J; RUBEN, J

    1995-01-01

    Recently, several papers investigated the linear dimensional changes in dentine after air-drying. This paper pertains to weight changes, volume changes, and density changes caused by air-drying of sound and demineralized intact dentine. The densities of sound and artificially demineralized human cor

  6. [Chronology of tropical dry forest regeneration in Santa Rosa, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. II. Vegetation in relation to the soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Jorge A; Rocha, Oscar J; Mata, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Soto, Marco V

    2009-09-01

    Tropical dry forest (TDF) succession was monitored in Santa Rosa, Costa Rica. We analyzed the effect of soil type on forest structure and diversity. Eight seasonally-dry TDF sites located along a successional chrono-sequence (10, 15, 20, 40, 60 and >100 years) were examined in relation to 17 soil pedons and six soil orders. Soils had moderate to high fertility and were classified as Entisols and Vertisols, although Mollisols, Alfisols, Inceptisols and Ultisols were also present. One-hundred and thirty 500 m2 plots were established, 20 plots in secondary and 10 plots in mature TDF sites. Diameter at breast height (dbh) and total tree height were measured for saplings (dbh > or = 1 and trees (dbh > or = 5 cm). With the exception of two sites (40 and 60 years), soil type did not have significant effects on forest structure. However, tree diversity measured with Shannon-Wiener's H' and Fisher's alpha rarefaction curves, showed substantial differences among soil types, which became accentuated in mature forests. This pattern might be explained by non-random distributions of TDF trees, the scale of the study, the plot shape, and the use of systematic sampling designs. Low-fertility sites in general had higher species richness, consistent with idea that more restrictive soils reduce competition among trees and allow co-existence of species with contrasting growth rates. Changes in soil properties along a chrono-sequence of Entisols indicated that trees may experience more severe water stress as succession progresses, which may require adjustments in biomass allocation and phenological behavior of the dominant species. Our results suggest that edaphic specialization is more pronounced in mature TDF forests, and that most TDF trees are generalists in relation to soil type, highly tolerant to site heterogeneity, and show little physiological specializations in response to edaphic heterogeneity.

  7. Essential oil composition of the aerial parts of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaber, Hala I; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A; Barhoumi, Lina M; Abaza, Ismail F; Afifi, Fatma U

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the essential oil of fresh and air-dried Salvia palaestina Benth. (Lamiaceae) growing wild in Jordan has been studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The essential oils of fresh and air-dried S. palaestina were mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (52.66% and 65.98%, respectively). The major component detected in the oils of fresh and dry S. palaestina was germacrene D (21.18% and 26.02%, respectively). Air drying resulted in a general increase of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and a great decrease in the percentage of monoterpene hydrocarbons.

  8. A preliminary investigation of the dynamic characteristics of dried soil layers on the Loess Plateau of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an; Shao, Hongbo

    2010-02-01

    SummarySerious soil desiccation, resulting from climatic conditions and poor land management, may lead to the formation of a dried soil layer (DSL), which can negatively affect ecological and hydrological processes. To mitigate these effects through management, it is necessary to understand property interactions within DSLs, compared with those in the whole soil profile, and DSL formation processes under different land uses. We investigated the relationships between soil water content (SWC) and plant root indices, and other soil properties, under various land uses in the Liudaogou watershed on the Loess Plateau, China. We also studied the development of DSLs as a function of the growth age of two vegetation types. Rate of formation and thickness of DSLs were dependent on vegetation type: DSLs formed after 2 years of alfalfa ( Medicago sativa) growth and 3 years of Caragana korshinskii growth; after 4 years of growth, DSLs under alfalfa were thicker than those under C. korshinskii, but after 31 years the DSL thickness under C. korshinskii (4.4 m) exceeded that formed under alfalfa (3 m). The more persistent DSLs occurred below a 100 cm thick upper soil layer that was seasonally dried and replenished by rainfall under both vegetation types. The degree of soil desiccation under natural vegetation was generally less than that under non-indigenous plant species, and was similarly less over a period of about 30 years for a natural plant succession sequence than for an artificial one. Thus, the use of natural vegetation succession management principles would possibly reduce soil desiccation during vegetative restoration. Densities of root length, weight, and surface area, and the average root diameter of soybean ( Glycine max), alfalfa, Stipa bubgeana, and C. korshinskii all decreased with increases in soil depths below 20 cm. Correlations between SWC and root indices, and various soil physical and chemical properties, were generally weaker within the DSL layers than

  9. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Rhoderick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12, trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11, and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113; the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22 and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b; and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a, all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  10. Effects of warm air-drying on intra-pulpal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, D; Kasloff, Z; Williams, P T

    1991-08-01

    This study was designed to determine what effects different warm air-drying conditions have on the intra-pulpal temperature (IPT), with or without chamber preparation and with or without an acid-etching treatment of the enamel. Four human maxillary centrals and four cuspids had lingual access openings prepared to accommodate a thermal sensor probe. Half of the specimens received a labial chamber preparation and half were acid-etched. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C prior to testing. Labial aspects were positioned at 2 cm and 6 cm from the nozzle of a 500W hair dryer and IPTs were recorded after 15, 30, 45, and 60-second exposures. Exposure times for the acid-etched samples were modified to 10 seconds at 2 cm and 15 seconds at 6 cm. Results showed that for unetched teeth, increases in the IPT were greater at the 2 cm/15-second exposure (a 10.4-12.0 degrees C increase) than at the 6 cm/15-second exposure (a 3.9-6.6 degrees C increase). Even greater temperature changes were seen as the exposure times were increased to 30, 45, and 60 seconds. When the teeth were acid-etched, IPT rises of 5.6-10.1 degrees C and 5.8-8.7 degrees C were measured at 2 cm/10 seconds and at 6 cm/15 seconds, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Pathogenic and opportunistic gram-negative bacteria in soil, leachate and air in San Nicolás landfill at Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tena, Francisco J; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma L; Avelar-González, Francisco J; Ramírez-López, E Marcela; Martínez-Saldaña, M Consolación

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of Gram-negative pathogenic and opportunistic species, was studied for two years on air. soil and leachate from the San Nicolás Landfill. Aguascalientes, Mexico. For soil and leachate four samplings were done, two during the dry season and two during the rainy season. For soil there were 15 sampling points, the leachate samples were taken on the leachate tank. For air, twelve sampling were done in three points of the landfill. Twenty pathogenic and/or opportunistic bacteria were identified from air, twenty from soil and eleven from leachate. Most of them were enteric; however respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria were also identified. Pasteurella haemolytica were isolated in all air samples. Nine species were found in the a half of the soil samples. The most frequent species in leachate were Acinetobacter baumanii, Bordetella sp, Brucella sp. and Escherichia coli var II. The occurrence of pathogenic and opportunistic species points out to the nosocomial and domestic clinical wastes discharged in the landfill as a potential risk for public and occupational health.

  12. Soil CO2 Efflux Dynamics in the Northern Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil during the Wet-Dry Season Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Hentz, C. S.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Santanna, F. B.; Dias, M. D. F.; de Musis, C. R.; Nogueira, J. D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The roles of tropical wetlands in the global carbon (C) cycle are still poorly understood, especially in seasonally flooded forests that are expected to be important sinks for atmospheric CO2. We measured soil CO2 efflux during the wet-dry transition period in a seasonally flooded palm-dominated forest (locally known as Acorizal) to determine the effect of litter input and seasonal hydrology. Measurements were performed monthly as part of a field litter manipulation experiment consisting of three treatments (litter removal, litter addition, and control; n = 6 plots per treatment), and our research objectives were to determine how soil CO2 efflux varied as a function of (1) litter input, (2) root density, and (3) seasonal variation in soil water content. We found that litter addition significantly increased soil CO2 efflux, but there was no relationship between root density and soil CO2 efflux. Efflux was highest during the wet season and declined as soil water content declined. Our data demonstrate that variations in litter inputs and soil water content are important controls on soil CO2 efflux in seasonally flooded tropical forests.

  13. Influence of prevailing disturbances on soil biology and biochemistry of montane habitats at Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India during wet and dry seasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, S.K.; Singh, Anoop; Rai, J.P.N.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prevailing disturbances in montane habitats of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) was studied on soil microbial population, biomass, soil respiration and enzyme activities during wet and dry seasons. The physico-chemical characteristics of soils exhibited conspicuous variation in t...

  14. Uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides from soil and air into radishes (Raphanus sativus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikes, Ondrej; Cupr, P.; Trapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Uptake of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls from soil and air into radishes was measured at a heavily contaminated field site. The highest contaminant concentrations were found for DDT and its metabolites, and for beta-hexachlorocyclohexane. Bioconcentration factor (BCF...

  15. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS.

  16. Nuclear thermal source transfer unit, post-blast soil sample drying system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory states that its mission is “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” [2] The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) programs exists to engage undergraduate students in STEM work by providing opportunity to work at DOE facilities. [5] As an undergraduate mechanical engineering intern under the SULI program at Los Alamos during the fall semester of 2016, I had the opportunity to contribute to the mission of the Laboratory while developing skills in a STEM discipline. I worked with Technology Applications, an engineering group that supports non-proliferation, counter terrorism, and emergency response missions. This group specializes in tool design, weapons engineering, rapid prototyping, and mission training. I assisted with two major projects during my appointment Los Alamos. The first was a thermal source transportation unit, intended to safely contain a nuclear thermal source during transit. The second was a soil drying unit for use in nuclear postblast field sample collection. These projects have given me invaluable experience working alongside a team of professional engineers. Skills developed include modeling, simulation, group design, product and system design, and product testing.

  17. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Sean; Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood....... This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal...... drying process (input temperature 95 °C, thermal fluid circuit temperature 200 °C, 95 % dry matter content). The drying process reduced the ammonium content of the biosolids and reduced it further at higher drying temperatures. These findings were attributed to ammonia volatilisation. The percentage...

  18. Arsenic in air and soil in the vicinity of the central gas station Molve, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žužul, Silva; Zgorelec, Željka; Bašić, Ferdo; Kisić, Ivica; Mesić, Milan; Vađić, Vladimira; Orct, Tatjana

    2011-05-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of arsenic levels in soil during the 9 year monitoring period was investigated on four different soil types in the area of the gas borehole system Podravina in Croatia. Arsenic levels in the PM(10) particle fraction were measured periodically at the same locations for 3 years. Arsenic levels in soil significantly depended on soil types. Elevated levels were found on gleysol vertic, at two sampling sites, with values exceeding 30 mg/kg of arsenic in soil. Arsenic levels in air were low and they were not significantly different between sampling sites, suggesting that gas borehole activities have no influence on arsenic levels in the environment.

  19. Liming and phosphorus fertilization in soils under cerrado. 1. Dry matter accumulation and phosphorus uptake by sorghum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.F.S. (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Bahia. Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Mandioca e Fruticultura); Fernandes, M.S.; Velloso, A.C.X. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos); Castro, A.F. de (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Rio de Janeiro. Servico Nacional de Levantamento e Conservacao de Solos)

    1983-07-01

    The effects of liming and phosphorus fertilizer (300 Kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha) application on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by sorghum plants were studied under greenhouse conditions. Plants were grown in four Oxisols originally under cerrado vegetation. There was a positive correlation between P-fertilization and liming on dry matter accumulation and P-uptake by plants. The results showed that the main effect of liming in these soils was on the elimination of phytotoxicity, mainly due to exchangeable aluminum.

  20. Seasonal dynamics of CO2 efflux in soils amended with composted and thermally-dried sludge as affected by soil tillage systems in a semi-arid agroecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Juan Carlos; Soler-Rovira, Pedro; López-de-Sa, Esther G.; Polo, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    In semi-arid agricultural soils, seasonal dynamic of soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is highly variable. Based on soil respiration measurements the effects of different management systems (moldboard plowing, chisel and no-tillage) and the application of composted sludge (CS) and thermally-dried sewage sludge (TSS) was investigated in a long-term field experiment (28 years) conducted on a sandy-loam soil at the experimental station 'La Higueruela' (40o 03'N, 4o 24'W). Both organic amendments were applied at a rate of 30 Mg ha-1 prior to tillage practices. Unamended soils were used as control for each tillage system. SCE was moderate in late spring (2.2-11.8 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) when amendments were applied and tillage was performed, markedly decreased in summer (0.4-3.2 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1), following a moderate increase in autumn (3.4-14.1 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1), rising sharply in October (5.6-39.8 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 ). In winter, SCE was low (0.6-6.5 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). In general, SCE was greater in chisel and moldboard tilled soils, and in CS and particularly TSS-amended soils, due to the addition of labile C with these amendments, meanwhile no-tillage soils exhibited smaller increases in C efflux throughout the seasons. Soil temperature controlled the seasonal variations of SCE. In summer, when drought occurs, a general decrease of SCE was observed due to a deficit in soil water content. After drought period SCE jumped to high values in response to rain events ('Birch effect') that changed soil moisture conditions. Soil drying in summer and rewetting in autumn may promotes some changes on the structure of soil microbial community, affecting associated metabolic processes, and enhancing a rapid mineralization of water-soluble organic C compounds and/or dead microbial biomass that acts as an energy source for soil microorganisms. To assess the effects of tillage and amendments on SCE, Q10 values were calculated. Data were grouped into three groups according to soil moisture (0

  1. The repeated drying-wetting and freezing-thawing cycles affect only the active pool of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Vyacheslav; Zinyakova, Natalya; Tulina, Anastasiya

    2016-04-01

    The decrease in the content of soil organic carbon, particularly in active form, is one of the major problems of the 21st century, which is closely related to the disturbance of the biogeochemical carbon cycle and to the increase in the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The main reasons for the SOM losses are the surplus of the SOM active pool losses due to mineralization, erosion, and infiltration over the input of fresh organic matter to the soil, as well as the changes in the soil conditions and processes due to natural and anthropogenic disturbing impacts. Experiments were carried out with mixed samples from the upper layers of soddy-podzolic soil, gray forest soil, and typical chernozems. Soil samples as controls were incubated after wetting for 150 days. The dynamics and cumulative production of C-CO2 under stable temperature (22°C) and moisture conditions were determined; the initial content of potentially mineralizable organic matter (C0) in the soil at the beginning of the incubation was then calculated to use these data as the control. Other soil samples were exposed in flasks to the following successive treatments: wetting →incubation → freezing → thawing → incubation →drying. Six repeated cycles of disturbing impacts were performed for 140 days of the experiment. After six cycles, the soil samples were incubated under stable temperature and moisture conditions for 150 days. The wetting of dried soils and the thawing of frozen soils are accompanied by the pulsed dynamics of the C-CO2 production with an abrupt increase in the rate of the C-CO2 emission within several days by 2.7-12.4 and 1.6-2.7 times, respectively, compared to the stable incubation conditions. The rate of the C-CO2 production pulses under each subsequent impact decreased compared to the preceding one similarly for all studied soils, which could be due to the depletion in potentially mineralizable soil organic matter (C0). The cumulative extra C-CO2 production by

  2. [Influence of Different Straws Returning with Landfill on Soil Microbial Community Structure Under Dry and Water Farming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Mu-ling; Gao, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Based on rice, wheat, corn straw and rape, broad bean green stalk as the research object, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) method, combining principal component analysis method to study the soil microbial quantity, distribution of flora, community structure characteristics under dry and water farming as two different cultivated land use types. The PLFA analysis results showed that: under dry farming, total PLFA quantity ranged 8.35-25.15 nmol x g(-1), showed rape > broad bean > corn > rice > wheat, rape and broad bean significantly increased total PLFA quantity by 1.18 and 1.08 times compared to the treatment without straw; PLFA quantity of bacterial flora in treatments with straws was higher than that without straw, and fungal biomass was significantly increased, so was the species richness of microbial community. Under water faming, the treatments of different straws returning with landfill have improved the PLFA quantity of total soil microbial and flora comparing with the treatment without straw, fungi significantly increased, and species richness of microbial communities value also increased significantly. Total PLFA quantity ranged 4.04-22.19 nmol x g(-1), showed rice > corn > wheat > broad bean > rape, which in rape and broad bean treatments were lower than the treatment without straw; fungal PLFA amount in 5 kinds of straw except broad bean treatment was significantly higher than that of the treatment without straw, bacteria and total PLFA quantity in broad bean processing were significantly lower than those of other treatments, actinomycetes, G+, G- had no significant difference between all treatments; rice, wheat, corn, rape could significantly increase the soil microbial species richness index and dominance index under water faming. The results of principal component analysis showed that broad bean green stalk had the greatest impact on the microbial community structure in the dry soil, rape green stalk and wheat straw had the biggest influence on

  3. Recovery of paddy soil methanotrophs from long term drought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collet, S.; Reim, A.; Ho, A.; Frenzel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Air-dried paddy soils stored for 1–18 years were used to examine the resistance of methanotrophs to drought. Older air-dried soils representing longer-lasting drought events reduced methanotrophic diversity, and adversely affected methane oxidation rate after re-wetting. In early incubations the typ

  4. The Research Status and Prospects of the Hot Air Drying and Freeze Drying for Papaya%木瓜热风干燥和冷冻干燥的研究现状和展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铭; 陈冬梅; 侯萍; 赵鹤飞; 余善鸣

    2013-01-01

    果蔬的干燥主要有热干、微波、冻干和组合干燥。木瓜的干燥以热干为主,冻干能最大程度保持木瓜的色泽、风味和营养价值,但研究报道较少。今后木瓜干燥研究的主要内容将是提高品质和降低产品成本。因此,木瓜的热干和冻干的组合干燥将是研究的重点。%The primary drying technologys of fruits and vegetables are hot-air drying , microwave drying , freeze drying and combined drying. The mainly drying method of papaya is hot-air drying. The freeze-dried can keep the greatest degree of color, flavor and nutritional value of papaya, However, it is lack of references on that. Future research of the drying technology of papaya will be improvement of the quality and to reduce product cost. Therefore, the combined drying technology of hot-air and freeze of papaya will become a study emphasis in further research.

  5. Changes in soil microbial community structure and function in an alpine dry meadow following spring snow melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, D A; Schadt, C W; Schmidt, S K

    2002-04-01

    Previous work in an alpine dry meadow in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains has shown that microbial biomass is high during winter and declines rapidly as snow melts in the spring, and that this decline is associated with changes in temperature regime and substrate availability. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the summer and winter microbial communities differ in function and composition. Shifts in species composition between pre- and post-snowmelt communities were detected using reciprocal hybridization of community DNA; DNA extracted from soils sampled at different times was significantly less homologous relative to spatial replicates sampled at the same time. Fungal/bacterial ratios, as measured by direct microscopic counts and by substrate-induced respiration experiments with specific inhibitors, were higher in winter soils. Specific activity of cellulase (absolute cellulase activity per unit microbial biomass C) was higher in the winter soils than in summer soils, while specific amylase activity was not different between winter and summer. Based on most-probable number measurements, the use of the phenolic compound vanillic acid was highest in the winter, while the use of the amino acid glycine was lowest in the winter. Winter and summer soil respiration responded differently to temperature; at 0 degrees C, winter soils respired at a higher proportion of the 22 degrees C rate than did summer soils.

  6. Long-term evaluation of the fate of sulfur mustard on dry and humid soils, asphalt, and concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Dana M; Goldvaser, Michael; Columbus, Ishay

    2011-04-15

    The long-term fate of the blister agent sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) was determined in a variety of commercial and natural matrices. HD was found to be extremely stable in dry matrices for over a year. The addition of 5% water to the matrices induced slow degradation of HD, which lasted several months. The major degradation product in sands and asphalt was found to be a sulfonium salt, S[CH(2)CH(2)S(+)(CH(2)CH(2)OH)(2)](2) (H-2TG). Red loam soil, which has not been examined before, exhibited strong interaction with HD, both in dry form and in the presence of water. Humid red loam soil gave rise to unique oxidative degradation products. On humid concrete HD degraded to a complex mixture of products, including vinyls. This may be attributed to the basic sites incorporated in concrete.

  7. Computer-Controlled Microwave Drying of Potentially Difficult Organic and Inorganic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    known to have a saturated, surface dry water content of about 3 percent and then subjecting the material to microwave drying. The gravels were...surface dry water content) of some coarse aggregate of chert, limestone, basalt, and quartz. Clay, at the other extreme, can exist at water contents...excluding such oversize particles from microwave water content specimens. c. The saturated surface dry water content of many rock or gravel particles has an

  8. Effects of Slice Processing on Hot Air Drying Characteristics of Semi-dry Original Red Jujube%切片处理对半干红枣热风干燥特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩志慧; 郭婷; 何新益; 程莉莉

    2013-01-01

      The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slice processing on hot air drying characteristics of semi-dry red jujube. Drying characteristics of red jujube slice and origine semi-dry original red jujube under different hot air drying temperature were compared. The drying kinetics model of red jujube slice and origine semi-dry original red jujube were founded. Results showed that slice processing could decrease the drying time of semi-dry original red jujube. Page model provided better simulation of drying curves for red jujube slice at different hot drying temperature. While Henderson and Pabis model provided better simulation of drying curves for origine semi-dry original red jujube at different hot air drying temperature. The effective moisture diffusivity of red jujube was 10 times that of origine semi-dry original red jujube, among 1.77×10-5 m2/s-2.99×10-5 m2/s and 4.56×10-6 m2/s-7.20×10-6 m2/s, respectively. Slice processing has the significant effects on drying characteristics of semi-dry original red jujube dried by hot air drying.%  为探索切片处理对半干红枣热风干燥特性的影响,以半干原枣果作参照,比较了不同热风干燥温度下枣片和枣果的干燥特性,分别建立了干燥动力学模型。研究结果表明,切片处理可以缩短红枣的干燥时间;枣片的热风干燥过程符合Page方程,而枣果的热风干燥过程符合Henderson and Pabis方程。枣片的有效扩散系数是枣果有效扩散系数的的10倍左右,分别为1.77×10-5 m2/s~2.99×10-5 m2/s、4.56×10-6 m2/s~7.20×10-6 m2/s。结果表明切片处理对红枣的干燥特性有明显的影响。

  9. Influence of diesel contamination in soil on growth and dry matter partitioning of Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatokun, Kayode; Zharare, Godfrey Elijah

    2015-09-01

    Phytotoxic effect of diesel contaminated soil was investigated on growth and dry matter partitioning in Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas in greenhouse pot experiment at two concentration range (0-30 ml and 0-6 ml diesel kg(-1) soil) for 14 weeks. The results indicated thatwhole plant biomass, stem length, root length, number of leaves and leaf chlorophyll in two plants were negatively correlated with increasing diesel concentrations. The critical concentration of diesel associated with 10% decrease in plant growth was 0.33 ml for lettuce and 1.50 ml for sweet potato. Thus, growth of lettuce in diesel contaminated soil was more sensitive than sweet potato. The pattern of dry matter partitioning between root and shoot in both plants were similar. In 0-6 ml diesel contamination range, allocation of dry matter to shoot system was favoured resulting in high shoot: root ratio of 4.54 and 12.91 for lettuce and sweet potato respectively. However, in 0-30 ml diesel contamination range, allocation of dry matter to root was favoured, which may have been an adaptive mechanism in which the root system was used for storage in addition to increasing the capacity for foraging for mineral nutrients and water. Although lettuce accumulated more metals in its tissue than sweet potato, the tissue mineral nutrients in both species did not vary to great extent. The critical diesel concentration for toxicity suggested that the cause of mortality and poor growth of sweet potato and lettuce grown in diesel contaminated soil was due to presence of hydrocarbons in diesel.

  10. Numerical modelling of the effect of dry air traces in a helium parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, C.; Belmonte, T.; Chiper, A. S.; Georghiou, G. E.

    2016-10-01

    A validated numerical model developed for the study of helium barrier discharges in the presence of dry air impurities is presented in this paper. The model was used to numerically investigate the influence of air traces on the evolution of the helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The level of dry air used as impurity was in the range from 0 to 1500 ppm, which corresponds to the most commonly encountered range in atmospheric pressure discharge experiments. The results presented in this study clearly show that the plasma chemistry and consequently the discharge evolution is highly affected by the concentration level of impurities in the mixture. In particular, it was observed that air traces assist the discharge ignition at low concentration levels (~55 ppm), while on the other hand, they increase the burning voltage at higher concentration levels (~1000 ppm). Furthermore, it was found that the discharge symmetry during the voltage cycle highly depends on the concentration of air. For the interpretation of the results, a detailed analysis of the processes that occur in the discharge gap is performed and the main reaction pathways of ion production are described. Thanks to this approach, useful insight into the physics behind the evolution of the discharge is obtained.

  11. Spectra and vegetation index variations in moss soil crust in different seasons, and in wet and dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shibo; Yu, Weiguo; Qi, Yue

    2015-06-01

    Similar to vascular plants, non-vascular plant mosses have different periods of seasonal growth. There has been little research on the spectral variations of moss soil crust (MSC) over different growth periods. Few studies have paid attention to the difference in spectral characteristics between wet MSC that is photosynthesizing and dry MSC in suspended metabolism. The dissimilarity of MSC spectra in wet and dry conditions during different seasons needs further investigation. In this study, the spectral reflectance of wet MSC, dry MSC and the dominant vascular plant (Artemisia) were characterized in situ during the summer (July) and autumn (September). The variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), biological soil crust index (BSCI) and CI (crust index) in different seasons and under different soil moisture conditions were also analyzed. It was found that (1) the spectral characteristics of both wet and dry MSCs varied seasonally; (2) the spectral features of wet MSC appear similar to those of the vascular plant, Artemisia, whether in summer or autumn; (3) both in summer and in autumn, much higher NDVI values were acquired for wet than for dry MSC (0.6 ∼ 0.7 vs. 0.3 ∼ 0.4 units), which may lead to misinterpretation of vegetation dynamics in the presence of MSC and with the variations in rainfall occurring in arid and semi-arid zones; and (4) the BSCI and CI values of wet MSC were close to that of Artemisia in both summer and autumn, indicating that BSCI and CI could barely differentiate between the wet MSC and Artemisia.

  12. Numerical analysis of temperature and flow effects in a dry, one-dimensional aquifer used for compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.C.; Wiles, L.E.; Loscutoff, W.V.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed description of the method of analysis and the results obtained for an investigation of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a model of a dry porous media reservoir used for compressed air energy storage (CAES) is presented. Results were obtained from a one-dimensional simulation of the cycling of heated air to and from a radial flow field surrounding a single well in a porous rock. It was assumed that the performance of the bulk of the reservoir could be characterized by the performance of a single well.

  13. Variations in soil carbon sequestration and their determinants along a precipitation gradient in seasonally dry tropical forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julio; Merino, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    The effect of precipitation regime on the C cycle of tropical forests is poorly understood, despite the existence of models that suggest a drier climate may substantially alter the source-sink function of these ecosystems. Along a precipitation regime gradient containing 12 mature seasonally dry tropical forests growing under otherwise similar conditions (similar annual temperature, rainfall seasonality, and geological substrate), we analyzed the influence of variation in annual precipitation (1240 to 642 mm) and duration of seasonal drought on soil C. We investigated litterfall, decomposition in the forest floor, and C storage in the mineral soil, and analyzed the dependence of these processes and pools on precipitation. Litterfall decreased slightly - about 10% - from stands with 1240 mm yr(-1) to those with 642 mm yr(-1), while the decomposition decreased by 56%. Reduced precipitation strongly affected C storage and basal respiration in the mineral soil. Higher soil C storage at the drier sites was also related to the higher chemical recalcitrance of litter (fine roots and forest floor) and the presence of charcoal across sites, suggesting an important indirect influence of climate on C sequestration. Basal respiration was controlled by the amount of recalcitrant organic matter in the mineral soil. We conclude that in these forest ecosystems, the long-term consequences of decreased precipitation would be an increase in organic layer and mineral soil C storage, mainly due to lower decomposition and higher chemical recalcitrance of organic matter, resulting from changes in litter composition and, likely also, wildfire patterns. This could turn these seasonally dry tropical forests into significant soil C sinks under the predicted longer drought periods if primary productivity is maintained.

  14. PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangement detection is feasible in routine air dried fine needle aspiration (FNA) smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraz, Carolina; Rehfeld, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise;

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic limitations of fine needle aspiration (FNA), like the "indeterminate" category, can be partially overcome by molecular analysis. As PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangements have been detected in follicular carcinomas (FTC) and papillary carcinomas (PTC), their detection...... as generally not suitable for testing these rearrangements in a clinical setting. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine-air-dried FNA smears for the detection of these rearrangements with RT-PCR. Methods: A new method for RNA extraction......). Similarly, RET/PTC was found in 3 of 96 FFPEs and in 4 of 96 FNAs. Two of 21 PTC samples and 3 of 42 FA samples carried this rearrangement. Conclusion: These data are the first to show the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine air dried FNA smears for the detection of PAX8/PPARG and RET...

  15. Modeling of mass transfer performance of hot-air drying of sweet potato (Ipomoea Batatas L. slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Aishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the transfer characteristics of the sweet potato drying process, a laboratory convective hot air dryer was applied to study the influences of drying temperature, hot air velocity and thickness of sweet potato slice on the drying process. The experimental data of moisture ratio of sweet potato slices were used to fit the mathematical models, and the effective diffusion coefficients were calculated. The result showed that temperature, velocity and thickness influenced the drying process significantly. The Logarithmic model showed the best fit to experimental drying data for temperature and the Wang and Singh model were found to be the most satisfactory for velocity and thickness. It was also found that, with the increase of temperature from 60 to 80°C, the effective moisture diffusion coefficient varied from 2.962×10-10 to 4.694×10-10 m2×s-1, and it fitted the Arrhenius equation, the activation energy was 23.29 kJ×mol-1; with the increase of hot air velocity from 0.423 to 1.120 m×s-1, the values of effective moisture diffusion coefficient varied from 2.877×10-10 to 3.760×10-10 m2•s-1; with the increase of thickness of sweet potato slice from 0.002 m to 0.004 m, the values of effective moisture diffusion coefficient varied from 3.887×10-10 to 1.225×10-9 m2•s-1.

  16. Drying characteristics of garlic ( Allium sativum L) slices in a convective hot air dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiray, Engin; Tulek, Yahya

    2014-06-01

    The effects of drying temperatures on the drying kinetics of garlic slices were investigated using a cabinet-type dryer. The experimental drying data were fitted best to the Page and Modified Page models apart from other theoretical models to predict the drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivities varied from 4.214 × 10-10 to 2.221 × 10-10 m2 s-1 over the temperature range studied, and activation energy was 30.582 kJ mol-1.

  17. In vitro equine embryo production using air-dried spermatozoa, with different activation protocols and culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A; Baca Castex, C; Ferrante, A; Pinto, M; Castañeira, C; Trasorras, V; Gambarotta, M C; Losinno, L; Miragaya, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of air-dried spermatozoa for in vitro production of equine embryos and verify if sperm extract activation and in vivo culture improve in vitro embryo production. Cooled spermatozoa (control) and air-dried spermatozoa stored for 2, 14 or 28 days were used for ICSI sperm extract, or ionomycin was used for oocyte activation, and embryos were in vitro or in vivo (in mare's oviduct) cultured for 7 days. With in vitro culture, cleavage rate was higher when activating with sperm extract (P  0.05). Blastocysts were obtained with cooled spermatozoa, and morulae were achieved using in vivo culture with 28-day storage spermatozoa and ionomycin-activated oocytes. When in vivo culture was performed, sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the sperm chromatin dispersion test and did not show statistical correlation with cleavage nor embryo recovery rates. In conclusion, equine embryos can be produced using air-dried spermatozoa stored for several weeks. Sperm extract activation increased cleavage rates but did not improve embryo development. In vivo culture allowed intrauterine stage embryos to be achieved.

  18. Variation in tensile properties and relationship between tensile properties and air-dried density for moso bamboo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaqiang YU; Benhua FEI; Haiqing REN; Zehui JIANG; Xinge LIU

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the variation in tensile properties and the relationship between the tensile properties and the air-dried density for the moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) by sampling at different heights and radial positions. Results showed that the variation of the longitudinal tensile properties in the radial direction was greater than that in the longitudinal direction. The longitudinal tensile modules of elasticity (MOE) ranged from 8.49 to 32.49 GPa. MOE for the outermost layer was 3-4 times as high as that for the innermost layer. The longitudinal tensile strength (MOR) ranged from 115.94 to 328.15 MPa. MOR for the outermost layer is 2-3 times as high as that for the innermost layer. Linear and curvilinear regressions were done from tested data of MOE, MOR and air-dried density in this paper. The linear equation worked a little better than the curvilinear one to predict the longitudinal MOR and MOE from air-dried density.

  19. Radon as a tracer for soil-gas entry into a house located next to a contaminated dry-cleaning property; Radon som sporgas for jordluftindtraengning til hus ved forurenet renserigrund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.E

    2001-07-01

    This study applies the naturally occurring radioactive gas radon-222 as a tracer for soil-gas entry into a house located next to a dry-cleaners shop. This is possible because the concentration of radon in the soil below the house is about 1000 times higher than the concentration in outdoor air. The study is based on continuous indoor measurement of radon, differential pressures, barometric pressure and temperatures and grab samples of radon below the slab and in the soil in the vicinity of the house. During the investigation, vacuum extraction were used to remove chlorinated solvents (perchloroethylene, PCE) from the unsaturated zone. The study shows that the vacuum extraction influences the radon concentration in and below the house. When the vacuum pump is on, the indoor radon concentration is only 10 Bq/m{sup 3} corresponding to the contribution from radon in outdoor air and exhalation from building materials. When the vacuum pump is set off, the average indoor radon concentration increases to 30 Bq/m{sup 3}. It is believed that the increase is caused by radon entry from the soil. Regression analysis demonstrates that changes in the indoor radon concentration can be explained by changes in indoor-outdoor pressure differences and changes in the atmospheric pressure. This suggests that advection is the primary mode of entry. Under some highly simplifying assumptions the soil-gas entry is found to be around 1 m{sup 3}/h. This, however, is most likely an overestimate. Based on the measured radon concentration in the exhaust air from the vacuum system and a typical radon emanation rate for Danish soil, it is estimated that the soil vapor extraction system ventilates about 10000 m{sup 3} of soil. The investigation is supported by numerical model calculations with the finite-volume model Rnmod3d. (au)

  20. Effects of precipitation regime and soil nitrogen on leaf traits in seasonally dry tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa-Fuentes, Lilia L; Templer, Pamela H; Campo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Leaf traits are closely associated with nutrient use by plants and can be utilized as a proxy for nutrient cycling processes. However, open questions remain, in particular regarding the variability of leaf traits within and across seasonally dry tropical forests. To address this, we considered six leaf traits (specific area, thickness, dry matter content, N content, P content and natural abundance (15)N) of four co-occurring tree species (two that are not associated with N2-fixing bacteria and two that are associated with N2-fixing bacteria) and net N mineralization rates and inorganic N concentrations along a precipitation gradient (537-1036 mm per year) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Specifically we sought to test the hypothesis that leaf traits of dominant plant species shift along a precipitation gradient, but are affected by soil N cycling. Although variation among different species within each site explains some leaf trait variation, there is also a high level of variability across sites, suggesting that factors other than precipitation regime more strongly influence leaf traits. Principal component analyses indicated that across sites and tree species, covariation in leaf traits is an indicator of soil N availability. Patterns of natural abundance (15)N in foliage and foliage minus soil suggest that variation in precipitation regime drives a shift in plant N acquisition and the openness of the N cycle. Overall, our study shows that both plant species and site are important determinants of leaf traits, and that the leaf trait spectrum is correlated with soil N cycling.

  1. Decadal co-variability of the summer surface air temperature and soil moisture in China under global warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU MingFeng; WANG HuiJun

    2007-01-01

    The self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is calculated using newly updated ground observations of monthly surface air temperature (SAT) and precipitation in China. The co-variabilities of PDSI and SAT are examined for summer for the period 1961-2004. The results show that there exist decadal climate co-variabilities and strong nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture in many regions of China. Some of the co-variabilities can be linked to global warming. In summer, significant decadal co-variabilities from cool-wet to warm-dry conditions are found in the east region of Northwest China, North China, and Northeast China. An important finding is that in the west region of Northwest China and Southeast China, pronounced decadal co-variabilities take place from warm-dry to cool-wet conditions. Because significant warming was observed over most areas of the global land surface during the past 20-30 years, the shift to cool-wet conditions is a unique phenomenon which may deserve much scientific attention. The nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture may partly account for the observed decadal co-variabilities. It is shown that anomalies of SAT will greatly affect the climatic co-variabilities, and changes of SAT may bring notable influence on the PDSI in China. These results provide observational evidence for increasing risks of decadal drought and wetness as anthropogenic global warming progresses.

  2. Prediction of soil frost penetration depth in northwest of Iran using air freezing indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H.; Moghbel, M.; Ranjbar, F.

    2016-11-01

    Information about soil frost penetration depth can be effective in finding appropriate solutions to reduce the agricultural crop damage, transportations, and building facilities. Amongst proper methods to achieve this information are the statistical and empirical models capable of estimating soil frost penetration depth. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to calculate soil frost penetration depth in northwest of Iran during the year 2007-2008 to validate two different models accuracy. To do so, the relationship between air and soil temperature in different depths (5-10-20-30-50-100 cm) at three times of the day (3, 9, and 15 GMT) for 14 weather stations over 7 provinces was analyzed using linear regression. Then, two different air freezing indices (AFIs) including Norwegian and Finn AFI was implemented. Finally, the frost penetration depth was calculated by McKeown method and the accuracy of models determined by actual soil frost penetration depth. The results demonstrated that there is a significant correlation between air and soil depth temperature in all studied stations up to the 30 cm under the surface. Also, according to the results, Norwegian index can be effectively used for determination of soil frost depth penetration and the correlation coefficient between actual and estimated soil frost penetration depth is r = 0.92 while the Finn index overestimates the frost depth in all stations with correlation coefficient r = 0.70.

  3. CONTROL OF AROMATIC WASTE AIR STREAMS BY SOIL BIOREACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three soils were examined for the ability to degrade hydrocarbon vapors of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX). Each of these compounds are major aromatic constituents of gasolines. The soils examined were Rubicon Sand from Traverse City, Michigan, Durant Loam fro...

  4. Variation in the sugar yield in response to drying-off of sugarcane before harvest and the occurrence of low air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The need to irrigate sugarcane in the Brazilian Savanna is due to the lack of rain from April to September. For efficient sugar accumulation, the crop needs water stress or heat stress at the maturation stage. However, when the water deficit is intense at this stage, it occurs the reduction in crop production. The objective of this study was: (i to assess the quality of the raw material of sugarcane in different drying-off seasons before harvest; (ii to evaluate the influence of heat stress on the culture. The experiment was conducted in Santo Antônio de Goiás (GO, Brazil, in Oxisol, with CTC4 variety in cane-plant cycle. A randomized block design in a split-plot array in time was used. The treatments of the plots were five drying-off times (90, 60, 30, 15 and 0 days before harvest and, in the subplots, five seasons of the yield evaluation. Irrigation was carried out by surface drip method, which provided 50% of crop water requirement. The best results for sugar yield occurred 30 days before harvest, period in which the crop irrigation could be interrupted. The water deficit of 37.76 mm appears to be the critical limit of water shortage in the soil, from which the sugarcane yield starts to be reduced. The sugar concentration in the stalk was more influenced by low air temperatures than sugarcane yield.

  5. Mathematical modeling of convective air drying of quinoa-supplemented feed for laboratory rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vega-Gálvez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Drying kinetics of quinoa-supplemented feed for laboratory rats during processing at 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90ºC was studied and modeled in this work. Desorption isotherm was obtained at 60ºC giving a monolayer moisture content of 0.04 g water/g d.m. The experimental drying curves showed that drying process took place only in the falling rate period. Several thin-layer drying equations available in the literature were evaluated based on determination coefficient (r², sum squared errors (SSE and Chi-square (χ2 statisticals. In comparison to the experimental moisture values, the values estimated with the Logarithmic model gave the best fit quality (r² >0.994, SSE < 0.00015 and χ2 < 0.00018, showing this equation could predict very accurately the drying time of rat feed under the operative conditions applied.

  6. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Yang; Baolu Han; Nandong Xue; Lingli Zhou; Fasheng Li

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g.,in plastic and glass sheds),which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs).A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)).Air was sampled at 5,15,and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cyhnders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges.Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils.In addition,significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs.These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air.The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed.

  7. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed.

  8. Runoff and interrill erosion in sodic soils treated with dry PAM and phosphogypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal formation at the soil surface during rainstorms reduces rain infiltration and leads to runoff and erosion. An increase in soil sodicity increases soil susceptibility to crusting, runoff, and erosion. Surface application of dissolved polyacrylamide (PAM) mixed with gypsum was found to be very ef...

  9. Soil nutrients and liming on dry weight yields and forage quality of Signal grass (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf.), grown on Korat soil series (oxic paleustults) in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholsen, Suradej

    2010-07-01

    This experiment was carried out at Khon Kaen University Experimental Farm, Khon Kaen University, Thailand during the 2004-2005 aiming to investigate effect of phosphorus (P) and dolomite levels on dry weight yields (DWYs) and forage quality of Signal grass. A 4x3 factorial arranged in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) was used. Four P levels were: 0, 100, 200 and 400 kg P2O5 ha-1 and three dolomite levels were: 0, 625 and 2,500 kg ha-1. The Signal grass plants were grown on Korat soil series, (Oxic Paleustults). A quadrat with a dimension of 50x50 cm was used for grass yield harvests. Crude Protein (CP), Acid Detergent Fibre (ADF), Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDF) and Dry Matter Degradability (DMD) contents were determined. Tissues phosphorus and calcium contents were also analysed. The results showed that an increase in dolomite levels increased soil pH from 4.4 to 5.1 for levels 1 and 3, respectively. An increase in P levels increased available soil P from 4.56 to 28.38 ppm for levels 1 and 4, respectively. For the first year experiment, dolomite levels had no significant effect on DWYs, whilst P levels significantly increased but only up to level 2. The 2-year average DWYs reached 11,368 kg ha-1 for level 4 of P. With the first year rainy season harvests, P levels had its significant effect on ADF and DMD up to level 2 but not with CP and NDF. For the dry season harvests, P and dolomite levels had no significant effects on forage quality. Dolomite levels had no significant effect on P and Ca contents of the Signal grass tissues but an increase in P levels increased P contents. P and Ca contents, in most cases, were higher for the dry season than the rainy season.

  10. Uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides from soil and air into radishes (Raphanus sativus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikes, Ondrej; Cupr, Pavel [RECETOX, Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Trapp, Stefan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Klanova, Jana [RECETOX, Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: klanova@recetox.muni.cz

    2009-02-15

    Uptake of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls from soil and air into radishes was measured at a heavily contaminated field site. The highest contaminant concentrations were found for DDT and its metabolites, and for {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane. Bioconcentration factor (BCF, defined as a ratio between the contaminant concentration in the plant tissue and concentration in soil) was determined for roots, edible bulbs and shoots. Root BCF values were constant and not correlated to log K{sub OW}. A negative correlation between BCF and log K{sub OW} was found for edible bulbs. Shoot BCF values were rather constant and varied between 0.01 and 0.22. Resuspended soil particles may facilitate the transport of chemicals from soil to shoots. Elevated POP concentrations found in shoots of radishes grown in the control plot support the hypothesis that the uptake from air was more significant for shoots than the one from soil. The uptake of POPs from air was within the range of theoretical values predicted from log K{sub OA}. - Uptake from air represented for majority of persistent organochlorines a dominant pathway into shoots while uptake from soil was dominant for roots.

  11. Response of four foliage plants to heated soil and reduced air temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnaruk, W.H. Jr.; Mills, T.W.; Ingram, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Tip cuttings of Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) G. Donn Exotic Perfection Compacta' and Aglaonema commutatum Schott Silver Queen and single eye cuttings of Epipremnum aureum (Linden and Andre) Bunt, and Philodendron scandens oxycardium (Schott) Bunt. were propagated in combinations of 4 minimum air temperatures, 45/sup 0/, 50/sup 0/, 55/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/F (7.2/sup 0/, 10/sup 0/, 12.7/sup 0/, 15.5/sup 0/C), and 2 soil temperature treatments; controlled 70/sup 0/F (21/sup 0/C) minimum and variable. Maintaining minimum soil temperatures at 70/sup 0/F reduced production times for rooted Dieffenbachia and Aglaonema tips by 45% and of Epipremnum and Philodendron suitable for 3 inch pots by 35% and 25%, respectively, regardless of minimum air temperature. Minimum air temperature had little effect on Dieffenbachia or Aglaonema root number and length at 70/sup 0/F soil temperature. Similarly shoot length and number of leaves of Philodendron and Epipremnum were not affected by minimum air temperatures with 70/sup 0/F soil temperature. Plant quality was uniformly high in all crops at the 70/sup 0/F soil minimum for all air temperatures except Epipremnum which was chlorotic at 45/sup 0/F. A description of a warm water in-benching heating system is included. 6 references, 2 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Natural ³⁷Ar concentrations in soil air: implications for monitoring underground nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Robin A; Purtschert, Roland

    2011-10-15

    For on-site inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) measurement of the noble gas ³⁷Ar is considered an important technique. ³⁷Ar is produced underground by neutron activation of Calcium by the reaction ⁴⁰Ca(n,α)³⁷Ar. The naturally occurring equilibrium ³⁷Ar concentration balance in soil air is a function of an exponentially decreasing production rate from cosmic ray neutrons with increasing soil depth, diffusive transport in the soil air, and radioactive decay (T(1/2): 35 days). In this paper for the first time, measurements of natural ³⁷Ar activities in soil air are presented. The highest activities of ~100 mBq m⁻³ air are 2 orders of magnitude larger than in the atmosphere and are found in 1.5-2.5 m depth. At depths > 8 m ³⁷Ar activities are < 20 mBq m⁻³ air. After identifying the main ³⁷Ar production and gas transport factors the expected global activity range distribution of ³⁷Ar in shallow subsoil (0.7 m below the surface) was estimated. In high altitude soils, with large amounts of Calcium and with low gas permeability, ³⁷Ar activities may reach values up to 1 Bq m⁻³.

  13. United States Air Force Soil Stabilization Index System - A Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Lime Influence on Soil Plasticity Preparation of Specimens for Strength and Durability Test Results of Strength Tests Durability Tests - General...10.54 7 12.40 12.37 12.36 11.07 | 8 12.40 12.40 11.59 1 10 12.10 12 12.40 | 14 12.40 26 3. Lime Influence on Soil Plasticity it has been

  14. Coal mining activities change plant community structure due to air pollution and soil degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bhanu; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coal mining activities on the community structures of woody and herbaceous plants. The response of individual plants of community to defilement caused by coal mining was also assessed. Air monitoring, soil physico-chemical and phytosociological analyses were carried around Jharia coalfield (JCF) and Raniganj coalfield. The importance value index of sensitive species minified and those of tolerant species enhanced with increasing pollution load and altered soil quality around coal mining areas. Although the species richness of woody and herbaceous plants decreased with higher pollution load, a large number of species acclimatized to the stress caused by the coal mining activities. Woody plant community at JCF was more affected by coal mining than herbaceous community. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that structure of herbaceous community was mainly driven by soil total organic carbon, soil nitrogen, whereas woody layer community was influenced by sulphur dioxide in ambient air, soil sulphate and soil phosphorus. The changes in species diversity observed at mining areas indicated an increase in the proportion of resistant herbs and grasses showing a tendency towards a definite selection strategy of ecosystem in response to air pollution and altered soil characteristics.

  15. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  16. Diversity and production of Ethiopian dry woodlands explained by climate- and soil- stress gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshete, A.; Sterck, F.J.; Bongers, F.

    2011-01-01

    Dry woodlands cover about 14% of the total African land surface and represent about 25% of the natural vegetation. They are characterized by a seasonal climate, with a dry season of 4–7 months. Large parts of these ecosystems are degrading due to grazing, fire or exploitation by people. We studied s

  17. Effect of dry mycelium of Penicillium chrysogenum fertilizer on soil microbial community composition, enzyme activities and snap bean growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Cai, Chen; Thabit, Mohamed; Wang, Pu; Li, Guomin; Duan, Ziheng

    2016-10-01

    The dry mycelium fertilizer (DMF) was produced from penicillin fermentation fungi mycelium (PFFM) following an acid-heating pretreatment to degrade the residual penicillin. In this study, it was applied into soil as fertilizer to investigate its effects on soil properties, phytotoxicity, microbial community composition, enzyme activities, and growth of snap bean in greenhouse. As the results show, pH, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, and organic matter of soil with DMF treatments were generally higher than CON treatment. In addition, the applied DMF did not cause heavy metal and residual drug pollution of the modified soil. The lowest GI values (microbial population and enzyme activities illustrated that DMF was rapidly decomposed and the decomposition process significantly affected microbial growth and enzyme activities. The DMF-modified soil phytotoxicity decreased at the late fertilization time. DMF1 was considered as the optimum amount of DMF dose based on principal component analysis scores. Plant height and plant yield of snap bean were remarkably enhanced with the optimum DMF dose.

  18. Microbial responses and nitrous oxide emissions during wetting and drying of organically and conventionally managed soil under tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M.; Jackson, L.E.; Lundquist, E.J.; Louie, D.T.; Miller, R.L.; Rolston, D.E.; Scow, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    The types and amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs, as well as irrigation management are likely to influence gaseous emissions and microbial ecology of agricultural soil. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) efflux, with and without acetylene inhibition, inorganic N, and microbial biomass C were measured after irrigation or simulated rainfall in two agricultural fields under tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). The two fields, located in the California Central Valley, had either a history of high organic matter (OM) inputs ("organic" management) or one of low OM and inorganic fertilizer inputs ("conventional" management). In microcosms, where short-term microbial responses to wetting and drying were studied, the highest CO2 efflux took place at about 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS). At this moisture level, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) indicative of microbial nutrient availability were elevated and a PLFA stress indicator was depressed, suggesting peak microbial activity. The highest N 2O efflux in the organically managed soil (0.94 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) occurred after manure and legume cover crop incorporation, and in the conventionally managed soil (2.12 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) after inorganic N fertilizer inputs. Elevated N2O emissions occurred at a WFPS >60% and lasted <2 days after wetting, probably because the top layer (0-150 mm) of this silt loam soil dried quickly. Therefore, in these cropping systems, irrigation management might control the duration of elevated N2O efflux, even when C and inorganic N availability are high, whereas inorganic N concentrations should be kept low during times when soil moisture cannot be controlled.

  19. Modeling the air-soil transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid in the mid-Ohio Valley using linked air dispersion and vadose zone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ryan, P. Barry; Vieira, Verónica M.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2012-05-01

    As part of an extensive modeling effort on the air-soil-groundwater transport pathway of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), this study was designed to compare the performance of different air dispersion modeling systems (AERMOD vs. ISCST3), and different approaches to handling incomplete meteorological data using a data set with substantial soil measurements and a well characterized point source for air emissions. Two of the most commonly used EPA air dispersion models, AERMOD and ISCST3, were linked with the EPA vadose zone model PRZM-3. Predicted deposition rates from the air dispersion model were used as input values for the vadose zone model to estimate soil concentrations of PFOA at different depths. We applied 34 years of meteorological data including hourly surface measurements from Parkersburg Airport and 5 years of onsite wind direction and speed to the air dispersion models. We compared offsite measured soil concentrations to predictions made for the corresponding sampling depths, focusing on soil rather than air measurements because the offsite soil samples were less likely to be influenced by short-term variability in emission rates and meteorological conditions. PFOA concentrations in surface soil (0-30 cm depth) were under-predicted and those in subsurface soil (>30 cm depth) were over-predicted compared to observed concentrations by both linked air and vadose zone model. Overall, the simulated values from the linked modeling system were positively correlated with those observed in surface soil (Spearman's rho, Rsp = 0.59-0.70) and subsurface soil (Rsp = 0.46-0.48). This approach provides a useful modeling scheme for similar exposure and risk analyses where the air-soil-groundwater transport is a primary contamination pathway.

  20. Determination of radon concentration in soil air and in the radioactive spring's bathroom air by passive method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Kimiko [Otsuma Women' s Univ., School of Social Information Studies, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Tadashi [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Radioisotope Lab., Tamaho, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    There are many kind of passive methods such as open vial method, {alpha}-track method and active carbon method (PICO-RAD detector) or so. The open vial method can determine radon in soil air, which dissolves easily into toluene and afterwards can be measured by the integral counting with a liquid scintillation counter. The {alpha}-track method can record {alpha} ray tracks of radon on thin cellulose nitrate film which can be rendered visible for counting after NaOH solution treatment. The PICO-RAD detectors are passive devices requiring no power. They are integrating detectors used to determine the average radon concentration in air where they are placed. The detectors consist of a plastic liquid scintillation vial which consists a porous canister held securely near the top of the vial. The porous canister contains a bed of a controlled weight of charcoal covered by a layer of desiccant. The securely capped canister has and indefinite shelf life. The {alpha} radioactivity of radon gas adsorbed in fine active charcoal exposed in the air is measured with a liquid scintillation counter. Using of those simple detectors, we have measured distribution of radon concentration in soil air and in the radioactive spring's bathroom air. (author)

  1. Response of respiration and nutrient availability to drying and rewetting in soil from a semi-arid woodland depends on vegetation patch and a recent wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Q.; Meyer, W. S.; Koerber, G. R.; Marschner, P.

    2015-08-01

    Semi-arid woodlands, which are characterised by patchy vegetation interspersed with bare, open areas, are frequently exposed to wildfire. During summer, long dry periods are occasionally interrupted by rainfall events. It is well known that rewetting of dry soil induces a flush of respiration. However, the magnitude of the flush may differ between vegetation patches and open areas because of different organic matter content, which could be further modulated by wildfire. Soils were collected from under trees, under shrubs or in open areas in unburnt and burnt sandy mallee woodland, where part of the woodland experienced a wildfire which destroyed or damaged most of the aboveground plant parts 4 months before sampling. In an incubation experiment, the soils were exposed to two moisture treatments: constantly moist (CM) and drying and rewetting (DRW). In CM, soils were incubated at 80 % of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) for 19 days; in DRW, soils were dried for 4 days, kept dry for another 5 days, then rewetted to 80 % WHC and maintained at this water content until day 19. Soil respiration decreased during drying and was very low in the dry period; rewetting induced a respiration flush. Compared to soil under shrubs and in open areas, cumulative respiration per gram of soil in CM and DRW was greater under trees, but lower when expressed per gram of total organic carbon (TOC). Organic matter content, available P, and microbial biomass C, but not available N, were greater under trees than in open areas. Wild fire decreased the flush of respiration per gram of TOC in the open areas and under shrubs, and reduced TOC and microbial biomass C (MBC) concentrations only under trees, but had little effect on available N and P concentrations. We conclude that the impact of wildfire and DRW events on nutrient cycling differs among vegetation patches of a native semi-arid woodland which is related to organic matter amount and availability.

  2. Modeling Air Permeability in Variably Saturated Soil from Two Natural Clay Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda T K K; Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    Understanding soil–gas phase properties and processes is important for finding solutions to critical environmental problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and transport of gaseous-phase contaminants in soils. Soil–air permeability, ka (μm2), is the key parameter governing advective gas movement...... in soil and is controlled by soil physical characteristics representing soil texture and structure. Models predicting ka as a function of air-filled porosity (ɛ) often use a reference-point measurement, for example, ka,1000 at ɛ1000 (where the measurement is done at a suction of –1000 cm H2O). Using ka...... measurements from two Danish arable fields, each located on natural clay gradients, this study presents a pore tortuosity–disconnectivity analysis to characterize the soil–gas phase. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil–moisture condition, clay content, and other potential...

  3. Performance Evaluation of a Solar Dryer with Finny, Perforated Absorber Plate Collector Equipped with an Air Temperature Control System for Dill Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Razmipour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dill is one of the most important plants in the world because of its medicinal properties and it is widely used as a vegetable in the most parts of Iran. In the present study a new solar dryer with finny, perforated absorber plate collector was utilized to dry fresh dill. The dryer was comprised of a solar collector, a product container, a fan and a drying air temperature controller. The temperature controller was used as a control system to regulate the drying air temperature. Thermal performance of the dryer with finny, perforated solar collector was compared with that of a simple flat plate solar collector at different airflow rates. The effect of drying air temperature at three levels (45, 55 and 65 °C, the product size at three lengths (3, 5 and 7 cm and two different modes of drying (mixed and indirect on the dryer performance was investigated. The results showed that the finny, perforated absorber plate solar collector could improve the thermal efficiency about 11% in comparison with the flat plate collector and the highest thermal efficiency was achieved at the maximum airflow rate. Meanwhile, increasing the air temperature and decreasing the product size caused a significant reduction in energy consumption. Solar fraction reduced by increasing the air temperature. Finally a maximum dryer efficiency of 70% was observed at air temperature of 65 oC, product size of 3 cm with mixed mode drying.

  4. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    2011-01-01

    with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water...... dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were...

  5. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  6. Theoretical preconditions and technical substantiation for mechanical compressed air drying method application on the railway transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana RIPOL’-SARAGOSI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is related to the compressed air purification for the rolling stock problems. The mechanical method is described as a potential way of the compressed air cooling and purificating. The temperature field at the heat conducting surface engineer function equation is given in the article as well.

  7. High accuracy measurements of dry mole fractions of carbon dioxide and methane in humid air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Rella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional techniques for measuring the mole fractions of greenhouse gases in the well-mixed atmosphere have required dry sample gas streams (dew point inter-laboratory compatibility goals (WMO, 2011a without drying the sample gas. In this paper, we present laboratory methodology for empirically deriving the water vapour correction factors, and we summarise a series of in-situ validation experiments comparing the measurements in humid gas streams to well-characterised dry-gas measurements. By using the manufacturer-supplied correction factors, the dry-mole fraction measurements have been demonstrated to be well within the GAW compatibility goals up to a water vapour concentration of at least 1%. By determining the correction factors for individual instruments once at the start of life, this water vapour concentration range can be extended to at least 2% over the life of the instrument, and if the correction factors are determined periodically over time, the evidence suggests that this range can be extended up to and even above 4% water vapour concentrations.

  8. Simultaneous decay of contact-angle and surface-tension during the rehydration of air-dried root mucilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arye, Gilboa; Chen, Fengxian

    2016-04-01

    Plants can extract or exude water and solutes at their root surface. Among the root exudates, the mucilage exhibits a surfactant like properties - depressing the surface-tension (ST, mN/m) at the water-air interface. The amphipathic nature of some of the mucilage molecules (e.g. lipids) is thought to be the reason for its surfactant like behavior. As the rhizosphere dries out, re-orientation and/or re-configuration of amphipathic molecules at the solid-air interface, may impart hydrophobic nature to the rhizosphere. Our current knowledge on the ST of natural and/or model root mucilage is based on measurements of the equilibrium ST. However, adsorption of amphipathic molecules at the water-air interface is not reached instantaneously. The hydrophobic nature of the rhizosphere was deduced from the initial advancing CA, commonly calculated from the first few milliseconds up to few seconds (depending on the method employed). We hypothesized that during the rehydration of the root mucilage; both quantities are dynamic. Processes such as water absorbance and dissolution, may vary the interfacial tensions as a function of time. Consequently, simultaneous reduction of both CA and ST as a function of time can be expected. The main objective of this study was to characterize and quantify the extent, persistency and dynamic of the CA and ST during rehydration of air-dried root mucilage. The study was involved with measurements of dynamic and equilibrium ST using the pedant drop or Wilhelmy plate method, respectively. Glass slides were coated with naturally occurring or model root mucilage and the CA of a sessile drop was measured optically, as a function of time. The results were analyzed based on the Young-Dupré and Young-Laplace equations, from which the simultaneous decay of CA and ST was deduced. The implication for the wettability and water flow in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  9. A comparison of measured and calculated values of air kerma rates from 137Cs in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, a study was conducted to determine the air gamma dose rate from 137Cs deposited in soil. The gamma dose rate measurements and soil sampling were performed at 30 reference plots from the south-west districts of the Bryansk region (Russia that had been heavily contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. The 137Cs inventory in the top 20 cm of soil ranged from 260 kBq m–2 to 2800 kBq m–2. Vertical distributions of 137Cs in soil cores (6 samples per a plot were determined after their sectioning into ten horizontal layers of 2 cm thickness. The vertical distributions of 137Cs in soil were employed to calculate air kerma rates, K, using two independent methods proposed by Saito and Jacob [Radiat. Prot. Dosimetry, 1995, Vol. 58, P. 29–45] and Golikov et al. [Contaminated Forests– Recent Developments in Risk Identification and Future Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999. – P. 333–341]. A very good coincidence between the methods was observed (Spearman’s rank coefficient of correlation = 0.952; P<0.01; on average, a difference between the kerma rates calculated with two methods did not exceed 3%. The calculated air kerma rates agreed with the measured dose rates in air very well (Spearman’s coefficient of correlation = 0.952; P<0.01. For large grassland plots (n=19, the measured dose rates were on average 6% less than the calculated kerma rates. The tested methods for calculating the air dose rate from 137Cs in soil can be recommended for practical studies in radiology and radioecology. 

  10. Community-weighted mean traits but not functional diversity determine the changes in soil properties during wetland drying on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Epstein, Howard E.; Wen, Zhongming; Zhao, Jie; Jin, Jingwei; Jing, Guanghua; Cheng, Jimin; Du, Guozhen

    2017-02-01

    Climate change and human activities have caused a shift in vegetation composition and soil biogeochemical cycles of alpine wetlands on the Tibetan Plateau. The primary goal of this study was to test for associations between community-weighted mean (CWM) traits, functional diversity, and soil properties during wetland drying. We collected soil samples and investigated the aboveground vegetation in swamp, swamp meadow, and typical meadow environments. Four CWM trait values (specific leaf area is SLA, leaf dry matter content is LDMC, leaf area is LA, and mature plant height is MPH) for 42 common species were measured across the three habitats; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, and functional divergence) were also quantified at these sites. Our results showed that the drying of the wetland dramatically altered plant community and soil properties. There was a significant correlation between CWM of traits and soil properties, but not a significant correlation between functional diversity and soil properties. Our results further showed that CWM-LA, CWM-SLA, and CWM-LDMC had positive correlations with soil readily available nutrients (available nitrogen, AN; available phosphorus, AP), but negative correlations with total soil nutrients (soil organic carbon is SOC, total nitrogen is TN, and total phosphorus is TP). Our study demonstrated that simple, quantitative plant functional traits, but not functional diversity, are directly related to soil C and N properties, and they likely play an important role in plant-soil interactions. Our results also suggest that functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing ecosystem processes during wetland drying.

  11. Soil microbiological properties and enzymatic activities of long-term post-fire recovery in dry and semiarid Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedo, J.; Lucas-Borja, M. E.; Wic, C.; Andrés-Abellán, M.; de Las Heras, J.

    2015-02-01

    Wildfires affecting forest ecosystems and post-fire silvicultural treatments may cause considerable changes in soil properties. The capacity of different microbial groups to recolonise soil after disturbances is crucial for proper soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate some microbial soil properties and enzyme activities in semiarid and dry Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands. Different plots affected by a wildfire event 17 years ago without or with post-fire silvicultural treatments 5 years after the fire event were selected. A mature Aleppo pine stand, unaffected by wildfire and not thinned was used as a control. Physicochemical soil properties (soil texture, pH, carbonates, organic matter, electrical conductivity, total N and P), soil enzymes (urease, phosphatase, β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities), soil respiration and soil microbial biomass carbon were analysed in the selected forests areas and plots. The main finding was that long time after this fire event produces no differences in the microbiological soil properties and enzyme activities of soil after comparing burned and thinned, burned and not thinned, and mature plots. Moreover, significant site variation was generally seen in soil enzyme activities and microbiological parameters. We conclude that total vegetation recovery normalises post-fire soil microbial parameters, and that wildfire and post-fire silvicultural treatments are not significant factors affecting soil properties after 17 years.

  12. High accuracy measurements of dry mole fractions of carbon dioxide and methane in humid air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Rella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional techniques for measuring the mole fractions of greenhouse gas in the well-mixed atmosphere have required extremely dry sample gas streams (dew point < −25 °C to achieve the inter-laboratory compatibility goals set forth by the Global Atmospheric Watch program of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO/GAW for carbon dioxide (±0.1 ppm and methane (±2 ppb. Drying the sample gas to low levels of water vapor can be expensive, time-consuming, and/or problematic, especially at remote sites where access is difficult. Recent advances in optical measurement techniques, in particular Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS, have led to the development of highly stable and precise greenhouse gas analyzers capable of highly accurate measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor. Unlike many older technologies, which can suffer from significant uncorrected interference from water vapor, these instruments permit for the first time accurate and precise greenhouse gas measurements that can meet the WMO/GAW inter-laboratory compatibility goals without drying the sample gas. In this paper, we present laboratory methodology for empirically deriving the water vapor correction factors, and we summarize a series of in-situ validation experiments comparing the measurements in humid gas streams to well-characterized dry-gas measurements. By using the manufacturer-supplied correction factors, the dry-mole fraction measurements have been demonstrated to be well within the GAW compatibility goals up to at least 1% water vapor. By determining the correction factors for individual instruments once at the start of life, this range can be extended to at least 2% over the life of the instrument, and if the correction factors are determined periodically over time, the evidence suggests that this range can be extended above 4%.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Force of Dry-Type Air-Core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhi-gang; GENGYing-san; WANGJian-hua

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled magnetic-circuit method for computing the magnetic force of air-core reactor under short-time current. The current and the magnetic flux density are computed first and then the magnetic force is obtained. Thus, the dynamic stability performance of air-core reactor can be analyzed at the design stage to reduce experimental cost and shorten the lead-time of product development.

  14. Air quality assessment in the periurban area of Mexico Megacity during dry hot season in 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reynoso, Agustin; Santos Garcia-Yee, Jose; Barrera-Huertas, Hugo; Gerardo Ruiz-Suárez, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Air quality is a human health threat not only in urbanized areas, it also affects the surrounding zones. Interaction between urban and rural areas can be evaluated by measurements and using models for regional areas that includes in its domain the peri-urban regions. The use of monitoring sites in remote areas is useful however it is not possible to cover all the region the use of models can provide valuable information about the source and fate of the pollution and its transformation. In order to evaluate the influence of the Mexico Megacity in the air quality of the region, two field campaigns were performed during the dry hot season during 2011 and 2012. Meterological and pollutant measurements were made during February and march 2011, in three sites towards the south east of Mexico Megacity, and from march to April 2012 towards the west after the Popocatepetl-Iztaccihuatl mountain range. Air quality modeling were performed by using the National Emissions Inventory 2008 during the studied periods, a comparison between measurements and the air quality model was performed. This type of studies can offer information about the pollutant distribution, the meteorological conditions and the exactness of emissions inventories. The latest can be useful for emissions inventory developers and policy makers.

  15. 柠檬热风干燥特性及数学模型%Hot-air drying characteristics and mathematical model of lemon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳斌; 郑优; 陈海桥; 李颖; 陈厚荣

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics hot-air drying of lemon and its mathematical model were studied with taking the fresh lemon as raw material. Effects of different factors which were lemon slice of thickness, hot-air temperature and wind speed,on the hot-air drying characteristics of lemon were studied to get lemon drying of drying characteristics of curve,drying rate curve. The experimental data was processed base on the SAS8.0 software to establish the drying mathematical model of lemon. Results showed that the hot-air temperature and the lemon slice of thickness had a greater impact on drying rate,while the wind speed on drying rate was less affected. And the hot-air drying model of lemon agreed with Page model.%以新鲜柠檬为原料,研究其热风干燥特性及数学模型。以柠檬片厚度、热风温度、热风风速为因素,分析其对柠檬热风干燥特性的影响,建立柠檬热风干燥的干燥特性曲线、干燥速率曲线,并利用SAS8.0软件对试验数据进行拟合,构建柠檬热风干燥数学模型。结果表明:热风温度、柠檬片厚度对柠檬热风干燥的速率有较大影响,而热风风速对干燥速率的影响较小;柠檬热风干燥符合Page模型。

  16. Simultaneous Water Vapor and Dry Air Optical Path Length Measurements and Compensation with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Defrère, D; Downey, E; Böhm, M; Danchi, W C; Durney, O; Ertel, S; Hill, J M; Hoffmann, W F; Mennesson, B; Millan-Gabet, R; Montoya, M; Pott, J -U; Skemer, A; Spalding, E; Stone, J; Vaz, A

    2016-01-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer uses a near-infrared camera to measure the optical path length variations between the two AO-corrected apertures and provide high-angular resolution observations for all its science channels (1.5-13 $\\mu$m). There is however a wavelength dependent component to the atmospheric turbulence, which can introduce optical path length errors when observing at a wavelength different from that of the fringe sensing camera. Water vapor in particular is highly dispersive and its effect must be taken into account for high-precision infrared interferometric observations as described previously for VLTI/MIDI or the Keck Interferometer Nuller. In this paper, we describe the new sensing approach that has been developed at the LBT to measure and monitor the optical path length fluctuations due to dry air and water vapor separately. After reviewing the current performance of the system for dry air seeing compensation, we present simultaneous H-, K-, and N-band observations that illus...

  17. Increases in soil water content after the mortality of non-native trees in oceanic island forest ecosystems are due to reduced water loss during dry periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kachi, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The control of dominant, non-native trees can alter the water balance of soils in forest ecosystems via hydrological processes, which results in changes in soil water environments. To test this idea, we evaluated the effects of the mortality of an invasive tree, Casuarina equisetifolia Forst., on the water content of surface soils on the Ogasawara Islands, subtropical islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, using a manipulative herbicide experiment. Temporal changes in volumetric water content of surface soils at 6 cm depth at sites where all trees of C. equisetifolia were killed by herbicide were compared with those of adjacent control sites before and after their mortality with consideration of the amount of precipitation. In addition, the rate of decrease in the soil water content during dry periods and the rate of increase in the soil water content during rainfall periods were compared between herbicide and control sites. Soil water content at sites treated with herbicide was significantly higher after treatment than soil water content at control sites during the same period. Differences between initial and minimum values of soil water content at the herbicide sites during the drying events were significantly lower than the corresponding differences in the control quadrats. During rainfall periods, both initial and maximum values of soil water contents in the herbicided quadrats were higher, and differences between the maximum and initial values did not differ between the herbicided and control quadrats. Our results indicated that the mortality of non-native trees from forest ecosystems increased water content of surface soils, due primarily to a slower rate of decrease in soil water content during dry periods.

  18. Dry sliding wear of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in air and vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 杨德庄; 何世禹; 武万良

    2003-01-01

    Differences in wear rate, morphology of the worn surface and debris, and the microstructure in subsurface of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy after wear in air and vacuum were compared. The wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in air is higher than that in vacuum in all the ranges of sliding velocities and applied loads. The wear of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in air is controlled by a combination of abrasion, oxidation and delamination with micro-cracks remaining in subsurface. Under the vacuum condition, the surface layer of Ti-6Al-4V alloy experiences a severe plastic deformation on a great scale, which results in an ultra-fine microstructure.

  19. 豇豆隧道式热风干燥特性和模型%Drying characteristics and model of cowpea in tunnel hot air dryer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师建芳; 吴辉煌; 娄正; 吴中华; 刘清

    2013-01-01

    Cowpea, also known as beans, black-eyed peas, is an important leguminous vegetable, which is extensively grown in China. Fresh cowpeas having relatively high moisture content must be distributed to customers or processed as quickly as possible in order to prevent microbial fermentation and thermal degradation. Cowpeas resources have great losses as which are putrescible at normal temperatures and pressures, and this severely limits the transportation, storage and process of cowpea, therefore the development of cowpea deep processing is necessary. As Asian people have the habit of eating dried vegetables such as dried cowpea, drying can not only solve the serious problem of huge losses, but also create more economic benefits for farmers;and because most of deep processing technology needs dried cowpea, drying is of great importance as a preprocessing method. The tunnel type of hot air drying technology has been widely utilized in the drying of carrots, preserved fruits, and plums etc. In this paper, hot air drying characteristics and a drying model of tunnel type of hot air drying technology was studied in drying Cowpea, in order to establish the best model to simulate and predict the water ratio and to provide a technical basis for the industrial application of the control and prediction of the drying process and the tunnel type of hot air drying for cowpea. The tunnel dryer was made by the Institute of Agricultural Product Processing, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Engineering and College of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology. According to the pre-test results, the drying characteristics of Cowpea was investigated under different air temperatures (70℃、80℃and 90℃), air velocities (0.3、0.4 and 0.5 m/s) and material thickness (6 mm、18 mm and 30 mm). The empirical relationships between Cowpea moisture then natural logarithmic lnMR and drying time, water effective diffusion coefficient Deff and drying air temperature was

  20. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign.

  1. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  2. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  3. Evaluation of air pollution phytotoxicity in a seasonally dry tropical urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, J; Pandey, U

    1994-12-01

    This study was conducted in the urban environment of Varanasi, India, to evaluate the plant responses to urban air pollution. Twenty sites were selected in four different zones of the city. At each site, seven woody perennials of same age classes were selected. Out of the four zones (I, II, III and IV), zone IV was used as a reference (control) zone as it received the minimum pollution input. Plant species growing in polluted and control areas were compared with respect to foliar dust load, per cent leaf area injury, leaf area, specific leaf weight and chlorophyll, ascorbic acid, SO 4 (2-) S and total N concentration in the leaves. Results indicated that the air pollution level in Varanasi causes leaf damage, reduces leaf area, specific leaf weight and chlorophyll, ascorbic acid and total N concentrations in the leaves. Sulphur concentration in leaves increased with increasing level of SO2 in the ambient air. The magnitude of such changes was maximum at the zone receiving maximum pollution load. Carissa carandas was found to be the most sensitive species and Bougainvillea spectabilis, the least. The study shows that the urban air pollution level in Varanasi is detrimental for the growth of plants involved in this study.

  4. Change in color and other fruit quality characteristics of tomato cultivars after hot-air drying at low final-moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashebir, Dereje; Jezik, Karoline; Weingartemann, Herbert; Gretzmacher, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the drying quality of three tomato cultivars (Amoroso, Berlinto and Messina) at low final-moisture content. Tomatoes were cut into slices and hot-air-dried from 92% (wet basis) to 12% final moisture content at 55 degrees C, 65 degrees C and 75 degrees C at 1.5 m/sec air flow. Color, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA) and ascorbic acid (AA) content were measured in both fresh and dried tomatoes. Brightness of the dried tomato slices was significantly decreased, while intensity of the red and yellow colors and brightness of the red color (a*/b*) increased. Low overall color change (DeltaE) was obtained at the lowest drying temperature (55 degrees C). Messina and Amoroso showed a higher a* value and lower DeltaE, respectively. The TSS content was increased, while the TA and AA contents were decreased through drying. This study shows that it is possible to hot-air dry tomato slices to a final moisture content of 12% maintaining quality that is comparable with studies where the final-moisture content was higher (15% or more).

  5. Two-Region Extended Archie's Law Model for Soil Air Permeability and Gas Diffusivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The air permeability (ka) and soil gas diffusion coefficients (Dp) are controlling factors for gas transport and fate in variably saturated soils. We developed a unified model for ka and Dp based on the classical Archie's law, extended by: (i) allowing for two-region gas transport behavior...... for structured soils, with the natural field moisture condition (set at −100 cm H2O matric potential [pF 2]) as the reference (spliced) point between the large-pore (drained pore diameter ≥30 μm at pF ≤ 2) and the small-pore (subsequently drained pores 2) regions, and (ii) including a percolation...... threshold, set as 10% of the total porosity for structureless porous media or 10% of the porosity in the large-pore region for structured soils. The resulting extended Archie's law with reference point (EXAR) models for ka and Dp were fitted to the measured data. For both structureless and structured porous...

  6. Microbial community dynamics and methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrous oxide concentrations in upland forest and riparian soils across a seasonal gradient of fully saturated soils to completely dried soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.; McGlynn, B. L.; McDermott, T.; Dore, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Gas concentrations (CH4, CO2, N2O, and O2), soil properties (soil water content and pH), and microbial community composition were measured from soils at 32 sites across the Stringer Creek Watershed in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest 7 times between June 3, 2013 and September 20, 2013. Soils were fully saturated during the initial sampling period and dried down over the course of the summer. Soils and gas were sampled from 5cm and 20cm at each site and also at 50cm at eight riparian sites. In total, 496 individual soil samples were collected. Soil moisture ranged from 3.7% to fully saturated; soil pH ranged from 3.60 to 6.68. Methane concentrations in soils ranged from 0.426 ppm to 218 ppm; Carbon dioxide concentrations ranged from 550 ppm to 42,990 ppm; Nitrous oxide concentrations ranged from 0.220 ppm to 2.111 ppm; Oxygen concentrations ranged from 10.2% to 21.5%. Soil microbial communities were characterized by DNA sequences covering the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. DNA sequences were generated (~30,000,000 sequences) from the 496 soil samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Operational Taxonomic Units were generated using USEARCH, and representative sequences were taxonomically classified according the Ribosomal Database Project's taxonomy scheme. Analysis of similarity revealed that microbial communities found within a landscape type (high upland forest, low upland forest, riparian) were more similar than among landscape types (R = 0.600; p<0.001). Similarly, communities from unique site x depths were similar across the 7 collection periods (R = 0.646; p<0.001) despite changes in soil moisture. Euclidean distances of soil properties and gas concentrations were compared to Bray-Curtis community dissimilarity matrices using Mantel tests to determine how community structure co-varies with the soil environment and gas concentrations. All variables measured significantly co-varied with microbial community membership (pH: R = 0.712, p < 0.001; CO2: R

  7. Effect of biochar addition on short-term N2O and CO2 emissions during repeated drying and wetting of an anthropogenic alluvial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Lee, Xinqing; Theng, Benny K G; Wang, Bing; Cheng, Jianzhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-06-07

    Agricultural soils are an important source of greenhouse gases (GHG). Biochar application to such soils has the potential of mitigating global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Under irrigation, the topsoils in arid regions experience repeated drying and wetting during the crop growing season. Biochar incorporation into these soils would change the soil microbial environment and hence affect GHG emissions. Little information, however, is available regarding the effect of biochar addition on carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural soils undergoing repeated drying and wetting. Here, we report the results of a 49-day aerobic incubation experiment, incorporating biochar into an anthropogenic alluvial soil in an arid region of Xinjiang Province, China, and measuring CO2 and N2O emissions. Under both drying-wetting and constantly moist conditions, biochar amendment significantly increased cumulative CO2 emission. At the same time, there was a significant reduction (up to ~20 %) in cumulative N2O emission, indicating that the addition of biochar to irrigated agricultural soils may effectively slow down global warming in arid regions of China.

  8. Microbial Community Responses to Increased Water and Organic Matter in the Arid Soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N Buelow

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The soils of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are an extreme polar desert, inhabited exclusively by microscopic taxa. This region is on the threshold of anticipated climate change, with glacial melt, permafrost thaw, and the melting of massive buried ice increasing liquid water availability and mobilizing soil nutrients. Experimental water and organic matter (OM amendments were applied to investigate how these climate change effects may impact the soil communities. To identify active taxa and their functions, total community RNA transcripts were sequenced and annotated, and amended soils were compared with unamended control soils using differential abundance and expression analyses. Overall, taxonomic diversity declined with amendments of water and organic matter. The domain Bacteria increased with both amendments while Eukaryota declined from 38% of all taxa in control soils to 8% and 11% in water and OM amended soils, respectively. Among bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria (59% dominated water-amended soils and Firmicutes (45% dominated OM amended soils. Three bacterial phyla (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes were primarily responsible for the observed positive functional responses, while eukaryotic taxa experienced the majority (27 of 34 of significant transcript losses. These results indicated that as climate changes in this region, a replacement of endemic taxa adapted to dry, oligotrophic conditions by generalist, copiotrophic taxa is likely.

  9. Polymer tensiometers with ceramic cones: direct observations of matric pressures in drying soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der M.J.; Gooren, H.P.A.; Bakker, G.; Hoogendam, C.W.; Huiskes, C.; Koopal, L.K.; Kruidhof, H.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring soil water potentials is crucial to characterize vadose zone processes. Conventional tensiometers only measure until approximately -0.09 MPa, and indirect methods may suffer from the non-uniqueness in the relationship between matric potential and measured properties. Recently developed pol

  10. Dried gamma-irradiated sewage solids use on calcareous soils: crop yeilds and heavy metals uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaslin, B.D.; Sivinski, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments designed to examine gamma-radiation effects on extractable and plant-available sludge elements and to examine the response of crops to sludge applications on two typical, calcareous soils in New Mexico are summarized. Information has been given indicating that the radiation process of reducing pathogens in sewage products being developed by Sandia Laboratories, does not significantly increase the chemical extractability and plant uptake of a broad range of nutrients and heavy metals. However, radiation treatment greatly facilitates handling sewage for experimentation, because pathogen contamination precautions are eliminated and weed seeds killed. Studies on the effects of sludge irradiation on plant nutrient uptake revealed no concentration increases, agreeing with results presented herein. Sewage products may have special potential for use on calcareous soils, such as in New Mexico. For instance, in New Mexico the lack of potassium in sewage products is not a problem and the naturally high pH of New Mexico soil greatly reduces plant availability of many problem heavy metals. Dramatic increases in yield are typified by the greenhouse and field results presented herein, especially for the known micronutrient deficient soils of New Mexico. Results indicate that sewage sludge is an excellent Zn and Fe fertilizer. More research needs to be done before the economics of sludge application can be calculated and more field information is needed before irradiated sewage products are used indiscriminately. (ERB)

  11. Infiltration and Erosion in Soils Treated with Dry PAM of Two Molecular Weights and Phosphogypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil surface application of dissolved linear polyacrylamide (PAM) of high molecular weight (MW) can mitigate seal formation, runoff and erosion, especially when added with a source of electrolytes (e.g., gypsum). Practical difficulties associated with PAM solution application prohibited commercial u...

  12. Using δ15 N- and δ18 O-NO to Evaluate Mechanisms of Nitric Oxide Production Following the Wetting of Dry Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, P. M.; Schimel, J.; Sickman, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    In xeric environments, where soils can remain dry for more than 6 months, abrupt transitions from dry-to-wet conditions produce NO pulses within seconds after soils wet up. During these periods of intense gaseous N production, biological processes (nitrification and denitrification) are known to control NO fluxes, but it is not clear how soil microbes can recover from drought-induced stress within seconds after soils wet up. Are NO pulses immediately following rewetting more so controlled by abiotic NO-producing reactions? Because biotic and abiotic mechanisms can occur simultaneously, distinguishing between these processes can be problematic. To understand the contribution of biotic and abiotic processes to NO pulses, and to better inform biogeochemical models, we measured the δ15N- and δ18O-NO following a field soil rewetting experiment in a California annual grassland. In October, during the end of the dry season, we artificially watered soils and captured NO emissions for up to 15 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, and 3 days after wet-up. Pulses of NO following the wetting of dry soil were explained by a two-component mixing model, where two distinct sources or processes produced NO. Within 15 minutes after soil wet-up, the isotopic composition of soil NO (δ15N =-8.95 ‰, δ18O=14.28 ‰) was similar to that of atmospheric samples (δ15N =-4.45 ‰, δ18O=15.20 ‰), but became increasingly depleted after 1 hour (δ15N =-21.08 ‰, δ18O=0.53 ‰), and more so after 1 day (δ15N =-37.44 ‰, δ18O=-9.45 ‰). After 3 days, the isotopic composition of NO (δ15N =-28.31 ‰, δ18O=-2.07 ‰) began to return to pre-wet-up conditions closely following the two-component mixing line. We conclude that NO-producing reactions immediately after the wetting of dry soil (up to 15 min) are different than those occurring after 1 hour post-wetting. We hypothesize that abiotic processes control the initial response to wetting, but that biological processes, which discriminate

  13. Effects of air-drying in vitro on human dentine permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Stewart, F P; Galloway, S E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of evaporation produced by air blasts of 0, 0.5, 2 or 5 min to dentine in vitro were evaluated by measuring dentine hydraulic conductance before and after each trial. When the tubules were filled with water, even prolonged evaporation had no effect on dentine permeability. Tubules filled with physiological salt solution produced a time-dependent decrease in dentine permeability. Tubules filled with 1.5 per cent albumin in water gave the largest reductions in dentine permeability. These effects were more marked in unetched as opposed to acid-etched dentine. The results suggest that part of the reduction in dentine sensitivity produced clinically by prolonged air blasts may be due to precipitation of organic and inorganic constituents of dentinal fluid at the surface.

  14. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  15. Experimental research on the mixed sand ratio and initial dry density of weathered sand improved expansive soil free load swelling rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jun; Yang Zhi; Zhang Guodong; Tang Yunwei; Chen Hongping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, through the indoor free load swelling rate test, expansive soil in a section of a first- class highway reconstruction project in Yichang City was studied. It emphatically analyzed the interrelations among free load swelling rate, non-load time, the proportion of mixed sand and initial dry density. Experimen- tal studies have shown that: Free load swelling deformation is mainly divided into three stages of rapid expan- sion, slow expansion and final stability; when the initial dry density is constant, free load swelling rate of the weathered sand modified soil will reduce rapidly before they slow down with the increase of sand proportion, and weathered sand modified soil free load swelling rate is not sensitive to the large amount of sand mixed; in the same mixed sand ratio, weathered sand modified soil free load swelling rate increases rapidly with the in- crease of initial dry density, there is a good linear correlation between them. To take appropriate control of the initial dry density during the expansive soil subgrade construction helps to reduce its swelling deformation and ensures the stability of the embankment.

  16. Organochlorine pesticides in surface soils from obsolete pesticide dumping ground in Hyderabad City, Pakistan: contamination levels and their potential for air-soil exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdar, Ambreen; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Liu, Junwen; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) contamination levels in the surface soil and air samples together with air-soil exchange fluxes at an obsolete pesticide dumping ground and the associated areas from Hyderabad City, Pakistan. Among all the sampling sites, concentrations of OCPs in the soil and air samples were found highest in obsolete pesticide dumping ground, whereas dominant contaminants were dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs) (soil: 77-212,200 ng g(-1); air: 90,700 pg m(-3)) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs) (soil: 43-4,090 ng g(-1); air: 97,400 pg m(-3)) followed by chlordane, heptachlor and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). OCPs diagnostic indicative ratios reflect historical use as well as fresh input in the study area. Moreover, the air and soil fugacity ratios (0.9-1.0) at the dumping ground reflecting a tendency towards net volatilization of OCPs, while at the other sampling sites, the fugacity ratios indicate in some cases deposition and in other cases volatilization. Elevated concentrations of DDTs and HCHs at pesticide dumping ground and its surroundings pose potential exposure risk to biological organisms, to the safety of agricultural products and to the human health. Our study thus emphasizes the need of spatio-temporal monitoring of OCPs at local and regional scale to assess and remediate the future adverse implications.

  17. Novel Approach for the Remediation of Radioactive Cesium Contaminated Soil with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO Dispersion Mixture in Dry Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallampati S. R.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study, first time we developed a nano-Fe/Ca/CaO dispersion mixture based remediation and volume reduction method of real radioactive cesium contaminated soils. After soil samples treated with 10wt% of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO dispersion mixtures, emitting radiation intensity was reduced from 4.00 μSv/h to 0.95 μSv/h in non-magnetic fraction soils. While, after treatment, about 30wt% magnetic and 70wt% nonmagnetic fraction soils were separated, and it’s condensed radioactive cesium concentration was about 80% and 20%, respectively. By this way, cesium contaminated soil volume can be reduced. These preliminary results appear to be very promising and the simple mixing with the addition of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO may be considered potentially applicable for the remediation and separation of radioactive Cs contaminated soil in dry conditions.

  18. Techno-economic analysis of a roof-integrated solar air heating system for drying fruit and vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekumar, A. [Dept. of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022 (India)

    2010-11-15

    The solar air heater was 46 m{sup 2} and recorded a maximum temperature of 76.6 C. The dryer was loaded with 200 kg of fresh pineapple slices 5 mm thick. The initial moisture content of 82% was reduced to the desired level (<10%) within 8 h. The performance of the dryer was analyzed in detail by three methods namely annualized cost, present worth of annual savings, and present worth of cumulative savings. The cost of drying 1 kg pineapple worked out to Rs. 11 which was roughly half of that of an electric dryer. The payback period worked out to 0.54 year, much less than the estimated life of the system (20 years). (author)

  19. Adaptations to soil drying in woody seedlings of African locust bean, (Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) Benth.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osonubi, O; Fasehun, F E

    1987-12-01

    Stomatal conductance, transpiration and xylem pressure potential of African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa (Jacq.) Benth.) seedlings subjected from the sixth week after emergence to four weeks of continuous soil drought did not differ from those of well-watered, control plants until two-thirds of the available soil water had been used. In both well-watered and drought-treated plants, stomatal conductance was highest early in the day when vapor pressure deficits were low, but decreased sharply by midday when evaporative demand reached its highest value. There was no increase in stomatal conductance later in the day as vapor pressure deficit declined. The relationship between transpiration rate and xylem pressure potential showed non-linearity and hysteresis in both control and drought-treated plants, which seems to indicate that the plants had a substantial capacity to store water. The rate of leaf extension in African locust bean seedlings subjected to six consecutive 2-week cycles of soil drought declined relative to that of well-watered, control plants, whereas relative root extension increased. It appears that African locust bean seedlings minimized the impact of drought by: (1) restricting transpiration to the early part of the day when a high ratio of carbon gain to water loss can be achieved; (2) utilizing internally stored water during periods of rapid transpiration; (3) reducing the rate of leaf expansion and final leaf size in response to soil drought without reducing the rate of root extension, thereby reducing the ratio of transpiring leaf surface area to absorbing root surface area.

  20. 自然干燥与热风干燥对甘薯粉丝质量的影响%Effcets of Natural Drying and Hot-air Drying on Quality of Sweet Potato Vermicelli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洁; 孔晓玲

    2011-01-01

    This article researches on the quality comparison of natural drying and hot air drying of sweet potato vermicelli, by the appearance of shape, swelling rate, break off rate, tensile properties . Analyses the effect of different dry methods on sweet potato vermicelli, points out the reasonable dry method of vermicelli.%对自然干燥与热风干燥的甘薯粉丝进行了质量对比,通过外观形状、膨润度、断条率、抗拉性等几个方面的观察与检测,分析了不同的干燥方法对粉丝干燥特性的影响,并给出了粉丝干燥方式的合理化建议.

  1. Effects of Corn Stover Incorporated in Dry Farmland on Soil Fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-bin; Cai Dian-xiong; ZHANG Jing-qing; GAO Xu-ke

    2001-01-01

    Seven years' field experiments on application of corn stover and/or cattle manure combined with chemical fertilizers were carried out in Shouyang Dryland Farming Experimental Station. Results showed that the increased available N in the plough layer was mainly influenced by the application of cattle manure; the available P was mainly influenced by the application of chemical fertilizer; the available K was mainly influenced by the incorporation of corn stover. The organic matter contents in the soils treated with corn stover or cattle manure were kept in balance under the experimental conditions. Corn yield and water use efficiency were influenced significantly not only by fertilizer N but also by incorporated corn stover. The results suggested that the highest N uptake, yield and water use efficiency could be obtained at rates of 105 kg fertilizer N, 6000 kg corn stover, and 1500 kg cattle manure per hectare. The experiments supplied information on nutrient recycling and use of corn stover as sources of fodder and organic fertilizer for balancing application of organic and inorganic fertilizer, improving soil fertility and increasing crop yield with incorporation of corn stover in soil.

  2. Polymer tensiometers with ceramic cones: direct observations of matric pressures in drying soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. van der Ploeg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring soil water potentials is crucial to characterize vadose zone processes. Conventional tensiometers only measure until approximately −0.09 MPa, and indirect methods may suffer from the non-uniqueness in the relationship between matric potential and measured properties. Recently developed polymer tensiometers (POTs are able to directly measure soil matric potentials until the theoretical wilting point (−1.6 MPa. By minimizing the volume of polymer solution inside the POT while maximizing the ceramic area in contact with that polymer solution, response times drop to acceptable ranges for laboratory and field conditions. Contact with the soil is drastically improved with the use of cone-shaped solid ceramics instead of flat ceramics. The comparison between measured potentials by polymer tensiometers and indirectly obtained potentials with time domain reflectometry highlights the risk of using the latter method at low water contents. By combining POT and time domain reflectometry readings in situ moisture retention curves can be measured over the range permitted by the measurement range of both POT and time domain reflectometry.

  3. Dry deposition of acidic air pollutants to tree leaves, determined by a modified leaf-washing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mirai; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami K.; Yamamura, Shigeki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    Dry deposition fluxes ( FL) of NO 3- and SO 42- to leaf surfaces were measured for Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora), Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa), and Japanese white oak ( Quercus myrsinaefolia), together with atmospheric concentrations ( CL) of NO x (NO + NO 2), T-NO 3 (gaseous HNO 3 + particulate NO 3-) and SO x (gaseous SO 2 + particulate SO 42-) around the leaves in a suburban area of Japan, using a modified leaf-washing technique. FL of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased as follows: pine >> cedar > cypress ≥ oak and pine >> cedar > oak ≥ cypress, respectively. FL of NO 3- for all tree species fluctuated synchronously with CL of T-NO 3. FL of SO 42- fluctuated with CL of SO x, but the dominant pollutant deposited (SO 2 or SO 42-) appeared to differ for different tree species. Dry deposition conductance ( KL) of T-NO 3 and SO x was derived as an FL/ CL ratio. Seasonal variations of KL likely reflect the gas/particle ratios of T-NO 3 and SO x, which were affected by meteorological conditions such as temperature. Dry deposition velocities ( Vd) of T-NO 3 and SO x were obtained as the mathematical product of annual mean KL and the total leaf surface areas in the forests. The comparison of Vd among tree species indicated that the loads of acidic air pollutants were higher to coniferous forests than broad-leaved forest because of the higher KL and/or larger leaf surface areas.

  4. Low Density Dry Coal Beneficiation Using an Air Dense Medium Fluidized Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-fu; ZHU Jian-feng; FAN Mao-ming; ZHAO Yue-min; TAO Xiu-xiang

    2007-01-01

    For the production of low ash content clean coal, separation at low density is required for some raw coals. Based on analyzing the fluidizing characteristics of magnetic pearls with a specific size distribution and formation mechanism of a microbubble fluidized bed, optimal technological and operating parameters suitable for low density coal separation were determined. The experimental results show that an air dense medium fluidized bed with low density can be formed using magnetic pearls as medium solids, which can efficiently beneficiate coal of 6-50 mm size with a probable error Ep value of 0.05 at a separating density of 1.44 g/cm3.

  5. Balancing mechanical strength with bioactivity in chitosan-calcium phosphate 3D microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: air- vs. freeze-drying processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; McCanless, J D; Mecwan, M M; Noblett, A P; Haggard, W O; Smith, R A; Bumgardner, J D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential benefit of 3D composite scaffolds composed of chitosan and calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering. Additionally, incorporation of mechanically weak lyophilized microspheres within those air-dried (AD) was considered for enhanced bioactivity. AD microsphere, alone, and air- and freeze-dried microsphere (FDAD) 3D scaffolds were evaluated in vitro using a 28-day osteogenic culture model with the Saos-2 cell line. Mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and lysozyme-driven enzymatic degradation of the scaffolds were also studied. FDAD scaffold showed a higher concentration (p mechanical strength was sacrificed through introduction of the less stiff, porous FD spheres.

  6. Influence of kiln and air drying on redistribution of low-molecular sugars and nitrogenous compounds in scots pine (`pinus sylvestris l.`) and consequences for mould susceptibility. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terziev, N.

    1994-12-31

    Drying of wood is linked up with the transport of free and bound water and will be of major importance for the redistribution of water soluble substances. Therefore this study treats the influence of drying on the redistribution of soluble sugars and nitrogen, including both transport- and chemical processes. Moreover the study deals with durability aspects: the influence of different kiln drying schedules and their parameters on the redistribution of low-molecular sugars and nitrogenous compounds--as a widely used method in practice air drying is also included in the study; investigation of the effect of different drying treatments on susceptibility to mold growth; and an attempt to shed light on the migration of water soluble substances above and under the fiber saturation point.

  7. Drying soil in North China drove the outbreak range expansion of meadow moth by facilitating long-distance migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Jiang, Yuying; Kang, Aiguo; Zhai, Baoping

    2016-07-01

    Studies of the mechanism underlying the range expansion of organisms have mainly focused on environmental conditions at the edges of species’ distributions, potentially ignoring other possible factors. Here, we demonstrated the outbreak range expansion of meadow moth from North China to Northeast China in the past three outbreak periods. We found that the negligible infestation in Northeast China in the 1950s could not be explained by local climatic conditions. However, the soil moisture in North China decreased distinctly from 1951 to 2011 and was significantly and positively correlated with the timing of the first adult peak on plateaus, meaning that the deterioration of habitat conditions could result in earlier peaks of adults in areas of high-elevation by stimulating the short-distance dispersal of adults from the plains to the plateaus. Adults peaking earlier have a stronger tendency to emigrate due to mismatched phenology. Hence, drying soil in North China caused the frequent long-distance migration of meadow moth after the 1970s and drove the outbreak range expansion. This study suggests that, for a migratory species, the deterioration of habitat conditions in overwintering areas might also influence the distribution of this species in breeding areas at high latitudes by facilitating migration activities.

  8. AirMOSS P-Band Radar Retrieval of Subcanopy Soil Moisture Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Burgin, M. S.; Duan, X.; Moghaddam, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil moisture, as a key variable of the Earth system, plays an important role in our under-standing of the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. The importance of such knowledge has led NASA to fund missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Airborne Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS). The AirMOSS mission seeks to improve the estimates of the North American Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) by providing high-resolution observations of the root zone soil moisture (RZSM) over regions representative of the major North American biomes. AirMOSS flies a P-band SAR to penetrate vegetation and into the root zone to provide estimates of RZSM. The flights cover areas containing flux tower sites in regions from the boreal forests in Saskatchewan, Canada, to the tropical forests in La Selva, Costa Rica. The radar snapshots are used to generate estimates of RZSM via inversion of a scattering model of vegetation overlying soils with variable moisture profiles. These retrievals will be used to generate a time record of RZSM, which will be integrated with an ecosystem demography model in order to estimate the respiration and photosynthesis carbon fluxes. The aim of this work is the retrieval of the moisture profile over AirMOSS sites using the collected P-band radar data. We have integrated layered-soil scattering models into a forest scattering model; for the backscattering from ground and for the trunk-ground double-bounce mechanism, we have used a layered small perturbation method and a coherent scattering model of layered soil, respectively. To estimate the soil moisture profile, we represent it as a second-order polynomial in the form of az2 + bz + c, where z is the depth and a, b, and c are the coefficients to be retrieved from radar measurements. When retrieved, these coefficients give us the soil moisture up to a prescribed depth of validity. To estimate the unknown coefficients of the polynomial, we use simulated

  9. 热风干燥联合真空降温缓苏提升黄秋葵干制品品质%Hot air drying combined vacuum ventilation tempering improving quality of dried okra products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段续; 刘文超; 任广跃

    2016-01-01

    world. Like others vegetables, okra is susceptible to rapid deterioration because of its high moisture content. Various physiological and morphological changes occur after harvest, which make these okras unacceptable for consumption, and thus it is necessary to remove the moisture of okras. Hot air drying is the most widely used and inexpensive drying technique for okra. Nevertheless, long-time drying at relatively high temperature during the falling rate period often leads to the overheating of dried products, and undesirable thermal degradation of the finished products may occur. Hence, it is necessary to apply innovative techniques on hot air drying to solve these drawbacks, which can increase drying rate and reduce quality loss. One of the methods that may be recommended is drying with tempering cycles. Tempering allows moisture diffusion from the interior to the external surface of the sample kernels to decrease the moisture gradients. Hence, the material structure can be well protected during drying process, and with the uniform distribution of moisture, the drying rate of next stage will be higher. While in a vacuum environment, the oxygen (O2) content is in a low level, which can reduce many undesirable oxidation reaction and slow down the physiological activity of materials. Moreover, many researchers have reported the vacuum tempering method can obviously reduce the tempering time compared to traditional natural tempering. Ventilation tempering is carried out under the condition of decreasing temperature, the moisture can be uniformly distributed not only by moisture gradient but also by temperature gradient. Consequently, combining the vacuum tempering method with ventilation tempering can reduce tempering time more significantly along with obtaining good product quality. As above introduction, applying the combined tempering method on hot air drying may overcome some limitations of traditional hot air drying process, which can be called as vacuum ventilation

  10. An improved high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in freeze-dried and hot-air-dried Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tsai Hua; Chen, Chia Ju; Chen, Bing Huei

    2011-10-30

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, a traditional Chinese herb possessing antioxidant and anti-cancer activities, has been reported to contain functional components like carotenoids and chlorophylls. However, the variety and amount of chlorophylls remain uncertain. The objectives of this study were to develop a high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS) method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in hot-air-dried and freeze-dried R. nasutus. An Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column and a gradient mobile phase composed of methanol/N,N-dimethylformamide (97:3, v/v), acetonitrile and acetone were employed to separate internal standard zinc-phthalocyanine plus 12 cholorophylls and their derivatives within 21 min, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', hydroxychlorophyll a, 15-OH-lactone chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll b', hydroxychlorophyll b, pheophytin a, pheophytin a', hydroxypheophytin a, hydroxypheophytin a' and pheophytin b in hot-air-dried R. nasutus with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 660 nm. But, in freeze-dried R. nasutus, only 4 chlorophylls and their derivatives, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', chlorophyll b and pheophytin a were detected. Zinc-phthalocyanine was found to be an appropriate internal standard to quantify all the chlorophyll compounds. After quantification by HPLC-DAD, both chlorophyll a and pheophytin a were the most abundant in hot-air-dried R. nasutus, while in freeze-dried R. nasutus, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b dominated.

  11. EPA Method EMSL-33: Isotopic Determination of Plutonium, Uranium, and Thorium in Water, Soil, Air, and Biological Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAM lists this method to provide for the analysis of isotopic plutonium, uranium and thorium, together or individually, in drinking water, aqueous/liquid, soil/sediment, surface wipe and/or air filter samples by alpha spectrometry.

  12. [Effect of Seasonal Temperature Increasing on Nitrogen Mineralization in Soil of the Water Level Fluctuating Zone of Three Gorge Tributary During the Dry Period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-jie; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Bin; Xiao, Xiao-jun; Ma, Hui-yan; Yu, Zhi-guo

    2016-02-15

    To reveal the effect of seasonal temperature increasing on nitrogen mineralization in soil of the water level fluctuating soil zone of three gorge reservoir areas in the Yangtze river tributary during the dry period, surface soils were collected from the water level fluctuating zone of Pengxi river crossing two hydrological sections, i.e., upstream and downstream and three water level altitudes, 155 m (low), 165 m (middle) and 175 m (high). We incubated the soil at 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C to determine the transformation rates of nitrogen in soil of Pengxi river basin during the dry period. The result showed that TN and NO3- -N contents in the soil of upstream section and higher (175 m) altitude of water level were higher than those in downstream and low (165 m) altitude of water level, whereas the pattern for NH4+ -N was different, with higher NH4+ -N contents in downstream and low water level. The inorganic nitrogen was dominated by NO3- -N, which accounted for up to 57.4%-84.7% of inorganic nitrogen. Generally, soil ammoniation, nitration and net N mineralization increased with the rising water level altitude and stream sections (P 0.05).

  13. Soil- and groundwater-quality data for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, David A.; Rowe, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Ellsworth Air Force Base is an Air Combat Command located approximately 10 miles northeast of Rapid City, South Dakota. Ellsworth Air Force Base occupies about 6,000 acres within Meade and Pennington Counties, and includes runways, airfield operations, industrial areas, housing, and recreational facilities. Fuels Area C within Ellsworth Air Force Base is a fuels storage area that is used to support the mission of the base. In fall of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, Ellsworth Air Force Base, to estimate groundwater-flow direction, select locations for permanent monitoring wells, and install and sample monitoring wells for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C. Nine monitoring wells were installed for the study within Fuels Area C during November 4–7, 2014. Soil core samples were collected during installation of eight of the monitoring wells and analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene,m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. Groundwater samples were collected from seven of the nine wells (two of the monitoring wells did not contain enough water to sample or were dry) during November 19–21, 2014, and analyzed for select physical properties, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene, m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. This report describes the nine monitoring well locations and presents the soil- and groundwater-quality data collected in 2014 for this study.

  14. Effect of Harvest of Air Relative Humidity on Water and Heat Transfer in Soil With Crops Under Arid Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Khadir LAKHAL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the main objective is to analyze the effect of the harvest of air relative humidity on soil temperature, soil water storage and evaporation. An experiment work was conducted in order to evaluate the quantity of soil water adsorbed by harvesting of relative air humidity. This experimental work was conducted on hilly areas with various hypsographic and microclimatic conditions greatly affecting daily fluctuations of air humidity and soil characteristics. The metrological data needed by SISPAT model were obtained by using a Campbell Scientific equipments Station recorder on data loggers every half hour. A numerical model based on SiSPAT (Système d’Interaction Sol Plante Atmosphère formulation is adopted. The general equations of the proposed model are based on heat and mass transfer in the soil, atmosphere and plant system. This study shows that Soil Water Adsorption (SWA induce an increasing in the total evaporation and in soil water storage especially on the upper layers. The effect of Soil Water Adsorption on soil temperature appears for the first layers of soil and become absent in the profound zone because the vapour condensation phenomenon is very important at night for the first layers.

  15. Evaluation of short-term tracer fluctuations in groundwater and soil air in a two year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Florian; Mayer, Simon; Aeschbach, Werner; Weissbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    The application of gas tracers like noble gases (NGs), SF6 or CFCs in groundwater studies such as paleo temperature determination requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of reactive and inert gases in the soil air with which the infiltrating water equilibrates. Due to microbial gas consumption and production, NG partial pressures in soil air can deviate from atmospheric air, an effect that could bias noble gas temperatures estimates if not taken into account. So far, such an impact on NG contents in groundwater has not been directly demonstrated. We provide the first long-term study of the above mentioned gas tracers and physical parameters in both the saturated and unsaturated soil zone, sampled continuously for more than two years near Mannheim (Germany). NG partial pressures in soil air correlate with soil moisture and the sum value of O2+CO2, with a maximal significant enhancement of 3-6% with respect to atmospheric air during summer time. Observed seasonal fluctuations result in a mass dependent fractionation of NGs in soil air. Concentrations of SF6 and CFCs in soil air are determined by corresponding fluctuations in local atmospheric air, caused by industrial emissions. Arising concentration peaks are damped with increasing soil depth. Shallow groundwater shows short-term NG fluctuations which are smoothed within a few meters below the water table. A correlation between NG contents of soil air and of groundwater is observable during strong recharge events. However, there is no evidence for a permanent influence of seasonal variations of soil air composition on shallow groundwater. Fluctuating NG contents in shallow groundwater are rather determined by variations of soil temperature and water table level. Our data gives evidence for a further temperature driven equilibration of groundwater with entrapped air bubbles within the topmost saturated zone, which permanently occurs even some years after recharge. Local subsurface temperature fluctuations

  16. Water relations and transpiration of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) under salinity and soil drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Adolf, Verena Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Drought and salinity are the two major factors limiting crop growth and production in arid and semi-arid regions. The separate and combined effects of salinity and progressive drought in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) were studied in a greenhouse experiment. Stomatal conductance (gs), leaf...... water potential (Wl), shoot and root abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]) and transpiration rate were measured in full irrigation (FI; around 95 % of water holding capacity (WHC)) and progressive drought (PD) treatments using the irrigation water with five salinity levels (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 dS m)1......); the treatments are referred to as FI0, FI10, FI20, FI30, FI40; PD0, PD10, PD20, PD30, PD40, respectively. The measurements were carried out over 9 days of continuous drought. The results showed that increasing salinity levels decreased the total soil water potential (WT) and consequently decreased gs and Wl...

  17. Effect of Organic Based N Fertilizer on Dry Matter (Zea mays L., Ammonium and Nitrate Recovery in an Acid Soil of Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilawati Kasim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Exchangeable ammonium (NH4+ could be recovered by humic and fulvic acids from humic substances. The ability of these acids in fixing or retaining NH4+ has been demonstrated in many findings and reports. Both acids could affect the plant growth, nutrients uptake by enhancing photosynthesis rate and root growth among others. Thus, in this study, the effect of both acids (in liquid form on soil exchangeable NH4+, dry matter production and available nitrate (NO3- was investigated. Approach: Humic molecules were isolated using standard procedures, followed by liquid organic N fertilizers formulation. Organic based N fertilizers were applied to soil in pots at 10 Days After Planting (DAP and 28 DAP. Treated soils and plant parts were sampled at 54 DAP or at tasselling stage. Soil samples were analyzed for pH, ammonium and nitrate content. The plant samples were weighed to assess dry matter production. Results: Under acid condition, organic based liquid N fertilizers (fulvic acid or both, humic and fulvic acids increased accumulation of NH4+in soil. The presence of carboxylic groups in humic molecules increased NH4+ retention with increasing soil's stock labile carbon. However, low percentage of these acids reduced their full effect on dry matter production. The availability of nitrate was not statistically different for all treatments. Low soil pH could had reduced nitrification processes and simultaneously soil NO3- content. Conclusion: Liquid form of humic and/or fulvic acids could play an important role in enhancing urea efficiency. However, their contribution needs to be studied in detail in relation to humic molecules characteristics. This study had a potential in the development of liquid and foliar organic fertilizers.

  18. The ecological dichotomy of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the hyper-arid soils of the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Maria Magalhães

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are considered to be one of the most physically and chemically extreme terrestrial environments on the Earth. However, little is known about the organisms involved in nitrogen transformations in these environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in four McMurdo Dry Valleys with highly variable soil geochemical properties and climatic conditions: Miers Valley, Upper Wright Valley, Beacon Valley and Battleship Promontory. The bacterial communities of these four Dry Valleys have been examined previously, and the results suggested that the extremely localized bacterial diversities are likely driven by the disparate physicochemical conditions associated with these locations. Here we showed that AOB and AOA amoA gene diversity was generally low; only four AOA and three AOB operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified from a total of 420 AOA and AOB amoA clones. Quantitative PCR analysis of amoA genes revealed clear differences in the relative abundances of AOA and AOB amoA genes among samples from the four Dry Valleys. Although AOB amoA gene dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in soils from Miers Valley and Battleship Promontory, AOA amoA gene were more abundant in samples from Upper Wright and Beacon Valleys, where the environmental conditions are considerably harsher (e.g., extremely low soil C/N ratios and much higher soil electrical conductivity. Correlations between environmental variables and amoA genes copy numbers, as examined by redundancy analysis (RDA, revealed that higher AOA/AOB ratios were closely related to soils with high salts and Cu contents and low pH. Our findings hint at a dichotomized distribution of AOA and AOB within the Dry Valleys, potentially driven by environmental constraints.

  19. X-ray CT-Derived Soil Characteristics Explain Varying Air, Water, and Solute Transport Properties across a Loamy Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per;

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important for explaining fluxes of air, water, and solutes through soil and understanding soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be applied for this characterization, and in this study CT-derived parameters were used...... be factors that increased the uncertainty of the relationships. Nevertheless, the results confirmed the potential of X-ray CT visualization techniques for estimating fluxes through soil at the field scale....... to explain water, air, and solute transport through soil. Forty-five soil columns (20 by 20 cm) were collected from an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark, and subsequently scanned using a medical CT scanner. Nonreactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory along with measurements...

  20. Human semen can be air-dried prior to testing for sperm DNA fragmentation with the Halosperm® G2 kit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kailin Yap; Phillip Matson

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore a method of semen storage prior to assessment of spermDNA fragmentation. Methods:This study examined a simplified alternative of air-drying semen on a microscope slide and reconstituting in seminal plasma prior to assessment of spermDNA fragmentation using the halosperm®G2 kit.Results:It showed that semen could be air-dried and stored overnight at room temperature with no detrimental effect onDNA quality.A significant correlation between results existed for20 semen samples both air-dried and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen(r=0.982, P=0.000).A mean difference between the results of only -1.98% confirmed the effectiveness of air-drying compared to snap-freezing.Conclusions:Future studies to refine this technique are required on the effect of extrinsic factors such as the choice of reconstituting medium, and stability over an extended time-frame at different temperatures.

  1. Variable pore connectivity model linking gas diffusivity and air-phase tortuosity to soil matric potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    2012-01-01

    of a variable pore connectivity factor, X, as a function of soil matric potential, expressed as pF (=log |−ψ|), for pF values ranging from 1.0 to 3.5. The new model takes the form of X = X* (F/F*)A with F = 1 + pF−1, where X* is the pore network tortuosity at reference F (F*) and A is a model parameter...... that accounts for water blockage. The X–pF relation can be linked to drained pore size to explain the lower probability of the larger but far fewer air-filled pores at lower pF effectively interconnecting and promoting gas diffusion. The model with X* = 2 and A = 0.5 proved promising for generalizing Dp....../Do predictions across soils of wide geographic contrast and yielded results comparable to those from widely used predictive models. The X–pF model additionally proved valuable for differentiating between soils (providing a unique soil structural fingerprint for each soil layer) and also between the inter...

  2. Soil erosion and causative factors at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Joel B.

    1988-01-01

    Areas of significant soil erosion and unvegetated road cuts were identified and mapped for Vandenberg Air Force Base. One hundred forty-two eroded areas (most greater than 1.2 ha) and 51 road cuts were identified from recent color infrared aerial photography and ground truthed to determine the severity and causes of erosion. Comparison of the present eroded condition of soils (as shown in the 1986 photography) with that in historical aerial photography indicates that most erosion on the base took place prior to 1928. However, at several sites accelerated rates of erosion and sedimentation may be occurring as soils and parent materials are eroded vertically. The most conspicuous erosion is in the northern part of the base, where severe gully, sheet, and mass movement erosion have occurred in soils and in various sedimentary rocks. Past cultivation practices, compounded by highly erodible soils prone to subsurface piping, are probably the main causes. Improper range management practices following cultivation may have also increased runoff and erosion. Aerial photography from 1986 shows that no appreciable headward erosion or gully sidewall collapse have occurred in this area since 1928.

  3. Effect of Wetting-Drying Cycles on Redistribution of Lead in Some Semi-Arid Zone Soils Spiked with a Lead Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.KHODAVERDILOO; M.RAHMANIAN; S.REZAPOUR; S.GHORBANI DASHTAKI; H.HADI; F.X.HAN

    2012-01-01

    Mobility and bioavailability of lead (Pb) could be affected considerably by soil physicochemical properties; however,less is known about the effect of Pb levels and aging time.This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Pb levels and wetting-drying (WD) cycles on distribution and bioavailability of Pb in three semi-arid zone soils treated with different levels of Pb(NO3)2.Wetting-drying cycles simulated the actual field irrigation in the semi-arid soils.A soil with a long history of Pb contamination was also taken as a reference soil.The soils were spiked with various levels of Pb and incubated under WD cycles for 160 d.Sequential extractions and batch sorption experiments were performed to assess the fractionation of Pb in the spiked soils.Redistribution index (Uts) and reduced partitioning parameter (IR) were applied to semi-quantify the distribution of Pb in the spiked soils.A small amount of Pb sorbed was desorbed by the soils,indicating a strong and irreversible binding of Pb in the studied soils.Contribution of carbonate-bound (Car) and residual (Res) Pb fractions to the total Pb of the soils was more than 97%.The Car,soluble plus exchangeable (SE),and organic matter-bound (OMB) fractions of Pb were transferred to the Res fraction under the WD cycles.The IR and Uts values were influenced by Pb loading levels and WD; therefore,the Pb lability and/or redistribution pattern could semi-quantitatively be assessed via these parameters.At the end of the experiment,the IR and Uts values for the Pb salt-spiked soils did not show the quasiequilibrium state.The lability of Pb in the soils decreased with increasing incubation time and showed a strong dependence on Pb levels and soil chemical composition.WD cycles significantly affected the overall lability of Pb in soils through influencing the redistribution of Pb among solid-phase components.

  4. 圣女果分段式变温变湿热风干燥特性%Dried characteristics of cherry tomatoes using temperature and humidity by stages changed hot-air drying method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆惠; 李忠新; 杨劲松; 谢龙; 张世湘; 高振江

    2014-01-01

    Cherry tomato decays easily. Generally, it can be preserved only for 5-7days under normal pressure and temperature. The dehydration of cherry tomatoes into dried or preserved fruits can prolong their shelf life and enrich the market of the fruit. Currently, cherry tomatoes is dehydrated through natural drying. The advantage of this method is simple, and low cost. But the drying time is long and is affected by the climate and sanitary conditions. The product quality is difficult to control. In order to shorten the drying time and prevent mildew, cherry tomatoes are often soaked or sprayed with the alkaline solution. These chemicals are bad for our health. Multi-stage temperature-and-humidity drying is conducted through the material drying characteristics. This method can speed up the drying rate, improve drying quality, and reduce energy consumption. It has been successfully applied for apricot,lyceum barbarum, grapes and other materials. In this study, internal recycling hot-air drying technology was employed for the drying of cherry tomatoes. The effects of drying temperatures, humidity, drying stages and slicing forms on the drying characteristics and the appearance quality of the cherry tomatoes were investigated. Each experiment was composed of four drying stages. The drying temperatures were fixed, the humidity of the environment was changed in processⅠ,Ⅱ andⅢ. The drying temperature was low, the humidity was high at the beginning of processⅣ. Gradually, the temperature was raised, the humidity was reduced. At the end of the process, the drying temperature was higher, the humidity was lower compared with their values at the beginning. The experimental results indicated that pre-heated and falling rate periods exist during the drying of cherry tomato. Previous studies only shown falling rate period. The increase in temperature and humidity has bad effects on the nutrition, color and the appearance quality of cherry tomato. Even though cherry tomato can

  5. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  6. Elevation trends and shrink-swell response of wetland soils to flooding and drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Donald R.; Perez, Brian C.; Segura, Bradley D.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Given the potential for a projected acceleration in sea-level rise to impact wetland sustainability over the next century, a better understanding is needed of climate-related drivers that influence the processes controlling wetland elevation. Changes in local hydrology and groundwater conditions can cause short-term perturbations to marsh elevation trends through shrink—swell of marsh soils. To better understand the magnitude of these perturbations and their impacts on marsh elevation trends, we measured vertical accretion and elevation dynamics in microtidal marshes in Texas and Louisiana during and after the extreme drought conditions that existed there from 1998 to 2000. In a Louisiana marsh, elevation was controlled by subsurface hydrologic fluxes occurring below the root zone but above the 4 m depth (i.e., the base of the surface elevation table benchmark) that were related to regional drought and local meteorological conditions, with marsh elevation tracking water level variations closely. In Texas, a rapid decline in marsh elevation was related to severe drought conditions, which lowered local groundwater levels. Unfragmented marshes experienced smaller water level drawdowns and more rapid marsh elevation recovery than fragmented marshes. It appears that extended drawdowns lead to increased substrate consolidation making it less resilient to respond to future favorable conditions. Overall, changes in water storage lead to rapid and large short-term impacts on marsh elevation that are as much as five times greater than the long-term elevation trend, indicating the importance of long-term, high-resolution elevation data sets to understand the prolonged effects of water deficits on marsh elevation change.

  7. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macropore characteristics inferred from X-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, S.; Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil macropores often control fluid flow and solute transport, and quantification of macropore characteristics including their variability in space and time are essential to predict soil hydraulic and hydrogeochemical functions. In this study, measurements of air and solute transport properties...... and direct macropore visualization by X-ray CT scanning were carried out on 17 large (19-cm diam.; 20-cm length) undisturbed soil columns sampled across a field site (Silstrup, Denmark) with natural gradients in texture and density. Air permeability (ka) at in-situ water content and -20 hPa of matric...

  8. Plants + soil/wetland microbes: Food crop systems that also clean air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Wolverton, B. C.

    2011-02-01

    The limitations that will govern bioregenerative life support applications in space, especially volume and weight, make multi-purpose systems advantageous. This paper outlines two systems which utilize plants and associated microbial communities of root or growth medium to both produce food crops and clean air and water. Underlying these approaches are the large numbers and metabolic diversity of microbes associated with roots and found in either soil or other suitable growth media. Biogeochemical cycles have microbial links and the ability of microbes to metabolize virtually all trace gases, whether of technogenic or biogenic origin, has long been established. Wetland plants and the rootzone microbes of wetland soils/media also been extensively researched for their ability to purify wastewaters of a great number of potential water pollutants, from nutrients like N and P, to heavy metals and a range of complex industrial pollutants. There is a growing body of research on the ability of higher plants to purify air and water. Associated benefits of these approaches is that by utilizing natural ecological processes, the cleansing of air and water can be done with little or no energy inputs. Soil and rootzone microorganisms respond to changing pollutant types by an increase of the types of organisms with the capacity to use these compounds. Thus living systems have an adaptive capacity as long as the starting populations are sufficiently diverse. Tightly sealed environments, from office buildings to spacecraft, can have hundreds or even thousands of potential air pollutants, depending on the materials and equipment enclosed. Human waste products carry a plethora of microbes which are readily used in the process of converting its organic load to forms that can be utilized by green plants. Having endogenous means of responding to changing air and water quality conditions represents safety factors as these systems operate without the need for human intervention. We review

  9. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  10. Effects of Land Use Change and Seasonality of Precipitation on Soil Nitrogen in a Dry Tropical Forest Area in the Western Llanos of Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pedraza, Ana Francisca; Dezzeo, Nelda

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated changes of different soil nitrogen forms (total N, available ammonium and nitrate, total N in microbial biomass, and soil N mineralization) after conversion of semideciduous dry tropical forest in 5- and 18-year-old pastures (YP and OP, resp.) in the western Llanos of Venezuela. This evaluation was made at early rainy season, at end rainy season, and during dry season. With few exceptions, no significant differences were detected in the total N in the three study sites. Compared to forest soils, YP showed ammonium losses from 4.2 to 62.9% and nitrate losses from 20.0 to 77.8%, depending on the season of the year. In OP, the ammonium content increased from 50.0 to 69.0% at the end of the rainy season and decreased during the dry season between 25.0 and 55.5%, whereas the nitrate content increased significantly at early rainy season. The net mineralization and the potentially mineralizable N were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in OP than in forest and YP, which would indicate a better quality of the substrate in OP for mineralization. The mineralization rate constant was higher in YP than in forest and OP. This could be associated with a reduced capacity of these soils to preserve the available nitrogen. PMID:25610907

  11. Bioindication of air pollution effects near a copper smelter in Brazil using mango trees and soil microbiological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Hintemann, Therese; Santana Lima, Josanidia; Kandeler, Ellen

    2003-12-01

    A field study near the copper smelter of a large industrial complex examined air pollution effects on vegetation and soil parameters in Camacari (northeast Brazil). Close to the smelter, soil pH-value was lower and total acidity as well as organic carbon contents were higher compared with a site far from the source and two reference sites. The acidification of top soil particularly and the drastically enhanced plant-available copper concentrations were caused by atmospheric deposition. High sulphur and copper deposition significantly reduced microbial biomass and altered functional diversity of soil microorganisms (arylsulphatase and xylanase). Large accumulations of sulphur, arsenic and copper were detected in mango leaves (Mangifera indica) growing downwind from the smelter suggesting potential food chain-mediated risk. - Atmospheric emissions in northeast Brazil have transformed soil pH, accumulated in soil and plants as sulphur and heavy metals, and affected the functional diversity of soil microorganisms.

  12. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes.

  13. Experimental Air Warming of a Stylosanthes capitata, Vogel Dominated Tropical Pasture Affects Soil Respiration and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Silva, Lais B. C.; Dias-De-Oliveira, Eduardo; Flower, Charles E.; Martinez, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Warming due to global climate change is predicted to reach 2°C in tropical latitudes. There is an alarming paucity of information regarding the effects of air temperature on tropical agroecosystems, including foraging pastures. Here, we investigated the effects of a 2°C increase in air temperature over ambient for 30 days on an established tropical pasture (Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil) dominated by the legume Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, using a T-FACE (temperature free-air controlled enhancement) system. We tested the effects of air warming on soil properties [carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and their stable isotopic levels (δ13C and δ15N), as well as soil respiration and soil enzymatic activity] and aboveground characteristics (foliar C, N, δ13C, δ15N, leaf area index, and aboveground biomass) under field conditions. Results show that experimental air warming moderately increased soil respiration rates compared to ambient temperature. Soil respiration was positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture during mid-day (when soil respiration was at its highest) but not at dusk. Foliar δ13C were not different between control and elevated temperature treatments, indicating that plants grown in warmed plots did not show the obvious signs of water stress often seen in warming experiments. The 15N isotopic composition of leaves from plants grown at elevated temperature was lower than in ambient plants, suggesting perhaps a higher proportion of N-fixation contributing to tissue N in warmed plants when compared to ambient ones. Soil microbial enzymatic activity decreased in response to the air warming treatment, suggesting a slower decomposition of organic matter under elevated air temperature conditions. Decreased soil enzyme capacity and increases in soil respiration and plant biomass in plots exposed to high temperature suggest that increased root activity may have caused the increase seen in soil respiration in this tropical pasture. This response

  14. Curtailment of soil vapor extraction systems at McClellan Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E. [BDM Federal, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Mook, P.H. Jr.; Wong, K.B. [SM-ALC/EMR, McClellan AFB, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB), located near Sacramento, California, is one of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s National Environmental Technology Test Sites. McClellan AFB has implemented soil vapor extraction (SVE) as an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) non-time-critical remedial action for volatile organic compounds in soil. Operation and maintenance costs for SVE systems are increasingly becoming a major component of the environmental clean-up budget. In an effort to reduce costs, while assuring the protection of public health and the environment, a risk-based strategy has been developed for the curtailment and eventual shut-down of SVE systems at McClellan AFB. This paper presents an overview of the SVE EE/CA process and a detailed description of the development and implementation of the curtailment strategy. Included in the discussion are details of the public and regulatory involvement in the process.

  15. 高温风干对风鸭品质及脂质氧化的影响%Effect of high-temperature air-drying on quality and lipid oxidation of dry-cured duck

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郇延军; 陈妹; 钟玉虎; 栾亚

    2013-01-01

    By analyzing the differences in physicochemical indices,TBARS,sensory quality and volatile flavor compounds between high-temperature and low-temperature air-drying ripened dry-cured duck,the potential effect of high-temperature air-drying processing on the quality characteristics and lipid oxidation were studied.The results showed that high-temperature air-drying significantly (p < 0.05) accelerated the decline of moisture,Aw and accumulation of salt,and also showed significant effect in a * value(p < 0.05),but not in texture.TBARS value of high-temperature air-drying group were extremely higher than that in control group (p < 0.01),temperature showed extremely significant effect on lipid oxidation.Aldehydes in high-temperature and lowtemperature air-drying ripened dry-cured duck increased significantly (54.85% and 67.1%,respectively).Hexanal,nonanal,3-methyl butanal and pentanal were the major component,which were the most important volative compounds for the flavor quality.High-temperature air-drying ripening produced more acids and ketones,and may be corrected with lipid peroxidation and rancid flavor.%通过对高温风干和低温风干鸭胸肉理化指标、TBARS及产品感官品质、挥发性风味物质的比较,研究高温风干工艺对风鸭品质特性及脂质氧化的影响.结果显示:高温风干可以显著加速风鸭水分散失、Aw下降及盐分积累速度(p<0.05),显著促进a*值下降(P<0.05),对质构影响不显著;高温风干组TBARS值极显著高于对照组(p<0.01),温度对脂质氧化速率影响极显著;挥发性风味物质中醛类物质含量(达54.85%和67.1%)显著高于原料,己醛、壬醛、3-甲基正丁醛和戊醛是醛类物质的主体成分,是形成风鸭风味品质的一类重要物质;高温风干生成更多的酸、酮类物质可能是脂质过氧化产生酸败味的重要成分.

  16. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating

  17. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  18. Effect of air flow rate on the polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of convective dried cactus pear cladodes (Opuntia ficus indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Infante, José-Alberto; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria-Elizabeth; González-Laredo, Ruben-Francisco; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Medina-Torres, Luis; Cervantes-Cardozo, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The interest in nopal has encouraged the use of dehydration; there are few studies about the effect of process parameters on the nopal polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of air-drying flow rates on the amount and antioxidant capacity of extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes. Nopal was dried at 45 degrees C and air flow rates of 3 and 5 m/sec. Samples were analyzed for moisture, total polyphenol, flavonoid, and flavonol contents, chain-breaking activity, inhibition of low-density lipoprotein and deoxyribose oxidation. Nopal drying at an air flow rate of 3 m/sec showed higher values of phenols, flavonoids and flavonols. The best value of low-density lipoprotein inhibition and deoxyribose was found at 1,000 microg/ml. The air flow rate affected the amount of polyphenols and the OH( . ) radical scavenging, but did not modify the chain-breaking activity and the low-density lipoprotein inhibition activity.

  19. 一种喷雾干燥塔的新风预处理系统%Fresh Air Pretreatment System in Spray Drying Tower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂伟; 周开翔; 付曜; 梅勇; 袁亮

    2016-01-01

    Spray drying technology has been widely used in food and pharmaceutical industry. Under the condition that the air in exterior environment is poor, how to make the air directly touching the product in spray drying tower qualified is core technology to ensure the quality of the product. In this article, one fresh air pretreatment system used in spray drying tower was introduced. This system has been proved to play significant roles in making the air in the tower qualified and saving the cost and energy consumption.%喷雾干燥技术已广泛应用于食品医药行业,在外部环境空气质量普遍较差的情况下,如何确保喷雾干燥塔内直接与产品接触的空气质量,将是企业保证产品质量的重要技术研究课题。介绍一种喷雾干燥塔的新风预处理系统,该系统在确保喷雾干燥塔内空气质量以及节约成本和能耗等方面具有重要意义。

  20. 核桃花干制加工工艺研究%Experimental Researches on Air Drying of Walnut Male Anthotaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞秀玲; 侯小玲

    2012-01-01

    The blanching treatment and air drying were optimized to improve quality of walnut male anthotaxy. The best treatment was blanching walnut male anthotaxy at 90℃,20 s in solution which contained NaC1. Dried products showed better quality via stage temperature control.%对核桃雄花序烫漂、热风干燥条件进行研究,结果表明烫漂温度为90℃、烫漂时间为20S,NaCI组成的护色液护色,分段控温干燥较好。

  1. Tracing the sources of gaseous components (222Rn, CO2 and its carbon isotopes) in soil air under a cool-deciduous stand in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Haraki, Yukihide; Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Amano, Hikaru; Kobal, Ivan; Vaupotic, Janja

    2010-02-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and carbon dioxide were monitored simultaneously in soil air under a cool-temperate deciduous stand on the campus of Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. Both (222)Rn and CO(2) concentrations in soil air varied with atmospheric (soil) temperature in three seasons, except for winter when the temperature in soil air remained constant at 2-3 degrees C at depth of 80 cm. In winter, the gaseous components were influenced by low-pressure region passing through the observation site when the ground surface was covered with snow of ~1 m thickness. Carbon isotopic analyses of CO(2) suggested that CO(2) in soil air may result from mixing of atmospheric air and soil components of different origins, i.e. CO(2) from contemporary soil organic matter and old carbon from deeper source, to varying degrees, depending on seasonal meteorological and thus biological conditions.

  2. Air-drying Models for New-built Offshore Gas Pipelines%新建海底天然气管道干空气干燥模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹学文; 王立洋; 林宗虎

    2005-01-01

    Drying (conditioning) is an important procedure to prevent hydrate formation during gas pipeline gas-up and to protect pipelines against corrosion. The air-drying method is preferred in offshore gas pipelines pre-commissioning. The air-drying process of gas pipelines commonly includes two steps, air purging and soak test. The mass conservation and the phase equilibrium theory are applied to setting up the mathematical models of air purging, which can be used to simulate dry airflow rate and drying time. Fick diffusion law is applied to setting up the mathematical model of soak test, which can predict the water vapor concentration distribution. The results calculated from the purging model and the soak test model are in good agreement with the experimental data in the DF1-1 offshore production pipeline conditioning. The models are verified to be available for the air-drying project design of offshore gas pipelines. Some proposals for air-drying engineering and operational procedures are put forward by analyzing the air-drying process of DF1-1 gas-exporting pipelines.

  3. Sources of organochlorine pesticides in air in an urban Mediterranean environment: volatilisation from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana; Erić, Ljiljana; Ilić, Predrag; Kohoutek, Jiří; Kovacić, Igor

    2011-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticide (OCP) cycling was studied in the area of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina, over 3 days in summer with high temporal (4 h-means) and spatial (3 sites distanced 3-6 km) resolutions. Elevated levels of DDX compounds (i.e. o,p'- and p,p'-isomers of DDT, DDE and DDD, 44-74 pg m(-3) at the urban sites and 27 pg m(-3) as a background level), HCH (α-, β- and γ-isomers, 52-70 vs. 147 pg m(-3)), HCB (34-48 vs. <0.1 pg m(-3)) and pentachlorobenzene (6.8-9.9 vs. 6.0 pg m(-3)) were found. The variation of OCP levels at the two urban sites was not in phase, except for most DDX compounds. This was related to background levels, which for HCH were higher than in the urban area. Vertical profiles between samples collected from 1.1 and 2.3 m (part of the time 0.6 and 2.3 m) above a soil, which was only moderately contaminated by OCPs (0.12 ng g(-1) HCH, 0.11 ng g(-1) DDX, 0.44 ng g(-1) HCB) were analysed. Volatilisation from the ground caused negative vertical concentration gradients of HCH isomers (day and night), but not for HCB (except for 1 day-time sample) and DDX compounds (except p,p'-DDD, day-time, sporadically). The concentration in air and the vertical concentration gradient of the HCH isomers varied with air temperature (day-time maxima), while the variation of the HCB concentration was inversely related to air temperature and was determined by mixing (night-time maxima). α- and β-HCH were volatilised from soil throughout the three days, even during periods of cooling. Fugacity calculations, based on the absorption in soil organic matter as the process determining retention in soil, underestimated the volatilisation of β-HCH and p,p'-DDD. It is concluded that the representativeness of point measurements of OCPs in urban areas is limited by the spatial variability of soil contamination.

  4. Deposition of heavy water vapor from air to plant and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoh, Mariko; Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ichimasa, Michiko; Ichimasa, Yusuke

    1999-03-01

    When tritium is released into the atmosphere, plants play an important role in processes of tritium transfer in the environment. However, available data is limited because the uptake of tritium into a plant is affected by many factors such as plant growth, humidity, solar radiation, stomatal condition - all of which vary in daily and seasonal cycles. Deuterium, a stable isotope of tritium, was released as a tracer of tritium in the form of D{sub 2}O vapor in a greenhouse to study the transfer of tritium from air to plants and soils. The deposition rate of D{sub 2}O from the air to plant leaves was measured in a daytime and in a nighttime, and the results were compared. After D{sub 2}O release stopped, decline of D{sub 2}O concentrations in plant free water was measured. (author)

  5. Soil temperatures and stability of ice-cemented ground in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C; Mellon, M T; Friedmann, E I

    1998-03-01

    Year-round temperature measurements at 1600 m elevation during 1994 in the Asgard Range Antarctica, indicate that the mean annual frost point of the ice-cemented ground, 25 cm below the surface, is -21.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C and the mean annual frost point of the atmosphere is -27.5 +/- 1.0 degrees C. The corresponding mean annual temperatures are -24.9 degrees C and -23.3 degrees C. These results imply that there is a net flux of water vapour from the ice to the atmosphere resulting in a recession of the ice-cemented ground by about 0.4-0.6 mm yr-1. The level of the ice-cemented permafrost is about 12 cm below the level of dry permafrost. The summer air temperatures would have to increase about 7 degrees C for thawing temperatures to just reach the top of the subsurface ice. Either subsurface ice at this location is evaporating over time or there are sporadic processes that recharge the ice and maintain equilibrium over long timescales.

  6. Study on the Drying Technology of Pumpkin by Heat Air%南瓜干热风干燥工艺的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅亚平; 吴卫国

    2014-01-01

    以南瓜为原料,采用热风干燥方法,在不同的干燥温度(60℃、70℃、80℃)、不同的切片厚度(2mm、4mm、6mm)、不同的热烫时间(30s、45s、60s)条件下,记录南瓜片干燥所需的时间,并探究干燥温度、热烫时间和切片厚度对南瓜干感官质量(包括色泽和硬度)的影响。%The hot air drying technology used to dry the raw materials for the pumpkin was studied.Pa-rameters of different drying temperature (60 ℃,70 ℃,80 ℃),different slice thickness (2 mm,4 mm and 6 mm),different blanching time (45 s,30 s,60 s),recorded the time needed for drying pumpkin,and explored the effects of drying temperature,blanching time and slice thickness on the sensory quality (including color and hardness)on pumpkin dried was collected.

  7. Air born soil pollution assessment and mitigation in the south of ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, Olga; Kharytonov, Mykola; Moschner, Christin; Khlopova, Valentina M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric emissions made by mining and metallurgy industry account for 54 % of total air pollutions of the Dnipropetrovsk Region. As it has been shown previously, the range of pollutants depends on the number and types of the industrial enterprises located within the each urban area. In Dnipropetrovsk and surrounding cities the dominant emissions come from the waste of metallurgical and chemical industries, which is heavily developed in this area. The multipollution exposure assessment was made for the several cities in Dnipropetrovsk industrial region in the south of Ukraine. In this connection the monitoring of atmospheric air pollution in the environment of the Dnepropetrovsk megalopolis area was carried out in several industrial cities: Dnipropetrovsk, Dneprodzerzhynsk, Kryvyy Ryg and Pavlograd with use of the network of stationary monitoring stations at the Dnepropetrovsk Regional Center of Hydrometeorology. The initial evaluation of technogenic atmospheric pollution with toxic substances was performed with due to the limit values of so-called maximum permissible concentrations (MPC) for harmful emissions in the atmosphere as set out in the Ukrainian Air Quality Standards. The main sources of air pollution in industrial cities are stationary. Meantime increasing road transport is a growing source of pollution. The maximum excess of MPC content of NO2 in the atmosphere of the cities has reached twice. Over the last 5 years in the atmosphere of industrial cities in the region there was an increased level of nitrogen dioxide (excess of MPC in 1, 5-2, 5 times). Number of inorganic aerosols (nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and other) has an effect of summation. In the presence of diffuse sources are superimposed individual emissions and formed the total torch actually located over the whole of the industrial agglomeration. Spatial structure of such a torch is very complicated, instant concentrations of impurities at various points in the city are substantially

  8. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the Indus River catchment area, Pakistan: Status, soil-air exchange and black carbon mediated distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Anam; Ali, Usman; Mahmood, Adeel; Chaudhry, Muhammad Jamshed Iqbal; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were investigated in passive air and soil samples from the catchment area of the Indus River, Pakistan. ∑15OCPs ranged between 0.68 and 13.47 ng g(-1) in soil and 375.1-1975 pg m-(3) in air. HCHs and DDTs were more prevalent in soil and air compartments. Composition profile indicated that β-HCH and p,p'-DDE were the dominant of all metabolites among HCHs and DDTs respectively. Moreover, fBC and fTOC were assessed and evaluated their potential role in the distribution status of OCPs. The fTOC and fBC ranged between 0.77 and 2.43 and 0.04-0.30% respectively in soil. Regression analysis showed the strong influence of fBC than fTOC on the distribution of OCPs in the Indus River catchment area soil. Equilibrium status was observed for β-HCH, δ-HCH, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, TC, HCB and Heptachlor with ff ranged between 0.3 and 0.59 while assessing the soil-air exchange of OCPs.

  9. Variations in soil properties, species composition, diversity and biomass of herbaceous species due to ruminant dung residue in a seasonally dry tropical environment of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Verma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ruminants directly or indirectly influence nutrient cycling and vegetation structure in grassland ecosystems. We assessed the impact of natural cattle dung deposition on soil attributes and the resulting effects on species composition, species diversity and biomass of herbaceous vegetation in a natural grassland in the seasonally dry tropical environment of Banaras Hindu University, India. For this 72 plots of 1 × 1 m [12 locations × 2 treatments (dung residue and control × 3 replicates] were selected in January 2013 and soil and vegetation samples collected. A total of 74 species belonging to 66 genera and 25 families were recorded. Principal Component Analysis (PCA ordination revealed that the dung residue (DP and control (CP plots were distinctly different in terms of soil attributes and species composition. The k-dominance plot showed greater species diversity in DPs than CPs, with higher soil nutrients and moisture and lower soil pH in DPs than CPs. Similarly, DPs showed more herbaceous species and greater biomass than CPs. This trend can be explained by the positive responses of forbs, erect plants, annuals, large-statured, non-native and non-leguminous species to dung residue, while increased biomass can be partly due to cattle preferentially not grazing areas adjacent to a dung pat. Overall, the study showed that deposition of dung during grazing by cattle stimulates growth of pasture species and increases species diversity. Therefore cattle dung could be used as a sustainable alternative to chemical fertilizers to manage soil pH, species composition and diversity, and forage production in the seasonally dry tropical grasslands of India, which are nutrient- and moisture-limited.Keywords: Animal manure, herbaceous vegetation, plant functional attributes, soil pH, species change.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(3112-128 

  10. Detection of PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC Rearrangements Is Feasible in Routine Air-Dried Fine Needle Aspiration Smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraz, Carolina; Rehfeld, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise;

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic limitations of fine needle aspiration (FNA), like the indeterminate category, can be partially overcome by molecular analysis. As PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangements have been detected in follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs...... as generally not suitable for testing these rearrangements in a clinical setting. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine air-dried FNA smears for the detection of these rearrangements with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT......-PCR). Methods: A new method for RNA extraction from routine air-dried FNA smears was established, which allowed analysis for the presence of four variants of PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC 1 and RET/PTC 3, which were analyzed in 106 routine FNA smears and the corresponding surgically obtained FFPE tissues using real...

  11. 城市污泥热干化产品林地施肥试验%Fertilization of Thermal Dried Sewage Sludge in Forest Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程志鹏; 夏恩思; 段方伦; 陈俊

    2013-01-01

    Experimental fertilization in forest soils was conducted using dried sludge from the Chongqing Jiguanshi Sewage Treatment Plant.Growth of tree diameter and accumulation of heavy metals in soil were observed.The results indicated that the dried sludge contained abundant nutrients like N,P and K.The application of dried sludge could promote the growth of plants,and the accumulation of heavy metals in soil was not remarkable,with a low pollution risk.%采用重庆市鸡冠石污水处理厂的干化污泥产品进行林地施肥试验,观测了树径的增长及土壤中重金属的累积情况.结果表明,干化污泥中含有丰富的N、P、K养分,施用干化污泥产品能够促进植物生长,且土壤中重金属累积作用不显著,重金属污染风险较低.

  12. Colloid Release From Differently Managed Loess Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    of the total clay not associated with organic matter. No significant difference in release rate was found for air-dry aggregates. The low-carbon soils initially had a higher content of WSA but were more susceptible to disaggregation than the high-carbon soils. Furthermore, the application of NPK fertilizer had......The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) in a soil can have a major impact on soil functions, such as permeability to water and air, and on soil strength, which can impair soil fertility and workability. In addition, the content of WDC in the soil may increase the risk of nutrient loss...... and of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. In the present study, soils from the Bad Lauchsta¨dt longterm static fertilizer experiment with different management histories were investigated to relate basic soil properties to the content of WDC, the content of water-stable aggregates (WSA...

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Hot Air Drying of Thin Layer Litchi Flesh%荔枝果肉热风干燥薄层模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关志强; 王秀芝; 李敏; 蒋小强; 谢晶

    2012-01-01

    The influences of drying temperature and hot air speed on the moisture ratio MR and the drying velocity U of litchi were studied by self-building heat pump drying device. The results showed that drying process of litchi occurred in the falling rate period, and the moisture transfer was controlled by internal diffusion. Nine different dynamic models were fitted nonlinearly by using the drying test data of litchi in the heat pump device. The results of comparing the values of the correlation coefficient R , the reduced chi-square X2 and the root mean square error eRMSE and the verification testing showed the Page model was the best suitable to descript the relationship of litchi moisture and drying time by hot air drying. The effective moisture diffusion coefficient Deff and the activation energy Ea were also obtained by experiments under different conditions, the values of Deff would increase with the addition of drying temperature and hot air speed, the average value of Ea was 29. 939 kJ/mol.%利用热泵干燥装置探讨了热风温度和热风风速对荔枝果肉干燥水分比MR和干燥速率U的影响.结果表明:荔枝果肉薄层热风干燥是内部水分扩散控制的降速干燥过程.对9种常见食品薄层干燥模型进行试验数据非线性拟合,通过比较评价决定系数R2、卡方x2和标准误差eRMSE以及试验验证,结果显示Page模型是描述荔枝果肉薄层热风干燥过程的最优模型.不同干燥条件下有效水分扩散系数Deff和活化能Ea的求解结果表明,有效水分扩散系数Deff随热风温度和风速的增加而变大,平均活化能Ea为29.939 kJ/mol.

  14. On the corrosion and soiling effects on materials by air pollution in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tzanis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the European project, entitled MULTI-ASSESS, specimens of structural metals, glass, stone and concrete materials were exposed to air pollution at a station, which was installed for this purpose on a building, located in the centre of Athens. The main purpose of this project was to determine the corrosion and soiling effects of air pollution on materials. A set of the specimens was exposed in a position that was sheltered from rain and partly from wind, and another set was exposed in unsheltered positions on the roof of the above said building. In addition, other specimens were exposed at different heights on the same building, in order to investigate for the first time the corrosion and soiling effects on various materials as a function of height. For the determination of these effects, chemical analysis of the specimens was performed and basic parameters as the weight change, the layer thickness and the optical properties were calculated. Finally, the results obtained are discussed and their plausible interpretation is attempted.

  15. Short-term effects of early-season fire on herbaceous composition, dry matter production and soil fertility in Guinea savanna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedeji Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecological impact of fire regimes on plant diversity and soil fertility has become a subject of intense discussion, especially in savannas where recurring incidences are common. This study assessed the short-term effects of early-season fire on herbaceous composition, dry matter yield and soil fertility in the Guinea savanna belt of Nigeria. Data on ground cover, dry matter yield (DMY in plants and concentrations of C, N, P, K, Ca and Mg in soil were collected from 10 delineated subplots in the burned and unburned zones of four sites after annual wildfire had occurred. Ground cover was significantly higher in the burned zones, increasing progressively from January to April (dry season. Eleven herbaceous species in addition to 2 tree seedlings occurred and represented families of Asteraceae, Cyperaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae. Digitaria nuda, Brachiaria lata, Daniellia oliveri and Aeschynomene indica were limited to the burnt zones while Cyperus tuberosus, Mariscus alternifolius and Rottboellia cochinchinensis were restricted to the unburned zones. DMY ranged from 0.32 g m-2 (Desmodium tortuosum to 52.96 g m-2 (Megathyrsus maximus. Average biomass in the burned and unburned sites was 35.86 g m-2 and 28.42 g m-2, respectively. Soil C, N and P concentrations decreased (positive deterioration index - DI, while those of K, Ca and Mg improved (negative DI in the burned sites. Burning altered the growth (ground cover and composition of plant species in the short term, and could significantly influence soil nutrient dynamics in the long term, especially with recurring fire events.

  16. Dynamics of thin layer hot-air drying of lagenaria leucantha rusby%瓠瓜薄层热风干燥动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸爱士; 夏凯

    2011-01-01

    为掌握瓠瓜薄层热风干燥特性,研究了一定条件下风温与风速对瓠瓜薄层热风干燥过程的影响,拟合了干燥曲线方程,计算了对流传热系数α与传质系数KH等动力学参数.结果表明:风温、风速均对干燥速度影响较大,以75℃、1.04 m/s为宜;干燥方程符合Page模型:随风速增大α与KH均增大,但风温对两者影响不大.结果可以为瓠瓜干制工业化生产和控制提供理论依据.%In order to master the thin layer hot-air drying character of lagenaria leucantha rusby, the influences of the wind temperature and speed on the drying process of thin layer hot-air drying of the lagenaria leucantha rusby under certain condition were studied. The equations of drying curve were fitted, and the dynamics parameters such as convective heat-transfer coefficient a, and quality transmission coefficient kH, were calculated. The results showed that the wind temperature and speed had greater influence on the dehydrating rate, and 75℃、 1.04 m/s were suitable parameters. The drying procedure could accurately be described by the Page model. With the wind speed rising, a and kH increased, but the wind temperature had a little effect on the two coefficients. The results can provide a theoretical basis for industrialization production and control of drying lagenaria leucantha rusby.

  17. Lichens as an integrating tool for monitoring PAH atmospheric deposition: a comparison with soil, air and pine needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Sofia; Máguas, Cristina; Matos, João; Pereira, Maria João; Branquinho, Cristina

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate lichens as biomonitors of PAH atmospheric deposition; for that, an inter-comparison between the PAH profile and concentrations intercepted in lichens with those of air, soil and pine needles was performed. The study was conducted in a petro-industrial area and the results showed that PAH profiles in lichens were similar to those of the air and pine needles, but completely different from those of soils. Lichens accumulated higher PAH concentrations when compared to the other environmental compartments and its concentrations were significantly and linearly correlated with concentrations of PAHs in soil; we showed that a translation of the lichen PAHs concentrations into regulatory standards is possible, fulfilling one of the most important requirements of using lichens as biomonitors. With lichens we were then able to characterize the air PAHs profile of urban, petro-industrial and background areas.

  18. NSGA-II Algorithm with a Local Search Strategy for Multiobjective Optimal Design of Dry-Type Air-Core Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengfen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry-type air-core reactor is now widely applied in electrical power distribution systems, for which the optimization design is a crucial issue. In the optimization design problem of dry-type air-core reactor, the objectives of minimizing the production cost and minimizing the operation cost are both important. In this paper, a multiobjective optimal model is established considering simultaneously the two objectives of minimizing the production cost and minimizing the operation cost. To solve the multi-objective optimization problem, a memetic evolutionary algorithm is proposed, which combines elitist nondominated sorting genetic algorithm version II (NSGA-II with a local search strategy based on the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES. NSGA-II can provide decision maker with flexible choices among the different trade-off solutions, while the local-search strategy, which is applied to nondominated individuals randomly selected from the current population in a given generation and quantity, can accelerate the convergence speed. Furthermore, another modification is that an external archive is set in the proposed algorithm for increasing the evolutionary efficiency. The proposed algorithm is tested on a dry-type air-core reactor made of rectangular cross-section litz-wire. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has high efficiency and it converges to a better Pareto front.

  19. Transformation of dry-steppe soils under long-term agrogenic impacts in the area of ancient Olbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisetskii, F. N.; Rodionova, M. E.

    2015-04-01

    The results of the study of dark chestnut soils (Kastanozems) differing in the time and intensity of their agricultural use and in the duration of the fallow stage are analyzed. Soil sequences differing in the character of their agrogenic changes were studied in the rural area of ancient Olbia with a centuries-long history of diverse economic activities, including crop growing. The agrophysical, agrochemical, and geochemical characteristics were examined in order to assess the soil transformation processes in a sequence from the initial virgin soil to the cultivated soil of the antique period in the fallow stage, the soil under recent (three-five years) fallow, and modern plowed soils in the area of ancient farming. It was found that the contents of humus, total nitrogen, and carbonates; the water stability of the soil aggregates; and the portion of coprolites in the agronomically valuable aggregate fraction are sensitive indicators of the duration of the agrogenesis in the dark chestnut soils. The manifestation of agrogenic processes at different hierarchical levels of the spatial and temporal organization of the soil system depended on the duration and intensity of the farming practices. Temporal abandonment of intensely cultivated lands in traditional farming practices with periodic initiation of the natural processes of restoration of the soil fertility can be considered a suitable measure to regulate agrogenic loads on the soils with the aim to enhance the self-organization processes in the soil system.

  20. Three-dimensional DEM-CFD analysis of air-flow-induced detachment of API particles from carrier particles in dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Air flow and particle-particle/wall impacts are considered as two primary dispersion mechanisms for dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Hence, an understanding of these mechanisms is critical for the development of DPIs. In this study, a coupled DEM-CFD (discrete element method-computational fluid dynamics) is employed to investigate the influence of air flow on the dispersion performance of the carrier-based DPI formulations. A carrier-based agglomerate is initially formed and then dispersed in a uniformed air flow. It is found that air flow can drag API particles away from the carrier and those in the downstream air flow regions are prone to be dispersed. Furthermore, the influence of the air velocity and work of adhesion are also examined. It is shown that the dispersion number (i.e., the number of API particles detached from the carrier) increases with increasing air velocity, and decreases with increasing the work of adhesion, indicating that the DPI performance is controlled by the balance of the removal and adhesive forces. It is also shown that the cumulative Weibull distribution function can be used to describe the DPI performance, which is governed by the ratio of the fluid drag force to the pull-off force.

  1. A comparison of the cost and performance of passive and active soil and soil gas measurement technologies at McClellan Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E. [BDM Federal, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Mook, P.H. Jr.; Wong, K.B. [SM-ALC/EMR, McClellan AFB, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB), located near Sacramento, California, is one of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s National Environmental Technology Test Sites. McClellan AFB has recently completed an evaluation of a passive soil gas screening technology and an innovative soil gas measurement technology for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The paper presents an overview and comparison of the cost and performance of a passive soil gas measurement technology with that of conventional and innovative soil gas monitoring techniques. Although not a quantitative analysis, the passive soil gas screening technology has been shown to be representative and cost effective for many site characterization and remedial action monitoring needs. The performance and experience with a multi-purpose soil gas and groundwater sampling probe are presented. The results of an in progress evaluation of an innovative soil sampling technique that allows VOC profiling of soil in a single direct push are also presented. The performance of the above innovative technologies are compared with conventional site characterization methods in use at McClellan AFB.

  2. THE IMPACT OF FRESH SAWDUST AND DRY PIG MANURE PRODUCED ON SAWDUST BEDDING APPLICATION ON THE NUTRIENTS MOBILITY IN SOIL AND SUGAR BEET YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kováčik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the pot trial carried out at the area of the Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra was to determine the impact of dry pig manure produced on the sawdust bedding and sawdust litter on the level of nutrients’ mobility in the soil and sugar beet yield. The achieved results showed that one month after the sawdust and manure application to the soil, the contents of mobile nutrients (Nan, P, K, Ca, Mg in soil were lower than in the control unfertilized treatment. The sawdust litter immobilized nutrients more considerably than manure. Four months after the manure application into soil, its immobilization effect was not evident. On the contrary, the manure increased the mobile nutrients content in soil. In the second year of experiment the immobilization effect of sawdust litter was proved even four months after its application into soil. The application of manure increased considerably the beet root yield. The maximum root yield was determined in the treatment where the highest dose of manure was applied. The minimum root yield was detected in the treatment where the highest dose of sawdust litter was applied.

  3. Evaluation of Biological and Enzymatic Activity of Soil in a Tropical Dry Forest: Desierto de la Tatacoa (Colombia) with Potential in Mars Terraforming and Other Similar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Moreno, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    Desierto de la Tatacoa has been determined to be a tropical dry forest bioma, which is located at 3° 13" N 75° 13" W. It has a hot thermal floor with 440 msnm of altitude; it has a daily average of 28° C, and a maximum of 40° C, Its annual rainfall total can be upwards of 1250 mm. Its solar sheen has a daily average of 5.8 hours and its relative humidity is between 60% and 65%. Therefore, the life forms presents are very scant, and in certain places, almost void. It was realized a completely random sampling of soil from its surface down to 6 inches deep, of zones without vegetation and with soils highly loaded by oxides of iron in order to determine the number of microorganisms per gram and its subsequent identification. It was measured the soil basal respiration. Besides, it was determined enzymatic activity (catalase, dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease). Starting with the obtained results, it is developes an alternative towards the study of soil genesis in Mars in particular, and recommendations for same process in other planets. Although the information found in the experiments already realized in Martian soil they demonstrate that doesnt exist any enzymatic activity, the knowledge of the same topic in the soil is proposed as an alternative to problems like carbonic fixing of the dense Martian atmosphere of CO2, the degradation of inorganic compounds amongst other in order to prepare the substratum for later colonization by some life form.

  4. Availability and evaluation of European forest soil monitoring data in the study on the effects of air pollution on forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cools N

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the study of air pollution effects on forest ecosystems, solid soil data such as cation exchange capacity, base saturation and other exchangeable cation fractions, soil texture, soil moisture, soil weathering rates, C/N ratio and other variables form an important information base for many air pollution impact models. This paper shows some of the possibilities and the limitations of the soil data that European countries collected on the systematic Level I and on the intensive and permanent Level II monitoring plots within the ICP Forests programme. The soil data date from a first inventory in the 1990s and from a second inventory more than 10 years later. Both surveys were conducted following a common manual on sampling and analysis of soil. An example of the changes in pH(CaCl2 and base saturation in the forest floor and mineral soil on more than 2000 plots till a depth of 80 cm between the two surveys is presented. In this period the pH(CaCl2 significantly increased in the very acid forest soils [with pH(CaCl2 below 4.0] but further decreased in forest soils with pH(CaCl2 above 4.0. Following the trend in pH, the base saturation increased in soils with a very low buffering capacity (soils with a base saturation below 20% in the first inventory and decreased in forest soils with reference base saturation values above 20%. There is both a decrease of soil pH and base saturation in the forest floor of the Arenosols and Podzols. In the Podzols this decreasing trend could not be established in the mineral soil, though this decreasing trend persisted in a number of mineral soil layers of the Arenosols. The only consistent increasing trend of pH and base saturation when stratifying according to the WRB reference soil groups was seen in the forest floor of the Luvisols and Cambisols.

  5. Correlation between geology and radon levels in groundwater, soil and indoor air in Bhilangana Valley, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Inst. of Himalayan Geology, Dehra Dun (India); Ramola, R.C. [Dept. of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal Univ. Campus, Tehri Garhwal (India)

    1997-11-01

    Radon concentrations were measured in soil, air and groundwater in Bhilangana Valley, Garhwal Himalaya, India by using an LR-115 plastic track detector and radon emanometer. Radon concentrations were found to vary from 1 KBq/m{sup 3} to 57 KBq/m{sup 3} in soil, 5 Bq/l to 887 Bq/l in water and 95 Bq/m{sup 3} to 208 Bq/m{sup 3} in air. The recorded values are quite high due to associated uranium mineralization in the area. Radon concentration was also found to depend on the tectonic structure and geology of the area. (orig.)

  6. 核桃气体射流冲击干燥特性及干燥模型%Drying Characteristics and Model of Walnut in Air-Impingement Jet Dryer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵珂; 肖旭霖

    2015-01-01

    [Objective] In order to improve the dried walnut quality, shorten the drying time, the effects of different conditions on the walnut air-impingement jet drying were studied and the activation energy for drying was obtained and the optimum drying model was selected.[Method] Using the method of energy saving technology of dry heat pipe combined with a self-made gas jet impingement equipment, in 9 groups of an experiment, effects of different jet air temperatures (40℃, 50℃ and 60℃) and air velocities (11, 12 and 13 m·s-1) on the drying characteristics of materials, effective moisture diffusion coefficient and activation energy were studied, at the same time, through the statistical data selection for the fitting drying models, 5 drying kinetics models were established. The 5 models are the Page model, the Modified Page model, the Logarithmic model, the Herdenson and Pabis model, and the Lemus model. The data were processed by using the DPS, after finishing the fitting, a parametric equation was obtained the final generalMR andt.[Result] Compared to the most results of food material drying test, air-impingement jet drying of walnut mainly occurred in the falling rate drying period, and there was no constant drying rate stage. Air temperature had large influence on each stage of walnut air impingement. With the increase of the air temperature values, the drying rate was rising and the MR was decreased. The air velocity almost had no influence on the drying time, but had a certain influence on the rate of surface water vaporizing stage by increasing the drying time. The air velocity almost had no influence on the drying rate of internal moisture transfer stage had almost no influence, and by employing this feature, a method of changing the wind temperature and wind speed could be used in different periods, so not only the drying time was shortened, but also the purpose of energy saving was achieved. Overall, for shortening the drying time, the order of the

  7. Soil-Air Mercury Flux near a Large Industrial Emission Source before and after Closure (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckley, Chris S; Blanchard, Pierrette; McLennan, Daniel; Mintz, Rachel; Sekela, Mark

    2015-08-18

    Prior to its closure, the base-metal smelter in Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada was one of the North America's largest mercury (Hg) emission sources. Our project objective was to understand the exchange of Hg between the soil and the air before and after the smelter closure. Field and laboratory Hg flux measurements were conducted to identify the controlling variables and used for spatial and temporal scaling. Study results showed that deposition from the smelter resulted in the surrounding soil being enriched in Hg (up to 99 μg g(-1)) as well as other metals. During the period of smelter operation, air concentrations were elevated (30 ± 19 ng m(-3)), and the soil was a net Hg sink (daily flux: -3.8 ng m(-2) h(-1)). Following the smelter closure, air Hg(0) concentrations were reduced, and the soils had large emissions (daily flux: 108 ng m(-2) h(-1)). The annual scaling of soil Hg emissions following the smelter closure indicated that the landscape impacted by smelter deposition emitted or re-emitted almost 100 kg per year. Elevated soil Hg concentrations and emissions are predicted to continue for hundreds of years before background concentrations are re-established. Overall, the results indicate that legacy Hg deposition will continue to cycle in the environment long after point-source reductions.

  8. 康乃馨热风干燥特性研究%Research on hot-air drying characteristics of carnation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚晶; 杨薇

    2012-01-01

    选取康乃馨为研究对象,以热风温度、风速、装载量为试验因素进行单因素试验,分析各个因素对干燥特性的影响.结果表明,3个因素对康乃馨的干燥特性影响均显著,温度越高,风速越大,装载量越少,康乃馨达到安全水分所用的时间就越短.采用3种常用的干燥模型单项扩散模型、指数模型、Page模型对试验数据进行线性回归分析和模型的拟合,得出Page模型适合描述康乃馨的干燥进程,并建立康乃馨的干燥模型.通过试验验证,Page模型的预测值与实测值的最大误差仅为6.7%,很好地描述了康乃馨的干燥进程.%Hot-air temperature, wind velocity and loading weight were taken as experimental factors to study the drying characteristics of carnation. Experimental results showed that all of the three factors significantly influence the drying characteristics of carnation. It was favorable to strengthen the drying process by increasing drying temperature and wind velocity. But the increase of loading weight could reduce drying rate. The experimental datum was simulated with different mathematical models. The results also showed that Page model was fitted to the hot-air drying curves of carnation. The change regulation of hot-air drying of carnation could be described and predicted very well by Page model according to the comparison of experimental and calculated values.

  9. Secagem de café cereja descascado por ar quente e microondas Drying pulped coffee cherry beans by means of hot air ond microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Cunha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou estudar a viabilidade de produzir café cereja descascado seco pela aplicação de microondas para assistir a secagem convencional a ar quente, a fim de reduzir o tempo de processo, com o aumento do rendimento industrial e da qualidade do produto perante os métodos tradicionais de secagem. Dois ciclos de secagem foram testados: a processo em secador rotativo convencional a ar quente, com umidade do produto reduzida de 45-50 a 11-13% b.u.; b processo subdividido em uma primeira etapa de pré-secagem convencional a ar quente de 45-50 a 30% b.u., seguida de etapa de secagem final por ar quente e microondas, com redução de 30 a 11-13% b.u. de umidade do produto. O tempo global do primeiro para o segundo ciclo de secagem foi reduzido de 15 a 37,5 para pouco mais de 10 horas, respectivamente. A qualidade sensorial do produto foi avaliada pela "prova da xícara", complementada por análises de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV, com resultados satisfatórios. Um estudo preliminar dos aspectos econômicos envolvidos na ampliação de escala para uma linha industrial de processamento de café com a inclusão de um sistema a microondas foi também delineado.This research concerns a process development study focussing the application of microwaves to pulped coffee cherries production, in order to reduce the drying time and increase the industrial yield and product quality when compared to conventional drying processes. Two drying cycles were tested: a a hot air drying process using a conventional batch rotary dryer from 45-50 to 11-13% w.b. product moisture; b a two stage process, whereby the product was pre dried with hot air from 45-50 to 30% w.b., followed by a final microwave and hot air drying stage, to reduce product moisture from 30 to 11-13% w.b. The overall drying time was reduced from 15 to 37.5 hours to about 10 hours, respectively. The sensory quality of the product was evaluated by the "cup test", complemented

  10. 环境友好型干粉空气净化涂料的研制%Preparation of Environmentally Friendly Dry Powder Air-purifying Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海银; 张安杰; 曾慧崇; 陈丽丽; 付燕; 李鑫哲; 韩立娟; 罗志河; 安兴才

    2016-01-01

    The novel environmentally friendly dry powder air-purifying coatings have been widely studied as an effective method for indoor air puriifcation, which could actively adsorb and decompose the pollutants in the air. This work optimized the formula of environmentally friendly dry powder air-purifying coatings. The optimal results were achieved when H-TiO2 as functional powders and the dosage at 2%~5%. Under these conditions, the removal rate of formaldehyde reached 100%after 1.5 h.%环境友好型干粉空气净化涂料是一种新型的功能涂料,能够主动吸附分解空气中的污染物。通过实验,优化了干粉空气净化涂料的基本配方,选择合作开发的H还原法制备的纳米TiO2(H-TiO2)为主要的功能粉体,粉体添加量为2%~5%(质量分数),最终确定的配方1.5 h对甲醛的总去除率为100%。

  11. KINETICS OF THIN LAYER DRYING OF POULTRY MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ghaly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The poultry industry is one of the largest and fastest growing sectors of livestock production in the world. The estimated 2010 world flock was over 18 billion birds with a yearly manure output of 22 million tonnes. Storage and disposal of raw poultry manure has become an environmental problem because of the associated air, water and soil pollution. Environmental and health problems such as odor and pathogens that may arise during and after land application of raw manure can be eliminated by drying. Dried manure can be utilized as a soil conditioner to improve soil tilth and reduce the problems associated with soil compaction and as a feed for ruminants because of its high nitrogen content. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of thin layer drying of poultry manure and evaluate the effects of drying with heated air on the chemical and biological properties of manure. The effects of temperature and depth of manure layer were evaluated. The profile of the moisture content of poultry manure followed an exponential decay curve. The moisture decay constant was affected by the drying temperature and the depth of the manure layer. At the three temperature levels studied, the time required to dry poultry manure in 1 cm-deep layer was the least, followed by 2 and 3 cm-deep layers, respectively. The diffusion coefficient increased with both temperature and depth of drying layer, but did not show a linear increase with either variable. The optimum depth for drying manure (at which the highest drying effectiveness occurred was 3 cm. Drying manure at 40-60°C resulted in the loss of 44-55% of the total Kjeldahl nitrogen, with losses increasing with both the temperature and depth of manure. The pH of the manure decreased from the initial value of 8.4 before drying to about 6.6 after drying. The odor analysis indicated that dried poultry manure did not have an offensive odor. Drying achieved 65.3 and 69.3% reductions in odor intensity and

  12. [Mechanism of injury of air-dry pea seeds under the influence of low doses of gamma-radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, T V; Veselovskiĭ, V A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine which processes in air-dry seeds result in bimodal changes of the pea seed quality under the influence of low doses of gamma-radiation. Pea seeds (cv. "Nemchinovsky-85", harvest 2006, 82% germination persentage) were exposed to gamma-radiation at doses of 3, 10 and 100 Gy The germination percentage decreased to 45% four days after irradiation at the dose of 3 Gy, rised up to 87% at doses of 10 Gy, while the dose of 100 Gy killed the most part of seeds. Seed fractions differing in quality were selected using the metod of Room temperature phosphorecsence (RTP): strong seed frasction I from non-irradiated seeds; weak seed fraction II from the seeds irradiated at a dose of 3 Gy; dead seeds from the seeds irradiated at a dose of 100 Gy. ThermoChemiLuminecnsece (TCL) of seed powders and cotyledons was used. It was shown that the increase of the TCL level in the temperature range from 50 to 110 degreesC was associated with the lipid peroxidation products. The TCL level of seeds subjected to gamma-irradiation at a dose of 3 Gy was similar to that of non-irradiated seeds in the temperature range 50 to 100 degreesC. Therefore, lipid peroxidation was not the cause of the abnormal seedling appearance. The TCL level within this temperature range was increased only in seeds subjected to y-irradiation at a dose of 100 Gy. The TCL level at 150 degreesC was in proportion with the exogenous glucose amount. The increased TCL level of seeds subjected to y-irradiation at a dose of 3 Gy at 150 degreesC resulted from the increase of the glucose content. This means that the transition from the fraction of strong seeds into the fraction of weak ones was the result of the activation of hydrolysis processes. Decrease in the water content of seeds testified to utilization of bound water in this process. The decrease of the glucose content in the "improved" seeds subjected to gamma-irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy most probably indicates the participation of

  13. Research on Solar Steamy Hot-air Drying Technology%太阳能蒸汽热风干燥技术的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴坤; 孔晓玲; 段凤江; 于鹏

    2012-01-01

    The technology of solar steamy hot-air drying uses the vacuum tube collector to heat water and produce steam, then converted it into hot air through the heat exchanger. The purpose is to realize the drying of agricultural products. This paper develops a set of test device. The experiments of drying carrots were carried out to test the drying system' s performance. The results show that when solar power reaches above 750W/ m2, the steam can stable work for about 5 ~7 hours;The temperature of the dryer's high temperature section can be stabilized at around 551 ,and the temperature of the low can be stabilized at around 40t. The drying effect of carrots is good.%太阳能蒸汽热风干燥技术利用真空集热管对水加热产生的水蒸气,通过换热器转换成热风,实现对农产品的干燥作业.本文研制了一套试验装置,以胡萝卜作为样品进行了干燥机的干燥性能试验,结果表明:当太阳辐射值达到750W/m2以上时,蒸汽可以稳定工作5~7h;干燥室内高温工作段温度可以稳定在55℃左右,低温工作段温度可以稳定在40℃左右.胡萝卜干燥效果良好.

  14. Evaluation of Trichloroethylene vapour fluxes using measurements at the soil-air interface and in the atmosphere close to the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotel, Solenn; Nagel, Vincent; Schäfer, Gerhard; Marzougui, Salsabil; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Millet, Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Industrialization during the 19th and 20th century led to the use of chemical products such as chlorinated solvents, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). At locations where volatile organic compounds were accidentally spilled on the soil during transport or leaked from their storage places, they could have migrated vertically through the unsaturated zone towards the underlying groundwater. As a result of their high volatility a large vapour plume is consequently formed. Understanding when, at which concentrations and how long, these pollutants will be present in soil, groundwater, atmosphere or indoor air, still remains a challenge up to date. This study was conducted as part of a broader experiment of TCE multiphase mass transfer in a large (25m×12m×3m) well-instrumented artificial basin. TCE was injected as liquid phase in the vadose zone and experiments were conducted during several months. Firstly, TCE vapour fluxes were experimentally determined in two different ways: (a) direct measurements at the soil-air interface using a flux chamber and (b) evaluations based on measurements of TCE concentrations in the air above the soil surface using a modular experimental flume (5m×1m×1m) with a fixed air flow. Secondly, numerical simulations were conducted to analyse the differences between these two types of fluxes. Several positions of the flume on the soil surface were tested. Based on the TCE concentrations measured in the air, vapour fluxes were determined with the aerodynamic method using the modified Thornthwaite-Holzmann equation. It assumes that the concentrations and velocities are temporally and spatially constant in horizontal planes and requires data on the gradients of concentration, horizontal wind velocity and temperature. TCE vapour fluxes measured at the soil-air interface decrease with distance from the source zone. However, this decrease was either high, at the first stage of experiment (120μg/(m2s) near the source zone compared to 1,1μg/(m2s) 2m

  15. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  16. Dry skin - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... moisture Hot, dry air in desert environments Air conditioners that cool the air and remove moisture Taking ... scrubbing your skin. Shave right after bathing, when hair is soft. Wear soft, comfortable clothing next to ...

  17. Identifying suitable land for alternative crops in a drying climate: soil salinity, texture and topographic conditions for the growth of old man saltbush (Atriplex nummularia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, K. W.; Barrett-Lennard, E. G.; Altman, M.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments conducted under controlled conditions clearly show that the growth and survival of plants on saltland is affected by both the levels of salinity and waterlogging (or depth to water-table) in the soil. Different plant species thrive under varying combinations of these growth constraints. However in natural settings, short distance spatial variability in soil properties and subtle topographic features often complicate the definition of saline and soil hydrological conditions; additional factors may also overprint the trends identified under controlled conditions, making it difficult to define the physical settings where planting is economically viable. We investigated the establishment and growth of old man saltbush (Atriplex nummularia) in relation to variable soil-landscape conditions across an experimental site in southwestern Australia where the combination of high salinity and occasional seasonal waterlogging ruled out the growth of traditional crops and pastures. Saltbush can be critical supplemental feed in the dry season, providing essential nutrients for sheep in combination with sufficient water and dry feed (hay). We applied a range of modeling approaches including classification and regression trees and generalized linear models to statistically characterize these plant-environment relationships, and extend them spatially using full cover raster covariate datasets. Plant deaths could be consistently predicted (97% correct classification of independent dataset) using a combination of topographic variables, salinity, soil mineralogical information, and depth to the water table. Plant growth patterns were more difficult to predict, particularly after several years of grazing, however variation in plant volume was well-explained with a linear model (r2 = 0.6, P Australia. Improving our understanding of their interactions and effect on productivity will help adapt agricultural management to changing environmental conditions in the future.

  18. Drying kinetics and mathematical modeling of abalone during the hot-air drying process%鲍鱼热风干燥动力学及干燥过程数学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾敏; 丛海花; 薛长湖; 薛勇; 孙兆敏; 李金章

    2012-01-01

    研究了鲍鱼在不同热风干燥温度下的干燥动力学特点,并构建了干燥过程的数学模型。热风干燥温度选取60、65、70、75、80℃;风速恒定为1m/s。干燥方法采取间歇干燥,分两个阶段进行。利用理论模型—扩散模型,和常见经验模型—Newton模型、Henderson and Pabis模型、Logaritmic模型、Two-terms模型、Page模型及Modified Page模型,对鲍鱼干燥过程的两个阶段分别进行描述。实验结果表明:鲍鱼热风干燥只经历降速阶段,水分扩散在鲍鱼干燥的过程中起主导作用。通过对实验数据进行统计分析,得到适合鲍鱼热风干燥的模型为Page模型(第一阶段干燥)和Two-terms模型(第二阶段干燥),模型的预测值与实际值比较吻合(Page模型r2〉0.999,s〈1%;Two-terms模型r2〉0.997,s〈2%),可以用来描述鲍鱼的热风干燥过程。%The drying dynamics characteristics and drying model of abalone were studied and constructed respectively,using a hot air dryer at five levels of drying air temperatures in the range of 60~80℃,and a fixed air flow velocity,1m/s.The drying process was intermittent,divided into two stages,during which the drying behaviors of abalone were estimated respectively by mechanistic and empirical models:the diffusion model,Newton model,Henderson and Pabis model,Logaritmic model,Two-terms model,Page model,and Modified Page model.It could be seen that the drying process of abalone only contained deceleration stage and the removal of moisture from the material was governed by diffusion phenomenon.Among the models,the Page model and the Two-terms models were found to be the most suitable(Page model:r20.999,s1%;Two-terms model:r20.997,s2%) for predicting moisture ratio of the product in the first and second stage of the drying process.

  19. Evaluating Soil Moisture Status Using an e-Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bieganowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of distinguishing different soil moisture levels by electronic nose (e-nose was studied. Ten arable soils of various types were investigated. The measurements were performed for air-dry (AD soils stored for one year, then moistened to field water capacity and finally dried within a period of 180 days. The volatile fingerprints changed during the course of drying. At the end of the drying cycle, the fingerprints were similar to those of the initial AD soils. Principal component analysis (PCA and artificial neural network (ANN analysis showed that e-nose results can be used to distinguish soil moisture. It was also shown that different soils can give different e-nose signals at the same moistures.

  20. Explaining Air and Water Transport in Undisturbed Soils By X-Ray CT Derived Macroporosity and CT- Number-Derived Matrix Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per

    The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important to predict the fluxes of air, water and solutes through soil and understand soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) -derived parameters were evaluated as predictors of water, air and solute transport through soil....... Forty five soil columns (20-cm × 20-cm) were collected at an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark. The soil columns were scanned in a medical CT-scanner. Subsequent to this, non-reactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory together with measurements of air permeability (Ka...... is considered a robust indicator of preferential flow. Meanwhile, CT-derived limiting macro-porosity was the best predictor for Ka and log10Ksat. A best subsets regression analysis was performed combining macroporosity, limiting macroporosity and CTmatrix. The predictions of water and air flow improved using...

  1. Studies on pulsed Nd:YAG laser cutting of thick stainless steel in dry air and underwater environment for dismantling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Ambar; Jain, R. K.; Ali, Sabir; Singh, Ravindra; Vishwakarma, S. C.; Agrawal, D. K.; Arya, R.; Kaul, R.; Upadhyaya, B. N.; Oak, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Dismantling of old equipments and structures is an important application in nuclear facilities and shipping industry. This paper presents a study on process optimization during pulsed Nd:YAG laser cutting of thick stainless steel (AISI SS304) sheets having a thickness in the range of 4-20 mm in dry air and underwater environment. Laser cutting experiments have been performed using a 500 W average power long pulse Nd:YAG laser system with fiber optic beam delivery. A water shielded laser cutting nozzle with coaxial gas jet was specifically developed to form a local dry cavity around the laser beam during the cutting experiments in underwater condition. It was found that for a given pulse energy, a higher cutting speed is possible with optimal value of pulse duration, spot overlapping, and assist gas pressure. Cutting speed of 20 mm thick SS sample was enhanced to about three times by means of increase in pulse duration from 14 ms to 20 ms and reduction in the required spot overlapping from a value of 80% to 40% using oxygen as the assist gas. A comparison of the cutting speed and heat affected zone in dry air and underwater environment has been performed. These results will be highly useful in laser based dismantling of old steel structures in radioactive and underwater environment to save time and minimize radiation dose consumption as compared to conventional dismantling methods.

  2. Drying of oxygen humidifier bottles with heated air-flow%热气流烘干法用于氧气湿化瓶干燥

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惜珍; 林佳玲; 黄丽侬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of drying oxygen humidifier bottles by using air-flow dryer for glass apparatus. Methods A total of 120 oxygen humidifier bottles recycled from the wards were randomized into a control group of 30 and an air-flow group of 90. All the bottles were disinfected and then rinsed with running water. The bottles in the control group were placed on racks with the opening of the bottles downwards and dried naturally. The bottles in the air-flow group were placed on the heating bars of the air-flow dryer for glass apparatus, and the heating temparatures were adjusted to 46-55℃ for the first batch, 56-65℃ for the sedcond batch, and 66-75℃ for the third batch respectively, with each batch having 30 bottles. Results It took 24 h for the control group to dry completely, and it took 1.5 h, 1.0 h and 0.5 h respectively for the first, second and third batch of the air-flow group to dry. However, 56.7% of the 3rd batch bottles became out of shape. After drying, all the bottles were sealed for storage,and on the 5th and 7th storage day, the air-flow group had higher rates of negative results of bacterial culture than the control group did (P<0. 05,P<0. 01). Conclusion Drying length of oxygen humidifier bottles can be shortened by staff's using air-flow dryer for glass apparatus which guarantees the disinfection effect.%目的 探讨玻璃仪器气流烘干器用于干燥氧气湿化瓶的实用性和可行性.方法 将从病房回收的氧气温化瓶120个随机分为自然晾干组30个,烘干器烘干组(下称烘干组)90个.统一消毒冲洗干净后,自然晾干组湿化瓶倒置插于晾干架上,在室温下晾干;烘干组分3批各30个分别选用46~55℃、56~65℃、66~75℃倒置插于烘干器上烘干.结果 自然晾干组干燥所需时间24 h;烘干组46~55℃、56~65℃、66~75℃3个温度档干燥所需时间分别为1.5 h、1.0 h、0.5 h,但后者变形率达56.7%;干燥密封包装后第5、7天

  3. Drying and rewetting of a loamy sand soil did not increase the turnover of native organic matter, but retarded the decomposition of added 14C-labelled plant material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magid, J.; Kjaergaard, C.; Gorissen, A.; Kuikman, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Drying and subsequent rewetting of soils has been recognized as an important process for accelerating the decomposition of soil organic matter. This effect has been attributed to (1) increasing solubility of humic substances (molecular level) (2), microbial death during desiccation and due to osmore

  4. A study of hear sink performance in air and soil for use in a thermoelectric energy harvesting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J.; Lawrence, E. E.

    2002-01-01

    A suggested application of a thermoelectric generator is to exploit the natural temperature difference between the air and the soil to generate small amounts of electrical energy. Since the conversion efficiency of even the best thermoelectric generators available is very low, the performance of the heat sinks providing the heat flow is critical. By providing a constant heat input to various heat sinks, field tests of their thermal conductances in soil and in air were performed. Aprototype device without a thermoelectric generator was constructed, buried, and monitored to experimentally measure the heat flow achievable in such a system. Theoretical considerations for design and selection of improved heat sinks are also presented. In particular, the method of shape factoranalysis is used to give rough estimates and upper bounds for the thermal conductance of a passive heat sink buried in soil.

  5. Reduced European emissions of S and N--effects on air concentrations, deposition and soil water chemistry in Swedish forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl Karlsson, Gunilla; Akselsson, Cecilia; Hellsten, Sofie; Karlsson, Per Erik

    2011-12-01

    Changes in sulphur and nitrogen pollution in Swedish forests have been assessed in relation to European emission reductions, based on measurements in the Swedish Throughfall Monitoring Network. Measurements were analysed over 20 years with a focus on the 12-year period 1996 to 2008. Air concentrations of SO(2) and NO(2), have decreased. The SO(4)-deposition has decreased in parallel with the European emission reductions. Soil water SO(4)-concentrations have decreased at most sites but the pH, ANC and inorganic Al-concentrations indicated acidification recovery only at some of the sites. No changes in the bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen could be demonstrated. Elevated NO(3)-concentrations in the soil water occurred at irregular occasions at some southern sites. Despite considerable air pollution emission reductions in Europe, acidification recovery in Swedish forests soils is slow. Nitrogen deposition to Swedish forests continues at elevated levels that may lead to leaching of nitrate to surface waters.

  6. Dynamic effects of wet-dry cycles and crust formation on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of surface soils in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Schümberg, Sabine; Kubitz, Anita; Frank, Franzi; Cheng, Zhang; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Pohle, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Highly disturbed soils and substrates used in land rehabilitation undergo rapid changes after the first wetting events which in turn can lead to ecosystem degradation. Such changes were detected during the early development of the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Surface substrates consisting of quaternary sandy sediments formed surface seals during the first rainfall events leading to reduced infiltration and substantially increased surface runoff. Subsequently biological soil crusts formed and stabilised the surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that cause the hydraulic conductivity to decrease using undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Based on the hypothesis that physical and biological crusts lower the hydraulic conductivity, the first set of experiments with undisturbed soil cores from the Hühnerwasser catchment were carried out to measure the saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method. Measurements were done with intact cores and repeated after the surface crust was removed. As the quaternary glacial sediments tend to display hard setting behaviour, we further hypothesised that the mobilisation of fine particles within the cores lead to pore clogging and that wet-dry cycles will therefore decrease hydraulic conductivity. A second set of experiments using the same methodology consisted of five repeated measurements of hydraulic conductivity after each drying cycle. These measurements were done with undisturbed core samples as well as repacked cores in order to assess how dry packing affects the dynamics of the hydraulic conductivity somewhat similar to the situation during the first wetting after completion of the catchment construction. For all experiments, the temporal evolution of hydraulic conductivity was measured and the turbidity of the effluent was recorded. The results clearly demonstrated that the substrate is highly unstable. The first set of experiments

  7. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields.

  8. 响应面分析法优化热风微波耦合干燥油茶籽工艺%Optimizing of coupled hot-air and microwave drying of tea camellia seeds by response surface analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂芬; 宋春芳; 崔政伟

    2012-01-01

    为了优化油茶籽干燥,分别研究了油茶籽的热风和热风微波耦合干燥工艺。热风微波耦合干燥利用Box-Benhnken中心组合实验设计和响应面分析法,以过氧化值(POV)和干燥时间为响应值,优化了不同热风温度、热风速度和微波功率密度时油茶籽的热风微波耦合干燥工艺。经响应面分析得油茶籽的干燥工艺为:在热风温度为58.9℃、热风速度为1.262m/s、微波功率密度为1.972W/g、干燥时间为306min时,油脂的过氧化值为1.0472nmol/kg。热风微波耦合干燥时间比热风干燥节约近3倍,过氧化值减小了7.46%。%Drying of tea camellia seeds were conducted by hot-air,coupled hot-air and microwave drying in order to optimize its drying technology.Coupled hot-air microwave drying was done at different temperatures,air velocities and microwave power densities.The Box-Benhnken design and the response surface analysis were adopted,and both peroxide values of unsaturated fatty acids and drying time were taken as evaluation indexs to optimize the drying parameters.The analysis of response values of peroxide value and drying time showed that the optimum coupled hot-air and microwave drying parameters were:hot-air temperature of 58.9℃,microwave density 1.972W/g,drying time 306min and peroxide value 1.0472nmol/kg when drying was conducted in above parameters.Comparing to hot-air drying,coupled hot-air microwave drying save drying time nearly three times while the peroxide value reduced 7.46%.

  9. Theoretical and experimental drying of a cylindrical sample by applying hot air and infrared radiation in an inert medium fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Honarvar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying of a cylindrical sample in a fluidized bed dryer containing inert particles was studied. For this purpose, a pilot-scaled fluidized bed dryer was constructed in which two different heat sources, hot air and infrared radiation were applied, and pieces of carrot were chosen as test samples. The heat transfer coefficient for cylindrical objects in a fluidized bed was also measured. The heat absorption coefficient for carrot was studied. The absorption coefficient can be computed by dividing the absorbed heat by the carrot to the heat absorbed for the water and black ink. In this regard, absorbed heat values by the carrot, water and black ink were used A mathematical model was proposed based on the mass and heat transfer phenomena within the drying sample. The results obtained by the proposed model were in favorable agreement with the experimental data.

  10. External Heat Transfer in Moist Air and Superheated Steam for Softwood Drying%软木干燥中湿空气和过热蒸汽的外部传热

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Shusheng

    2004-01-01

    In kiln drying of softwood timber, external heat and moisture mass transfer coefficients are important in defining boundary temperature and moisture content at the wood surface. In addition, superheated steam drying of wood is a promising technology but this has not been widely accepted commercially, partially due to the lack of understanding of the drying phenomena occurred during drying. In this work, experimental investigation was performed to quantify the heat transfer between wood surface and surrounding moist air or superheated steam. In the experiment, saturated radiata pine sapwood samples were dried using dry-bulb/wet-bulb temperatures of 60℃/50℃,90℃/60℃, 120℃/70℃, 140℃/90℃, 160℃/90℃, 140℃/100℃ and 160℃/100℃. The last two schedules were for superheated steam drying as the wet-bulb temperature was set at 100℃. The circulation velocity over the board surface was controlled at 4.2 m·s-1. Two additional runs (90℃/60℃) using air velocities of 2.4 m·s-1 and 4.8 m·s-1were performed to check the effect of the circulation velocity. During drying, sample weight and temperatures at wood surface and different depths were continuously measured. From these measurements, changes in wood temperature and moisture content were calculated and external heat-transfer coefficient was determined for both the moist air and the superheated steam drying.

  11. Root depth and morphology in response to soil drought: comparing ecological groups along the secondary succession in a tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Horacio; Pineda-García, Fernando; Pinzón-Pérez, Luisa F

    2015-10-01

    Root growth and morphology may play a core role in species-niche partitioning in highly diverse communities, especially along gradients of drought risk, such as that created along the secondary succession of tropical dry forests. We experimentally tested whether root foraging capacity, especially at depth, decreases from early successional species to old-growth forest species. We also tested for a trade-off between two mechanisms for delaying desiccation, the capacity to forage deeper in the soil and the capacity to store water in tissues, and explored whether successional groups separate along such a trade-off. We examined the growth and morphology of roots in response to a controlled-vertical gradient of soil water, among seedlings of 23 woody species dominant along the secondary succession in a tropical dry forest of Mexico. As predicted, successional species developed deeper and longer root systems than old-growth forest species in response to soil drought. In addition, shallow root systems were associated with high plant water storage and high water content per unit of tissue in stems and roots, while deep roots exhibited the opposite traits, suggesting a trade-off between the capacities for vertical foraging and water storage. Our results suggest that an increased capacity of roots to forage deeper for water is a trait that enables successional species to establish under the warm-dry conditions of the secondary succession, while shallow roots, associated with a higher water storage capacity, are restricted to the old-growth forest. Overall, we found evidence that the root depth-water storage trade-off may constrain tree species distribution along secondary succession.

  12. 粮食热风干燥热能结构与解析法%Thermal energy structure of grain hot air drying and analytical method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长友; 马兴灶; 方壮东; 张烨

    2014-01-01

    为了揭示粮食干燥系统客观作用效果,定量评价环境条件、粮食状态对干燥机效能的影响,分析了粮食热风干燥势场的来源与特征,建立了干燥特性函数、给出了粮食和介质状态参数解析图,分析了热量及效率,定量评价了热能结构,结果发现利用温度和相对湿度变化范围分别为26~35℃和40%~55%的自然空气直接干燥初期湿基含水率38.6%的高湿稻谷,平均小时降水率达1.2%,在5HP-3.5型循环干燥机上的热风干燥试验结果显示,稻谷的干基含水率由27.06%降至16.96%的过程中,单位气耗量由最初的113.0kg/kg 增加到了546.4 kg/kg,单位热耗量由最初的2548.9 kJ/kg增加到了16352.7kJ/kg,排气热损失由最初的6.2%增加到了30.6%。解析出了造成干燥效率偏低的主要原因是热能匹配性较差。指出了评价粮食干燥工艺及干燥机能量利用效果不能忽视客观干燥的作用。研究结果为指导干燥设计,形成粮食干燥系统公平的评价标准,提供了科学的解析方法。%The impact to grain drying involves a number of factors, such as environmental factors, grain physical properties, and flow characteristics, as well as the processing technology and equipment geometry. The change of environmental conditions and physical property characteristics, and differences in processing technology, which makes the system energy loss, was a major difference in the quantity and quality. To essentially illustrate these differences, to improve the comparability of dryer performance test results, and to form objective and fair evaluation standards, the researchers investigated state parameters of grain drying systems and energy transfer by taking moisture migration as a certain amount of energy transfer. Based on the exergy analysis and thermodynamics, the thermal structure of grain drying and its transformation and transfer were analyzed. Using the induced air, the

  13. Quantitative ecology and dry-heat resistance of psychrophiles. M.S. Thesis; [in soil samples from Viking spacecraft manufacturing areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of growth at 7 C were enumerated and isolated from soil samples from the manufacture area (Denver, Colorado) and assembly area (Cape Kennedy, Florida) of the Viking spacecraft. Temperature requirements were determined for these isolates, and those growing at 3 C, but not at 32 C were designated as obligate psychrophiles in this investigation. These were identified to major generic groups, and the population density of obligate psychrophiles from the various groups was determined. Dry heat D-values were found for those spores that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment.

  14. Applicability of 239Pu as a tracer for soil erosion in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.; Tims, S. G.; Fifield, L. K.; Wasson, R. J.; Howe, D.

    2013-01-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) has been employed to determine modern soil loss rates through the analysis of 239Pu profiles in soil cores from the Daly ba