WorldWideScience

Sample records for air ambulances

  1. Operational implementation and lessons learned from Haiti's first helicopter air ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGennaro, Vincent; Owen, Jordan; Chandler, Jerry; McDaniel, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Critical-care helicopter transport has demonstrated improvements in morbidity and mortality to those patients who utilise the service, but this has largely excluded developing country populations due to set up costs. Haiti Air Ambulance is the first completely publicly-available helicopter ambulance service in a developing country. US standards were adopted for both aviation and aeromedical care in Haiti due to proximity and relationships. In order to implement properly, standards for aviation, critical care, and insurance reimbursement had to be put in place with local authorities. Haiti Air Ambulance worked with the Ministry of Health to author standards for medical procedures, medication usage, and staff training for aeromedical programs in the country. Utilisation criteria for the helicopter were drafted, edited, and constantly updated to ensure the program adapted to the clinical situation while maintaining US standard of care. During the first year, 76 patients were transferred; 13 of whom were children and 3 pregnant women. Three patients were intubated and two required bi-level mask ventilation. Traumatic injury and non-emergency interfacility transfers were the two most common indications for service. More than half of the transfers (54%) originated at one of six hospitals, mostly as a result of highly-involved staff. The program was limited by weather and the lack of weather reporting, radar, visual flight recognition, thus also causing an inability to fly at night. In partnership with the government and other non-governmental organisations, we seek to implement a more robust pre-hospital system in Haiti over the next 12-24 months, including more scene call capabilities. PMID:26739767

  2. The equestrian sport-related injury workload of a regional doctor-led air ambulance unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleetman, David

    2012-12-01

    The Great Western Ambulance Service Air Support Unit (ASU) was established in July 2007. The helicopter carries a doctor, providing a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) model of care. Equestrian sport-related injuries account for 6.8% of the unit's total attended case load. Horse riding has a higher rate of severe injury than motorcycle racing and 45% of patients admitted with equestrian injuries require surgical intervention. Orthopaedic injuries to the extremities are commonest, superseding head injuries since the introduction of protective headwear. The majority of equestrian sport-related injuries occur in areas inaccessible to land crews. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the ASU mission database from July 2008 to December 2009 (18 months) and identified 29 patients that were attended to by the ASU. The patient cohort had a female majority with an average age of 31.9. 10 Patients (34.5%) were under the age of 20. The ISS ranged from 1 to 75 (mean, 4.8; median, 1) and injuries to the extremities were commonest. The location of the accident was inaccessible to land ambulance in 55.2% of missions. The average mission time was over 2h. Doctors delivered more advanced (medical) interventions in 20.7% of missions. In 41.4% of missions, there were no such interventions performed by the attending doctor and no access to land ambulance. We therefore conclude that a large proportion of ASU dispatches were due to limited access rather than for the delivery of advanced interventions. However, our results support the opinion that horse riding carries some risk of serious injury and when employed appropriately, HEMS doctors on the ASU are a useful resource for a minority of equestrian sport-related injuries. PMID:22015142

  3. An ambulance helicopter for emergency calls.

    OpenAIRE

    Sellwood, N

    1992-01-01

    The use of a helicopter as a primary response vehicle for the Cornwall Ambulance Service is presented. A brief analysis of the activities of the First Air Ambulance is described and an appraisal of its effects on the overall performance of the Service is given. Emphasis is given to patient acceptability and also to the flexibility of the helicopter in terms of its response to different situations. In conclusion, The Air Ambulance, as part of an integrated ambulance service, is an effective pr...

  4. Influence of short-term air pollution with carbon monoxide on the risk of ambulance call-outs related to arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Agnė Brazienė; Jonė Venclovienė; Rūta Babarskienė; Tautvydė Danilčikaitė

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution by carbon monoxide can be possibly related to the increase in arterial blood pressure and the risk of arterial hypertension. The study was made in Kaunas. The concentration of daily carbon monoxide was estimated according to the data provided by the Department of Environment of Kaunas and environmental monitoring stations of Kaunas city municipality. The study aims to determine a short-term impact of air pollution by carbon monoxide on the number of calls for ambulance due to th...

  5. The effect of active warming in prehospital trauma care during road and air ambulance transportation - a clinical randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naredi Peter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention and treatment of hypothermia by active warming in prehospital trauma care is recommended but scientifical evidence of its effectiveness in a clinical setting is scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of additional active warming during road or air ambulance transportation of trauma patients. Methods Patients were assigned to either passive warming with blankets or passive warming with blankets with the addition of an active warming intervention using a large chemical heat pad applied to the upper torso. Ear canal temperature, subjective sensation of cold discomfort and vital signs were monitored. Results Mean core temperatures increased from 35.1°C (95% CI; 34.7-35.5°C to 36.0°C (95% CI; 35.7-36.3°C (p Conclusions In mildly hypothermic trauma patients, with preserved shivering capacity, adequate passive warming is an effective treatment to establish a slow rewarming rate and to reduce cold discomfort during prehospital transportation. However, the addition of active warming using a chemical heat pad applied to the torso will significantly improve thermal comfort even further and might also reduce the cold induced stress response. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01400152

  6. 75 FR 62639 - Air Ambulance and Commercial Helicopter Operations, Part 91 Helicopter Operations, and Part 135...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://Dockets.... Helicopter air medical transportation was first used prominently during the Korean War to move injured... safety culture, and aeronautical decisionmaking skills. The following provides a summary of many of...

  7. Can ambulance personnel intubate?

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, A.J.; Cartlidge, D; Gavalas, M C

    1992-01-01

    To assess the performance of intubation skills by advanced trained ambulance personnel, a prospective study was carried out of the intubation of cardiac arrest victims by ambulance personnel in the field. Twenty-eight ambulance personnel attempted the intubation of 87 patients over 2 years. Eighty-five patients were initially successfully intubated, one endotracheal tube became displaced and cuff leakage occurred on three occasions. This was treated appropriately in each instance. Ambulance p...

  8. Monitoring the effect of air pollution episodes on health care consultations and ambulance call-outs in England during March/April 2014: A retrospective observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alex J; Smith, Sue; Dobney, Alec; Thornes, John; Smith, Gillian E; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence illustrating the negative health effects of air pollution including increased risk of respiratory, cardiac and other morbid conditions. During March and April 2014 there were two air pollution episodes in England that occurred in close succession. We used national real-time syndromic surveillance systems, including general practitioner (GP) consultations, emergency department attendances, telehealth calls and ambulance dispatch calls to further understand the impact of these short term acute air pollution periods on the health seeking behaviour of the general public. Each air pollution period was comparable with respect to particulate matter concentrations (PM10 and PM2.5), however, the second period was longer in duration (6 days vs 3 days) and meteorologically driven 'Sahara dust' contributed to the pollution. Health surveillance data revealed a greater impact during the second period, with GP consultations, emergency department attendances and telehealth (NHS 111) calls increasing for asthma, wheeze and difficulty breathing indicators, particularly in patients aged 15-64 years. Across regions of England there was good agreement between air quality levels and health care seeking behaviour. The results further demonstrate the acute impact of short term air pollution episodes on public health and also illustrate the potential role of mass media reporting in escalating health care seeking behaviour. PMID:27179935

  9. Radiology trainer. Surgical ambulance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DVD-ROM contains landmarks for fast anatomical orientation, a training mode showing the most common pathological radiological findings, a practical mode for accurate diagnosis, and textbook texts for background information. Situations encountered in surgical ambulance are simulated close to reality and in a user-friendly manner. The DVD-ROM is lavishly illustrated with more than 1600 X-ray images. (orig.)

  10. Ambulance management system using GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Pasha, Imtiyaz

    2006-01-01

    For emergency service providers, giving their service in least time shows their best performance. Emergency hospitals will be at their best if the ambulance reaches the site in Golden hour where life of injured persons can be saved. Ambulance uses the road network to reach the accident site. Today there are many GIS based systems being developed for routing of ambulance using GPS and other real-time technologies. These systems are useful and play a major role in solving the routing problem. B...

  11. Intelligent Ambulance Traffic Assistance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONOJOY GHOSH

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in traffic road density, several causalities occur due to delay in taking a patient to the hospital in an ambulance. In this paper, we have developed an algorithm to find the shortest path to reach the required destination. As required the software will identify the present location of the vehicle and ask the user for the destination. Then it will show all the available paths, highlighting the shortest one or in several cases the most optimum one. Further we made the traffic signals automated for special vehicles like an ambulance or a fire-engine such that the signals will go green for the ambulance as it comes in the vicinity of the traffic signal, thus providing them with a clear path to reach its destination. The original signal is restored as soon as the ambulance goes undetected by the Bluetooth scanner of the traffic signal.

  12. A Theory of Ambulance Chasing

    OpenAIRE

    Backović, Mihailo

    2016-01-01

    Ambulance chasing is a common socio-scientific phenomenon in particle physics. I argue that despite the seeming complexity, it is possible to gain insight into both the qualitative and quantitative features of ambulance chasing dynamics. Compound-Poisson statistics suffices to accommodate the time evolution of the cumulative number of papers on a topic, where basic assumptions that the interest in the topic as well as the number of available ideas decrease with time appear to drive the time e...

  13. A Theory of Ambulance Chasing

    CERN Document Server

    Backović, Mihailo

    2016-01-01

    Ambulance chasing is a common socio-scientific phenomenon in particle physics. I argue that despite the seeming complexity, it is possible to gain insight into both the qualitative and quantitative features of ambulance chasing dynamics. Compound-Poisson statistics suffices to accommodate the time evolution of the cumulative number of papers on a topic, where basic assumptions that the interest in the topic as well as the number of available ideas decrease with time appear to drive the time evolution. It follows that if the interest scales as an inverse power law in time, the cumulative number of papers on a topic is well described by a di-gamma function, with a distinct logarithmic behavior at large times. In cases where the interest decreases exponentially with time, the model predicts that the total number of papers on the topic will converge to a fixed value as time goes to infinity. I demonstrate that the two models are able to fit at least 9 specific instances of ambulance chasing in particle physics us...

  14. Do ambulance crews triage trauma patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Rouse, A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To determine whether ambulance crew triage trauma patients appropriately. DESIGN. A retrospective descriptive study. SETTINGS. Cornwall County Ambulance Service. VARIABLES STUDIED. On-scene times, injury severity, establishment of intravenous infusion and time from scene to A&E department. SUBJECTS. Patients with compound fracture of the lower limb taken to Truro Accident and Emergency department. OUTCOME MEASURES. Ambulance service on-scene times and mission times. RESULTS. Ambula...

  15. Riding Third: Social Work in Ambulance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Hilary; Rasmussen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible role of social work alongside emergency ambulance services. An ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and direct observations collected over 300 hours while riding in ambulances in an urban setting. The data suggest that social work could play a role by providing needed psychosocial care during…

  16. Availability and utilisation of physician-based pre-hospital critical care support to the NHS ambulance service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, Philip; Mackenzie, Rod; Ng, Gail; Reid, Cliff; Pearson, Gale

    2011-01-01

    Background Every day throughout the UK, ambulance services seek medical assistance in providing critically ill or injured patients with pre-hospital care. Objective To identify the current availability and utilisation of physician-based pre-hospital critical care capability across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Design A postal and telephone survey was undertaken between April and December 2009 of all 13 regional NHS ambulance services, 17 air ambulance charities, 34 organisations affili...

  17. Nosocomial infections in ambulances and effectiveness of ambulance fumigation techniques in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alrazeeni, Daifallah; Al Sufi, Mohammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate infection control and the incidence of bacterial pathogens in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) ambulances in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The effectiveness of fumigation techniques used for these ambulances to minimize the spread of infection to transported patients and pre-hospital care providers was also assessed. Methods: Based on previous literature review indicating a higher propensity of microbial load, 3 areas within the ambulance, such as, stretcher handle, oxygen flow...

  18. Ambulance Reasonable Charge Public Use Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulance Reasonable Charge public use files for calendar years (CY) 2003 through 2005 are located in the Downloads section below. These public use files are...

  19. Robotic Assistance During Ambulation by Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Judith; Engberg, Sandra; Montemerlo, Michael; Pineau, Joelle; Roy, Nicholas; Rogers, Joan; Thrun, Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Some older adults require assistance with ambulation due to physical mobility limitations. Others lack the cognitive ability, either alone or in combination with physical impairment, to get where they need to go. Investigation of older adults' gait speed, social interaction, and responsiveness to a robot during ambulation is part of the Nursebot Project, a unique collaboration of health care professionals and technologists focused on developing a personal robotic assistant for frail elderly a...

  20. Ambulance officers' use of online clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Westbrook Mary T; Westbrook Johanna I; Gosling A Sophie

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Hospital-based clinicians have been shown to use and attain benefits from online evidence systems. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating whether and how ambulance officers use online evidence systems if provided. We surveyed ambulance officers to examine their knowledge and use of the Clinical Information Access Program (CIAP), an online evidence system providing 24-hour access to information to support evidence-based practice. Methods A questionnaire w...

  1. Improving community ambulation after stroke: the AMBULATE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindley Richard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that following rehabilitation, only 7% of stroke survivors are able to walk at a level commensurate with community participation. Previous research indicates that treadmill and overground walking training can improve walking capacity in people living in the community after stroke. The main objectives of the AMBULATE trial are to determine (i whether a 4-month treadmill walking program is more effective than a 2-month program, compared to control, in improving walking capacity, health and community participation and (ii the "threshold" walking speed that results in sufficient walking capacity that makes walking self-sustaining. Methods/Design A prospective randomised controlled trial of unsupported treadmill training with a 12 month follow-up with concealed allocation and blinded assessment will be conducted. 210 community-dwelling people after stroke who are able to walk independently but slowly will be recruited and randomly allocated to either a 4 month training group, 2 month training group or the control (no intervention group. Intervention for the two training groups will occur 3 days per week for 30 minutes each session. Measurements of walking, health and community participation will be taken at baseline, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months and 12 months. This study has obtained ethical approval from the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. Discussion By improving stroke survivors' walking ability, it is likely also to improve their general wellbeing by promoting better health and greater community participation. Furthermore, if stroke survivors can reach a point where their walking and community participation is self-sustaining, this will reduce the burden of care on family and friends as well as the economic burden on the health system. Given the major demographic shift in developed nations involving significant growth in the aged population, this research will make an important evidence

  2. Ambulance officers' use of online clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Mary T

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital-based clinicians have been shown to use and attain benefits from online evidence systems. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating whether and how ambulance officers use online evidence systems if provided. We surveyed ambulance officers to examine their knowledge and use of the Clinical Information Access Program (CIAP, an online evidence system providing 24-hour access to information to support evidence-based practice. Methods A questionnaire was completed by 278 ambulance officers in New South Wales, Australia. Comparisons were made between those who used CIAP and officers who had heard of, but not used CIAP. Results Half the sample (48.6% knew of, and 28.8% had used CIAP. Users were more likely to have heard of CIAP from a CIAP representative/presentation, non-users from written information. Compared to ambulance officers who had heard of but had not used CIAP, users were more likely to report better computer skills and that their supervisors regarded use of CIAP as a legitimate part of ambulance officers' clinical role. The main reasons for non-use were lack of access(49.0% and training(31.4%. Of users, 51.3% rated their skills at finding information as good/very good, 67.5% found the information sought all/most of the time, 87.3% believed CIAP had the potential to improve patient care and 28.2% had directly experienced this. Most access to CIAP occurred at home. The databases frequently accessed were MIMS (A medicines information database (73.8% and MEDLINE(67.5%. The major journals accessed were Journal of Emergency Nursing(37.5%, American Journal of Medicine(30.0% and JAMA(27.5%. Conclusion Over half of ambulance officers had not heard of CIAP. The proportion who knew about and used CIAP was also low. Reasons for this appear to be a work culture not convinced of CIAP's relevance to pre-hospital patient care and lack of access to CIAP at work. Ambulance officers who used CIAP accessed it

  3. CERN'S Fire and Rescue Group Gets New Ambulance

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ambulance is to replace another based on the off-road vehicle design which was originally acquired for the civil engineering phase of LEP construction. Just one figure, in 1999, the CERN ambulance was called out 195 times.

  4. User reflection on actions in ambulance telemedicine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Much information is shared, interpreted and recreated between caller, emergency dispatch personnel and ambulance crew during an emergency call. This paper studies the use of reflection in the ambulance control center based on the information an ambulance crew produces during patient treatment in ...... understand and use the feedback delivered through the system. The paper argues for broadening the scope of telemedicine use outside the boundaries of communication between ambulance and emergency department....

  5. Post-traumatic stress among Swedish ambulance personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, A; Segesten, K; Mattsson, B

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Emergency workers, including ambulance personnel, must cope with a variety of duty related stressors including traumatic incident exposures. Little is known about the variables that might be associated with post-traumatic stress symptom in high risk occupational groups such as ambulance personnel. This study investigated the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among Swedish ambulance personnel.

  6. Rushing Roulette: The State of Canada's Ambulance Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, L

    1976-02-01

    In a Canada-wide survey, CANADIAN FAMILY PHYSICIAN found a startling divergence in provincial standards for ambulance crews and vehicles.While some provinces had developed a well-integrated ambulance system with central dispatching, rigorous standards for attendants and advanced paramedical training programs, in some the ambulances are run almost entirely by local undertakers. PMID:21308032

  7. Nosocomial infections in ambulances and effectiveness of ambulance fumigation techniques in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrazeeni, Daifallah; Al Sufi, Mohammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate infection control and the incidence of bacterial pathogens in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) ambulances in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The effectiveness of fumigation techniques used for these ambulances to minimize the spread of infection to transported patients and pre-hospital care providers was also assessed. Methods: Based on previous literature review indicating a higher propensity of microbial load, 3 areas within the ambulance, such as, stretcher handle, oxygen flow meter knob, and interior handle of the rear door were selected for specimen collection. Swab samples were collected both in the day and night shift, after the intended disinfection and cleaning (before and after fumigation). Micro-organisms were identified using standard procedures. This phase-I study was conducted at the Emergency Medical Services Department, Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz College of Emergency Medical Services, Al Malaz, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between October and November 2013, wherein a total of 10 ambulances from the Saudi Red Crescent Authority in Riyadh were selected for inclusion in the study. Results: The specimens from all 10 ambulances showed similar results. In post disinfection and before fumigation, swab samples showed positive cultures that grew moderate to large quantities of environmental and skin flora. However, almost all organisms were susceptible to the fumigation technique. Conclusion: This study confirms the importance of evaluating the frequency and efficiency of various fumigation techniques as an ambulance is a potential reservoir for microbial transmission to patients and staff. PMID:25399212

  8. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Swathi Balantrapu; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Brian M. Sandroff; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW)...

  9. Prehospital outcomes for ambulance service care: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Phung, Viet-Hai; Booth, Andrew; Joanne, Coster; Turner, Janette; Wilson, Richard; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulance service performance measurement has previously focused on response times and survival. We conducted a systematic review of the international literature on quality measures and outcomes relating to pre-hospital ambulance service care, aiming to identify a broad range of outcome measures to provide a more meaningful assessment of ambulance service care. Methods: We searched a number of electronic databases including CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline, and Web...

  10. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  11. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW), timed 25 foot walk (T25FW), and timed up-and-go (TUG), and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc.) for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n = 44) of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P = 0.0001, d = −0.86), T25FW (P = 0.003, d = 0.72), TUG (P = 0.001, d = 0.84), MSWS-12 (P = 0.0001, d = 1.09), O2 cost of walking (P = 0.001, d = 0.75), average steps/day (P < 0.05, d = −0.45), and walking velocity (P < 0.05, d = −0.53) and cadence (P < 0.05, d = −0.46). Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking. PMID:24999434

  12. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  13. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Spacewalk Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS. METHODS Four experiments will replicate the CEVIS exercise-enhanced oxygen prebreathe protocol, each with a different exception. The first of these is currently underway. Experiment 1 - Subjects complete controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining nonambulatory throughout. Experiment 2 - Subjects remain non-ambulatory during the preflight period and ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 3 - Subjects ambulate during the preflight period and remain non-ambulatory at 4.3 psi. Experiment 4 - The order of heavy and light exercise employed in the CEVIS protocol is

  14. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, Svetlana; Tan, P J; Dunn, S P; Bizjak-Mikic, M

    2016-01-01

    The quality of ambulance services has an immense impact on patients' future well-being and quality of life. Patient satisfaction is one of the key metrics for evaluating the quality of this service. Yet, the patient satisfaction measurement may be limited in its ability to accurately reflect this service quality, and even reflect factors beyond the patient experiences. We analyze 10 years of survey data to reveal a number of factors that systematically bias ambulance satisfaction ratings. Taking into account these biases provides more robust comparison of ambulance performance over time or across different jurisdictions. PMID:27295008

  15. Older people's use of ambulance services: a population based analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M J; Fitzgerald, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of emergency and non-urgent ambulance transport services by people aged 65 years and over. SETTING: The study was undertaken in Queensland where the Queensland Ambulance Services (QAS) is the sole provider of emergency pre-hospital and non-urgent ambulance services for the entire state. METHODS: The age and sex of 351,000 emergency and non-urgent cases treated and transported by the QAS from July 1995 to June 1996 were analysed. RESULTS: People aged 65 years ...

  16. [Comatose patient with neuroleptic malignant syndrome brought by ambulance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takinami, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman with schizophrenia showed signs of neuroleptic malignant syndrome with disturbed consciousness, high fever, muscle rigidity, and autonomic dysfunction (including tachycardia and enhancement of saliva secretion). Since the age of 15, she had been treated at a local psychiatric clinic with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. On the day she was brought to the emergency room, she was asleep in the morning, but tachycardia was observed in the evening in the absence of consciousness. The patient was brought to our hospital by ambulance. It was revealed that she had taken a massive dose of chlorpromazine hydrochloride in the morning on the same day. On arrival, the Japan coma scale, pulse, respiratory rate, body temperature, and Sp(O2) were 300, 114 beats x min(-1), 26 breaths x min(-1), 39.0 degrees, and 91% (room air), respectively. The CPK level was 1,776 IU x l(-1). Sp(O2), bilateral pneumonia, and right atelectasis improved 2 hours after admission. Endotracheal intubation was performed for artificial respiration. Salivation, marked sweating, and rigidity of the limbs were noted. Under a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, dantrolene was administered. For pneumonia, ceftriaxone and pazufloxacin were administered. The consciousness became clear 2 days after admission. The patient was discharged 10 days after admission. PMID:22338865

  17. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  18. What do users value about the emergency ambulance service?

    OpenAIRE

    Togher, Fiona; Phung, Viet-Hai; Turner, Janette; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; O'Cathain, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Response times have been used as a key quality indicator for measuring the quality of emergency ambulance services in the United Kingdom, but criticised for their narrow focus. As outcomes become the focus of primary care commissioning of ambulance services, wider measures of quality need to be considered. The patient perspective is becoming an increasingly important dimension in primary and pre-hospital outcomes research. To that end, we aimed to investigate patients’ experie...

  19. Private Ambulance Services, ambulance zone, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Private Ambulance Services dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  20. CERN'S Fire and Rescue Group Gets New Ambulance

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of a new vehicle is always an important moment in the life of a fire station. So when a new ambulance was delivered to the CERN Fire Brigade on Wednesday 16 September 2000, it was given a warm welcome, attended by staff of the different divisions involved in its purchase. It took a year from the first administrative moves to the day of acquisition. On the one hand there were the calls for tender needed for such a purchase and on the other the development of this custom-designed ambulance with its unique features. Three visits to the manufacturer had to be made, including two to the head office of the Miesen factory at Bonn to study and incorporate in the ambulance the special requirements called for by its future users. These requirements, born from the past experience of CERN’s ambulance crews, concerned not only interior arrangements but also included a new side panel, opening up a stowage compartment where everything will be put that gets dirty during ambulance operations. This will minimize ...

  1. Influence of ambulance use on early reperfusion therapies for acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li; HU Da-yi; YAN Hong-bing; YANG Jin-gang; SUN Yi-hong; LI Chao; LIU Shu-shan; WU Dong; FENG Qi

    2008-01-01

    Background Ambulance use expedites the definitive treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ambulance use on the administration of early reperfusion therapies for patients with AMI in Beijing, China.Methods Data were prospectively collected from 498 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were admitted within 12 hours of symptom onset to 19 hospitals in Beijing between November 1,2005 and December 31, 2006. The baseline characteristics of and the initial management of the ambulance users and the non-ambulance users were compared.Results Only 186 (37.3%) patients used an ambulance as transportation to the hospital. Ambulance users were, on average, older and at relatively higher risk on presentation than the non-ambulance users. After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, ambulance use was associated with a greater early reperfusion rate, mainly because of a greater incidence of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In addition, ambulance users had a significantly shorter median door-to-balloon (120 compared with 145 minutes, P<0.001) and symptom onset-to-balloon (223 compared with 300 minutes, P<0.001) time than non-ambulance users.Conclusions Ambulances are underused by AMI patients in Beijing. Ambulance use may lead to more frequent and faster receipt of early reperfusion therapies. New public health strategies should be developed to facilitate an increased use of ambulances by AMI patients.

  2. Efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered by ambulance personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesgaard, Kristian Dahl; Nikolajsen, Lone; Giebner, Matthias;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of pain in the pre-hospital setting is often inadequate. In 2011, ambulance personnel were authorized to administer intravenous fentanyl in the Central Denmark Region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered by...... ambulance personnel. METHODS: Pre-hospital medical charts from 2348 adults treated with intravenous fentanyl by ambulance personnel during a 6-month period were reviewed. The primary outcome was the change in pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) from before fentanyl treatment to hospital arrival....... Secondary outcomes included the number of patients with reduction in pain intensity during transport (NRS ≥ 2), the number of patients with NRS > 3 at hospital arrival, and potential fentanyl-related side effects. RESULTS: Fentanyl reduced pain from before treatment (8, IQR 7-9) to hospital arrival (4, IQR...

  3. Levels of mental health problems among UK emergency ambulance workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, P; Williams, Y; Page, N; Hood, K; Woollard, M

    2004-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety in a sample of emergency ambulance personnel. Of 1029 personnel in one ambulance service mailed a questionnaire, 617 were returned. Among respondents, the overall rate of PTSD was 22%. Levels of PTSD did not differ according to grade, but men had a higher prevalence rate than women (23% compared with 15%). Nearly one in ten reported probable clinical levels of depression, 22% reported probable clinical levels of anxiety based on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores. PMID:14988360

  4. Ambulation in adults with myelomeningocele. Is it possible to predict the level of ambulation in early life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitzberg, A.; Lind, M.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2008-01-01

    . Information on muscle strength and ambulatory function in early life was retrieved from medical records. The motor levels determined by the muscle strength were used to predict ambulatory function later in life. At follow-up, a clinical examination was performed. RESULTS: Of 20 MMC individuals assessed with...... life than predicted. Good strength in quadriceps muscles gave significant better prospect for adult walking. Of the 52 participants, 41 retained their ambulation status from 5-8 years of age. CONCLUSION: For MMC individuals with motor levels L3-L5, adult ambulatory function cannot be determined from......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prediction of ambulation in adults with myelomeningocele from muscle strength testing and ambulation in early life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two myelomeningocele (MMC) individuals at the age 18-37 years at follow-up were studied...

  5. The desired competence of the Swedish ambulance nurse according to the professionals - A Delphi study.

    OpenAIRE

    Wihlborg, Jonas; Edgren, Gudrun; Johansson, Anders; Sivberg, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Nursing is evolving into new fields of health care including ambulance care, where a branch of specialist nursing is growing. Various views exist on the desired competence for the ambulance nurse and valid guidelines are lacking in Sweden. To increase knowledge of the field, professionals were asked to describe what competences an ambulance nurse should possess. The aim of this study was therefore to elucidate the desired professional competence of the specialist ambulance nurse, according to...

  6. Role of Nurses in Early Ambulation of Living Donor Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Orie; Osanai, Yumiko; Urushidate, Chie; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Narumi, Shunji; Umehara, Minoru; Toyoki, Yoshikazu; Sugai, Michihiro; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kimura, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    [Introduction] Liver transplant recipients suffer more complications than do patients undergoing other gastroenterological surgeries. Many factors inhibit ambulation in liver transplant patients, such as the level of restriction to bed rest and length of stay in the intensive care unit( ICU). Patients thus face ambulation difficulties. Support for ambulation is one of the major daily tasks of nurses. We reviewed the ambulation situations of patients who underwent living donor liver transplant...

  7. How should we measure ambulance service quality and performance? Results from a Delphi study

    OpenAIRE

    Coster, Jo; Irving, Andy; Turner, Janette; Wilson, Richard; Phung, Viet-Hai; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The Pre-hospital Outcomes for Evidence Based Evaluation (PhOEBE) research programme aims to develop better ways of measuring the quality of ambulance service care. Ambulance service care is often measured by the speed of the ambulance response rather than the quality of care provided or patient outcomes. Whilst response times are relevant to a small proportion of seriously ill patients, they are not clinically relevant for most people who contact the ambulance se...

  8. Effects of weather conditions on emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Siurkaite, Viktorija

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between weather conditions and daily emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The study included data on 3631 patients who called the ambulance for chest pain and were admitted to the department of cardiology as patients with ACS. We investigated the effect of daily air temperature (T), barometric pressure (BP), relative humidity, and wind speed (WS) to detect the risk areas for low and high daily volume (DV) of emergency calls. We used the classification and regression tree method as well as cluster analysis. The clusters were created by applying the k-means cluster algorithm using the standardized daily weather variables. The analysis was performed separately during cold (October-April) and warm (May-September) seasons. During the cold period, the greatest DV was observed on days of low T during the 3-day sequence, on cold and windy days, and on days of low BP and high WS during the 3-day sequence; low DV was associated with high BP and decreased WS on the previous day. During June-September, a lower DV was associated with low BP, windless days, and high BP and low WS during the 3-day sequence. During the warm period, the greatest DV was associated with increased BP and changing WS during the 3-day sequence. These results suggest that daily T, BP, and WS on the day of the ambulance call and on the two previous days may be prognostic variables for the risk of ACS. PMID:25344902

  9. Effects of weather conditions on emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Siurkaite, Viktorija

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between weather conditions and daily emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The study included data on 3631 patients who called the ambulance for chest pain and were admitted to the department of cardiology as patients with ACS. We investigated the effect of daily air temperature ( T), barometric pressure (BP), relative humidity, and wind speed (WS) to detect the risk areas for low and high daily volume (DV) of emergency calls. We used the classification and regression tree method as well as cluster analysis. The clusters were created by applying the k-means cluster algorithm using the standardized daily weather variables. The analysis was performed separately during cold (October-April) and warm (May-September) seasons. During the cold period, the greatest DV was observed on days of low T during the 3-day sequence, on cold and windy days, and on days of low BP and high WS during the 3-day sequence; low DV was associated with high BP and decreased WS on the previous day. During June-September, a lower DV was associated with low BP, windless days, and high BP and low WS during the 3-day sequence. During the warm period, the greatest DV was associated with increased BP and changing WS during the 3-day sequence. These results suggest that daily T, BP, and WS on the day of the ambulance call and on the two previous days may be prognostic variables for the risk of ACS.

  10. Mathematical model of ambulance resources in Saint-Petersburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavidze, G. G.; Balykina, Y. E.; Lejnina, E. A.; Svirkin, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Emergency medical system is one of the main elements in city infrastructure. The article contains analysis of existing system of ambulance resource distribution. Paper considers the idea of using multiperiodicity as a tool to increase the efficiency of the Emergency Medical Services. The program developed in programming environment Matlab helps to evaluate the changes in the functioning of the system of emergency medical service.

  11. How should we measure ambulance service quality and performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Coster, Jo; Turner, Janette; Irving, Andy; Wilson, Richard; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Phung, Viet-Hai

    2014-01-01

    The problem Ambulance services in England treat 6.5 million people per year but get no information about what happens to patients after discharge. This has led to a reliance on measuring response times rather than outcomes to assess how well services perform, and little opportunity for identifying problems and good practice or evaluating service developments. Research aim There is a lack of consensus on which outcome measures are important for pre-hospital care so we set out to addre...

  12. Orthostatic Intolerance Ambulation in Patients Using Patient Controlled Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kwang Ok; Lee, Yoon Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid analgesics are widely used to reduce postoperative pain and to enhance post-operative recovery. However, orthostatic intolerance (OI) induced by opioid containing intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IPCA) may hinder postoperative recovery. This study investigated factors that affect OI in patients receiving IPCA for postoperative pain control. Methods OI was instantly evaluated at the time of first ambulation in 175 patients taking opioid containing IPCA after open and...

  13. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  14. Ambulance Work : Relationships between occupational demands, individual characteristics and health-related outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Aasa, Ulrika

    2005-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and other health complaints are an occupational problem for ambulance personnel, there is a lack of knowledge regarding work-related factors associated with MSDs and other health complaints. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the relationships between occupational demands, individual characteristics and health-related outcomes among ambulance personnel. A random sample of 234 female and 953 male ambulance personnel participated in a nat...

  15. Corticosteroid Treatments in Males With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Treatment Duration and Time to Loss of Ambulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sunkyung; Campbell, Kimberly A.; Fox, Deborah J.; Matthews, Dennis J.; Valdez, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    This population-based study examines the association between corticosteroid treatment and time to loss of ambulation, stratifying by treatment duration (short: 0.25–3 years, long: >3 years), among 477 Duchenne muscular dystrophy cases identified by the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network (MDSTARnet). Those cases who received short-term corticosteroid treatment had a time to loss of ambulation that was 0.8 years shorter (t test) and an annual risk of losing ambulation...

  16. Family physician decisions following stroke symptom onset and delay times to ambulance call

    OpenAIRE

    Donnan Geoffrey; Nicol Marcus; Mosley Ian; Dewey Helen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background For stroke patients, calling an ambulance has been shown to be associated with faster times to hospital than contacting a family physician. However little is known about the impact of decisions made by family physicians on delay times for stroke patients once they have been called. We aimed to test the hypotheses that among ambulance transported stroke patients: • Factors associated with first calling a family physician, could be identified. • Time to ambulance call will b...

  17. Prioritising outcomes measures for ambulance service care: a three stage consensus study

    OpenAIRE

    Coster, Joanne; Turner, Janette; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Wilson, Richard; Phung, Viet-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Background Historically ambulance care quality and performance has been measured by response times rather than clinical need or effectiveness. This limits the evidence about the effectiveness of the care the ambulance service provides. The Pre-hospital Outcomes for Evidence Based Evaluation (PhOEBE) project is a 5 year research programme which aims to develop new ways of measuring the performance, quality and impact of ambulance service care that better reflect the care provided. Meth...

  18. Effects of Weather and Heliophysical Conditions on Emergency Ambulance Calls for Elevated Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jone Vencloviene

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that weather and space weather conditions were associated with the exacerbation of essential hypertension. The study was conducted during 2009–2010 in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. We analyzed 13,475 cards from emergency ambulance calls (EACs, in which the conditions for the emergency calls were made coded I.10–I.15. The Kaunas Weather Station provided daily records of air temperature (T, wind speed (WS, relative humidity, and barometric pressure (BP. We evaluated the associations between daily weather variables and daily number of EACs by applying a multivariate Poisson regression. Unfavorable heliophysical conditions (two days after the active-stormy geomagnetic field or the days with solar WS > 600 km/s increased the daily number of elevated arterial blood pressure (EABP by 12% (RR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04–1.21; and WS ≥ 3.5 knots during days of T < 1.5 °C and T ≥ 12.5 °C by 8% (RR = 1.08; CI 1.04–1.12. An increase of T by 10 °C and an elevation of BP two days after by 10 hPa were associated with a decrease in RR by 3%. An additional effect of T was detected during days of T ≥ 17.5 °C only in females. Women and patients with grade III arterial hypertension at the time of the ambulance call were more sensitive to weather conditions. These results may help in the understanding of the population’s sensitivity to different weather conditions.

  19. Perioperative transfusion threshold and ambulation after hip revision surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kamilla; Johansson, Pär I; Dahl, Benny; Wagner, Michael; Frausing, Britt; Børglum, Jens; Jensen, Kenneth; Stürup, Jens; Hvolris, Jesper; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion with red blood cells (RBC) may be needed during hip revision surgery but the appropriate haemoglobin concentration (Hb) threshold for transfusion has not been well established. We hypothesized that a higher transfusion threshold would improve ambulation after hip revision...... patients received RBC. CONCLUSIONS: A Hb transfusion threshold of 8.9 g/dL was associated with a statistically significantly faster TUG after hip revision surgery compared to a threshold of 7.3 g/dL but the clinical importance is questionable and the groups did not differ in Hb at the time of testing....

  20. Masculinity and Lifting Accidents among Danish Ambulance Personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D.; Nielsen, Kent J

    alone. Aim This presentation investigates whether failure to use AT is linked to male ambulance workers’ gender identity? Is lifting patients alone a way of performing masculinity for AP’s? Method Data is taken from MARS, a panel study of AP workers in Denmark (n = 1606). Information from questionnaires...... measuring traditional male role norms (MRNI), safety attitudes and safety behavior will be linked to company register information on work injuries categorized as lifting accidents. Logistic regression is used to analyse associations between masculinity, lifting behavior, and lifting accidents. Results...

  1. Physical fitness and occupational demands of the Belfast ambulance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, R P; Stevens, A B; McBrien, H; Black, A; Cran, G W; Boreham, C A

    1991-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the current fitness of an area ambulance service based in Belfast and to quantify the physiological demands of accident and emergency work. From a total staff of 230, 105 (46%) volunteered to undergo a series of fitness tests subject to health state. Results based on body mass indices showed that 52% of subjects could be classified as overweight and 10% of subjects as obese. Fitness levels were similar to other comparable samples and showed the expected but not inevitable decrease with age. A simple work related task (walking at 6 km/h) performed in the laboratory showed that 54% of men over 40 years of age and 24% under 40 found it taxing. This would favour selection for accident and emergency work on the basis of functional capacity rather than chronological age. Accident and emergency work consisted of long periods of inactivity interspersed with shorter periods of relatively intense activity, often above the anaerobic threshold. Lactate concentrations measured during a staged emergency incident also suggested that personnel may work at intensities exceeding their anaerobic threshold. The incorporation of physical fitness standards in the ambulance service may be appropriate and consideration should be given to a reduced age of retirement. PMID:1911401

  2. Basic life support and automated external defibrillator skills among ambulance personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2012-01-01

    Ambulance personnel play an essential role in the 'Chain of Survival'. The prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was dismal on a rural Danish island and in this study we assessed the cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance of ambulance personnel on that island....

  3. A national census of ambulance response times to emergency calls in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, N; Woods, J.; Bury, G; Murphy, A.; Brazier, H

    2000-01-01

    Background—Equity of access to appropriate pre-hospital emergency care is a core principle underlying an effective ambulance service. Care must be provided within a timeframe in which it is likely to be effective. A national census of response times to emergency and urgent calls in statutory ambulance services in Ireland was undertaken to assess current service provision.

  4. The use and abuse of the emergency ambulance service: some of the factors affecting the decision whether to call an emergency ambulance.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, G J

    1990-01-01

    Over a 1-month period all patients arriving in the accident and emergency department by ambulance following a '999' call were questioned using a standard proforma. They were assessed as to whether their medical condition warranted ambulance transfer. A number of social and practical points were analyzed to see whether they would identify any group of patients who used the emergency service without medical need. Overall 289 patients were questioned. Of these 178 (62%) were considered to have m...

  5. Development of Training Programs to Optimize Planetary Ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Warren, L. E.; Rutley, T. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in functional mobility following their return to Earth due to adaptive responses that occur during exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. Despite significant time spent performing in-flight exercise routines, these training programs have not been able to mitigate postflight alterations in postural and locomotor function. Therefore, the goal of our two inter-related projects (NSBRI-ground based and ISS flight study, "Mobility") is to develop and test gait training programs that will serve to optimize functional mobility during the adaptation period immediately following space flight, thereby improving the safety and efficiency of planetary ambulation. The gait training program entails manipulating the sensory conditions of treadmill exercise to systematically challenge the balance and gait control system. This enhances the overall adaptability of locomotor function enabling rapid reorganization of gait control to respond to ambulation in different gravitational environments. To develop the training program, we are conducting a series of ground-based studies evaluating the training efficacy associated with variation in visual flow, body loading, and support surface stability during treadmill walking. We will also determine the optimal method to present training stimuli within and across training sessions to maximize both the efficacy and efficiency of the training procedure. Results indicate that variations in both visual flow and body unloading during treadmill walking leads to modification in locomotor control and can be used as effective training modalities. Additionally, the composition and timing of sensory challenges experienced during each training session has significant impact on the ability to rapidly reorganize locomotor function when exposed to a novel sensory environment. We have developed the capability of producing support surface variation during gait training by mounting a treadmill on a six

  6. Automatic Accident Detection and Ambulance Rescue with Intelligent Traffic Light System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.IYYAPPAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the road accidents in modern urban areas are increased to uncertain level. The loss of human life due to accident is to be avoided. Traffic congestion and tidal flow are major facts that cause delay to ambulance. To bar loss of human life due to accidents we introduce a scheme called ITLS (Intelligent Traffic Light system. The main theme behind this scheme is to provide a smooth flow for the emergency vehicles like ambulance to reach the hospitals in time and thus minimizing the delay caused by traffic congestion. The idea behind this scheme is to implement ITLS which would control mechanically the traffic lights in the path of the ambulance. The ambulance is controlled by the control unit which furnishes adequate route to the ambulance and also controls the traffic light according to the ambulance location and thus reaching the hospital safely. The controller identifies the location of the accident spot through the sensor systems in the vehicle which determined the accident and thus the controller walks through the ambulance to the spot. This scheme is fully automated, thus it finds the accident spot, controls the traffic lights, helping to reach the hospital in time.

  7. INTRODUKSI TEKNOLOGI INOVASI AMBUL UNTUK BUDIDAYA TANAMAN SAYURAN DI KALIMANTAN TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASTIN ERNAWATI NUR CHUSNUL CHOTIMAH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Arut Bawah is a settlement that is always flooded every year due to Kahayan river run off . Residents perform various activities on the water, and transportation between housing residents with one another, using wooden boards. The conditions is not possible if it is used to grow crops. It is certainly limiting factor for household food needs, including the need for vegetables. Flooded land use around residential has not been done because the technology is not yet known. Through these activities, the community is expected to implement one of the local knowledges of the environment-friendly cultivation in swampy areas with ambul system so that people can still grow crops to sustain life. It consists of meeting nutritional needs, as well as improving food security in water-saturated soil conditions. This community service was conducted by the various stages of 1 outreach and dissemination of technology ambul 2 training of making ambul and 3 planting a variety of vegetables in ambul. The results showed that ambul can be used as a technology for cultivation in flooded areas. The introduction of technology ambul got a positive response from residents Arut Bawah Palangkaraya Central Kalimantan. Keywords: ambul, vegetables and flooded areas.

  8. The Fire Brigade acquires a new ambulance with all the bells and whistles!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 19 April the Fire Brigade unveiled its latest acquisition: a brand-new ambulance specially designed for CERN.   One of the Fire Brigade's two ambulances has just been replaced by a state-of-the-art vehicle tailor-made to meet CERN's unique requirements. At 4.6 metres long it's much more spacious than its predecessors, providing plenty of room for patient, doctor and paramedic. The ambulance's design and manufacture are the result of a successful collaboration between the Fire Brigade and the technicians from Profile Vehicles, the Finnish company that won the contract following a call for tenders launched in June 2011. "It took us six months to finalise the specification for our new ambulance," explains Patrick Berlinghi, who is responsible for the Fire Brigade's logistics. "We wanted it to be spacious enough for us to be able to work comfortably and to have the latest safety and patient care equipment.  We also reques...

  9. Private Ambulance Services, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Shawano County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Private Ambulance Services dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008....

  10. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... house) Industrial emissions (like smoke and chemicals from factories) Household cleaners (spray cleaners, air fresheners) Car emissions (like carbon monoxide) *All of these things make up “particle pollution.” They mostly come from cars, trucks, buses, and ...

  11. The Assessment of Competiencies for Ambulance Personnel –Problems and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Dambe, Gundega; Atstāja, Dzintra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify whetherperformances assessment at a work place promotes Ambulance professionals for personnel development, and if it providesthe possibility to assess personnel’s competence and professionalism. The results of State Emergency Medical Service ambulance personnel’s performance assessment in years 2013 and 2014 are analysed in the research. The results obtainedthat using existing methods for performance assessment, there are not possibility to assess perso...

  12. Acute and chronic job stressors among ambulance personnel: predictors of health symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, E; Kleber, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To predict symptomatology (post-traumatic distress, fatigue, and burnout) due to acute and chronic work related stressors among ambulance personnel. Methods: Data were gathered from 123 ambulance workers in The Netherlands in a longitudinal design. At two measurements they completed standardised questionnaires to assess health symptoms, such as the Impact of Event Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Checklist Individual Strength. Acute stressors were assessed with specif...

  13. Call selection for the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service: implications for ambulance control.

    OpenAIRE

    Coats, T J; Newton, A

    1994-01-01

    The increasing sophistication of pre-hospital care, with paramedics and many types of 'rapid response' units, requires the use of advanced systems of ambulance control. The introduction of call selection by a paramedic in the ambulance control room significantly improved the tasking of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service. This paper illustrates the need for a system to grade 999 calls, so that the appropriate pre-hospital response can be directed to each patient.

  14. Systematic review of pre-hospital outcomes for evidence-based evaluation of ambulance service care

    OpenAIRE

    Phung, Viet-Hai; Coster, Joanne; Wilson, Richard; Turner, Janette; Booth, Andrew; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulance service performance measurement has previously focused on response times and survival (particularly from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest). The PhOEBE (Pre-hospital Outcomes for Evidence Based Evaluation) project is a 5-year research programme which aims to develop new ways of measuring the performance, quality and impact of ambulance service care. As part of this programme we conducted a systematic review of the international literature on quality measures and outcomes re...

  15. Developing new ways of measuring the impact of ambulance service care

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Janette; Coster, Joanne; Wilson, Richard; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Phung, Viet-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-hospital care in England is provided by ambulance services who deliver a diverse range of services to over 9 million patients a year but there is limited evidence about the effectiveness of this care. Historically ambulance performance has been measured by response times rather than clinical need or effectiveness. Progress on developing more appropriate performance measures is constrained by a lack of information about what happens to patients and their outcome after the pre...

  16. Qualitative interview study of patients', ambulance practitioners' and emergency department clinicians' perceptions of prehospital pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Iqbal; Spaight, P. A.; Siriwardena, Niro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital pain management is increasingly important with most patients (80%) presenting to UK ambulance services in pain and 20% of patients reporting inadequate pain relief. Improving prehospital pain management is important for service quality. Our aim was to investigate perceptions of pain management from patients, ambulance and emergency care staff. Methods Qualitative data were gathered through focus group (5) and interviews (28). Participants were purposively ...

  17. Weather factors in the short-term forecasting of daily ambulance calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ho-Ting; Lai, Poh-Chin

    2014-07-01

    The daily ambulance demand for Hong Kong is rising, and it has been shown that weather factors (temperature and humidity) play a role in the demand for ambulance services. This study aimed at developing short-term forecasting models of daily ambulance calls using the 7-day weather forecast data as predictors. We employed the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method to analyze over 1.3 million cases of emergency attendance in May 2006 through April 2009 and the 7-day weather forecast data for the same period. Our results showed that the ARIMA model could offer reasonably accurate forecasts of daily ambulance calls at 1-7 days ahead of time and with improved accuracy by including weather factors. Specifically, the inclusion of average temperature alone in our ARIMA model improved the predictability of the 1-day forecast when compared to that of a simple ARIMA model (8.8 % decrease in the root mean square error, RMSE = 53 vs 58). The improvement in the 7-day forecast with average temperature as a predictor was more pronounced, with a 10 % drop in prediction error (RMSE = 62 vs 69). These findings suggested that weather forecast data can improve the 1- to 7-day forecasts of daily ambulance demand. As weather forecast data are readily accessible from Hong Kong Observatory's official website, there is virtually no cost to including them in the ARIMA models, which yield better prediction for forward planning and deployment of ambulance manpower.

  18. [Long-haul intensive care transports by air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Jürgen; Seiler, Olivier; Pump, Stefan; Günther, Marion; Albrecht, Roland

    2013-03-01

    The need for inter-hospital transports over long distances aboard air ambulances or airlines has increased in recent years, both in the civil as well as the military sector. More often severely ill intensive care patients with multiple organ failure and appropriate supportive care (e.g. mechanical ventilation, catecholamines, dialysis, cardiac assist devices) are transported by air. Despite the fact that long-haul intensive care transports by air ambulance and airlines via Patient Transport Compartment (PTC) are considered established modes of transport they always provide a number of challenges. Both modes of transport have distinct logistical and medical advantages and disadvantages. These-as well as the principal risks of an air-bound long-haul intensive care transport -have to be included in the risk assessment and selection of means of transport. Very often long-haul intensive care transports are a combination of air ambulance and scheduled airlines utilizing the PTC. PMID:23504461

  19. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  20. Weather and Age-Gender Effects on the Projection of Future Emergency Ambulance Demand in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, PC; Wong, FHT

    2012-01-01

    An accurate projection for ambulance demand is essential to enable better resource planning for the future that strives to either maintain current levels of services or reconsider future standards and expectations. More than 2 million cases of emergency room attendance in 2008 were obtained from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority to project the demand for its ambulance services in 2036. The projection of ambulance demand in 2036 was computed in consideration of changes in the age-gender structu...

  1. The effect of a national ambulance Quality Improvement Collaborative on performance in care bundles for acute myocardial infarction and stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Shaw, Deborah; Essam, Nadya; Togher, Fiona; Davy, Zowie; Spaight, Anne; Dewey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: National ambulance service indicators showed considerable variation in care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to improve reliability of pre-hospital care processes for these conditions using a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC). The QIC involved educating ambulance staff in Quality Improvement (QI) methods, and the use of plan-do-study-act cycles (PDSA) to implement changes. Ambulance staff were provided with feedback on the effect of the PDSA cycles ...

  2. Ambulation following spinal cord injury and its correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess walking ability of spinal cord injury (SCI patients and observe its correlation with functional and neurological outcomes. Patients and Methods: The present prospective, observational study was conducted in a tertiary research hospital in India with 66 patients (46 males between January 2012 and December 2013. Mean age was 32.62 ± 11.85 years (range 16-65 years, mean duration of injury was 85.3 ± 97.6 days (range 14-365 days and mean length of stay in the rehabilitation unit was 38.08 ± 21.66 days (range 14-97 days in the study. Walking Index for spinal cord injury (WISCI II was used to assess ambulation of the SCI patients. Functional recovery was assessed using Barthel Index (BI and Spinal Cord Independence Measures (SCIM. Neurological recovery was assessed using ASIA impairment scale (AIS. We tried to correlate ambulatory ability of the patients with functional and neurological recovery. Results: Ambulatory ability of the patients improved significantly using WISCI II (P < 0.001 when admission and discharge scores were compared (1.4 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 6.03. Similarly, functional (BI: 31.7 ± 20.5 vs 58.4 ± 23.7 and SCIM: 29.9 ± 15.1 vs 56.2 ± 20.6 and neurological recovery were found to be very significant (P < 0.001 when admission vs discharge scores were compared. Improvement in WISCI II scores was significantly correlated with improvement in neurological (using AIS scores and functional status (using BI and SCIM scores (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Significant improvement was seen in WISCI II, BI, and SCIM scores after in-patient rehabilitation. Improvement in WISCI II scores also significantly correlated with functional and neurological recovery.

  3. Ambulation speed and corresponding mechanics are associated with changes in serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Becker Pardo, Michael; Winward, Jason G; Hunter, Iain; Ridge, Sarah; Hopkins, J Ty; Reese, C Shane; Parcell, Allen C; Seeley, Matthew K

    2016-02-01

    Because serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been used to reflect articular cartilage condition, we aimed to identify walking and running mechanics that are associated with changes in serum COMP. Eighteen subjects (9 male, 9 female; age=23 ± 2 yrs.; mass=68.3 ± 9.6 kg; height=1.70 ± 0.08 m) completed 4000 steps on an instrumented treadmill on three separate days. Each day corresponded to a different ambulation speed: slow (preferred walking speed), medium (+50% of slow), and fast (+100% of slow). Synchronized ground reaction force and video data were collected to evaluate walking mechanics. Blood samples were collected pre-, post-, 30-minute post-, and 60-minute post-ambulation to determine serum COMP concentration at these times. Serum COMP increased 29%, 18%, and 5% immediately post ambulation for the fast, medium, and slow sessions (p<0.01). When the speeds were pooled, peak ankle inversion, knee extension, knee abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, and hip abduction moment, and knee flexion angle at impact explained 61.4% of total variance in COMP concentration change (p<0.001). These results indicate that (1) certain joint mechanics are associated with acute change in serum COMP due to ambulation, and (2) increased ambulation speed increases serum COMP concentration. PMID:27004646

  4. Calls Forecast for the Moscow Ambulance Service. The Impact of Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Vladimir; Bykov, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    We use the known statistics of the calls for the current and previous days to predict them for tomorrow and for the following days. We assume that this algorithm will work operatively, will cyclically update the available information and will move the horizon of the forecast. Sure, the accuracy of such forecasts depends on their lead time, and from a choice of some group of diagnoses. For comparison we used the error of the inertial forecast (tomorrow there will be the same number of calls as today). Our technology has demonstrated accuracy that is approximately two times better compared to the inertial forecast. We obtained the following result: the number of calls depends on the actual weather in the city as well as on its rate of change. We were interested in the accuracy of the forecast for 12-hour sum of the calls in real situations. We evaluate the impact of the meteorological errors [1] on the forecast errors of the number of Ambulance calls. The weather and the Ambulance calls number both have seasonal tendencies. Therefore, if we have medical information from one city only, we should separate the impacts of such predictors as "annual variations in the number of calls" and "weather". We need to consider the seasonal tendencies (associated, e. g. with the seasonal migration of the population) and the impact of the air temperature simultaneously, rather than sequentially. We forecasted separately the number of calls with diagnoses of cardiovascular group, where it was demonstrated the advantage of the forecasting method, when we use the maximum daily air temperature as a predictor. We have a chance to evaluate statistically the influence of meteorological factors on the dynamics of medical problems. In some cases it may be useful for understanding of the physiology of disease and possible treatment options. We can assimilate some personal archives of medical parameters for the individuals with concrete diseases and the relative meteorological archive. As a

  5. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  6. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  7. Early ambulation following 6 French diagnostic left heart catheterization: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R A; Lewis, B K; Harber, D R; Kovack, P J; Bates, E R; Stomel, R J

    1997-09-01

    Outpatient cardiac catheterization is frequently performed, but the optimal recovery time after sheath removal has not been defined. Left heart catheterization was performed via the femoral artery utilizing 6 French catheters on 323 outpatients. One hundred thirty-five patients were randomized to ambulate at a mean of 2.5 hr (group 1) after puncture site compression, whereas 188 patients were randomized to ambulate at a mean of 4.1 hr (group 2). Telephone follow-up occurred within 48 hr. A small hematoma (< 5 cm) occurred in 2 (1.6%) patients in group 1 and in 4 (2.4%) patients in group 2. These results indicate that it is safe to ambulate patients 2.5 hr following 6 French diagnostic heart catheterization. PMID:9286529

  8. Reducing Emergency Medical Service response time via the reallocation of ambulance bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L C; Pinto, L R; Silva, P M S

    2016-03-01

    The demand for highly efficient and effective services and consumer goods is an essential prerequisite for modern organizations. In healthcare, efficiency and effectiveness mean reducing disabilities and maintaining human life. One challenge is guaranteeing rapid Emergency Medical Service (EMS) response. This study analyzes the EMS of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, using two modeling techniques: optimization and simulation. The optimization model locates ambulance bases and allocates ambulances to those bases. A simulation of this proposed configuration is run to analyze the dynamic behavior of the system. The main assumption is that optimizing the ambulance base locations can improve the system response time. Feasible solutions were found and the current system may be improved while considering economic and operational changes. PMID:24744263

  9. A Prevalence and Management Study of Acute Pain in Children Attending Emergency Departments by Ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; McCoy, Siobhan; O'Reilly, Kay; Fogarty, Eoin; Dietz, Jason; Crispino, Gloria; Wakai, Abel; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    Pain is the most common symptom in the emergency setting and remains one of the most challenging problems for emergency care providers, particularly in the pediatric population. The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute pain in children attending emergency departments (EDs) in Ireland by ambulance. In addition, this study sought to describe the prehospital and initial ED management of pain in this population, with specific reference to etiology of pain, frequency of pain assessment, pain severity, and pharmacological analgesic interventions. A prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken over a 12-month period of all pediatric patients transported by emergency ambulance to four tertiary referral hospitals in Ireland. All children (management of acute pain in children transferred by ambulance to the ED in Ireland is currently poor, with documentary evidence of only 26% receiving prehospital analgesic agents. PMID:26024309

  10. [An ambulance helicopter in Jamtland. A survival necessity in a county of tourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, B; Zetterström, H

    2000-03-22

    The county of Jämtland is a sparsely populated area in which an ambulance-helicopter has been in use since the middle of the 1970's. A prospective study was undertaken during a six month period with the aim of evaluating the benefits of the helicopter as compared with the use of road-ambulance transport alone. Total number of patients involved was n = 249. Both flight nurses and receiving doctors found that in most cases, patients transported by helicopter manned with a flight nurse were given higher quality care. A follow-up study by specialists from the receiving departments confirmed that for 3% (n = 8), transport by ambulance-helicopter resulted in "probably better prognosis", and that for 2% (n = 6) the result was "lifesaving". PMID:10765625

  11. Prognostische Indices bei älteren Patienten mit ambulant erworbener Pneumonie

    OpenAIRE

    Niklaus, David

    2010-01-01

    Problem: Die Studie prüft, ob der CURBA-Index dem Pneumonie-Schwere-Index (PSI) bei älteren Patienten mit ambulant erworbener Pneumonie gleichwertig ist für die Abschätzung der Intrahospitalmortalität. Methode: Eine retrospektive Kohortenstudie wertet Daten stationärer Patienten ≥ 65 Jahre mit ambulant erworbener Pneumonie des Marienhospital Herne aus. Die Indices werden daraus generiert und evaluiert. Alle Patienten sind ≥ 65 Jahre, so wird der kürzere CURB-Score verwendet. Er...

  12. The Analysis of Vibration Characteristics and Motion Stability of the Tracked Ambulance Nonlinear Damping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of the nonlinear stiffness, a 2 DOF dynamic nonlinear vibration model with cubic terms was established according to the structural feature and nonlinear behavior of the tracked ambulance. In the case of primary resonance and 1: 1 internal resonance, multiple scale method was used to obtain a first-order approximate solution for this model. Taking the parameters of the tracked ambulance for instance, the approximate solution was verified and the influence of the parameters on damping effect was investigated. Finally, the motion stability of the damping system was analyzed with singularity theory and the theoretical bases for improving efficiency of the damping system were provided.

  13. Design and methods of European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography Trial (EUROMAX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steg, Philippe Gabriel; van 't Hof, Arnoud; Clemmensen, Peter; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Dudek, Dariusz; Hamon, Martial; Cavallini, Claudio; Gordini, Giovanni; Huber, Kurt; Coste, Pierre; Thicoipe, Michel; Nibbe, Lutz; Steinmetz, Jacob; Ten Berg, Jurrien; Eggink, Gerrit Jan; Zeymer, Uwe; Campo Dell' Orto, Marco; Kanic, Vojko; Deliargyris, Efthymios N; Day, Jonathan; Schuette, Diana; Hamm, Christian W; Goldstein, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) triaged to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), anticoagulation often is initiated in the ambulance during transfer to a PCI site. In this prehospital setting, bivalirudin has not been compared with standard-of-care ......In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) triaged to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), anticoagulation often is initiated in the ambulance during transfer to a PCI site. In this prehospital setting, bivalirudin has not been compared with standard...

  14. Treatment of presumed acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema in an ambulance system by nurses using Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Weelink, E. E. M.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; de Vos, R.; Jaarsma, T.; Aarts, L. P. H. J.; Zijlstra, F.; Nijsten, M. W. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied by face mask benefits patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE). The simple disposable Boussignac CPAP (BCPAP) has been used in ambulances by physicians. In the Netherlands, ambulances are manned by nurs

  15. Necessities detected in patients derived to sanitary center in an ambulance of the urgent transport network after being treated by the 061 emergency team

    OpenAIRE

    Sixto Cámara Anguita; Antonio J. Valenzuela Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    The integral systems of urgencies and sanitary emergencies has, as resources for the urgent transport of patients, with nonwelfare ambulances, ambulances of basic life support and ambulances of advanced life support. In the two first, due to the ambiguity of the norm, the presence of a nurse to give care is not compulsory. Nevertheless, in the present study, it is detected that, the patients of this study, transferred in nonwelfare ambulance of the urgent transport network to a useful hospita...

  16. Cross-cultural validation of the Italian version of the Cumulated Ambulation Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grana, Elisa; Verzellotti, Simone; Grassi, Federico A;

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly patients, and walking impairment is a frequent complication. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a validated functional scale used to monitor easily three basic mobility activities in patients with hip fracture. The aim of this study was to translate, cross...

  17. Telemedicin - en mulighed til kvinder der føder ambulant?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Clemensen, Jane; Wagner, Lis;

    2009, s.36). Det overordnede formål er at udforske om telemedicin kan være en mulig løsning, når kvinder udskrives ambulant. Design og metoder: Projektet er et aktionsforskningsprojekt, nærmere bestemt arbejdes der ud fra Participartory Design. Metodologien er baseret på deltagelse af brugerne, og det...

  18. A new vibration isolation bed stage with magnetorheological dampers for ambulance vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration experienced in an ambulance can lead to secondary injury to a patient and discourage a paramedic from providing emergency care. In this study, with the goal of resolving this problem, a new vibration isolation bed stage associated with magnetorheological (MR) dampers is proposed to ensure ride quality as well as better care for the patient while he/she is being transported. The bed stage proposed in this work can isolate vibrations in the vertical, rolling and pitching directions to reflect the reality that occurs in the ambulance. Firstly, an appropriate-sized MR damper is designed based on the field-dependent rheological properties of MR fluid, and the damping force characteristics of a MR damper are evaluated as a function of the current. A mechanical model of the proposed vibration isolation bed stage is then established to derive the governing equations of motion. Subsequently, a sliding mode controller is formulated to control the vibrations caused from the imposed excitation signals; those signals are directly measured using a real ambulance subjected to bump-and-curve road conditions. Using the controller based on the dynamic motion of the bed stage, the vibration control performance is evaluated in both the vertical and pitch directions. It is demonstrated that the magnitude of the vibration in the patient compartment of the ambulance can be significantly reduced by applying an input current to the MR dampers installed for the new bed stage. (technical note)

  19. Præhospital behandling. Ambulance-projektet Odense. En prospektiv undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Jørgensen, H R; Nielsen, J R;

    1990-01-01

    by the Danish National Board of Health was also tested. Experience from abroad and recent Danish trial arrangements demonstrate the positive effect of extended professional prehospital treatment. The authors consider, therefore, that an ambulance law is required as this would ensure better and more...

  20. Radiology trainer. Surgical ambulance. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; Roentgen-Trainer. Chirurgische Ambulanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Ole [Wedau-Kliniken Duisburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Ruchholtz, Steffen [Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg GmbH, Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie; Siemann, Holger [LVR Klinikum Essen (Germany); Barkhausen, Joerg [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2013-08-01

    The radiology trainer for surgical ambulance includes informative X-ray imaging examples for the following issues: zygoma, nasal bone, spinal cord, clavicle, shoulder, upper arms, elbow, forearms, wrist, hand, phalanx, thorax, sternum, pelvis, abdomen, hips, femur, knee, lower leg, ankle, feet.

  1. Educating the ambulance technician, paramedic, and clinical supervisor: using factor analysis to inform the curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Kilner, T

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Data generated by a Delphi study investigating the desirable attributes of ambulance technician, paramedic, and clinical supervisor were subject to factor analysis to explore inter-relations between the variables or desirable attributes. Variables that loaded onto any factor at a correlation level of >0.3 were included in the analysis.

  2. Time-dependent ambulance allocation considering data-driven empirically required coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degel, Dirk; Wiesche, Lara; Rachuba, Sebastian; Werners, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    Empirical studies considering the location and relocation of emergency medical service (EMS) vehicles in an urban region provide important insight into dynamic changes during the day. Within a 24-hour cycle, the demand, travel time, speed of ambulances and areas of coverage change. Nevertheless, most existing approaches in literature ignore these variations and require a (temporally and spatially) fixed (double) coverage of the planning area. Neglecting these variations and fixation of the coverage could lead to an inaccurate estimation of the time-dependent fleet size and individual positioning of ambulances. Through extensive data collection, now it is possible to precisely determine the required coverage of demand areas. Based on data-driven optimization, a new approach is presented, maximizing the flexible, empirically determined required coverage, which has been adjusted for variations due to day-time and site. This coverage prevents the EMS system from unavailability of ambulances due to parallel operations to ensure an improved coverage of the planning area closer to realistic demand. An integer linear programming model is formulated in order to locate and relocate ambulances. The use of such a programming model is supported by a comprehensive case study, which strongly suggests that through such a model, these objectives can be achieved and lead to greater cost-effectiveness and quality of emergency care. PMID:24609684

  3. Ambulance services at hospital universiti sains malaysia and hospital kota bharu: a retrospective study of calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Che Hamzah, Mohd Shaharudin; Ahmad, Rashidi; Nik Abdul Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Pardi, Kasmah Wati; Jaafar, Naimah; Wan Adnan, Wan Aasim; Jaalam, Kamaruddin; Sahil Jamalullail, Syed Mohsin

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study attempted to identify the pattern of ambulance calls for the past two years at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) and Hospital Kota Bharu (HKB). This study will provide a simple method of acquiring information related to ambulance response time (ART) and to test whether it met the international standards and needs of the client. Additionally, this paper takes into account the management of emergency calls. This included ambulance response time, which was part of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) episode: onset of ART, which started when details like phone number of the caller, exact location of the incident and the nature of the main complaint had been noted. ART ended when the emergency team arrived at the scene of incident. Information regarding ambulance calls from the record offices of HUSM and HKB was recorded for the year 2001 and 2002, tabulated and analyzed. There was a significant difference in the total number of calls managed by HUSM and HKB in the year 2001. It was noted that 645 calls were managed by HUSM while 1069 calls were recorded at HKB. In the year 2002, however, HUSM led with 613 extra numbers of calls as compare to HKB with 1193 numbers of calls. The pattern of ambulance calls observed is thought to possibly be influenced by social activities like local festivities, school holidays and the seasons. Further, it is observed that no studies were previously undertaken to compare the ART at both the HUSM and HKB to that of the international standards. In fact, a literature review undertaken so far showed no similar studies have been done for the whole Malaysia. PMID:22605956

  4. Weather and age-gender effects on the projection of future emergency ambulance demand in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Poh-Chin; Wong, Ho-Ting

    2015-03-01

    An accurate projection for ambulance demand is essential to enable better resource planning for the future that strives to either maintain current levels of services or reconsider future standards and expectations. More than 2 million cases of emergency room attendance in 2008 were obtained from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority to project the demand for its ambulance services in 2036. The projection of ambulance demand in 2036 was computed in consideration of changes in the age-gender structure between 2008 and 2036. The quadratic relation between average daily temperature and daily ambulance demand in 2036 was further explored by including and excluding age-gender demographic changes. Without accounting for changes in the age-gender structure, the 2036 ambulance demand for age groups of 65 and above were consistently underestimated (by 38%-65%), whereas those of younger age groups were overestimated (by 6%-37%). Moreover, changes in the 2008 to 2036 age-gender structure also shift upward and emphasize relationships between average daily temperature and daily ambulance demand at both ends of the quadratic U-shaped curve. Our study reveals a potential societal implication of ageing population on the demand for ambulance services. PMID:23070758

  5. Basic life support and automated external defibrillator skills among ambulance personnel: a manikin study performed in a rural low-volume ambulance setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Anne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance personnel play an essential role in the ‘Chain of Survival’. The prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was dismal on a rural Danish island and in this study we assessed the cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance of ambulance personnel on that island. Methods The Basic Life Support (BLS and Automated External Defibrillator (AED skills of the ambulance personnel were tested in a simulated cardiac arrest. Points were given according to a scoring sheet. One sample t test was used to analyze the deviation from optimal care according to the 2005 guidelines. After each assessment, individual feedback was given. Results On 3 consecutive days, we assessed the individual EMS teams responding to OHCA on the island. Overall, 70% of the maximal points were achieved. The hands-off ratio was 40%. Correct compression/ventilation ratio (30:2 was used by 80%. A mean compression depth of 40–50 mm was achieved by 55% and the mean compression depth was 42 mm (SD 7 mm. The mean compression rate was 123 per min (SD 15/min. The mean tidal volume was 746 ml (SD 221 ml. Only the mean tidal volume deviated significantly from the recommended (p = 0.01. During the rhythm analysis, 65% did not perform any visual or verbal safety check. Conclusion The EMS providers achieved 70% of the maximal points. Tidal volumes were larger than recommended when mask ventilation was applied. Chest compression depth was optimally performed by 55% of the staff. Defibrillation safety checks were not performed in 65% of EMS providers.

  6. Short-term exposure to ambient particulate matter and emergency ambulance dispatch for acute illness in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasmin, Saira; Ueda, Kayo; Stickley, Andrew; Yasumoto, Shinya; Phung, Vera Ling Hui; Oishi, Mizuki; Yasukouchi, Shusuke; Uehara, Yamato; Michikawa, Takehiro; Nitta, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to negative health outcomes that require an emergency medical response. However, few studies have been undertaken on this phenomenon to date. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the association between short-term exposure to ambient suspended particulate matter (SPM) and emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for acute illness in Japan. Daily EAD data, daily mean SPM and meteorological data were obtained for four prefectures in the Kanto region of Japan for the period from 2007 to 2011. The area-specific association between daily EAD for acute illness and SPM was explored using generalized linear models while controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, seasonality, long-term trends, day of the week and public holidays. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the modifying effects of age, sex and medical conditions. Area-specific estimates were combined using meta-analyses. For the total study period the mean level of SPM was 23.7μg/m(3). In general, higher SPM was associated with a significant increase in EAD for acute illness [estimated pooled relative risk (RR): 1.008, 95% CI: 1.007 to 1.010 per 10μg/m(3) increase in SPM at lag 0-1]. The effects of SPM on EAD for acute illness were significantly greater for moderate/mild medical conditions (e.g. cases that resulted in 3weeks hospitalization or which resulted in death). Using EAD data, this study has shown the adverse health effects of ambient air pollution. This highlights the importance of reducing the level of air pollution in order to maintain population health and well-being. PMID:27235903

  7. Proposal for periodic verifications of electromedical devices integrated to terrestrial Technical Ambulance Inspection (TAI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Argentina, electromedical devices may only be commercialized if they meet safety and performance requirements established by current regulations, ensuring their safety and intended performance when leaving the Factory. However, during usage, natural wearing and overloading may change this condition, especially if used in extra hospital services performed by ambulances, which are likely to be subjected to rough handling conditions and hitting. This proposal explains the chosen methodology to address the periodic verification activities of electro medical devices within the process of terrestrial Technical Ambulance Inspection (TAI). Among the results stand out the set of methods for verification and the lists used to record the outcome of this evaluation. Outstanding conclusions include that the operations meet the conditions of an analogous mechanism to that of a Technical Vehicle Inspection (existing for other vehicles), and that the same working structure can be used as a basis for making a manual of procedures for a TAI.

  8. Venous Gas Emboli and Ambulation at 4.3 PSIA (Preliminary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Martina, S. D.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ambulation imparts compressive and decompressive forces into the lower body[1], potentially creating quasi-stable micronuclei that influence the outcome of hypobaric depressurizations[2-4]. Hypotheses: ambulation before the conclusion of a denitrogenation (prebreathe) protocol at 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute is not sufficient to increase the incidence of venous gas emboli (VGE) at 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute but is sufficient if performed after tissues become supersaturated with nitrogen at 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute. Methods: VGE results from 45 subjects that performed exercise prebreathe without ambulation before or during a 4-hr exposure to 4.3 pounds per square inch absolute (Phase II control) are compared to 21 subjects that performed the same prebreathe but ambulated before and during the hypobaric exposure (Phase II-1) and to 30 subjects that only ambulated before the hypobaric exposure (Phase II-3). VGE in the pulmonary artery were detected at about 16 min intervals using precordial Doppler ultrasound (2.5 megahertz) and assigned a Spencer 0-IV grade. The highest grade assigned during the exposure is one metric, and Grade III or IV were combined as "high VGE grade". We used Fisher's exact directional chi squared for VGE count data. We evaluated survival curves for onset of high VGE grade using non-parametric Kaplan-Meier. Finally, we used logistic regression (LR) to describe the binary response of high VGE grade during an exposure across the three protocols with the three categorical ambulatory states (k) transformed into k-1 dummy variables, plus the following explanatory variables: gender (74 men and 22 women), age (19-57 years), height (155-191 cm), weight (44-115 kg), body mass index (17.5-35.5, as weight in kg/height as square meters), and aerobic fitness through peak oxygen (O (sub 2)) consumption as the volume of oxygen peak (26.1-64.9 milliliters (O (sub 2 (STPD - standard temperature and pressure, dry)) per

  9. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed. PMID:10992814

  10. Urban Overdose Hotspots: A 12-Month Prospective Study in Dublin Ambulance Services

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, Jan; O'Reilly, Martin; Egan, Mairead; Tobin, Helen; Bury, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioid overdose is the primary cause of death among drug users globally. Personal and social determinants of overdose have been studied before, but the environmental factors lacked research attention. Area deprivation or presence of addiction clinics may contribute to overdose. Objectives: To examine the baseline incidence of all new opioid overdoses in an ambulance service, and their relationship with urban deprivation and presence of addiction services. Methods: A prospective ch...

  11. Ambulant jongerenwerk : Vinden, binden, motiveren en doorleiden : de actuele relevantie van de klassieker.

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Literatuuronderzoek naar de invloed van 'Welzijn Nieuwe Stijl'. Binnen deze ontwikkeling is er veel aandacht voor outreachend werken (de Eropaf-methode). Een van de acht bakens die richting geven aan de verdere ontwikkeling heet letterlijk ‘Direct eropaf’. Ingegaan wordt op de doelgroepen, de aard van het werk (Wat is ambulant jongerenwerk?), de pedagogische opdracht, methodische uitgangspunten en vaardigheden en randvoorwaarden voor de professional. Ten slotte worden in het onderzoek de resu...

  12. Current challenges in the provision of ambulance services in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan

    2010-01-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in New Zealand has been serving the society since the first ambulance in 1892. Since then it has developed rapidly following national health system reforms and changes in lifestyle that increase demands and expectations from local communities. Today, the system provides high-quality pre-hospital emergency care. This article will briefly introduce some of the issues facing EMS that will impact the future of this crucial system in New Zealand. These issues inclu...

  13. Limited benefits of ambulance telemetry in delivering early thrombolysis: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Woollard, M; Pitt, K.; Hayward, A.; Taylor, N.

    2005-01-01

    Methods: This prospective randomised controlled trial recruited patients using the 999 ambulance service in a rural area of the UK with signs or symptoms of coronary heart disease. Subjects were assigned to receive either standard paramedic treatment or transmission of 12 lead ECG, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and relevant medical history to a general hospital coronary care unit. Cardiology senior house officers then determined each patient's suitability for pre-hospital thrombolysis time,...

  14. How public ambulance arrivals impact on Emergency Department workload and resource use

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Ferri; Laura Magrini(INAF Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy); Marco Alfano; Michele Del Parco; Salvatore Di Somma

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine patient’s characteristics associated with ED arrival mode, and to determine EMS impact on ED clinical resource use, workload and crowding. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients seen at Sant’Andrea Hospital ED. Comparison focused on visit characteristics, and on resource use. Results: The use of EMS ambulance confirms association to older age, higher rate of hospital admission, longer length of stay, and severity of injury. Moreover our data show...

  15. The effect of early ambulation on the incidence of neurological complication after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihanak Talakoub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transient neurological symptoms (TNS, was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine but its etiology remains unknown this study was evaluated the influence of ambulation time on the occurrence of TNSs after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine 5%. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades I and II, who were candidates for lower abdominal surgery in supine or lithotomy positions. Patients were randomly divided into early ambulation group (Group A who were asked to start walking as soon as the anesthesia was diminished or to the late ambulation group (Group B who walked after at least 12 h bedridden. Participants were contacted 2 days after spinal anesthesia to assess any type of pain at surgical or anesthesia injection site, muscle weakness, fatigue, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, headache, and difficult urination or defecation. Results: Four subjects (13.3% in Group A and two patients (6.7% in Group B had pain at anesthesia injection site (P = 0.019. Fourteen patients in Group A (46.7% and six patients in Group B (20% had post-dural puncture headache (P = 0.014. Participants in Group B reported difficult urination more than Group A (P = 0.002. there were not statistically significant differences between two groups regarding frequency of fatigue, muscle weakness, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, difficult defecation, paresthesia, and the mean of visual analogue scale at the surgical site. Conclusion: Early ambulation after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine did not increase the risk of neurologic complication.

  16. The effect of early ambulation on the incidence of neurological complication after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Reihanak Talakoub; Mohammad Golparvar; Rezvan Arshi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transient neurological symptoms (TNS), was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine but its etiology remains unknown this study was evaluated the influence of ambulation time on the occurrence of TNSs after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine 5%. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades I and II, who were candidates for lower abdominal surgery in supine or lithoto...

  17. Symbolic and systemic violence in media representations of aggression towards ambulance personnel in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers, Nicole; Brown, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Violence towards public sector employees is perceived as a growing problem in a number of societies, attracting the attention of mass media, politicians and social scientists alike. In this article we discuss how national newspapers have reported aggression towards ambulance workers in the Netherlands. Our analysis is informed by Žižek’s conceptualisations of less visible yet fundamental formats of violence, which he posits as vital for analysing narratives of subjective experiences of aggres...

  18. Experience of critical incident stress among ambulance service staff and relationship to psychological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sharon; McGilloway, Sinéad

    2009-01-01

    This two-stage study was undertaken to assess the extent and nature of Critical Incident Stress (CIS) amongst frontline staff in a large ambulance service in Ireland. In Stage One, 63% (112/180) of participants completed a Screening Questionnaire and the GHQ-12. In Stage Two, 27 participants, who had experienced a critical incident (CI) during the previous year completed several measures to assess PTSD symptomatology, burnout, health-related Quality of Life, and dispositional optimism. Eighty-one per cent (80/94) of the Stage One group reported that their health had been affected by a CI; 42% (44/106) were identified as 'cases' on the GHQ-12. Stage Two results indicated that 12 participants had PTSD symptoms while this entire group showed moderate levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, despite experiencing high levels of personal accomplishment and optimism. The findings suggest a high prevalence of CIS among ambulance personnel in Ireland and a significant impact on overall health and wellbeing. This has important implications for the effective management of CIS and suggests an important role for occupational health and organizational psychologists in providing routine support to ambulance service staff andpossibly other emergency services personnel. PMID:20524508

  19. Manager-employee interaction in ambulance services: an exploratory study of employee perspectives on management communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Managers of ambulance stations face many communicative challenges in their interaction with employees working in prehospital first-line services. The article presents an exploratory study of how paramedics experience these challenges in communication with station leaders. On the basis of a dialogue perspective in qualitative method, 24 paramedics were interviewed in one-to-one and focus group settings. Naturalistic and phenomenological approaches were used to analyze the interviews. All the paramedics said that they wished to be more involved in decision processes and that station managers should provide better explanations of information "from above." The paramedics understood that it was difficult for the managers to find time for extensive dialogue, but many thought that the managers should give more priority to communication. The paramedics' views correspond to theoretical assumptions in human resource management. According to this model, employees should be involved in decision processes on management levels, as long as it is realistically possible to do so. Furthermore, expressing emotional support and positive attitudes does not take much time, and the study suggests that many ambulance managers should focus more on interpersonal relations to employees. It has been extensively documented that management communication affects organizational performance. The study indicates that managers of ambulance stations should be more aware of how their leadership style affects professional commitment and motivation in the first-line services. PMID:25909398

  20. Reducing Time to First on Scene: An Ambulance-Community First Responder Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alan; Ellington, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The importance of early access to prehospital care has been demonstrated in many medical emergencies. This work aims to describe the potential time benefit of implementing a student Community First Responder scheme to support ambulance services in an inner-city setting in the United Kingdom. Twenty final and penultimate year medical students in the UK were trained in the "First Person on Scene" Business and Technology Education Council (BTEC) qualification. Over 12 months, they attended 89 emergency calls in an inner-city setting as Community First Responders (CFRs), alongside the West Midlands Ambulance Service, UK. At the end of this period, a qualitative survey investigated the perceived educational value of the scheme. The mean CFR response time across all calls was an average of 3 minutes and 8 seconds less than ambulance crew response times. The largest difference was to calls relating to falls (12 min). The difference varied throughout the day, peaking between 16:00 and 18:00. All questionnaire respondents stated that they felt more prepared in assessing and treating acutely unwell patients. In this paper, the authors present a symbiotic solution which has both reduced time to first on scene and provided training and experience in medical emergencies for senior medical students. PMID:27119024

  1. Feasibility, Reliability and Predictive Value Of In-Ambulance Heart Rate Variability Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Yperzeele

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is a parameter of autonomic nervous system function. A decrease of HRV has been associated with disease severity, risk of complications and prognosis in several conditions.We aim to investigate the feasibility and the reliability of in-ambulance HRV registration during emergency interventions, and to evaluate the association between prehospital HRV parameters, patient characteristics, vital parameters and short-term outcome.We conducted a prospective study using a non-invasive 2-lead ECG registration device in 55 patients transported by the paramedic intervention team of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel. HRV assessment included time domain parameters, frequency domain parameters, nonlinear analysis, and time-frequency analysis. The correlation between HRV parameters and patient and outcome characteristics was analyzed and compared to controls.Artifact and ectopic detection rates were higher in patients during ambulance transportation compared to controls in resting conditions, yet technical reasons precluding in-ambulance HRV analysis occurred in only 9.6% of cases. HRV acquisition was possible without safety issues or interference with routine emergency care. Reliability of the results was considered sufficient for Sample entropy (SampEn, good for the ratio of low frequency and high frequency components (LF/HF ratio in the frequency and the time frequency domain, and excellent for the triangular interpolation of the NN interval histogram (TINN, and for the short-term scaling exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA α1. HRV indices were significantly reduced inpatients with unfavorable outcome compared to patients with favorable outcome and controls. Multivariate analysis identified lower DFA α1 as an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (OR, 0.155; 95% CI 0.024-0.966; p = 0.049.In-ambulance HRV registration is technically and operationally feasible and produces reliable results for parameters

  2. Feasibility, Reliability and Predictive Value Of In-Ambulance Heart Rate Variability Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Nagels, Guy; Hubloue, Ives; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) is a parameter of autonomic nervous system function. A decrease of HRV has been associated with disease severity, risk of complications and prognosis in several conditions. Objective We aim to investigate the feasibility and the reliability of in-ambulance HRV registration during emergency interventions, and to evaluate the association between prehospital HRV parameters, patient characteristics, vital parameters and short-term outcome. Methods We conducted a prospective study using a non-invasive 2-lead ECG registration device in 55 patients transported by the paramedic intervention team of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel. HRV assessment included time domain parameters, frequency domain parameters, nonlinear analysis, and time-frequency analysis. The correlation between HRV parameters and patient and outcome characteristics was analyzed and compared to controls. Results Artifact and ectopic detection rates were higher in patients during ambulance transportation compared to controls in resting conditions, yet technical reasons precluding in-ambulance HRV analysis occurred in only 9.6% of cases. HRV acquisition was possible without safety issues or interference with routine emergency care. Reliability of the results was considered sufficient for Sample entropy (SampEn), good for the ratio of low frequency and high frequency components (LF/HF ratio) in the frequency and the time frequency domain, and excellent for the triangular interpolation of the NN interval histogram (TINN), and for the short-term scaling exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA α1). HRV indices were significantly reduced inpatients with unfavorable outcome compared to patients with favorable outcome and controls. Multivariate analysis identified lower DFA α1 as an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (OR, 0.155; 95% CI 0.024–0.966; p = 0.049). Conclusion In-ambulance HRV registration is technically and operationally feasible and

  3. Automated personnel-assets-consumables-drug tracking in ambulance services for more effective and efficient medical emergency interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utku, Semih; Özcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Unluturk, Mehmet Suleyman

    2016-04-01

    Patient delivery time is no longer considered as the only critical factor, in ambulatory services. Presently, five clinical performance indicators are used to decide patient satisfaction. Unfortunately, the emergency ambulance services in rapidly growing metropolitan areas do not meet current satisfaction expectations; because of human errors in the management of the objects onboard the ambulances. But, human involvement in the information management of emergency interventions can be reduced by electronic tracking of personnel, assets, consumables and drugs (PACD) carried in the ambulances. Electronic tracking needs the support of automation software, which should be integrated to the overall hospital information system. Our work presents a complete solution based on a centralized database supported by radio frequency identification (RFID) and bluetooth low energy (BLE) identification and tracking technologies. Each object in an ambulance is identified and tracked by the best suited technology. The automated identification and tracking reduces manual paper documentation and frees the personnel to better focus on medical activities. The presence and amounts of the PACD are automatically monitored, warning about their depletion, non-presence or maintenance dates. The computerized two way hospital-ambulance communication link provides information sharing and instantaneous feedback for better and faster diagnosis decisions. A fully implemented system is presented, with detailed hardware and software descriptions. The benefits and the clinical outcomes of the proposed system are discussed, which lead to improved personnel efficiency and more effective interventions. PMID:26777434

  4. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error. PMID:25804608

  5. Clinical effectiveness of grip strength in predicting ambulation of elderly inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beseler MR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available MR Beseler,1 C Rubio,1 E Duarte,1 D Hervás,2 MC Guevara,1 M Giner-Pascual,1 E Viosca1 1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, La Fe Hospital, Valencia, Spain; 2Statistical Unit, La Fe Hospital, Valencia, Spain Background: Assessing the clinical effectiveness of measuring grip strength as a prognostic tool in recovering ambulation in bed-confined frail elderly patients. Methods: A prospective study was carried out with 50 elderly inpatients (mean age: 81.6 years old. Manual muscle test was used for checking strength of hip flexor muscles, hip abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. Grip strength was assessed by hydraulic dynamometer. Walking ability was assessed by functional ambulation categories and Functional Classification of Sagunto Hospital Ambulation. Existence of cognitive impairment (Short Portable Mental Status of Pfeiffer and comorbidity (abbreviated Charlson index were considered to be confounding variables. Statistical analysis: Simple comparisons and mixed models of multiple ordinal regression. Results: The sample presented generalized weakness in scapular (mean 4.22 and pelvic (mean 3.82 muscle. Mean hand grip values were similar: 11.98 kg right hand; 11.70 kg left hand. The patients had lost walking ability. After treatment, there was a statistically significant for scapular waist strength (P=0.001, pelvic waist strength (P=0.005 and walking ability (P=0.001. A statistically significant relationship in the regression analysis was found between the grip (right and left hands and walking ability post-treatment (P=0.009; odds ratio 1.14 and P=0.0014 odds ratio 1.113 for each walking scale. The confounding variables showed no statistical significance in the results.Conclusion: Grip strength is associated with walking ability in hospitalized frail elderly. Grip strength assessment by hydraulic dynamometry is useful in patients with poor collaboration. Walking ability training in frail elderly inpatients is useful. Keywords: gait

  6. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Pierre K; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment. PMID:27340808

  7. The use of intraluminal strain gauges for recording ambulant small bowel motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R C; Kellow, J E; Browning, C; Wingate, D L

    1990-04-01

    Perfused-tube manometry has hitherto been the standard technique for recording intraluminal intestinal pressure in humans, but it is unsuitable for ambulant use. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ability of resistive strain gauge transducers attached to a fine catheter to detect pressure change. Simultaneous strain gauge and perfused-tube manometry was performed on six fasting subjects; in four, strain gauge activation was continuous and in two, the transducers were activated in a pulsed mode with data encoded as a pulse train with an approximate frequency of 20 Hz. Eight thousand eight hundred eighty-eight pressure waves were recorded by strain gauge, of which 96% were detected by perfused-tube manometry. There was good agreement in both phases II and III of the migrating motor complex. The amplitude of pressure waves recorded by strain gauge was slightly but significantly greater. A proportion (14-17%) of pressure waves recorded by strain gauge were bifid; this was not seen with the perfused tube. These differences are best explained by the greater sensitivity and more rapid rise time of the strain gauges. There was no loss of fidelity in the pulse-interval recording mode. A seventh subject underwent a continuous 72-h recording with the strain gauge catheter attached to a battery-operated encoder and magnetic tape cassette recorder and was freely ambulant during this period. The procedure was well tolerated and motility patterns could be clearly identified. We conclude that intraluminal strain gauge catheters are suitable for prolonged use in ambulant subjects and produce data that are closely comparable to the data acquired from perfused-tube manometry under laboratory conditions. PMID:2333973

  8. Samarbeid og kompetanseutveksling mellom sykehus og kommune : evaluering av prosjektet "Ambulant team"

    OpenAIRE

    Lorentzen, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Rapporten er en evaluering av prosjektet ”Ambulant team” som innbefattet ambulerende virksomhet fra Geriatrisk seksjon ved Sykehuset i Vestfold og ut i Horten, Nøtterøy og Sandefjord kommuner i forbindelse med hjemsending av pasienter. Hovedmålene med inneværende undersøkelse har vært å evaluere effekten av den ambulerende virksomheten på samhandlingen og kompetanseutvekslingen behandlingsnivåene imellom, samt å ta stilling til prosjektets videre- og overføringsverdi.

  9. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mort, Alasdair J.; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M. J.; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth® Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were ...

  10. Referral to the Hospital And Emergency Ambulance Service Uses Patterns of the Inmates and Convicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Oncu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses patterns of the inmates and convicts in an E type prison. Material and Method: In this descriptive study, it was evaluated the prison records associated with referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses for one year in 2010- 2011. Of the statistical analysis, descriptive statistics, chi-square test and Fisher%u2019s Exact Test were used. Results: All inmates and convicts were man, the median of age was 30,0 (min 18- max 68 years and substance use was 34,5%. The number of prisoners were referred to the hospital 815, total referrals were 1491; (referrals ranged from one to six and most common in January; and according to frequency, reasons of the referral were eyes problems, musculoskeletal disorders and psychological problems. Emergency medical service was used for in medical causes (78,3%, accident, trauma and injuries (16,4%, suicide (5,3%. Discussion: Findings from the study show that prisoners are more likely to have suffered physical and mental health problems that compared to the rest of society and have significantly high substance use rates.

  11. Kinematics and kinetics with an adaptive ankle foot system during stair ambulation of transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimusaj, Merkur; Fradet, Laetitia; Braatz, Frank; Gerner, Hans J; Wolf, Sebastian I

    2009-10-01

    Conventional prosthetic feet cannot adapt to specific conditions such as walking on stairs or ramps. Amputees are therefore forced to compensate their prosthetic deficits by modifying the kinematics and kinetics of their lower limbs. The Proprio-Foot (Ossur) intends to reduce these compensation mechanisms by automatically increasing dorsiflexion during stair ambulation thanks to an adaptive microprocessor-controlled ankle. The present investigation proposes to analyze the biomechanical effects of the dorsiflexion adaptation in transtibial (TT) amputees during stair ambulation. Sixteen TT amputees and sixteen healthy controls underwent conventional 3D gait analysis. Kinematics and kinetics of the lower limbs were compared during stair ascent and descent performed by patients with the prosthetic foot set to a neutral ankle angle and with an adapted dorsiflexion ankle angle of 4 degrees . Norm distance as well as minimum and maximal values of sagittal kinematics and kinetics were calculated for comparisons between patients and control subjects. For both stair ascent and descent, an improvement of the knee kinematics and kinetics could particularly be noticed on the involved side with an increase of the knee flexion and an increase of the knee moment during stance. Therefore, despite its additional weight compared to a conventional prosthetic ankle, the Proprio-Foot should be beneficial to active TT amputees whose knee musculature strength does not constitute a handicap. PMID:19616436

  12. Assessing post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ambulation using wireless wearable integrated sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosha Senanayake, S M N; Ahmed Malik, Owais; Mohammad Iskandar, Pg; Zaheer, Dansih

    2013-11-01

    Abstract A hardware/software co-design for assessing post-Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction ambulation is presented. The knee kinematics and neuromuscular data during walking (2-6 km h(-1)) have been acquired using wireless wearable motion and electromyography (EMG) sensors, respectively. These signals were integrated by superimposition and mixed signals processing techniques in order to provide visual analyses of bio-signals and identification of the recovery progress of subjects. Monitoring overlapped signals simultaneously helps in detecting variability and correlation of knee joint dynamics and muscles activities for an individual subject as well as for a group. The recovery stages of subjects have been identified based on combined features (knee flexion/extension and EMG signals) using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The proposed system has been validated for 28 test subjects (healthy and ACL-reconstructed). Results of ANFIS showed that the ambulation data can be used to distinguish subjects at different levels of recuperation after ACL reconstruction. PMID:24117351

  13. Humeral fracture in non-ambulant infants - a possible accidental mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, John M.; Halliday, Katharine E. [Nottingham University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Chapman, Stephen [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Humeral fracture in a non-ambulant infant younger than 1 year is suspicious for a non-accidental injury unless there is a credible accidental explanation. A previously unrecognised accidental mechanism was described in 1996 whereby a 5-month-old infant was rolled by a 3-year-old sibling from a prone to a supine position. To investigate the widely accepted view that an infant with limited mobility cannot sustain a fracture of the humerus by his or her own actions in the absence of the intervention of an external party. We present seven cases of non-ambulant infants between 4 and 7 months of age in whom an isolated humeral fracture was the only injury present. In each case the caregiver described the fracture occurring when the child rolled over, trapping the dependent arm, without the intervention of another party. There is no proof for this mechanism in the form of an independent witness or video recording. However, we propose that this mechanism is worthy of further consideration as a rare and unusual cause for the injury. Further study is required. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of an algorithm for estimating a patient's life threat risk from an ambulance call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriwaki Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Utilizing a computer algorithm, information from calls to an ambulance service was used to calculate the risk of patients being in a life-threatening condition (life threat risk, at the time of the call. If the estimated life threat risk was higher than 10%, the probability that a patient faced a risk of dying was recognized as very high and categorized as category A+. The present study aimed to review the accuracy of the algorithm. Methods Data collected for six months from the Yokohama new emergency system was used. In the system, emergency call workers interviewed ambulance callers to obtain information necessary to assess triage, which included consciousness level, breathing status, walking ability, position, and complexion. An emergency patient's life threat risk was then estimated by a computer algorithm applying logistic models. This study compared the estimated life threat risk occurring at the time of the emergency call to the patients' state or severity of condition, i.e. death confirmed at the scene by ambulance crews, resulted in death at emergency departments, life-threatening condition with occurrence of cardiac and/or pulmonary arrest (CPA, life-threatening condition without CPA, serious but not life-threatening condition, moderate condition, and mild condition. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of the algorithm for categorizing A+ were calculated. Results The number of emergency dispatches over the six months was 73,992. Triage assessment was conducted for 68,692 of these calls. The study targets account for 88.8% of patients who were involved in triage calls. There were 2,349 cases where the patient had died or had suffered CPA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio of the algorithm at predicting cases that would result in a death or CPA were 80.2% (95% confidence interval

  15. Effect of Planned Early Recommended Ambulation Technique on Selected Post caesarean Biophysiological Health Parameters

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    Jyoti V. Dube

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caesarean section has been a part of human culture since ancient times. It has been used effectively throughout the 20th century and among the major abdominal surgeries, it is the most common, oldest worldwide surgery performed in obstetrics. Despite the life saving advantages, there are several adverse consequences of caesarean delivery for a woman and to her household. The rate and risk of these complications increases due to the increasing incidence mainly in countries like India. The role of nurse midwife is to act in the best interest of patient and newborn and make the patient independent in carrying out the activities of daily living as soon as possible. This can lead to a faster recovery and shorter hospital stay. Also it can indirectly help in reducing the complications associated with prolonged bed rest and can improve the maternal newborn bonding. Aim and Objectives: The present study was done to evaluate the effect of planned early ambulation on selected biophysiological health parameters of post caesarean patients. Material and Methods: The study included total 500 study subjects, 250 in experimental and 250 in control group. Quasi experimental approach with multiple time series design was adopted for the study. The experimental group was given an early planned recommended ambulation technique starting from the day of surgery. This consisted of deep breathing exercise, cough exercise, leg exercise and early mobilization. Over and above, the routine general health care was given by the doctors and nurses. The control group received only by routine general care by doctors and nurses and mobilization on third post operative day as per strategy adopted by the hospital. The deep breathing exercises, coughing exercises and leg exercises were not given routinely and hence were not given to the control group. Post caesarean biophysiological parameters chart was used to assess the selected parameters for first five post operative

  16. A comparison of general and ambulance specific stressors: predictors of job satisfaction and health problems in a nationwide one-year follow-up study of Norwegian ambulance personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Bjørn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To address the relative importance of general job-related stressors, ambulance specific stressors and individual characteristics in relation to job satisfaction and health complaints (emotional exhaustion, psychological distress and musculoskeletal pain among ambulance personnel. Materials and methods A nationwide prospective questionnaire survey of ambulance personnel in operational duty at two time points (n = 1180 at baseline, T1 and n = 298 at one-year follow up, T2. The questionnaires included the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The Job Satisfaction Scale, Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-10, Job Stress Survey, the Norwegian Ambulance Stress Survey and the Basic Character Inventory. Results Overall, 42 out of the possible 56 correlations between job stressors at T1 and job satisfaction and health complaints at T2 were statistically significant. Lower job satisfaction at T2 was predicted by frequency of lack of leader support and severity of challenging job tasks. Emotional exhaustion at T2 was predicted by neuroticism, frequency of lack of support from leader, time pressure, and physical demands. Adjusted for T1 levels, emotional exhaustion was predicted by neuroticism (beta = 0.15, p Psychological distress at T2 was predicted by neuroticism and lack of co-worker support. Adjusted for T1 levels, psychological distress was predicted by neuroticism (beta = 0.12, p Musculoskeletal pain at T2 was predicted by, higher age, neuroticism, lack of co-worker support and severity of physical demands. Adjusted for T1 levels, musculoskeletal pain was predicted neuroticism, and severity of physical demands (beta = 0.12, p Conclusions Low job satisfaction at T2 was predicted by general work-related stressors, whereas health complaints at T2 were predicted by both general work-related stressors and ambulance specific stressors. The personality variable neuroticism predicted increased complaints across all health outcomes.

  17. Cumulated Ambulation Score to evaluate mobility is feasible in geriatric patients and in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Nielsen, Jesper Westphal;

    2012-01-01

    Regaining basic mobility independence is considered important for elderly hospitalised patients. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a valid tool for evaluating these patients' basic mobility (getting in and out of bed, sit-to-stand from a chair and walking) in orthopaedic wards, and its use is...

  18. 42 CFR 422.113 - Special rules for ambulance services, emergency and urgently needed services, and maintenance and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... representative instructs an enrollee to seek emergency services within or outside the plan; and (v) With a limit... pre-approved ends when— (i) A plan physician with privileges at the treating hospital assumes... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for ambulance services, emergency...

  19. Feasibility of AmbulanCe-Based Telemedicine (FACT) Study : Safety, Feasibility and Reliability of Third Generation Ambulance Telemedicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yperzeele, Laetitia; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van Dyck, Rita; Van de Casseye, Rohny; Convents, Andre; Hubloue, Ives; Lauwaert, Door; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Telemedicine is currently mainly applied as an in-hospital service, but this technology also holds potential to improve emergency care in the prehospital arena. We report on the safety, feasibility and reliability of in-ambulance teleconsultation using a telemedicine system of the third

  20. Geographic information system data from ambulances applied in the emergency department: effects on patient reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaber, Nikolaj; Pedersen, Iben Duvald; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (ED) recognize crowding and handover from prehospital to in-hospital settings to be major challenges. Prehospital Geographical Information Systems (GIS) may be a promising tool to address such issues. In this study, the use of prehospital GIS data was implemented...... data was displayed in the ED. Data included real-time estimated time of arrival, distance to ED, dispatch criteria, patient data and ambulance contact information. Data was used by coordinating nurses for time activation of TT and MET involved in the initial treatment of severely-injured or critically...... were reported. DISCUSSION: The contradiction of measured median wait time and nurses perceived improved timing of team activation may result from having both RT- ETA and supplemental patient information not only for seriously-injured or critically-ill patients received by the TT and MET, but for all...

  1. The effects of liberal versus restrictive transfusion thresholds on ambulation after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Jensen, Pia Søe; Palm, Henrik; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative anemia leads to increased morbidity and mortality and potentially inhibits rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery. As such, the optimum transfusion threshold after hip fracture surgery is unknown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 120 elderly, cognitively intact hip...... fracture patients admitted from their own home were randomly assigned to receive transfusion at a hemoglobin threshold of 10.0 g per dL (liberal) versus 8.0 g per dL (restrictive) in the entire perioperative period. Patients were treated according to a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation program....... Primary outcome was postoperative functional mobility measured with the cumulated ambulation score (CAS). RESULTS: Patients in the liberal group received transfusions more frequently than those in the restrictive group (44 patients vs. 22 patients; p < 0.01) and received more transfusions during...

  2. The Effect of Early Ambulation on Patient Outcomes for Total Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Melissa; Stichler, Jaynelle

    2015-01-01

    The National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses published clinical practice guidelines in 2010 to improve outcomes with day of surgery mobilization in the total joint replacement patient (). With the cost of healthcare skyrocketing and reimbursement marginally covering costs, healthcare professionals must look for ways to reduce length of stay for elective procedures. The purpose of this change project was to provide and measure the effectiveness of an educational intervention on the benefits of day of surgery mobility for nurses and physical therapy staff. Acquisition of caregivers' knowledge, attitudes, and practice was measured along with three patient outcomes (length of stay, discharge destination, and day of ambulation). The findings from this change project resulted in improvements in structure (new practice protocol), processes (nursing and physical therapy care processes), and patient and organization outcomes. PMID:26213872

  3. A Study on Vibration Characteristics and Stability of the Ambulance Nonlinear Damping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of the nonlinear stiffness, a 2-DOF vibration model with cubic terms was established according to the structural feature and nonlinear behavior. Ignoring the impact of nonlinear terms, the system was linearly analyzed. In the case of primary resonance and 1 : 1 internal resonance, a multiscale method was used to obtain a first-order approximate solution. Taking the parameters of one tracked ambulance for instance, the approximate solution was corroborated and the influence of the parameters on damping effect was investigated. Finally, motion stability of the damping system was analyzed with singularity theory. The theoretical bases for improving efficiency of the damping system were provided.

  4. Design and Development of an Intelligent Mobile Health Tele-assistance System in Ambulance Practice Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Merzougui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our attention has focused on the choice of a relevant work. It concerns an implemented and conceived service of medical Teleassistance for monitoring risky persons brought by ambulance service. Thus, a medical bulletin is automatically filled on mobile terminal, immediately transmitted to the service of the emergency (on doctors mobile terminal, data base of clinic. This paper recalls a complete architecture of an economic wireless transmission system with the implementation of an effective application, adapted to the portable phone, allowing the doctor to have the medical information of patients who have a risk of accident. Thus, the stakes of setting up such systems are numerous, so much for patients, medical staff and the society in general.

  5. Use of Functional Ambulation Performance Score as measurement of gait ability: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gouelle, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis systems are widely used for the assessment of gait disabilities and provide more accurate and detailed information than clinical tests. Scores and indexes have been proposed to summarize the large volume of data produced, each emphasizing different aspects of gait. Based on specific spatiotemporal gait parameters, the Functional Ambulation Performance Score (FAPS quantifies gait at a self-selected speed. Integrated within electronic walkways, the FAPS is commonly used for clinical evaluations and has been used in an increasing number of publications over the past few years. However, its use is sometimes distorted by misunderstandings of its composition and calculation, practical and/or conceptual limits, and even the meaning of the score. This technical report reviews the use of the FAPS for the evaluation of gait based on peer-reviewed articles and clinical experience and addresses important issues that must be considered for an optimal unbiased understanding and analysis of the score.

  6. [Idiopathic hemothorax associated with shock during transporting in an ambulance; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukoyama, Norio; Ishikawa, Y; Toki, S; Tsuzuki, T

    2004-07-01

    A 37-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. The patient noted sudden right back pain after coughing before 1 hour. Loss of consciousness was occurred in an ambulance. Chest X-P revealed whole fluid in the right chest. Enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) revealed extravasation of contrast media into the pleural cavity from the right chest wall. Thoracentesis was performed to relieve dyspnea and 2,000 ml of blood was removed. Then hemoglobin count was dropped to 3.8 g/dl. At thoracotomy whole blood was sucked about 3,900 ml. Bleeding point was found at third intercostal vein. The vein was knotted and sutured by prolene thread. The bleeding lesion was no inflammation and no string like tissue. We report a case of idiopathic hemothorax and enhanced chest CT was useful for diagnosis of bleeding lesion of pleural cavity. PMID:15285390

  7. Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination on Pre Hospital Ambulances in Qom University of Medical Sciences of Iran in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohollah Farhadloo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims of the Study: When the issue of the quality of the patient's care is addressed, determination of infection degrees in reference to the quality of such cares has gained a high priority. Therefore, infections in ambulance equipment might play a significant role in reduction of the quality of the hospital cares. This study was conducted wishing to determine bacterial infection degrees in ambulances servicing in pre-hospital emergency medical services of Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, 132 sampling of the equipments of 12 ambulances were done. Samples were stored on BHI broth as an amplifier for 24 hours. Then, they were introduced to blood agar and Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB agar culture environments. After 24 hours, negative staphylococcus coagulase and bacillus were specified by different environments, solutions, diagnostic discs, gram staining, catalase test, oxidase test and coagulase test. Then data were analyzed by SPSS16. Results: The results showed that the highest infection prevalence rate was observed in stretchers (12 samples, 100% and the lowest in oxygenation moisturizers (1 sample, 8.4%. From infected equipments, in addition, four instruments (37% were mobile and eight of them (63% were immobile. Conclusion: Results indicated that an infection degree of the utensils and instruments which were used in ambulances employed servicing in the Qom Province Medical Emergency Response Center of Iran is high, that might have their roots in non-application of disinfectants for disinfecting ambulance surfaces and equipment. This is a mandatory for healthcare agents to utilize the protective covers, especially medical gloves.

  8. Benefits of glucocorticoids in non-ambulant boys/men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A multicentric longitudinal study using the Performance of Upper Limb test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Marika; Fanelli, Lavinia; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Olivieri, Giorgia; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Scutifero, Marianna; Battini, Roberta; Petillo, Roberta; Frosini, Silvia; Sivo, Serena; Vita, Gian Luca; Bruno, Claudio; Mongini, Tiziana; Pegoraro, Elena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Gardani, Alice; Berardinelli, Angela; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Carlesi, Adelina; Viggiano, Emanuela; Cavallaro, Filippo; Sframeli, Maria; Bello, Luca; Barp, Andrea; Bianco, Flaviana; Bonfiglio, Serena; Rolle, Enrica; Palermo, Concetta; D'Angelo, Grazia; Pini, Antonella; Iotti, Elena; Gorni, Ksenija; Baranello, Giovanni; Bertini, Enrico; Politano, Luisa; Sormani, Maria Pia; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the possible effect of glucocorticoid treatment on upper limb function in a cohort of 91 non-ambulant DMD boys and adults of age between 11 and 26 years. All 91 were assessed using the Performance of Upper Limb test. Forty-eight were still on glucocorticoid after loss of ambulation, 25 stopped steroids at the time they lost ambulation and 18 were GC naïve or had steroids while ambulant for less than a year. At baseline the total scores ranged between 0 and 74 (mean 41.20). The mean total scores were 47.92 in the glucocorticoid group, 36 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and 30.5 in the naïve group (p < 0.001). The 12-month changes ranged between -20 and 4 (mean -4.4). The mean changes were -3.79 in the glucocorticoid group, -5.52 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and -4.44 in the naïve group. This was more obvious in the patients between 12 and 18 years and at shoulder and elbow levels. Our findings suggest that continuing glucocorticoids throughout teenage years and adulthood after loss of ambulation appears to have a beneficial effect on upper limb function. PMID:26248957

  9. Benefits of glucocorticoids in non-ambulant boys/men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A multicentric longitudinal study using the Performance of Upper Limb test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Marika; Fanelli, Lavinia; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Olivieri, Giorgia; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Scutifero, Marianna; Battini, Roberta; Petillo, Roberta; Frosini, Silvia; Sivo, Serena; Vita, Gian Luca; Bruno, Claudio; Mongini, Tiziana; Pegoraro, Elena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Gardani, Alice; Berardinelli, Angela; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Carlesi, Adelina; Viggiano, Emanuela; Cavallaro, Filippo; Sframeli, Maria; Bello, Luca; Barp, Andrea; Bianco, Flaviana; Bonfiglio, Serena; Rolle, Enrica; Palermo, Concetta; D'Angelo, Grazia; Pini, Antonella; Iotti, Elena; Gorni, Ksenija; Baranello, Giovanni; Bertini, Enrico; Politano, Luisa; Sormani, Maria Pia; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the possible effect of glucocorticoid treatment on upper limb function in a cohort of 91 non-ambulant DMD boys and adults of age between 11 and 26 years. All 91 were assessed using the Performance of Upper Limb test. Forty-eight were still on glucocorticoid after loss of ambulation, 25 stopped steroids at the time they lost ambulation and 18 were GC naïve or had steroids while ambulant for less than a year. At baseline the total scores ranged between 0 and 74 (mean 41.20). The mean total scores were 47.92 in the glucocorticoid group, 36 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and 30.5 in the naïve group (p < 0.001). The 12-month changes ranged between −20 and 4 (mean −4.4). The mean changes were −3.79 in the glucocorticoid group, −5.52 in those who stopped at loss of ambulation and −4.44 in the naïve group. This was more obvious in the patients between 12 and 18 years and at shoulder and elbow levels. Our findings suggest that continuing glucocorticoids throughout teenage years and adulthood after loss of ambulation appears to have a beneficial effect on upper limb function. PMID:26248957

  10. Necessities detected in patients derived to sanitary center in an ambulance of the urgent transport network after being treated by the 061 emergency team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sixto Cámara Anguita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The integral systems of urgencies and sanitary emergencies has, as resources for the urgent transport of patients, with nonwelfare ambulances, ambulances of basic life support and ambulances of advanced life support. In the two first, due to the ambiguity of the norm, the presence of a nurse to give care is not compulsory. Nevertheless, in the present study, it is detected that, the patients of this study, transferred in nonwelfare ambulance of the urgent transport network to a useful hospitable center with urgency character, once they have been attended by the 061 emergency team, presented/displayed a group of altered basic human necessities, medical levels of dependency as far as autonomy, nurse diagnoses, medical diagnoses, and necessities of pursuit of the restored evolution of the therapeutic technique and that cause the necessity of benefit of nursing care during this transfer.

  11. L’ambulantage : Représentations du commerce ambulant ou informel et métropolisation

    OpenAIRE

    MONNET, Jérôme

    2006-01-01

    Les représentations sociales font du commerce dit ambulant, informel ou de rue un ensemble flou d’activités liées à l’illégalité, à l’archaïsme et au sous-développement. En première partie, une cybergéographie de ces représentations présente les trois identifications dominantes de ce type de commerce et différencie des approches selon que l’on s’exprime en anglais ou en français et en espagnol. Cependant, elles ont en commun de marginaliser le commerce ambulant, et en particulier de ne pas co...

  12. Use of the emergency ambulance service to an inner city accident and emergency department--a comparison of general practitioner and '999' calls.

    OpenAIRE

    Pennycook, A. G.; Makower, R M; Morrison, W G

    1991-01-01

    Over a 2-week period a prospective study was undertaken of patients brought to an inner city accident and emergency department by the emergency ambulance service. Criteria for assessing the appropriateness of use of the emergency ambulance service are not well defined and at worst entirely subjective. The author's finding that, of patients attending after a '999' call, 49.8% were discharged with no follow-up suggests that many of these journeys represented inappropriate use of the emergency a...

  13. Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Claus D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance personnel and the core work force in Denmark. In addition, to examine the association between physical and psychosocial work environment factors and different measures of health among ambulance personnel. Methods Data were taken from a nationwide sample of ambulance personnel and fire fighters (n = 1,691 and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5% vs. 10%. Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%. The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional demands and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor that was associated with both poorer mental health and worse sleep quality. Conclusions Ambulance personnel have similar levels of mental health but substantially higher levels of musculoskeletal pain than the work force in general. They are more exposed to emotional demands and these demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal

  14. Emergency department visits, ambulance calls, and mortality associated with an exceptional heat wave in Sydney, Australia, 2011: a time-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffer Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From January 30-February 6, 2011, New South Wales was affected by an exceptional heat wave, which broke numerous records. Near real-time Emergency Department (ED and ambulance surveillance allowed rapid detection of an increase in the number of heat-related ED visits and ambulance calls during this period. The purpose of this study was to quantify the excess heat-related and all-cause ED visits and ambulance calls, and excess all-cause mortality, associated with the heat wave. Methods ED and ambulance data were obtained from surveillance and administrative databases, while mortality data were obtained from the state death registry. The observed counts were compared with the average counts from the same period from 2006/07 through 2009/10, and a Poisson regression model was constructed to calculate the number of excess ED visits, ambulance and deaths after adjusting for calendar and lag effects. Results During the heat wave there were 104 and 236 ED visits for heat effects and dehydration respectively, and 116 ambulance calls for heat exposure. From the regression model, all-cause ED visits increased by 2% (95% CI 1.01-1.03, all-cause ambulance calls increased by 14% (95% CI 1.11-1.16, and all-cause mortality increased by 13% (95% CI 1.06-1.22. Those aged 75 years and older had the highest excess rates of all outcomes. Conclusions The 2011 heat wave resulted in an increase in the number of ED visits and ambulance calls, especially in older persons, as well as an increase in all-cause mortality. Rapid surveillance systems provide markers of heat wave impacts that have fatal outcomes.

  15. Differences in police, ambulance, and emergency department reporting of traffic injuries on Karachi-Hala road, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagarde Emmanuel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research undertaken in developing countries has assessed discrepancies in police reporting of Road Traffic Injury (RTI for urban settings only. The objective of this study was to assess differences in RTI reporting across police, ambulance, and hospital Emergency Department (ED datasets on an interurban road section in Pakistan. Methods The study setting was the 196-km long Karachi-Hala road section. RTIs reported to the police, Edhi Ambulance Service (EAS, and five hospital EDs in Karachi during 2008 (Jan to Dec were compared in terms of road user involved (pedestrians, motorcyclists, four-wheeled vehicle occupants and outcome (died or injured. Further, records from these data were matched to assess ascertainment of traffic injuries and deaths by the three datasets. Results A total of 143 RTIs were reported to the police, 531 to EAS, and 661 to hospital EDs. Fatality per hundred traffic injuries was twice as high in police records (19 per 100 RTIs than in ambulance (10 per 100 RTIs and hospital ED records (9 per 100 RTIs. Pedestrian and motorcyclist involvement per hundred traffic injuries was lower in police records (8 per 100 RTIs than in ambulance (17 per 100 RTIs and hospital ED records (43 per 100 RTIs. Of the 119 deaths independently identified after matching, police recorded 22.6%, EAS 46.2%, and hospital ED 50.4%. Similarly, police data accounted for 10.6%, EAS 43.5%, and hospital ED 54.9% of the 1 095 independently identified injured patients. Conclusions Police reporting, particularly of non-fatal RTIs and those involving vulnerable road users, should be improved in Pakistan.

  16. North Star Ambulatory Assessment, 6-minute walk test and timed items in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena; Martinelli, Diego; Berardinelli, Angela; Messina, Sonia; D'Amico, Adele; Vasco, Gessica; Main, Marion; Doglio, Luca; Politano, Luisa; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Carlesi, Adelina; Bonetti, Anna Maria; Zucchini, Elisabetta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Scutifero, Marianna; Bianco, Flaviana; Rossi, Francesca; Motta, Maria Chiara; Sacco, Annalisa; Donati, Maria Alice; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Pane, Marika; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Bruno, Claudio; Vita, Giuseppe; de Waure, Chiara; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2010-11-01

    The North Star Ambulatory Assessment is a functional scale specifically designed for ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Recently the 6-minute walk test has also been used as an outcome measure in trials in DMD. The aim of our study was to assess a large cohort of ambulant boys affected by DMD using both North Star Assessment and 6-minute walk test. More specifically, we wished to establish the spectrum of findings for each measure and their correlation. This is a prospective multicentric study involving 10 centers. The cohort included 112 ambulant DMD boys of age ranging between 4.10 and 17 years (mean 8.18±2.3 DS). Ninety-one of the 112 were on steroids: 37/91 on intermittent and 54/91 on daily regimen. The scores on the North Star assessment ranged from 6/34 to 34/34. The distance on the 6-minute walk test ranged from 127 to 560.6 m. The time to walk 10 m was between 3 and 15 s. The time to rise from the floor ranged from 1 to 27.5 s. Some patients were unable to rise from the floor. As expected the results changed with age and were overall better in children treated with daily steroids. The North Star assessment had a moderate to good correlation with 6-minute walk test and with timed rising from floor but less with 10 m timed walk/run test. The 6-minute walk test in contrast had better correlation with 10 m timed walk/run test than with timed rising from floor. These findings suggest that a combination of these outcome measures can be effectively used in ambulant DMD boys and will provide information on different aspects of motor function, that may not be captured using a single measure. PMID:20634072

  17. Does a waist-worn ActiGraph accelerometer quantify community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob J. Sosnoff, PhD; Michael J. Socie, MS; Morgan K. Boes, MS; Brian M. Sandroff, MS; Robert W. Motl, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometry has been recognized as a method of objectively measuring community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the assumption that walking itself serves as a major contributor to the accelerometer signal has yet to be tested. This study examined the assumption that community-based walking is a primary contributor to accelerometer output in MS. Ambulatory persons (5 males/17 females; 13 without aid/9 with aid) with MS wore a triaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X...

  18. Post-dural Puncture Headache in the Obstetric Patient: Needle Size, Number of Dural Puncture and Timing of Ambulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Rasooli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This prospective study compared the incidence of post-dural puncture headache (PDPH in obstetric patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for caesarean section from April 2012 to April 2013 in one year. We also evaluated the relationship between needle size, number of dural punctures, timing of ambulation and PDPH after cesarean section. Materials and Methods: A total of 319 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II full term pregnant women, scheduled for caesarean section under spinal anesthesia from April 2012 to April 2013 were evaluated. Spinal anesthesia was performed with hyperbaric bupivacaine plus fentanyl 10 μg, from L3-4 intervertebral space. We recorded the number of attempts for spinal anesthesia, and the timing of ambulation. Each patient was monitored every day for 4 days following caesarean section. Frequency and severity of PDPH were recorded. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: Needles used were 25G Quincke spinal needle in 243 patients (76.2% and 27G Quincke spinal needle in 76 patients (21.9%. Of 319 patients, there were 315 (95.6 % in the late ambulation group and 14 (4.4% in the 6 hour bed rest group. In this study only one patient had the classic symptoms of PDPH, whose spinal block were performed with 25G Quincke spinal needle by residents with more than 2 attempts of lumbar puncture (LP. Severe PDPH was not observed in 27G Quincke group. Conclusion: Although our study was performed in a teaching hospital with more residents of anesthesia attempting the procedure, the incidence of PDPH was lower in this study as compared to other studies. This study also concluded that needle size and early ambulation may have some effect on the incidence and characteristics of PDPH.

  19. 6-Minuten-Gehtest bei Patienten mit ambulant erworbener Pneumonie : Belastungsuntersuchung bei der Diagnosestellung und im Verlauf

    OpenAIRE

    Zuber, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Über 6 Wochen erfolgte die Begleitung von 23 Patienten im Verlauf der Rekonvaleszenz nach einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie. An vier Zeitpunkten (Diagnosestellung, Entlassung, Ende der Arbeitsunfähigkeit, 6 Wochen nach Diagnosestellung) wurden durch 6-Minuten-Gehtest, Lungenfunktion und Blutgasanalyse die körperlichen Einschränkungen objektiv beurteilt, in der Selbstbeurteilung per St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire die subjektiven Beschwerden erfasst. Bei Abschluss der Unter...

  20. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel K; Herr, Hugh; Weber, Jeff; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can provide active mechanical power during the stance period of walking. The basic architecture of the prosthesis is a unidirectional spring, configured in parallel with a force-controllable actuator with series elasticity. With this architecture, the anklefoot prosthesis matches the size and weight of the human ankle, and is also capable of delivering high mechanical power and torque observed in normal human walking. We also propose a biomimetic control scheme that allows the prosthesis to mimic the normal human ankle behavior during walking. To evaluate the performance of the prosthesis, we measured the rate of oxygen consumption of three unilateral transtibial amputees walking at self-selected speeds to estimate the metabolic walking economy. We find that the powered prosthesis improves amputee metabolic economy from 7% to 20% compared to the conventional passive-elastic prostheses (Flex-Foot Ceterus and Freedom Innovations Sierra), even though the powered system is twofold heavier than the conventional devices. This result highlights the benefit of performing net positive work at the ankle joint to amputee ambulation and also suggests a new direction for further advancement of an ankle-foot prosthesis. PMID:18002631

  1. Resource planning for ambulance services in mass casualty incidents: a DES-based policy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Marion S; Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela M; Niessner, Helmut

    2012-09-01

    Due to an increasing number of mass casualty incidents, which are generally complex and unique in nature, we suggest that decision makers consider operations research-based policy models to help prepare emergency staff for improved planning and scheduling at the emergency site. We thus develop a discrete-event simulation policy model, which is currently being applied by disaster-responsive ambulance services in Austria. By evaluating realistic scenarios, our policy model is shown to enhance the scheduling and outcomes at operative and online levels. The proposed scenarios range from small, simple, and urban to rather large, complex, remote mass casualty emergencies. Furthermore, the organization of an advanced medical post can be improved on a strategic level to increase rescue quality, including enhanced survival of injured victims. In particular, we consider a realistic mass casualty incident at a brewery relative to other exemplary disasters. Based on a variety of such situations, we derive general policy implications at both the macro (e.g., strategic rescue policy) and micro (e.g., operative and online scheduling strategies at the emergency site) levels. PMID:22653522

  2. Treadmill measures of ambulation rates in ovine models of spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safayi, S; Miller, J W; Wilson, S; Shivapour, S K; Oelfke, T F; Ford, A L; Klarmann Staudt, A; Abode-Iyamah, K; Reddy, C G; Jeffery, N D; Fredericks, D C; Gillies, G T; Howard, M A

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratories are developing treadmill-based gait analysis employing sheep to investigate potential efficacy of intra-dural spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain. As part of efforts to establish the performance characteristics of the experimental arrangement, this study measured the treadmill speed via a tachometer, video belt-marker timing and ambulation-rate observations of the sheep. The data reveal a 0.1-0.3% residual drift in the baseline (unloaded) treadmill speed which increases with loading, but all three approaches agree on final speed to within 1.7%, at belt speeds of ≈ 4 km/h. Using the tachometer as the standard, the estimated upper limit on uncertainty in the video belt-marker approach is ± 0.18 km h(-1) and the measured uncertainty is ± 0.15 km h(-1). Employment of the latter method in determining timing differences between contralateral hoof strikes by the sheep suggests its utility in assessing severity of SCI and responses to therapeutic interventions. PMID:26785329

  3. Ambulation During Periods of Supersaturation Increase Decompression Stress in Spacewalk Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Martina, S. D.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation (nucleation) and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation are likely critical to the net effect. Understanding the relationships is important to evaluate exercise prebreathe protocols and quantify decompression risk in gravity and microgravity environments. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a low pressure (4.3 psia; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) simulation exposure of non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. One protocol included both upright cycling and non-cycling exercise (CEVIS: 'cycle ergometer vibration isolation system') and one protocol relied on non-cycling exercise only (ISLE: 'in-suit light exercise'). CEVIS trial data serve as control data for the current study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise in 1G environments on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS.

  4. Long term natural history data in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: 36-month changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Pane

    Full Text Available The 6 minute walk test has been recently chosen as the primary outcome measure in international multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy ambulant patients. The aim of the study was to assess the spectrum of changes at 3 years in the individual measures, their correlation with steroid treatment, age and 6 minute walk test values at baseline. Ninety-six patients from 11 centers were assessed at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after baseline using the 6 minute walk test and the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. Three boys (3% lost the ability to perform the 6 minute walk test within 12 months, another 13 between 12 and 24 months (14% and 11 between 24 and 36 months (12%. The 6 minute walk test showed an average overall decline of -15.8 (SD 77.3 m at 12 months, of -58.9 (SD 125.7 m at 24 months and -104.22 (SD 146.2 m at 36 months. The changes were significantly different in the two baseline age groups and according to the baseline 6 minute walk test values (below and above 350 m (p<0.001. The changes were also significantly different according to steroid treatment (p = 0.01. Similar findings were found for the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. These are the first 36 month longitudinal data using the 6 minute walk test and North Star Ambulatory Assessment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our findings will help not only to have a better idea of the progression of the disorder but also provide reference data that can be used to compare with the results of the long term extension studies that are becoming available.

  5. Long term natural history data in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: 36-month changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Marika; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Sivo, Serena; Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; D'Amico, Adele; Carlesi, Adelina; Vita, Gianluca; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Torrente, Yvan; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Viggiano, Emanuela; D Ambrosio, Paola; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Barp, Andrea; Bonfiglio, Serena; Scalise, Roberta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Graziano, Alessandra; Magri, Francesca; Palermo, Concetta; Rossi, Francesca; Donati, Maria Alice; Sacchini, Michele; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Previtali, Stefano; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The 6 minute walk test has been recently chosen as the primary outcome measure in international multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy ambulant patients. The aim of the study was to assess the spectrum of changes at 3 years in the individual measures, their correlation with steroid treatment, age and 6 minute walk test values at baseline. Ninety-six patients from 11 centers were assessed at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after baseline using the 6 minute walk test and the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. Three boys (3%) lost the ability to perform the 6 minute walk test within 12 months, another 13 between 12 and 24 months (14%) and 11 between 24 and 36 months (12%). The 6 minute walk test showed an average overall decline of -15.8 (SD 77.3) m at 12 months, of -58.9 (SD 125.7) m at 24 months and -104.22 (SD 146.2) m at 36 months. The changes were significantly different in the two baseline age groups and according to the baseline 6 minute walk test values (below and above 350 m) (p<0.001). The changes were also significantly different according to steroid treatment (p = 0.01). Similar findings were found for the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. These are the first 36 month longitudinal data using the 6 minute walk test and North Star Ambulatory Assessment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our findings will help not only to have a better idea of the progression of the disorder but also provide reference data that can be used to compare with the results of the long term extension studies that are becoming available. PMID:25271887

  6. Cross-cultural validation of the Italian version of the Cumulated Ambulation Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, Elisa; Verzellotti, Simone; Grassi, Federico A; Ferriero, Giorgio; Kristensen, Morten T; Cisari, Carlo; Invernizzi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly patients, and walking impairment is a frequent complication. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a validated functional scale used to monitor easily three basic mobility activities in patients with hip fracture. The aim of this study was to translate, cross-cultural adapt, and validate the CAS in the Italian language (CAS-I). The translation was carried out according to recommended guidelines. The final version of the CAS-I was administered to 80 geriatric patients with hip fracture admitted to a Traumatology Unit, and allowed full weight-bearing after treatment with hemiarthroplasty. Two raters evaluated each patient 2 days after surgery and then after 3 months. Statistical methods included Cronbach's α coefficient for the scale's internal consistency; the total agreement; and the κ coefficient for the inter-rater reliability. The concurrent validity of the scale was determined by comparing the total CAS-I (0-6 points) with the Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living score (0-4 points). Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the CAS, evaluated with Cronbach's α and κ, respectively, were above 0.84 and 0.94. The SE of measurement for the total CAS-I (0-6 points) 2 days and 3 months after surgery were 0.03 and 0.13 points, respectively. The CAS-I showed a significant correlation with the first four items of the Activities of Daily Living score scale (r≥0.85, P<0.001). This study confirms the validity of the CAS-I for patients with a hemiarthroplasty after hip fracture and provides additional evidence of the psychometric properties of the scale. We suggest that the official CAS-I version be used in other settings to evaluate the basic mobility in patients with hip fracture. PMID:27028288

  7. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Implementation and Extension of Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Designated Geographic Locations and Lifting of the Temporary Moratoria on Enrollment of Part B Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers in All Geographic Locations. Extension, implementation, and lifting of temporary moratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This document announces the extension of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare home health agencies (HHAs), subunits, and branch locations in specific locations within designated metropolitan areas in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to prevent and combat fraud, waste, and abuse. It also announces the implementation of temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new Medicare Part B non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers and Medicare HHAs, subunits, and branch locations in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey on a statewide basis. In addition, it announces the lifting of the moratoria on all Part B emergency ground ambulance suppliers. These moratoria, and the changes described in this document, also apply to the enrollment of HHAs and non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. PMID:27487581

  8. Response times of ambulances to calls from Midwife Obstetric Units of the Peninsula Maternal and Neonatal Service (PMNS in Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Response times of ambulances to calls from Midwife Obstetric Units, although varied, are perceived as slow. Delays in transporting women experiencing complications during or after their pregnancies to higher levels of care may have negative consequences such as fetal, neonatal or maternal morbidity or death. An exploratory descriptive study was undertaken to investigate the response times of ambulances of the Western Cape Emergency Medical Services to calls from midwife obstetric units (MOUs in the Peninsula Maternal and Neonatal Services (PMNS in Cape Town. Response times were calculated from data collected in specific MOUs using a specifically developed instrument. Recorded data included time of call placed requesting transfer, diagnosis or reason for transfer, priority of call and the time of arrival of ambulance to the requesting facility. Mean, median and range of response times, in minutes, to various MOUs and priorities of calls were calculated. These were then compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A comparison was then made between the recorded and analysed response times to national norms and recommendations for ambulance response times and maternal transfer response times respectively.A wide range of response times was noted for the whole sample. Median response times across all priorities of calls and to all MOUs in sample fell short of national norms and recommendations. No statistical differences were noted between various priorities of calls and MOUs.The perception of delayed response times of ambulances to MOUs in the PMNS was confirmed in this pilot study.

  9. Otimização da localização das bases de ambulâncias e do dimensionamento das suas regiões de cobertura em rodovias Optimizing the location of ambulance bases and the districting of their covering regions on highways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Iannoni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo combinamos extensões do modelo hipercubo de filas com algoritmos genéticos para otimizar a configuração e operação de sistemas médicos emergenciais em rodovias. Inicialmente apresentamos um método para localizar as bases de ambulâncias ao longo da rodovia, de forma a otimizar as principais medidas de desempenho do sistema. Em seguida estendemos a abordagem para apoiar duas decisões combinadas: a localização das bases de ambulâncias e o dimensionamento das regiões de cobertura de cada base na rodovia. Por exemplo, a abordagem permite determinar os locais para posicionar as bases de ambulâncias e dimensionar os tamanhos das suas áreas de atuação, tais que minimizem o tempo médio de resposta aos usuários e/ou o desbalanceamento das cargas de trabalho das ambulâncias do sistema. Para ilustrar a aplicação dos métodos propostos, analisamos os resultados de dois estudos de caso em rodovias brasileiras.In this paper we combine extensions of the hypercube queueing model with genetic algorithms to optimize the configuration and operation of emergency medical systems on highways. Initially we present a method to locate the ambulance bases along the highway so that the main system performance measures are optimized. Then we extend the approach to support combined decisions: the location of ambulance bases and the districting of the covering regions of each base on the highway. For instance, the approach can search for locals to place the ambulance bases and determine the sizes of their operation areas, such that the mean user response time and/or the ambulance workload imbalance are minimized. To illustrate the application of the proposed methods, we analyze the results of two case studies of Brazilian highways.

  10. Feasibility of AmbulanCe-Based Telemedicine (FACT study: safety, feasibility and reliability of third generation in-ambulance telemedicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Yperzeele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telemedicine is currently mainly applied as an in-hospital service, but this technology also holds potential to improve emergency care in the prehospital arena. We report on the safety, feasibility and reliability of in-ambulance teleconsultation using a telemedicine system of the third generation. METHODS: A routine ambulance was equipped with a system for real-time bidirectional audio-video communication, automated transmission of vital parameters, glycemia and electronic patient identification. All patients ( ≥ 18 years transported during emergency missions by a Prehospital Intervention Team of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel were eligible for inclusion. To guarantee mobility and to facilitate 24/7 availability, the teleconsultants used lightweight laptop computers to access a dedicated telemedicine platform, which also provided functionalities for neurological assessment, electronic reporting and prehospital notification of the in-hospital team. Key registrations included any safety issue, mobile connectivity, communication of patient information, audiovisual quality, user-friendliness and accuracy of the prehospital diagnosis. RESULTS: Prehospital teleconsultation was obtained in 41 out of 43 cases (95.3%. The success rates for communication of blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, glycemia, and electronic patient identification were 78.7%, 84.8%, 80.6%, 64.0%, and 84.2%. A preliminary prehospital diagnosis was formulated in 90.2%, with satisfactory agreement with final in-hospital diagnoses. Communication of a prehospital report to the in-hospital team was successful in 94.7% and prenotification of the in-hospital team via SMS in 90.2%. Failures resulted mainly from limited mobile connectivity and to a lesser extent from software, hardware or human error. The user acceptance was high. CONCLUSIONS: Ambulance-based telemedicine of the third generation is safe, feasible and reliable but further research and

  11. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  12. Characterization of Artifacts Produced by Gel Displacement on Non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces during Ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Álvaro; Salazar-Varas, Rocio; Úbeda, Andrés; Azorín, José M

    2016-01-01

    So far, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) have been mainly used to study brain potentials during movement-free conditions. Recently, due to the emerging concern of improving rehabilitation therapies, these systems are also being used during gait experiments. Under this new condition, the evaluation of motion artifacts has become a critical point to assure the validity of the results obtained. Due to the high signal to noise ratio provided, the use of wet electrodes is a widely accepted technic to acquire electroencephalographic (EEG signals). To perform these recordings it is necessary to apply a conductive gel between the scalp and the electrodes. This work is focused on the study of gel displacements produced during ambulation and how they affect the amplitude of EEG signals. Data recorded during three ambulation conditions (gait training) and one movement-free condition (BMI motor imagery task) are compared to perform this study. Two phenomenons, manifested as unusual increases of the signals' amplitude, have been identified and characterized during this work. Results suggest that they are caused by abrupt changes on the conductivity between the electrode and the scalp due to gel displacement produced during ambulation and head movements. These artifacts significantly increase the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of EEG recordings at all frequencies from 5 to 90 Hz, corresponding to the main bandwidth of electrocortical potentials. They should be taken into consideration before performing EEG recordings in order to asses the correct gel allocation and to avoid the use of electrodes on certain scalp areas depending on the experimental conditions. PMID:26941601

  13. Model application for rapid detection of the exact location when calling an ambulance using OGC Open GeoSMS Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukic, Enes; Stoimenov, Leonid

    2016-02-01

    The web has penetrated just about every sphere of human interest and using information from the web has become ubiquitous among different categories of users. Medicine has long being using the benefits of modern technologies and without them it cannot function. This paper offers a proposal of use and mutual collaboration of several modern technologies within facilitating the location and communication between persons in need of emergency medical assistance and the emergency head offices, i.e., the ambulance. The main advantage of the proposed model is the technical possibility of implementation and use of these technologies in developing countries and low implementation cost.

  14. Indications and results of the unilateral /sup 123/I-hippurate-clearance in an ambulant urological-nephrological patients collective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariss, P.; Haubold, E.

    1988-02-01

    In 572 nephrological-urological ambulant patients 688 estimations of unilateral renal plasma flow were performed after application of 300 kBq/kg /sup 123/I-hippurate using a large field scintillation camera, external scintillation probe over the right shoulder and a computer system. The indications were patients with hypertension, chronic pyelonephritis, unilateral nephrocirrhosis, exclusion or approval of renal failure, furthermore diverse malformations of the urovesical system, nephrolithiasis and follow-up after urological operations. The unilateral renal clearance by /sup 123/I-hippurate represents an important diagnostic tool in urological-nephrological patients with special diseases in addition to morphological and microbiological methods.

  15. Indications and results of the unilateral 123I-hippurate-clearance in an ambulant urological-nephrological patients collective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 572 nephrological-urological ambulant patients 688 estimations of unilateral renal plasma flow were performed after application of 300 kBq/kg 123I-hippurate using a large field scintillation camera, external scintillation probe over the right shoulder and a computer system. The indications were patients with hypertension, chronic pyelonephritis, unilateral nephrocirrhosis, exclusion or approval of renal failure, furthermore diverse malformations of the urovesical system, nephrolithiasis and follow-up after urological operations. The unilateral renal clearance by 123I-hippurate represents an important diagnostic tool in urological-nephrological patients with special diseases in addition to morphological and microbiological methods. (orig.)

  16. Improvement in the pre-hospital care of recreational drug users through the development of club specific ambulance referral guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Kim

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously developed 'club guidelines' developed for club owners and promoters have tended to focus more on the legislative aspects of clubs, rather than the medical management of unwell clubbers within club environments. Despite this lack of guidance on the management of unwell clubbers, a significant proportion of clubs have 'club medic' rooms for managing these individuals. However, due to the lack of specific guidance on the training of staff working in these rooms and guidelines on when an ambulance should be called for an unwell clubber, there have been instances previously where clubbers have been inappropriately managed within the club environment, and often referred to hospital only after significant physiological derangement has occurred, thereby leading to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Methods We identified owners and promoters of local club venues within the catchment area of our Emergency Department and working jointly with them and other key stakeholders, in particular the London Ambulance Service and Metropolitan Police, identified strategies to improve pre-hospital care for clubbers who become unwell as a result of recreational drug use. These included developing guidelines detailing indications for ambulance transfer to hospital for clubbers with recreational drug toxicity and the training of club medic staff to use the guidelines Results Following the initial development of a pilot set of guidelines, an audit of their use identified training needed relating to the assessment of unwell clubbers with recreational drug toxicity and revisions required to the pilot version of the guidelines. After training related to the revised guidelines, all the club medic staff were confident in their ability to assess unwell clubbers with recreational drug toxicity, the use of the guidelines and also when to call an ambulance. Conclusion Working with key stakeholders in the local community, we have developed

  17. Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D; Rasmussen, Kurt; Kyed, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal problems and the presence of positive organizational support mechanisms that can prevent negative effects from the high levels of emotional......,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of...... poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5 % vs. 10 %). Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%). The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional...

  18. Integration between the tele-cardiology unit and the central laboratory: methodological and clinical evaluation of point-of-care testing cardiac marker in the ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Serio, Francesca; Lovero, Roberto; Leone, Massimo; De Sario, Rosalia; Ruggieri, Vincenzo; Varraso, Lucia; Pansini, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify patients with myocardial necrosis in pre-hospital phase during transport by ambulance, without ST-segment elevation (NSTE) on the ambulance ECG. The analytical performance of the i-STAT troponin I (cTnI) method was assessed. A total of 53 NSTE ambulance ECG patients admitted to hospital were followed. The ambulance had experimental software able to receive data from the i-STAT device and transmit it to a protected address and server. cTnI mean values from 2.0 to 34 microg/L showed a total CV of 3.0-5.6%. The detection limit was 0.016 microg/L. A mean cTnI concentration of 0.09 microg/L was associated with a CV of 8.0% (decision limit). The i-STAT cTnI method was linear for concentrations from 0 to 35 microg/L. There was no effect (p0.09 microg/L in 20 AMI patients (91%). The median ambulance turnaround time (TAT) was 12 min and median hospital TAT was 40 min, a difference of 28 min. The high sensitivity of the i-STAT cTnI method integrated with tele-medicine procedures could play an important role in the management of acute coronary syndrome patients related to the pre-hospital phase (early diagnosis and treatment in the ambulance). These approaches may allow improvements in patient outcomes and continuous monitoring of the POCT network in the central laboratory, thus meeting quality requirements. PMID:16729867

  19. Does a waist-worn ActiGraph accelerometer quantify community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J. Sosnoff, PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometry has been recognized as a method of objectively measuring community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS. However, the assumption that walking itself serves as a major contributor to the accelerometer signal has yet to be tested. This study examined the assumption that community-based walking is a primary contributor to accelerometer output in MS. Ambulatory persons (5 males/17 females; 13 without aid/9 with aid with MS wore a triaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, Health One Technologies; Fort Walton Beach, Florida as well as an IDEEA system (MiniSun, Inc; Fresno, Florida over the course of a single day. Outcome measures for the accelerometer included movement counts/hour for the vertical, anterior-posterior, and mediolateral axes. Outcomes for the IDEEA system included percent time walking, sitting, and standing, as well as walking speed. Pearson product correlations (r were used to examine the associations between outcomes from the accelerometer and IDEEA system. Significant correlations were observed between percent walking time and movement counts/hour along the vertical (r = 0.84 and anterior-posterior (r = 0.69 axes. Significant correlations were further noted between movement counts/hour along the vertical axis and walking speed (r = 0.45 and self-report walking impairment (r = −0.50 and disability (r = −0.46. Such observations further support accelerometry as an objective marker of community ambulation in persons with MS.

  20. Living in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of Critical Incidents (CIs) on the lives of ambulance personnel. One-to-one interviews were conducted with 27 participants who had experienced CIs during the previous 12 months in order to: assess the nature and impact of CIs on health and well-being; examine attitudes toward support services; and explore barriers to service use. The results showed that incidents involving children, suicides, and grotesque mutilation were the most distressing. Participants reported a wide range of physical and mental health problems including sleep difficulties, angry outbursts, irrationality and feelings of alienation. Key themes included: low support service uptake due to fears relating to confidentiality and machismo; a perceived lack of concern and support from management; and a need for professional counselling and stress awareness training. Emergency Medical Controllers (EMCs) also reported a number of difficulties unique to their role. The findings suggest that exposure to CIs has a significant impact on health and well-being; this has important implications for recognizing and appropriately addressing the health and training needs of ambulance personnel, including the effective management of Critical Incident Stress.

  1. Minimally Invasive Posterior Stabilization Improved Ambulation and Pain Scores in Patients with Plasmacytomas and/or Metastases of the Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Schwab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of spine metastasis is expected to increase as the population ages, and so is the number of palliative spinal procedures. Minimally invasive procedures are attractive options in that they offer the theoretical advantage of less morbidity. Purpose. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation provided significant pain relief and improved function. Study Design. We compared pre- and postoperative pain scores as well as ambulatory status in a population of patients suffering from oncologic conditions in the spine. Patient Sample. A consecutive series of patients with spine tumors treated minimally invasively with stabilization were reviewed. Outcome Measures. Visual analog pain scale as well as pre- and postoperative ambulatory status were used as outcome measures. Methods. Twenty-four patients who underwent minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation for metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. Results. Seven (29% patients were unable to ambulate secondary to pain and instability prior to surgery. All patients were ambulating within 2 to 3 days after having surgery (=0.01. The mean visual analog scale value for the preoperative patients was 2.8, and the mean postoperative value was 1.0 (=0.001. Conclusion. Minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation significantly improved pain and ambulatory status in this series.

  2. Pre-hospital assessment by a single responder: The Swedish ambulance nurse in a new role: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Carl; Källenius, Christofer; Knutsson, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Axelsson, Christer

    2016-05-01

    When a person with vague symptoms calls 112, the dispatchers often have difficulty prioritising the severity of the call. Their only alternative has been to send an ambulance. In Gothenburg, Sweden, a nurse-manned single responder (SR) was initiated to assess this patient group. The study aims to describe patient characteristics and assessment level made by the SR nurse among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority and/or vague symptoms. A consecutive journal review was conducted. During six months, 529 patients were assessed; 329 (62%) attended the emergency department (ED) or inpatient care (IC). Of these, 85 patients (26%) were assessed as high priority. Only 108 were assessed as being in need of ambulance transport. ED/IC patients were significantly older. Two hundred (38%) stayed at the scene (SS) (n = 142) or were referred to primary care (PC) (n = 58). Of the 200 SS/PC patients, 38 (19%) attended the ED within 72 hrs with residual symptoms, 20 of whom were admitted to a ward. Nine patients (4% of 200 SS/PC patients) required inpatient treatment and 11 patients stayed overnight for observation. These results suggest a relatively high level of patient safety and the usefulness of an SR among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority. PMID:26472522

  3. Partial and full PTSD in Brazilian ambulance workers: prevalence and impact on health and on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, William; Figueira, Ivan; Maurat, Ana Maria; Bucassio, Erika P; Vieira, Isabela; Jardim, Sílvia R; Coutinho, Evandro S F; Mari, Jair J; Mendlowicz, Mauro V

    2007-08-01

    A cross-sectional survey for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was conducted with 234 Brazilian ambulance workers (180 men and 54 women) using a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Short Form Health Survey-36. Current prevalence rates for full and partial PTSD were 5.6% (men = 6.7%, women = 1.9%) and 15% (men = 13.3%, women = 20.4%), respectively. Male workers with full PTSD were more likely to be nonmarried (75% vs. 43%) and those with partial PTSD reported more emotional problems (65.2% vs. 30%) and medical visits (67% vs. 44%) than the controls. Workers with PTSD showed impairment in the physical and mental domains of the SF-36, whereas workers with partial PTSD had only the later compromised. The characteristics and the level of exposure to trauma of the study population may account for the low prevalence of PTSD. PMID:17721969

  4. The NSW Ambulance Service healthy lifestyle program--a case study in the evaluation of a health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomel, M; Oldenburg, B

    1990-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to reduce Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk in the community, including programs based in the workplace. To date, it has been difficult to draw accurate conclusions on the effectiveness of worksite CVD risk reduction programs. Typically, such programs suffer from poor participation and high attrition rates and most lack physical and biochemical validation of self-reported lifestyle changes. The present paper describes an evaluation of four health promotion worksite interventions (screening, education, incentive and lifestyle change) conducted in the NSW Ambulance Service. The study achieved very high participation and low attrition rates. Self-reported changes in lifestyle were validated with physical and biochemical measures. The results suggest greater change in some risk factors for those individuals receiving the incentive and lifestyle change programs compared to screening alone or education. PMID:10109119

  5. Field testing of a remote controlled robotic tele-echo system in an ambulance using broadband mobile communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Harada, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kohji; Ota, Gen-ichiro; Yokoi, Masaki; Teramura, Nobuyasu; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2008-06-01

    We report the testing of a mobile Robotic Tele-echo system that was placed in an ambulance and successfully transmitted clear real time echo imaging of a patient's abdomen to the destination hospital from where this device was being remotely operated. Two-way communication between the paramedics in this vehicle and a doctor standing by at the hospital was undertaken. The robot was equipped with an ultrasound probe which was remotely controlled by the clinician at the hospital and ultrasound images of the patient were transmitted wirelessly. The quality of the ultrasound images that were transmitted over the public mobile telephone networks and those transmitted over the Multimedia Wireless Access Network (a private networks) were compared. The transmission rate over the public networks and the private networks was approximately 256 Kbps, 3 Mbps respectively. Our results indicate that ultrasound images of far higher definition could be obtained through the private networks. PMID:18444361

  6. Has increased nursing competence in the ambulance services impacted on pre-hospital assessment and interventions in severe traumatic brain-injured patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Alm, Annika; Lindström, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Objective Trauma is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in modern society, and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are the single leading cause of mortality among young adults. Pre-hospital acute care management has developed during recent years and guidelines have shown positive effects on the pre-hospital treatment and outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. However, reports of impacts on improved nursing competence in the ambulance services are scarce. Ther...

  7. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  8. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, pollen and ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, ...

  9. Pilot Field Test: The Ability to Ambulate After Landing as Assessed with Seat Egress, Walk, and Obstacle Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E. A.; Fomina, E. V.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Gadd, N. E.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These changes lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial reintroduction to a gravitational environment. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the components involved in postflight ataxia. Full functional recovery has not been sufficiently investigated for long-duration crewmembers. The joint U.S./Russian Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment (a pre-cursor to Field Test (FT)) was developed to address this gap in knowledge. The PFT was conducted on crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S and was comprised of several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing and for several days thereafter. Closing this gap will allow us to characterize the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks that they will be expected to perform after an unassisted landing following 6 to 12 months in microgravity. The Seat Egress, Walk and Obstacle (SEWO) Test will be discussed in this poster.

  10. Air Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  11. A Movement Monitor Based on Magneto-Inertial Sensors for Non-Ambulant Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study in Controlled Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraux, Amélie; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Dorveaux, Eric; Gasnier, Erwan; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Voit, Thomas; Vissière, David; Servais, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of muscle strength and activity of upper limbs of non-ambulant patients with neuromuscular diseases is a major challenge. ActiMyo® is an innovative device that uses magneto-inertial sensors to record angular velocities and linear accelerations that can be used over long periods of time in the home environment. The device was designed to insure long-term stability and good signal to noise ratio, even for very weak movements. In order to determine relevant and pertinent clinical variables with potential for use as outcome measures in clinical trials or to guide therapy decisions, we performed a pilot study in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients. We report here data from seven Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients (mean age 18.5 ± 5.5 years) collected in a clinical setting. Patients were assessed while wearing the device during performance of validated tasks (MoviPlate, Box and Block test and Minnesota test) and tasks mimicking daily living. The ActiMyo® sensors were placed on the wrists during all the tests. Software designed for use with the device computed several variables to qualify and quantify muscular activity in the non-ambulant subjects. Four variables representative of upper limb activity were studied: the rotation rate, the ratio of the vertical component in the overall acceleration, the hand elevation rate, and an estimate of the power of the upper limb. The correlations between clinical data and physical activity and the ActiMyo® movement parameters were analyzed. The mean of the rotation rate and mean of the elevation rate appeared promising since these variables had the best reliability scores and correlations with task scores. Parameters could be computed even in a patient with a Brooke functional score of 6. The variables chosen are good candidates as potential outcome measures in non-ambulant patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and use of the ActiMyo® is currently being explored in home environment. Trial Registration

  12. Physician presence in an ambulance car is associated with increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Hagihara

    Full Text Available The presence of a physician seems to be beneficial for pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the effectiveness of a physician's presence during CPR before hospital arrival has not been established. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between 2005 and 2010 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and short- and long-term survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Specifically, a full non-parsimonious logistic regression model was fitted with the physician presence in the ambulance as the dependent variable; the independent variables included all study variables except for endpoint variables plus dummy variables for the 47 prefectures in Japan (i.e., 46 variables. In total, 619,928 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Among propensity-matched patients, a positive association was observed between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (ROSC: OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63-2.07, p = 0.00 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; 1-month survival: OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.02 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; cerebral performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.29, p = 0.04 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; and overall performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.01-2.24, p = 0.05 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates. A prospective observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests shows that a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride was independently associated with

  13. Pilates based core stability training in ambulant individuals with multiple sclerosis: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS frequently experience balance and mobility impairments, including reduced trunk stability. Pilates-based core stability training, which is aimed at improving control of the body's stabilising muscles, is popular as a form of exercise with people with MS and therapists. A replicated single case series study facilitated by the Therapists in MS Group in the United Kingdom (UK provides preliminary evidence that this approach can improve balance and mobility in ambulant people with MS; further evidence is needed to substantiate these findings to ensure that limited time, energy, finances and resources are used to best effect. This study builds upon the pilot work undertaken in the case series study by implementing a powered randomised controlled study, with the aims of: 1 Establishing the effectiveness of core stability training 2 Comparing core stability training with standardised physiotherapy exercise 3 Exploring underlying mechanisms of change associated with this intervention Methods This is a multi-centre, double blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Eligible participants will be recruited from 4 UK centres. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Pilates based core stability training, standardised physiotherapy exercise or contract-relax relaxation sessions (placebo control. All will receive face to face training sessions over a 12 week period; together with a 15 minute daily home programme. All will be assessed by a blinded assessor before training, at the end of the 12 week programme and at 4 week follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the 10 metre timed walk. Secondary outcome measures are the MS walking Scale (MSWS-12, the Functional Reach (forwards and lateral, a 10 point Numerical Rating Scale to determine "Difficulty in carrying a drink when walking", and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale. In addition, ultrasound imaging of the

  14. Préambule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Grimaud

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Courses à la virtuosité Nombreuses sont les pratiques qui ont généré, parfois en leur cœur et souvent en leurs marges, des programmes acrobatiques. Ces programmes ont généralement des finalités comparables. Il s’agit d’apprécier et d’évaluer l’excellence technique, d’explorer plus ou moins librement les possibilités d’un instrument ou de mettre à l’épreuve ses limites. De la musique à la jonglerie, de la prestidigitation à la voltige aérienne ou encore à la cascade à moto, rares sont les arts...

  15. Evaluation of the effects of botulinum toxin A injections when used to improve ease of care and comfort in children with cerebral palsy whom are non-ambulant: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Thorley Megan; Donaghey Samantha; Edwards Priya; Copeland Lisa; Kentish Megan; McLennan Kim; Lindsley Jayne; Gascoigne-Pees Laura; Sakzewski Leanne; Boyd Roslyn N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP) whom are non-ambulant are at risk of reduced quality of life and poor health status. Severe spasticity leads to discomfort and pain. Carer burden for families is significant. This study aims to determine whether intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) combined with a regime of standard therapy has a positive effect on care and comfort for children with CP whom are non-ambulant (GMFCS IV/V), compared with standard therapy alo...

  16. Evaluation of the effects of botulinum toxin A injections when used to improve ease of care and comfort in children with cerebral palsy whom are non-ambulant: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Thorley, Megan; Donaghey, Samantha; Edwards, Priya; Copeland, Lisa; Kentish, Megan; McLennan, Kim; Lindsley, Jayne; Gascoigne-Pees, Laura; Sakzewski, Leanne; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP) whom are non-ambulant are at risk of reduced quality of life and poor health status. Severe spasticity leads to discomfort and pain. Carer burden for families is significant. This study aims to determine whether intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) combined with a regime of standard therapy has a positive effect on care and comfort for children with CP whom are non-ambulant (GMFCS IV/V), compared with standard therapy alone (cycle...

  17. The Loyal Customer Phenomenon as a Social Relationship: A Study with Ambulant Coffee Salesmen in the City of Ibagué

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Grey Javela**

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the relationship established between an ambulant coffee salesman (ACSM and his loyal client, in the frame of Michael Argyle’s social relationships model. Thirty couples were interviewed about the ACSM and loyal clients relationship; also interactions among 183 ACSM – loyal clients and 117 ACS M –sporadic clients were registered. Our research found that the commercial relationship between an ACSM and his/her loyal client is a social relationship, taking into account that it brought evidence about the constitutive elements of a relationship of this nature under Argyle’s perspective; and coincidences were observed in the declarations that the actors of the relationship made about it. Additionally, we found that the ACSM’s behavior is different depending on the type of client that he/she is attending –loyal or sporadic–.

  18. An artificial neural network to safely reduce the number of ambulance ECGs transmitted for physician assessment in a system with prehospital detection of ST elevation myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forberg Jakob L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-hospital electrocardiogram (ECG transmission to an expert for interpretation and triage reduces time to acute percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in patients with ST elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI. In order to detect all STEMI patients, the ECG should be transmitted in all cases of suspected acute cardiac ischemia. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of an artificial neural network (ANN to safely reduce the number of ECGs transmitted by identifying patients without STEMI and patients not needing acute PCI. Methods Five hundred and sixty ambulance ECGs transmitted to the coronary care unit (CCU in routine care were prospectively collected. The ECG interpretation by the ANN was compared with the diagnosis (STEMI or not and the need for an acute PCI (or not as determined from the Swedish coronary angiography and angioplasty register. The CCU physician's real time ECG interpretation (STEMI or not and triage decision (acute PCI or not were registered for comparison. Results The ANN sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for STEMI was 95%, 68%, 18% and 99%, respectively, and for a need of acute PCI it was 97%, 68%, 17% and 100%. The area under the ANN's receiver operating characteristics curve for STEMI detection was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.96 and for predicting the need of acute PCI 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.97. If ECGs where the ANN did not identify a STEMI or a need of acute PCI were theoretically to be withheld from transmission, the number of ECGs sent to the CCU could have been reduced by 64% without missing any case with STEMI or a need of immediate PCI. Conclusions Our ANN had an excellent ability to predict STEMI and the need of acute PCI in ambulance ECGs, and has a potential to safely reduce the number of ECG transmitted to the CCU by almost two thirds.

  19. Air Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Lawther, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The human costs of air pollution are considerable in Jordan. According to a report published in 2000 by the World Bank under the Mediterranean Environmental Technical Assistance Program (METAP), approximately 600 people die prematurely each year in Jordan because of urban pollution. 50-90% of air pollution in Jordanian towns is caused by road traffic. Readings taken in 2007 by Jordanian researchers showed that levels of black carbon particles in the air were higher in urban areas (caused by v...

  20. Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  1. Thin air

    OpenAIRE

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Clearing the air How do we grasp the air? Without Michel Callon’s guidance, I might never have asked that question. Years ago, when I first entered environmental law practice, I took it for granted that problems such as air pollution exist “out there” in the real world for science to discover and law to fix. It is a measure of Callon’s influence that I understand the law today as a metaphysical instrument, no less powerful in its capacity to order nature than the tools of the ancient oracular...

  2. 中美救护车车载物品比较%Comparison with the Supplies and Equipment Carried on Ambulance between the United State and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑进

    2013-01-01

    The supplies and equipment carried on ambulance is the foundation and guarantee of pre--hospital emergency care,it is significant for the efficiency and result of pre-hospital emergency care.This paper made a summary and analysis of the characteristic for the supplies and equipment carried on ambulance and the pre-hospital emergency care in American:pay more attention to the personal safety of prehospital emergency personal; pay more attention to the extrication for patient; pay more attention to the utilizing of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)board; pay more attention to the scientificalness of allocation for the jump kit; pay more attention to the using of ordinary goods; pay more attention to the patient transfer.The emergency medical personal rescued 5,120 sudden death patients out hospital in Seattle of the United States in 1970s,and the rate of successful resuscitation was 28.9%; the emergency medical personal of Shanghai emergency medical center rescued 4,374 sudden death patients out hospital in Shanghai in 1999,and the rate of successful resuscitation was 1.35%; Obviously,the rate of successful resuscitation for sudden death patients out hospital in China is much lower than that in the United States.It is probably related with the difference in ambulance equipment between the United States and China.Knowing this could be beneficial and referential for the pre-hospital emergency care in our country.%救护车车载物品是院前急救的基础和保障,对院前急救的效率和质量具有十分重要的意义.本文总结并分析了美国救护车车载物品和院前急救的特点:更加注重院前急救人员的个人防护;更加注重对患者的救出;更加注重心脏按压板的运用;更加注重急救箱物品配置的科学性;更加注重对普通物品的利用;更加注重患者的转运.美国西雅图20世纪70年代抢救5 120例院外猝死患者,复苏成功至康复出院者达28.9%;

  3. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a close in June 2013 when the company, Conscious Clothing, was awarded the My Air grand ... Page Options: Request Translation Services Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Reddit Email Evernote More Increase Font Size Decrease ...

  4. Intervention to prevent further falls in older people who call an ambulance as a result of a fall: a protocol for the iPREFER randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background An increasing number of falls result in an emergency call and the subsequent dispatch of paramedics. In the absence of physical injury, abnormal physiological parameters or change in usual functional status, it could be argued that routine conveyance by ambulance to the Emergency Department (ED) is not the most effective or efficient use of resources. Further, it is likely that non-conveyed older fallers have the potential to benefit from timely access to fall risk assessment and intervention. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of a timely and tailored falls assessment and management intervention on the number of subsequent falls and fall-related injuries for non-conveyed older fallers. Methods Community dwelling people aged 65 years or older who are not conveyed to the ED following a fall will be eligible to be visited at home by a research physiotherapist. Consenting participants will receive individualised intervention strategies based on risk factors identified at baseline. All pre-test measures will be assessed prior to randomisation. Post-test measures will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to group allocation 6 months post-baseline. Participants in the intervention group will receive individualised pro-active fall prevention strategies from the clinical researcher to ensure that risk factors are addressed adequately and interventions carried out. The primary outcome measure will be the number of falls recorded by a falls diary over a 12 month period. Secondary outcome measures assessed six months after baseline will include the subsequent use of medical and emergency services and uptake of recommendations. Data will be analysed using the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion As there is currently little evidence regarding the effectiveness or feasibility of alternate models of care following ambulance non-conveyance of older fallers, there is a need to explore assessment and intervention programs to

  5. Integrated Suit Test 1 - A Study to Evaluate Effects of Suit Weight, Pressure, and Kinematics on Human Performance during Lunar Ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Norcross, Jason; Vos, Jessica R.

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to design the next generation Lunar suit, NASA has initiated a series of tests aimed at understanding the human physiological and biomechanical affects of space suits under a variety of conditions. The first of these tests was the EVA Walkback Test (ICES 2007-01-3133). NASA-JSC assembled a multi-disciplinary team to conduct the second test of the series, titled Integrated Suit Test 1 (IST-1), from March 6 through July 24, 2007. Similar to the Walkback Test, this study was performed with the Mark III (MKIII) EVA Technology Demonstrator suit, a treadmill, and the Partial Gravity Simulator in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility at Johnson Space Center. The data collected for IST-1 included metabolic rates, ground reaction forces, biomechanics, and subjective workload and controllability feedback on both suited and unsuited (shirt-sleeve) astronaut subjects. For IST-1 the center of gravity was controlled to a nearly perfect position while the weight, pressure and biomechanics (waist locked vs. unlocked) were varied individually to evaluate the effects of each on the ability to perform level (0 degree incline) ambulation in simulated Lunar gravity. The detailed test methodology and preliminary key findings of IST-1 are summarized in this report.

  6. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  7. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery. PMID:25525522

  8. Air surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  9. Healthy Air Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung.org > Our Initiatives > Healthy Air > Outdoor Healthy Air Outdoors The quality of the air we breathe ... families and can even shorten their lives. Outdoor Air Pollution and Health Outdoor air pollution continues to ...

  10. Air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter of the 'Assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' describes the air quality and identifies the most important air quality issues. Baseline information about the factors affecting dispersion and the climate of Lebanon presents as well and overall estimation of total emissions in Lebanon. Emissions from vehicles, electricity and power plants generation are described. Industrial emitters of air pollutants are described for each kind of industry i.e.cement plants, Selaata fertilizer factory, sugar-beet factory, refineries and for those derived from the use of leaded fuel . Impact of economic and human activities on air quality in Lebanon (especially in Beirut and Tripoli) are quantified by quantities of CO2, SO2, NOx, total suspended particulates(TSP), deposition and their environmental effects on health. In abscence of emissions monitoring, data available are expressed in terms of fuel use, output and appropriate empirical factors, national output and workfores sizes. Finally key issues and some potential mitigation /management approaches are presented

  11. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    This brief examines the development of the first Danish Air Force Air Operations Doctrine, which was officially commissioned in October 1997 and remained in effect until 2010. The development of a Danish air power doctrine was heavily influenced by the work of Colonel John Warden (USAF), both...... through his book ”The Air Campaign” and his subsequent planning of the air campaign against Iraq in 1990-1991. Warden’s ideas came to Denmark and the Danish Air Force by way of Danish Air Force students attending the United States Air Force Air University in Alabama, USA. Back in Denmark, graduates from...... the Air University inspired a small number of passionate airmen, who then wrote the Danish Air Operations Doctrine. The process was supported by the Air Force Tactical Command, which found that the work dovetailed perfectly with the transformation process that the Danish Air Force was in the midst of...

  12. Air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian cites experience a number of current and emerging air pollution problems. Concentrations of traditional primary pollutants such as CO, lead and dust have fallen in recent years as a consequence of air pollutant control measures, and the widespread introduction of lead-free petrol. However, recommended guidelines for ozone, the principal component of photochemical smog, are regularly exceeded in major capital cities in the summer months. In addition, it is predicted that extensive urban expansion will lead to much greater dependence on the motor vehicle as the primary means of transportation. Effects of air pollution are felt at a variety of scales. Traditionally, concerns about gaseous and particulate emissions from industrial and vehicular sources were focused on local impacts due to exposure to toxic species such as CO and lead. As noted above, concentrations of these pollutants have been reduced by a variety of control measures. Pollutants which have effects at a regional scale, such as photochemically-produced ozone, and acidic gases and particles have proved more difficult to reduce. In general, these pollutants arc not the result of direct emissions to atmosphere, but result from complex secondary processes driven by photochemical reactions of species such as NO2 and aldehydes. In addition, global effects of gaseous and particulate emissions to the atmosphere have received significant recent attention, concentrations of atmospheric CO2 with predicted impacts on global climate, and ozone depletion due to anthropogenic emissions of chlorine-containing chemicals are the two major examples. Combustion processes from petrol- and diesel-fuelled vehicles, make major contributions to air pollution, and the magnitude of this contribution is discussed in this article

  13. Radiation Monitoring Results from the First Year of Operation of a Unique Ambulance-based Computed Tomography Unit for the Improved Diagnosis and Treatment of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Janet M; Emery, Robert J; Parker, Stephanie A; Jackson, Kamilah; Grotta, James C

    2016-05-01

    When a blood clot blocks the blood supply to the brain or when a blood vessel bursts, resulting in brain cell death, the medical condition is referred to as a "stroke." Stroke is a main cause of death worldwide and is a common cause of disability. A common form of stroke, called ischemic stroke, is when blood flow to the brain is decreased. Clinical research has revealed that treatment within the very first hours of symptom onset is key for ischemic stroke with recanalization of occluded arteries by thrombolysis with alteplase. Computed tomography (CT) is one of the diagnostic tools used to determine if this treatment path is appropriate. To determine if health outcomes of possible stroke patients can be improved by decreasing the time from symptom presentation to treatment, the first mobile stroke ambulance unit in the United States was deployed by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) in 2014, equipped with a computed tomography imaging system. The mobile stroke unit shortens the time to treatment for stroke patients by allowing pre-hospital treatment. Having completed its first year of operation, radiation-monitoring data describing the doses delivered to various entities have been characterized. The CT operator's cumulative deep dose equivalent for 1 y of operation was 1.14 mSv resulting from the care of 106 patients. Area monitors were deployed and measurements performed demonstrating that general public doses did not exceed 0.02 mSv h or 1.0 mSv year. PMID:27023154

  14. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... cleaning techniques. Supply air filter is one of the key components in the ventilation system. Studies have shown that used ventilation filters themselves can be a significant source of indoor air pollution with consequent impact on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance...

  15. An observational study of hand hygiene in 120 ambulance service%“120”救护车手卫生相关状况的观察研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨珊; 王丽媛; 刘茜; 臧渝梨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate into hand hygiene facilities and worker's practice of hand hygiene during 120 ambulance services in a capital city.Methods With the standard Observation Form publicized by the World Health Organization,field observation was carried out to monitor hand hygiene facilities and the practice of hand hygiene in workers during ambulance services provided by four service centers.Results A total of seven ambulances and 80 times of services were observed across a span of 21 days.The provision and position of hand hygiene facilities were found very limited in these ambulances.Of 656 times of presence of indictors for hand hygiene,the overall compliance rate was 3.04% reflecting the practice of hand hygiene in ambulance workers.The compliance rate was found to be 0 (0/291),1.96% (1/51),13.64% (3/22),5.21% (16/307) and 0(0/2) before touching patients,after body fluids exposure risk,before clean/aseptic procedures and after touching patients' surroundings respectively.Conclusions Poor practice of hand hygiene which was revealed in 120 ambulance services suggests the great need for education and training to improve patient safety and occupational health.%目的 深入了解某省会城市“120”救护车的手卫生设施及出诊工作者的手卫生执行情况.方法 采用世界卫生组织标准监督观察表,跟车对某省会城市4所急救分中心“120”救护车的手卫生设施及出车工作者的手卫生行为进行现场观察.结果 21 d观察7辆救护车80次出诊发现,救护车手卫生设施配置与摆放有限;出现手卫生机会656次,总体依从性3.04%,接触患者前、清洁无菌操作前、可能接触患者体液后、接触患者后及接触患者周围环境后的依从性分别为0(0/291)、1.96%(1/51)、13.64%(3/22)、5.21%(16/307)、0(0/2).结论 “120”院前急救手卫生状况不容乐观,亟待加强培训,促进患者安全和职业防护.

  16. R9 Air Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Region 9 Air Districts layer is a compilation of polygons representing the California Air Pollution Control and Air Quality Management Districts, Arizona Air...

  17. AirData

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The AirData site provides access to yearly summaries of United States air pollution data, taken from EPA's air pollution databases. AirData has information about...

  18. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  19. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Hazardous Air Pollutants Hazardous air pollutants are those known to cause ... protect against adverse environmental effects. About Hazardous Air Pollutants What are hazardous air pollutants? Health and Environmental ...

  20. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Moratoria-Designated Geographic Locations. Implementation of the waiver demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This notice announces the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in 6 states. The demonstration is being implemented in accordance with section 402 of the Social Security Amendments of 1967 and gives CMS the authority to grant waivers to the statewide enrollment moratoria on a case-by-case basis in response to access to care issues, and to subject providers and suppliers enrolling via such waivers to heightened screening, oversight, and investigations. PMID:27487580

  1. Pressurized air supply device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventilation air-conditioning facilities in a nuclear reactor building are adapted to suck clean external air not containing radioactivity through air supply filters disposed at an air intake port of the nuclear reactor building by means of an air supply blower and then supply the sucked air through an air supply duct and an air supply port to the inside of the power plant. Futher, pipeways for supplying sucked air to a compressor is branched from the air supply duct, through which air is supplied to an air compressor for instrumentation and an air compressor used in the power plant. The air sucked and compressed in the air compressor for instrumentation is further supplied by way of pipeways for supplying air for instrumentation to air-actuated valves, instruments, etc. Further, air sucked and compressed in the air compressor used in the power plant is further supplied by way of air supply pipeways for the power plant to a reservoir, air mask, etc. By supplying clean compressed air in this way, operators exposure dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  2. Air movement and perceived air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, J.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of air movement on perceived air quality (PAQ) and sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms was studied. In total, 124 human subjects participated in four series of experiments performed in climate chambers at different combinations of room air temperature (20, 23, 26 and 28 °C), relative...... humidity (30, 40 and 70%) and pollution level (low and high). Most of the experiments were performed with and without facially applied airflow at elevated velocity. The importance of the use of recirculated room air and clean, cool and dry outdoor air was studied. The exposures ranged from 60. min to 235....... min. Acceptability of PAQ and freshness of the air improved when air movement was applied. The elevated air movement diminished the negative impact of increased air temperature, relative humidity and pollution level on PAQ. The degree of improvement depended on the pollution level, the temperature and...

  3. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... contradictions should motivate manufacturers and researchers to develop new efficient filtration techniques and/or improve the existing ones. Development of low polluting filtration techniques, which are at the same time easy and inexpensive to maintain is the way forward in the future....

  4. Air protection. Ochrana ovzdusia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siska, F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses problems of air pollution control, air pollution abatement and effects of air pollution. Air pollution caused by black and brown coal combustion, by fossil-fuel power plants and by coking plants is evaluated. Air pollution by dusts, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, ammonia as well arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, chromium, gallium, cobalt, manganese, copper, nickel, lead, plutonium, titanium and vanadium, which sometimes accompany ashes in coal, is analyzed. Methods of air pollution abatement such as fluidized bed combustion, coal preparation, desulfurization or dry coke quenching are described. Systems for air pollution control are presented: air filtration, cyclones, electrostatic precipitators. Systems of air pollution measurement and recording are evaluated. Propagation of air pollutants in the atmosphere as well as the factors which influence pollutant propagation are characterized. Problems associated with site selection for fossil-fuel power plants are also discussed. An analysis of economic aspects of air pollution abatement and air pollution control is made. (55 refs.)

  5. Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protect yourself and your family. Learn more Air Quality at Work Workers should breathe easy while on the job, but worksites with poor air quality put employees at risk. Healthy air is essential ...

  6. HEPA air filter (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  7. Bad Air Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Bad Air Day Air Quality and Your Health In many parts of the country, summer has the worst air quality of any season. When the forecast says ...

  8. Evaluation of the effects of botulinum toxin A injections when used to improve ease of care and comfort in children with cerebral palsy whom are non-ambulant: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorley Megan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP whom are non-ambulant are at risk of reduced quality of life and poor health status. Severe spasticity leads to discomfort and pain. Carer burden for families is significant. This study aims to determine whether intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A combined with a regime of standard therapy has a positive effect on care and comfort for children with CP whom are non-ambulant (GMFCS IV/V, compared with standard therapy alone (cycle I, and whether repeated injections with the same regime of adjunctive therapy results in greater benefits compared with a single injecting episode (cycle II. The regime of therapy will include serial casting, splinting and/or provision of orthoses, as indicated, combined with four sessions of goal directed occupational therapy or physiotherapy. Method/design This study is a double blind randomized controlled trial. Forty participants will be recruited. In cycle I, participants will be randomized to either a treatment group who will receive BoNT-A injections into selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, or a control group who will undergo sham injections. Both groups will receive occupational therapy and /or physiotherapy following injections. Groups will be assessed at baseline then compared at 4 and 16 weeks following injections or sham control. Parents, treating clinicians and assessors will be masked to group allocation. In cycle II, all participants will undergo intramuscular BoNT-A injections to selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, followed by therapy. The primary outcome measure will be change in parent ratings in identified areas of concern for their child’s care and comfort, using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. Secondary measures will include the Care and Comfort Hypertonicity Scale (ease of care, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire (CP QoL–Child (quality of life, the Caregiver Priorities and Child

  9. Direct ambulance transport to catheterization laboratory reduces door-to-balloon time in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: the DIRECT-STEMI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Jian-ping; ZHANG Qi; LU Ji-de; WANG Hai-rong; LIN Jie; GE Zhi-ru; ZHANG Rui-yan; SHEN Wei-feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been clearly identified as the first therapeutic option for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The importance of reducing door-to-balloon (D2B) time has gained increased recognition. This study aimed to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the strategy of direct ambulance transportation of patients with acute STEMI to catheterization lab to receive primary PCI.Methods The study population included 141 consecutive patients with chest pain and ST-segment elevation who were admitted to the catheterization laboratory directly by the ambulance and underwent primary PCI (DIRECT group).Another 145 patients with STEMI randomly selected from the PCI database, were served as control group (conventional group); they were transported to catheterization laboratory from emergency room (ER). The primary endpoint of D2B time,and secondary endpoint of in-hospital and 30-day major adverse cardiac events (MACE, including death, non-fatal reinfarction, and target vessel revascularization) were compared.Results Baseline and procedural characteristics between the two groups were comparable, except more patients in the DIRECT group presented TIMI 0-1 flow in culprit vessel at initial angiogram (80.1% and 73.8%, P=0.04). Comparing to conventional group, the primary endpoint of D2B time was reduced ((54±18) minutes and (112±55) minutes, P <0.0001)and the percentage of patients with D2B <90 minutes was increased in the DIRECT group (96.9% and 27.0%, P<0.0001).The success rate of primary PCI with stent implantation with final Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 3 flow was significantly higher in the DIRECT group (93.8% and 85.2%, P=0.03). Although no significant difference was found at 30-day MACE free survival rate between the two groups (95.0% and 89.0%, P=0.06), a trend in improving survival status in the DIRECT group was demonstrated by Kaplan-Meier analysis

  10. Aplicação do modelo hipercubo de filas para avaliar a descentralização de ambulâncias em um sistema urbano de atendimento médico de urgência

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Algisi Takeda; João Alexandre Widmer; Reinaldo Morabito

    2004-01-01

    Uma das maiores preocupações de sistemas urbanos de atendimento médico-emergencial é a rapidez no atendimento às vítimas. Os tempos de resposta dependem de diversos fatores como condições de tráfego local, dia da semana e período do dia, tipo e número de veículos disponíveis, localização destes veículos, políticas de despacho, etc. Neste trabalho apresenta-se uma análise dos efeitos da descentralização de ambulâncias que operam no sistema de atendimento médico-emergencial (SAMU-192) de Campin...

  11. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  12. Indoor Air Pollution (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Students to Environmental Health Information Menu Home Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ... Pollution Indoor Air Pollution Print this Page Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ...

  13. Indoor Air Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Korlakunta Divya #1, M.Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of our project is to maintain the indoor air quality.The analysis is done on different parameters like temperature,relativehumidity,CO2,lights,sens ors and air conditioners to maintain the indoor environment.This report provides overview on importance of indoor air quality in an office or any other closed structure. It also discusses about the effects of poor indoor air quality, the various factors that affect the indoor air quality and various methods to assess indoor air qualit...

  14. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Facilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other...

  15. Indoor Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include Mold and pollen Tobacco smoke Household products ...

  16. Allegheny County Air Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Air quality data from Allegheny County Health Department monitors throughout the county. Air quality monitored data must be verified by qualified individuals...

  17. Nuclear air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly describes the history of the use of high- efficiency particulate air filters for air cleaning at nuclear installations in the United States and discusses future uses of such filters

  18. Air Quality System (AQS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Quality System (AQS) database contains measurements of air pollutant concentrations from throughout the United States and its territories. The measurements...

  19. Indoor air: Reference bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency initially established the indoor air Reference Bibliography in 1987 as an appendix to the Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan. The document was submitted to Congress as required under Title IV--Radon Gas and Indoor Air Quality Research of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. The Reference Bibliography is an extensive bibliography of reference materials on indoor air pollution. The Bibliography contains over 4500 citations and continues to increase as new articles appear

  20. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  1. Air Pollution Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This catalog lists the universities, both supported and not supported by the Division of Air Pollution, which offer graduate programs in the field of air pollution. The catalog briefly describes the programs and their entrance requirements, the requirements, qualifications and terms of special fellowships offered by the Division of Air Pollution.…

  2. Indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Susanne; Recevska, Ieva

     The objective of the 35th specific agreement is to provide support to the EEA activities in Environment and Health (E&H) on the topic of indoor air quality. The specific objectives have been to provide an overview of indoor air related projects in EU and indoor air related policies as well...

  3. Indoor Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution ... is known as sick building syndrome. Usually indoor air quality problems only cause discomfort. Most people feel ...

  4. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Air Travel Health Tips Air Travel Health Tips How can I improve plane travel? Most people don't have any problems when ... and dosages of all of your medicines. The air in airplanes is dry, so drink nonalcoholic, decaffeinated ...

  5. We Pollute the Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.Clean air is important to good health.If the aircontains impurities,they may be absorbed by ourbodies and make us ill.We need clean air,butunfortunately,air pollution is generally present,especially in cities. 2.Our cities have many factories,which we need tomake food products,clothing and many other things.

  6. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  7. Advanced air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of total volume air distribution (TVAD) involves achieving uniform temperature and velocity in the occupied zone and environment designed for an average occupant. The supply of large amounts of clean and cool air are needed to maintain temperature and pollution concentration at acceptable....... Ventilation in hospitals is essential to decrease the risk of airborne cross-infection. At present, mixing air distribution at a minimum of 12 ach is used in infection wards. Advanced air distribution has the potential to aid in achieving healthy, comfortable and productive indoor environments at levels...... higher than what can be achieved today with the commonly used total volume air distribution principles....

  8. Relations of compassion fatigue to occupational stress and job burnout in ambulance nurses%院前急救护士共情疲劳与职业应激、职业倦怠关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏华; 黄敬堂; 申培红

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship of compassion fatigue and occupational stress and job burnout in ambulance nurses.Methods By stratified cluster random sampling method, a total of 380 ambulance nurses from 5 cities in Henan Province were selected as objects, and 261 emergency nurses from the same hospital were selected as control.A assessment survey was performed using the Chinese version of Professional Quality of Life, the Maslach Burnout Inventory ( MBI) , and the Chinese Nursing Stressor Scale ( NSS) which included the stressor related to working expectation ( factor 1), the stressor related to family (factor 2), the stressor related to interpersonal relationships (factor 3), the stressor related to job specification (factor 4), related to patients (factor 5), and to the working load (factor 6).Results The ambulance nurses had higher compassion fatigue scores than the emergency nurses ( P <0.01 ) .One-way analysis of variance showed that the ambulance nurses with length of service less than 3.0 years had higher compassion fatigue scores than those with 3.0 or more years and those with over 10.0 years of service length ( P<0.05 ) .The compassion fatigue scores of general nurses were higher than those professional titled as senior nurses and nurse supervisors or above ( P<0.05).The correlation analysis showed that the compassion fatigue scores of ambulance nurse were positively correlated with the factor 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of NSS scores and MBI scores [the correlation coefficients (r) were 0.15, 0.28, 0.25, 0.34, 0.32 and 0.36, P<0.05].The MBI scores were positively correlated with all the 6 factors of NSS (r were 0.31, 0.25, 0.36, 0.32, 0.37 and 0.31, respectively, P<0.05).The multiple linear regression analysis results showed that the regression correlations among MBI score, NSS factor 5 score, interaction effect of MBI and NSS factor 5 and the compassion fatigue score were confirmed (the standardized partial regression coefficient were 0.39, 0.24 and 0

  9. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  10. Manual for THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Brandt, Jørgen;

    The report provides an outline of the THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system and a brief manual for getting started with the air quality models and input data included in THOR-AirPAS.......The report provides an outline of the THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system and a brief manual for getting started with the air quality models and input data included in THOR-AirPAS....

  11. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1) trial protocol. Computerised on-scene decision support for emergency ambulance staff to assess and plan care for older people who have fallen: evaluation of costs and benefits using a pragmatic cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts Stephen; Phillips Judith; Phillips Ceri; Peconi Julie; Merali Yasmin; Mason Suzanne; Lyons Ronan; Humphreys Ioan; Gaze Sarah; Dale Jeremy; Close Jacqueline; Cheung Wai-Yee; Snooks Helen; Russell Ian; Sánchez Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Many emergency ambulance calls are for older people who have fallen. As half of them are left at home, a community-based response may often be more appropriate than hospital attendance. The SAFER 1 trial will assess the costs and benefits of a new healthcare technology - hand-held computers with computerised clinical decision support (CCDS) software - to help paramedics decide who needs hospital attendance, and who can be safely left at home with referral to community fall...

  12. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air pollution How to protect yourself from air pollution Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home The environment and your health Air Health effects of air pollution ... Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that ...

  13. Air filtration in HVAC systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ginestet, Alain; Tronville, Paolo; Hyttinen, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Air filtration Guidebook will help the designer and user to understand the background and criteria for air filtration, how to select air filters and avoid problems associated with hygienic and other conditions at operation of air filters. The selection of air filters is based on external conditions such as levels of existing pollutants, indoor air quality and energy efficiency requirements.

  14. Evaluation of group versus individual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-Type A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: A single-blind randomized comparison trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rachel E; Johnston, Leanne M; Sakzewski, Leanne; Kentish, Megan J; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate efficacy of group (GRP) versus individual (IND) physiotherapy rehabilitation following lower limb intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A (BoNT-A) for ambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following lower limb BoNT-A injections, 34 children were randomly allocated to GRP (n=17; mean age 7y8m SD 2.0; 13 males; Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) I=5, II=8, III=4) or IND physiotherapy (n=17; mean age 8y7m SD 2.0; 11 males; GMFCS I=9, II=5, III=3). Primary outcomes were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Edinburgh Visual Gait Score (EVGS) assessed at baseline, 10 and 26 weeks post intervention. There were no baseline differences between groups. GRP intervention had greater, but not clinically meaningful, improvement in COPM satisfaction (estimated mean difference EMD 1.7, 95% CI 0.4-3.1; p<0.01) at 26 weeks. Both groups demonstrated clinically significant improvements in COPM performance and satisfaction, but minimal change in quality of gait (EVGS). Six hours of direct physiotherapy (either GRP or IND) with an additional indirect dose (median 16 episodes) of individualized home programme activities following lower limb BoNT-A injections, however, was inadequate to drive clinically meaningful changes in lower limb motor outcomes. PMID:26955912

  15. Effect of High-Dose Vitamin D3 Intake on Ambulation, Muscular Pain and Bone Mineral Density in a Woman with Multiple Sclerosis: A 10-Year Longitudinal Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Feron

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence correlate vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol supplementation or higher serum levels of vitamin D (25(OHD with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS, reduced relapse rate, slower progression or fewer new brain lesions. We present here the case of a woman who was diagnosed with MS in 1990. From 1980 to 2000, her ability to walk decreased from ~20 to 1 km per day. Since January 2001, a vitamin D3 supplement was ingested daily. The starting dose was 20 mcg (800 IU/day and escalated to 100 mcg (4000 IU/day in September 2004 and then to 150 mcg (6000 IU/day in December 2005. Vitamin D3 intake reduced muscular pain and improved ambulation from 1 (February 2000 to 14 km/day (February 2008. Vitamin D intake over 10 years caused no adverse effects: no hypercalcaemia, nephrolithiasis or hypercalciuria were observed. Bowel problems in MS may need to be addressed as they can cause malabsorption including calcium, which may increase serum PTH and 1,25(OH2D levels, as well as bone loss. We suggest that periodic assessment of vitamin D3, calcium and magnesium intake, bowel problems and the measurement of serum 25(OHD, PTH, Ca levels, UCa/Cr and bone health become part of the integral management of persons with MS.

  16. Air Quality in Lithuania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietilae, P. [Tampere University of Technology / ECAT-Lithuania (Lithuania); Kliucininkas, L. [Department for Environmental Engineering, Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania)

    2000-07-01

    Sustainable monitoring of the ambient air is the major preventive measure of ensuring its proper quality. Only with a monitoring procedure going-on a continuous basis it is possible to make an objective evaluation of air pollution trends, of the efficiency of air protection measures and, partially, to a certain extent of the impact the pollution exerts on a human health. The information stemming from the monitoring procedure must be reliable, sustainable and efficient. (orig.)

  17. Indonesia's Clean Air Program

    OpenAIRE

    Budy P. Resosudarmo

    2002-01-01

    Unprecedented industrial development in Indonesia during the last two decades, accompanied by a growing population, has increased the amount of environmental damage. One of the most important environmental problems is that the level of air pollution in several large cities has become alarming, particularly in the last few years. This high pollution level has stimulated the government to develop a national clean air program designed to control the quantity of pollutants in the air. However, th...

  18. Bad traffic, bad air

    OpenAIRE

    Duca, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is one of Malta’s greatest concerns. Transportation is the principal source with over 300,000 vehicles belching out smoke, which damages our environment and health. Emissions from vehicles need to be monitored and controlled, and the information used to improve the current system and ensure an acceptable air quality. By using the pollution data set, Nicolette Formosa (supervised by Dr Kenneth Scerri) mapped the air pollution levels and major sources around Malta. http://www....

  19. Emergency air supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An air supply safety device is described which can operate in an hostile environment. The system ensures that should the ring mains supply or the operator's individual hose fail an emergency air supply is obtained from a compressed air bottle fed to the operator's face mask via a valve. The valve switches from mains/mask to emergency supply/mask when the mains pressure falls below the emergency supply pressure. (U.K.)

  20. Radioactive material air transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As function of the high aggregated value, safety regulations and the useful life time, the air transportation has been used more regularly because is fast, reliable, and by giving great security to the cargo. Based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the IATA (International Air Transportation Association) has reproduced in his dangerous goods manual (Dangerous Goods Regulations - DGR IATA), the regulation for the radioactive material air transportation. Those documents support this presentation

  1. Electric air filtration movie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electrostatics to improve the performance of conventional air filters has gained considerable attention in recent years. This interest is due to the higher efficiency and reduced pressure drop of electrically enhanced filters compared to conventional fibrous filters. This 30-minute movie presents a state of the art review of electric air filters in the United States with major illustrations provided by the research and development program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored by the Department of Energy. The electric air filters described in this movie are mechanical air filters to which electrical forces have been added

  2. Applications Using AIRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Olsen, E. T.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. For vector-borne disease, research is underway using AIRS near surface retrievals to assess outbreak risk, mosquito incubation periods and epidemic potential for dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. For drought applications, AIRS temperature and humidity data are being used in the development of new drought indicators and improvement in the understanding of drought development. For volcanic hazards, new algorithms using AIRS data are in development to improve the reporting of sulfur dioxide concentration, the burden and height of volcanic ash and dust, all of which pose a safety threat to aircraft. In addition, anomaly maps of many of AIRS standard products are being produced to help highlight "hot spots" and illustrate trends. To distribute it's applications imagery, AIRS is leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving, distribution and participation in the BEDI. This poster will communicate the status of the applications effort for the AIRS Project and provide examples of new maps designed to best communicate the AIRS data.

  3. Air pollution meteorology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is intended as a training cum reference document for scientists posted at the Environmental Laboratories at the Nuclear Power Station Sites and other sites of the Department of Atomic Energy with installations emitting air pollutants, radioactive or otherwise. Since a manual already exists for the computation of doses from radioactive air pollutants, a general approach is take here i.e. air pollutants in general are considered. The first chapter presents a brief introduction to the need and scope of air pollution dispersion modelling. The second chapter is a very important chapter discussing the aspects of meteorology relevant to air pollution and dispersion modelling. This chapter is important because without this information one really does not understand the phenomena affecting dispersion, the scope and applicability of various models or their limitations under various weather and site conditions. The third chapter discusses the air pollution models in detail. These models are applicable to distances of a few tens of kilometres. The fourth chapter discusses the various aspects of meteorological measurements relevant to air pollution. The chapters are followed by two appendices. Apendix A discusses the reliability of air pollution estimates. Apendix B gives some practical examples relevant to general air pollution. It is hoped that the document will prove very useful to the users. (author)

  4. Restoran Buenos Aires = Restaurant Buenos Aires

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Restorani Buenos Aires (Narva mnt. 5, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid: Janno Roos ja Andres Labi (Ruumilabor OÜ). Laudu eraldavad 400 vardasse aetud puukuuli. Sisearhitektidest, nende tähtsamad tööd. I-III korruse plaan, 12 värv. vaadet, fotod sisearhitektidest

  5. Air pollution and society

    OpenAIRE

    Brimblecombe P.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution is as much a product of our society as it is one of chemistry and meteorology. Social variables such as gender, age, health status and poverty are often linked with our exposure to air pollutants. Pollution can also affect our behaviour, while regulations to improve the environment can often challenge of freedom.

  6. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  7. Air Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaroni, Charles W.; O'Donnell, Patrick A.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on air pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of air pollution and involves students in processes of…

  8. Air Pollution and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,…

  9. Transportation and air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the greater Vancouver regional district (GVRD), some 80% of the annual production of 600,000 tonnes of air pollutants come from motor vehicles. Three critical air quality issues in the GVRD are discussed: local air pollution, ozone layer depletion, and greenhouse gas emissions, all of which are fundamentally linked to transportation. Overall air quality in the GVRD has been judged acceptable by current federal standards, but ground-level ozone has exceeded maximum tolerable levels at some locations and concentrations of suspended particulates are above maximum acceptable levels. Serious deterioration in air quality has been predicted unless a concerted effort is made to manage air quality on an airshed-wide basis. The GVRD is developing Canada's first Air Management Plan with the goal of halving atmospheric emissions by 2000. GVRD transportation priorities stress public transit, walking, cycling, car pooling, and reducing of travel demand; however, the viability of such strategies depends on decisions made outside the transportation sector. Restricted authority and jurisdiction also hinder GVRD goals; the regional level of government has no authority over highways or transit and only has authority for pollution control in some parts of the Fraser Valley. Airshed quality management, using the Los Angeles example, is seen as a possible direction for future GVRD policymaking in the transportation sector. A single regional planning agency with responsibility for transportation, land use, and air quality management appears as the best option for an integrated approach to solve multiple problems. 19 refs

  10. International Air Services

    OpenAIRE

    Productivity Commission

    2001-01-01

    On 12 December 1997 the Treasurer referred international air services arrangements to the Industry Commission for inquiry and report within nine months. The Commission was asked to report on the arrangements for negotiating entitlements under air services agreements and the process of allocating capacity entitlements to Australian carriers.

  11. Energy and air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of a series of handbooks designed to provide nontechnical readers with a general understanding of the interaction between energy development and environmental media and to provide a rudimentary data base from which estimates of potential future impacts can be made. This handbook describes the air quality impacts of energy development and summarizes the major federal legislation which regulates the potential air quality impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which can be used as the basis for measurement, and in some cases, prediction of the potential conflicts between energy development and achieving and maintaining clean air. Energy utilization is the largest emission source of man-made air pollutants. Choices in energy resource development and utilization generate varying emissions or discharges into the atmosphere, the emissions are affected by the assimilative character of the atmosphere, and the resultant air pollutant concentrations have biological and aesthetic effects. This handbook describes the interrelationships of energy-related air emissions under various methods of pollution control, the assimilative character of the air medium, and the effects of air pollution. The media book is divided into three major sections: topics of concern relating to the media and energy development, descriptions of how to use available data to quantify and examine energy/environmental impacts, and the data

  12. Air Pollution Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association, New York, NY.

    As the dangers of polluted air to the health and welfare of all individuals became increasingly evident and as the complexity of the causes made responsibility for solutions even more difficult to fix, the National Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association felt obligated to give greater emphasis to its clean air program. To this end they…

  13. Over the air test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    [1] This invention relates to over-the-air testing of a device in an anechoic chamber. In particular, the invention is suitable for simulating both uplink and downlink over-the-air communication with a device under test even when the anechoic chamber has different numbers of uplink and downlink...

  14. Air pollution and air cleaning equipment in buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Evdokimova, Ekaterina

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this thesis work is air pollution and air cleaners in building. Clean air has big significance for human health because different pollutions can cause allergy and disease. The quality of indoor air affects health and effective working. The aim of this thesis is to present methods and devices for cleaning the air.

  15. AIRE-Linux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Benda; Peng, Chuan; Yang, Yang; Huo, Zhuoxi

    2015-08-01

    AIRE-Linux is a dedicated Linux system for astronomers. Modern astronomy faces two big challenges: massive observed raw data which covers the whole electromagnetic spectrum, and overmuch professional data processing skill which exceeds personal or even a small team's abilities. AIRE-Linux, which is a specially designed Linux and will be distributed to users by Virtual Machine (VM) images in Open Virtualization Format (OVF), is to help astronomers confront the challenges. Most astronomical software packages, such as IRAF, MIDAS, CASA, Heasoft etc., will be integrated into AIRE-Linux. It is easy for astronomers to configure and customize the system and use what they just need. When incorporated into cloud computing platforms, AIRE-Linux will be able to handle data intensive and computing consuming tasks for astronomers. Currently, a Beta version of AIRE-Linux is ready for download and testing.

  16. Cabin air temperature of parked vehicles in summer conditions: life-threatening environment for children and pets calculated by a dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Johannes; Schmerold, Ivo; Wimmer, Kurt; Schauberger, Günther

    2016-07-01

    In vehicles that are parked, no ventilation and/or air conditioning takes place. If a vehicle is exposed to direct solar radiation, an immediate temperature rise occurs. The high cabin air temperature can threaten children and animals that are left unattended in vehicles. In the USA, lethal heat strokes cause a mean death rate of 37 children per year. In addition, temperature-sensitive goods (e.g. drugs in ambulances and veterinary vehicles) can be adversely affected by high temperatures. To calculate the rise of the cabin air temperature, a dynamic model was developed that is driven by only three parameters, available at standard meteorological stations: air temperature, global radiation and wind velocity. The transition from the initial temperature to the constant equilibrium temperature depends strongly on the configuration of the vehicle, more specifically on insulation, window area and transmission of the glass, as well as on the meteorological conditions. The comparison of the model with empirical data showed good agreement. The model output can be applied to assess the heat load of children and animals as well as temperature-sensitive goods, which are transported and/or stored in a vehicle.

  17. Air Baltic: Estonian Air on nurka surutud / Teele Tammeorg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammeorg, Teele

    2010-01-01

    Air Balticu asepresidendi Janis Vanagsi hinnangul on Estonian Air aastaid jätnud tähelepanuta oma peamised turismiturud ning on praegu halvas seisus. Air Baltic on endiselt huvitatud Estonian Airi ostust. Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniminister Juhan Partsi seisukoht

  18. Air Cleaning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This health technology policy assessment will answer the following questions: When should in-room air cleaners be used? How effective are in-room air cleaners? Are in-room air cleaners that use combined HEPA and UVGI air cleaning technology more effective than those that use HEPA filtration alone? What is the Plasmacluster ion air purifier in the pandemic influenza preparation plan? The experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) locally, nationally, and internationally underscored the importance of administrative, environmental, and personal protective infection control measures in health care facilities. In the aftermath of the SARS crisis, there was a need for a clearer understanding of Ontario’s capacity to manage suspected or confirmed cases of airborne infectious diseases. In so doing, the Walker Commission thought that more attention should be paid to the potential use of new technologies such as in-room air cleaning units. It recommended that the Medical Advisory Secretariat of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care evaluate the appropriate use and effectiveness of such new technologies. Accordingly, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat to review the literature on the effectiveness and utility of in-room air cleaners that use high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) air cleaning technology. Additionally, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee prioritized a request from the ministry’s Emergency Management Unit to investigate the possible role of the Plasmacluster ion air purifier manufactured by Sharp Electronics Corporation, in the pandemic influenza preparation plan. Clinical Need Airborne transmission of infectious diseases depends in part on the concentration of breathable infectious pathogens (germs) in room air. Infection control is achieved by a combination of administrative, engineering

  19. Clean Air and Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    The air we breathe and the water we drink are both vital components of our health. Nevertheless, bacteria, pollutants, and other contaminates can alter life-giving air and water into health-threatening hazards. Learn about how scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work to protect the public from air and water-related health risks.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  20. AIR / SEA RESCUE LAUNCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Rice

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Motor Boat Wing of the South African Air Force was inaugurated some thirty eight years ago.With its main base at Gordon's Bay, the wing was formed to operate the various marine craft used to provide a service to the flying component of the South African Air Force. Its main function was to be air/sea rescue, but it also had to man and maintain armoured target boats, seaplane tenders, marine tenders and the 'bomb scows', used for recovering practise bombs and missiles and for laying and lifting moorings.

  1. Mid-air Acrobatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LlU FENG'AN

    2011-01-01

    On September 1 two new aerobatic demonstration teams,theSky Wing and the Red Falcon,debuted at an air show held in Changchun,capital of northeast China's Jilin Province.The show was staged at a ceremony held by the Aviation University of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force.Also performing at the show was the 50-year-old Bayi aerobatic demonstration team.The teams demonstrated their superlative flying skills,which showcase the quality of the air force's rigorous pilot training.

  2. Air/liquid collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Østergaard; Olesen, Ole; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    1997-01-01

    This report determine efficiency equations for combined air/liquid solar collectors by measurements on to different air/liquid collectors. Equations which contain all relevant informations on the solar collectors. A simulation program (Kviksol) has been modified in order to be able to handle this...... kind of collectors. The modified simulation program has been used for the determination of the surplus in performance which solar heating systems with this type of solar collectors for combined preheating of ventilation air and domestic hot water will have. The simulation program and the efficiency...

  3. Air Quality Monitoring Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K.; Palmgren, F.

    The air quality in Danish cities has been monitored continuously since 1982 within the Danish Air Quality (LMP) network. The aim has been to follow the concentration levels of toxic pollutants in the urban atmosphere and to provide the necessary knowledge to assess the trends, to perform source...... apportionment, and to evaluate the chemical reactions and the dispersion of the pollutants in the atmosphere. In 2002 the air quality was measured in four Danish cities and at two background sites. NO2 and PM10 were at several stations found in concentrations above the new EU limit values, which the Member...

  4. Air/Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  5. Olefin metathesis in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Piola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery and now widespread use of olefin metathesis, the evolution of metathesis catalysts towards air stability has become an area of significant interest. In this fascinating area of study, beginning with early systems making use of high oxidation state early transition metal centers that required strict exclusion of water and air, advances have been made to render catalysts more stable and yet more functional group tolerant. This review summarizes the major developments concerning catalytic systems directed towards water and air tolerance.

  6. Air issues update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A government sponsored poll revealed that the primary environmental concern for Ontarians in 2000 was air pollution. While scientists tend to focus on smog episodes, greenhouse gas emissions, acid rain or emissions of toxic pollutants, the public shows concern in more practical terms such as the overall impact of poor air quality on people and the ecosystem, and how this will affect future life on earth. It was emphasized that policy makers should try to apply this holistic approach to the complex issues associated with air quality. Climate change, acid rain and ultraviolet radiation are some examples of how air emissions impact on ecosystems. Other examples include elevated levels of mercury in otters in Ontario. Climate change has also been linked with the re-acidification of lakes, as droughts typically occur in years following an El Nino cycle which has been pronounced as a possible consequence of greenhouse gas emissions. The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO) has reviewed the efforts of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) regarding the regulation of air quality. The MOE has proposed several initiatives, including newer air dispersion models into legislation, establishing a new consultation process for applying new air quality standards to emission sources, an expansion of the Drive Clean Program, and a discussion paper on a proposed emission cap and trade system. This paper presents ECO's review of these initiatives and provides updates on other air quality issues such as control of emissions from Ontario's transportation, industrial and electricity sectors. It also described policy proposals related to standard-setting for air pollutants, as well as the newly adopted Canada-wide Standards for Particulate Matter and Ozone. A progress report on Ontario's Anti-Smog Action Plan (ASAP) confirms that major reductions in NO{sub x} expected from Ontario's coal-fired power plants never materialized. Emissions of nitrogen oxide

  7. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  8. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... US Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us ... Indoor Air Quality An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality IAQ & Health Causes of IAQ Problems Identifying IAQ ...

  9. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Air and Radiation??s (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as...

  10. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Air and Radiation's (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as...

  11. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Air Quality Guide for Ozone Ground-level ozone is one of our nation’s most common air pollutants. Use the chart below to help reduce ...

  12. Air transportation energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy efficiency of air transportation, results of the recently completed RECAT studies on improvement alternatives, and the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Research Program to develop the technology for significant improvements in future aircraft were reviewed.

  13. Criteria Air Emissions Trends

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Emissions Trends site provides national trends of criteria pollutant and precursor emissions data based on the the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) from...

  14. Indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor Air Quality is rapidly becoming a major environmental concern because a significant amount of people spend a substantial amount of time in a variety of different indoor environments. Health effects from indoor pollutants fall into two categories: those that are experienced immediately after exposure and those that do not show up until years later. They are: radon, formaldehyde, asbestos, lead and household organic chemicals. The authors presented a source-by-source look at the most common indoor air pollutants, their potential health effects, and ways to reduce their levels in the home. There are three basic strategies to improve indoor air quality: one method is source control, another is through ventilation improvements, and the third is the utilization of some sort of mechanical device such as air cleaners

  15. Transportation and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors research. - Modeling & Inventories - Testing & Measuring Emissions - Clean Automotive Technologies - Emission Factors Research This page is maintained by EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) . For more: About Us | Get E-mail ...

  16. Air conditioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Miller, Jeffrey; Gruendeman, Peter; DaSilva, Michael

    2005-02-01

    An air conditioner comprises a plurality of plates arranged in a successively stacked configuration with portions thereof having a spaced apart arrangement, and defining between successive adjacent pairs of plates at the spaced apart portions a first and second series of discrete alternating passages wherein a first air stream is passed through the first series of passages and a second air stream is passed through the second series of passages; and said stacked configuration of plates forming integrally therewith a liquid delivery means for delivering from a source a sufficient quantity of a liquid to the inside surfaces of the first series of fluid passages in a manner which provides a continuous flow of the liquid from a first end to a second end of the plurality of plates while in contact with the first air stream.

  17. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although official efforts to control air pollution have traditionally focused on outdoor air, it is now apparent that elevated contaminant concentrations are common inside some private and public buildings. Concerns about potential public health problems due to indoor air pollution are based on evidence that urban residents typically spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors, concentrations of some contaminants are higher indoors than outdoors, and for some pollutants personal exposures are not characterized adequately by outdoor measurements. Among the more important indoor contaminants associated with health or irritation effects are passive tobacco smoke, radon decay products, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, asbestos fibers, microorganisms and aeroallergens. Efforts to assess health risks associated with indoor air pollution are limited by insufficient information about the number of people exposed, the pattern and severity of exposures, and the health consequences of exposures. An overall strategy should be developed to investigate indoor exposures, health effects, control options, and public policy alternatives

  18. Indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising energy prices, among other factors, have generated an incentive to reduce ventilation rates and thereby reduce the cost of heating and cooling buildings. Reduced ventilation in buildings may significantly increase exposure to indoor air pollution and perhaps have adverse effects on occupant health and comfort. Preliminary findings suggest that reduced ventilation may adversely affect indoor air quality unless appropriate control strategies are undertaken. The strategies used to control indoor air pollution depend on the specific pollutant or class of pollutants encountered, and differ somewhat depending on whether the application is to an existing building or a new building under design and construction. Whenever possible, the first course of action is prevention or reduction of pollutant emissions at the source. In most buildings, control measures involve a combination of prevention, removal, and suppression. Common sources of indoor air pollution in buildings, the specific pollutants emitted by each source, the potential health effects, and possible control techniques are discussed

  19. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  20. Regional Air Quality Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on regional air quality, including trace level SO2, nitric acid, ozone, carbon monoxide, and NOy; and particulate sulfate, nitrate, and...

  1. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  2. INDOOR AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    With the development of modern architecture, one of the building's interior decoration, furnishings, appliances and equipment have become increasingly demanding, making construction of the indoor environment of increasing pollution, increasing pollution, indoor environmental pollution hazards to human is also a growing the greater. This thesis summarizes the major indoor air pollution sources and major pollutants. Indoor air pollutants are formaldehyde, radon, ammonia, total volatile org...

  3. Indoor Air Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk R Smith

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution in developing-country cities is difficult to overlook. Indoor air pollution caused by burning such traditional fuels as wood, crop residues, and dung is less evident, yet it is responsible for a significant part of country and global disease burdens. The main groups affected are poor women and children in rural areas and urban slums as they go about their daily activi...

  4. INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Soysal; Yucel Demiral

    2007-01-01

    The existance of hazardious materials including biological, chemical, and physical agents such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, radon, volotile organic compounds, microorganisms in houses and the other non-industrilized buildings have been defined as “indoor air pollution”. Indoor air pollutants could possible arised from inside or outside environment and categorized into six subgroups. Almost 80% Turkish population have living in the urban areas...

  5. Air Distribution in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The research on air distribution in rooms is often done as full-size investigations, scale-model investigations or by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). New activities have taken place within all three areas and this paper draws comparisons between the different methods. The outcome of the l......EA sponsored research "Air Flow Pattern within Buildings" is used for comparisons in some parts of the paper because various types of experiments and many countries are involved....

  6. Hot Air Engines

    OpenAIRE

    P. Stouffs

    2011-01-01

    Invented in 1816, the hot-air engines have known significant commercial success in the nineteenth century, before falling into disuse. Nowadays they enjoy a renewed interest for some specific applications. The "hot-air engines" family is made up of two groups: Stirling engines and Ericsson engines. The operating principle of Stirling and Ericsson engines, their troubled history, their advantages and their niche applications are briefly presented, especially in the field of...

  7. Air gun test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a facility that is potentially useful in providing data for models to predict the effects of nuclear explosions on cities. IIT Research Institute has a large air gun facility capable of launching heavy items of a wide variety of geometries to velocities ranging from about 80 fps to 1100 fps. The facility and its capabilities are described, and city model problem areas capable of investigation using the air gun are presented

  8. Canada's Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provided an outline of Canada's Clean Air Act and examined some of the regulatory changes that will occur as a result of its implementation. The Act is being introduced to strengthen the legislative basis for taking action on reducing air pollution and GHGs, and will allow the government to regulate both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHGs. The Act will require the Ministers of the Environment and Health to establish national air quality objectives, as well as to monitor and report on their attainment. The Canadian Environmental Protection Act will be amended to enable the government to regulate the blending of fuels and their components. The Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act will also be amended to enhance the government's authority to regulate vehicle fuel efficiency. The Energy Efficiency Act will also be expanded to allow the government to set energy efficiency standards and labelling requirements for a wider range of consumer and commercial products. The Act will commit to short, medium and long-term industrial air pollution targets. Regulations will be proposed for emissions from industry; on-road and off-road vehicles and engines; and consumer and commercial products. It was concluded that the Government of Canada will continue to consult with provinces, territories, industries and Canadians to set and reach targets for the reduction of both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHG emissions. 6 figs

  9. Acute and Subacute Effects of Urban Air Pollution on Cardiopulmonary Emergencies and Mortality: Time Series Studies in Austrian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rabczenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Daily pollution data (collected in Graz over 16 years and in the Linz over 18 years were used for time series studies (GAM and case-crossover on the relationship with daily mortality (overall and specific causes of death. Diagnoses of patients who had been transported to hospitals in Linz were also available on a daily basis from eight years for time series analyses of cardiopulmonary emergencies. Increases in air pollutant levels over several days were followed by increases in mortality and the observed effects increased with the length of the exposure window considered, up to a maximum of 15 days. These mortality changes in Graz and Linz showed similar patterns like the ones found before in Vienna. A significant association of mortality could be demonstrated with NO2, PM2.5 and PM10 even in summer, when concentrations are lower and mainly related to motor traffic. Cardiorespiratory ambulance transports increased with NO2/PM2.5/PM10 by 2.0/6.1/1.7% per 10 µg/m³ on the same day. Monitoring of NO2 (related to motor traffic and fine particulates at urban background stations predicts acute effects on cardiopulmonary emergencies and extended effects on cardiopulmonary mortality. Both components of urban air pollution are indicators of acute cardiopulmonary health risks, which need to be monitored and reduced, even below current standards.

  10. Clean air Hamilton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarry, B.E. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The industrial City of Hamilton is located on Lake Ontario, downwind from the Ohio Valley. The Hamilton Air Quality Initiative (HAQI) was divided in several phases, one of which is Clean Air Hamilton. This most recent phase was described in this presentation. Two major goals of this phase were: to ensure that the City of Hamilton has the best air quality of any major urban area in Ontario, and to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases by 20 per cent compared to the levels in 1990. There were five main objectives to this initiative, namely: (1) the identification of priority air quality issues, (2) achieving an understanding of air quality issues, (3) the identification of sources, the evaluation of impacts and the recommendation of solutions, (4) the assessment of human health, and (5) the identification of further research. The reduction of air quality impacts is progressing through the support provided to the Drive Clean Program, the discouragement of vehicle idling, the support to car pooling initiatives, and the promotion of green vehicles. The implementation of pollution control technologies is taking place on the industrial side, as well as the development of plans to reduce steel industry emissions, the development of energy conservation measures and the promotion of green building practices. Efforts are being deployed over fleet greening partnerships, community tree planting program, an international air conference, an electronic information network linking the United States and the communities of Southern Ontario, a road dust study, a truck emissions research project, the assessment of human health impacts, and finally methods for the monitoring of local improvements. figs.

  11. Computers in Air Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V.S. Rao

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available With man's mastery over the third dimension - the near atmosphere and space- it has become increasingly necessary to protect oneself not merely from attacks from land and the sea but, more importantly, from attacks from the air. This was recognised even during the World War II and a rudimentary air defence capability was sought to be established; by the manul (visual surveillance and the anti-aircraft guns. The advent of radar signified a major advance in air defence technology and techniques. Rather than depend on visual observation and the hazards and limitations thereof, it became possible with radar to detect the presence of flying objects at much great distances. The PPI display of a conventional air-surveillance radar permits an operator to scan the sky for several hundreds of kilometers all around. Early radar-based air defence systems were dependent on human observation and decision making for detecting targets, identifying them, deciding on interception strategy and for recovering the interceptor after completion of his mission. This was feasible because, with a radar of between 200 to 400 kilometers and aircraft speeds in the range of 500 kilometers per hour, upto 30 minutes warning was available before the target was overhead.

  12. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor air pollution after being a neglected subject for a number of years, is attracting attention recently because it is a side effect of energy crisis. About 50% of world's 6 billion population, mostly in developing countries, depend on biomass and coal in the form of wood, dung and crop residues for domestic energy because of poverty. These materials are burnt in simple stoves with incomplete combustion and infants, children and women are exposed to high levels of indoor air pollution for a considerable period, approximately between 2-4 hours daily. Current worldwide trade in wood fuel is over US $7 billion and about 2 million people are employed full time in production and marketing it. One of the most annoying and common indoor pollutant in both, developing and developed countries, is cigarette smoke. Children in gas-equipped homes had higher incidences of respiratory disease. Babies' DNA can be damaged even before they are born if their mothers breathe polluted air. Exposure to indoor air pollution may be responsible for nearly 2 million excess deaths in developing countries and for 4% of the global burden of the disease. Only a few indoor pollutants have been studied in detail. Indoor air pollution is a major health threat on which further research is needed to define the extent of the problem more precisely and to determine solutions by the policy-makers instead of neglecting it because sufferers mostly belong to Third World countries. (author)

  13. Infants Can Study Air Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alan

    1983-01-01

    Provided are activities and demonstrations which can be used to teach infants about the nature of air, uses of air, and objects that fly in the air. The latter include airships, hot-air balloons, kites, parachutes, airplanes, and Hovercraft. (JN)

  14. Selection of Air Terminal Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,......This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,...

  15. The Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clean Air Act amendments alter the complex laws affecting atmospheric pollution and at the same time have broad implications for energy. Specifically, the Clean Air Act amendments for the first time deal with the environmental problem of acid deposition in a way that minimizes energy and economic impacts. By relying upon a market-based system of emission trading, a least cost solution will be used to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions by almost 40 percent. The emission trading system is the centerpiece of the Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments effort to resolve energy and environmental interactions in a manner that will maximize environmental solutions while minimizing energy impacts. This paper will explore how the present CAA amendments deal with the emission trading system and the likely impact of the emission trading system and the CAA amendments upon the electric power industry

  16. Liquid air cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevear, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a definition of Liquid Air Cycle Engines (LACE) and existing relevant technologies. Heat exchanger design and fabrication techniques, the handling of liquid hydrogen to achieve the greatest heat sink capabilities, and air decontamination to prevent heat exchanger fouling are discussed. It was concluded that technology needs to be extended in the areas of design and fabrication of heat exchangers to improve reliability along with weight and volume reductions. Catalysts need to be improved so that conversion can be achieved with lower quantities and lower volumes. Packaging studies need to be investigated both analytically and experimentally. Recycling with slush hydrogen needs further evaluation with experimental testing.

  17. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  18. Air the excellent canopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fahy, F

    2013-01-01

    We take it for granted, but without it we perish and if we continue to abuse it, it may kill us in the end. This fascinating text provides an understanding and appreciation of the role that air plays in our environment and its importance in relation to human life and technology. Aimed at those who are scientifically curious but who have no specialist training, it contains no mathematical equations and relies upon the qualitative descriptions and analogies to explain the more technical parts of the text together with simple home experiments to illustrate a range of air-based phenomena. Liberall

  19. Air Freight and Logistics Services

    OpenAIRE

    Kiso, Fadila; Deljanin, Abidin

    2009-01-01

    Air transport industry has gradually increased its share of global passenger and freight traffic, and this trend has accelerated in the last 40 years. For the past decade, air-freight traffic growth has outpaced air passenger traffic growth by 1-2% each year. In the past, air-freight sector offered limited services, with heavy reliance on several intermediaries and a significant dependence on air passenger operations. The sector can now be characterized as a sophisticated, innovative one, rel...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  1. Indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor air pollution is a potential risk to human health. Prolonged exposure to indoor pollutants may cause various infectious, allergic and other diseases. Indoor pollutants can emanate from a broad array of internal and external sources. Internal sources include building and furnishing materials, consumer and commercial products, office equipment, micro-organisms, pesticides and human occupants activities. External sources include soil, water supplies and outside makeup air. The main indoor air pollutants of concern are inorganic gases, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, pesticides, radon and its daughters, particulates and microbes. The magnitude of human exposure to indoor pollutants can be estimated or predicted with the help of mathematical models which have been developed using the data from source emission testing and field monitoring of pollutants. In order to minimize human exposure to indoor pollutants, many countries have formulated guidelines / standards for the maximum permissible levels of main pollutants. Acceptable indoor air quality can be achieved by controlling indoor pollution sources and by effective ventilation system for removal of indoor pollutants. (author)

  2. Indoor air quality research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various types of pollutant found in indoor air are introduced and the effects on the health of the occupants of buildings summarized. The ''sick'' building syndrome is described in detail and the need for further investigation into its causes and remedies is stressed. 8 tabs

  3. Mid-air Acrobatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Two new aerobatic demonstration teams take to the skies On September 1,two new aerobatic demonstration teams,the Sky Wing and the Red Falcon,debuted at an air show held in Changchun,capital of northeast China’s Jilin Province.

  4. Russia air management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, T.G. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NC (United States); Markin, S. [Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources, Moscow (Sweden); Kosenkova, S.V. [Volgograd Environmental Services Administration, Volgograd (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The Russia Air Management Program is in the second year of a four-year cooperative program between the Russian Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources (MEPNR) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to improve national institutions, policies, and practices for air quality management in Russia. This program is part of the Environmental Policy and Technology project being conducted by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Russia Air Management Program will pilot the application of potential air program improvements in the important industrial City of Volgograd which will enable the development, practical demonstration and evaluation of alternative approaches for improving AQM policies and practices in Russia. Volgograd has a progressive and environmentally enlightened local government, a diverse industrial base and a relatively healthy economy. It is located south of Moscow on the Volga River and was proposed by the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources. It was selected after a site visit and a series of discussions with the Ministry, Volgograd officials, the World Bank and the EPA. Following the pilot, RAMP will work to facilitate implementation of selected parts of the pilot in other areas of Russia using training, technology transfer, and public awareness. (author)

  5. Air Quality Monitoring Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K.; Palmgren, F.

    The Danish Air Quality Monitoring Programme (LMP IV) has been revised in accordance with the Framework Directive and the first three daughter directives of SO2, NOx/NO2, PM10, lead, benzene, CO and ozone. PM10 samplers are under installation and the installation will be completed during 2002...

  6. Indoor Air Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selman, Ayser Dawod; Heiselberg, Per

    Overall purpose of the research is to provide an overview of the relevance and importance of various defined Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) parameters in a European perspective. Based on the report it should be possible to prioritize which countries to target for further activities as well as it should...

  7. Hexane Air Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Philipp A; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2010-01-01

    Hot surface ignition and subsequent flame propagation of premixed n-hexane air mixtures are shown in this fluid dynamics video. High speed schlieren photography revealed 3 distinct behaviors of ignition and propagation as a function of mixture composition and initial pressure.

  8. Images in the Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, H. G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two "magic tricks" in terms of underlying optical principles. The first trick is new and produces a "ghost" in the air, and the second is the classical real image produced with two parabolic mirrors. (Contains 2 figure and 6 photos.)

  9. Ames Air Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Roger Z.

    2015-01-01

    This is an informal presentation presented to the University of Colorado, Boulder Bioastronautics group seminar. It highlights the key focal areas of the Air Revitalization Group research over the past year, including progress on the CO2 Removal and Compression System, testing of CDRA drying bed configurations, and adsorption research.

  10. Hydrogen-air detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General gaseous detonation propagation phenomena are briefly discussed. The importance of cellular structure and cell size to detonation initiation, transmission and failure is emphasized. Experimental measurements of cell size lambda for hydrogen-air-carbon dioxide mixtures are presented; the hydrogen/air volume ratios range between 0.16 and 1.5 and the carbon dioxide mole fractions are 0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15. Cell sizes are a minimum for both diluted and undiluted hydrogen-air mixtures near stoichiometric (i.e., hydrogen/air = 0.4). Minimum cell sizes for carbon dioxide mole fractions of 0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 are 1.51, 2.05, 4.2 and 15.0 cm, respectively. Results of large- and small-scale critical tube diameter (d/sub c/) measurements are presented and show good agreement with the empirical scaling law, d/sub c/ = 13 lambda. Mean detonation velocities and pressures have been measured and compared to the theoretical Chapman-Jouguet values

  11. Air-cleaning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An air-cleaning, heat-exchange apparatus includes a main housing portion connected by means of an air inlet fan to the kitchen exhaust stack of a restaurant. The apparatus includes a plurality of heat exchangers through which a heat-absorptive fluid is circulated, simultaneously, by means of a suitable fluid pump. These heat exchangers absorb heat from the hot exhaust gas, out of the exhaust stack of the restaurant, which flows over and through these heat exchangers and transfers this heat to the circulating fluid which communicates with remote heat exchangers. These remote heat exchangers further transfer this heat to a stream of air, such as that from a cold-air return duct for supplementing the conventional heating system of the restaurant. Due to the fact that such hot exhaust gas is heavily grease laden , grease will be deposited on virtually all internal surfaces of the apparatus which this exhaust gas contacts. Consequently, means are provided for spraying these contacted internal surfaces , as well as the hot exhaust gas itself, with a detergent solution in which the grease is soluble, thereby removing grease buildup from these internal surfaces

  12. Learning AirWatch

    CERN Document Server

    Dunkerley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    If you are a technical professional who wants to dive deeper into the functionality offered by AirWatch or manage the solution, then this book will help you choose the best set of configuration, device management, and monitoring options that you can use to effectively manage your EMM implementation.

  13. Air quality indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes and describes in detail several air quality indicators that may be used to describe population exposure. The suggested indicators account for temporal and spatial patterns of pollution and movements of individuals between different micro-environments. The Air Quality Indicator /AQI) should represent both the spatial and temporal aspects of pollution exposure that may have important effects on health. Two indicators are needed, the Population Air Quality Indicator and the Individual Air Quality Indicator. Mean concentrations, 98th percentile and maximum values are the traditional indicators for estimating exposure. the temporal variability of PM-10 and NO2, however, is here described by means of: 1) The rate of change of pollution as the difference between two consecutive hourly values and of 2) episodes, described in terms of number, duration and winter episode period, maximum concentration in the episode and integrated episode exposure (episode AOT50/100). The spatial variation of AQIs can be described in several ways, e.g.: 1) Concentrations in neighbouring grid squares can be compared as an indication of spatial variation and 2) point estimates can be compared to grid values for a description of variation within a grid. Both methods are presented here. A test of the representativity of static point estimates for pollution exposure is to compare them to an estimate of air pollution exposure accounting for movements between different locations, obtained using diaries. The ultimate aim of AQIs is to describe the population exposure to ambient pollution. This is done by estimating the number of people exposed using different characteristics of AQIs. The data used to describe these indicators originates from dispersion modelling of short-term air pollution concentrations in Oslo. Two series of data are used. One represents hour-for hour concentrations in the 1 km2 grid system covering the city of Oslo, winter 1994/95, calculated by the grid

  14. Role sestry v proktologické ambulanci

    OpenAIRE

    Šulcová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical basis: The problems in rectal and anal diseases have had rising tendency, especially haemorrhoidal diseases, on which we put emphasis in our bachelor thesis. 37% of adult population suffers from this disease so we may line it up to civilization illnesses. Their treatment involves wide range of medical methods, from the conservative therapy to semi invasive ways of treatment. The semi invasive treatment is well withstood by patients and it can help up to 90% of clients. This bachel...

  15. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Air movement - good or bad? The question can only be answered by those who are exposed when they are exposed. Human perception of air movement depends on environmental factors including air velocity, air velocity fluctuations, air temperature, and personal factors such as overall thermal sensation...... and activity level. Even for the same individual, sensitivity to air movement may change from day to day as a result of e.g. different levels of fatigue. Based on existing literature, the current paper summarizes factors influencing the human perception of air movement and attempts to specify in...... general terms when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation...

  16. EN EL AIRE / In the air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés López Fernández

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN En el aire es un viaje a la primera mitad del siglo XX que nos tratará de acercar la frescura y oportunidad de las calles corredor y los jardines en la ciudad vertical. Se inicia en 1909 en Nueva York, con la publicación por la revista Life de La Torre del Globo, se acerca al Inmueble-Villas y al Plan Obus para Argel de Le Corbusier, y finaliza en 1952 con el proyecto para el conjunto residencial de Golden Lane en Londres de A. y P. Smithson. Fragmentos para la ciudad vertical que se construía sobre papel, tras el espejo, paralela en el tiempo, pero muy distinta a la ciudad real, con el objetivo entre otros de integrar arquitectura y naturaleza. Esas propuestas siguen teniendo hoy un gran valor, en un panorama en que el espacio público ligado a la vivienda colectiva, prácticamente ha desaparecido, y el esfuerzo que se demanda al arquitecto se centra, en tejer a modo de encaje de bolillos, una fachada que envuelva un programa de vivienda, funcional y espacialmente obsoleto.SUMMARY In the air, is a journey to the first half of the twentieth century that will try to bring us to the freshness and opportunity of the corridor streets and gardens in the vertical city. It begins in 1909 in New York, with the publication in Life magazine of the Globe Tower, it approaches the Immeubles-Villas and Plan Obus for Algiers by Le Corbusier, and ends in 1952 with the project for the Golden Lane Estate residential complex in London, by A. and P. Smithson. Fragments for the vertical city that was constructed on paper, behind the mirror, parallel in time, but was very different from the real city, with the aim, inter alia, of integrating architecture and nature. These proposals continue to have great value today, in a scenario where the public space linked to the collective home has virtually disappeared, and the effort that is demanded of the architect focuses on weaving a facade like bobbin lace around a functionally and spatially obsolete housing

  17. Molecular Air Data Clear Air Turbulence Sensor: MADCAT Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear air turbulence (CAT), often referred to as "air pockets," is attributed to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at altitudes usually above 18,000ft, often without...

  18. Molecular Air Data Clear Air Turbulence Sensor: MADCAT Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear air turbulence (CAT), often referred to as "air pockets," is attributed to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at altitudes generally above 18,000ft, often in the...

  19. Enhancing indoor air quality –The air filter advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Vannan Kandi Vijayan; Haralappa Paramesh; Sundeep Santosh Salvi; Alpa Anil Kumar Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has become the world's single biggest environmental health risk, linked to around 7 million deaths in 2012 according to a recent World Health Organisation (WHO) report. The new data further reveals a stronger link between, indoor and outdoor air pollution exposure and cardiovascular diseases, such as strokes and ischemic heart disease, as well as between air pollution and cancer. The role of air pollution in the development of respiratory diseases, including acute respiratory in...

  20. Air sampling in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC's Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ''Air sampling in the Workplace.'' That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC's regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed

  1. A Breath of Fresh Air: Addressing Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution refers to "chemical, biological, and physical contamination of indoor air," which may result in adverse health effects (OECD 2003). The causes, sources, and types of indoor air pollutants will be addressed in this article, as well as health effects and how to reduce exposure. Learning more about potential pollutants in home…

  2. Indoor Air Quality in Schools: Clean Air Is Good Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneiri, Michele A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the effect of poor indoor air quality (IAQ) on student health, the cost of safeguarding good IAQ, the cause of poor IAQ in schools, how to tell whether a school has an IAQ problem, and how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can help schools improve indoor air quality though the use of their free "Indoor Air Quality Tools for…

  3. Properties of air and combustion products of fuel with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties have been calculated for air, the combustion products of natural gas and air, and combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air. Properties calculated include: ratio of specific heats, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy.

  4. Aeromicrobiology/air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Gary L.; Frisch, A.S.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Levetin, E.; Lighthart, Bruce; Paterno, D.

    2009-01-01

    The most prevalent microorganisms, viruses, bacteria, and fungi, are introduced into the atmosphere from many anthropogenic sources such as agricultural, industrial and urban activities, termed microbial air pollution (MAP), and natural sources. These include soil, vegetation, and ocean surfaces that have been disturbed by atmospheric turbulence. The airborne concentrations range from nil to great numbers and change as functions of time of day, season, location, and upwind sources. While airborne, they may settle out immediately or be transported great distances. Further, most viable airborne cells can be rendered nonviable due to temperature effects, dehydration or rehydration, UV radiation, and/or air pollution effects. Mathematical microbial survival models that simulate these effects have been developed.

  5. Air Pollution in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of improvements relative to air pollution, there is still much to do. more than thirty millions of European people are exposed to sulfur dioxide concentrations superior to guide values for health fixed by European Union, 20% of ecosystems in Europe are above the critical charges in the area of acidification and 33% concern eutrophication. Relative to the carbon dioxide, it is not sure that European Union realize the objective to stabilize the emissions for the year 2000 at the level of the year 1990, because of the increasing of automobile traffic and the energy consumption. Four subjects are presented: the climatic change, acidification and eutrophication, tropospheric ozone and air quality. (N.C.)

  6. Hot Air Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stouffs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Invented in 1816, the hot-air engines have known significant commercial success in the nineteenth century, before falling into disuse. Nowadays they enjoy a renewed interest for some specific applications. The "hot-air engines" family is made up of two groups: Stirling engines and Ericsson engines. The operating principle of Stirling and Ericsson engines, their troubled history, their advantages and their niche applications are briefly presented, especially in the field of micro-combined heat and power, solar energy conversion and biomass energy conversion. The design of an open cycle Ericsson engine for solar application is proposed. A first prototype of the hot part of the engine has been built and tested. Experimental results are presented.

  7. Air transport system

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The book addresses all major aspects to be considered for the design and operation of aircrafts within the entire transportation chain. It provides the basic information about the legal environment, which defines the basic requirements for aircraft design and aircraft operation. The interactions between  airport, air traffic management and the airlines are described. The market forecast methods and the aircraft development process are explained to understand the very complex and risky business of an aircraft manufacturer. The principles of flight physics as basis for aircraft design are presented and linked to the operational and legal aspects of air transport including all environmental impacts. The book is written for graduate students as well as for engineers and experts, who are working in aerospace industry, at airports or in the domain of transport and logistics.

  8. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU......) and Spencer C. Sorenson (ET). The theory which decribes in detail the overall dynamic chracteristics of the sensor was developed at IAU, DTU....

  9. Urban air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1950 the world population has more than doubled, and the global number of cars has increased by a factor of 10. In the same period the fraction of people living in urban areas has increased by a factor of 4. In year 2000 this will amount to nearly half of the world population. About 20 urban regions will each have populations above 10 million people. Seen over longer periods, pollution in major cities tends to increase during the built up phase, they pass through a maximum and are then again reduced, as abatement strategies are developed. In the industrialised western world urban air pollution is in some respects in the last stage with effectively reduced levels of sulphur dioxide and soot. In recent decades however, the increasing traffic has switched the attention to nitrogen oxides, organic compounds and small particles. In some cities photochemical air pollution is an important urban problem, but in the northern part of Europe it is a large-scale phenomenon, with ozone levels in urban streets being normally lower than in rural areas. Cities in Eastern Europe have been (and in many cases still are) heavily polluted. After the recent political upheaval, followed by a temporary recession and a subsequent introduction of new technologies, the situation appears to improve. However, the rising number of private cars is an emerging problem. In most developing countries the rapid urbanisation has so far resulted in uncontrolled growth and deteriorating environment. Air pollution levels are here still rising on many fronts. Apart from being sources of local air pollution, urban activities are significant contributors to transboundary pollution and to the rising global concentrations of greenhouse gasses. Attempts to solve urban problems by introducing cleaner, more energy-efficient technologies will generally have a beneficial impact on these large-scale problems. Attempts based on city planning with a spreading of the activities, on the other hand, may generate

  10. Urban air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, Jes

    Since 1950 the world population has more than doubled, and the global number of cars has increased by a factor of 10. In the same period the fraction of people living in urban areas has increased by a factor of 4. In year 2000 this will amount to nearly half of the world population. About 20 urban regions will each have populations above 10 million people. Seen over longer periods, pollution in major cities tends to increase during the built up phase, they pass through a maximum and are then again reduced, as abatement strategies are developed. In the industrialised western world urban air pollution is in some respects in the last stage with effectively reduced levels of sulphur dioxide and soot. In recent decades however, the increasing traffic has switched the attention to nitrogen oxides, organic compounds and small particles. In some cities photochemical air pollution is an important urban problem, but in the northern part of Europe it is a large-scale phenomenon, with ozone levels in urban streets being normally lower than in rural areas. Cities in Eastern Europe have been (and in many cases still are) heavily polluted. After the recent political upheaval, followed by a temporary recession and a subsequent introduction of new technologies, the situation appears to improve. However, the rising number of private cars is an emerging problem. In most developing countries the rapid urbanisation has so far resulted in uncontrolled growth and deteriorating environment. Air pollution levels are here still rising on many fronts. Apart from being sources of local air pollution, urban activities are significant contributors to transboundary pollution and to the rising global concentrations of greenhouse gasses. Attempts to solve urban problems by introducing cleaner, more energy-efficient technologies will generally have a beneficial impact on these large-scale problems. Attempts based on city planning with a spreading of the activities, on the other hand, may generate

  11. Air Facility System (AFS) Widget

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Facility System (AFS) widget allows users to enter a specific location and retrieve facilities in the area of interest for stationary sources of air...

  12. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more announcements Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke from fires | What You Can ... Partners Kids Movies NAQ Conferences NOAA Older Adults Ozone Particle Pollution (PM2.5, PM10) Publications Publicaciones (En ...

  13. State of the Air 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Banners Social Media What's the State of Your Air ? Home > 2015 > States States State List FAQ Understanding ... Environment: Act Locally What You Can Do Healthy Air News Facebook Twitter Google Plus Instagram © American Lung ...

  14. Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD) which logs all air pollution complaints...

  15. Air Markets Program Data (AMPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Markets Program Data tool allows users to search EPA data to answer scientific, general, policy, and regulatory questions about industry emissions. Air...

  16. Air System Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  17. Air transparent soundproof window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation

  18. Air transparent soundproof window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hoon Kim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  19. Air transparent soundproof window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon, E-mail: shkim@mmu.ac.kr [Division of Marine Engineering, Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo 530-729, R. O. Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seong-Hyun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343, R. O. Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  20. Human preference for air movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Tynel, A.;

    2002-01-01

    Human preference for air movement was studied at slightly cool, neutral, and slightly warm overall thermal sensations and at temperatures ranging from 18 deg.C to 28 deg.C. Air movement preference depended on both thermal sensation and temperature, but large inter-individual differences existed...... between subjects. Preference for less air movement was linearly correlated with draught discomfort, but the percentage of subjects who felt draught was lower than the percentage who preferred less air movement....

  1. Air quality assessment for Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, A; Miranda, A. I.; C. Borrego; R. Vautard

    2007-01-01

    According to the Air Quality Framework Directive, air pollutant concentration levels have to be assessed and reported annually by each European Union member state, taking into consideration European air quality standards. Plans and programmes should be implemented in zones and agglomerations where pollutant concentrations exceed the limit and target values. The main objective of this study is to perform a long-term air quality simulation for Portugal, using the CHIMERE chemistry-transport mod...

  2. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  3. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  4. Overview of Emerging Air Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    These slides will be presented at the 2014 National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference in Atlanta, GA during August 11-15, 2014. The goal is to provide an overview of air sensor technology and the audience will be primarily state air monitoring agencies and EPA Regions.

  5. Pupils' Understanding of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Anastasia; Christidou, Vasilia

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of pupils' knowledge and understanding of atmospheric pollution. Specifically, the study is aimed at identifying: 1) the extent to which pupils conceptualise the term "air pollution" in a scientifically appropriate way; 2) pupils' knowledge of air pollution sources and air pollutants; and 3) pupils' knowledge of air…

  6. Air Consumption Analysis of Air-Jet Weaving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJ KUMAR KHIANI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Textile industry, production is mostly key concern for Industry owner. This always has attracted researchers and machines manufacturers to make new developments in process and machines. Air-jet is one of the leading and successful highest productive weaving machines. However, it is now well established that due to add of charges of compressed air, manufacturing cost of air-jet weaving machine is higher as compared with rapier and projectile weaving machines. This is why countries having energy issues do not prefer air-jet weaving machines comparing projectile weaving machines. In this regard, several researchers and machine manufacturers have continuously been working to improve the efficiency of air-jet weft insertion. However, industry practice is as important as design made by researchers. The aim of this research is to investigate the air consumption of air-jet weaving on industrial scale practice. In this study, five weaving machine of same manufacturer and model were selected. It was observed that despite of manufacturing same quality of fabric, air consumption was varying almost in all weaving machines. Conventionally, mill workers adopt hit and trial practice in weaving industry including airpressure setting which leads to variation of nozzle pressure. Main reason of disparity of air consumption in air-jet weaving machines may be variation of distance from compressor to weaving machines, number of joints, un-necessary valve opening and pipes leakages cause an increase of compressed air consumption.

  7. Enhancing indoor air quality –The air filter advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannan Kandi Vijayan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution has become the world's single biggest environmental health risk, linked to around 7 million deaths in 2012 according to a recent World Health Organisation (WHO report. The new data further reveals a stronger link between, indoor and outdoor air pollution exposure and cardiovascular diseases, such as strokes and ischemic heart disease, as well as between air pollution and cancer. The role of air pollution in the development of respiratory diseases, including acute respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, is well known. While both indoor and outdoor pollution affect health, recent statistics on the impact of household indoor pollutants (HAP is alarming. The WHO factsheet on HAP and health states that 3.8 million premature deaths annually - including stroke, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer are attributed to exposure to household air pollution. Use of air cleaners and filters are one of the suggested strategies to improve indoor air quality. This review discusses the impact of air pollutants with special focus on indoor air pollutants and the benefits of air filters in improving indoor air quality.

  8. Enhancing indoor air quality -The air filter advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vannan Kandi; Paramesh, Haralappa; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Dalal, Alpa Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has become the world's single biggest environmental health risk, linked to around 7 million deaths in 2012 according to a recent World Health Organisation (WHO) report. The new data further reveals a stronger link between, indoor and outdoor air pollution exposure and cardiovascular diseases, such as strokes and ischemic heart disease, as well as between air pollution and cancer. The role of air pollution in the development of respiratory diseases, including acute respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, is well known. While both indoor and outdoor pollution affect health, recent statistics on the impact of household indoor pollutants (HAP) is alarming. The WHO factsheet on HAP and health states that 3.8 million premature deaths annually - including stroke, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are attributed to exposure to household air pollution. Use of air cleaners and filters are one of the suggested strategies to improve indoor air quality. This review discusses the impact of air pollutants with special focus on indoor air pollutants and the benefits of air filters in improving indoor air quality. PMID:26628762

  9. Laboratory study of air sparging: Air flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory flow visualization experiments, using glass beads as the porous medium, were conducted to study air sparging, an innovative technology for subsurface contaminant remediation. The purpose of these experiments was to observe how air flows through saturated porous media and to obtain a basic understanding of air plume formation and medium heterogeneity effects. The experiments indicate that air flow occurring in discrete, stable channels is the most probable flow behavior in medium to fine grained water saturated porous media and that medium heterogeneity plays an important role in the development of air channels. Several simulated scales of heterogeneities, from pore to field, have been studied. The results suggest that air channel formation is sensitive to the various scales of heterogeneities. Site-specific hydrogeologic settings have to be carefully reviewed before air sparging is applied to remediate sites contaminated by volatile organic compounds

  10. Adobe AIR for Android -sovelluskehitys

    OpenAIRE

    Palovuori, Jani

    2011-01-01

    Tässä opinnäytetyössä käsitellään sovelluskehitystä Android-laitteille Adoben AIR for Android -tekniikkaa hyväksi käyttäen. Tavoitteena on esitellä sovelluskehityksen periaatteita Adoben Flash-tekniikkaan pohjautuvan AIR for Android -teknologian kannalta. Työ on tehty Yleisradio Oy:n toimeksiantona ja toimii johdatuksena AIR-sovelluksen kehittämiseen AIR for Android -teknologialla. Työssä esitellään yleisesti rikkaat internet-sovellukset ja käydään tarkemmin läpi Adoben AIR-teknologia sek...

  11. Air Risk Information Support Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  12. Control of air toxics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory has supported the US DOE's Flue Gas Cleanup Program objective by developing new or improved environmental controls for industries that use fossil fuels. Argonne's pollutant emissions research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing, to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. The work on air toxics is currently divided into two components: Investigating measures to improve the removal of mercury in existing pollution-control systems applied to coal combustion; and, Developing sensors and control techniques for emissions found in the textile industry

  13. In the air

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés López Fernández

    2011-01-01

    RESUMEN En el aire es un viaje a la primera mitad del siglo XX que nos tratará de acercar la frescura y oportunidad de las calles corredor y los jardines en la ciudad vertical. Se inicia en 1909 en Nueva York, con la publicación por la revista Life de La Torre del Globo, se acerca al Inmueble-Villas y al Plan Obus para Argel de Le Corbusier, y finaliza en 1952 con el proyecto para el conjunto residencial de Golden Lane en Londres de A. y P. Smithson. Fragmentos para la ciudad vertical que se ...

  14. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1 trial protocol. Computerised on-scene decision support for emergency ambulance staff to assess and plan care for older people who have fallen: evaluation of costs and benefits using a pragmatic cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many emergency ambulance calls are for older people who have fallen. As half of them are left at home, a community-based response may often be more appropriate than hospital attendance. The SAFER 1 trial will assess the costs and benefits of a new healthcare technology - hand-held computers with computerised clinical decision support (CCDS software - to help paramedics decide who needs hospital attendance, and who can be safely left at home with referral to community falls services. Methods/Design Pragmatic cluster randomised trial with a qualitative component. We shall allocate 72 paramedics ('clusters' at random between receiving the intervention and a control group delivering care as usual, of whom we expect 60 to complete the trial. Patients are eligible if they are aged 65 or older, live in the study area but not in residential care, and are attended by a study paramedic following an emergency call for a fall. Seven to 10 days after the index fall we shall offer patients the opportunity to opt out of further follow up. Continuing participants will receive questionnaires after one and 6 months, and we shall monitor their routine clinical data for 6 months. We shall interview 20 of these patients in depth. We shall conduct focus groups or semi-structured interviews with paramedics and other stakeholders. The primary outcome is the interval to the first subsequent reported fall (or death. We shall analyse this and other measures of outcome, process and cost by 'intention to treat'. We shall analyse qualitative data thematically. Discussion Since the SAFER 1 trial received funding in August 2006, implementation has come to terms with ambulance service reorganisation and a new national electronic patient record in England. In response to these hurdles the research team has adapted the research design, including aspects of the intervention, to meet the needs of the ambulance services. In conclusion this complex emergency care

  15. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1) trial protocol. Computerised on-scene decision support for emergency ambulance staff to assess and plan care for older people who have fallen: evaluation of costs and benefits using a pragmatic cluster randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Many emergency ambulance calls are for older people who have fallen. As half of them are left at home, a community-based response may often be more appropriate than hospital attendance. The SAFER 1 trial will assess the costs and benefits of a new healthcare technology - hand-held computers with computerised clinical decision support (CCDS) software - to help paramedics decide who needs hospital attendance, and who can be safely left at home with referral to community falls services. Methods/Design Pragmatic cluster randomised trial with a qualitative component. We shall allocate 72 paramedics ('clusters') at random between receiving the intervention and a control group delivering care as usual, of whom we expect 60 to complete the trial. Patients are eligible if they are aged 65 or older, live in the study area but not in residential care, and are attended by a study paramedic following an emergency call for a fall. Seven to 10 days after the index fall we shall offer patients the opportunity to opt out of further follow up. Continuing participants will receive questionnaires after one and 6 months, and we shall monitor their routine clinical data for 6 months. We shall interview 20 of these patients in depth. We shall conduct focus groups or semi-structured interviews with paramedics and other stakeholders. The primary outcome is the interval to the first subsequent reported fall (or death). We shall analyse this and other measures of outcome, process and cost by 'intention to treat'. We shall analyse qualitative data thematically. Discussion Since the SAFER 1 trial received funding in August 2006, implementation has come to terms with ambulance service reorganisation and a new national electronic patient record in England. In response to these hurdles the research team has adapted the research design, including aspects of the intervention, to meet the needs of the ambulance services. In conclusion this complex emergency care trial will provide

  16. Building air exhaustion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An opening is formed on the side wall of a building such as of a nuclear power plant, and a blow out panel is held (supported) by a clip for closing the opening. A large-diameter pipeline is connected at one end to the opening so as to cover the blow out panel, and immersed at the other end in a pool water. When a pipeline such as of main steam pipelines is ruptured in the building, high temperature and high pressure coolants are flown out from the ruptured port, and the pressure in the building is elevated. The blow out panel falls off from the side of the building by the elevation of the pressure in the building. Steams or compressed air discharged from the opening is introduced to the pool through the large diameter pipeline, then the steams are condensed by the pool water and radioactive materials contained in the condensed steams are kept in the pool water. Radioactive materials contained in the released compression air are also removed into the pool water. (I.N.)

  17. Baltimore Air Toxics Study (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.A. [Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Baltimore Air Toxics Study is one of the three urban air toxics initiatives funded by EPA to support the development of the national air toxics strategy. As part of this project, the Air Quality Integrated Management System (AIMS) is under development. AIMS is designed to bring together the key components of urban air quality management into an integrated system, including emissions assessment, air quality modeling, and air quality monitoring. Urban area source emissions are computed for a wide range of pollutants and source categories, and are joined with existing point source emissions data. Measured air quality data are used to evaluate the adequacy of the emissions data and model treatments as a function of season, meteorological parameters, and daytime/nighttime conditions. Based on tested model performance, AIMS provides the potential to improve the ability to predict air quality benefits of alternative control options for criteria and toxic air pollutants. This paper describes the methods used to develop AIMS, and provides examples from its application in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The use of AIMS in the future to enhance environmental management of major industrial facilities also will be addressed in the paper.

  18. Comparison of indoor air and outdoor air contaminant concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Pykhova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Since most people spend their time indoors, there has been increased interest in air pollution concen-trations. Number of very small liquid and solid particles suspended in the air is depending on different factors. But how should be decreased particle number? The field of this work is particulate matter concentration in the indoor and outdoor air. Measurements were carried out in number concentration. The Indoor-Outdoor correlation was de-termined in order to investigate normative parti...

  19. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunesada Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  20. Sights from the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartara, P.

    2009-04-01

    The first aerial shots were taken by aerostat balloon during the second half of the nineteen century for military purpose and subsequently utilized for civilian, archaeological and town planning uses (Roman Forum 1900, Pompei 1910, Venezia 1913, etc.). Sights from the air have given the most objective representation of the landscape and traces progressively left by human activities. After the First World War the use of airplanes for photogrammetric shots suitable to create cartography (territorial map making) has permitted to realize a good basic documentation; successively it has been increased by aerial reconnaissance during the Second World War. Aerial shots by RAF, USAF and Luftwaffe brought to the establishment of rich aerial photograph Archives, particularly in Europe, which have had a very low utilization for the historical restoration of landscape. From the fifties, aerial documentation becomes systematic for different scale analysis and territorial planning. The use of satellite imagery and multispectral bands integrates the historical and recent aerial photographs; the former is particularly helpful for cartography updating, for large scale environmental analysis, for study and research of territories with not available air photographs or lacking in aerial shots. The amount and density of archaeological buried evidences, unknown at the most, is very substantial in Italy and in the whole Mediterranean area; here air-photo interpretation is being applied at advanced levels, but not systematically, since several decades. Some archaeological research teams, working for the knowledge of territorial cultural heritage, utilize historical and recent aerial photographs intensively (aerial photographs previous the II WW, just before the intensive and extensive use of mechanical means to till the land, preserve a large amount of traces or cropmarks of buried evidences; recent shots taken on different conditions of climate and crops, allow to see and read important

  1. Air climate health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'France Nature Environnement Ile de France' publishes, on occasion of the COP 21, a special paper about the air pollution in the Paris region, greenhouse gases and their influence on the environment. This document has been written in close cooperation with professionals and civil associations. Elected representatives from local and regional authorities also speak about their experiences. The first part emphasizes the urgency to accelerate preventive and corrective measures since the air pollution, after slightly decreasing in the 2000's, remains stable. Our work is a science based analysis of essential parameters and details the impact of local pollution and greenhouse gases on the climate. It is based on the GIEC 2013 and 2015 reports, as well as the work of National meteorology in association with the Climate agency of Paris. The threshold of not exceeding an average temperature of +2 deg. C in 2100 is almost reached. If consumption of fossil energies does not heavily decline in the next 10 years, the earth's thermal machine will enter, for several centuries, into an uncontrollable cycle which could endanger life on earth with average temperatures exceeding 4 to 6 deg. C above the current level. The second part reveals the impact of air pollution on the health of the Paris region's population, especially on women who are the most affected by respiratory diseases: obstructive pulmonary bronchitis and asthma. Four departments are particularly affected: Paris, Seine-et-Marne, Seine-Saint-Denis and Val-d'Oise. Even though we do not have the formal causal proof between gas concentration and disease, analysis of similar situations worldwide eliminate any doubts about the reality of the relationship. The third part proposes solutions which can be implemented by local government, companies, but also civil associations and citizens in order to quickly decrease greenhouse gas production. Solutions range from energy sobriety to change in travel

  2. Air Quality and Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and air quality are closely related: through the policy measures implemented to mitigate these major environmental threats but also through the geophysical processes that drive them. We designed, developed and implemented a comprehensive regional air quality and climate modeling System to investigate future air quality in Europe taking into account the combined pressure of future climate change and long range transport. Using the prospective scenarios of the last generation of pathways for both climate change (emissions of well mixed greenhouse gases) and air pollutants, we can provide a quantitative view into the possible future air quality in Europe. We find that ozone pollution will decrease substantially under the most stringent scenario but the efforts of the air quality legislation will be adversely compensated by the penalty of global warming and long range transport for the business as usual scenario. For particulate matter, the projected reduction of emissions efficiently reduces exposure levels. (authors)

  3. Air ions and aerosol science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  4. Air ions and aerosol science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammet, H. [Department of Environmental Physics, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia (Estonia) 2400

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4{endash}1.8 nm. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. The weight of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once a controversial idea, the fact that gases like air have weight can easily be demonstrated using reasonably precise scales in the modern teaching laboratory. But unlike a liquid, where a mechanical model suggests a pile of hard spheres resting on each other, gas molecules are in continual motion and can have minimal interaction. How should we think about the effect these molecules have on the scale? And more importantly, how should we explain it to students? Several models of gas behavior are employed to answer these questions and it is shown how the weight of a gas is, like electric current, an emergent phenomena in contrast to the weight of a liquid which is direct or causal. (paper)

  6. Photochemical air pollution syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamming, W.J.; MacBeth, W.C.; Chass, R.L.

    1967-01-01

    There are two distinct pollution problems in the Los Angeles Basin - one in winter, the other most frequently in summer and fall. In winter the concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black filterable aerosols are higher than in summer, but the secondary pollutants such as ozone and photochemical oxidants are not as high. The photochemical air pollution syndrome is due to a pattern set by previous smog attacks. This pattern is due to low wind speeds, low inversion heights, a trajectory to carry the pollution and sufficient sunlight to photodissociate the nitrogen dioxide formed and to form nitric oxide and atomic oxygen. The results are high levels of oxidant or ozone and large quantities of particles. 5 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Change in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviation has a key part to play in the future protection of the environment. Such issues as climate change raise serious questions for all of us, but particularly for energy-intensive industries such as aviation, which makes a small but identifiable contribution to man's impact on the global climate. Airlines, such as British Airways, must strive to meet ever-higher standards of environmental performance. Environmental challenges facing the aviation industry are categorized as: noise, emissions and fuel efficiency, waste of energy, water and material, congestion in the air and on the ground, tourism and conservation. These headings have proved to be robust and our environmental programmes have, accordingly, been deployed under them

  8. metropolitana en Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pírez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a description of some concrete processes that made up the transformations in the metropolitan configuration and functioning in Buenos Aires in the 1990s during the 20th Century. We are referring to components related to the impact of processes at the macro level (national and international pertaining to restructuring and globalisation. We aim to understand the “forces” that mediate between the global and the local arenas, identifying the actors and the relationships behind metropolitan changes as well as searching for the meaning that the city acquires and which is understood as “privatisation”. In the first section of the paper, this concept is made explicit.

  9. de Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Linne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación explora la situación de los cibercafés en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires y de su principalpoblación, los adolescentes de sectores populares. Aunque en los últimos años millones de adolescentes abandonaronestos espacios como consecuencia de la ampliación de la Internet hogareña, en sectores popularesmuchos adolescentes aún continúan asistiendo en busca de recreación lúdico-comunicativa, información eintegración social. La metodología utilizada consiste en 40 entrevistas en profundidad, observaciones participantesy análisis de contenido de perfiles de Facebook (n: 200. Entre los resultados, se destaca que lasprincipales prácticas de estos adolescentes son comunicativas y que estos espacios funcionan para ellos comoherramientas de alfabetización digital, sociabilidad entre pares e inclusión ciudadana.

  10. Metal hydride air conditioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry...

  12. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  13. Air pollution control in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book offers a comprehensive treatment of the subject, from air pollution monitoring and effects on human and animal health, on plants and materials, to pollution reduction measures, practical applications, and legal regulations. It intends to give the air pollution expert a basis for developing practicable solutions. Apart from the 'classic' pollutants, also radioactive air pollution is gone into. (DG) With 366 figs., 190 tabs

  14. Managing Air in Olympic Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing W. Tian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century Olympic Agenda aims to align itself with the concept of sustainable development and has driven improved environmental quality in host cities, such as the Green Games in Sydney 2000 and the planned Beijing 2008 Games and in London 2012 as the Low Carbon Games. Air quality has long been a concern of Olympic mega-cities, although the air quality plans and strategies have often seemed short-lived and unsustainable in the long term. We have explored air quality data and air pollution control from seven Olympic cities: Mexico City, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Sydney and Athens and also Beijing and London which will host Olympic Games in near future. The study shows that despite a high altitude and air pollution problems, Mexico City had no clear environmental policy in place for the 1968 games. The characteristic smog of Los Angeles raised concerns about athletic performance at the Olympic Games of 1984, but there were limited efforts to tackle the ozone concentration during these games. The 1996 Atlanta Games represents a case where temporary public transport changes were used as a tactic to reduce air pollution. In Sydney a well planned sustainable strategy reduced air pollutants and CO2 emissions in 2000, but Athens' long efforts to improve air quality for the 2004 games were not wholly effective. Even where strategies proved successful the improvements in air quality seem short-lived. Current host cities Beijing and London are developing emission reduction plans. These have clear air quality objectives and are well intentioned. However, the improvements may be too narrow and may not be sustainable in the long term. Our analysis looks at the origins of success and failure and how more coherent improvements might be achieved and what would promote sustainable plans for air quality management at future games. The study illustrates the feedback between air pollution science and policy awareness.

  15. Air pollution: Impact and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    SIERRA-VARGAS, MARTHA PATRICIA; Teran, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Air pollution is becoming a major health problem that affects millions of people worldwide. In support of this observation, the World Health Organization estimates that every year, 2.4 million people die because of the effects of air pollution on health. Mitigation strategies such as changes in diesel engine technology could result in fewer premature mortalities, as suggested by the US Environmental Protection Agency. This review: (i) discusses the impact of air pollution on respirat...

  16. "Air embolism during fontan operation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Mohan Maddali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with a right to left intracardiac shunt, air embolism results in an obligatory systemic embolization. Nonembolization of entrained air is described in a child with a single ventricle physiology who had earlier undergone bidirectional Glenn shunt construction and Damus-Kaye-Stansel anastomosis. The air entrainment was detected by intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography. The combined effect of a "diving bell" phenomenon and mild aortic valve regurgitation are suggested as the reasons for the confinement of air into the ventricle preventing catastrophic systemic embolization.

  17. Managing Air in Olympic Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Qing W. Tian; Peter Brimblecombe

    2008-01-01

    The 21st century Olympic Agenda aims to align itself with the concept of sustainable development and has driven improved environmental quality in host cities, such as the Green Games in Sydney 2000 and the planned Beijing 2008 Games and in London 2012 as the Low Carbon Games. Air quality has long been a concern of Olympic mega-cities, although the air quality plans and strategies have often seemed short-lived and unsustainable in the long term. We have explored air quality data and air pollut...

  18. Effect of Air Outlet Angle on Air Distribution Performance Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbeyeh W. Maid

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available       In this paper a numerical study of velocity and temperature distribution in air conditioned space have been made. The computational model consists of the non-isothermal 3-D turbulent with (k-ε model. The numerical study is made to conduct air distribution in a room air-conditioned space with real interior dimensions (6×4×3m and to analyze the effect of changing angle of grille vanes on the flow pattern, velocity, and temperature distribution in the room under a set of different condition, and under a supply air temperature of 16˚C to examine the final result on air distribution performance index (ADPI.The results show a significant effect within the change of supply air angle, the maximum air distribution performance index (ADPI is 52% when air change per hour (ACH is equal to 10 at 16˚C inlet temperature with angle ( 15˚ down, and the minimum value of (ADPI is 20% when ACH is equal to 15 at 16˚C inlet temperature and angle ( degree. 

  19. Norma Primaria de calidad del aire AIR QUALITY STANDARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA MATUS C.

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Las normas primarias de calidad del aire tienen por finalidad proteger la salud de la población de la contaminación atmosférica. Ellas establecen un nivel de riesgo socialmente aceptado. Este artículo describe los antecedentes considerados durante el proceso de actualización de la regulación vigente en Chile. Detalla conceptos sobre la calidad del aire, describe los efectos en la salud de los contaminantes, y el procedimiento seguido para fijar los nuevos estándares Finaliza enumerando la norma primaria de calidad del aire, sus valores y los limites definidos para ser considerados en el ámbito de la gestión de los episodios críticos o de alta contaminaciónThe main purpose of air quality standards is to protect people health from air pollution. They establish a socially accepted level of risk. This article describes the background information considered during the process for updating the current Chilean regulation. Concepts about quality of air, and the effects of the pollutants on the health are described. The procedure followed to fix the new standards is detailed. Finally we state the primary air quality norm, its values as well as the critical limits in order to control critical events of high air pollution

  20. Fundamentals of air pollution. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubel, R.W.; Fox, D.L.; Turner, D.B.; Stern, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    This book presents an overview of air pollution. In Part I, the history of air pollution and the basic concepts involved with air pollution such as sources, scales, definitions are covered. Part II describes how airborne pollutants damage materials, vegetation, animals, and humans. Six fundamental aspects of air pollution are included in the text: The Elements of Air Pollution; The Effects of Air Pollution; Measurement and Monitoring of Air Pollution; Meterology of Air Pollution; regulatory Control of Air Pollution; and Engineering Control of Air Pollution.

  1. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  2. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  3. Mind Your Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Lily

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to excelling in the classroom, it turns out the air students are breathing is just as important as the lessons they are learning. Studies show poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can lessen the comfort of students as well as staff--affecting concentration, attendance and student performance. It can even lead to lower IQs. What's more, poor…

  4. The Federal Air Pollution Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Described is the Federal air pollution program as it was in 1967. The booklet is divided into these major topics: History of the Federal Program; Research; Assistance to State and Local Governments; Abatement and Prevention of Air Pollution; Control of Motor Vehicle Pollution; Information and Education; and Conclusion. Federal legislation has…

  5. Improved Air-Treatment Canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed air-treatment canister integrates a heater-in-tube water evaporator into canister header. Improved design prevents water from condensing and contaminating chemicals that regenerate the air. Heater is evenly spiraled about the inlet header on the canister. Evaporator is brazed to the header.

  6. Complexity in Air Traffic Management

    OpenAIRE

    Delahaye, Daniel; Puechmorel, Stéphane; Dougui, Nour Elhouda

    2009-01-01

    Air traffic Management Requirements : -Insure separation between aircraft. -Avoid costly manoeuvres and optionally optimize trajectories. -Insure trafic organization. Trends : -Separation delegated to aircraft. -Trajectory based air traffic management. -Introduction of decision support tools / automated conflict solvers. Workload : -Related to cognitive processes of human controllers. -Easy/Hard forecasting of conflict occurrence. -Monitoring is a non negligible part of the workload. -Relevan...

  7. A Breath of Fresh Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belew, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of a healthy school--and one that, unfortunately, often falls by the wayside--is indoor air quality. The U.S. Government Accountability Office estimates that more than 15,000 schools nationwide report suffering from poor indoor air quality. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, schools with poor…

  8. Air movement - good or bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    general terms when air movement is desirable and when it is not. At temperatures up to 22-23oC, at sedentary activity and with occupants feeling neutral or cooler there is a risk of air movement being perceived as unacceptable, even at low velocities. In particular, a cool overall thermal sensation...

  9. Ozone as an air pollutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    1996-01-01

    A Danish new book on ozone as an air pollutant has been reviewed. The Book is "Ozon som luftforurening" by Jes Fenger, Published by "Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser, 1995.......A Danish new book on ozone as an air pollutant has been reviewed. The Book is "Ozon som luftforurening" by Jes Fenger, Published by "Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser, 1995....

  10. Airborne rotary air separator study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, A.; Gottzmann, C. F.; Nowobilski, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Several air breathing propulsion concepts for future earth-to-orbit transport vehicles utilize air collection and enrichment, and subsequent storage of liquid oxygen for later use in the vehicle emission. Work performed during the 1960's established the feasibility of substantially reducing weight and volume of a distillation type air separator system by operating the distillation elements in high 'g' fields obtained by rotating the separator assembly. This contract studied the capability test and hydraulic behavior of a novel structured or ordered distillation packing in a rotating device using air and water. Pressure drop and flood points were measured for different air and water flow rates in gravitational fields of up to 700 g. Behavior of the packing follows the correlations previously derived from tests at normal gravity. The novel ordered packing can take the place of trays in a rotating air separation column with the promise of substantial reduction in pressure drop, volume, and system weight. The results obtained in the program are used to predict design and performance of rotary separators for air collection and enrichment systems of interest for past and present concepts of air breathing propulsion (single or two-stage to orbit) systems.

  11. Vehicles and Particulate Air Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The current scene relating to particles and vehicular emissions in UK is reviewed. The active research topics are health effects of particles, particle size and composition, modeling the fate of particles and assessing individual exposure. There is a National Air Quality Strategy combined with local air quality management which includes monitoring and assessment, dispersion modeling and development of management plans.

  12. Anisotropy of successive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, N.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Ohashi, A.; Yamamoto, I.; Nakatsuka, T.; Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) Group

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the anisotropy of successive air shower (SAS) events, which we define as the detection of many air showers within a short time window, using data from six stations of the Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group. On the criterion of 22 air showers within 20 minutes, five SAS events are found against 1.4 expected from the Poisson distribution in Okayama University station's data. From six stations' data, we find 24 SAS events in total. By plotting them in equatorial coordinates, it is revealed that SAS events are observed more frequently when the Galactic plane is around the zenith. This can be attributed to a hypothetical small flux of ultra-high-energy γ-rays from the direction of the Galactic plane superposed on conventional cosmic rays. If this hypothesis is true, the analytical procedure used here has potential to measure ultra-high-energy γ-ray sources by even small air shower arrays like ours.

  13. Anisotropy of successive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the anisotropy of successive air shower (SAS) events, which we define as the detection of many air showers within a short time window, using data from six stations of the Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group. On the criterion of 22 air showers within 20 minutes, five SAS events are found against 1.4 expected from the Poisson distribution in Okayama University station's data. From six stations' data, we find 24 SAS events in total. By plotting them in equatorial coordinates, it is revealed that SAS events are observed more frequently when the Galactic plane is around the zenith. This can be attributed to a hypothetical small flux of ultra-high-energy γ-rays from the direction of the Galactic plane superposed on conventional cosmic rays. If this hypothesis is true, the analytical procedure used here has potential to measure ultra-high-energy γ-ray sources by even small air shower arrays like ours

  14. Air Quality at Your Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Becker, Thomas; Ketzel, Matthias;

    concerned citizents, or in the context of localization of institutions, etc. The purpose of the project ‘Air Quality at Your Street’ is to create interactive air quality maps on the internet using webGIS to illustrate the geographical variation of air quality in Denmark for selected health related air...... is calculated with a model system consisting of a regional model (DEHM), an urban background model (UBM) and a street model (OSPM) with associated meteorology and emissions data etc. Recently updated input data has been used for the road network and traffic data based on the national traffic model...... (LTM) from DTU Transport as well as data on travel speeds based on GPS data from SpeedMap from the Danish Road Directorate. Modelled concentrations have been compared to fixed regional, urban background and street air quality monitoring stations to assess uncertainties, and to model results from about...

  15. Tritium-in-air monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for continuously monitoring air for the presence of tritiated water vapor is described comprising contacting a predetermined mass flow of an air sample with a predetermined flow of a liquid miscible with tritiated water to transfer any tritiated water vapor in the air sample to the liquid; stripping radioactive noble gases from the liquid with a stream of gas; and analyzing the liquid for beta radiation to determine the presence of tritium. In the preferred embodiment of the apparatus an air-liquid contactor, a gas-liquid separator and a stripper are combined into a single unit with a common outlet for the contacted air and stripping gas. 6 claims, 2 figures

  16. Lithium-Air Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Dobley, Arthur; Seymour, Frasier W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) primary batteries have a theoretical specific capacity of 11,400 Wh/kg, the highest of any common metal-air system. NASA is developing Li-air technology for a Mobile Oxygen Concentrator for Spacecraft Emergencies, an application which requires an extremely lightweight primary battery that can discharge over 24 hours continuously. Several vendors were funded through the NASA SBIR program to develop Li-air technology to fulfill the requirements of this application. New catalysts and carbon cathode structures were developed to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction and increase surface area to improve cell performance. Techniques to stabilize the lithium metal anode surface were explored. Experimental results for prototype laboratory cells are given. Projections are made for the performance of hypothetical cells constructed from the materials that were developed.

  17. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  18. Population Dynamics and Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Sørensen, Jan; Bønløkke, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore how three different assumptions on demographics affect the health impact of Danish emitted air pollution in Denmark from 2005 to 2030, with health impact modeled from 2005 to 2050. Methods. Modeled air pollution from Danish sources was used as exposure in a newly developed......) a static year 2005 population, (2) morbidity and mortality fixed at the year 2005 level, or (3) an expected development. Results. The health impact of air pollution was estimated at 672,000, 290,000, and 280,000 lost life years depending on demographic assumptions and the corresponding social costs at 430.......4 M€, 317.5 M€, and 261.6 M€ through the modeled years 2005–2050. Conclusion. The modeled health impact of air pollution differed widely with the demographic assumptions, and thus demographics and assumptions on demographics played a key role in making health impact assessments on air pollution....

  19. Airing Out Anthrax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The AiroCide TiO2 is an air-purifier that kills 93.3 percent of airborne pathogens that pass through it, including Bacillus anthraci, more commonly known as anthrax. It is essentially a spinoff of KES Science & Technology, Inc.'s Bio-KES system, a highly effective device used by the produce industry for ethylene gas removal to aid in preserving the freshness of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. The TiO2-based ethylene removal technology that is incorporated into the company's AiroCide TiO2 and Bio-KES products was first integrated into a pair of plant-growth chambers known as ASTROCULTURE(TM) and ADVANCED ASTROCULTURE(TM). Both chambers have housed commercial plant growth experiments in space on either the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station. The AiroCide TiO2 also has a proven record of destroying 98 percent of other airborne pathogens, such as microscopic dust mites, molds, and fungi. Moreover, the device is a verified killer of Influenza A (flu), E. coli, Staphylococcus aureas, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, among many other harmful viruses.

  20. Air coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main patent relates to a process of cooling the steam from the turbine working with a nuclear power reactor, in said process a two-phase fluid mixture is circulated inside a closed circuit between the turbine condenser and a cooling tower. The present addition to the main patent relates to a cooling system comprising instead of the vertical tower, a nearly horizontal structure open to wind, in which the air is circulated by natural convection. The lower part of said structure, according to the invention, comprises two parallel rows of nearly rectangular cooling fins and the upper part consists of two walls made antiparallel with respect to the longitudinal symmetry plane of said structure and thus forming an upwards widening, the resulting vertical planar section of the long-shaped cooling structure according to the invention assuming a venturi shape. Said type of structure a few hundred meters long but only fifty meters high is less visible in the landscape than the vertical tower, and condensation clouds are formed onside a larger surface, that is another ecological advantage

  1. Breathe the air!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Feeling a bit cooped up in your office? Want to share your interest in science and technology with others but your computer's heard it all before and your colleagues won't even listen anymore? Then here's the answer - come and get some fresh air with the Education and Communication Group. The Visits Service and the Press Office offer you the opportunity to come into contact with CERN visitors. - Be a guide! In becoming a guide you get the opportunity to introduce the Laboratory to vast array of visitors of all nationalities and ages and communicate to them your passion for science and technology. You can get involved as a CERN guide on various levels - giving presentations and tours of the Laboratory, but also leading a «Drôle de Physique» workshop and giving tours of Microcosm. Guides receive training. If you're interested, take a look at the Guides Homepage where all the relevant information and formalities are explained: http://www.cern.ch/guides See also the article in the Bulletin n°25/2002. - Fa...

  2. Radioxenon spiked air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Matthew G; Delmore, James E; Hague, Robert K; Houghton, Tracy P; Jenson, Douglas D; Mann, Nick R

    2015-12-01

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes ((131m)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe and (135)Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. The International Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This paper focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities. PMID:26318775

  3. Air pollution in Copenhagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosols were monitored in Greater Copenhagen in the period June 1973 to July 1974. Size-fractionated cascade impactor samples and unfractionated filter samples were regularly collected and analyzed be neutron activation analysis, spark emission spectroscopy or proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy. Concentrations were determined of the following elements: Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, and Pb. All elements showed orders-of-magnitude fluctuationsthe mean concentrations were roughly the same as in other large cities. In relation to proposed air quality standards, Pb was the most critical component. Statistical analysis of variation patterns, size distributions and interelement correlations indicate that automotive exhaust is the source of Br and Pbfuel-oil combustion is the main source of V and Ni (and partly of S)soil dust raised by wind or by human activity (e.g. traffic) is the main source of Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe. (author)

  4. Air contaminants in a submarine equipped with air independent propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ola; Ostberg, Christina; Pagels, Joakim; Sebastian, Aleksandra

    2006-11-01

    The Swedish Navy has operated submarines equipped with air independent propulsion for two decades. This type of submarine can stay submerged for periods far longer than other non-nuclear submarines are capable of. The air quality during longer periods of submersion has so far not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents results for a number of air quality parameters obtained during more than one week of continuous submerged operation. The measured parameters are pressure, temperature, relative humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter and microbiological contaminants. The measurements of airborne particles demonstrate that air pollutants typically occur at a low baseline level due to high air exchange rates and efficient air-cleaning devices. However, short-lived peaks with comparatively high concentrations occur, several of the sources for these have been identified. The concentrations of the pollutants measured in this study do not indicate a build-up of hazardous compounds during eight days of submersion. It is reasonable to assume that a substantial build-up of the investigated contaminants is not likely if the submersion period is prolonged several times, which is the case for modern submarines equipped with air independent propulsion. PMID:17075617

  5. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  6. Large scale air monitoring: Biological indicators versus air particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological indicator organisms are widely used for monitoring and banking purposes since many years. Although the complexity of the interactions between bioorganisms and their environment is generally not easily comprehensible, environmental quality assessment using the bioindicator approach offers some convincing advantages compared to direct analysis of soil, water, or air. Direct measurement of air particulates is restricted to experienced laboratories with access to expensive sampling equipment. Additionally, the amount of material collected generally is just enough for one determination per sampling and no multidimensional characterization might be possible. Further, fluctuations in air masses have a pronounced effect on the results from air filter sampling. Combining the integrating property of bioindicators with the world wide availability and uniform matrix characteristics of air particulates as a prerequisite for global monitoring of air pollution will be discussed. A new approach for sampling urban dust using large volume filtering devices installed in air conditioners of large hotel buildings is assessed. A first experiment was initiated to collect air particulates (300 to 500 g each) from a number of hotels during a period of three to four months by successive vacuum cleaning of used inlet filters from high volume air conditioning installations reflecting average concentrations per three months in different large cities. This approach is expected to be upgraded and applied for global monitoring. Highly positive correlated elements were found in lichen such as K/S, Zn/P, the rare earth elements (REE) and a significant negative correlation between Fig and Cu was observed in these samples. The ratio of concentrations of elements in dust and Usnea spp. is highest for Cr, Zn, and Fe (400-200) and lowest for elements such as Ca, Rb, and Sr (20-10). (author)

  7. Large scale air monitoring: lichen vs. air particulate matter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, M; Jayasekera, R; Kniewald, G; Thang, N H

    1999-07-15

    Biological indicator organisms have been widely used for monitoring and banking purposes for many years. Although the complexity of the interactions between organisms and their environment is generally not easily comprehensible, environmental quality assessment using the bioindicator approach offers some convincing advantages compared to direct analysis of soil, water, or air. Measurement of air particulates is restricted to experienced laboratories with access to expensive sampling equipment. Additionally, the amount of material collected generally is just enough for one determination per sampling and no multidimensional characterization might be possible. Further, fluctuations in air masses have a pronounced effect on the results from air filter sampling. Combining the integrating property of bioindicators with the world wide availability and particular matrix characteristics of air particulate matter as a prerequisite for global monitoring of air pollution is discussed. A new approach for sampling urban dust using large volume filtering devices installed in air conditioners of large hotel buildings is assessed. A first experiment was initiated to collect air particulates (300-500 g each) from a number of hotels during a period of 3-4 months by successive vacuum cleaning of used inlet filters from high volume air conditioning installations reflecting average concentrations per 3 months in different large cities. This approach is expected to be upgraded and applied for global monitoring. Highly positive correlated elements were found in lichens such as K/S, Zn/P, the rare earth elements (REE) and a significant negative correlation between Hg and Cu was observed in these samples. The ratio of concentrations of elements in dust and Usnea spp. is highest for Cz, Zn and Fe (400-200) and lowest for elements such as Ca, Rb, and Sr (20-10). PMID:10474261

  8. Air Pollution in the World's Megacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Reports findings of the Global Environment Monitoring System study concerning air pollution in the world's megacities. Discusses sources of air pollution, air pollution impacts, air quality monitoring, air quality trends, and control strategies. Provides profiles of the problem in Beijing, Los Angeles, Mexico City, India, Cairo, Sao Paulo, and…

  9. Egypt air radioactive sources warehouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I would like to give me this chance, of being here among famous scientists. I wish to thank the general director of cargo division, and the general manager of import for providing all facilities for me to be present at this scientific meeting. At this conference, I wish to explain the role played by egypt air (as public sector company) in the officiant of radiation physics. The atomic energy authority, ministry of health, and ministry of civil aviation; have provided instructions that were essentially required to complete the work of the national radioactive warehouse located in egypt air terminal in Cairo. Now the license for operating the store has been granted. Prior to constructing the warehouse, the radioactive sources were distributed among the foreign cargo terminals at Cairo airport, such as swiss air, air france, saudi arabia, the Ice stores, as well egypt Air. Cargo terminals. The control of radiation hazard was therefore difficult. The ministry of Civil aviation then issued a decree dictating the storage of all radioactive sources exclusively at the national store of egypt air. All foreign cargo terminals should transfer all imported radioactive sources to the national warehouse at Cairo air port. According to that decree. 6 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Air Force neutron dosimetry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 1000 Air Force personnel are monitored for neutron radiation resulting from various sources at more than thirty worldwide locations. Neutron radiation spanning several orders of magnitude in energy is encountered. The Air Force currently uses albedo thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters for personnel monitoring. The energy dependence of the albedo neutron dosimeter is a current problem and the development of site specific correction factors is ongoing. A summary of data on the energy dependence is presented as well as efforts to develop algorithms for the dosimeter. An overview of current Air Force neutron dosimetry users and needs is also presented

  11. Korean Air Excellence in Flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Korean Air with a fleet of 119 aircraft, is one of the world's top 20 airlines, and oper-ates almost 400 flights everyday to 90 cities in 33 countries. The airline has about 50 flights per week between the US and Asia from nine US gateways: New York, Los Angeles, Washington,Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, Atlanta, Anchorage and Honolulu.The carrier is a founding member of SkyTeam, the global airline alliance partnering AeroMexico, Air France, Alitalia, CSA Czech Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, KLM and Northwest Airlines to provide customers with extensive worldwide destina-tions, flights and services.

  12. Local air entrainment and detrainment

    OpenAIRE

    Kobus, Helmut

    1984-01-01

    Air and water are usually well separated by gravity due to their extreme difference in specific weight. Whenever they are mixed, however, they give rise to a very complex two-phase flow situation. The hydraulic engineer is often faced with the problem of estimating the effects of entrained air upon the flow, because this may be essential for the safe operation of a hydraulic structure.The predominant mechanism in generating airwater mixtures is the inclusion of air at the surface of flowing w...

  13. Air quality indices : a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollution Probe presents some background information that will help in the development of a national Air Quality Index (AQI) in Canada. This report examines the issues that should be addressed in revising the national Index of the Quality of Air (IQUA) or creating a new national Air Quality Index. The IQUA was devised in 1976 and provides Canadians with real-time information on the state of community air quality by including major pollutants and their synergies. It is currently being used for air quality management plans and air quality alert systems. At the same time that the IQUA was devised, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) produced a parallel air quality index known as the Pollution Standard Index (PSI) which incorporated 5 criteria pollutants (particulate matter, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and ground level ozone) for which national health-based standards were devised. In 1999, the US EPA renamed their index the Air Quality Index (AQI) and made revisions to the primary health-based national ambient air quality standards for ground-level ozone and particulate matter. Separate values for PM2.5 and PM10 were incorporated and mandatory reporting was required for metropolitan areas with populations of 350,000 or more. Similarly, the IQUA has undergone major developments that affect the validity of the index, including: rejection by the Working Group on Air Quality Objectives and Guidelines of the previous maximum desirable and maximum acceptable air quality criteria, recognition that standards for many of the contaminants are outdated, developing more sensitive instrumentation for real-time monitoring of contaminants. This report also describes the use of the national short term Air Quality Index by provincial, territorial and local authorities in Canada. Pollution Probe recommends setting up a mechanism to review and revise IQUA on a regular basis that would incorporate governments, the medical profession, special

  14. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  15. Rooftop Unitary Air Conditioner with Integral Dedicated Outdoor Air System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiax Llc

    2006-02-28

    Energy use of rooftop and other unitary air-conditioners in commercial applications accounts for about 1 quad (10{sup 15} Btu) of primary energy use annually in the U.S. [Reference 7]. The realization that this cooling equipment accounts for the majority of commercial building cooled floorspace and the majority also of commercial building energy use has spurred development of improved-efficiency equipment as well as development of stricter standards addressing efficiency levels. Another key market driver affecting design of rooftop air-conditioning equipment has been concern regarding comfort and the control of humidity. Trends for increases in outdoor air ventilation rates in certain applications, and the increasing concern about indoor air quality problems associated with humidity levels and moisture in buildings points to a need for improved dehumidification capability in air-conditioning equipment of all types. In many cases addressing this issue exacerbates energy efficiency, and vice versa. The integrated dedicated outdoor air system configuration developed in this project addresses both energy and comfort/humidity issues.

  16. Air Conditioning Compressor Air Leak Detection by Image Processing Techniques for Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pookongchai Kritsada; Nakornrat Prasit; Sookananta Bongkoj; Buasri Panhathai

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents method to detect air leakage of an air conditioning compressor using image processing techniques. Quality of air conditioning compressor should not have air leakage. To test an air conditioning compressor leak, air is pumped into a compressor and then submerged into the water tank. If air bubble occurs at surface of the air conditioning compressor, that leakage compressor must be returned for maintenance. In this work a new method to detect leakage and search leakage point...

  17. Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Historical Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory contains measured and estimated data on ambient air pollution for use in assessing air quality, assisting in...

  18. High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory conducted the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project in the mid 1960s with the intention of better understanding air...

  19. National Air Toxic Assessments (NATA) Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Air Toxics Assessment was conducted by EPA in 2002 to assess air toxics emissions in order to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types...

  20. Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) is a national air quality monitoring network designed to provide data to assess trends in air quality, atmospheric...

  1. Profit goal set for airBaltic

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Latvijas Krajbanka president arvab, et airBalticu olukorra stabiliseerimiseks läheb vähemalt aasta. AirBalticu senine juht Bertolt Flick võib hakata uue Vilniuse lennukompanii investoriks. AirBalticu uuest juhatusest

  2. Manual on indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

  3. 2011 NATA - Air Toxics Monitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes annual (2005 - 2013) statistics of measured ambient air toxics concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) and associated risk estimates...

  4. Reverse Ballistic Air Gun Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This custom-designed facility houses a suite of three air guns capable of generating accelerations up to 100,000 Gs and velocities up to 2,000 ft/s. In addition to...

  5. A Martian Air Battery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will investigate an entirely new battery chemistry by developing A Martian Air Battery. Specifically the project will explore the concept of a Martian...

  6. Personal Air Vehicle Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a low aspect ratio all-lifting configuration for personal air vehicles. This configuration uses an architecture fundamentally different from...

  7. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  8. Kongres IFLA v Buenos Aires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burgetová, Jarmila

    -, č. 4 (2004), s. 4-7. ISSN 1210-8502 Keywords : IFLA * International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions * Congress 2004 * Buenos Aires Subject RIV: AF - Documentation, Librarianship, Information Studies

  9. Indoor plants as air cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Cruz, Majbrit; Christensen, Jan H.; Müller, Renate

    2015-01-01

    experiments is not directly transferrable to real life settings. The largest problem is the use of closed chambers where there is no air exchange. This also results in a declining VOC concentration over time. Due to this limitation, we constructed a new experimental system which among others can allow for air......Plants have been used decoratively indoors for centuries. For the last 25-30 years, their beneficial abilities to reduce the levels of harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the indoor air have also been investigated. Previous studies have shown that VOCs are removed by the plant itself...... exchange and a constant VOC concentration. With the new system it was found that removal rates obtained in chambers with air exchange and constant VOC concentration were significantly higher than removal rates obtained in closed chambers. This means that removal rates obtained in closed chambers may be an...

  10. In Brief: Air pollution app

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-10-01

    A new smartphone application takes advantage of various technological capabilities and sensors to help users monitor air quality. Tapping into smartphone cameras, Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors, compasses, and accelerometers, computer scientists with the University of Southern California's (USC) Viterbi School of Engineering have developed a new application, provisionally entitled “Visibility.” Currently available for the Android telephone operating system, the application is available for free download at http://robotics.usc.edu/˜mobilesensing/Projects/AirVisibilityMonitoring. An iPhone application may be introduced soon. Smartphone users can take a picture of the sky and then compare it with models of sky luminance to estimate visibility. While conventional air pollution monitors are costly and thinly deployed in some areas, the smartphone application potentially could help fill in some blanks in existing air pollution maps, according to USC computer science professor Gaurav Sukhatme.

  11. Manual on indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues

  12. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  13. Air pollution in the Slovak Republic, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report on air quality and contribution of individual sources on its pollution in the Slovak Republic in 2001 is presented. This report consists of two parts: (1) Ambient air and (2) Emission. Ambient air part is divided into the following chapters: Regional air pollution and quality of precipitation; Local air pollution; Atmospheric ozone. Emission part is divided into the following chapters: Emission and air pollution source inventory, Greenhouse gas emissions

  14. Senyawa Organik Dalam Air Minum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Soewasti Soesanto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kadar zat   organik   yang berlebihan dalam  air  minum  tidak diperbolehkan karena selain menimbulkan warna, bau dan  rasa yang tidak  diinginkan, juga mungkin bersifat toksik baik secara langsung maupun setelah bersenyawa dengan zat lain yang ada.Zat organik yang ada dalam air minum dapat berasal dari alam atau sebagai dampak dari kegiatan manusia.

  15. Molecular Epidemiology and Air Pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Binková, B.; Rössnerová, Andrea; Šrám, Radim

    Rieka: InTech, 2015 - (Nejadkoorki, F.), s. 609-643 ISBN 978-953-51-2180-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13458S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : molecular epidemiology * biomarkers * human populations * in vitro studies Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality http://www.intechopen.com/books/current-air-quality-issues/molecular-epidemiology-and-air- pollution

  16. The lithium air battery fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Bruce, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Lithium air rechargeable batteries are the best candidate for a power source for electric vehicles, because of their high specific energy density. In this book, the history, scientific background, status and prospects of the lithium air system are introduced by specialists in the field. This book will contain the basics, current statuses, and prospects for new technologies. This book is ideal for those interested in electrochemistry, energy storage, and materials science.

  17. Air sea ratio reduction initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberle, Jean

    2010-09-15

    Airfreight is the most expensive mode of transportation as well as the most impacting in terms of CO{sup 2} emissions. It is 7 times more expensive on average to ship by air than shipping by sea 1. Airfreight transportation mode emits 30 times more CO{sup 2} than sea freight mode 2. These elements provided a compelling platform to design a global logistics program to initiate a modal shift from air to sea freight without compromising service to customers.

  18. 新入职院前急救护士职业应激、心理资本与共情疲劳感的关系分析%Relationship of compassion fatigue, occupational stress and psychological capital among new graduate ambulance nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏华; 董越娟; 邹涛; 王永革; 陈妍; 段梅艳

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨新入职院前急救护士职业应激、心理资本与共情疲劳感的关系。方法选取入职1个月的253名院前急救护士为研究对象,采用护士专业生活品质量表( ProQOL-V)、心理资本问卷(PCQ-24)和护士应激源量表(CNSS)进行测评,入职后3,6个月进行追踪测评。结果入职后6个月院前急救护士CNSS得分、CNSS-4得分、CNSS-6得分分别为(100.21±14.82),(185.54±50.54),(165.54±51.87)分,分别优于入职后1,3个月,差异有统计学意义(F值分别为14.53,17.41,14.89;P<0.05)。新入职院前急救护士 CNSS得分与 PCQ-24得分呈负相关(r=-0.45,P<0.05),与 CNSS-1、CNSS-2、CNSS-4、CNSS-6得分呈正相关(r=0.28,0.15,0.37,0.36;P<0.05);PCQ-24得分与 CNSS-1、CNSS-2、CNSS-3、CNSS-4、CNSS-6得分呈负相关(r=-0.30,-0.30,-0.27,-0.34,-0.23;P<0.05)。结论新入职院前急救护士共情疲劳感症状严重,可能与职业应激及心理资本的消耗有关。%Objective To explore the relationship of compassion fatigue, occupational stress and psychological capital among new graduate ambulance nurses. Methods A total of 253 new graduate nurses were selected and followed-up in ambulance department. They were assessed by Professional Quality of Life(ProQOL-V), Chinese Nursing Stressor Scale (CNSS) and Psychological Capital Questionnaire-24 (PCQ-24). Results After six months, the scores of CNSS, CNSS-4 and CNSS-6 were (100. 21 ± 14. 82), (185. 54 ± 50. 54) and (165. 54 ± 51. 87), which were significantly higher than those at the first and third month (F=14. 53, 17. 41, 14. 89, respectively;P<0. 05). The score of CNSS was negatively correlated with the score of PCQ-24 (r=-0. 45,P<0. 05) and was positively correlated with the scores of CNSS-1, CNSS-2, CNSS-4 and CNSS-6 (r=0. 28, 0. 15, 0. 37, 0. 36, respectively;P<0. 05). The score of PCQ-24 was negatively correlated with the scores of CNSS-1, CNSS-2, CNSS-3, CNSS-4 and CNSS-6 (r= -0. 30, -0. 30, -0. 27, -0. 34, -0

  19. Small Break Air Ingress Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim

    2011-09-01

    The small break air-ingress experiment, described in this report, is designed to investigate air-ingress phenomena postulated to occur in pipes in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTRs). During this experiment, air-ingress rates were measured for various flow and break conditions through small holes drilled into a pipe of the experimental apparatus. The holes were drilled at right angles to the pipe wall such that a direction vector drawn from the pipe centerline to the center of each hole was at right angles with respect to the pipe centerline. Thus the orientation of each hole was obtained by measuring the included angle between the direction vector of each hole with respect to a reference line anchored on the pipe centerline and pointing in the direction of the gravitational force. Using this reference system, the influence of several important parameters on the air ingress flow rate were measured including break orientation, break size, and flow velocity . The approach used to study the influence of these parameters on air ingress is based on measuring the changes in oxygen concentrations at various locations in the helium flow circulation system as a function of time using oxygen sensors (or detectors) to estimate the air-ingress rates through the holes. The test-section is constructed of a stainless steel pipe which had small holes drilled at the desired locations.

  20. 75 FR 34673 - Approval of the Clean Air Act, Section 112(l), Authority for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 Approval of the Clean Air Act, Section 112(l), Authority for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Air Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning Machines: State of Rhode Island... Emissions from Organic Solvent Cleaning (``RI Regulation No. 36'') and Rhode Island Air Pollution...

  1. Unit for air decontamination; Unidad para descontaminacion de aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano H, E

    1991-02-15

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  2. Megacities, air quality and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Molina, Luisa T.; Gauss, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The rapid urbanization and growing number of megacities and urban complexes requires new types of research and services that make best use of science and available technology. With an increasing number of humans now living in urban sprawls, there are urgent needs of examining what the rising number of megacities means for air pollution, local climate and the effects these changes have on global climate. Such integrated studies and services should assist cities in facing hazards such as storm surge, flooding, heat waves, and air pollution episodes, especially in changing climates. While important advances have been made, new interdisciplinary research studies are needed to increase our understanding of the interactions between emissions, air quality, and regional and global climates. Studies need to address both basic and applied research and bridge the spatial and temporal scales connecting local emissions and air pollution and local weather, global atmospheric chemistry and climate. This paper reviews the current status of studies of the complex interactions between climate, air quality and megacities, and identifies the main gaps in our current knowledge as well as further research needs in this important field of research.

  3. Air Pollution and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni eDrakaki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase of air pollution over the years has major effects on the human skin. The skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR and environmental air pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, volatile organic compounds (VOCs, oxides, particulate matter (PM, ozone (O3 and cigarette smoke. Although human skin acts as a biological shield against pro-oxidative chemical and physical air pollutants, the prolonged or repetitive exposure to high levels of these pollutants may have profound negative effects on the skin. Exposure of the skin to air pollutants has been associated with skin aging and inflammatory or allergic skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or acne, while skin cancer is among the most serious effects. On the other hand, some air pollutants (ie, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide and scattering particulates (clouds and soot in the troposphere reduce the effects of shorter wavelength UVR and significant reductions in UV irradiance have been observed in polluted urban areas.

  4. Air protection strategy in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszczyk, B.

    1995-12-31

    Air quality is one of the basic factors determining the environmental quality and influencing the life conditions of people. There is a shortage of proper quality air in many regions of Poland. In consequence, and due to unhindered transport, air pollution is the direct cause of losses in the national economy (reduction of crops, losses in forestry, corrosion of buildings and constructions, worsening of people`s health). Poland is believed to be one of the most contaminated European countries. The reason for this, primarily, is the pollution concomitant with energy-generating fuel combustion; in our case it means the use of solid fuels: hard coal and lignite. This monocultural economy of energy generation is accompanied by low efficiency of energy use (high rates of energy loss from buildings, heat transmission pipelines, energy-consuming industrial processes). This inefficiency results in the unnecessary production of energy and pollution. Among other reasons, this results from the fact that in the past Poland did not sign any international agreements concerning the reduction of the emission of pollution. The activities aimes at air protection in Poland are conducted based on the Environmental Formation and Protection Act in effect since 1980 (with many further amendments) and the The Ecological Policy of the state (1991). The goals of the Polish air pollution reduction program for the period 1994-2000 are presented.

  5. Trading emissions improve air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While admitting sharply contrasting views exist, James M. Lents of the South Coast Air Quality Management District in southern California sees emissions trading open-quotes as a lifesaver for our troubled planet.close quotes He explains: open-quotes If political support for the environment is to be maintained, we must seek the most economical and flexible means of pursuing cleanup. At present, market incentives and emissions trading represent our best hope.close quotes Lents is putting his money where his pen is. The air quality management district he heads plans to use market incentives, including emissions trading, to reduce air pollution in the notoriously dirty southern California area. When the system goes into operation in 1994, he estimates it will save southern California businesses more than $400 million a year in compliance costs, while also making major improvements in the region's air quality. If the idea works there, why won't it work elsewhere, even on a global scale, Lents asks? He believes it will. But open-quotes the ultimate success of emissions-trading programs, whether regional, national, or international in scope, lies in the proof that they're actually achieving reductions in harmful emissions,close quotes he emphasizes. open-quotes These reductions must be real and verifiable to satisfy the Clean Air Act and a skeptical public.close quotes

  6. Air quality in Europe - 2012 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    This report presents an overview and analysis of the status and trends of air quality in Europe based on concentration measurements in ambient air and data on anthropogenic emissions and trends from 2001 - when mandatory monitoring of ambient air concentrations of selected pollutants first produced reliable air quality information - to 2010. (Author)

  7. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1926.803 Section 1926.803 Labor Regulations... Compressed Air § 1926.803 Compressed air. (a) General provisions. (1) There shall be present, at all times... medical aspects of compressed air work and the treatment of decompression illness. He shall be...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  11. 22 CFR 228.22 - Air transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... criteria for determining when U.S. flag air carriers are unavailable. See 48 CFR 47.403-1, or USAID... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Air transportation. 228.22 Section 228.22... for USAID Financing § 228.22 Air transportation. (a) The eligibility of air transportation...

  12. A method and device for cleaning air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and device for cleaning pollution from air wherin the air to be cleaned is subjected to a sequence of physical and chemical treatments.......The present invention relates to a method and device for cleaning pollution from air wherin the air to be cleaned is subjected to a sequence of physical and chemical treatments....

  13. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  14. 19 CFR 122.165 - Air cabotage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Penalties § 122.165 Air cabotage. (a) The air cabotage law (49 U.S.C. 41703... provided for in 14 CFR 121.153, and those aircraft used exclusively in the service of any government. (b... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Air cabotage. 122.165 Section 122.165...

  15. Sumatera Air Asia Training Center (Arsitektur Metafora)

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, William

    2015-01-01

    Sumatera Air Asia Training Center as Air Asia training facility’s construction have a propose to train the Air Asia air craft crew who will be the employee of the Air Asia Airlines.Beside the main function;training facility for the Air Asia Crew; the other airline’s crew can be train by a cooperation with Air Asia.The aircraft crew that can be train in this facility is pilot initial, pilot type-rating, pilot recurrent, ATPL, Flight attendant initial and recurrent..This facility ha...

  16. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Bergé, L; Skupin, S; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled with the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which is paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. The resulting unique feature of the picosecond filamentation regime is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for numerous applications.

  17. Metal-air electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarbacher, R. I.; Fechter, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for which fuel is prepared and introduced under artificial gravity forces. The active metal is deposited through the action of the field on an anode current collecting member, effecting good compaction and reduced cell internal impedance. A microprocessor provides control of the induced gravity, flow rates, temperature, and other variables-enabling the active metal to be controlled in its thickness as well as providing a predetermined separation from the cathode. Abrasion of the cathode and the possibility of shorting are avoided by the presence of outwardly directed radial forces. These forces are induced by rotation of the electrolyte, air cathode, anode collector and the active metal. The forces promote also the passage of moisture laden air through the air cathode elements. Reaction products produced within the cell volume are circulated to an outside container for separation and possible reuse.

  18. Air showers and geomagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow the calculation of very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Our simulations indicate that the geomagnetic deflections significantly alter some shower observables such as, for example, the lateral distribution of muons in the case of events with large zenith angles (larger than 75 deg.). On the other hand, such alterations seem to be unimportant for smaller zenith angles. Global observables such as the total number of particles or longitudinal development parameters do not present appreciable dependences on the geomagnetic deflections for all the cases that were studied. (author)

  19. Air pollution and allergic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, J.

    1987-03-13

    In the discussion on possible adverse effects of air pollution upon human health one has to distinguish between out-door and in-door environment. The most frequent pollutants in out-door air over industrialized areas are particulate substances, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbonmonoxide, ozone and lead. Most of these substances have direct irritating effects on mucous surfaces. Hypersensitivity reactions have been described against sulfur dioxide and sulfites occurring as asthma, urticaria or anaphylactoid reactions. In-door air pollution is of much greater practical importance for a variety of diseases. Apart from physio-chemical irritants and microbial organisms leading to infections, organic allergens (e.g. house dust mites, moulds, animal epithelia) can induce a variety of allergic diseases via different pathomechanisms.

  20. Distributed Air Traffic Control Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Radovanović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available During initial training air traffic control students acquire theoretical knowledge in various fields including air traffic management, aircraft performance, air traffic control equipment and systems, navigation and others. This paper proposes a simulator and explains its use and features that allows students to gain a practical insight into their coursework in order to complement their training. The goal of the simulator is to realistically implement all the key functionalities needed to cover the topics that were presented in class. The simulator offers a user friendly, distributed, and multi-role environment that can be deployed on regular PCs. Moreover, this paper discusses and resolves some of the main conceptual and implementational issues that were faced during simulator development.

  1. Urban air quality in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book provides an overview of air quality in urban environments in Europe, focusing on air pollutant emission sources and formation mechanisms, measurement and modeling strategies, and future perspectives. The emission sources described are biomass burning, vehicular traffic, industry and agriculture, but also African dust and long-range transport of pollutants across the European regions. The impact of these emission sources and processes on atmospheric particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen oxides and volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds is discussed and critical areas for particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide in Europe are identified. Finally, this volume presents future perspectives, mainly regarding upcoming air quality monitoring strategies, metrics of interest, such as submicron and nanoparticles, and indoor and outdoor exposure scenarios.

  2. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, N.

    2014-11-01

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of sea air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Feistel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Very accurate thermodynamic potential functions are available for fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air covering wide ranges of temperature and pressure conditions. They permit the consistent computation of all equilibrium properties as, for example, required for coupled atmosphere-ocean models or the analysis of observational or experimental data. With the exception of humid air, these potential functions are already formulated as international standards released by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS, and have been adopted in 2009 for oceanography by IOC/UNESCO.

    In this paper, we derive a collection of formulas for important quantities expressed in terms of the thermodynamic potentials, valid for typical phase transitions and composite systems of humid air and water/ice/seawater. Particular attention is given to equilibria between seawater and humid air, referred to as "sea air" here. In a related initiative, these formulas will soon be implemented in a source-code library for easy practical use. The library is primarily aimed at oceanographic applications but will be relevant to air-sea interaction and meteorology as well.

    The formulas provided are valid for any consistent set of suitable thermodynamic potential functions. Here we adopt potential functions from previous publications in which they are constructed from theoretical laws and empirical data; they are briefly summarized in the appendix. The formulas make use of the full accuracy of these thermodynamic potentials, without additional approximations or empirical coefficients. They are expressed in the temperature scale ITS-90 and the 2008 Reference-Composition Salinity Scale.

  4. Air quality management planning (AQMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivertsen Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In most urban areas of the world, particulate matter (PM levels pose severe problems, addressed in several policy areas (air quality, climate change, and human health. PM presents multiple challenges due to the multitude of its sources, spanning many sectors of economic activity as well as nature, and due to the complexity of atmospheric processes involved in its transport and secondary formation. For the authorities, the goal is to assure minimal impacts of atmospheric PM levels, in practice represented by compliance with existing regulations and standards. This may be achieved through an air quality management plan (AQMP. In Northern America and in parts of Europe, comprehensive research programs have guided development of AQMP over the last forty years. This cumulated experience can be utilized by others who face the same problems, but have yet to develop their own substantial research base. The main purpose of the AQMP development process is to establish an effective and sound basis for planning and management of air quality in a selected area. This type of planning will ensure that significant sources of impacts are identified and controlled in a most cost-effective manner. The choice of tools, methods and input information is often dictated by their availability, and should be evaluated against current best practices. Important elements of the AQMP are the identification of sources and development of a complete emission inventory, the development and operation of an air quality monitoring programme, and the development and application of atmospheric dispersion models. Major task is to collect the necessary input data. The development of the AQMP will take into account: - Air Quality Management System (AQMS requirements; - Operational and functional structure requirements; - Source identification through emission inventories; - Source reduction alternatives, which may be implemented; - Mechanisms for facilitating interdepartmental

  5. Hot air in Kyoto, cold air in The Hague

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    , the EU must reconsider and acknowledge US claims for cheaper reduction options and the right to trade 'hot air.' This point is important. If the US does not participate, the increase in emissions will be much higher than the emission reduction following the EU supplementarity proposal. Udgivelsesdato...

  6. Hot air in Kyoto, cold air in The Hague

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Urs; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2001-01-01

    -trading scheme, the EU must reconsider and acknowledge US claims for cheaper reduction options and the right to trade 'hot air.' This point is important. If the US does not participate, the increase in emissions will be much higher than the emission reduction following the EU supplementarity proposal....

  7. Pesticides in Air: New Challenges in Agricultural Air Quality Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    As agricultural and urban communities have become more intertwined, and the average size of agricultural production operations have increased substantially, issues of air quality have emerged as an area of increasing regulatory pressure for farmers in many countries. The science of measuring emissi...

  8. Geostatistical models for air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to present geostatistical models applied to the spatial characterisation of air pollution phenomena. A concise presentation of the geostatistical methodologies is illustrated with practical examples. The case study was conducted in an underground copper-mine located on the southern of Portugal, where a biomonitoring program using lichens has been implemented. Given the characteristics of lichens as indicators of air pollution it was possible to gather a great amount of data in space, which enabled the development and application of geostatistical methodologies. The advantages of using geostatistical models compared with deterministic models, as environmental control tools, are highlighted. (author)

  9. When water molecules meet air

    OpenAIRE

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  10. Flow in air conditioned rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    1974-01-01

    Flow in air conditioned r ooms is examined by means of model experiments . The different gearnetries giving unsteady, steady three- dimensional and steady twodimensional flow are determined . Velacity profiles and temperature profiles are measured in some of the geometries. A numerical solution...... of the flow equations is demonstrated and the flow in air conditioned rooms in case of steady two dimensional flow is predi cted. Compari son with measured results is shown i n the case of small Archimedes numbers, and predictions are shown at high Archimedes numbers. A numerical prediction of f low and heat...

  11. Pigeons home faster through polluted air

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongqiu Li; Franck Courchamp; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution, especially haze pollution, is creating health issues for both humans and other animals. However, remarkably little is known about how animals behaviourally respond to air pollution. We used multiple linear regression to analyse 415 pigeon races in the North China Plain, an area with considerable air pollution, and found that while the proportion of pigeons successfully homed was not influenced by air pollution, pigeons homed faster when the air was especially polluted. Our resu...

  12. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality policies. This paper describes the programs that are being used to fulfill the three tasks of the project: air pollution modeling and simulation, air pollution monitoring, and strategic evaluation. The two lead institutions for this project are the Mexican Petroleum Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratory

  13. Considering Air Density in Wind Power Production

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Zénó

    2011-01-01

    In the wind power production calculations the air density is usually considered as constant in time. Using the CIPM-2007 equation for the density of moist air as a function of air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity, we show that it is worth taking the variation of the air density into account, because higher accuracy can be obtained in the calculation of the power production for little effort.

  14. Air permeability of polyester nonwoven fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Guocheng; Kremenakova Dana; Wang Yan; Militky Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Air permeability is one of the most important properties of non-woven fabrics in many applications. This paper aims to investigate the effects of thickness, porosity and density on the air permeability of needle-punched non-woven fabrics and compare the experimental values with two models which are based on hydraulic radius theory and drag theory, respectively. The air permeability of the samples was measured by an air permeability tester FX3300. The results showed that the air permeability o...

  15. Impact of individually controlled facially applied air movement on perceived air quality at high humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The effect of facially applied air movement on perceived air quality (PAQ) at high humidity was studied. Thirty subjects (21 males and 9 females) participated in three, 3-h experiments performed in a climate chamber. The experimental conditions covered three combinations of relative humidity and...... local air velocity under a constant air temperature of 26 degrees C, namely: 70% relative humidity without air movement, 30% relative humidity without air movement and 70% relative humidity with air movement under isothermal conditions. Personalized ventilation was used to supply room air from the front...... room air temperature of 26 degrees C and relative humidity of 70%....

  16. Review of Air Exchange Rate Models for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessments is estimation of the air exchange rate (AER) for various buildings, where people spend their time. The AER, which is rate the exchange of indoor air with outdoor air, is an important determinant for entry of outdoor air pol...

  17. 49 CFR 570.57 - Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake... STANDARDS Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.57 Air brake system and air-over-hydraulic brake subsystem. The following requirements apply to vehicles with air brake and...

  18. 21 CFR 211.46 - Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and... Buildings and Facilities § 211.46 Ventilation, air filtration, air heating and cooling. (a) Adequate... holding of a drug product. (c) Air filtration systems, including prefilters and particulate matter...

  19. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  20. Isothermal air ingress validation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomic's Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident. (author)