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Sample records for aids-free hiv-1-infected patients

  1. Impaired production of cytokines is an independent predictor of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Bente K;

    2003-01-01

    With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients.......With regard to the natural history of HIV-1 infection this study investigated whether whole-blood culture cytokine production was associated with mortality in HIV-1-infected patients....

  2. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  3. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University Hospital of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Maes, Alex [AZ Groening, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  4. No relationship between gastric pH, small bowel bacterial colonisation, and diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, C; Waites, K; SMITH, P., CUBAS, M., CORRIN, J., TAPIA, J., DE PEDRO, I., RUIZ COBO, J., PEREDA ROSALES, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims—Conclusive studies of small bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with HIV-1 infection are limited. The relation was therefore determined between the quantity and species of bacteria in the proximal small intestine of HIV-1 infected patients and the presence of diarrhoea, gastric acidity, severity of immune deficiency, and clinical outcome. 
Methods—Bacteria in the duodenal fluids obtained endoscopically from 32 HIV-1 infected patients, 21 of whom had dia...

  5. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs. PMID:26544580

  6. Oxidative Imbalance in HIV-1 Infected Patients Treated with Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Antonella Mandas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that oxidative stress is involved in HIV infection. However, the role in oxidative balance of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART is still debated. In our study we assessed serum oxidant and antioxidant levels in an HIV-1-infected population treated with HAART, and compared them with those of untreated HIV-1 patients and HIV-1-negative subjects. The study included 116 HIV-1-infected patients (86 HAART-treated and 30 untreated, and 46 HIV-negative controls. Serum oxidant levels were significantly higher in the HIV-1 treated group as compared to untreated and control groups. In addition, a decrease of serum total antioxidant status was observed in the HIV-1 treated group. To be noted is that patients who rigorously follow antiretroviral therapy (optimal HAART adherence have significantly higher oxidative status than those who do not closely follow the therapy (poor HAART adherence. Analysis of variance revealed no significant further increase in oxidative status in HIV-1-infected patients taking antiretroviral and other drugs with the exception of psychiatric drugs (e.g. anxiolytics or antidepressants. Taken together, our results indicate that HAART may affect oxidative stress in HIV-1-infected patients and suggest that antiretroviral therapy plays an important role in the synergy of HIV infection and oxidative stress.

  7. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highl...

  8. Chronic renal failure among HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to antiretrovirals in chronic renal failure (CRF) is not well understood. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) are estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) or Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations. METHODS: Baseline was arbitrarily defined as the first...... recorded GFR; patients with two consecutive GFR determine odds ratio (OR) of CRF at baseline. ART exposure (yes/no or cumulative exposure) prior to baseline was included in multivariate models (adjusted for region...... of Europe, age, prior AIDS, CD4 cell count nadir, viral load, hypertension and use of nephrotoxic anti-infective therapy). RESULTS: Using CG, the median GFR at baseline (n = 4474) was 94.4 (interquartile range, 80.5-109.3); 158 patients (3.5%) had CRF. Patients with CRF were older (median, 61.9 versus 43...

  9. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S.R.; Katzenstein, T.L.; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2008-01-01

    Despite undetectable viral load in conventional assays, probably all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients have residual viraemia (RV) detectable by ultra-sensitive assays. To study this issue, this study investigated virologic and immunologic consequences of RV in highly active......-count, CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+HLA-DR+CD38+, CD4+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD8+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+, CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells, IgG or IgM. In conclusion, RV was associated with increased blood levels of soluble immune activation markers in HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. The finding that RV was...... antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA or=1 episode with TMA-RV whereas 9 patients had undetectable TMA-RV throughout the study-period. Time-points with TMA-RV and PCR-RV were associated with higher circulating sTNFrII (+0.234 ng/ml, P = 0.030) and beta(2...

  10. Limited patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, PT; Sprangers, MAG; Burger, DM; Hoetelmans, RMW; Hugen, PWH; Danner, SA; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Schneider, MME; Schrey, G; Meenhorst, PL; Sprenger, HG; Kauffmann, RH; Jambroes, M; Chesney, MA; de Wolf, F; Lange, JMA

    2001-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency syndrome type 1 (HIV-1) infection is essential to sustain viral suppression and prevent drug resistance. We investigated adherence to HAART among patients in a clinical cohort study. Methods: Patients re

  11. Association of visceral adiposity with increased intrarenal artery resistive index in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Grima Pierfrancesco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of our study was to evaluate whether perirenal fat thickness (PRFT, a parameter of central obesity, is related to kidney function and intrarenal artery resistive index (IARI in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected patients. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 102 consecutive HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy for more than 12 months in a prospective cohort study. Echographically, the PRFT and IARI were measured and the serum metabolic parameters were evaluated. PRFT and IARI were measured using a 3.75 MHz convex linear probe. Results: The mean of PRFT and IARI in HIV-1-infected patients with visceral obesity was considerably higher than that in patients without it (P <0.001 and <0.01, respectively. Using the average IARI as the dependent variable, age (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.14; P < 0.5 and PRFT (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.08-1.51; P<0.01 were independent factors associated with IARI. Conclusion: Our data indicate that ultrasonographic assessment of PRFT may have a potential to be a marker of increased endothelial damage with specific involvement of the renal vascular district in HIV-1-infected patients.

  12. External Validation of the Bilirubin–Atazanavir Nomogram for Assessment of Atazanavir Plasma Exposure in HIV-1-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Bergstrand, Martin; Tarning, Joel; Calcagno, Andrea; D’Avolio, Antonio; Ormaasen, Vidar; Vigan, Marie; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Ashton, Michael; Gisslén, Magnus; Äbelö, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Atazanavir increases plasma bilirubin levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Due to less costly and readily available assays, bilirubin has been proposed as a marker of atazanavir exposure. In this work, a previously developed nomogram for detection of suboptimal atazanavir exposure is validated against external patient populations. The bilirubin nomogram was validated against 311 matching bilirubin and atazanavir samples from 166 HIV-1-infected Norwegian, French, and Italian patients on...

  13. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highly...... active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Plasma suPAR decreased after introducing HAART, most pronounced during the first treatment year. The change in plasma suPAR was independent of changes in viral replication and CD4+ cells but it was strongly correlated with plasma levels of the soluble TNF receptor...... II. Compared with healthy individuals, plasma suPAR and sTN-FrII was increased in untreated patients. After initiating HAART, plasma sTNFrII remained increased whereas plasma suPAR decreased to a level comparable with healthy individuals. The present data indicate that the circulating suPAR level is...

  14. Levels of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and neopterin in patients with advanced HIV-1 infection

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    P Bipath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP and neopterin as indicators of immune deficiency, co-infection, efficacy of treatment, and disease progression, in patients with advanced HIV-1 infection. Design. Cross-sectional, investigating baseline blood measurements and clinical observations in 82 HIV-positive patients divided into an antiretroviral treatment (ART group and an ART-naïve group. Setting. Secondary general hospital in Pretoria. Results. Procalcitonin and CRP levels showed no significant differences between the ART and ART-naïve groups, and no correlations with CD4 counts or viral loads. CRP levels were significantly higher with TB co-infection (p<0.05. Neopterin levels were raised above normal in 92% of the ART-naïve group and in 75% of the ART group. The levels were significantly higher (p<0.05 in the ART- naïve group. Negative correlations were found between neopterin and CD4 counts for the total patient group (r=-0.482; p<0.001. Neopterin was significantly (p<0.05 higher in the HIV/TB co-infection group than in those without TB. Higher neopterin levels at baseline were associated with a decline in CD4 counts over the ensuing 6-month period, and patients with higher baseline neopterin levels developed more complications over the 6-month period. Conclusions. Compared with procalcitonin and CRP, neopterin appears to be associated with the degree of immunodeficiency and of co-infection with TB. Neopterin levels may be investigated further as a measure of disease progression or treatment response. S Afr J HIV Med 2012;13(2:78-82.

  15. HIV-1 infected patients with suppressed plasma viremia on treatment have pro-inflammatory HDL

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    Navab Kaveh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of pro-inflammatory lipids in systemic immune activation in HIV infection remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that HIV-1-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy would have pro-inflammatory high density lipoprotein (HDL, and that an apoA-1 mimetic peptide might reverse the inflammatory properties of HDL in these persons. Methods Plasma was obtained from 10 HIV-1-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy with suppressed viremia and was incubated with the apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F or sham-treated prior to isolation of HDL. The HDL that was isolated from each sample was tested for its ability to inhibit LDL-induced MCP-1 production in cultures of human aortic endothelial cells. Results We found in a small pilot study of HIV-1-infected individuals with suppressed viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy that oxidative stress and inflammation in HIV-1 are associated with a marked reduction of HDL antioxidant/anti-inflammatory activities. In vitro, these abnormalities were significantly improved by treatment with the apoA-1 mimetic peptide, 4F. Conclusions These preliminary observations suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL are defective in HIV-1-infected persons despite treatment that is considered to be virologically successful.

  16. Activation and inflammation markers in HIV-1-infected patients in dependency of treatment strategies

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    R Ehret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: HIV-1-infected patients have elevated levels of immune activation and systemic inflammatory markers which are partially strong predictors of disease progression or are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The dependency of anti-retroviral treatment (ART, the usage of NNRTI or PI-based and the application of non-nuc regimens is analysed here on the basis of a dataset (Chronic Inflammation Dependency on TREatment: CIDRE cohort from 1500 patients in Berlin. Methods: In a retrospective analysis we compared relative CD4+ cell counts, viral load, relative CD8+CD38+DR-and CD3+DR+cells, concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in therapy-naïve or treated patients dependent on usage or non-usage of NUCs, PI or NNRTI. Statistics were performed with R (R Core Team; 2012; R: A language and environment for statistical computing using Wilcoxon rank sum test in two-sided analysis. Summary of results: As to expect, ART-naïve patients (n=190 had significantly higher viral loads and lower CD4+cell counts (p: both<0.05 and showed higher activation levels than treated patient (CD8+CD38+DR- and CD3+DR+both<0.05. But no significant difference was calculated for hsCRP or IL-6. Nuc-sparing regimen (n=46 did not show any distinction compared to nuc-containing therapies (n=1249 for the analysed parameters. Significant differences were detected for PI-regimen (n=711 with lower CD4+ cell counts and higher activation (CD8+38+DR-, CD3+DR+ and IL-6 (p: all<0.05 but not for hsCRP (p=0.39. The opposite was true for NNRTI-based therapies (n=445 with higher CD4+ cell percentages and lower activation and inflammation markers (p: all<0.05 and as well no difference in hsCRP (p=0.97 compared with all other treated patients. Conclusions: The lack of differences between therapy-naïve patients and patients on ART for inflammation markers may be due to the relative good immunological state of the first group

  17. Prognosis of HIV-1-infected patients up to 5 years after initiation of HAART: collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, M; Sterne, JAC; Sabin, C;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prognosis over 5 years of HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive patients starting HAART, taking into account the immunological and virological response to therapy. DESIGN: A collaborative analysis of data from 12 cohorts in Europe and North America on 20,379 adults who started...... HAART between 1995 and 2003. METHODS: Parametric survival models were used to predict the cumulative incidence at 5 years of a new AIDS-defining event or death, and death alone, first from the start of HAART and second from 6 months after the start of HAART. Data were analysed by intention...

  18. Impact of gender on the risk of AIDS-defining illnesses and mortality in Danish HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Larsen, Mette Vang; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Pedersen, Gitte; Storgaard, Merete; Obel, Niels; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    time of HIV diagnosis MSM had a lower prevalence of AIDS compared to MSW. Women and MSW presented more often with tuberculosis and less often with AIDS-defining cancers compared to MSM. In the adjusted analyses we observed no differences in progression to AIDS. In the adjusted analyses of risk of death......Abstract Background: Gender differences in the risk of AIDS-defining illness (ADI) and mortality have been reported in the HIV-1-infected (HIV-positive) population, with conflicting findings. We aimed to assess the impact of gender on the risk of ADI and death in HIV-positive patients infected...

  19. Study of T Cell subsets and IL-7 protein expression in HIV-1-infected patients after 7 years HAART

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    Shou C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study the changes in T cell subsets and IL-7 in HIV-1-infected patients after seven years of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Methods Seventy-five individuals were included in this study (25 with effective HAART, 18 with ineffective HAART, 17 untreated HIV+ patients, and 15 volunteers in the HIV negative control group. The counts of CD4+, CD8+, CD8/CD38+, and CD8/HLADR+ T cells as well as the IL-7 protein expression was measured at 5 time points during a period of seven years in patients starting HAART (baseline and in the HIV negative control group. The expression of CD127 on CD3+ T cells was measured by flow cytometry at a single time point (after 7 years in patients with HAART and was compared with untreated HIV+ patients and the HIV negative control group. Results At baseline CD4+ T cell counts of HIV-1-infected patients were lower than that in the control group (p +, CD8/HLADR+ and CD8/CD38+ T cell counts were higher than those in the control group (p 0.01. After seven years of effective HAART, the CD4+ T cell counts had increased and the CD8+ T cell count had decreased, although not to the normal levels (p + and CD8/CD38+ T cell counts had gradually approached those of the control group (p > 0.05. In the ineffective HAART group, the CD8/CD38+ T cell count had not decreased significantly, and CD8/HLADR+ T cell count gradually decreased. Before treatment, IL-7 serum levels of patients were significantly higher than that in the control group (p p + CD8+ T cells in effective HAART patients was higher than in untreated HIV+ patients (p p + CD4+ T cells was not significantly different among the control group, untreated HIV+ patients and effective HAART group. Conclusion After seven years of effective HAART, the quantity and capacity of T cell subsets and IL-7 in HIV-1-infected patients had been partially restored, and the abnormal immune activation has significantly diminished.

  20. STRike - characteristics of HIV-1-infected patients treated with a single-tablet regimen in daily clinical practice

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    S Esser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The life-long antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 infection requires effective and well tolerated medications complemented by high rates of adherence in order to achieve viral suppression, immunologic reconstitution and to prevent the development of resistance. Single-tablet regimens (STRs, combining a full antiretroviral regimen in one tablet taken once daily, have been designed to achieve high adherence and better long-term outcomes. “STRike” is the first cohort study, describing the use of various STRs in routine clinical practice in Germany. In this observational cohort study 800 participants will be included in 4 treatment arms, treated with the STRs of TDF/FTC/EFV (a retrospective and prospective arm, TDF/FTC/RPV or TDF/FTC/COBI/EVG after regulatory approval. Patients are followed for at least two years, and reasons for choice of medications and treatment satisfaction will be collected, in addition to safety, demographic, effectiveness data. To date 344 patients on TDF/FTC/EFV and 123 patients on TDF/FTC/RPV are being followed. In general, the spectrum of patients in the study reflects the German HIV-1 infected population with regards to gender (88%/89% male, age (median 40/38 years of age and mode of infection (71%/63% MSM. However, patients starting TDF/FTC/RPV are less progressed in their disease according to their CDC stage compared with patients on TDF/FTC/EFV (74.5% stage “A” vs. 53.2%. Patients starting TDF/FTC/RPV show less comorbidities (54% vs. 82% with a spectrum different from patients on TDF/FTC/EFV. Pre-existing neuropsychiatric comorbidities are relatively more common (10% more among patients starting TDF/FTC/RPV than TDF/FTC/EFV. The decision to use an STR is mostly driven by patient preference to start with a more convenient ART regimen (56% or to simplify their current ART regimen (75%. STRs aim to make treatment of HIV more convenient, more efficacious and more durable and by that allowing for earlier initiation of

  1. High plasma levels of intact and cleaved soluble urokinase receptor reflect immune activation and are independent predictors of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Piironen, Timo; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) (bulk measurement of 3-domain and 2-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)], and suPAR(I-III) ligand complexes) strongly predict mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. This study in...

  2. High plasma levels of intact and cleaved soluble urokinase receptor reflect immune activation and are independent predictors of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Piironen, Timo; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2005-01-01

    High blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) (bulk measurement of 3-domain and 2-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)], and suPAR(I-III) ligand complexes) strongly predict mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. This study investigated p...

  3. Uridine metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients: effect of infection, of antiretroviral therapy and of HIV-1/ART-associated lipodystrophy syndrome.

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    Pere Domingo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uridine has been advocated for the treatment of HIV-1/HAART-associated lipodystrophy (HALS, although its metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients is poorly understood. METHODS: Plasma uridine concentrations were measured in 35 controls and 221 HIV-1-infected patients and fat uridine in 15 controls and 19 patients. The diagnosis of HALS was performed following the criteria of the Lipodystrophy Severity Grading Scale. Uridine was measured by a binary gradient-elution HPLC method. Analysis of genes encoding uridine metabolizing enzymes in fat was performed with TaqMan RT-PCR. RESULTS: Median plasma uridine concentrations for HIV-1-infected patients were 3.80 µmol/l (interquartile range: 1.60, and for controls 4.60 µmol/l (IQR: 1.8 (P = 0.0009. In fat, they were of 6.0 (3.67, and 2.8 (4.65 nmol/mg of protein, respectively (P = 0.0118. Patients with a mixed HALS form had a median plasma uridine level of 4.0 (IC95%: 3.40-4.80 whereas in those with isolated lipoatrophy it was 3.25 (2.55-4.15 µmol/l/l (P = 0.0066. The expression of uridine cytidine kinase and uridine phosphorylase genes was significantly decreased in all groups of patients with respect to controls. A higher expression of the mRNAs for concentrative nucleoside transporters was found in HIV-1-infected patients with respect to healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-1 infection is associated with a decrease in plasma uridine and a shift of uridine to the adipose tissue compartment. Antiretroviral therapy was not associated with plasma uridine concentrations, but pure lipoatrophic HALS was associated with significantly lower plasma uridine concentrations.

  4. Comparison of intima-media thickness and ophthalmic artery resistance index for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-1-infected patients

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    Tana Mariangela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and antiretroviral treatment are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications that potentially increase the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in this population. Measurement of arterial wall thickness has been used as a surrogate of extent, severity and progression of atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional cohort study was performed to compare the validity of two non-invasive arterial measures: carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, a parameter of atherosclerosis, and ophthalmic artery resistance index (OARI, an index of occlusive carotid artery disease. Methods A total of 95 patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART for more than 12 months were consecutively enrolled. IMT and OARI were measured by 7.5 MHz linear probe. Results There was a significant linear increase in IMT and OARI values as the grade of cardiovascular risk (0.70 and 0.69 for very low risk, 0.86 and 0.72 for low risk and 0.98 and 0.74 for medium/high risk, p 0.83 and an OARI > 0.72 were the most discriminatory values for predicting a cardiovascular risk ≥ 10% (sensibility 89.6% and 75.8%; sensitivity 70.5% and 68.4%; p Conclusions Our data indicate that OARI may have a potential as a new precocious marker of subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-1-infected patients.

  5. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L; Gerstoft, Jan; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART).......The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART)....

  6. Decreased HIV diversity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation of an HIV-1 infected patient: a case report

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    Thielen Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 coreceptor use and viral evolution were analyzed in blood samples from an HIV-1 infected patient undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT. Coreceptor use was predicted in silico from sequence data obtained from the third variable loop region of the viral envelope gene with two software tools. Viral diversity and evolution was evaluated on the same samples by Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods. In addition, phenotypic analysis was done by comparison of viral growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in a CCR5 (R5-deficient T-cell line which was controlled by a reporter assay confirming viral tropism. In silico coreceptor predictions did not match experimental determinations that showed a consistent R5 tropism. Anti-HIV directed antibodies could be detected before and after the SCT. These preexisting antibodies did not prevent viral rebound after the interruption of antiretroviral therapy during the SCT. Eventually, transplantation and readministration of anti-retroviral drugs lead to sustained increase in CD4 counts and decreased viral load to undetectable levels. Unexpectedly, viral diversity decreased after successful SCT. Our data evidence that only R5-tropic virus was found in the patient before and after transplantation. Therefore, blocking CCR5 receptor during stem cell transplantation might have had beneficial effects and this might apply to more patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, we revealed a scenario of HIV-1 dynamic different from the commonly described ones. Analysis of viral evolution shows the decrease of viral diversity even during episodes with bursts in viral load.

  7. Persistent inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV-1 infected patients after 12 years of antiretroviral therapy.

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    Frederikke F Rönsholt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART. METHODS: Inflammation and endothelial activation were assessed by measuring levels of immunoglobulins, β2-microglobulin, interleukin (IL 8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, sE-Selectin, and sP-Selectin. RESULTS: HIV infected patients had higher levels of β2-microglobulin, IL-8, TNFα, and sICAM-1 than uninfected controls, and HIV infected patients lacked correlation between platelet counts and sP-Selectin levels found in uninfected controls. CONCLUSION: Discrete signs of systemic and vascular inflammation persist even after very long term cART.

  8. Bypassing non-adherence via PEG in a critically ill HIV-1-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipe, J; Hueber, A J; Rech, J; Harrer, T

    2008-08-01

    This case study describes a 44-year-old, chronically non-adherent, HIV-infected male with relapsing, life threatening toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) and other recurring opportunistic infections. Non-adherence resulted in critical illness, suppressed CD4 lymphocyte count and elevated viral load. In order to bypass the patient's complete psychological aversion to taking medication, and after exhausting various psychological interventions, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG) tube was inserted for delivery of indispensable medication. During the 15-month follow-up the patient was adherent, exhibiting a consistently undetectable viral load, high CD4 count and a remission of the opportunistic infections. This is an interesting case study demonstrating life-saving and long-term benefit of PEG in an exceptional setting, which has implications for future research and treatment of non-adherent HIV-infected patients. PMID:18608059

  9. Bezafibrate for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Juliana Geraix

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in HIV-infected patients has been associated with the development of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CD including dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia being the most frequent metabolic disturbance in these patients. Fibrates are indicated when hypertriglyceridemia is accentuated and persists for over six months. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of bezafibrate for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV-infected individuals on HAART. All patients received 400mg/day of bezafibrate and were evaluated three times: Mo (pre-treatment, M1 (one month after treatment, and M2 (six months after treatment. Fifteen adult individuals, eight males and seven females with mean age = 41.2 ± 7.97 years and triglyceride serum levels > 400mg/dL were included in the study. Smoking, alcohol ingestion and sedentarism rates were 50%, 6.66% and 60%, respectively. Family history of CD, hypertension and diabetes mellitus was reported in 33.3%, 40% and 46.7% of the cases, respectively, while dyslipidemia was reported by only 13.3%. More than half of the patients were using a protease inhibitor plus a nucleotide analog transcriptase inhibitor. Eutrophy and tendency toward overweight were observed at all three study time points. There were significant reductions in triglyceride serum levels from Mo to M1 and from Mo to M2. No significant changes were observed in the serum levels of creatine phosphokinase, hepatic enzymes, CD4+, CD8+ and viral load. Therefore, bezafibrate seems to be safe and effective for the reduction of hypertriglyceridemia in HIV-infected patients on HAART.

  10. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Katzenstein, T L; Pedersen, B K;

    2008-01-01

    Despite undetectable viral load in conventional assays, probably all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients have residual viraemia (RV) detectable by ultra-sensitive assays. To study this issue, this study investigated virologic and immunologic consequences of RV in highly active......-count, CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+HLA-DR+CD38+, CD4+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD8+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+, CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells, IgG or IgM. In conclusion, RV was associated with increased blood levels of soluble immune activation markers in HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. The finding that RV was...... antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA or=1 episode with TMA-RV whereas 9 patients had undetectable TMA-RV throughout the study-period. Time-points with TMA-RV and PCR-RV were associated with higher circulating sTNFrII (+0.234 ng/ml, P = 0.030) and beta(2...

  11. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L; Gerstoft, Jan; Sisse R Ostrowski

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). Methods Inflammation and endothelial activation were assessed by measuring levels of immunoglobulins, β2-microglobulin, interleukin (IL) 8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), sE-Selectin, and sP-Selectin. Results HIV infected p...

  12. Efficacy and safety of rilpivirine-based regimens in treatment-experienced HIV-1 infected patients: a prospective cohort study

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    Sandrine Gazaignes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rilpivirine (RPV is a new once-daily, non-nucleoside, reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI. In treatment-naïve patients, RPV has shown non-inferior antiviral activity to efavirenz but data in treatment-experienced patients are more limited. We assessed the efficacy and safety of RPV in treatment-experienced patients switching to a RPV-based regimen. Methods: Between September 2012 and June 2013, all antiretroviral therapy (ART experienced HIV-1 infected patients with a plasma HIV-RNA level <50 cp/mL, and switching to a RPV-based regimen, were enrolled in this prospective monocentric cohort study. Clinical and laboratory data were collected every 3 months to assess safety and efficacy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with virologic success (HIV-RNA load <50 cp/mL at 12 months using the FDA snapshot algorithm. Results: A total of 281 patients (76% male, median age: 47 years, 56% MSM were enrolled in this study. Median lymphocyte CD4 count at baseline was 640/mm3. Patients have received ART for a median of 7 years and viral replication was fully suppressed for a median of 3 years. Before the switch, 39% patients were treated with NNRTI, 52% with protease inhibitor and 7% with integrase inhibitor-based regimens. Reasons for switch were simplification (176 cases, adverse events (AEs (93 cases and others (12 cases. At month 12 (database frozen on June 2014 in the snapshot analysis, 56% of patients met virologic success, 5% experienced virologic failure (n=14 and 39% had no data in the window period. In the LOCF analysis (using data from the previous available visit before month 12, 89% patients were suppressed, 5% had virologic failure and 6% had no data. Genotypic resistance analysis was performed in 7/14 patients at the time of virologic failure (3 of whom had previous NRTI/NNRTI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs, and new NNRTI and NRTI RAMs emerged in 4 patients. RPV-based regimen was generally well

  13. Increased density of neurons containing NADPH diaphorase and nitric oxide synthase in the cerebral cortex of patients with HIV-1 infection and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljis, Rodrigo O; Shapshak, Paul; Alcabes, Philip; Rodríguez de la Vega, Pura; Fujimura, Robert; Petito, Carol K

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide; NO) synthase (NOS) and NADPH diaphorase (NDP) co-containing cerebrocortical neurons (NOSN) neurons are affected in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with and without associated intake of drugs of abuse, we examined the temporal neocortex of 24 individuals: 12 HIV-1 positive (including 3 drug users, 9 non-drug users) and 12 HIV-1 negative (including 6 drug users, and 6 non-drug users). Histochemical labeling for NDP-an enzymatic domain co-expressed in the NOS enzyme-was employed to visualize NOSN. Drug abuse and HIV-1 infection cause independently an increase in NOSN density, but combined they result in up to a 38-fold increase in NOSN density, suggesting that the combination of these factors induces NOS expression powerfully in neurons that normally do not synthesize NDP/NOS. This is associated with an increase in the proportion of NOSN displaying dystrophic changes, indicating that NOSN undergo massive degeneration in association with NOS synthesis induction. The increase in density of NOSN in HIV-1 infected drug abusers may be among the important sources of NO mediating cerebrocortical dysfunction, and the degeneration of NOS-containing local circuit neurons in patients with HIV-1 infection or drug abuse may underlie in part their neuropsychiatric manifestations. PMID:16873197

  14. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, B K;

    2005-01-01

    highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), low-level viraemia, proviral-DNA or immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients. A total of 101 HAART-treated HIV-1 infected patients with < or = 200 HIV-RNA copies/ml were followed prospectively for 24 months. HIV-RNA was investigated 3-monthly and 2B4...... expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected...... follow-up (both P < 0.001). Higher levels of proviral-DNA carrying cells and plasma sTNFrII were associated with reductions in the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells (all P < 0.05). HIV-RNA had no effect on 2B4 expression on NK cells or CD3+ CD8+ cells. These findings demonstrate that the concentration of 2B...

  15. Lack of awareness of treatment failure among HIV-1-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau – a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Medina, Candida; da Silva Té, David; Correira, Faustino Gomes; Laursen, Alex Lund; Erikstrup, Christian; Østergaard, Lars; Wejse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With more people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), the need to detect treatment failure and switch to second-line ART has also increased. We assessed CD4 cell counts (as a marker of treatment failure), determined the rate of switching to second-line treatment and evaluated mortality related to treatment failure among HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, adult patients infected with HIV-1 receiving ≥6 months of ART at an HIV clinic in Bissau were included from June 2005 to July 2014 and followed until January 2015. Treatment failure was defined as 1) a fall in CD4 count to baseline (or below) or 2) CD4 levels persistently below 100 cells/µL after ≥6 months of ART. Cox hazard models, with time since six months of ART as the time-varying coefficient, were used to estimate the hazard ratio for death and loss to follow-up. Results We assessed 1,591 HIV-1-infected patients for immunological treatment failure. Treatment failure could not be determined in 594 patients (37.3%) because of missing CD4 cell counts. Among the remaining 997 patients, 393 (39.4%) experienced failure. Only 39 patients (9.9%) with failure were switched from first- to second-line ART. The overall switching rate was 3.1 per 100 person-years. Mortality rate was higher in patients with than without treatment failure, with adjusted hazard rate ratios (HRRs) 10.0 (95% CI: 0.9–107.8), 7.6 (95% CI: 1.6–35.5) and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.5–6.3) in the first, second and following years, respectively. During the first year of follow-up, patients experiencing treatment failure had a higher risk of being lost to follow-up than patients not experiencing treatment failure (adjusted HRR 4.4; 95% CI: 1.7–11.8). Conclusions We found a high rate of treatment failure, an alarmingly high number of patients for whom treatment failure could not be assessed, and a low rate of switching to a second-line therapy. These factors could lead to an increased

  16. Lack of awareness of treatment failure among HIV-1-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau – a retrospective cohort study

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    Sanne Jespersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With more people receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART, the need to detect treatment failure and switch to second-line ART has also increased. We assessed CD4 cell counts (as a marker of treatment failure, determined the rate of switching to second-line treatment and evaluated mortality related to treatment failure among HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, adult patients infected with HIV-1 receiving ≥6 months of ART at an HIV clinic in Bissau were included from June 2005 to July 2014 and followed until January 2015. Treatment failure was defined as 1 a fall in CD4 count to baseline (or below or 2 CD4 levels persistently below 100 cells/µL after ≥6 months of ART. Cox hazard models, with time since six months of ART as the time-varying coefficient, were used to estimate the hazard ratio for death and loss to follow-up. Results: We assessed 1,591 HIV-1-infected patients for immunological treatment failure. Treatment failure could not be determined in 594 patients (37.3% because of missing CD4 cell counts. Among the remaining 997 patients, 393 (39.4% experienced failure. Only 39 patients (9.9% with failure were switched from first- to second-line ART. The overall switching rate was 3.1 per 100 person-years. Mortality rate was higher in patients with than without treatment failure, with adjusted hazard rate ratios (HRRs 10.0 (95% CI: 0.9–107.8, 7.6 (95% CI: 1.6–35.5 and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.5–6.3 in the first, second and following years, respectively. During the first year of follow-up, patients experiencing treatment failure had a higher risk of being lost to follow-up than patients not experiencing treatment failure (adjusted HRR 4.4; 95% CI: 1.7–11.8. Conclusions: We found a high rate of treatment failure, an alarmingly high number of patients for whom treatment failure could not be assessed, and a low rate of switching to a second-line therapy. These factors could lead to an

  17. Guillain Barre syndrome in an HIV-1-infected patient after the beginning of combined antiretroviral therapy: an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Digiulio, Maria Anna; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated Guillan-Barre syndrome (hGBS) is an ascendant progressive polyradiculoneuropathy described throughout the course of the viral disease, mainly associated with the acute retroviral syndrome. HGBS is occasionally described in severely immunocompromised subjects in the context of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The case described occurred soon after the start of a combined antiretroviral treatment in an HIV-1 infected patient with ulcerative colitis in the absence of severe immunosuppression. This manifestation may be interpreted as an uncommon appearance of an immune reconstitution syndrome in the presence of a predisposing autoimmune pathology. PMID:24531178

  18. Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

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    Sungkanuparph Somnuek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients, the data of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand is still limited. This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected Thai patients from 2007 to 2010. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations were assayed by sequencing a region of HIV-1 pol gene. Surveillance drug resistance mutations recommended by the World Health Organization for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in 2009 were used in all analyses. Primary HIV-1 drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more surveillance drug resistance mutations. Results Of 466 patients with a mean age of 38.8 years, 58.6% were males. Risks of HIV-1 infection included heterosexual (77.7%, homosexual (16.7%, and intravenous drug use (5.6%. Median (IQR CD4 cell count and HIV-1 RNA were 176 (42-317 cells/mm3 and 68,600 (19,515-220,330 copies/mL, respectively. HIV-1 subtypes were CRF01_AE (86.9%, B (8.6 and other recombinants (4.5%. The prevalence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance was 4.9%; most of these (73.9% had surveillance drug resistance mutations to only one class of antiretroviral drugs. The prevalence of patients with NRTI, NNRTI, and PI surveillance drug resistance mutations was 1.9%, 2.8% and 1.7%, respectively. From logistic regression analysis, there was no factor significantly associated with primary HIV-1 drug resistance. There was a trend toward higher prevalence in females [odds ratio 2.18; 95% confidence interval 0.896-5.304; p = 0.086]. Conclusions There is a significant emergence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy. Although HIV-1 genotyping prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation is not routinely recommended in Thailand, our results raise concerns about the

  19. Effect of Integrated Yoga (IY) on psychological states and CD4 counts of HIV-1 infected patients: A randomized controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoroibam, Rosy; Metri, Kashinath G; Bhargav, Hemant; Nagaratna, R; Nagendra, HR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals frequently suffer from anxiety and depression. Depression has been associated with rapid decline in CD4 counts and worsened treatment outcomes in HIV-infected patients. Yoga has been used to reduce psychopathology and improve immunity. Aim: To study the effect of 1-month integrated yoga (IY) intervention on anxiety, depression, and CD4 counts in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection. Methods: Forty four HIV-1 infected individuals from two HIV rehabilitation centers of Manipur State of India were randomized into two groups: Yoga (n = 22; 12 males) and control (n = 22; 14 males). Yoga group received IY intervention, which included physical postures (asanas), breathing practices (pranayama), relaxation techniques, and meditation. IY sessions were given 60 min/day, 6 days a week for 1 month. Control group followed daily routine during this period. All patients were on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and dosages were kept stable during the study. There was no significant difference in age, gender, education, CD4 counts, and ART status between the two groups. Hospital anxiety and depression scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, CD4 counts were measured by flow cytometry before and after intervention. Analysis of variance – repeated measures was applied to analyze the data using SPSS version 10. Results: Within group comparison showed a significant reduction in depression scores (F [1, 21] =4.19, P < 0.05) and non-significant reduction in anxiety scores along with non significant increment in CD4 counts in the yoga group. In the control group, there was a non-significant increase in anxiety and depression scores and reduction in CD4 counts. Between-group comparison revealed a significant reduction in depression scores (F [1, 21] =5.64, P < 0.05) and significant increase in CD4 counts (F [1, 21] =5.35, P < 0.05) in the yoga group as compared to the control. Conclusion: One month practice of IY

  20. Effectiveness of first-line antiretroviral therapy based on NNRTIs vs ritonavir-boosted PIs in HIV-1 infected patients with high plasma viral load

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    A Imaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Few clinical trials have compared non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r as initial combined antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV-1-infected patients with high plasma viral load (pVL, and non-conclusive results have been reported. We compared the effectiveness between NNRTI and PI/r as first-line cART for HIV-1-infected patients with high pVL. Methods: Observational retrospective study of 664 consecutive treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients with pVL (HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL who initiated NNRTI or PI/r-based cART between 2000–2010 in three University hospitals. Only currently preferred or alternative regimens in clinical guidelines were included. Primary endpoint: percentage of therapeutic failures at week 48. Virologic failure was defined as: a lack of virologic response (<1 log RNA HIV-1 decrease in first 3 months; b RNA HIV-1 >50 c/mL at week 48; c confirmed rebound >50 c/ml after a previous value <50 c/mL. Intent-to-treat (ITT noncompleter=failure and on-treatment (OT analyses were performed. Results: 62% of patients initiated NNRTI-regimens (83% efavirenz and 38% PI/r-regimens (62% lopinavir/. Baseline characteristics: male 83%; median age 39 yrs; median CD4 count: 212/µL (NNRTI 232 vs PI/r 177, p=0.028; pVL 5.83 log10 c/mL (NNRTI 5.43 vs PI/r 5.55, p=0.007; AIDS 24% (NNRTI 21% vs PI/r 29%, p=0.015. NRTI backbones were tenofovir plus 3TC or FTC in 72%. The percentage of therapeutic failure was higher in the PI/r group (ITT NC=F 26% vs 18%, p=0.012 with no differences in virologic failures (PI/r 5%, NNRTI 6%, p=0.688. The rate of treatment changes due to toxicity and/or voluntary discontinuations was higher in the PI/r group (15% vs 8%, p=0.008. A multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, CD4 count, VL and AIDS showed NNRTI vs PI/r as the only variable associated with treatment response (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41–0.88. Median pVL and rate of

  1. Longitudinal changes of peripheral blood DC subsets and regulatory T cells in Chinese chronic HIV-1-infected patients during antiretroviral therapy.

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    Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available It has been emphasized that chronic generalized immune dysfunction is the leading event in the pathogenesis of HIV infection, in which the contribution of dendritic cells (DCs and regulatory T cells (Tregs should not be underestimated. In current study, we assessed the longitudinal changes of peripheral blood DC subsets and Tregs in chronically asymptomatic treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 60 weeks of antiretroviral therapy (ART, and compared with those in healthy controls and long term non-progressors (LTNPs. Blood samples were collected at week 0, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 60 of treatment to measure the counts of DC subsets and Tregs by flow cytometry and IFN-a plasma levels by ELISA. The counts of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs increased during ART, reaching similar levels to healthy controls at week 60 post ART but still lower than those of LTNPs. In HIV-1-infected patients, the mDCs counts were directly correlated with CD4 counts during ART. Changes in mDCs at week 8 were positively correlated with the changes in CD4 counts at week 60 post ART. However, the counts and function of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs remained relatively stable during ART, and similar to those in healthy controls and LTNPs. The percentage of Tregs increased before ART and normalized after ART. Importantly, we found pDCs counts were associated with percentage of Tregs during ART, which may help in understanding of the role of these cells in HIV infection.

  2. Durability of Stavudine, Lamivudine and Nevirapine among Advanced HIV-1 Infected Patients with/without Prior Co-administration of Rifampicin: A 144-week Prospective Study

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    Prasithisirikul Wisit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, data on the durability of a regimen of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine are very limited, particularly from the resource-limited settings. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among 140 antiretroviral-naïve patients who were enrolled to initiate d4T, 3TC and NVP between November 2004 and March 2005. The objectives were to determine immunological and virological responses after 144 weeks of antiretroviral therapy. Seventy patients with tuberculosis also received rifampicin during the early period of antiviral treatment (TB group. Results Of all, median (IQR baseline CD4 cell count was 31 (14–79 cells/mm3; median (IQR baseline HIV-1 RNA was 433,500 (169,000–750,000 copies/mL. The average body weight was 55 kilograms. By intention-to-treat analysis at 144 weeks, the overall percentage of patients who achieved plasma HIV-1 RNA P = 0.731. Eight (5.8% patients discontinued d4T due to neuropathy and/or symptomatic lactic acidosis. Conclusion The overall durability and efficacy of antiviral response of d4T, 3TC and NVP are satisfied and they are not different between HIV-1 infected patients with and without co-administration of rifampicin due to tuberculosis. However, stavudine-related adverse effects are concerns. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00703898

  3. A randomized trial to evaluate lopinavir/ritonavir versus saquinavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients: the MaxCmin2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Gerstoft, J; Youle, M;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the rate of protocol-defined treatment failure and safety of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and saquinavir/ritonavir (SAQ/r). DESIGN: Open-label, prospective, randomized (1:1), international multi-centre trial. METHODS: Adult HIV-1-infected patients were assigned LPV/r 400/100 mg....../e; P = 0.001). The primary reasons for premature discontinuation were non-fatal adverse events (LPV/r: 12/163; SAQ/r: 21/161) and patients' choice (LPV/r: 7/163; SAQ/r: 8/161). In the on-treatment analysis of time to treatment failure, no difference was observed between the two arms (P = 0.27, log rank...... twice daily or SAQ/r 1000/100 mg twice daily with two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)/non-NRTIs. All patients, whether on or off the assigned treatment, were followed for 48 weeks. RESULTS: Of 339 randomized patients, 324 initiated assigned treatment (intention...

  4. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  5. Follow-up of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 infected patient successfully treated with darunavir and etravirine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audelin, Anne Margrethe; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Petersen, Ann Berith;

    2008-01-01

    A multi-drug-resistant, non-compliant HIV-1 patient was treated successfully with a combination of the drugs darunavir and etravirine for more than 8 months. The patient experienced an immunoreconstitution syndrome due to improved compliance. Examining previous resistance tests for this type of...

  6. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

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    Ruiz-Palacios Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-administration of immunomodulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two doses of recombinant HBV vaccine (10 or 40 μg, IM at 0, 1 and 6 months. Vaccination response was measured 30–50 days after last dose; titers of >9.9 IU/L were considered positive. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, 48 patients (60.7% serconverted. Thirty-nine patients (49.3% received 10 μg vaccine dose, 24 patients (61.5% seroconverted. Forty patients (50.7% received 40 μg vaccine dose, 24 (60% seroconverted. There were no differences between two doses. A statistically significant higher seroconversion rate was found for patients with CD4 cell counts at vaccination ≥ 200 cel/mm3 (33 of 38 patients, 86.8%, compared with those with CD4 4 count 3 were significantly associated with non serologic response (p = 0.003. None other variables such as gender, age, risk exposure for HIV, viral load, type or duration of HAART or AIDS-defining illness, were asociated with seroconversion. Conclusion In this study, an increase dose of HBV vaccine did not show to increase the rate of response in HIV infected subjects. The only significant findings associated to the response rate was that a CD4 count ≥ 200 cel/mm3, we suggest this threshold at which HIV patients should be vaccinated.

  7. Liver injury in HIV-1-infected patients receiving non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zai-cun; LI Hong-jun; DAI Li-li; GAO Yan-qing; CAI Wei-ping; LI Hai-ying; HUANG Xiao-jie; ZHANG Tong; WU Hao

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver injury is one of the most important adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy, leading to therapy changing or discontinuation. Data on liver injury in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy are limited in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the features of liver injury in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based antiretroviral therapy in China.Methods Seventy-five patients on antiretroviral therapy containing non-nucleosides reverse transcriptase inhibitors were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (with liver injury, n=45) and group 2(without liver injury, n=30). The features of liver injury were analyzed. The sex, age, baseline CD4 counts, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection, hepatotoxic drug use and nevirapine or efavirenz use were compared between two groups.Results Forty-five patients (60.0%), 31 (68.9%) males and 14 (31.1%) females, aged 12 to 52 years (averaged (3g±9)years), experienced at least one episode of liver injury. Forty (53.3%) patients were co-infected with HBV and/or HCV, 42 (56%) patients had concomitant use of antituberculosis drugs or cotrimoxazole, 46 (61.3%) and 29 (38.7%) patients received regimen containing nevirapine and efavirenz, respectively. Grade 1 liver injuries were observed in 26 (57.8%)patients, grade 2 in 16 (35.6%), grade 3 in 2 (4.0%) and grade 4 in 1 (2.2%). Three (6.7%) patients discontinued highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) due to liver injury. In group 1, there were 29 (64.4%) patients co-infected with HBV and/or HCV, 32 (71.1%) patients received regimen containing nevirapine, and 30 (66.7%) patients had concomitant use of anti-tuberculosis drugs or cotrimoxazole, respectively, significantly higher than those in group 2 (11 (36.7%), 14 (46.7%)and 12 (40%), respectively; P=0.018, 0.033, 0

  8. Impact of low-level viremia on clinical and virological outcomes in treated HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Ingle, Suzanne; May, Margaret;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goal of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is to reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality by suppressing HIV replication. The prognostic value of persistent low-level viremia (LLV), particularly for clinical outcomes, is unknown. OBJECTIVE: Assess the association of different levels of...... LLV with virological failure, AIDS event, and death among HIV-infected patients receiving combination ART. METHODS: We analyzed data from 18 cohorts in Europe and North America, contributing to the ART Cohort Collaboration. Eligible patients achieved viral load below 50  copies/ml within 3-9 months...

  9. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Palacios Guillermo; Vilar-Compte Diana; Escobedo-López Kenia; Volkow-Fernández Patricia; Cornejo-Juárez Patricia; Soto-Ramírez Luis

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-a...

  10. T cell subset distribution in HIV-1 infected patients after 12 years of treatment induced viraemic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2012-01-01

    healthy controls. METHODS:: Several different subsets of naïve, memory and activated T cells were analyzed in fresh whole blood by 6-color flowcytometry and ultra sensitive quantification of HIV RNA was performed. RESULTS:: HIV-infected patients (HIV+) had lower absolute and relative CD4 T cell counts...

  11. Effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy and development of drug resistance in HIV-1 infected patients in Mombasa, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaerts Jacqueline

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART is increasing in resource-limited settings (RLS and can successfully reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality. However, virologic failure and development of viral drug resistance can result in reduced treatment options and disease progression. Additionally, transmission of resistant virus, and particularly multi-drug resistance, could become a public health concern. This study evaluated treatment success and development of ART drug resistance after short-term treatment among patients attending the Comprehensive HIV Care Centre (CCC of Coast Province General Hospital, Mombasa, Kenya. One hundred and fifty HIV-infected individuals receiving ART were consecutively recruited to participate in the study. After determination of plasma viral load, patients with detectable viral load levels were subjected to genotypic drug resistance testing. At the time of sampling, 132 of the 150 participants were on ART for more than 6 months (median 21 months, IQR = 12–26. An efficient viral load reduction to below 50 copies/ml was observed in 113 (85.6% of them. Of the 19 patients with a detectable viral load, sequencing of the protease (PR and reverse transcriptase (RT gene was successful in 16. Eleven (11 of these 16 patients were infected with a subtype A1 virus. Major PR mutations were absent, but mutations associated with drug resistance in RT were detected in 14 of the 16 patients (87.5%. High-level resistance against at least 2 drugs of the ART regimen was observed in 9/14 (64.3%. The 3TC mutation M184V and the NNRTI mutation K103N were most frequent but also the multi-drug resistance Q151M and the broad NRTI cross-resistance K65R were observed. The results of this study revealed a high rate of treatment success after short term ART in patients treated at a public provincial hospital in a RLS. Nevertheless, the observed high risk of accumulation of resistance mutations among patients failing treatment and

  12. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control. PMID:26817581

  13. Safety of darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r in HIV-1-infected DRV/r-experienced and -naïve patients: analysis of data in the real-world setting in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Antinori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This descriptive, non-interventional study on HIV-1-infected patients treated with DRV/r in the usual clinical setting, with a single-arm prospective observational design, collected data on utilization of darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r under the conditions described in marketing authorization in usual clinical practice in Italy to evaluate efficacy and safety of DRV/r-based antiretroviral (ARV treatment. This analysis focussed on the safety profile of DRV/r in HIV-1 infected patients. Materials and Methods: Data were analyzed from four cohorts of HIV-1-infected patients treated with DRV/r in the real-world setting, including an ARV-naïve-DRV/r-naïve cohort (Cohort 1, an ARV-experienced-DRV/r-naïve cohort (Cohort 2 and two ARV-DRV/r-experienced cohorts (Cohorts 3 and 4, one of which (Cohort 3 was from the DRV/r Early Access Program. The objective of this analysis was to examine the safety data obtained in these four cohorts in patients enrolled from June 2009 to November 2011 and observed until December 2012 or DRV/r discontinuation. Results: Safety data from 875 patients were analyzed. DRV/r-based treatment was well tolerated, with 36.2% of patients reporting ≥1 adverse event (AE and very few discontinuations due to study drug-related AEs (3.0% overall. The most frequent AEs were diarrhoea (2.7%, reduced bone density (2.6% and hypercholesterolaemia (2.1% (Table 1. Regarding metabolic parameters, levels of liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST remained stable from baseline to the last study visit (LSV in DRV-experienced patients and decreased in DRV-naïve patients. Blood glucose concentrations remained stable in all cohorts. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations remained stable in DRV-experienced patients but increased in naïve patients, yet were still within normal range. Conclusions: In HIV-1-infected patients treated with DRV/r in these settings, the tolerability profile

  14. HIV-1 infection, but not syphilis or HBV infection, is a strong risk factor for anorectal condyloma in Asian population: A prospective colonoscopy screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nishijima

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: HIV-1 infection, but not syphilis or HBV infection, was identified as a strong risk for anorectal condyloma. Anal HPV 16/18 was highly prevalent in patients with HIV-1 infection, especially in those with condyloma.

  15. Effectiveness, durability, and safety of darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients in routine clinical practice in Italy: a postauthorization noninterventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antinori A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Antinori,1 Paola Meraviglia,2 Antonella d’Arminio Monforte,3,4 Antonella Castagna,5,6 Cristina Mussini,7 Teresa Bini,4 Nicola Gianotti,5 Stefano Rusconi,8 Elisa Colella,8 Giuseppe Airoldi,9 Daniela Mancusi,10 Roberta Termini10 1Clinical Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, Rome, 2Department of Infectious Disease, “L. Sacco” University Hospital, 3Department of Health Sciences – University of Milan, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, “San Paolo” Hospital, 5Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 6Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, 7Institute of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, 9Studio Associato Airoldi, Cicogna, Ghirri, 10Janssen-Cilag SpA, Medical Affairs, Cologno Monzese, Milan, Italy Abstract: Current antiretroviral (ARV therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected patients provides long-term control of viral load (VL. Darunavir (DRV is a nonpeptidomimetic protease inhibitor approved for use with a ritonavir booster (DRV/r. This study evaluated the effectiveness of DRV/r in combination with other ARV agents in routine clinical practice in Italy. In this descriptive observational study, data on utilization of DRV/r, under the conditions described in the marketing authorization, were collected from June 2009 to December 2012. Effectiveness (VL <50 copies/mL, tolerability, and durability in four patient groups (two DRV/r-experienced, one ARV-experienced DRV/r-naïve, and one ARV-naïve were analyzed. Secondary objectives included immunological response, safety, and persistence/discontinuation rates. In total, 875 of 883 enrolled patients were included in the analysis: of these, 662 (75.7% completed the follow-up until the end of 2012 and 213 (24.3% withdrew from the study earlier. Initial DRV dose was 600 mg twice daily (67.1% or 800

  16. Enhanced CD4+ cellular apoptosis by CCR5-restricted HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein variants from patients with progressive HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CCR5-using (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains cause CD4+ T-cell loss in most infected individuals, but mechanisms underlying cytopathicity of R5 viruses are poorly understood. We investigated mechanisms contributing to R5 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cellular apoptosis by constructing a panel of retroviral vectors engineered to co-express GFP and R5 Envs derived from two HIV-1-infected subjects spanning asymptomatic (Early, E-R5 Envs) to late stages of infection (Late, L-R5 Envs). The L-R5 Envs induced significantly more cellular apoptosis than E-R5 Envs, but only in Env-expressing (GFP-positive) cells, and only in cells where CD4 and CCR5 levels were limiting. Studies with fusion-defective Env mutants showed induction of apoptosis required membrane-fusing events. Our results provide evidence for an intracellular mechanism of R5 Env-induced apoptosis of CD4+ cells that requires membrane fusion. Furthermore, they contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms involved in CD4+ T-cell loss in subjects experiencing progressive R5 HIV-1 infection.

  17. Neuroimaging studies of the aging HIV-1-infected brain

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, John L.; Kraft-Terry, Stephanie D.; Chang, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has increased life expectancy among HIV-infected individuals, and by 2015, at least half of all HIV-infected individuals will be over 50 years of age. Neurodegenerative processes associated with aging may be facilitated by HIV-1 infection, resulting in premature brain aging. This review will highlight brain abnormalities in HIV patients in the setting of aging, focusing on recent neuroimaging studies of the structural, physiological, functional and...

  18. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    (PAI-1) were measured using a Luminex assay in plasma samples from routine visits both 12 and 2 months prior to the case patient's MI. RESULTS: The two groups had similar HIV characteristics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. In univariate analysis, PAI-1 levels were associated with MI......OBJECTIVES: Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and coagulation are associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but their association and possible predictive value remain controversial among HIV-1-infected individuals. We sought to investigate the association of...... seven biomarkers with first-time myocardial infarction (MI) in an HIV-1-infected population. DESIGN: A matched case-control study of 54 cases and 54 controls. METHODS: We compared 54 HIV-1-infected patients with verified first-time MI and 54 HIV-1-infected controls matched for age, duration of...

  19. The Effect of β-Carotene Supplementation on the Pharmacokinetics of Nelfinavir and Its Active Metabolite M8 in HIV-1-infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humayoun Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Carotene supplements are often taken by individuals living with HIV-1. Contradictory results from in vitro studies suggest that β-carotene may inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters. The study objective was to investigate the effect of β-carotene on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir and its active metabolite M8 in HIV-1 infected individuals. Twelve hour nelfinavir pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted at baseline and after 28 days of β-carotene supplementation (25,000 IU twice daily. Nelfinavir and M8 concentrations were measured with validated assays. Non-compartmental methods were used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters. Geometric mean ratios comparing day 28 to day 1 area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–12 h, maximum (Cmax and minimum (Cmin concentrations of nelfinavir and M8 are presented with 90% confidence intervals. Eleven subjects completed the study and were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in nelfinavir AUC0–12 h and Cmin (−10%, +4% after β-carotene supplementation. The M8 Cmin was increased by 31% while the M8 AUC0–12 h and Cmax were unchanged. During the 28 day period, mean CD4+ % and CD4+:CD8+ ratio increased significantly (p < 0.01. β-carotene supplementation increased serum carotene levels but did not cause any clinically significant difference in the nelfinavir and M8 exposure.

  20. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  1. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  2. Flail arm-like syndrome associated with HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years at least 23 cases of motor neuron disease have been reported in HIV-1 seropositive patients. In this report we describe the clinical picture of a young man with HIV-1 clade C infection and flail arm-like syndrome, who we were able to follow-up for a long period. We investigated and prospectively monitored a 34-year-old man with features of flail arm syndrome, who developed the weakness and wasting 1 year after being diagnosed with HIV-1 infection after a routine blood test. He presented in 2003 with progressive, symmetrical wasting and weakness of the proximal muscles of the upper limb of 2 years′ duration. He had severe wasting and weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. There were no pyramidal signs. He has been on HAART for the last 4 years and the weakness or wasting has not worsened. At the last follow-up in July 2007, the patient had the same neurological deficit and no other symptoms or signs of HIV-1 infection. MRI of the spinal cord in 2007 showed characteristic T2 hyperintense signals in the central part of the spinal cord, corresponding to the central gray matter. Thus, our patient had HIV-1 clade C infection associated with a ′flail arm-like syndrome.′ The causal relationship between HIV-1 infection and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-like syndrome is still uncertain. The syndrome usually manifests as a lower motor neuron syndrome, as was seen in our young patient. It is known that treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART stabilizes/improves the condition. In our patient the weakness and atrophy remained stable over a period of 3.5 years after commencing HAART regimen.

  3. Flail arm–like syndrome associated with HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, A.; Desai, Anita; Mahato, Simendra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years at least 23 cases of motor neuron disease have been reported in HIV-1 seropositive patients. In this report we describe the clinical picture of a young man with HIV-1 clade C infection and flail arm-like syndrome, who we were able to follow-up for a long period. We investigated and prospectively monitored a 34-year-old man with features of flail arm syndrome, who developed the weakness and wasting 1 year after being diagnosed with HIV-1 infection after a routine blood test. He presented in 2003 with progressive, symmetrical wasting and weakness of the proximal muscles of the upper limb of 2 years' duration. He had severe wasting and weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. There were no pyramidal signs. He has been on HAART for the last 4 years and the weakness or wasting has not worsened. At the last follow-up in July 2007, the patient had the same neurological deficit and no other symptoms or signs of HIV-1 infection. MRI of the spinal cord in 2007 showed characteristic T2 hyperintense signals in the central part of the spinal cord, corresponding to the central gray matter. Thus, our patient had HIV-1 clade C infection associated with a ‘flail arm–like syndrome.’ The causal relationship between HIV-1 infection and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like syndrome is still uncertain. The syndrome usually manifests as a lower motor neuron syndrome, as was seen in our young patient. It is known that treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART) stabilizes/improves the condition. In our patient the weakness and atrophy remained stable over a period of 3.5 years after commencing HAART regimen. PMID:20142861

  4. 48-week efficacy and safety of dolutegravir relative to commonly used third agents in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipen A Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A network meta-analysis can provide estimates of relative efficacy for treatments not directly studied in head-to-head randomized controlled trials. We estimated the relative efficacy and safety of dolutegravir (DTG versus third agents currently recommended by guidelines, including ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r, ritonavir-boosted darunavir (DRV/r, efavirenz (EFV, cobicistat-boosted elvitegravir (EVG/c, ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r, raltegravir (RAL, and rilpivirine (RPV, in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: A systematic review of published literature was conducted to identify phase 3/4 randomized controlled clinical trials (up to August 2013 including at least one third agent of interest in combination with a backbone nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI regimen. Bayesian fixed-effect network meta-analysis models adjusting for the type of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine [TDF/FTC] or abacavir/lamivudine [ABC/3TC] were used to evaluate week 48 efficacy (HIV-RNA suppression to <50 copies/mL and change in CD4+ cells/µL and safety (lipid changes, adverse events, and discontinuations due to adverse events of DTG relative to all other treatments. Sensitivity analyses assessing the impact of NRTI treatment adjustment and random-effects models were performed. RESULTS: Thirty-one studies including 17,000 patients were combined in the analysis. Adjusting for the effect of NRTI backbone, treatment with DTG resulted in significantly higher odds of virologic suppression (HIV RNA<50 copies/mL and increase in CD4+ cells/µL versus ATV/r, DRV/r, EFV, LPV/r, and RPV. Dolutegravir had better or equivalent changes in total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, and lower odds of adverse events and discontinuation due to adverse events compared to all treatments. Random-effects and unadjusted models resulted in similar conclusions. CONCLUSION: Three

  5. Clinical significance of B cell dysfunction in patients with chronic HIV-1 infection%HIV-1慢性感染者B细胞功能受损的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学秀; 徐向升; 张政; 王福生

    2013-01-01

    HIV慢性感染是全球性的问题和大家关注的热点,其主要标志是CD4+ T淋巴细胞计数的减少和免疫系统的功能失调.关于其发病机制方面的研究很多,但是关于B细胞方面的研究较少,而且关于其在HIV慢性感染中的功能和意义尚不清楚.本文对HIV-1慢性感染者B细胞功能受损的临床意义进行综述,以期为HIV感染的研究工作提供参考.%Chronic HIV infection is a global question and an issue focused on by many researchers.The major characteristics of chronic HIV infection are the decrease in CD4+ T lymphocyte counts and the dysfunction of immune system.Many studies have been carried out on the pathogenesis of HIV infection,but only a few studies on B cells in patients with chronic HIV infection.Moreover,the function and significance of B cells in chronic HIV infection remain unknown.The authors summarize the clinical significance of B cell dysfunction in patients with chronic HIV-1 infection,intending to provide a reference for the studies on HIV infection.

  6. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickabaugh, Tammy M; Baxter, Ruth M; Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Hultin, Patricia M; Hultin, Lance E; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, pnetwork analysis (WGCNA) identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9); βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5); βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6), odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are similar to age-associated patterns and suggest that general aging

  7. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  8. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  9. Varicella vaccination in HIV-1-infected children after immune reconstitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bekker; G.H.A. Westerlaken; H. Scherpbier; S. Alders; H. Zaaijer; D. van Baarle; T. Kuijper

    2006-01-01

    Background: HIV-1-infected children have an increased risk of severe chickenpox. However, vaccination is not recommended in severely immunocompromised children. Objective: Can the live-attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) Oka strain be safely and effectively given to HIV-1-infected children despi

  10. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the Euro...

  11. Hepatitis C virus coinfection does not influence the CD4 cell recovery in HIV-1-infected patients with maximum virologic suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting data exist whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects the CD4 cell recovery in patients with HIV starting antiretroviral treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of HCV coinfection on the CD4 recovery in patients with maximum virologic suppression within the EuroSID...

  12. T-cell dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients with impaired recovery of CD4 cells despite suppression of viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kronborg, Gitte; Lohse, Nicolai;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CD4 T-cell recovery is impeded in some HIVinfected patients despite successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with suppressed HIV RNA. We hypothesized that T-cell dysfunction would be increased in these patients. METHODS: In the Danish HIV Cohort Study, we identified HIV-...

  13. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a novel, independent predictive marker of myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Knudsen, A; Katzenstein, T L;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients infected with HIV are at increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Increased plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including MI in the......, gender, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), smoking and no known CVD. suPAR was measured in the four plasma samples available for each patient at different time-points; 1, Before initiation of ART; 2, 3 months after initiation of ART; 3, 1 year before the case's MI; and 4, The last sample available...... before the case's MI. RESULTS: In unadjusted conditional regression analysis, higher levels of suPAR were associated with a significant increase in risk of MI at all time-points. Patients in the third and fourth suPAR quartiles had a three- to 10-fold higher risk of MI compared to patients in the lowest...

  14. Long-term efficacy and safety of etravirine-containing regimens in a real-life cohort of treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, Clotilde; Katlama, Christine; Cotte, Laurent; Roger, Pierre Marie; Delobel, Pierre; Cheret, Antoine; Duvivier, Claudine; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Hoen, Bruno; Cabie, André; Cheret, Arnaud; Lahoulou, Rima; Raffi, François; Pugliese, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Etravirine (ETR) was approved in France in September 2008 and is used in combination with a boosted protease inhibitor (bPI) and other anti-retrovirals (ART) in HIV-infected pre-treated patients. This study aimed to report in a real-life setting the efficacy and tolerability of ETR-based regimens and factors associated with virological response. Methods The study population included all treatment-experienced patients who initiated an ETR-based regimen between September 2008 and July 2013 from the French Dat'AIDS cohort. Analyses were performed in ART-experienced patients starting ETR after virological failure (VF) or as a maintenance therapy (MT), with or without bPI. Results A total of 2006 patients (VF, n = 1014 (51%); MT, n = 992 (49%)) were included. At M12, the proportion of patients with HIV RNA ART-experienced patients ETR is well tolerated with a high efficacy when combined with other active drugs, even when the regimen does not include a bPI. PMID:26757613

  15. A Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in ABCC4 Is Associated with Tenofovir-Related Beta2-Microglobulinuria in Thai Patients with HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirirat Likanonsakul

    Full Text Available In Thailand, the combined generic anti-retroviral drug stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (d4T/3TC/NVP has been used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals since 2001. Due to relatively frequent adverse effects, d4T gradually has been replaced with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF. Although the frequency of adverse drug effects with TDF is lower than that with d4T, TDF is known to induce kidney dysfunction, especially in the proximal tubules. It has been reported that renal tubular transporters, including members of the multi-drug resistant (MDR protein family, are implicated in tenofovir extrusion and may, therefore, confer susceptibility to TDF-induced kidney tubular dysfunction (KTD. We have explored the association between KTD and polymorphisms in genes that encode adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC-type MDRs.HIV-infected patients receiving TDF-containing antiretroviral regimens for at least one year were enrolled in the study. The levels of beta2-microglobulin in urine and creatinine (Cr were measured. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms, ABCC2 C-24T (rs717620, ABCC2 G1429A (rs2273697, and ABCC4 T4976C (rs1059751, were analyzed using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays.A total of 273 HIV-infected patients were recruited. The median number of years of TDF treatment was 5.04 with interquartile range (IQR of 3.9-6.7. Despite the length of treatment with TDF, 98.5% patients maintained an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of >60 mL/min as calculated by the CKD-EPI formula. Fifty-four patients (19.8% showed beta2-microglobulinuria (median 2636 μg/g Cr with IQR of 1519-13197 μg/g Cr. The allele frequency of ABCC4 T4976C among those 54 patients was 0.602, compared to 0.475 among the 219 remaining patients (p = 0.018.Approximately 20% of HIV-infected patients receiving TDF showed beta2-microglobulinuria. The C allele at position 4976 of the ABCC4 gene was associated with beta2-microglobulinuria in this

  16. Implementing the number needed to harm in clinical practice: risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected patients treated with abacavir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kowalska; O. Kirk; A. Mocroft; L. Høj; N. Friis-Møller; P. Reiss; I. Weller; J. Lundgren

    2010-01-01

    Objective The D:A:D study group reported a 1.9-fold increased relative risk (RR) of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with current or recent use of abacavir. The number needed to harm (NNH) incorporates information about the underlying risk of MI and the increased RR of MI in patients taking aba

  17. Drug-resistance development differs between HIV-1-infected patients failing first-line antiretroviral therapy containing nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with and without thymidine analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, MM; Sabin, C.; Forbici, F; Bansi, L.; Dunn, D; Fearnhill, E.; Boumis, E; Nicastri, E.; Antinori, A; Palamara, G.; Callegaro, A.; Francisci, D; Zoncada, A.; Maggiolo, F; Zazzi, M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the emergence of drug resistance in patients failing first-line regimens containing one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) administered with zidovudine (ZDV) + lamivudine (the ZDV group) or non-thymidine analogues (non-TAs) (tenofovir or abacavir, + lamivudine or emtricitabine; the non-TA group).

  18. Model-Based Once-Daily Darunavir/Ritonavir Dosing Recommendations in Pediatric HIV-1-Infected Patients Aged ≥3 to <12 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Brochot, A.; Kakuda, TN; Van de Casteele, T; Opsomer, M; Tomaka, FL; Vermeulen, A.; Vis, P.

    2015-01-01

    An existing population pharmacokinetic model of darunavir in adults was updated using pediatric data from two studies evaluating weight-based, once-daily dosing of darunavir/ritonavir (ARIEL, NCT00919854 and DIONE, NCT00915655). The model was then used to provide once-daily dosing recommendations for darunavir/ritonavir in pediatric patients aged ≥3 to

  19. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Theys (Kristof); K. Deforche; J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); P. Libin (Pieter); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); J. Albert (Jan); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); M. Bruckova (Marie); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); Z. Grossman (Zehava); A. Horban (Andrzej); C. Kücherer (Claudia); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); C. Riva (Chiara); L. Ruiz (Lidia); J.C. Schmit; R. Schuurman (Rob); A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); D. Struck (Daniel); K. van Laethem (Kristel); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); E. Puchhammer-Stockl E. (E.); M. Sarcletti (M.); B. Schmied (B.); M. Geit (M.); G. Balluch (G.); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); I. Derdelinck (Inge); A. Sasse (A.); M. Bogaert (M.); H. Ceunen (H.); A. de Roo (Annie); M. De Wit (Meike); F. Echahidi (F.); K. Fransen (K.); J.-C. Goffard (J.); P. Goubau (Patrick); E. Goudeseune (E.); J.-C. Yombi (J.); P. Lacor (Patrick); C. Liesnard (C.); M. Moutschen (M.); L.A. Pierard; R. Rens (R.); J. Schrooten; D. Vaira (D.); A. van den Heuvel (A.); B. van der Gucht (B.); M. van Ranst (Marc); E. van Wijngaerden (Eric); T. Vandercam; M. Vekemans (M.); C. Verhofstede; N. Clumeck (N.); K. van Laethem (K.); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); I. Demetriades (I.); I. Kousiappa (Ioanna); V.L. Demetriou (Victoria); J. Hezka (Johana); M. Linka (Marek); L. Machala (L.); L.B. Jrgensen (L.); J. Gerstoft (J.); L. Mathiesen (L.); C. Pedersen (Court); C. Nielsen (Claus); A. Laursen (A.); B. Kvinesdal (B.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Ristola (M.); J. Suni (J.); J. Sutinen (J.); K. Korn (Klaus); C. K̈ucherer (C.); P. Braun (P.); G. Poggensee (G.); M. Däumer (M.); D. Eberle (David); O. Hamouda (Osamah); H. Heiken (H.); R. Kaiser (R.); H. Knechten (H.); H. M̈uller (H.); S. Neifer (S.); H. Walter (Hauke); B. Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer (B.); T. Harrer (T.); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); E. Hatzitheodorou (E.); C. Issaris (C.); C. Haida (C.); A. Zavitsanou (A.); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); M. Lazanas (M.); L. Chini; N. Magafas (N.); N. Tsogas (N.); V. Paparizos (V.); S. Kourkounti (S.); A. Antoniadou (A.); A. Papadopoulos (A.); P. Panagopoulos (P.); G. Poulakou (G.); V. Sakka (V.); G. Chryssos (G.); S. Drimis (S.); P. Gargalianos (P.); M. Lelekis (M.); G. Xilomenos (G.); M. Psichogiou (M.); G.L. Daikos (G.); G. Panos (G.); G. Haratsis (G.); T. Kordossis (T.); A. Kontos (Angelos); G. Koratzanis (G.); M. Theodoridou (M.); G. Mostrou (G.); V. Spoulou (V.); W. Hall (W.); C. de Gascun (Cillian); C. Byrne (C.); M. Duffy (M.); P. Bergin; D. Reidy (D.); G. Farrell; J. Lambert; E. O'Connor (E.); A. Rochford (A.); J. Low (J.); P. Coakely (P.); S. Coughlan (Suzie); I. Levi (I.); D. Chemtob (D.); C. Balotta (Claudia); C. Mussini (C.); I. Caramma (I.); A. Capetti (A.); M.C. Colombo (M.); C. Rossi (Cesare); F. Prati (Francesco); F. Tramuto (F.); F. Vitale (F.); M. Ciccozzi (M.); G. Angarano (Guiseppe); G. Rezza (G.); R. Hemmer (R.); V. Arendt (V.); T. Staub (T.); F. Schneider (F.); F. Roman (Francois); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); P.H.M. van Bentum (P. H M); K. Brinkman; E.L.M. Op de Coul (Eline); M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); I.M. Hoepelman (Ilja Mohandas); M.E.E. van Kasteren (Marjo); J. Juttmann (Job); M. Kuipers (M.); N. Langebeek (Nienke); C. Richter (C.); R.M.W.J. Santegoets (R. M W J); L. Schrijnders-Gudde (L.); R. Schuurman (R.); B.J.M. van de Ven (B. J M); B. Asjö (Birgitta); V. Ormaasen (Vidar); P. Aavitsland (P.); J. Stanczak (J.); G.P. Stanczak (G.); E. Firlag-Burkacka (E.); A. Wiercinska-Drapalo (A.); E. Jablonowska (E.); E. Malolepsza (E.); M. Leszczyszyn-Pynka (M.); W. Szata (W.); A. de Palma (Andre); F. Borges (F.); T. Paix̃ao (T.); V. Duque (V.); F. Aráujo (F.); M. Stanojevic (Maja); D.J. Jevtovic (D.); D. Salemovic (D.); M. Habekova (M.); M. Mokras (M.); P. Truska (P.); M. Poljak (Mario); D. Babic (D.); J. Tomazic (J.); S. Vidmar (Suzanna); P. Karner (P.); C. Gutíerrez (C.); C. deMendoza (C.); I. Erkicia (I.); P. Domingo (P.); X. Camino (X.); M.A. Galindo (Miguel Angel); J.L. Blanco (J.); M. Leal (M.); A. Masabeu (A.); A. Guelar (A.); J.M. Llibre (Josep M.); N. Margall (N.); C. Iribarren (Carlos); S. Gutierrez (S.); J.F. Baldov́i (J.); C.E. Pedreira (Carlos Eduardo); J.M. Gatell (J.); S. Moreno (S.); C. de Mendoza (Carmen); V. Soriano (Virtudes); A. Blaxhult (A.); A. Heidarian (A.); A. Karlsson (A.); K. Aperia-Peipke (K.); I.-M. Bergbrant (I.); M. Gissĺen (M.); M. Svennerholm (M.); P. Bj̈orkman (P.); G. Bratt (G.); M. Carlsson (M.); H. Ekvall (H.); M. Ericsson (M.); M. Ḧofer (M.); B. Johansson (Bert); N. Kuylenstierna (N.); K. Ljungberg (Karl); S. Mäkitalo (S.); A. Strand; K. Öberg (Kjell); T. Berg (Trine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutatio

  20. A cohort study of treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients treated with raltegravir: factors associated with virological response and mutations selected at failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Delaugerre, Constance; Beaudoux, Céline; Descamps, Diane; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Amiel, Corinne; Schneider, Veronique; Ferre, Virginie; Izopet, Jacques; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Maillard, Anne; Henquell, Cécile; Desbois, Delphine; Lazrek, Mouna; Signori-Schmuck, Anne; Rogez, Sylvie; Yerly, Sabine; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Fourati, Slim; Houssaini, Allal; Masquelier, Bernard; Calvez, Vincent; Flandre, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with virological response (VR) to raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens in 468 treatment-experienced but integrase inhibitor-naive HIV-1 patients receiving a RAL-containing regimen. VR was defined at Month 6 (M6) as HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) 50 copies/mL at M6, integrase mutations selected were characterised. Median baseline VL was 4.2 log(10)copies/mL (IQR 3.3-4.9 log(10) copies/mL) and CD4 count was 219 cells/mm(3) (IQR 96-368 cells/mm(3)). At M6, 71% of patients were responders. In multivariate analysis, baseline VL and CD4 count and ≥ 2 new antiretrovirals among darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and enfuvirtide were associated with VR to RAL. Neither HIV-1 subtype nor baseline integrase polymorphisms were associated with VR to RAL. Among 63 failing patients at M6, selection of ≥ 1 change in the integrase gene was observed in 49 (77.8%), and 27/63 (42.9%) were considered as RAL-associated resistance mutations. Factors independently associated with the occurrence of ≥ 1 RAL-associated resistance mutation were VL at failure >3 log(10) and having no new drugs associated with RAL. RAL showed great potency in treatment-experienced patients. The number of new drugs associated with RAL was an important factor associated with VR. HIV-1 subtype and baseline integrase polymorphisms do not influence the RAL VR. PMID:23562640

  1. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Theys, Kristof; Deforche, Koen; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Libin, Pieter; van de Vijver, David A M C; Albert, Jan; Åsjø, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Bruckova, Marie; Camacho, Ricardo J; Clotet, Bonaventura; Coughlan, Suzie; Grossman, Zehava; Hamouda, Osamah; Horban, Andrzei

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and ...

  2. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Theys, Kristof; Deforche, Koen; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Libin, Pieter; van de Vijver, David Amc; Albert, Jan; Asjo, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Bruckova, Marie; Camacho, Ricardo J; Clotet, Bonaventura; Coughlan, Suzie; Grossman, Zehava; Hamouda, Osamah; Horban, Andrzei

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and ...

  3. Rates and reasons for early change of first HAART in HIV-1-infected patients in 7 sites throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Cesar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HAART rollout in Latin America and the Caribbean has increased from approximately 210,000 in 2003 to 390,000 patients in 2007, covering 62% (51%-70% of eligible patients, with considerable variation among countries. No multi-cohort study has examined rates of and reasons for change of initial HAART in this region. METHODOLOGY: Antiretroviral-naïve patients >or= 18 years who started HAART between 1996 and 2007 and had at least one follow-up visit from sites in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico and Peru were included. Time from HAART initiation to change (stopping or switching any antiretrovirals was estimated using Kaplan-Meier techniques. Cox proportional hazards modeled the associations between change and demographics, initial regimen, baseline CD4 count, and clinical stage. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 5026 HIV-infected patients, 35% were female, median age at HAART initiation was 37 years (interquartile range [IQR], 31-44, and median CD4 count was 105 cells/uL (IQR, 38-200. Estimated probabilities of changing within 3 months and one year of HAART initiation were 16% (95% confidence interval (CI 15-17% and 28% (95% CI 27-29%, respectively. Efavirenz-based regimens and no clinical AIDS at HAART initiation were associated with lower risk of change (hazard ratio (HR = 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.6 and 2.1 (95% CI 1.7-2.5 comparing neverapine-based regimens and other regimens to efavirenz, respectively; HR = 1.3 (95% CI 1.1-1.5 for clinical AIDS at HAART initiation. The primary reason for change among HAART initiators were adverse events (14%, death (5.7% and failure (1.3% with specific toxicities varying among sites. After change, most patients remained in first line regimens. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse events were the leading cause for changing initial HAART. Predictors for change due to any reason were AIDS at baseline and the use of a non-efavirenz containing regimen. Differences between participant sites were observed and require

  4. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1-Infected Drug-Naive Patients from Urban and Suburban Regions of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsongo, Simon; Abidi, Syed Hani; Khamadi, Samoel; Shah, Reena; Kageha, Sheila; Ojwang, Peter; Ali, Syed; Okinda, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    HIV was first described in Kenya in 1984-1985. Currently, Kenya has an estimated HIV-1 prevalence of 6.2%. With the introduction of antiretroviral drugs, the survival of most HIV patients has been prolonged markedly. However, this is greatly threatened by increasing rates of antiretroviral dug resistance, which may eventually lead to suboptimal treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to characterize currently occurring antiretroviral drug resistance mutations among drug-naive patients visiting two referral hospitals in Kenya. Using polymerase chain reaction, the HIV protease gene was amplified from blood samples of 63 study participants. The sequences were used to determine HIV-1 subtype and presence/prevalence of mutations associated with resistance to protease inhibitors. Finally, the protease gene was variably measured using Shannon entropy analysis. Analysis of frequency of HIV-1 subtypes revealed subtype A to be the predominant subtype, while the analysis of drug resistance mutations revealed the presence of four minor drug resistance mutations associated weakly with resistance to protease inhibitors. Among these mutations, L33I was the most prevalent mutation. Shannon entropy analysis revealed high genomic variability, especially in region spanning nucleotides 1-55, 113-170, and 205-240. This study warrants the need for dedicated efforts to improve compliance to antiretroviral therapy and reduce transmitted resistance rates, which will greatly ensure the therapeutic efficacy of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:26401720

  5. Implementing the number needed to harm in clinical practice: risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected patients treated with abacavir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, J D; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The D:A:D study group reported a 1.9-fold increased relative risk (RR) of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with current or recent use of abacavir. The number needed to harm (NNH) incorporates information about the underlying risk of MI and the increased RR of MI in patients taking...... abacavir. METHODS: NNH was calculated as the reciprocal of the difference between the underlying risks of MI with and without abacavir use. A parametric statistical model was used to calculate the underlying risk of MI over 5 years. RESULTS: The relationship between NNH and underlying risk of MI is......Hg and a 5-year risk of MI of 1.3% the NNH is 85, but the NNH increases to 277 if the patient is a nonsmoker and to 370 if sBP is within the normal range (120 mmHg). CONCLUSIONS: We have illustrated that the impact of abacavir use on risk of MI varies according to the underlying risk and it may be...

  6. Patterns of drug resistance among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected patients in Greece during the last decade: the crucial role of transmission networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Paraskevis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of drug resistance is approximately 10% in Europe and North America among newly infected patients. We aim to investigate the temporal patterns of resistance among drug naive HIV-infected individuals in Greece and also to determine transmission networking among those with resistant strains. Materials and Methods: Protease (PR and partial reverse transcriptase (RT sequences were determined from 2499 newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients, in Greece, during 2003–2013. Genotypic drug resistance was estimated using the HIVdb: Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm. We identified transmission clusters of resistant strains on the basis of a large collection of HIV-1 sequences from 4024 seropositives in Greece. Phylodynamic analysis was performed using a Bayesian method. Results: We estimated drug resistance levels among naïve patients on the basis of all resistance mutations in PR and partial RT. The overall prevalence of resistance was 19.6% (490/2499. Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (397/2499, 15.9% followed by PIs (116/2499, 4.6% and NRTIs (79/2499, 3.2%. We found a significant trend for decreasing resistance to NRTIs over time (6.7%–1.6%. There was no time trend for the overall PI and NNRTI resistance. The most frequently observed major resistant sites in PR were V82 (2.0% and L90 (1.8%. In RT, we found E138 (58.6%, K103 (13.1%, V179 (8.4% and T215 (7.1%, M41 (4.7% associated with resistance to NNRTIs and NRTIs, respectively. The prevalence of K103N and E138Q were significantly increased during 2003–2013. Crucially, we found that both K103N, E138Q are associated with transmission networking within men having sex with men (MSM and intravenous drug user (IDU local networks. The K103N network included seropositives across Greece, while the latter only from the recent IDU outbreak in Athens metropolitan area (1. Phylodynamic analyses revealed that the exponential growth for K103N network started in 2009

  7. Patterns of drug resistance among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected patients in Greece during the last decade: the crucial role of transmission networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Zavitsanou, Assimina; Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Xylomenos, Georgios; Lazanas, Marios; Chini, Maria; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Papastamopoulos, Vasileios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Psichogiou, Mina; Daikos, Georgios; Vassilakis, Alexis; Chrysos, Georgios; Paparizos, Vasilis; Kourkounti, Sofia; Sambatakou, Helen; Kordossis, Theodoros; Koratzanis, Georgios; Panagopoulos, Periklis; Maltezos, Evangelos; Drimis, Stylianos; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of drug resistance is approximately 10% in Europe and North America among newly infected patients. We aim to investigate the temporal patterns of resistance among drug naive HIV-infected individuals in Greece and also to determine transmission networking among those with resistant strains. Materials and Methods Protease (PR) and partial reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were determined from 2499 newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients, in Greece, during 2003–2013. Genotypic drug resistance was estimated using the HIVdb: Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm. We identified transmission clusters of resistant strains on the basis of a large collection of HIV-1 sequences from 4024 seropositives in Greece. Phylodynamic analysis was performed using a Bayesian method. Results We estimated drug resistance levels among naïve patients on the basis of all resistance mutations in PR and partial RT. The overall prevalence of resistance was 19.6% (490/2499). Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (397/2499, 15.9%) followed by PIs (116/2499, 4.6%) and NRTIs (79/2499, 3.2%). We found a significant trend for decreasing resistance to NRTIs over time (6.7%–1.6%). There was no time trend for the overall PI and NNRTI resistance. The most frequently observed major resistant sites in PR were V82 (2.0%) and L90 (1.8%). In RT, we found E138 (58.6%), K103 (13.1%), V179 (8.4%) and T215 (7.1%), M41 (4.7%) associated with resistance to NNRTIs and NRTIs, respectively. The prevalence of K103N and E138Q were significantly increased during 2003–2013. Crucially, we found that both K103N, E138Q are associated with transmission networking within men having sex with men (MSM) and intravenous drug user (IDU) local networks. The K103N network included seropositives across Greece, while the latter only from the recent IDU outbreak in Athens metropolitan area (1). Phylodynamic analyses revealed that the exponential growth for K103N network started in 2009 (Figure 1

  8. Short-term maraviroc exposure, a clinical approach to decide on maraviroc prescription in HIV-1-infected treatment-naïve patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Serna A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Gonzalez-Serna,1 Miguel Genebat,2 Ezequiel Ruiz-Mateos,2 Manuel Leal2 1Laboratory of Molecular Immunobiology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, 2Laboratory of Immunovirology, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville, Seville, SpainWoollard and Kanmogne1 have generated an exhaustive review on maraviroc and its use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Within their interesting dissertation, they discuss about the maraviroc clinical test (MCT, a clinical approach developed in our group in order to decide candidate patients to receive maraviroc as part of a further combined antiretroviral therapy, as an alternative to genotypic and phenotypic tropism assays.2View the original article by Woollard and Kanmogne

  9. The naive CD4+ count in HIV-1-infected patients at time of initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with the level of immunological recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, OG; Kirk, O; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    2002-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy can induce considerable, sustained viral suppression followed by immunological recovery, in which naive CD4 + cells are important. Long-term immunological recovery was investigated during the first 3 y of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 210 HIV-1...... immunological recovery that can be obtained from treatment. Surprisingly, the naive CD4 + cell count tended to stabilize at a subnormal level after 18 months of HAART. This finding merits further investigation.......-infected patients. The focus was on the naive CD4 + cell time course and associations between naive CD4 + cell counts and established prognostic markers. Total and naive CD4 + cell counts were measured using flow cytometry. The HIV-RNA detection limit was 20 copies/ml. During 36 months of HAART, the total...

  10. Prevalence of prediabetes in HIV-1 infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagos Amare Gebreyesus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prediabetes is a substantial risk factor for developing type-2 diabetes mellitus and its sequel, which include heart disease, stroke, nephropathy and retinopathy. Apart from the genetic and lifestyle risk factors, antiretroviral drugs aggravate the predisposition. Thus, detecting this condition can allow for the provision of better care for HIV-1-infected patients. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of prediabetes in HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Method: A cross sectional study was conducted in HIV-1 infected patients enrolled in ART program in a tertiary hospital ART clinic in Addis Ababa. A total of 134 subjects taking HAART were included in the study. 61 (45.5% were males and 73(54.5% were females. The age of the participants range from 20-69 with a median of 40 years. The median duration of HAART intake was 58 months. The prevalence of prediabetes was found to be 22.4%. Among the total study subjects, 19.4% of them had overweight. 50.5% of males and 41% females had a WHR of ≥0.90 and ≥0.85, respectively indicating a high prevalence of central obesity and future risk of cardiovascular problem among this group. Conclusion: Pre-diabetes is common in HIV-1-infected patients receiving ART; putting this group at substantial risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Characterization of mannose-binding lectin plasma levels and genetic polymorphisms in HIV-1-infected individuals

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    Antonio Carlos Rosário Vallinoto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated the association between mannose-binding lectin (MBL gene polymorphism and serum levels with infection by HIV-1. METHODS: Blood samples (5mL were collected from 97 HIV-1-infected individuals resident in Belém, State of Pará, Brazil, who attended the Special Outpatient Unit for Infections and Parasitic Diseases (URE-DIPE. CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and plasma viral load were quantified. A 349bp fragment of exon 1 of the MBL was amplified via PCR, using genomic DNA extracted from controls and HIV-1-infected individuals, following established protocols. MBL plasma levels of the patients were quantified using an enzyme immunoassay kit. RESULTS: Two alleles were observed: MBL*O, with a frequency of 26.3% in HIV-1-infected individuals; and the wild allele MBL*A (73.7%. Similar frequencies were observed in the control group (p > 0.05. Genotype frequencies were distributed according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both groups. Mean MBL plasma levels varied by genotype, with statistically significant differences between the AA and AO (p 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that MBL gene polymorphism or low plasma MBL concentrations might have a direct influence on HIV-1 infection, although a broader study involving a large number of patients is needed.

  12. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-07-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported.The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection.A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection.Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743-751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283-289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327-3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection.We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  13. Cytokine expression during syphilis infection in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Benfield, Thomas; Kofoed, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about cytokine responses to syphilis infection in HIV-1-infected individuals. METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients with HIV-1 and Treponema pallidum coinfection. Plasma samples from before, during, and after coinfection were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-2, IL......-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients were included. IL-10 levels increased significantly in patients with primary or secondary stage syphilis from a median of 12.8 pg/mL [interquartile range (IQR), 11.0-27.8] before...... infection to 46.7 pg/mL (IQR, 28.4-78.9) at the time of diagnosis (P = 0.027) and decreased to 13.0 pg/mL (IQR, 6.2-19.4) after treatment of syphilis (P <0.001). TNF-alpha levels showed no significant change from before to during syphilis in patients with primary or secondary stage syphilis (median 3.9 pg...

  14. Primary drug resistance at diagnosis of HIV-1 infection: a Portuguese cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Rocha Pereira; Raquel Duro; Carmela Piñero; Cristóvão Figueiredo; Ana Sofia Santos; Jorge Soares; Rosário Serrão; António Sarmento

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of viral mutations conferring resistance to antiretroviral drugs has potential impact on success of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of resistance-associated mutations in HIV-infected patients without prior ART in a Portuguese cohort. Materials and Methods: Retrospective single-centre study of patients newly diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between 2006 and 2012. Resistance genotyping was obtained with HIV TRUGENE® and Vir...

  15. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

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    Tammy M Rickabaugh

    Full Text Available Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of young (20-35 and older (36-56 adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x 10(-200 and 0.47, p<1 x 10(-200. Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3 was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70 and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31. Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015. In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9; βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5; βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001. Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6, odds ratio=1.91. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that

  16. Global human genetics of HIV-1 infection and China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuo Fu ZHU; Tie Jian FENG; Xin XIAO; Hui WANG; Bo Ping ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human genes can influence the risk for HIV-1 infection and disease progression, although the reported effects of these alleles have been inconsistent. This review highlights the recent discoveries on global and Chinese genetic polymorphisms and their association with HIV-1 transmission and disease progression.

  17. Neutralizing antibodies in slowly progressing HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Nielsen, C; Iversen, Johan;

    1995-01-01

    Ten asymptomatic individuals who had experienced only limited CD4+ cell loss after prolonged infection with HIV-1 were studied. These individuals had a mean CD4+ cell count of 674 x 10(6) cells/L and a mean duration of infection of 8.5 years. Also included were 10 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected indi...

  18. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia; Butterworth, Anthony E; van Dam, Govert J; Erikstrup, Christian; Ullum, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Stunted development and reduced fecundity of Schistosoma parasites in immunodeficient mice and the impaired ability of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans to excrete schistosome eggs have been described. This study explores the effect that HIV-1-associated immunodeficiency has ...

  19. Predictors of impaired HDL function in HIV-1 infected compared to uninfected individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Objective: HDL function rather than absolute level may be a more accurate indicator for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but it is unclear what drives HDL dysfunction in HIV-1 infection. The objective of this study is to identify factors that may contribute to HDL dysfunction in chronic HIV-1 infection. Design: Retrospective study of HIV-1 infected males with low overall CVD risk and healthy males with no known CVD risk matched by race to the HIV-1 infected participants. Methods: We related para...

  20. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

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    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  1. Protein methylation is required to maintain optimal HIV-1 infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Piller Sabine C; Warrilow David; Apolloni Ann; Bodetti Tracey J; Hitchen Eleanor M; Willemsen Nicole M; Harrich David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background: Protein methylation is recognized as a major protein modification pathway regulating diverse cellular events such as protein trafficking, transcription, and signal transduction. More recently, protein arginine methyltransferase activity has been shown to regulate HIV-1 transcription via Tat. In this study, adenosine periodate (AdOx) was used to globally inhibit protein methyltransferase activity so that the effect of protein methylation on HIV-1 infectivity could be asses...

  2. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection

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    Aditi Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these “functional” pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  3. Immune suppression by neutrophils in HIV-1 infection: role of PD-L1/PD-1 pathway.

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    Nathan L Bowers

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is associated with a progressive loss of T cell functional capacity and reduced responsiveness to antigenic stimuli. The mechanisms underlying T cell dysfunction in HIV-1/AIDS are not completely understood. Multiple studies have shown that binding of program death ligand 1 (PD-L1 on the surface of monocytes and dendritic cells to PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates T cell function. Here we show that neutrophils in the blood of HIV-1-infected individuals express high levels of PD-L1. PD-L1 is induced by HIV-1 virions, TLR-7/8 ligand, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and IFNα. Neutrophil PD-L1 levels correlate with the expression of PD-1 and CD57 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, elevated levels of neutrophil degranulation markers in plasma, and increased frequency of low density neutrophils (LDNs expressing the phenotype of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs. Neutrophils purified from the blood of HIV-1-infected patients suppress T cell function via several mechanisms including PD-L1/PD-1 interaction and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Collectively, the accumulated data suggest that chronic HIV-1 infection results in an induction of immunosuppressive activity of neutrophils characterized by high expression of PD-L1 and an inhibitory effect on T cell function.

  4. Acute plasma biomarkers of T cell activation set-point levels and of disease progression in HIV-1 infection.

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    Anne-Sophie Liovat

    Full Text Available T cell activation levels, viral load and CD4(+ T cell counts at early stages of HIV-1 infection are predictive of the rate of progression towards AIDS. We evaluated whether the inflammatory profile during primary HIV-1 infection is predictive of the virological and immunological set-points and of disease progression. We quantified 28 plasma proteins during acute and post-acute HIV-1 infection in individuals with known disease progression profiles. Forty-six untreated patients, enrolled during primary HIV-1 infection, were categorized into rapid progressors, progressors and slow progressors according to their spontaneous progression profile over 42 months of follow-up. Already during primary infection, rapid progressors showed a higher number of increased plasma proteins than progressors or slow progressors. The plasma levels of TGF-β1 and IL-18 in primary HIV-1 infection were both positively associated with T cell activation level at set-point (6 months after acute infection and together able to predict 74% of the T cell activation variation at set-point. Plasma IP-10 was positively and negatively associated with, respectively, T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point and capable to predict 30% of the CD4(+ T cell count variation at set-point. Moreover, plasma IP-10 levels during primary infection were predictive of rapid progression. In primary infection, IP-10 was an even better predictor of rapid disease progression than viremia or CD4(+ T cell levels at this time point. The superior predictive capacity of IP-10 was confirmed in an independent group of 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Altogether, this study shows that the inflammatory profile in primary HIV-1 infection is associated with T cell activation levels and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point. Plasma IP-10 levels were of strong predictive value for rapid disease progression. The data suggest IP-10 being an earlier marker of disease progression than CD4(+ T cell counts or

  5. LILRB2 interaction with HLA class I correlates with control of HIV-1 infection.

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    Arman A Bashirova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR, a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs. We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126 to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10(-2. Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10(-11-10(-9 and African (p = 10(-5-10(-3 descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement.

  6. Raltegravir: The evidence of its therapeutic value in HIV-1 infection

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    Kavya Ramkumar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kavya Ramkumar, Nouri NeamatiDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAIntroduction: The antiretroviral treatment paradigm for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection has undergone a significant change with the addition of a new class of therapeutic agents targeting HIV-1 integrase (IN. IN inhibitors prevent the integration of viral DNA into the human genome and terminate the viral life cycle. As the first member of this new class of anti-HIV drugs, raltegravir has shown promising results in the clinic. Aims: To review the emerging evidence for the use of the IN inhibitor raltegravir in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.Evidence review: Strong evidence shows that raltegravir is effective in reducing the viral load to less than 50 copies/mL and increasing CD4 cell count in treatment-experienced patients with triple-drug class-resistant HIV-1 infection. Substantial evidence also indicates that while raltegravir is able to achieve treatment response in patients with drug-resistant HIV-1, it is susceptible to development of resistance. Raltegravir should be used with at least one other active drug. In addition to its use in salvage therapy upon failure of first-line antiretroviral treatment, a raltegravir-based treatment regimen may also be effective as initial therapy. Substantial evidence also shows that raltegravir-based treatment regimen is well tolerated with minimal clinically severe adverse events and toxicities. Modeling studies suggest a cost-effectiveness of US$21,339 per quality-adjusted life year gained with raltegravir use, though further direct evidence on quality of life and cost-effectiveness is needed. Place in therapy: Raltegravir shows significant and sustained virologic and immunologic response in combination with other antiretrovirals in treatment-experienced HIV-1 infected patients who show evidence of viral replication or multidrug

  7. Protein methylation is required to maintain optimal HIV-1 infectivity

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    Piller Sabine C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Protein methylation is recognized as a major protein modification pathway regulating diverse cellular events such as protein trafficking, transcription, and signal transduction. More recently, protein arginine methyltransferase activity has been shown to regulate HIV-1 transcription via Tat. In this study, adenosine periodate (AdOx was used to globally inhibit protein methyltransferase activity so that the effect of protein methylation on HIV-1 infectivity could be assessed. Results: Two cell culture models were used: HIV-1-infected CEM T-cells and HEK293T cells transfected with a proviral DNA plasmid. In both models, AdOx treatment of cells increased the levels of virion in culture supernatant. However, these viruses had increased levels of unprocessed or partially processed Gag-Pol, significantly increased diameter, and displayed reduced infectivity in a MAGI X4 assay. AdOx reduced infectivity equally in both dividing and non-dividing cells. However, infectivity was further reduced if Vpr was deleted suggesting virion proteins, other than Vpr, were affected by protein methylation. Endogenous reverse transcription was not inhibited in AdOx-treated HIV-1, and infectivity could be restored by pseudotyping HIV with VSV-G envelope protein. These experiments suggest that AdOx affects an early event between receptor binding and uncoating, but not reverse transcription. Conclusion: Overall, we have shown for the first time that protein methylation contributes towards maximal virus infectivity. Furthermore, our results also indicate that protein methylation regulates HIV-1 infectivity in a complex manner most likely involving the methylation of multiple viral or cellular proteins and/or multiple steps of replication.

  8. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

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    Dollfus Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%: drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8 suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10 and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8 suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%, drug

  9. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Emma Tippett

    Full Text Available CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004, supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16- monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively, which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16- subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16- monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD

  10. AMYLOID BETA ACCUMULATION IN HIV-1-INFECTED BRAIN: THE ROLE OF THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER

    OpenAIRE

    András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    In recent years we face an increase in the aging of the HIV-1-infected population, which is not only due to effective antiretroviral therapy but also to new infections among older people. Even with the use of the antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders represent an increasing problem as the HIV-1-infected population ages. Increased amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition is characteristic of HIV-1-infected brains, and it has been hypothesized that brain vascular dysfunction contr...

  11. Socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-explosed but uninfected individuals, and in HIV-1-infected patients from a southern brasilian population Características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1 em indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados e em pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1, provenientes da população da região Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and progression of the disease is regulated by host and viral factors. This cross-sectional study describes the socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics associated with HIV-1 infection in 1,061 subjects attended in Londrina and region, south of Brazil: 136 healthy individuals (Group 1, 147 HIV-1-exposed but uninfected individuals (Group 2, 161 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic patients (Group 3, and 617 patients with AIDS (Group 4. Data were obtained by a standardized questionnaire and serological tests. The age of the individuals ranged from 15.1 to 79.5 years, 54.0% and 56.1% of the Groups 3 and 4 patients, respectively, were men. The major features of groups 2, 3, and 4 were a predominance of education level up to secondary school (55.8%, 60.2% and 62.4%, respectively, sexual route of exposure (88.4%, 87.0% and 82.0%, respectively, heterosexual behavior (91.8%, 75.2% and 83.7%, respectively, and previous sexually transmitted diseases (20.4%, 32.5%, and 38.1%, respectively. The patients with AIDS showed the highest rates of seropositivity for syphilis (25.6%, of anti-HCV (22.3%, and anti-HTLV I/II obtained by two serological screening tests (6.2% and 6.8%, respectively. The results documenting the predominant characteristics for HIV-1 infection among residents of Londrina and region, could be useful for the improvement of current HIV-1 prevention, monitoring and therapeutic programs targeted at this population.Este estudo transversal descreve as principais características sociodemográficas e epidemiológicas associadas com a infecção pelo HIV-1 em 1.061 indivíduos atendidos em Londrina e região, Sul do Brasil: 136 indivíduos saudáveis (Grupo 1, 147 indivíduos expostos ao HIV-1 mas não infectados (Grupo 2, 161 pacientes infectados pelo HIV-1 assintomáticos (Grupo 3 e 617 pacientes com aids (Grupo 4. Os dados foram obtidos pela aplicação de um

  12. Nanogel-conjugated reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their combinations as novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy against HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Senanayake, TH; Gorantla, S.; Makarov, E.; Lu, Y; Warren, G.; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) are an integral part of the current anti-retroviral therapy (ART), which dramatically reduced the mortality from AIDS and turned the disease from lethal to chronic. The further steps in curing the HIV-1 infection must include more effective targeting of infected cells and virus sanctuaries inside the body and modification of drugs and treatment schedules to reduce common complications of the long-term treatment and increase patient complianc...

  13. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.

  14. Outcome and reinfection after Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in individuals with and without HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammler Jaliff, Bianca; Dahl-Knudsen, Jenny; Petersen, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Individuals infected with HIV-1 are at an increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB). The aim of this study was to investigate mortality rate and risk of reinfection associated with SAB in HIV-1-infected individuals compared to individuals without HIV-1 infection. SETTI...... and Pitt score predicted outcome. For patients infected with HIV, neither CD4 T-lymphocyte counts nor plasma HIV RNA levels were associated with 30-day outcome. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: The study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (record no. 2007-41-1196)....... associate to mortality. During follow-up, there were 43 episodes of reinfection; in individuals with HIV infection at an incidence rate of 7.8 (95% CI 4.7 to 10.9)/100 person-years compared with 2.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 3.2)/100 person-years for individuals without HIV. In multivariate analysis, HIV status (OR 2...

  15. Tipranavir/Ritonavir (500/200 mg and 500/100 mg) Was Virologically Non-Inferior to Lopinavir/Ritonavir (400/100 mg) at Week 48 in Treatment-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Patients: A Randomized, Multinational, Multicenter Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David A.; Cordery, Damien V.; Zajdenverg, Roberto; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Arastéh, Keikawus; Bergmann, Frank; Neto, José L. de Andrade; Scherer, Joseph; Chaves, Ricardo L.; Robinson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ritonavir-boosted tipranavir (TPV/r) was evaluated as initial therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients because of its potency, unique resistance profile, and high genetic barrier. Trial 1182.33, an open-label, randomized trial, compared two TPV/r dose combinations versus ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r). Eligible adults, who had no prior antiretroviral therapy were randomized to twice daily (BID) 500/100 mg TPV/r, 500/200 mg TPV/r, or 400/100 mg LPV/r. Each treatment group also received Tenofovir 300 mg + Lamivudine 300 mg QD. The primary endpoint was a confirmed viral load (VL) 65% of patients receiving either TPV/r200 or TPV/r100. The trial was subsequently discontinued; primary objectives were achieved and continuing TPV/r100 was less tolerable than standard of care for initial highly active antiretroviral therapy. All treatment groups had similar 48-week treatment responses. TPV/r100 and TPV/r200 regimens resulted in sustained treatment responses, which were non-inferior to LPV/r at 48 weeks. When compared with the LPV/r regimen and examined in the light of more current regimens, these TPV/r regimens do not appear to be the best options for treatment-naïve patients based on their safety profiles. PMID:26730818

  16. Seroprevalence and clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in Kananga, Zaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the seroprevalence and clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in Kananga, Zaire, in 1988. In the city of Kananga (population 300,000), eight out of 258 (3.1%) consecutive, asymptomatic, prenatal patients were seropositive. Of 452 consecutive blood donors at our institution, eight (1.8%) were seropositive. Sixty per cent of 299 consecutive, seropositive, clinically ill adults presented with chronic diarrhea, fever or weight loss (Centers for Disease Control group IVA). The male-to-female ratio of symptomatic, seropositive patients was 1:1.5. Women who indicated on a socioeconomic questionnaire that they engaged in 'commerce' (meaning possibly that they were petty traders, wholesale brokers, or prostitutes) were more often HIV-seropositive than women who did not engage in 'commerce' (P less than 0.001). PMID:2088403

  17. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  18. Iron status in HIV-1 infection: implications in disease pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banjoko S Olatunbosun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There had been conflicting reports with levels of markers of iron metabolism in HIV infection. This study was therefore aimed at investigating iron status and its possible mediation of severity of HIV- 1 infection and pathogenesis. Method Eighty (80 anti-retroviral naive HIV-1 positive and 50 sero-negative controls were recruited for the study. Concentrations of serum total iron, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, CD4+ T -lymphocytes, vitamin C, zinc, selenium and transferrin saturation were estimated. Results The mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts, serum iron, TIBC, transferrin saturation for the tests and controls were 319 ± 22, 952 ± 57 cells/μl (P 4+ T-lymphocyte cell count had a positive correlation with levels of vitamin C (r = 0.497, P Conclusion It could be inferred that derangement in iron metabolism, in addition to oxidative stress, might have contributed to the depletion of CD4+ T cell population in our subjects and this may result in poor prognosis of the disease.

  19. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  20. Host genetic factors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koushik Chatterjee

    2010-04-01

    HIV-1 infection has rapidly spread worldwide and has become the leading cause of mortality in infectious diseases. The duration for development of AIDS (AIDS progression) is highly variable among HIV–1 infected individuals, ranging from 2–3 years to no signs of AIDS development in the entire lifetime. Several factors regulate the rate at which HIV-1 infection progresses to AIDS. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases as AIDS and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  1. Association of PD-1 expression on CD4~+CD25~(nt/hi)CD127~(lo) regulatory T cells with disease progression in HIV-1 infected patients%HIV-1感染者CD4~+CD25~(nt/hi)CD127~(lo)调节性T细胞PD-1表达水平与疾病进展的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹清华; 薛以乐; 王盈

    2009-01-01

    目的:阐明HIV-1感染者外周血中具有CD4~+CD25~(nt/hi)CD127~(lo)特征的调节性T细胞(Treg)表面PD-1的表达水平与疾病进展的关系.方法:选取108名未经治疗的不同进展期的HIV-1感染者和27名健康人对照, 采集静脉血, 用Ficoll-Hypaque密度梯度离心法分离获得PBMC, 加入PerCP-CD4抗体、 FITC-CD25抗体、 PE-CD127抗体和APC-PD-1抗体, 经细胞表面四色染色、流式细胞术(FCM)分析Treg表面PD-1的表达;另将50 L全血加入Trucount绝对计数管, 采用Multitest CD3/CD8/CD45/CD4试剂盒检测CD4+T细胞绝对数;分离静脉血血浆, NucliSens EasyQ测定血浆HIV-1病毒载量;实验数据采用SPSS14.0 统计学软件分析处理.结果:HIV-1感染者Treg表面PD-1表达水平显著高于健康人(5.33%±2.24% vs 1.72%±0.65%, P<0.01);AIDS期(7.87%±2.23%)明显高于进展期(5.21%±1.72%, P<0.05)和新近感染者(3.22%±1.01%, P<0.05);HIV-1感染者Treg表面PD-1表达水平与血浆中的HIV-1病毒载量和CD4~+T细胞绝对数密切相关.结论:首次证实HIV-1感染者外周血中Treg表面PD-1表达增加, 且表达水平与病程进展相关.该结果为进一步揭示HIV-1感染中Treg的效应机制、探索新的免疫治疗方案提供了理论及实验依据.%AIM: To investigate whether Programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression on peripheral CD4~+CD25~(nt/hi)CD127~(lo) regulatory T cells (Treg) was associated with disease progression in HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 108 HIV-1-infected patients in distinct disease progression statuses and 27 healthy individuals were collected in the present investigation. PBMCs were isolated by centrifugation on Ficoll-Hypaque, followed by staining with anti-CD4-PerCP, anti-CD25-FITC, anti-CD127-PE and anti-PD-1-APC. PD-1 expression on Treg was analyzed by four-color staining flow cytometry. CD4~+T cell absolute counts were determined using Multitest CD3/CD4/CD8/CD45 kit and plasma viral loads were detected on Nucli

  2. Dolutegravir plus abacavir-lamivudine for the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon L. Walmsley; Antela, Antonio; Clumeck, Nathan; Duiculescu, Dan; Eberhard, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Felix; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Maggiolo, Franco; Sandkovsky, Uriel; Granier, Catherine; Pappa, Keith; Wynne, Brian; Min, Sherene; Nichols, Garrett; SINGLE Investigators, for the

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572), a once-daily, unboosted integrase inhibitor, was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Dolutegravir, in combination with abacavir-lamivudine, may provide a simplified regimen. Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study involving adult participants who had not received previous therapy for HIV-1 infection a...

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Helminth Co-infection in Kenyan HIV-1 Infected Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Walson, Judd L; Stewart, Barclay T; Sangaré, Laura; Mbogo, Loice W.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Piper, Benjamin K. S.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Deworming HIV-1 infected individuals may delay HIV-1 disease progression. It is important to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1/helminth co-infection in helminth-endemic areas. Methods HIV-1 infected individuals (CD4>250 cells/ul) were screened for helminth infection at ten sites in Kenya. Prevalence and correlates of helminth infection were determined. A subset of individuals with soil-transmitted helminth infection was re-evaluated 12 weeks following albendazole the...

  4. Role of IL-7 in immune activation during HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sammicheli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Viral replication, lymphopenia and microbial translocation at the mucosal surfaces lead to a chronic state of immune activation during HIV-1 infection. Chronic immune activation is believed to impact on the functionality of cell types that are not the main target for virus replication, including CD8+T cells, B cells and NK cells. In this thesis two main aspects of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection were studied: 1) how viral replication and disease progression affect the homeo...

  5. Rilpivirine versus efavirenz with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients with HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL: week 96 pooled ECHO/THRIVE subanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Georg; Rijnders, Bart; Nelson, Mark; Orkin, Chloe; Cohen, Calvin; Mills, Anthony; Elion, Richard A; Vanveggel, Simon; Stevens, Marita; Rimsky, Laurence; Thorpe, David; Bosse, Matthew; White, Kirsten; Zhong, Lijie; DeMorin, Jennifer; Chuck, Susan K

    2014-04-01

    The once daily, single-tablet regimen (STR) combining rilpivirine (RPV), emtricitabine (FTC), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) provides a simplified treatment option for antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients with baseline HIV-1 RNA (BLVL) of ≤100,000 copies/mL. The aim of this analysis is to compare long-term efficacy, safety, and tolerability of RPV+FTC/TDF vs. efavirenz (EFV)+FTC/TDF as individual components in subjects with BLVL ≤100,000 copies/mL. Week 96 efficacy and safety data from subjects with BLVL ≤100,000 copies/mL, who received daily RPV 25 mg or EFV 600 mg with FTC/TDF in the phase 3, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, registrational trials ECHO and THRIVE, were analyzed. Virologic response was evaluated by intent-to-treat, time to loss of virological response (ITT-TLOVR), and Snapshot algorithms. Through Week 96, RPV+FTC/TDF demonstrated non-inferior efficacy to EFV+FTC/TDF (84% vs. 81%, respectively; ITT-TLOVR) in 543 subjects with BLVL ≤100,000 copies/mL, and overall rates of virologic failure (VF) were 5.9% vs. 2.4%, respectively. Resistance development was lower in Year 2 than Year 1. Subjects in both arms with suboptimal adherence (≤95%) had lower virologic responses (63% vs. 62%, respectively). Treatment with RPV+FTC/TDF was associated with significantly fewer treatment-related adverse events (AEs), grade 2-4 AEs, neurological and psychiatric AEs (including dizziness and abnormal dreams/nightmares), and rash. Additionally, grade 2-4 treatment-emergent laboratory abnormalities and grade 1-3 lipid abnormalities were significantly less common with RPV+FTC/TDF than EFV+FTC/TDF. RPV+FTC/TDF demonstrated non-inferior efficacy to EFV+FTC/TDF in ART-naïve subjects with BLVL ≤100,000 copies/mL and was associated with a higher rate of VF but a more favorable safety and tolerability profile through Week 96. PMID:24660840

  6. APOBEC3H polymorphisms and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in an Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Taeko K; Sakurai, Daisuke; Ohtani, Hitoshi; Sharma, Gaurav; Sharma, Surendra K; Vajpayee, Madhu; Mehra, Narinder K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kimura, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Human APOBEC3H (A3H) is a member of APOBEC cytidine deaminase family intensively constraining the HIV-1 replication. A3H is known to be polymorphic with different protein stability and anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. We recently reported that A3H haplotypes composed of two functional polymorphisms, rs139292 (N15del) and rs139297 (G105R), were associated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in Japanese. To confirm the association of A3H and HIV-1 infection in another ethnic group, a total of 241 HIV-1-infected Indian individuals and ethnic-matched 286 healthy controls were analyzed for the A3H polymorphisms. The frequency of 15del allele was high in the HIV-1-infected subjects as compared with the controls (0.477 vs 0.402, odds ratio (OR)=1.36, P=0.014). Haplotype analysis showed that the frequencies of 15del-105R was high (0.475 vs 0.400, OR=1.36, permutation P=0.037) in the HIV-1-infected subjects, confirming the association of A3H polymorphisms with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. PMID:26559750

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup A Decreases the Risk of Drug Addiction but Conversely Increases the Risk of HIV-1 Infection in Chinese Addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A-Mei; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Feng-Liang; Bi, Rui; Yang, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Hao; Logan, Ian; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is one of the most serious social problems in the world today and addicts are always at a high risk of acquiring HIV infection. Mitochondrial impairment has been reported in both drug addicts and in HIV patients undergoing treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup could affect the risk of drug addiction and HIV-1 infection in Chinese. We analyzed mtDNA sequence variations of 577 Chinese intravenous drug addicts (289 with HIV-1 infection and 288 without) and compared with 2 control populations (n = 362 and n = 850). We quantified the viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without haplogroup A status and investigated the potential effect of haplogroup A defining variants m.4824A > G and m.8794C > T on the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by using an allotopic expression assay. mtDNA haplogroup A had a protective effect against drug addiction but appeared to confer an increased risk of HIV infection in addicts. HIV-1-infected addicts with haplogroup A had a trend for a higher viral load, although the mean viral load was similar between carriers of haplogroup A and those with other haplogroup. Hela cells overexpressing allele m.8794 T showed significantly decreased ROS levels as compared to cells with the allele m.8794C (P = 0.03). Our results suggested that mtDNA haplogroup A might protect against drug addiction but increase the risk of HIV-1 infection. The contradictory role of haplogroup A might be caused by an alteration in mitochondrial function due to a particular mtDNA ancestral variant. PMID:26162319

  8. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  9. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8+ T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8+ T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8+ T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24Gag in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8+ T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8+ T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect

  10. Treatment and disease progression in a birth cohort of vertically HIV-1 infected children in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilipenko Tatyana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ukraine has the highest HIV prevalence (1.6% and is facing the fastest growing epidemic in Europe. Our objective was to describe the clinical, immunological and virological characteristics, treatment and response in vertically HIV-infected children living in Ukraine and followed from birth. Methods The European Collaborative Study (ECS is an ongoing cohort study, in which HIV-1 infected pregnant women are enrolled and followed in pregnancy, and their children prospectively followed from birth. ECS enrolment in Ukraine started in 2000 initially with three sites, increasing to seven sites by 2009. Results A total of 245 infected children were included in the cohort by April 2009, with a median age of 23 months at most recent follow-up; 33% (n = 77 had injecting drug using mothers and 85% (n = 209 were infected despite some use of antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Fifty-five (22% children had developed AIDS, at a median age of 10 months (IQR = 6-19. The most prevalent AIDS indicator disease was Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP. Twenty-seven (11% children had died (median age, 6.2 months. Overall, 108 (44% children had started highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART, at a median 18 months of age; median HAART duration was 6.6 months to date. No child discontinued HAART and 92% (100/108 remained on their first-line HAART regimen to date. Among children with moderate/severe immunosuppression, 36% had not yet started HAART. Among children on HAART, 71% (69/97 had no evidence of immunosuppression at their most recent visit; the median reduction in HIV RNA was 4.69 log10 copies/mL over a median of 10 months treatment. From survival analysis, an estimated 94%, 84% and 81% of children will be alive and AIDS-free at 6, 12 and 18 months of age, respectively. However, survival increased significantly over time: estimated survival rates to 12 months of age were 87% for children born in 2000

  11. siRNA Against KIR3DL1 as a Potential Gene Therapeutic Agent in Controlling HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng-Feng; Pan, Ji-Cheng; Lin, Nan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Tang, Wei-Ming; Xu, Jin-Shui; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Qiu, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Guo-Hong; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Huan, Xi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the expression of KIR3DL1 receptor on natural killer (NK) cells, in order to promote the ability of NK cells to destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cells and thus prevent failure of siRNA therapy targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus among HIV-1 infected patients in vitro. Methods: A siRNA targeting KIR3DL1 was synthesized and then modified with cholesterol, methylene, and sulfate. The inhibitory action of the siRNAs on primary cultured NK cells was detected. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in NK cells was measured. The intended functions of NK cells in vitro were analyzed by CFSE and PI methods. Results: There were no significant differences in inhibiting the expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells between the modified and unmodified siRNAs, while inhibition by each of them differed significantly from controls. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in the NK cells was abundant due to unsuccessful expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells, which further promoted function of the NK cells. Conclusion: The siRNA against KIR3DL1 could enhance the ability of the NK cells to kill the HIV-1 infected cells in vitro and successfully prevented the failure of siRNA therapy targeting the HIV-1 virus. Therefore, it can act as a potential gene therapeutic agent among HIV-1 infected people. PMID:24834927

  12. Total and unbound darunavir (DRV pharmacokinetics (PK in HIV-1-infected pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Zorrilla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV therapy during pregnancy is recommended to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT. Physiologic changes during pregnancy can affect PK. We present the PK of total and unbound (pharmacologically active DRV in HIV-1-infected pregnant women receiving twice-daily (bid DRV/ritonavir (rtv. This Phase IIIb study enrolled HIV-1-infected pregnant women≥18 years old in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy receiving DRV/rtv 600/100 mg bid and other ARVs. DRV (total and unbound and rtv (total plasma concentrations were obtained predose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 hours postdose during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters and postpartum. Total DRV and rtv plasma concentrations were determined using a previously validated HPLC-MS/MS assay (lower limit of quantification 5.00 ng/mL. Unbound DRV was determined by fortifying plasma samples with 14-C DRV and separating total and unbound DRV using ultrafiltration. Total and unbound 14-C DRV were measured using liquid scintillation counting. Total and unbound PK parameters were derived using a noncompartmental analysis. Safety and efficacy were investigated at each visit and summarized using descriptive statistics. Sixteen women (10 black, 4 Hispanic, 2 white were enrolled; 11 had evaluable PK data. Total DRV AUC12h was 24% and 17% lower during 2nd and 3rd trimesters, respectively, vs postpartum (Table. Unbound DRV AUC12h was unchanged during 2nd and 3rd trimesters vs postpartum. Total and unbound DRV Cmin increased by 43% and 10%, respectively, during 2nd trimester and by 86% and 14%, respectively, during 3rd trimester vs postpartum. Unbound DRV was above the EC50 (27.5 ng/mL for PI-resistant HIV in all patients. Albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG concentrations were 22%–29% lower during pregnancy vs postpartum. Viral load decreased and CD4+ count increased over time. One serious adverse event was reported (increased transaminase. Three of 12 infants were born prior to 37 weeks (30, 36 and

  13. Immune control of HIV-1 infection after therapy interruption: immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernaschi Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal stage for initiating antiretroviral therapies in HIV-1 bearing patients is still a matter of debate. Methods We present computer simulations of HIV-1 infection aimed at identifying the pro et contra of immediate as compared to deferred Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. Results Our simulations highlight that a prompt specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes response is detected when therapy is delayed. Compared to very early initiation of HAART, in deferred treated patients CD8+ T cells manage to mediate the decline of viremia in a shorter time and, at interruption of therapy, the virus experiences a stronger immune pressure. We also observe, however, that the immunological effects of the therapy fade with time in both therapeutic regimens. Thus, within one year from discontinuation, viral burden recovers to the value at which it would level off in the absence of therapy. In summary, simulations show that immediate therapy does not prolong the disease-free period and does not confer a survival benefit when compared to treatment started during the chronic infection phase. Conclusion Our conclusion is that, since there is no therapy to date that guarantees life-long protection, deferral of therapy should be preferred in order to minimize the risk of adverse effects, the occurrence of drug resistances and the costs of treatment.

  14. Outcome and reinfection after Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in individuals with and without HIV-1 infection: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Stammler Jaliff, Bianca; Dahl-Knudsen, Jenny; Petersen, Andreas; Skov, Robert; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Individuals infected with HIV-1 are at an increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB). The aim of this study was to investigate mortality rate and risk of reinfection associated with SAB in HIV-1-infected individuals compared to individuals without HIV-1 infection. Setting University hospital treating a third of the estimated 5000 individuals with HIV infection in Denmark. Participants HIV-1-infected (n=82) and sex-matched and age-matched uninfected (n=163) individual...

  15. Etravirine (TMC-125: The evidence for its place in the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Stellbrink

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hans-Jürgen StellbrinkInfektionsmedizinisches Centrum Hamburg (iCH, Hamburg, GermanyIntroduction: Etravirine is a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI specifically designed to suppress the replication of viruses resistant to the three currently approved NNRTIs efavirenz, nevirapine, and delavirdine.Aims: To assess the evidence for the place of etravirine in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.Evidence review: In combination with a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor etravirine has demonstrated high antiviral activity against strains exhibiting up to three NNRTI resistance mutations. The drug appears to be well tolerated, with only nausea and rash occuring significantly more frequently with etravirine compared with placebo. Of note, neuropsychologic side effects that frequently limit the use of efavirenz were not reported more frequently with etravirine.Place in therapy: Given its high activity against most NNRTI-resistant strains and its very good tolerability, etravirine is of high value for pretreated patients with NNRTI resistance and protease inhibitor exposure. Efforts should be made to demonstrate activity in switching strategies (due to toxicity and earlier lines of failure or in the setting of primary NNRTI resistance in order to explore the potential of the drug beyond salvage therapy.Keywords: etravirine, HIV-1, evidence

  16. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  17. Primary HIV-1 Infection Among Infants in sub-Saharan Africa: HPTN 024.

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Jennifer S.; Mwatha, Anthony; Richardson, Barbra; Valentine, Megan; Emel, Lynda; Manji, Karim; Hoffman, Irving; Sharma, Usha; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Taha, Taha E.

    2009-01-01

    Our objectives were to assess clinical signs and diagnoses associated with primary HIV-1 infection among infants. We analyzed data from a clinical trial (HIV Prevention Trials Network Protocol 024) in sub-Saharan Africa. Study visits were conducted at birth, at 4-6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The study population comprised live born, singleton, first-born infants of HIV-1-infected women with negative HIV-1 RNA assays who were still breastfeeding at 4-6 weeks. Of 1317 HIV-1-exposed i...

  18. Characterization of Antiviral Activity of Benzamide Derivative AH0109 against HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liyu; Ao, Zhujun; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Kobinger, Gary; Liu, ShuiPing; Wu, Guojun; Wainberg, Mark A.; Yao, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 infection, anti-HIV-1 strategies play a major role in disease control. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance against all currently used anti-HIV-1 molecules necessitates the development of new antiviral molecules and/or strategies against HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have identified a benzamide derivative named AH0109 that exhibits potent anti-HIV-1 activity at an 50% effective concentration of 0.7 μM in HIV-1-susceptible CD...

  19. Production of Interferons and β-Chemokines by Placental Trophoblasts of HIV-1-Infected Women

    OpenAIRE

    Reuben, James M.; Shearer, William T; Mary Paul; Claudia Kozinetz; Stanley Cron; Popek, Edwina J; Hunter Hammill; Bang-Ning Lee

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The mechanism whereby the placental cells of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected mother protect the fetus from HIV-1 infection is unclear. Interferons (IFNs) inhibit the replication of viruses by acting at various stages of the life cycle and may play a role in protecting against vertical transmission of HIV-1. In addition the β-chemokines RANTES (regulated on activation T cell expressed and secreted), macrophage inflammatory protein-1-α (MIP-1α), and MIP-1β can block H...

  20. Is clinical practice concordant with the changes in guidelines for antiretroviral therapy initiation during primary and chronic HIV-1 infection? The ANRS PRIMO and COPANA cohorts.

    OpenAIRE

    Krastinova, Evguenia; Seng, Remonie; Yeni, Patrick; Viard, Jean-Paul; Vittecoq, Daniel; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Fourn, Erwan; Pahlavan, Golriz; Delfraissy, Jean François; Goujard, Cécile; Meyer, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Guidelines for initiating HIV treatment are regularly revised. We explored how physicians in France have applied these evolving guidelines for ART initiation over the last decade in two different situations: chronic (CHI) and primary HIV-1 infection (PHI), since specific recommendations for PHI are also provided in France. METHODS: Data came from the ANRS PRIMO (1267 patients enrolled during PHI in 1996-2010) and COPANA (800 subjects enrolled at HIV diagnosis in 2004-2008) cohorts....

  1. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Mellon, Michael [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Bowder, Dane [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Quinn, Meghan [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Xiang, Shi-Hua, E-mail: sxiang2@unl.edu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  2. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture

  3. Changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular risk after a switch to abacavir in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, U S; Kofoed, K; Kronborg, G;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, using a longitudinal design, whether biomarkers of cardiovascular risk change after a switch to an abacavir (ABC)-containing regimen in HIV-1-infected individuals already receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Thirty-five HIV-1-infected individuals...

  4. Epigenetic modulations in activated cells early after HIV-1 infection and their possible functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana T Maricato

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications refer to a number of biological processes which alter the structure of chromatin and its transcriptional activity such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational processing. Studies have tried to elucidate how the viral genome and its products are affected by epigenetic modifications imposed by cell machinery and how it affects the ability of the virus to either, replicate and produce a viable progeny or be driven to latency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate epigenetic modifications in PBMCs and CD4+ cells after HIV-1 infection analyzing three approaches: (i global DNA- methylation; (ii qPCR array and (iii western blot. HIV-1 infection led to methylation increases in the cellular DNA regardless the activation status of PBMCs. The analysis of H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 suggested a trend towards transcriptional repression in activated cells after HIV-1 infection. Using a qPCR array, we detected genes related to epigenetic processes highly modulated in activated HIV-1 infected cells. SETDB2 and RSK2 transcripts showed highest up-regulation levels. SETDB2 signaling is related to transcriptional silencing while RSK2 is related to either silencing or activation of gene expression depending on the signaling pathway triggered down-stream. In addition, activated cells infected by HIV-1 showed lower CD69 expression and a decrease of IL-2, IFN-γ and metabolism-related factors transcripts indicating a possible functional consequence towards global transcriptional repression found in HIV-1 infected cells. Conversely, based on epigenetic markers studied here, non-stimulated cells infected by HIV-1, showed signs of global transcriptional activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 infection exerts epigenetic modulations in activated cells that may lead these cells to transcriptional repression with important functional consequences. Moreover, non-stimulated cells seem to increase gene transcription after HIV-1 infection

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  6. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  7. Usefulness of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound stiffness for the evaluation of bone health in HIV-1-infected subjects: comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Floridia, Marco; Ceci, Fabrizio; Cacciatore, Francesco; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the development of effective treatments and the resulting increase in life expectancy, bone mineral density (BMD) alteration has emerged as an important comorbidity in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. The potential contributors to the pathogenesis of osteopenia/osteoporosis include a higher prevalence of risk factors, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART)-exposure, HIV-1 itself and chronic immune activation/inflammation. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the “gold standard” technique for assessing bone status in HIV-1 population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate bone mineral status in a group of 158 HIV-1-infected subjects. The primary endpoint was the feasibility of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) as a screening tool for BMD. All subjects were receiving stable cART and were virologically suppressed (HIV-RNA vitamin D levels ng/mL (P-values: 0.004, 0.016, and 0.015, respectively). Conclusion As an alternative and/or integrative examination to DXA, calcaneal QUS could be proposed as a useful screening in HIV-1-infected patients for assessing bone health impairment. In fact, the results obtained confirm that calcaneal QUS may be useful for monitoring bone status, being a noninvasive and inexpensive technique, especially in those subjects with the classical traditional risk factors for bone damage that were observed earlier in HIV-1 population. PMID:27330330

  8. Inequalities and Duality in Gene Coexpression Networks of HIV-1 Infection Revealed by the Combination of the Double-Connectivity Approach and the Gini's Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis (Sym and pathogenesis (Pat is a duality problem of microbial infection, including HIV/AIDS. Statistical analysis of inequalities and duality in gene coexpression networks (GCNs of HIV-1 infection may gain novel insights into AIDS. In this study, we focused on analysis of GCNs of uninfected subjects and HIV-1-infected patients at three different stages of viral infection based on data deposited in the GEO database of NCBI. The inequalities and duality in these GCNs were analyzed by the combination of the double-connectivity (DC approach and the Gini's method. DC analysis reveals that there are significant differences between positive and negative connectivity in HIV-1 stage-specific GCNs. The inequality measures of negative connectivity and edge weight are changed more significantly than those of positive connectivity and edge weight in GCNs from the HIV-1 uninfected to the AIDS stages. With the permutation test method, we identified a set of genes with significant changes in the inequality and duality measure of edge weight. Functional analysis shows that these genes are highly enriched for the immune system, which plays an essential role in the Sym-Pat duality (SPD of microbial infections. Understanding of the SPD problems of HIV-1 infection may provide novel intervention strategies for AIDS.

  9. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:27035639

  10. Detecção de Mycoplasma genitalium, M. fermentans e M. penetrans em pacientes com sintomas de uretrite e em indivíduos infectados pelo HIV-1 no Brasil Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium, M. fermentans and M. penetrans in patients with symptoms of urethritis and in HIV-1 infected persons in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Mauricio Mendes de Cordova

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho investigamos a prevalência de três espécies de micoplasma recém-identificadas como patógenos humanos, M. genitalium, implicado em casos de uretrite não-gonocócica, e M. fermentans e M. penetrans, isolados de pacientes imunodeprimidos, e das duas espécies mais freqüentes no trato geniturinário, M. hominis e U. urealyticum. Foram estudados 110 pacientes com sintomas de uretrite (grupo A e 106 indivíduos infectados pelo HIV-1 (grupo B. M. genitalium foi detectado em 10,9% das amostras de raspado uretral do grupo A, e em 1,9% das amostras de raspado uretral e 0,9% das amostras de urina do grupo B. M. fermentans foi detectado em 0,9% e 5,7% das amostras de raspado uretral dos grupos A e B, respectivamente. M. penetrans foi detectado em 6,6% das amostras de urina somente do grupo B. M. hominis e U. urealyticum tiveram taxas de infecção de 0,9% e 14,5% no grupo A, e de 7,5% e 18,9% no grupo B, respectivamente. A relevante prevalência da infecção por estas novas espécies, em comparação aos micoplasmas mais conhecidos do trato urogenital, sugere que a magnitude do papel destes microrganismos no âmbito das doenças sexualmente transmissíveis (DST e da infecção pelo HIV pode estar sendo subestimada em nossa população.In this work the prevalence of three mycoplasma species recently identified as human pathogens was investigated: M. genitalium, involved in cases of non-gonococcal urethritis, and M. fermentans and M. penetrans, isolated from immunosupressed individuals, and the 2 species more frequently isolated from the urogenital tract: M. hominis and U. urealyticum. Studied groups were composed by 110 patients with symptoms of urethritis (group A and 106 HIV-1-infected individuals (group B. M. genitalium was detected in 10.9% of the urethral swab samples from the group A, and in 1.9% of the urethral swab samples and 0.9% of the urine samples from the group B. M. fermentans was detected in 0.9% and 5.7% of the

  11. Low level of regulatory T cells and maintenance of balance between regulatory T cells and TH17 cells in HIV-1-infected elite controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas Lars; Mens, Helene;

    2011-01-01

    A subgroup of HIV-1-infected individuals, elite controllers, have spontaneous viral control and offer an exceptional opportunity to study virological and immunolocigal factors of possible involvement in control of HIV-1 infection....

  12. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Nawei; Zhang, Zhenyu [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Feng, Shan [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Qingtao [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Malamud, Daniel [NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Deng, Haiteng, E-mail: dht@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-24

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity.

  13. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity

  14. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  15. Mortality attributable to smoking among HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, Marie; Afzal, Shoaib; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    population-attributable risk of death associated with smoking was 61.5% among HIV patients and 34.2% among controls.Conclusions. In a setting where HIV care is well organized and antiretroviral therapy is free of charge, HIV-infected smokers lose more life-years to smoking than to HIV. The excess mortality......Background. We assessed mortality attributable to smoking among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Methods. We estimated mortality rates (MRs), mortality rate ratios (MRRs), life expectancies, life-years lost, and population-attributable risk of death associated with smoking and with...... of smokers is tripled and the population-attributable risk of death associated with smoking is doubled among HIV patients compared to the background population....

  16. Association of Neutralization Sensitivity of HIV- 1 Primary Isolates With Biological Properties of Isolates From HIV-1 Infected Chinese Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA-XIN HEI; HAI-LI TANG; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG PENG; LIN YUAN; JIANG-QING XU; YI-MING SHAO

    2005-01-01

    Objective Although HIV-1 infection is prevalent in many regions in China, it remains largely unknown on the biological characteristics of dominant circulating isolates. This study was designed to isolate the circulating viral strains from different prevalent regions and to characterize their biological properties and neutralization sensitivity. Methods Primary viruses were isolated from fresh PBMCs using the traditional co-culture method and their capacity of inducing syncytium was tested in MT-2 cells. Meanwhile, their coreceptor usage was determined with two cell lines: Magi and GHOST (3) stably expressing CD4 and the chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization by HIV-1-infected patients' plasma which were highly active to neutralize SF33 strain, was quantified in GHOST cell-based neutralization assay. Results Six primary viral strains were isolated from 4 separated regions. Isolates LTG0213,LTG0214 and XVS032691 induced syncytia in MT-2 cells, and used CXCR4 as coreceptor. Isolates XJN0021, XJN0091, or SHXDC0041 did not induce syncytia, and used CCR5 as coreceptor. Overall neutralization sensitivity differed among four representative strains: HIV-1 XVS032691>LTG0214>XJN0091≈SHXDC0041. Conclusion The neutralization sensitivity of HIV isolates is linked with the phenotype of isolates, in which syncytium-inducing (SI) or CXCR4-tropic (X4) viruses are more easily neutralized than non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or CCR5-tropic (R5) viruses. The genetic subtypes based on the phylogeny of env sequences are not classical neutralization serotypes.

  17. Nanogel-Conjugated Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors and Their Combinations as Novel Antiviral Agents with Increased Efficacy against HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, T H; Gorantla, S; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Warren, G; Vinogradov, S V

    2015-12-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are an integral part of the current antiretroviral therapy (ART), which dramatically reduced the mortality from AIDS and turned the disease from lethal to chronic. The further steps in curing the HIV-1 infection must include more effective targeting of infected cells and virus sanctuaries inside the body and modification of drugs and treatment schedules to reduce common complications of the long-term treatment and increase patient compliancy. Here, we describe novel NRTI prodrugs synthesized from cholesteryl-ε-polylysine (CEPL) nanogels by conjugation with NRTI 5'-succinate derivatives (sNRTI). Biodegradability, small particle size, and high NRTI loading (30% by weight) of these conjugates; extended drug release, which would allow a weekly administration schedule; high therapeutic index (>1000) with a lower toxicity compared to NRTIs; and efficient accumulation in macrophages known as carriers for HIV-1 infection are among the most attractive properties of new nanodrugs. Nanogel conjugates of zidovudine (AZT), lamivudine (3TC), and abacavir (ABC) have been investigated individually and in formulations similar to clinical NRTI cocktails. Nanodrug formulations demonstrated 10-fold suppression of reverse transcriptase activity (EC90) in HIV-infected macrophages at 2-10, 2-4, and 1-2 μM drug levels, respectively, for single nanodrugs and dual and triple nanodrug cocktails. Nanogel conjugate of lamivudine was the most effective single nanodrug (EC90 2 μM). Nanodrugs showed a more favorable pharmacokinetics compared to free NRTIs. Infrequent iv injections of PEGylated CEPL-sAZT alone could efficiently suppress HIV-1 RT activity to background level in humanized mouse (hu-PBL) HIV model. PMID:26565115

  18. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count approaches. PMID:27415828

  19. Multiple roles of the capsid protein in the early steps of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassati, Ariberto

    2012-12-01

    The early steps of HIV-1 infection starting after virus entry into cells up to integration of its genome into host chromosomes are poorly understood. From seminal work showing that HIV-1 and oncoretroviruses follow different steps in the early stages post-entry, significant advances have been made in recent years and an important role for the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein, the constituent of the viral core, has emerged. CA appears to orchestrate several events, such as virus uncoating, recognition by restriction factors and the innate immune system. It also plays a role in nuclear import and integration of HIV-1 and has become a novel target for antiretroviral drugs. Here we describe the different functions of CA and how they may be integrated into one or more coherent models that illuminate the early events in HIV-1 infection and their relations with the host cell. PMID:23041358

  20. The X awakens: multifactorial ramifications of sex-specific differences in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Sven; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Sex-specific differences have been described for a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases. In HIV-1 infection women present with significantly lower viral loads during early infection, but during chronic infection women progress faster to AIDS for the same amount of viral replication. Recent studies have shown that sex differences during HIV-1 infection might also include the size of the latent viral reservoir, which represents a major obstacle towards a cure for HIV-1. Here we review different immunological and virological aspects that can be influenced by sex hormones and sex-specific genetic factors and their contribution to viral replication, as well as the creation and maintenance of the HIV-1 reservoir. PMID:27482439

  1. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional......Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia and...... similarities in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share...

  2. polymorphism Analysis of Resistance Genes in Chinese Populations with HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯铁建; 王福生; 王晓辉; 陈琳; 金磊; 侯静; 李良成; 施红; 洪卫国; 王业东

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the genotypes of CCR5 △ 32,CCR2b-64I and SDF 1-3`A and mutation frequencies of allelic genes in Chinese populations infected with HIV-1.Methods: Genome DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 78 HIV-1 infectors was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CCR5, CCR2b and SDF1 gene fragments were obtained from restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and/or CCR/△32, CCR5m303,CCR2b-64I and SDF1-3' A allelic genes' mutational frequencies were sequenced directly from PCR products.Results: None of CCR5△32, CCR5m303 gene mutation were found in 78 subjects with HIV-1 infection. The allelic gene mutation frequencies of CCR2b-64I and SDF1-3'A corresponding to 14.9-34.0% and 17.6-38.2% of 95% CI, were 22.79% and 26.92% respectively. Their colony distribution conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.Conclusion: The HIV-1 infections found at present are all susceptible population of CCR5△32 and CCR5m303. The polymorphism and frequencies of CCR5△32, CCR5m303,CCR2b-64I and SDFI-3'A alleles from Chinese HIV-1 infected population were disclosed in this study for the first time, which is of significance for studying the genetic resistance to susceptibility to HIV-1 infection as well as AIDS disease progression.

  3. APOBEC3G Variants and Protection against HIV-1 Infection in Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegwinde Rebeca Compaore

    Full Text Available Studies on host factors, particularly the APOBEC3G gene, have previously found an association with AIDS progression in some populations and against some HIV-1 strains but not others. Our study had two main objectives: firstly, to screen a population from Burkina Faso for three variants of APOBEC3G previously described, and secondly to analyze the effect of these three variants and their haplotypes on HIV-1 infection with Circulating Recombinant Forms (CRFs present in Burkina Faso. This case control study involved 708 seropositive and seronegative individuals. Genotyping was done by the TaqMan allelic discrimination method. Minor allele frequencies of rs6001417 (p<0.05, rs8177832 (P<0.05, and rs35228531 (P<0.001 were higher in seronegative subjects. The rs6001417 and rs8177832 SNPs were associated with HIV-1 infection in an additive model (P<0.01. Furthermore the SNP rs35228531 was also associated with HIV-1 infection in a dominant model (P<0.001. Odds ratio analysis of genotypes and alleles of the different APOBEC3G variants showed that there is a strong association between the minor genetic variants, genotype of the three SNPs, and HIV-1 status. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 are in linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype GGT from the rs6001417, rs8177832 and rs35228531 respectively has a protective effect OR = 0.54 [0.43-0.68] with P<0.001. There was also associations between the haplotypes GGC OR = 1.6 [1.1;-2.3] P<0.05, and CGC OR = 5.21 [2.4-11.3] P<0.001, which increase the risk of infection by HIV-1 from almost two (2 to five (5 fold. This study demonstrates an association of rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 of APOBEC3G with HIV-1 infection in a population from Burkina Faso.

  4. Multiple roles of the capsid protein in the early steps of HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Fassati, A.

    2012-01-01

    The early steps of HIV-1 infection starting after virus entry into cells up to integration of its genome into host chromosomes are poorly understood. From seminal work showing that HIV-1 and oncoretroviruses follow different steps in the early stages post-entry, significant advances have been made in recent years and an important role for the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein, the constituent of the viral core, has emerged. CA appears to orchestrate several events, such as virus uncoating, recognitio...

  5. Dermatomyositis associated with HIV-1 infection in a Nigerian adult female: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoina, D; A. Umar; Obiako, OR

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been implicated as a trigger for various autoimmune diseases, one of which is dermatomyositis. This is a very rare autoimmune disease characterised by myopathy, typical cutaneous signs and variable systemic manifestations. To our knowledge, the association of this rare disease with HIV infection has not been previously reported in Nigeria. We therefore decided to report the case of a 40 year old HIV-1 infected Nigerian female who presented to u...

  6. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-3 Alpha (MIP-3α)/CCL20 in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Chang, L Cindy; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled HIV infection progresses to the depletion of systemic and mucosal CD4 and AIDS. Early HIV infection may be associated with increases in the concentration of MIP-3α in the blood and gut fluids. MIP-3α/CCL20 is the only chemokine known to interact with CCR6 receptors which are expressed on immature dendritic cells and both effector and memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The role and prognostic value of blood levels of MIP-3α in HIV-infected individuals has yet to be described. Methods We determined the serum levels of MIP-3α, and IFN-γ, in 167 HIV-1-infected and 27 HIV-1-uninfected men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The blood biomarkers were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the cell phenotypes using flow cytometry. Results Median serum levels of MIP-3α in HIV-1-infected and uninfected men was significantly different (pabsolute number of CD4+ T cell (p=0.01) and were positively correlated with CD38 molecules on CD8+ T cells (p=0.0002) and with serum levels of IFN-γ (0.006). Conclusion Serum levels of MIP-3α concomitantly increase with plasma levels of IFN-γ, CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells, and decreased of absolute CD4+ T cells in HIV-1-infected men. A higher blood level of MIP-3α may be representation of locally high level of MIP-3α and more recruitment of immature dendritic cell at site of infection. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20 axis and epithelial cells at the recto-colonel level may enhance sexual transmission of HIV-1 in MSM and may be useful as a prognostic marker in HIV-1-infection and AIDS.

  7. Epigenetics of μ-Opioid receptors: Intersection with HIV-1 infection of the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, Patrick M.; Dave, Rajnish S.; Datta, Prasun K.; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    The abuse of intravenous drugs, such as heroin, has become a major public health concern due to the increased risk of HIV-1 infection. Opioids such as heroin were originally identified and subsequently abused for their analgesic effects. However, many investigations have found additional effects of opioids, including regulation of the immune system. As such, chronic opioid abuse has been shown to promote HIV-1 pathogenesis and facilitate HIV-1-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Clinical o...

  8. Foxp3 and Treg cells in HIV-1 infection and immuno-pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Derek; Jiang, Qi; Zhang, Liguo; Su, Lishan

    2008-01-01

    FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are implicated in a number of pathologic processes including elevated levels in cancers and infectious diseases, and reduced levels in autoimmune diseases. Treg cells are activated to modulate immune responses to avoid over-reactive immunity. However, conflicting findings are reported regarding relative levels of Treg cells during HIV-1 infection and disease progression. The role of Treg cells in HIV-1 diseases (aberrant immune activation) is poorly u...

  9. IgM Repertoire Biodiversity is Reduced in HIV-1 Infection and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Li; Hou, Wei; Liu, Li; Cai, Yunpeng; Wallet, Mark Andrew; Gardner, Brent Paul; Chang, Kaifen; Lowe, Amanda Catherine; Rodriguez, Carina Adriana; Sriaroon, Panida; Farmerie, William George; Sleasman, John William; Goodenow, Maureen Michels

    2013-01-01

    Background: HIV-1 infection or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disrupt B cell homeostasis, reduce memory B cells, and impair function of IgG and IgM antibodies. Objective: To determine how disturbances in B cell populations producing polyclonal antibodies relate to the IgM repertoire, the IgM transcriptome in health and disease was explored at the complementarity determining region 3 (CDRH3) sequence level. Methods: 454-deep pyrosequencing in combination with a novel analysis pipelin...

  10. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines

  11. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  12. Psoralen/UV inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells for use in cytologic and immunologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid procedure for the inactivation of HIV-1-infected cells using psoralen and ultraviolet (UV) light is described. Exposure of HIV-1-infected cells to 5 micrograms/ml psoralen followed by UV irradiation (320-380 nm) for 5 minutes yields cells that are noninfectious as assessed by extended infectivity assays. The psoralen/UV inactivation procedure described is effective with cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 and is unaffected by cell densities up to 12 x 10(6)/ml. At 5 micrograms/ml psoralen does little damage to cellular permeability as shown by the ability of treated cells to exclude trypan blue and propidium iodide. Psoralen/UV treatment of HIV-1-infected cells does not cause a significant decrease in the reactivity of HIV-1 core and envelope antigens or cellular antigens to monoclonal antibodies. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of these cells for flow cytometry studies and for cell surface labeling using the lactoperoxidase 125I iodination procedure

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1IIIB infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent

  14. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1α and matrix metalloproteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1α production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1α was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1α and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD

  15. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  16. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  17. Zidovudine/lamivudine for HIV-1 infection contributes to limb fat loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit G A van Vonderen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipoatrophy is known to be associated with stavudine as part of the treatment for HIV infection, but it is less clear if this serious side effect is also related to other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors like zidovudine. We aimed to determine whether zidovudine-sparing first-line antiretroviral therapy would lead to less lipoatrophy and other metabolic changes than zidovudine-containing therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1 infected men with an indication to start antiretroviral therapy were included in a randomized single blinded clinical trial. Randomisation was between zidovudine-containing therapy (zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir and zidovudine-sparing therapy (nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir. Main outcome measures were body composition assessed by computed tomography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and lipid profile before and after 3, 12, 24 months of antiretroviral therapy. In the zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir group, from 3 months onward limb fat decreased progressively by 684+/-293 grams (estimated mean+/-standard error of the mean(p = 0.02 up to 24 months whereas abdominal fat increased, but exclusively in the visceral compartment (+21.9+/-8.1 cm(2, p = 0.008. In contrast, in the nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir group, a generalized increase in fat mass was observed. After 24 months no significant differences in high density lipoprotein and total/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were found between both treatment groups, but total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were higher in the nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir group (6.1+/-0.2 versus 5.3+/-0.2 and 3.6+/-0.1 versus 2.8+/-0.1 mmol/l respectively, p<0.05. Virologic response and safety were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Zidovudine/lamivudine+lopinavir/ritonavir, but not nevirapine+lopinavir/ritonavir in antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients, is

  18. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Carmen E.; Perdiguero, Beatriz; García Arriaza, Juan; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Mothe, B; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz Fernández, María Ángeles; Gatell, J. M.; López Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Brander, Christian; Garcia, Felipe; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1) to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) or placebo, followed by interr...

  19. Episodes of Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with the acute phase of HIV-1 infection and with recurrence of viremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Gleusa de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a severe case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS characterized by flaccid areflexive tetraplegia and signs of autonomic instability related to acute HIV-1 infection, and the occurrence of relapse episodes coinciding with the detection of HIV-1 RNA in blood during the phase of irregular treatment with antiretroviral agents. The patient has been asymptomatic for 3 years and has an HIV-1 load below the limit of detection. The recurrence of GBS in this case may be related to alterations of the immunologic response caused by disequilibrium in the host-HIV relationship due to the increase in HIV-1 viremia.

  20. Evaluating the role of atazanavir/cobicistat and darunavir/cobicistat fixed-dose combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crutchley RD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rustin D Crutchley,1 Rakesh C Guduru,2 Amy M Cheng1 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, 2CompanionDX, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Atazanavir/cobicistat (ATV/c and darunavir/cobicistat (DRV/c are newly approved once daily fixed-dose protease inhibitor combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Studies in healthy volunteers have established bioequivalence between cobicistat and ritonavir as pharmacoenhancers of both atazanavir (ATV and darunavir (DRV. In addition, two randomized clinical trials (one Phase II and one Phase III noninferiority trial with a 144-week follow-up period demonstrated that cobicistat had sustainable and comparable efficacy and safety to ritonavir as a pharmacoenhancer of ATV through 144 weeks of treatment in HIV-1-infected patients. Furthermore, one Phase III, open-label, single-arm, clinical trial reflected virologic and immunologic responses and safety outcomes consistent with prior published data for DRV/ritonavir 800/100 mg once daily, supporting the use of DRV/c 800/150 mg once daily for future treatment of treatment-naïve and -experienced HIV-1-infected patients with no DRV resistance-associated mutations. Low rates of virologic failure secondary to resistance to antiretroviral regimens were present in these clinical studies. Most notable adverse events in the ATV studies were hyperbilirubinemia and in the DRV study rash. Small increases in serum creatinine and minimally reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate Cockcroft–Gault calculation (eGFRCG were observed in ATV/c and DRV/c clinical studies consistent with other studies evaluating elvitegravir/cobicistat/tenofovir/emtricitabine for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. These renal parameter changes occurred acutely in the first few weeks and plateaued off for the remaining study periods and are not necessarily clinically relevant. Cobicistat has numerous advantages compared to

  1. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  2. Contribution of immunological and virological factors to extremely severe primary HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Judith; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Azuara, Marta; Mariño, Ana; Frahm, Nicole; Mothe, Beatriz; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Buzón, Maria José; Paredes, Roger; Matas, Lourdes; Allen, Todd M.; Brander, Christian; Rodrigo, Carlos; Clotet, Bonaventura; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute HIV infection, high viral loads and the induction of host immune responses typically coincide with the onset of clinical symptoms. However, clinically severe presentations during acute HIV-1 infection, including AIDS-defining symptoms, are unusual. Methods Virus isolates were tested for clade, drug susceptibility, coreceptor usage, and growth rate for two cases of clinically severe sexual transmission. HLA genotype was determined, and HIV-1-specific CTL responses to an overlapping peptide set spanning the entire HIV clade A and clade B proteome were assayed. Results The virus isolated from the two unrelated cases of severe primary HIV-1 infection showed R5/X4 dual/mixed tropism, belonged to clade B and CRF02-AG, and were highly replicative in peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture. Impaired humoral responses were paralleled by a profound absence of HIV-1-specific CTL responses to the entire viral proteome in the two study cases. One case for which the virus source was available, showed a remarkable HLA similarity between the transmission pair as all 4 HLA-A and -B alleles were HLA supertype-matched between the subjects involved in the transmission case. Conclusions The data suggest that concurrence of viral and host factors contribute to the clinical severity of primary HIV-1 infection and that subjects infected with highly replicative dual tropic viruses are more prone to develop AIDS-defining symptoms during acute infection if they are unable to mount humoral and cellular HIV-1-specific immune responses. Concordant HLA supertypes might facilitate the preferential transmission of HLA-adapted viral variants, further accelerating disease progression. PMID:19093810

  3. Polymorphisms in the IFNγ, IL-10, and TGFβ Genes May Be Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bonfim Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study investigated possible associations between the TNFα-308G/A, IFN+874A/T, IL-6-174C/G, IL-10-1082A/G, and TGFβ-509C/T polymorphisms with HIV-1 infection, in addition to correlation of the polymorphisms with clinical markers of AIDS progression, such as levels of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and plasma viral load. Methods. A total of 216 individuals who were infected with HIV-1 and on antiretroviral therapy (ART and 294 individuals from the uninfected control group were analyzed. Results. All individuals evaluated were negative for total anti-HBc, anti-HCV, anti-T. pallidum, and anti-HTLV-1/2. The polymorphisms were identified by PCR-RFLP. Individuals presenting the IFN+874A allele as well as the AA genotype were more frequent in the HIV-1 infected group compared to the control group (P<0.05, in addition to having lower levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The CD8+ T lymphocytes count was significantly lower in individuals with the IL-10-1082 GG genotype. The TGFβ-509TT genotype was associated with higher plasma viral load. Conclusions. The results suggest that the presence of the IFN+874A allele confers susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and a decrease in the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, the genotype associated with high serum levels of TGFβ may be associated with an increase in plasma viral load.

  4. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  5. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding...... time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4+ T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I...

  6. Specific elimination of HIV-1 infected cells using Tat/Rev-dependent circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Perdigão, Pedro Ricardo Lucas, 1987-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Genética). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 Despite the success of antiretroviral cocktails, a cure for HIV-1 remains elusive. This is mainly due to the existence of persistent cellular reservoirs infected with non-transcriptional, latent HIV-1. An effective treatment against HIV-1 would target both active and latent HIV-1-infected cells, and eliminate them without harming non-infected cells. In order to achieve this, we h...

  7. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

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    Amy Liese Cole

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa.

  8. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

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    Qingwen Jin

    Full Text Available Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed.We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects.Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5.Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  9. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  10. Similar Neutralizing Activity in the HIV-1 Infected Long Term Non-progressors(LTNPs) and Typical Progressors(TPs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wang; Si-yang Liu; Lin Li; Tian-yi Li; Jing-yun Li; Li-li Chen; Yong-jian Liu; Han-ping Li; Zuo-yi Bao; Xiao-lin Wang; Dao-min Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are considered to be an important protective parameter used in HIV-l vaccine evaluation.However,the exact role that neutralizing antibodies plays in controlling the disease progression of HIV-1 infected peoples is still undetermined.In this paper,we compared the protective function of the neutralizing antibody response in the plasma from LTNP and TP against clade B and clade C pseudoviruses.No difference in the neutralizing activities between the plasma from LTNP and TP was found,which was consistent with the most recent reports.In addition,no correlations between the titer or breadth and CD4+ or viral load in HIV-1 infected individuals were found.The protective roles played by neutralizing antibodies in controlling disease progression of HIV-1 infected people need to be considered in a new viewpoint.

  11. Frequency and Absolute Number of FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Correlate with Disease Progression of Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been found to down-regulate immune activation in HIV-1 infection. However, whether the depletion of Treg benefits to the disease status of HIV infection remains undefined. To address this issue, we enumerated the Treg absolute counts and frequency in 75 antiviral-na(i)ve HIV-1-infected individuals in this study. It was found that HIV-infected patients displayed a significant decline in Treg absolute counts but a significant increase in Treg frequency. In addition, with disease progression indicated by CD4 T-cell absolute counts, circulating Treg frequency gradually increased; while Treg absolute counts were gradually decreased, suggesting that the alteration of Treg number closely correlated with disease progression in HIV infection.Functional analysis further showed that Treg efficiently inhibit both CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation in vitro. Thus, our findings indicates that Treg actively participate in pathogenesis of chronic HIV infection,influencing the disease progression.

  12. Randomized pilot trial of a synbiotic dietary supplement in chronic HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schunter Marco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV-1 results in marked immunologic insults and structural damage to the intestinal mucosa, including compromised barrier function. While the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been a major advancement in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the need for novel complementary interventions to help restore intestinal structural and functional integrity remains unmet. Known properties of pre-, pro-, and synbiotics suggest that they may be useful tools in achieving this goal. Methods This was a 4-week parallel, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot trial in HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy. A synbiotic formulation (Synbiotic 2000® containing 4 strains of probiotic bacteria (1010 each plus 4 nondigestible, fermentable dietary fibers (2.5 g each was provided each day, versus a fiber-only placebo formulation. The primary outcome was bacterial translocation. Secondary outcomes included the levels of supplemented bacteria in stool, the activation phenotype of peripheral T-cells and monocytes, and plasma levels of C-reactive protein and soluble CD14. Results Microbial translocation, as measured by plasma bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA concentration, was not altered by synbiotic treatment. In contrast, the synbiotic formulation resulted in significantly elevated levels of supplemented probiotic bacterial strains in stool, including L. plantarum and P. pentosaceus, with the colonization of these two species being positively correlated with each other. T-cell activation phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed modest changes in response to synbiotic exposure, with HLA-DR expression slightly elevated on a minor population of CD4+ T-cells which lack expression of HLA-DR or PD-1. In addition, CD38 expression on CD8+ T-cells was slightly lower in the fiber-only group. Plasma levels of soluble CD14 and C-reactive protein were unaffected by synbiotic treatment in this study. Conclusions

  13. FOXP3 Inhibits HIV-1 Infection of CD4 T-cells via Inhibition of LTR Transcriptional Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Selliah, Nithianandan; Zhang, Mingce; White, Sara; Zoltick, Philip; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Finkel, Terri H.; Cron, Randy Q

    2008-01-01

    FOXP3 is a necessary transcription factor for the development and function of CD4+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs). The role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection remains unclear. Here, we show expression of FOXP3 in primary human CD4 T-cells significantly inhibits HIV-1 infection. Since FOXP3 inhibits NFAT activity, and NFAT proteins contribute to HIV-1 transcription, we explore a transcriptional repressive function of HIV-1 LTR by FOXP3. Over-expression of FOXP3 in primary CD4 T-cells inhibits wild-type H...

  14. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  15. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells

  16. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mthunzi, Patience [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2015-12-31

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  17. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-01

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  18. Care and management of the infant of the HIV-1-infected mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paintsil, Elijah; Andiman, Warren A

    2007-04-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus continues to be a major global health problem. The pediatric HIV-1 epidemic is fueled by HIV-1 infection in women of childbearing age with vertical transmission in utero or at the time of birth. In resource-rich countries, the birth of an infected child is a sentinel health event signaling a chain of missed opportunities and barriers to prevention. Because the fate and ultimate HIV-infection status of the baby is inextricably linked to the infection status of the mother and her general state of well-being, we provide in this review: 1) background and state-of-the-art management guidelines for optimum maternal care; 2) strategies to minimize the risk of vertical transmission of HIV; and 3) recommendations for managing infants born to HIV-infected women. These are discussed under four case scenarios that obstetric and pediatric providers frequently encounter in their practices. PMID:17462496

  19. Virologic effects of broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 administration during chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rebecca M; Boritz, Eli; Coates, Emily E; DeZure, Adam; Madden, Patrick; Costner, Pamela; Enama, Mary E; Plummer, Sarah; Holman, Lasonji; Hendel, Cynthia S; Gordon, Ingelise; Casazza, Joseph; Conan-Cibotti, Michelle; Migueles, Stephen A; Tressler, Randall; Bailer, Robert T; McDermott, Adrian; Narpala, Sandeep; O'Dell, Sijy; Wolf, Gideon; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Freemire, Brandie A; Gorelick, Robert J; Pandey, Janardan P; Mohan, Sarumathi; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Chun, Tae-Wook; Fauci, Anthony S; Schwartz, Richard M; Koup, Richard A; Douek, Daniel C; Hu, Zonghui; Capparelli, Edmund; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Ledgerwood, Julie E

    2015-12-23

    Passive immunization with HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is being considered for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. As therapeutic agents, mAbs could be used to suppress active virus replication, maintain suppression induced by antiretroviral therapy (ART), and/or decrease the size of the persistent virus reservoir. We assessed the impact of VRC01, a potent human mAb targeting the HIV-1 CD4 binding site, on ART-treated and untreated HIV-1-infected subjects. Among six ART-treated individuals with undetectable plasma viremia, two infusions of VRC01 did not reduce the peripheral blood cell-associated virus reservoir measured 4 weeks after the second infusion. In contrast, six of eight ART-untreated, viremic subjects infused with a single dose of VRC01 experienced a 1.1 to 1.8 log10 reduction in plasma viremia. The two subjects with minimal responses to VRC01 were found to have predominantly VRC01-resistant virus before treatment. Notably, two subjects with plasma virus load <1000 copies/ml demonstrated virus suppression to undetectable levels for over 20 days until VRC01 levels declined. Among the remaining four subjects with baseline virus loads between 3000 and 30,000 copies, viremia was only partially suppressed by mAb infusion, and we observed strong selection pressure for the outgrowth of less neutralization-sensitive viruses. In summary, a single infusion of mAb VRC01 significantly decreased plasma viremia and preferentially suppressed neutralization-sensitive virus strains. These data demonstrate the virological effect of this neutralizing antibody and highlight the need for combination strategies to maintain virus suppression. PMID:26702094

  20. Elvitegravir/Cobicistat/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Alafenamide: A Review in HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Sarah L; Deeks, Emma D

    2016-06-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (tenofovir AF) is a novel oral prodrug of the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) tenofovir that has several pharmacological advantages over tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (tenofovir DF), including increased plasma stability and reduced tenofovir systemic exposure. Tenofovir AF has been coformulated with elvitegravir, cobicistat and emtricitabine as a once-daily, single-tablet regimen (elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir AF; Genvoya(®)) for the treatment of adults and adolescents with HIV-1 infection. With regard to establishing and/or maintaining virological suppression over 48 weeks in randomized, phase III trials, elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir AF was noninferior to elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive adults, and statistically superior (subsequent to established noninferiority) to ongoing treatment with tenofovir DF-containing regimens in ART-experienced adults with virological suppression. In single-arm, phase III trials, elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir AF also provided high rates of virological suppression among ART-naive adolescents and ART-experienced adults with stable renal impairment. In general, elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir AF was well tolerated and associated with more favourable renal and bone parameters, but a less favourable lipid profile, than tenofovir DF-containing regimens. Thus, elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir AF is an alternative single-tablet regimen for adults and adolescents with HIV-1 infection, particularly those with an estimated creatinine clearance of ≥30 to <50 mL/min or an increased risk of tenofovir DF-related bone toxicity. PMID:27189707

  1. APOBEC3G Variants and Protection against HIV-1 Infection in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaore, Tegwinde Rebeca; Soubeiga, Serge Theophile; Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Tchelougou, Damehan; Maiga, Mamoudou; Assih, Maleki; Bisseye, Cyrille; Bakouan, Didier; Compaore, Issaka Pierre; Dembele, Augustine; Martinson, Jeremy; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Studies on host factors, particularly the APOBEC3G gene, have previously found an association with AIDS progression in some populations and against some HIV-1 strains but not others. Our study had two main objectives: firstly, to screen a population from Burkina Faso for three variants of APOBEC3G previously described, and secondly to analyze the effect of these three variants and their haplotypes on HIV-1 infection with Circulating Recombinant Forms (CRFs) present in Burkina Faso. This case control study involved 708 seropositive and seronegative individuals. Genotyping was done by the TaqMan allelic discrimination method. Minor allele frequencies of rs6001417 (pratio analysis of genotypes and alleles of the different APOBEC3G variants showed that there is a strong association between the minor genetic variants, genotype of the three SNPs, and HIV-1 status. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 are in linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype GGT from the rs6001417, rs8177832 and rs35228531 respectively has a protective effect OR = 0.54 [0.43-0.68] with P<0.001. There was also associations between the haplotypes GGC OR = 1.6 [1.1;-2.3] P<0.05, and CGC OR = 5.21 [2.4-11.3] P<0.001, which increase the risk of infection by HIV-1 from almost two (2) to five (5) fold. This study demonstrates an association of rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 of APOBEC3G with HIV-1 infection in a population from Burkina Faso. PMID:26741797

  2. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Steele

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging". Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD and microbial translocation (MT contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear.Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP, MT (LPS, sCD14, T-cell activation (sCD27, and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos adults from 20-100 years old.Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008, sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = <0.0001 and LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002 levels in HIV(neg but not HIV(pos subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos subjects to determine whether HIV(pos subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01.We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCoy Joe-Ann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mint family (Lamiaceae produces a wide variety of constituents with medicinal properties. Several family members have been reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., sage (Salvia spp., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., basil (Ocimum spp. and self-heal (Prunella vulgaris L.. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of Prunella vulgaris, water and ethanol extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 at sub μg/mL concentrations with little to no cellular cytotoxicity at concentrations more than 100-fold higher. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that aqueous extracts were effective when added during the first five hours following initiation of infection, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting entry events. Further analysis revealed that extracts inhibited both virus/cell interactions and post-binding events. While only 40% inhibition was maximally achieved in our virus/cell interaction studies, extract effectively blocked post-binding events at concentrations similar to those that blocked infection, suggesting that it was targeting of these latter steps that was most important for mediating inhibition of virus infectivity. Conclusions We demonstrate that aqueous P. vulgaris extracts inhibited HIV-1 infectivity. Our studies suggest that inhibition occurs primarily by interference of early, post-virion binding events. The ability of aqueous extracts to inhibit early events within the HIV life cycle suggests that these extracts, or purified constituents responsible for the antiviral activity, are promising microbicides and/or antivirals against HIV-1.

  4. Prevalence and impact of minority variant drug resistance mutations in primary HIV-1 infection.

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    Joanne D Stekler

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate minority variant drug resistance mutations detected by the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA but not consensus sequencing among subjects with primary HIV-1 infection. DESIGN/METHODS: Observational, longitudinal cohort study. Consensus sequencing and OLA were performed on the first available specimens from 99 subjects enrolled after 1996. Survival analyses, adjusted for HIV-1 RNA levels at the start of antiretroviral (ARV therapy, evaluated the time to virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL among subjects with minority variants conferring intermediate or high-level resistance. RESULTS: Consensus sequencing and OLA detected resistance mutations in 5% and 27% of subjects, respectively, in specimens obtained a median of 30 days after infection. Median time to virologic suppression was 110 (IQR 62-147 days for 63 treated subjects without detectable mutations, 84 (IQR 56-109 days for ten subjects with minority variant mutations treated with ≥3 active ARVs, and 104 (IQR 60-162 days for nine subjects with minority variant mutations treated with <3 active ARVs (p = .9. Compared to subjects without mutations, time to virologic suppression was similar for subjects with minority variant mutations treated with ≥3 active ARVs (aHR 1.2, 95% CI 0.6-2.4, p = .6 and subjects with minority variant mutations treated with <3 active ARVs (aHR 1.0, 95% CI 0.4-2.4, p = .9. Two subjects with drug resistance and two subjects without detectable resistance experienced virologic failure. CONCLUSIONS: Consensus sequencing significantly underestimated the prevalence of drug resistance mutations in ARV-naïve subjects with primary HIV-1 infection. Minority variants were not associated with impaired ARV response, possibly due to the small sample size. It is also possible that, with highly-potent ARVs, minority variant mutations may be relevant only at certain critical codons.

  5. Impact of etravirine use on hospitalization rates among highly pre-treated failing HIV-1 infected individuals between 2005 and 2011

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    Jean-Marc Lacombe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Etravirine (ETR, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor available in France since 2006, is indicated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in combination with a ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor (PI in antiretroviral treatment-experienced adult patients. To assess its impact in routine clinical care, our objective was to compare hospitalization rates in highly pre-treated failing HIV-1 infected individuals between 2005 and 2011 depending on whether or not they received ETR+PI. Methods: From the French Hospital Database on HIV (ANRS CO4, we selected highly pre-treated individuals (prior exposure to at least 2NRTI, 2PI and 1 NNRTI with a viral load (VL>50 copies/mL initiating a new regimen between 2005 and 2011. Hospitalization rates were calculated for each calendar month and depending on whether patients never received ETR+PI at any time or during months before initiating ETR+PI (no ETR+PI or during months after initiating ETR+PI (ETR+PI, using an intention to continue treatment approach. Poisson regression models were used to compare incidence between the two groups, after adjustment for potential confounders (age, transmission group, origin, AIDS, PCP prophylaxis, viral load, CD4, nb of previous ARV. Results: Overall 3884 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. Among them 838 (21.6% received ETR+PI at least once. Among all enrolled patients, 35.8% had CD4 100,000 copies/ml, 42.8% had had an AIDS event and 47.8% had received more than 10 different antiretroviral drugs. There were 2484 hospitalizations in 808 individuals over 13,986 patient-years. The hospitalization rates for 1000 P-Y were 169.0 for the ETR+PI group and 179.3 for the no ETR+PI group. After adjustment, the corresponding figures were 144.8 for 1000 P-Y and 192.7 for 1000 P-Y respectively, with a relative risk estimated as 0.75 (95% CI 0.67–0.84. Conclusions: Access to ETR+PI between 2005 and 2011 was associated with a 25% reduction in the

  6. Large Isoform of Mammalian Relative of DnaJ is a Major Determinant of Human Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection

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    Yu-Ping Chiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection have been of interest for decades. We aimed to determine the contribution of large isoform of Mammalian DnaJ (MRJ-L, a HIV-1 Vpr-interacting cellular protein, to this natural variation. Expression of MRJ-L in monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals (n = 31 than their uninfected counterparts (n = 27 (p = 0.009. Fifty male homosexual subjects (20 of them are HIV-1 positive were further recruited to examine the association between MRJ-L levels and occurrence of HIV infection. Bayesian multiple logistic regression revealed that playing a receptive role and increased levels of MRJ-L in macrophages were two risk factors for HIV-1 infection. A 1% rise in MRJ-L expression was associated with a 1.13 fold (95% CrI 1.06–1.29 increase in odds of contracting HIV-1 infection. Ex vivo experiments revealed that MRJ-L facilitated Vpr-dependent nuclear localization of virus. Infection of macrophage-tropic strain is a critical step in HIV-1 transmission. MRJ-L is a critical factor in this process; hence, subjects with higher macrophage MRJ-L levels are more vulnerable to HIV-1 infection.

  7. Polyclonal B cell differentiation and loss of gastrointestinal tract germinal centers in the earliest stages of HIV-1 infection.

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    Marc C Levesque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The antibody response to HIV-1 does not appear in the plasma until approximately 2-5 weeks after transmission, and neutralizing antibodies to autologous HIV-1 generally do not become detectable until 12 weeks or more after transmission. Moreover, levels of HIV-1-specific antibodies decline on antiretroviral treatment. The mechanisms of this delay in the appearance of anti-HIV-1 antibodies and of their subsequent rapid decline are not known. While the effect of HIV-1 on depletion of gut CD4(+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection is well described, we studied blood and tissue B cells soon after infection to determine the effect of early HIV-1 on these cells.In human participants, we analyzed B cells in blood as early as 17 days after HIV-1 infection, and in terminal ileum inductive and effector microenvironments beginning at 47 days after infection. We found that HIV-1 infection rapidly induced polyclonal activation and terminal differentiation of B cells in blood and in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT B cells. The specificities of antibodies produced by GALT memory B cells in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI included not only HIV-1-specific antibodies, but also influenza-specific and autoreactive antibodies, indicating very early onset of HIV-1-induced polyclonal B cell activation. Follicular damage or germinal center loss in terminal ileum Peyer's patches was seen with 88% of follicles exhibiting B or T cell apoptosis and follicular lysis.Early induction of polyclonal B cell differentiation, coupled with follicular damage and germinal center loss soon after HIV-1 infection, may explain both the high rate of decline in HIV-1-induced antibody responses and the delay in plasma antibody responses to HIV-1. Please see later in the article for Editors' Summary.

  8. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  9. Down-regulation of HIV-1 Infection by Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gong; Xi-hui Shen; Chao Chen; Hui Qiu; Rong-ge Yang

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)can interact with and exploit the host cellular machinery to replicate and propagate itself.Numerous studies have shown that the Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)signal pathway can positively regulate the replication of HIV-1,but exactly how each MAPK pathway affects HIV-1 infection and replication is not understood.In this study,we used the Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(ERK)pathway inhibitor,PD98059,the Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)pathway inhibitor,SP600125,and the p38 pathway inhibitor,SB203580,to investigate the roles of these pathways in HIV-1replication.We found that application of PD98059 results in a strong VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus and HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.In addition,SB203580 and SP600125 also elicited marked VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus inhibition activity but no HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.We also found that SB203580 and SP600125 can enhance the HIV-1 inhibition activity of PD98059when cells were treated with all three MAPK pathway inhibitors in combination.Finally,we show that HIV-1virus inhibition activity of the MAPK pathway inhibitors was the result of the negative regulation of HIV-1 LTR promoter activity.

  10. Biophysical characterization of V3-lipopeptide liposomes influencing HIV-1 infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The V3-loop of the HIV-1 gp120 alters host cell immune function and modulates infectivity. We investigated biophysical parameters of liposome constructs with embedded lipopeptides from the principle neutralizing domain of the V3-loop and their influence on viral infectivity. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed liposome supramolecular structures with hydrodynamic radius of the order of 900 and 1300 nm for plain and V3-lipopeptide liposomes. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed almost identical local microenvironment. The difference in liposome hydrodynamic radius was attributed to the fluctuating ionic environment of the V3-lipopeptide liposomes. In vitro HIV-1 infectivity assays showed that plain liposomes reduced virus production in all cell cultures, probably due to the hydrophobic nature of the aggregates. Liposomes carrying V3-lipopeptides with different cationic potentials restored and even enhanced infectivity (p < 0.05). These results highlight the need for elucidation of the involvement of lipid bilayers as dynamic components in supramolecular structures and in HIV-1 fusion mechanisms

  11. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

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    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  12. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbro, Raffaello; Peterson, Francis C; Liu, Qingbo; Guzzo, Christina; Zhang, Peng; Miao, Huiyi; Van Ryk, Donald; Ambroggio, Xavier; Hurt, Darrell E; De Gioia, Luca; Volkman, Brian F; Dolan, Michael A; Lusso, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177) were recently identified within the second variable (V2) loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3) loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys) adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:27389109

  13. HLA-DR expression on regulatory T cells is closely associated with the global immune activation in HIV-1 infected subjects na(i)ve to antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian; LI Ming-yuan; WANG Ying; QIAN Ke-lei; CAO Qing-hua; QIU Chen-li; QIU Cao; XUE Yi-le; ZHANG Xiao-yan; ZHONG Ping; XU Jian-qing

    2011-01-01

    Background The frequencies of regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased over the HIV infection but its counts actually decreased. We proposed that the decrease of Treg counts may cause the reduction of inhibitory effect and thereby account for the over-activation of Tregs during HIV infection. However, it remains unknown whether Tregs are also over-activated and thereafter the activation induced death may lead to the decrease of Tregs. Methods Tregs were defined as CD4+CD25+CD127lo/-T cells. Eighty-one HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in our study, and twenty-two HIV-1 seronegative donors were recruited as the control. The levels of HLA-DR on Tregs were determined by FACSAria flow cytometer. ResultsCompared to HIV-1 seronegative donors, the levels of HLA-DR on CD4+CD25+CD127lo/- Tregs were significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients, and its increase was positively associated with viral loads (r=0.3163,P=0.004) and negatively with CD4 T-cell counts (r=-0.4153, P<0.0001). In addition, significant associations between HLA-DR expression on CD4+CD25+CD127lo/-Tregs and the percentages of HLA-DR, CD38, Ki67 expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were also identified. Conclusion HLA-DR on Tregs is a good marker for viral replication and disease progression. The over-activation of Tregs might result in the decrease of Tregs.

  14. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...... CD4 and that post binding events may be common to the infection of lymphocytes. Anti HIV-1 sera showed neutralizing activity against heterologous and even autologous escape virus. This finding, together with the observation that monocytes and M phi s are infected in vivo, suggests that protection...

  15. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing using Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a New Technique for Detecting HIV-1 Infection

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    Alex Willyandre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 infection by individuals in window period who are tested negative in conventional HIV-1 detection would pose the community with serious problems. Several diagnostic tools require specific labora-tory equipment, perfect timing of diagnosis, antibody to HIV-1, and invasive technique to get sample for examination, until high amount of time to process the sample as well as accessibility of remote areas. Many attempts have been made to solve those problems to come to a new detection technique. This review aims to give information about the current development technique for detection of HIV infection. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing is currently introduced for detection of HIV-1 infection. This review also cover the possible usage of gingival crevicular fluid as sample specimen that could be taken noninvasively from the individual.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.63

  16. Incidence and risk factors of chronic renal disease in a cohort of Greek HIV-1-infected adults

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    V Sakka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD in HIV-infected patients is associated with both HIV and non-HIV-related factors. Initial renal dysfunction is silent and detectable only by laboratory tests such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Our objective was to assess possible risk factors for CKD in a cohort of Greek HIV-1-infected adults. Methods Patients in the AMACS (Athens Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study cohort with at least two available creatinine values were enrolled in the study. Renal dysfunction was defined as eGFR below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. The Kaplan-Meier estimator and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to analyze the occurrence and predictors of renal dysfunction. Results A total of 1073 patients were enrolled in the study; 255 (23.76% had baseline eGFR below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 and were excluded. Characteristics of the study population: men 88.4%, MSM 62.6%, median baseline age, CD4+count and viral load were 32.6 years, 413 cells/µL and 3.77 log10 copies/mL, respectively. 240 (29.3% patients experienced an eGFR decrease below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 during follow-up period. Older age, female gender, heterosexual mode of transmission, lower baseline eGFR (all p<0.001, lower baseline CD4+(p=0.001, stage C (p=0.023, administration of cART (p<0.001 or other nephrotoxic agent (p=0.035 were the major risk factors in univariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified older age [hazard ratio (HR 1.289 per 10 years, p<0.001] and female gender (HR vs male: 1.899, p<0.001, as the major factors associated with increased hazard of developing CRD, whereas baseline eGFR <110 (HR vs eGFR <110: 0.245, p<0.001 and current CD4+count ≥350 cells/µL (HR 0.564, p=0.003 were significant protective factors. Conclusion In this large cohort of HIV-infected Greek patients, almost one-third (29.3% experienced some degree of renal dysfunction during HIV infection. Older age and female gender were major

  17. The next generation: etravirine in the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults refractory to other antiretrovirals

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    R Chris Rathbun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available R Chris Rathbun, Michelle D LiedtkeDepartment of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, USAAbstract: Etravirine is a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI that is approved for the treatment of adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients with documented or suspected resistance to first-generation NNRTIs. Etravirine has a flexible molecular structure that allows it to retain its activity against mutant HIV strains that exhibit resistance to first-generation agents. It is evident that 3 or more etravirine resistance-associated mutations are typically necessary before clinical resistance to etravirine. Safety and efficacy of etravirine are established in antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients in combination with antiretroviral regimens that contain darunavir/ritonavir. In phase III studies, cutaneous reactions occurred in 19% of treated patients and are the most commonly observed adverse event. The typical manifestation is the development of a maculopapular rash within the first few weeks of etravirine therapy. Resolution commonly occurs within 1–2 weeks on continued therapy. Rare cases of severe skin reactions (<0.1% have been reported. Etravirine is hepatically metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19. Drug interactions with some antiretrovirals (eg, unboosted protease inhibitors and fosamprenavir/ritonavir and medications for other comorbidities (eg, atorvastatin and clarithromycin have been reported and may require dosage adjustment for the coadministered drug or selection of alternative therapy in some instances. Administration of etravirine with potent inducers of CYP450 is not recommended due to the potential for subtherapeutic etravirine concentrations. In this article, the pharmacology, efficacy, safety, and tolerability of etravirine in adult treatment-experienced patients with HIV-1

  18. Epigenetic alterations in the brain associated with HIV-1 infection and methamphetamine dependence.

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    Paula Desplats

    Full Text Available HIV involvement of the CNS continues to be a significant problem despite successful use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. Drugs of abuse can act in concert with HIV proteins to damage glia and neurons, worsening the neurotoxicity caused by HIV alone. Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, abuse of which has reached epidemic proportions and is associated with high-risk sexual behavior, increased HIV transmission, and development of drug resistance. HIV infection and METH dependence can have synergistic pathological effects, with preferential involvement of frontostriatal circuits. At the molecular level, epigenetic alterations have been reported for both HIV-1 infection and drug abuse, but the neuropathological pathways triggered by their combined effects are less known. We investigated epigenetic changes in the brain associated with HIV and METH. We analyzed postmortem frontal cortex tissue from 27 HIV seropositive individuals, 13 of which had a history of METH dependence, in comparison to 14 cases who never used METH. We detected changes in the expression of DNMT1, at mRNA and protein levels, that resulted in the increase of global DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in a subset of cases, showed differential methylation on genes related to neurodegeneration; dopamine metabolism and transport; and oxidative phosphorylation. We provide evidence for the synergy of HIV and METH dependence on the patterns of DNA methylation on the host brain, which results in a distinctive landscape for the comorbid condition. Importantly, we identified new epigenetic targets that might aid in understanding the aggravated neurodegenerative, cognitive, motor and behavioral symptoms observed in persons living with HIV and addictions.

  19. Synergistic reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by 5-azacytidine and inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Roth, Megan E; Xie, Jiashu; Daly, Michele B; Clouser, Christine L; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Kim, Baek; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-06-01

    Although many compounds have been approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency type-1 (HIV-1) infection, additional anti-HIV-1 drugs (particularly those belonging to new drug classes) are still needed due to issues such as long-term drug-associated toxicities, transmission of drug-resistant variants, and development of multi-class resistance. Lethal mutagenesis represents an antiviral strategy that has not yet been clinically translated for HIV-1 and is based on the use of small molecules to induce excessive levels of deleterious mutations within the viral genome. Here, we show that 5-azacytidine (5-aza-C), a ribonucleoside analog that induces the lethal mutagenesis of HIV-1, and multiple inhibitors of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) interact in a synergistic fashion to more effectively reduce the infectivity of HIV-1. In these drug combinations, RNR inhibitors failed to significantly inhibit the conversion of 5-aza-C to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, suggesting that 5-aza-C acts primarily as a deoxyribonucleoside even in the presence of RNR inhibitors. The mechanism of antiviral synergy was further investigated for the combination of 5-aza-C and one specific RNR inhibitor, resveratrol, as this combination improved the selectivity index of 5-aza-C to the greatest extent. Antiviral synergy was found to be primarily due to the reduced accumulation of reverse transcription products rather than the enhancement of viral mutagenesis. To our knowledge, these observations represent the first demonstration of antiretroviral synergy between a ribonucleoside analog and RNR inhibitors, and encourage the development of additional ribonucleoside analogs and RNR inhibitors with improved antiretroviral activity. PMID:27117260

  20. Epigenetic alterations in the brain associated with HIV-1 infection and methamphetamine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Cronin, Peter; Gianella, Sara; Woods, Steven; Letendre, Scott; Smith, David; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    HIV involvement of the CNS continues to be a significant problem despite successful use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Drugs of abuse can act in concert with HIV proteins to damage glia and neurons, worsening the neurotoxicity caused by HIV alone. Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, abuse of which has reached epidemic proportions and is associated with high-risk sexual behavior, increased HIV transmission, and development of drug resistance. HIV infection and METH dependence can have synergistic pathological effects, with preferential involvement of frontostriatal circuits. At the molecular level, epigenetic alterations have been reported for both HIV-1 infection and drug abuse, but the neuropathological pathways triggered by their combined effects are less known. We investigated epigenetic changes in the brain associated with HIV and METH. We analyzed postmortem frontal cortex tissue from 27 HIV seropositive individuals, 13 of which had a history of METH dependence, in comparison to 14 cases who never used METH. We detected changes in the expression of DNMT1, at mRNA and protein levels, that resulted in the increase of global DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in a subset of cases, showed differential methylation on genes related to neurodegeneration; dopamine metabolism and transport; and oxidative phosphorylation. We provide evidence for the synergy of HIV and METH dependence on the patterns of DNA methylation on the host brain, which results in a distinctive landscape for the comorbid condition. Importantly, we identified new epigenetic targets that might aid in understanding the aggravated neurodegenerative, cognitive, motor and behavioral symptoms observed in persons living with HIV and addictions. PMID:25054922

  1. Inter-laboratory assessment of a prototype multiplex kit for determination of recent HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. METHODS: To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laboratories. Longitudinal seroconversion specimens were tested in parallel by each laboratory and kit performance was compared to that of an in-house assay. Additionally, the ability of the kit to distinguish recent from long-term HIV-1 infection, as compared to the in-house assay, was determined by comparing the reactivity of known recent (infected 12 months drug naïve specimens. RESULTS: Although the range of reactivity for each analyte varied between the prototype kit and in-house assay, a measurable distinction in reactivity between recent and long-term specimens was observed with both assays in all three laboratories. Additionally, kit performance was consistent between all three laboratories. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV, between sample replicates for all laboratories, ranged from 0.5% to 6.1%. The inter-laboratory CVs ranged from 8.5% to 21.3% for gp160-avidity index (a and gp120-normalized mean fluorescent intensity (MFI value (n, respectively. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of producing a multiplex kit for measuring HIV antibody levels and avidity, with the potential for improved incidence estimates based on multi-analyte algorithms. The availability of a commercial kit will facilitate the transfer of technology among diverse laboratories for widespread assay use.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for HIV-1 infection in rural Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania: Implications for prevention and treatment

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    Leyna Germana H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variability in stages of the HIV-1 epidemic and hence HIV-1 prevalence exists in different areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnitude of HIV-1 infection and identify HIV-1 risk factors that may help to develop preventive strategies in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between March and May of 2005 involving all individuals aged between 15–44 years having an address in Oria Village. All eligible individuals were registered and invited to participate. Participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, and medical history. Following a pre-test counseling, participants were offered an HIV test. Results Of the 2 093 eligible individuals, 1 528 (73.0% participated. The overall age and sex adjusted HIV-1 prevalence was 5.6%. Women had 2.5 times higher prevalence (8.0% vs. 3.2% as compared to men. The age group 25–44 years, marriage, separation and low education were associated with higher risk of HIV-1 infection for both sexes. HIV-1 infection was significantly associated with >2 sexual partners in the past 12 months (women: Adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.5 (95%CI: 1.3–4.7, and past 5 years, [(men: AOR, 2.2 (95%CI:1.2–5.6; women: AOR, 2.5 (95%CI: 1.4–4.0], unprotected casual sex (men: AOR,1.8 95%CI: 1.2–5.8, bottled alcohol (Men: AOR, 5.9 (95%CI:1.7–20.1 and local brew (men: AOR, 3.7 (95%CI: 1.5–9.2. Other factors included treatment for genital ulcers and genital discharge in the past 1 month. Health-related complaints were more common among HIV-1 seropositive as compared to seronegative participants and predicted the presence of HIV-1 infection. Conclusion HIV-1 infection was highly prevalent in this population. As compared to our previous findings, a shift of the epidemic from a younger to an older age group and from educated to uneducated individuals was observed. Women and married or

  3. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme

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    Veille Jean-Claude

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS, in microglia and astrocytes. Results S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3 infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4 and CCR5 (R5-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC. S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3 was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of therapeutic DNA vaccination in individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection.

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    Eric S Rosenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An effective therapeutic vaccine that could augment immune control of HIV-1 replication may abrogate or delay the need for antiretroviral therapy. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG A5187 was a phase I/II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine (VRC-HVDNA 009-00-VP in subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection. (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00125099 METHODS: Twenty healthy HIV-1 infected subjects who were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection and had HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL were randomized to receive either vaccine or placebo. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine. Following vaccination, subjects interrupted antiretroviral treatment, and set-point HIV-1 viral loads and CD4 T cell counts were determined 17-23 weeks after treatment discontinuation. RESULTS: Twenty subjects received all scheduled vaccinations and discontinued antiretroviral therapy at week 30. No subject met a primary safety endpoint. No evidence of differences in immunogenicity were detected in subjects receiving vaccine versus placebo. There were also no significant differences in set-point HIV-1 viral loads or CD4 T cell counts following treatment discontinuation. Median set-point HIV-1 viral loads after treatment discontinuation in vaccine and placebo recipients were 3.5 and 3.7 log(10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The HIV-1 DNA vaccine (VRC-HIVDNA 009-00-VP was safe but poorly immunogenic in subjects treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection. Viral set-points were similar between vaccine and placebo recipients following treatment interruption. However, median viral load set-points in both groups were lower than in historical controls, suggesting a possible role for antiretroviral therapy in persons with acute or early HIV-1

  5. Production and characterization of human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies from the cells of HIV-1 infected Indian donors

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    Andrabi Raiees

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs developed from HIV-1 infected donors have enormously contributed to the identification of neutralization sensitive epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The third variable region (V3 is a crucial target on gp120, primarily due to its involvement in co-receptor (CXCR4 or CCR5 binding and presence of epitopes recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Methods Thirty-three HIV-1 seropositive drug naive patients (18 males and 15 females within the age range of 20–57 years (median = 33 years were recruited in this study for mAb production. The mAbs were selected from EBV transformed cultures with conformationally constrained Cholera-toxin-B containing V3C (V3C-CTB fusion protein. We tested the mAbs for their binding with HIV-1 derived proteins and peptides by ELISA and for neutralization against HIV-1 viruses by TZM-bl assays. Results We isolated three anti-V3 mAbs, 277, 903 and 904 from the cells of different individuals. The ELISA binding revealed a subtype-C and subtype-A specific binding of antibody 277 and 903 while mAb 904 exhibited cross reactivity also with subtype-B V3. Epitope mapping of mAbs with overlapping V3 peptides showed exclusive binding to V3 crown. The antibodies displayed high and low neutralizing activity against 2/5 tier 1 and 1/6 tier 2 viruses respectively. Overall, we observed a resistance of the tier 2 viruses to neutralization by the anti-V3 mAbs, despite the exposure of the epitopes recognized by these antibodies on two representative native viruses (Du156.12 and JRFL, suggesting that the affinity of mAb might equally be crucial for neutralization, as the epitope recognition. Conclusions Our study suggests that the anti-V3 antibodies derived from subtype-C infected Indian patients display neutralization potential against tier 1 viruses while such activity may be limited against more resistant tier 2 viruses. Defining the fine epitope

  6. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

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    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  7. Participation in Research Involving Novel Sampling and Study Designs to Identify Acute HIV-1 Infection among Minority Men Who Have Sex with Men

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Kristina; Castor, Delivette; Mah, Timothy; Cook, Stephanie; Auguiste, Lex M.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Markowitz, Marty

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infection disproportionally affects African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) and their inclusion in biomedical and behavioral research is critical to understanding and addressing HIV vulnerability. Using focus groups, we sought to understand the perceptions related to participating in biomedical research of acute/recent HIV-1 infection (AHI) using complex sampling and data collection methods to reach this hidden group at highest risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV....

  8. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Morrison; Grace John-Stewart; John J Egessa; Sezi Mubezi; Sylvia Kusemererwa; Dennis K Bii; Nulu Bulya; Francis Mugume; Campbell, James D.; Jonathan Wangisi; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Connie Celum; Baeten, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  9. High Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) Prevalence, Clinical Correlates and High Incidence among Recently HIV-1-Infected Subjects in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Dias Batista; Suzete Ferreira; Sauer, Mariana M.; Helena Tomiyama; Maria Teresa Maidana Giret; Pannuti, Cláudio S.; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Sabino, Ester C; Esper G Kallas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the etiological agent for Kaposi Sarcoma, which occurs especially in HIV-infected subjects. HHV-8 infection and its clinical correlates have not been well characterized in recently HIV-1-infected subjects, especially men who have sex with men (MSM). METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the HHV-8 seroprevalence, clinical correlates, and incidence after one year of follow-up in a cohort of 228 recently HIV-1-infected individuals, of whom 83.6% ...

  10. Human TOP1 residues implicated in species specificity of HIV-1 infection are required for interaction with BTBD2, and RNAi of BTBD2 in old world monkey and human cells increases permissiveness to HIV-1 infection

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    Cutler Mary

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host determinants of HIV-1 viral tropism include factors from producer cells that affect the efficiency of productive infection and factors in target cells that block infection after viral entry. TRIM5α restricts HIV-1 infection at an early post-entry step through a mechanism associated with rapid disassembly of the retroviral capsid. Topoisomerase I (TOP1 appears to play a role in HIV-1 viral tropism by incorporating into or otherwise modulating virions affecting the efficiency of a post-entry step, as the expression of human TOP1 in African Green Monkey (AGM virion-producing cells increased the infectivity of progeny virions by five-fold. This infectivity enhancement required human TOP1 residues 236 and 237 as their replacement with the AGM counterpart residues abolished the infectivity enhancement. Our previous studies showed that TOP1 interacts with BTBD1 and BTBD2, two proteins which co-localize with the TRIM5α splice variant TRIM5δ in cytoplasmic bodies. Because BTBD1 and BTBD2 interact with one HIV-1 viral tropism factor, TOP1, and co-localize with a splice variant of another, we investigated the potential involvement of BTBD1 and BTBD2 in HIV-1 restriction. Results We show that the interaction of BTBD1 and BTBD2 with TOP1 requires hu-TOP1 residues 236 and 237, the same residues required to enhance the infectivity of progeny virions when hu-TOP1 is expressed in AGM producer cells. Additionally, interference with the expression of BTBD2 in AGM and human 293T target cells increased their permissiveness to HIV-1 infection two- to three-fold. Conclusions These results do not exclude the possibility that BTBD2 may modestly restrict HIV-1 infection via colocation with TRIM5 variants in cytoplasmic bodies.

  11. NRTI Sparing Therapy in Virologically Controlled HIV-1 Infected Subjects: Results of a Controlled, Randomized Trial (Probe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiolo, Franco; Di Filippo, Elisa; Valenti, Daniela; Ortega, Paula S; Callegaro, Annapaola

    2016-05-01

    Dual treatments could help clinicians to avoid drawbacks and toxicities due to the nucleosidic backbone, while maintaining the efficacy and convenience of robust combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We explored the combination of rilpivirine plus boosted darunavir (DRV) as an option when switching from standard cART in patients who are virologically suppressed. In this randomized, open-label, proof-of-concept, noninferiority trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older with chronic HIV-1 infection and on a stable, effective (>6 months) protease inhibitor-based cART including a nucleosidic backbone. The primary endpoint was noninferiority of the virological response between treatment groups, according to FDA snapshot approach. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to dual treatment with rilpivirine plus boosted DRV or to continue their ongoing triple treatment. Noninferiority was shown at the prespecified level of -12% both at 24 and 48 weeks. At week 24, 100% of patients in the dual arm presented a blood HIV-RNA level cell count from baseline was 6.0 cells per microliter (SD, 184) for dual treatment and 16.5 cells per microliter (SD, 142) for triple treatment. A relevant decrement in CD838HLADR cells was observed in both arms. The reduction was, however, significantly more pronounced in the dual-therapy arm. At week 48, the CD838HLADR cell count was 3.4% (SD, 2.2) in the dual-therapy arm and 5.2% (SD, 3.1) in the triple arm (P = 0.018). None of the patients developed severe adverse events nor had to stop treatment because of adverse events or presented grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities. A greater reduction of bone stiffness (-2.25; SD, 7.1) was observed in patients randomized to continue triple therapy compared with patients switched to dual therapy (-0.32; SD, 8.8). Finally, baseline HIV-DNA content directly correlated with pre-cART viral load of patients (P = 0.021), but not with time on cART or time with HIV-RNA below 50 copies per milliliter

  12. Cost of switching darunavir+ritonavir (DRV+RTV) to lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) in HIV-1-infected treatment-naïve women of child-bearing age (WOCBA)

    OpenAIRE

    Baran, R.; Moller, J.; Desai, K; Simpson, K; O Van de Steen; Dietz, B.; Gooch, K.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines consider LPV/r a preferred protease inhibitor for use during pregnancy. When an HIV-infected woman receiving DRV+RTV becomes pregnant, a switch to LPV/r may be warranted. The budget implications of proactively initiating LPV/r versus initiating DRV+RTV and then switching has not been examined. A cost-minimization analysis was performed from the US healthcare perspective for HIV-1-infected, treatment-naïve WOCBA comparing: initiating LPV/r in all patients versus initiating DR...

  13. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

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    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  14. Human embryonic stem cell (hES derived dendritic cells are functionally normal and are susceptible to HIV-1 infection

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    Bandi Sriram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human embryonic stem (hES cells hold considerable promise for cell replacement and gene therapies. Their remarkable properties of pluripotency, self-renewal, and tractability for genetic modification potentially allows for the production of sizeable quantities of therapeutic cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Dendritic cells (DC arise from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs and are important in many innate and adaptive immune functions. With respect to HIV-1 infection, DCs play an important role in the efficient capture and transfer of the virus to susceptible cells. With an aim of generating DCs from a renewable source for HIV-1 studies, here we evaluated the capacity of hES cell derived CD34+ cells to give rise to DCs which can support HIV-1 infection. Results Undifferentiated hES cells were cultured on S17 mouse bone marrow stromal cell layers to derive CD34+ HPCs which were subsequently grown in specific cytokine differentiation media to promote the development of DCs. The hES derived DCs (hES-DC were subjected to phenotypic and functional analyses and compared with DCs derived from fetal liver CD34+ HPC (FL-DC. The mature hES-DCs displayed typical DC morphology consisting of veiled stellate cells. The hES-DCs also displayed characteristic phenotypic surface markers CD1a, HLA-DR, B7.1, B7.2, and DC-SIGN. The hES-DCs were found to be capable of antigen uptake and stimulating naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction assay. Furthermore, the hES-DCs supported productive HIV-1 viral infection akin to standard DCs. Conclusion Phenotypically normal and functionally competent DCs that support HIV-1 infection can be derived from hES cells. hES-DCs can now be exploited in applied immunology and HIV-1 infection studies. Using gene therapy approaches, it is now possible to generate HIV-1 resistant DCs from anti-HIV gene transduced hES-CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  15. Complementary Assays Reveal a Low Level of CA Associated with Viral Complexes in the Nuclei of HIV-1-Infected Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Amy E.; Kelley, Z; Foley, Deirdre; Hope, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    During uncoating, the conical capsid of HIV disassembles by dissociation of the p24 capsid protein (CA). Uncoating is known to be required for HIV replication, but the mechanism is poorly defined. Here, we examined the timing and effect of two capsid binding drugs (PF74 and BI2) on infectivity and capsid integrity in HIV-1-infected cells. The virus remained susceptible to the action of PF74 and BI2 for hours after uncoating as defined in parallel drug addition and cyclosporine (CsA) washout a...

  16. Objective evaluation of two markers of HIV-1 infection (p24 antigen concentration and CD4+ cell counts) by a self organizing neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, M; Ruggiero, C; Maillard, M; Lillo, F B; Varnier, O E

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to obtain groups of patients with similar profiles of p24 antigen concentration and of CD4+ cell counts. These two markers were chosen because their evaluation represents a significant step in the clinical follow up of HIV-1 infected subjects. The detection methods for p24 antigen concentration and for CD4+ cell counts are well assessed and guarantee easy reproducibility of data obtained in different laboratories. A set of observations with the same time intervals were derived from a continuous function obtained for each patient by a back-propagation neural net trained on the raw data from the patient. The classifications were obtained by a Kohonen neural net trained in three ways: with p24 antigen profiles only, with CD4+ cell count profiles only and with both sets of profiles. The results show that the clustering fashion of the two parameters closely resembles the clustering fashion of CD4+ only, rather than that of p24Ag, both with reference to cluster formation and with reference to distances between clusters. PMID:9062884

  17. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    heterosexually infected women (N=587) and heterosexually infected men (N=583) with no record of Hepatitis C infection diagnosed with HIV after 1 January 1997. Among these subjects, 473 women (81%) and 435 men (75%) initiated HAART from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2009. We used Cox regression to calculate...

  18. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

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    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  19. Selective elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by Env-directed, HIV-1-based virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently showed that both replicating and resting cells cultivated with ganciclovir (GCV) were killed when challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped HIV-1-based virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the Nef7 (i.e., an HIV-1 Nef mutant incorporating in virions at high levels)/herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) fusion product. On this basis, a novel anti-HIV therapeutic approach based on Nef7/TK VLPs expressing X4 or R5 HIV cell receptor complexes has been attempted. We here report that (CD4-CXCR4) and (CD4-CCR5) Nef7-based VLPs efficiently enter cells infected by X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. Importantly, the delivery of the VLP-associated Nef7/TK led to cell death upon GCV treatment. Of interest, VLPs were effective also against non-replicating, HIV-1-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. HIV-targeted VLPs represent a promising candidate for the treatment of persistently HIV-1-infected cells that are part of virus reservoirs resistant to HAART therapies

  20. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M., E-mail: narendra@chemeng.iisc.ernet.in

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  1. Dynamics of the human and viral m(6)A RNA methylomes during HIV-1 infection of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichinchi, Gianluigi; Gao, Shang; Saletore, Yogesh; Gonzalez, Gwendolyn Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Wang, Yinsheng; Mason, Christopher E; Rana, Tariq M

    2016-01-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most prevalent internal modification of eukaryotic mRNA. Very little is known of the function of m(6)A in the immune system or its role in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we investigate the topology, dynamics and bidirectional influences of the viral-host RNA methylomes during HIV-1 infection of human CD4 T cells. We show that viral infection triggers a massive increase in m(6)A in both host and viral mRNAs. In HIV-1 mRNA, we identified 14 methylation peaks in coding and noncoding regions, splicing junctions and splicing regulatory sequences. We also identified a set of 56 human gene transcripts that were uniquely methylated in HIV-1-infected T cells and were enriched for functions in viral gene expression. The functional relevance of m(6)A for viral replication was demonstrated by silencing of the m(6)A writer or the eraser enzymes, which decreased or increased HIV-1 replication, respectively. Furthermore, methylation of two conserved adenosines in the stem loop II region of HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) RNA enhanced binding of HIV-1 Rev protein to the RRE in vivo and influenced nuclear export of RNA. Our results identify a new mechanism for the control of HIV-1 replication and its interaction with the host immune system. PMID:27572442

  2. The Role of Genetic Variants of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 in Pediatric HIV-1 Infection and Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianesin, Ketty; Freguja, Riccardo; Carmona, Francesco; Zanchetta, Marisa; Del Bianco, Paola; Malacrida, Sandro; Montagna, Marco; Rampon, Osvalda; Giaquinto, Carlo; De Rossi, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF1) is the natural ligand of CXCR4, the coreceptor of HIV-1 X4 viruses. This study investigated the role of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1801157 (NM_000609.5:c.*519G>A) of the SDF1 gene in the natural history of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 and disease progression of HIV-1-infected children. The study was conducted in 428 children born to HIV-1-seropositive mothers, who had not undergone antiretroviral therapy (ART) during pregnancy, and in 120 HIV-1-infected children for whom the end-point was the onset of AIDS or the initiation of ART; 16 children developed early AIDS (84 months). The rs1801157 SNP was not associated with risk of perinatal infection in any genetic models tested. By contrast, this SNP influenced disease progression in a time-dependent manner. rs1801157 GA heterozygous children had a higher risk of late AIDS (HR = 6.3, 95%CI 1.9–20.7, p = 0.002) than children with the rs1801157 GG genotype. Children were studied for viral coreceptor usage at birth, after 84 months of age and/or at AIDS onset. While R5 viruses using CCR5 coreceptor were predominant at birth (94%) and at early AIDS (85%), viruses using CXCR4 coreceptor emerged during the course of infection and were detected in 49% of children older than 84 months and in 62% of late AIDS. The rs1801157 SNP did not influence the emergence of R5X4 viruses, but children with the rs1801157 GA genotype and R5X4 viruses were at significantly higher risk of late AIDS than children with rs1801157 GG genotype (OR = 8.0, 95% CI 1.2–52.2, p = 0.029). Our results indicate that the rs1801157 SNP does not influence perinatal infection, but impacts disease progression. This effect is time-dependent and linked to the coreceptor-usage of viral variants that undergo evolution during the course of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22962615

  3. Association between invasive cancer of the cervix and HIV-1 infection in Tanzania: the need for dual screening

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    Ngoma Twalib

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of the cervix is the second commonest malignancy in females worldwide and is the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. Cancer of the cervix has been strongly associated with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV which is a sexually transmitted disease. However, the role of HIV-1 in the aetiology of cancer of the cervix is less clear. Studies suggest that HPV and HIV-1 infection are synergistic and therefore their dual occurrence may fuel increased incidence of cancer of the cervix and AIDS. We therefore conducted a study to determine the association between cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Methods The study was carried out in Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania between January and March 2007. A hospital-based case control design was used to study 138 cases and 138 controls. The cases were consenting women 18 years and above with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, while the controls were consenting non-cancer adult women attendants or visitors. The participants were counselled and tested for HIV-1 and interviewed to assess risk factors for cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Estimation of risk was done by computing odds ratios and confidence intervals. Confounding and interaction between the factors were assessed using logistic regression. Results HIV-1 prevalence was much higher among the cases (21.0% than among the controls (11.6%. In logistic regression, HIV-1 was associated with cancer of the cervix (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.9. Among the cases the mean age was lower for HIV-1 infected (44.3 years than HIV-1 uninfected women (54 years, p = 0.0001. Conclusion HIV-1 infection is associated with invasive cancer of the cervix. Resource-constrained countries with a high burden of HIV-1 and cervical cancer should adopt a high-risk approach that targets HIV-1 positive women for screening of cervical cancer initially by utilizing HIV/AIDS resources.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The number of men who have sex with men (MSM infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208 and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9% were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%. Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4% subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001; exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001; versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003; oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044; times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021; illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001; and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002. In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease

  5. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe: effect of treatment of schistosomiasis on CD4 cell count and plasma HIV-1 RNA load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia;

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether treatment of schistosomiasis has an effect on the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, individuals with schistosomiasis and with or without HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive praziquantel treatment at inclusion or after a delay of 3 months;......; 287 participants were included in the study, and 227 (79%) were followed up. Among the 130 participants who were coinfected, those who received early treatment (n=64) had a significantly lower increase in plasma HIV-1 RNA load than did those who received delayed treatment (n=66) (P...

  6. Virologic and immunologic effectiveness of darunavir-based salvage therapy in HIV-1-infected adults in a Brazilian clinical practice setting: results of a multicenter and retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mota Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Darunavir has been proven efficacious for antiretroviral-experienced HIV-1-infected patients in randomized trials. However, effectiveness of darunavir-based salvage therapy is understudied in routine care in Brazil. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of HIV-1-infected patients from three public referral centers in Belo Horizonte, who received a darunavir-based therapy between 2008 and 2010, after virologic failure. Primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48. Change in CD4 cell count was also evaluated. Outcome measures were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis applied to observational studies. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact of missing data at week 48. Predictors of virologic failure were examined using rare-event, finite sample, bias-corrected logistic regression. Results: Among 108 patients, the median age was 44.2 years, and 72.2% were male. They had long-standing HIV-1 infection (median 11.6 years and advanced disease (76.9% had an AIDS-defining event. All patients had previously received protease inhibitors and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 75% nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 4.6% enfuvirtide. The median length of protease inhibitor use was 8.9 years, and 90.8% of patients had prior exposure to unboosted protease inhibitor. Genotypic resistance profile showed a median of three primary protease inhibitor mutations and 10.2% had three or more darunavir resistance-associated mutations. Virologic success at week 48 was achieved by 78.7% (95% CI = 69.7–86% of patients and mean CD4 cell count increase from baseline was 131.5 cells/μL (95% CI = 103.4–159.6. In multiple logistic regression analysis, higher baseline viral load (RR = 1.04 per 10,000 copies/mL increase; 95% CI = 1.01–1.09 and higher number of darunavir resistance-associated mutations (RR = 1.23 per each; 95% CI = 0.95–1.48 were independently associated with

  7. Antiviral molecules correlate with vitamin D pathway genes and are associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Jimenez, Wbeimar; Zapata, Wildeman; Rugeles, María T

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the immunomodulatory effects of Vitamin D (VitD) and the expression of anti-HIV-1 molecules has not been explored in HIV-1-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs). Higher mRNA levels of cathelicidin and HAD-4 in oral-mucosa and peripheral-blood, along with higher CYP24A1 mRNA in vaginal-mucosa and lower TLR2 mRNA in endocervical-mucosa were found in HESNs compared to non-exposed controls. Furthermore, the mRNA of anti-HIV molecules Elafin, TRIM5, Cathelicidin, HAD-4 and RNase7, previously associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection, positively correlated with the mRNA expression of VDR in HESNs, suggesting the potential participation of VitD in natural resistance to HIV-1. PMID:27083474

  8. CD28 costimulation and CD28 expression in T lymphocyte subsets in HIV-1 infection with and without progression to AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choremi-Papadopoulou, H; Panagiotou, N; Samouilidou, E; Kontopidou, F; Viglis, V; Antoniadou, A; Kosmidis, J; Kordossis, T

    2000-01-01

    In a prospective study of 152 HIV-1 patients (with and without progression to AIDS) we examined CD28 MoAb costimulation and CD3 MoAb response using whole blood culture at baseline and up to either the time of AIDS diagnosis or the end of the observation period. CD28 antigen expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was also studied in both groups of patients. In patients who progressed to AIDS, CD28 MoAb costimulation was found to be decreased. Univariate time-dependent analysis showed that decreases in (i) absolute numbers of either CD4+, CD4+CD28+, CD8+CD28+ T cells, (ii) CD28 MoAb costimulation, and (iii) CD3 MoAb response, and an increase in CD8+CD28− %, are significant predictors for progression to AIDS. In addition, multivariate time-dependent analysis demonstrated that a decrease in CD28 MoAb costimulation (but not a decrease in CD3 MoAb response) was predictive for progression to AIDS, as were decreases in the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the absolute number of CD4+CD28+ T cells. Thus, CD28 MoAb costimulation can be considered a useful assay for monitoring HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, apart from the early increase in the percentage of CD8+CD28− T cells and an increase in the percentage of CD28− on CD8+ T cells in both groups of patients at baseline compared with normal controls, a negative correlation was found to exist between the percentages of CD4+ or CD4+CD28+ T cells and the percentage of CD8+CD28− T cells; this suggests that these cells are probably mutually regulated. PMID:10691923

  9. HIV-1 Infection of T Cells and Macrophages Are Differentially Modulated by Virion-Associated Hck: A Nef-Dependent Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Tachedjian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The proline repeat motif (PxxP of Nef is required for interaction with the SH3 domains of macrophage-specific Src kinase Hck. However, the implication of this interaction for viral replication and infectivity in macrophages and T lymphocytes remains unclear. Experiments in HIV-1 infected macrophages confirmed the presence of a Nef:Hck complex which was dependent on the Nef proline repeat motif. The proline repeat motif of Nef also enhanced both HIV-1 infection and replication in macrophages, and was required for incorporation of Hck into viral particles. Unexpectedly, wild-type Hck inhibited infection of macrophages, but Hck was shown to enhance infection of primary T lymphocytes. These results indicate that the interaction between Nef and Hck is important for Nef-dependent modulation of viral infectivity. Hck-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection of T cells suggests that Nef-Hck interaction may contribute to the spread of HIV-1 infection from macrophages to T cells by modulating events in the producer cell, virion and target cell.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection in ex vivo cervical tissue model of human vagina by palmitic acid; implications for a microbicide development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 80% of all new HIV-1 infections are acquired through sexual contact. Currently, there is no clinically approved microbicide, indicating a clear and urgent therapeutic need. We recently reported that palmitic acid (PA is a novel and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and entry. Mechanistically, PA inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor and blocks efficient gp120-to-CD4 attachment. Here, we wanted to assess the ability of PA to inhibit HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue ex vivo model of human vagina, and determine its effect on Lactobacillus (L species of probiotic vaginal flora. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that treatment with 100-200 µM PA inhibited HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue by up to 50%, and this treatment was not toxic to the tissue or to L. crispatus and jensenii species of vaginal flora. In vitro, in a cell free system that is independent of in vivo cell associated CD4 receptor; we determined inhibition constant (Ki to be ∼2.53 µM. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate utility of PA as a model molecule for further preclinical development of a safe and potent HIV-1 entry microbicide inhibitor.

  11. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) is Associated with Metabolic Changes in HIV-1-Infected Africans: A Prospective Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fourie, Carla M T; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Olsen, Michael H;

    2011-01-01

    -infected black South Africans had significantly higher suPAR levels than uninfected controls at baseline and at follow-up 3 years later. However, only the treated HIV-1-infected participants showed an increase in suPAR levels at follow-up. The treated group also showed signs of lipodystrophy and their...

  12. HIV-1 infection of T cells and macrophages are differentially modulated by virion-associated Hck: a Nef-dependent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornall, Alyssa; Mak, Johnson; Greenway, Alison; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2013-09-01

    The proline repeat motif (PxxP) of Nef is required for interaction with the SH3 domains of macrophage-specific Src kinase Hck. However, the implication of this interaction for viral replication and infectivity in macrophages and T lymphocytes remains unclear. Experiments in HIV-1 infected macrophages confirmed the presence of a Nef:Hck complex which was dependent on the Nef proline repeat motif. The proline repeat motif of Nef also enhanced both HIV-1 infection and replication in macrophages, and was required for incorporation of Hck into viral particles. Unexpectedly, wild-type Hck inhibited infection of macrophages, but Hck was shown to enhance infection of primary T lymphocytes. These results indicate that the interaction between Nef and Hck is important for Nef-dependent modulation of viral infectivity. Hck-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection of T cells suggests that Nef-Hck interaction may contribute to the spread of HIV-1 infection from macrophages to T cells by modulating events in the producer cell, virion and target cell. PMID:24051604

  13. Induction of novel CD8+ T-cell responses during chronic untreated HIV-1 infection by immunization with subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Karlsson, Ingrid; Bonde, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the potential to induce additional cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection. DESIGN:: We selected infrequently targeted or subdominant but conserved HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes in Gag, Pol, Env, Vpu and Vif. These relatively immune silent epi...... lead to stronger and more durable cellular responses to selected epitopes with the potential to control viral replication and prevent disease in HIV-1-infected individuals.......OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the potential to induce additional cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection. DESIGN:: We selected infrequently targeted or subdominant but conserved HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes in Gag, Pol, Env, Vpu and Vif. These relatively immune silent...... epitopes were modified as anchor-optimized peptides to improve immunogenicity and delivered on autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). METHODS:: Twelve treatment-naïve HLA-A*0201 HIV-1-infected Danish individuals received 1 x 10 MDDCs subcutaneously (s.c.) (weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8), pulsed with...

  14. HIV-1 Infection Dysregulates Cell Cycle Regulatory Protein p21 in CD4+ T Cells Through miR-20a and miR-106b Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Debjani; Mancini, Allison; Sparks, Jessica; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2016-08-01

    Both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages are the major targets of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); however, they respond differently to HIV-1 infection. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection alters gene expression in CD4+ T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in a cell specific manner and microRNAs (miRNAs) in part play a role in cell-specific gene expression. Results indicate that 183 and 31 genes were differentially regulated in HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells and MDMs, respectively, compared to their mock-infected counterparts. Among the differentially expressed genes, cell cycle regulatory gene, p21 (CDKN1A) was upregulated in virus infected CD4+ T cells both at the mRNA and protein level in CD4+ T cells, whereas no consistent change was observed in MDMs. Productively infected CD4+ T cells express higher amount of p21 compared to bystander cells. In determining the mechanism(s) of cell type specific regulation of p21, we found that the miRNAs miR-106b and miR-20a that target p21 were specifically downregulated in HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells. Overexpression of these two miRNAs reduced p21 expression significantly in HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells. These findings provide a potential mechanism, by which, HIV-1 could exploit host cellular machineries to regulate selective gene expression in target cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1902-1912, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26755399

  15. No change in viral set point or CD4 cell decline among antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected individuals enrolled in the Danish HIV Cohort Study in 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, C S; Pedersen, Gitte; Pedersen, C; Obel, Niels; Gerstoft, Jan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have reported faster progression of HIV infection than anticipated based on results from earlier studies. The aim of the present study was to examine if the virulence of HIV-1 infection changed in the period 1995-2010 among chronically HIV-infected individuals in Denmark....... METHODS: We included all patients registered in the Danish HIV Cohort Study, who were diagnosed in 1995-2009, had a CD4 count > 100 cells/μL at diagnosis and had at least two CD4 measurements prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Changes in viral set point and rate of CD4 cell decline from...... enrolment until the initiation of ART by calendar year of HIV diagnosis were analysed. Time to first CD4 count...

  16. Interaction between Artemether-Lumefantrine and Nevirapine-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1-Infected Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kredo, T.; Mauff, K.; Van der Walt, J. S.; Wiesner, L.; G. Maartens; Cohen, K.; Smith, P.; Barnes, K. I.

    2011-01-01

    Artemether-lumefantrine and nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) are the most commonly recommended first-line treatments for malaria and HIV, respectively, in Africa. Artemether, lumefantrine, and nevirapine are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme system, which nevirapine induces, creating potential for important drug interactions. In a parallel-design pharmacokinetic study, concentration-time profiles were obtained in two groups of HIV-infected patients: ART-naïve patients...

  17. The Effects of RANTES Polymorphisms on Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Disease Progression: Evidence from an Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangyang; She, Shangyang; Xie, Li; Chen, Xiaopei; Mo, Cuiju; Huang, Li; Tang, Wenqian; Chen, Xuejie

    2016-06-01

    Associations of regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) -403G/A, -28C/G, and In1.1T/C polymorphisms with HIV-1 infection and the progression of HIV-1 disease have been widely reported with inconsistent results. To clarify this situation, we performed an updated meta-analysis of all available studies from PubMed, EMBASE, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure. A total of 24 eligible studies involving more than 10,000 subjects were included. By using the healthy controls, we found that -403G/A polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in G/A+A/A versus GG (odds ratio [OR] = 0.755, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.581-0.982); and a significantly decreased risk was also found for -28C/G polymorphisms (G vs. C, OR = 0.804, 95% CI = 0.696-0.927; G/G+C/G vs. C/C, OR = 0.826, 95% CI = 0.704-0.969). Whereas for In1.1T/C polymorphism, increased risk of HIV-1 infection was revealed (C vs. T, OR = 1.216, 95% CI = 1.047-1.430; T/C vs. T/T, OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.263-2.234; T/C+T/T vs. C/C, OR = 1.466, 95% CI = 1.147-1.875). Subgroup analyses by ethnicity showed significant association among Asians, but not among Caucasians. When HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HESN) controls were used, no significant association was detected. Moreover, -403G/A and -28C/G polymorphisms were also not associated with long-term nonprogressive HIV-1 infection (all p > .05). This meta-analysis suggests that RANTES -403G/A and -28C/G polymorphisms confer possible protection against HIV-1 infection, whereas In1.1T/C polymorphism may increase risk of HIV-1 infection, especially in Asians. These results may contribute to finding a theoretical basis for effective control strategies against HIV/AIDS. Further investigations are needed to validate our conclusions. PMID:26690919

  18. Epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics of currently alive HIV-1 infected former blood donors naive to antiretroviral therapy in Anhui Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-qing; SU Bing; DING Xin-ping; GAO Bing; GU Yong-bin; CAO Xiao-yun; XING Hui; HONG Kun-xue; PENG Hong; ZHAO Quan-bi; YUAN Lin; WANG Jian-jun; FENG Yi; ZHANG Gui-yun; MA Li-ying; WU Lan; SHAO Yi-ming; HAN Li-feng; XU Chen; RUAN Yu-hua; XU Zhen-hou; CHEN Xi; LIU Zhen-dong; WANG Jun

    2006-01-01

    Background Unregulated commercial blood/plasma collection among farmers occurred between 1992 and 1995 in central China and caused the second major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)infection in China. It is important to characterize HIV-1-infected former blood donors and to study characteristics associated with disease progression for future clinical intervention and vaccine development.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on HIV-1-infected former blood donors (FBDs) and age-matched HIV-seronegative local residents. Demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and key laboratory data were collected from all study participants. Both unadjusted and adjusted multivariate linear regressions were employed to analyze the association of the decrease of CD4+ T-cell counts with other characteristics.Results Two hundred and ninety-four HIV-1-infected FBDs and 59 age-matched HIV-seronegative local residents were enrolled in this study. The unregulated blood/plasma collection occurred more than a decade (10.8- 12.8 years) ago, which caused the rapid spread of HIV-1 infection and the high prevalence of co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV, 89.5%); hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection was observed in only 11 HIV+participants (3.7%). Deterioration in both clinical manifestation and laboratory parameters and increase of viral loads were observed in parallel with the decrease of CD4+ T-cell counts. The decrease of total lymphocyte counts (P<0.001)and hemoglobin levels (P<0.001) and the appearance of dermatosis (P=0.03) were observed in parallel with the decrease of CD4+ T-cell counts whereas viral loads (P<0.001) and CD8+ T-cell counts (P=0.01) were inversely associated with CD4+ T-cell counts.Conclusions Co-infection with HCV but not HBV is highly prevalent among HIV-1-infected FBDs. CD4+ T-cell counts is a reliable indicator for disease progression among FBDs. Total lymphocyte counts, hemoglobin level and appearance of dermatosis were positively

  19. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reflects Brain Pathology During Progressive HIV-1 Infection of Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Aditya N; Gorantla, Santhi; Dash, Prasanta K; Makarov, Edward; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Luo, Jiangtao; Gendelman, Howard E; Boska, Michael D; Liu, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Progressive human immunodeficiency viral (HIV) infection commonly leads to a constellation of cognitive, motor, and behavioral impairments. These are collectively termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces HAND severity, it does not affect disease prevalence. Despite decades of research, there remain no biomarkers for HAND and all potential comorbid conditions must first be excluded for a diagnosis to be made. To this end, we now report that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) can reflect brain region-specific HIV-1-induced neuropathology in chronically virus-infected NOD/scid-IL-2Rγc(null) humanized mice. MEMRI diagnostics mirrors the abilities of Mn(2+) to enter and accumulate in affected neurons during disease. T1 relaxivity and its weighted signal intensity are proportional to Mn(2+) activities in neurons. In 16-week virus-infected humanized mice, altered MEMRI signal enhancement was easily observed in affected brain regions. These included, but were not limited to, the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, globus pallidus, caudoputamen, substantia nigra, and cerebellum. MEMRI signal was coordinated with levels of HIV-1 infection, neuroinflammation (astro- and micro-gliosis), and neuronal injury. MEMRI accurately demonstrates the complexities of HIV-1-associated neuropathology in rodents that reflects, in measure, the clinical manifestations of neuroAIDS as it is seen in a human host. PMID:26063593

  20. Huwe1, a novel cellular interactor of Gag-Pol through integrase binding, negatively influences HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji P; Okawa, Katsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Sano, Kouichi; Ogawa, Kanako; Masuda, Takao; Morikawa, Yuko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2011-04-01

    Integration, an indispensable step for retrovirus replication, is executed by integrase (IN), which is expressed as a part of a Gag-Pol precursor. Although mechanistic detail of the IN-catalyzed integration reaction is well defined, numerous evidence have demonstrated that IN is involved in multiple steps of retrovirus replication other than integration. In this study, Huwe1, a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, was identified as a new cellular interactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN. The interaction was mediated through the catalytic core domain of IN and a wide-range region of Huwe1. Interestingly, although depletion of Huwe1 in target cells did not affect the early phase of HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line, we found that infectivity of HIV-1 released from the Huwe1 knockdown cells was significantly augmented more than that of virus produced from control cells. The increase in infectivity occurred in proviral DNA synthesis. Further analysis revealed that Huwe1 interacted with HIV-1 Gag-Pol precursor protein through an IN domain. Our results suggest that Huwe1 in HIV-1 producer cells has a negative impact on early post-entry events during the next round of virus infection via association with an IN region of Gag-Pol. PMID:21167302

  1. Diagnostic performance of line-immunoassay based algorithms for incident HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüpbach Jörg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serologic testing algorithms for recent HIV seroconversion (STARHS provide important information for HIV surveillance. We have previously demonstrated that a patient's antibody reaction pattern in a confirmatory line immunoassay (INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score provides information on the duration of infection, which is unaffected by clinical, immunological and viral variables. In this report we have set out to determine the diagnostic performance of Inno-Lia algorithms for identifying incident infections in patients with known duration of infection and evaluated the algorithms in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. Methods Diagnostic sensitivity was determined in 527 treatment-naive patients infected for up to 12 months. Specificity was determined in 740 patients infected for longer than 12 months. Plasma was tested by Inno-Lia and classified as either incident ( Results The 10 best algorithms had a mean raw sensitivity of 59.4% and a mean specificity of 95.1%. Adjustment for overrepresentation of patients in the first quarter year of infection further reduced the sensitivity. In the preferred model, the mean adjusted sensitivity was 37.4%. Application of the 10 best algorithms to four annual cohorts of HIV-1 notifications totalling 2'595 patients yielded a mean IIR of 0.35 in 2005/6 (baseline and of 0.45, 0.42 and 0.35 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The increase between baseline and 2008 and the ensuing decreases were highly significant. Other adjustment models yielded different absolute IIR, although the relative changes between the cohorts were identical for all models. Conclusions The method can be used for comparing IIR in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. The use of several different algorithms in combination, each with its own sensitivity and specificity to detect incident infection, is advisable as this reduces the impact of individual imperfections stemming primarily from relatively low sensitivities and

  2. Predictors of mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected adults in rural Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo;

    2007-01-01

    CD4 cell count and plasma HIV RNA level are used to monitor HIV-infected patients in high-income countries, but the applicability in an African context with frequent concomitant infections has only been studied sparsely. Moreover, alternative inexpensive markers are needed in the attempts to roll...

  3. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J; Machuca, R; Nielsen, C; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the...... importance of autologous neutralizing antibodies in SPI more fully, we have now conducted a prospective study taking consecutive blood samples from the individuals with SPI (8 patients) and RPI (10 patients). Blood sampling in the group with SPI was done 110 and 123 months after the estimated seroconversion...... (geometric mean titer [GMT] 8.7 versus 1.6 in SPI and RPI, respectively; p = 0.0048). However, not all individuals withSPI possessed autologous neutralizing antibodies, indicating that other factors may be decisive for SPI. Furthermore, neutralizing antibody titers did not increase from early to late serum...

  4. Diagnosis of Perinatal Transmission of HIV-1 Infection by HIV DNA PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Shah

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the sensitivity and specificity of HIV DNA PCR (Qualitative at various age groups todetect or rule out HIV infection in infants born to HIV infected mothers. Pediatric and perinatal HIVclinic in a tertiary pediatric hospital.Sixteen infants born to HIV positive mother enrolled in the preventionof mother to child transmission of HIV at our center were tested for HIV infection by HIV DNAPCR at 1.5 months, 3 months, 5.5 months and/or 7 months of age. Their HIV status was confirmedby an HIV ELISA test at 18 months of age by 2 different ELISA kits. Eight patients (50% had anegative HIV DNA PCR whereas 8 patients (50% had a positive DNA PCR of which 6 patients(75% had a false positive HIV DNA PCR and no false negative DNA PCR. Thus, the sensitivity ofHIV DNA PCR was 100% and specificity was 57.1% with a total efficiency of the test being62.5%. The efficiency of HIV DNA PCR at 1.5 months of age was 50%, at 3 months of age42.9%, at 5.5 months of age 60% and at 7 months of age was 100%. HIV DNA PCR has a highsensitivity but low specificity to diagnose HIV infection in infants less than 7 months of age. Hence,the results of the test have to be interpreted with caution in infants born to HIV positive mothers.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Gender Differences in the HIV-1 Infection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, P.; Estrada, J. L.; Barriga, G.; Molinar, F.; Hernández, M. C.; Huerta, L.; Cocho, G.; Villarreal, C.

    2006-09-01

    We have performed a retrospective study of the HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-cell counts in blood plasma of more than 3000 Mexican patients. We found that women had consistently lower viral loads than men for CD4 T-cell counts higher than 50 cells/μL and higher viral loads when CD4 T-cell counts were at most 50 cells/μL. Our results show the same pattern as the one reported in studies performed in European and North American populations. We present theoretical predictions of viral load dynamics during highly active antiretroviral therapy taking into account gender differences.

  6. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  7. Lopinavir/ritonavir in the treatment of HIV-1 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chandwani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ashish Chandwani1, Jonathan Shuter21Division of Infectious Diseases, Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2AIDS Center and Division of Infectious Diseases, Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAAbstract: Lopinavir/ritonavir is the first and only coformulated HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI. Large clinical trials have demonstrated lopinavir/ritonavir’s clinical efficacy in both antiretroviral-naïve and -experienced patients. The immunologic and virologic benefits of treatment with this agent have been proven in HIV-infected adults, adolescents, and children. Smaller studies support the use of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy as a therapeutic option in certain patients. The drug is characterized by a high genetic barrier to resistance, and appears to be more forgiving of non-adherence than earlier, unboosted PIs. The most frequent side effects observed are diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. These gastrointestinal adverse effects are generally mild to moderate. Metabolic derangements, including hyperlipidemia and glucose intolerance, have also been observed in lopinavir/ritonavir recipients. As the menu of available antiretroviral agents continues to expand, lopinavir/ritonavir remains a proven and effective drug for the treatment of HIV infection.Keywords: lopinavir/ritonavir, protease inhibitor, HIV, antiretroviral, Kaletra®

  8. Thyroid cancer in a long-term nonprogressor HIV-1 infection

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    Uday A Phatak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term non-progressor HIV infection (LTNP-HIV is seen in <1 percent of HIV-afflicted population. There are definite criteria for the diagnosis of LTNP-HIV. Malignancies either solid tumors or haematological cancers have not been reported in such population. We report here a rare case of follicular thyroid carcinoma in LTNP-HIV infection. She never had any opportunistic infections. She did not receive anti-retroviral therapy in the entire course of illness and continued to have good quality of life. Treatment of follicular thyroid cancer was similar to other patients without HIV infection. This could be the first case study from India.

  9. Outcome of protease inhibitor substitution with nevirapine in HIV-1 infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez M Luisa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease inhibitors (PIs have been associated with metabolic complications. There is a trend to switch to simpler therapy to improve these disturbances. We report a case-series describing the effects in metabolic abnormalities in seven HIV-infected children, previously treated with protease inhibitor (PI after switching to nevirapine. Methods Seven children with stable PI-containing regimen and a long lasting HIV-1 RNA Results Seven HIV-infected children were enrolled. Median age: 130 months (99,177. Median baseline CD4%: 32%. All had HIV-1 RNA Conclusion PI substitution with nevirapine improved lipid profile in our patients, although this strategy did not show significant changes in body fat or lipodystrophy.

  10. Prevalence, incidence density, and genotype distribution of GB virus C infection in a cohort of recently HIV-1-infected subjects in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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    Maria Teresa M Giret

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies elsewhere have indicated that GB virus C (GBV-C infection is frequent in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 due to similar transmission routes of both viruses. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, incidence density and genotypic characteristics of GBV-C in this population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study population included 233 patients from a cohort primarily comprised of homosexual men recently infected with HIV-1 in São Paulo, Brazil. The presence of GBV-C RNA was determined in plasma samples by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction and quantified by real-time PCR. GBV-C genotypes were determined by direct sequencing. HIV viral load, CD4+ T lymphocyte and CD8+ T lymphocyte count were also tested in all patients. The overall prevalence of GBV-C infection was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.29 in the study group. There was no significant difference between patients with and without GBV-C infection and Glycoprotein E2 antibody presence regarding age, sex, HIV-1 viral load, CD4+ and CD8+T cell counts and treatment with antiretroviral drugs. An inverse correlation was observed between GBV-C and HIV-1 loads at enrollment and after one year. Also, a positive but not significant correlation was observed between GBV-C load and CD4+ T lymphocyte. Phylogenetic analysis of the GBV-C isolates revealed the presence of genotype 1 and genotype 2, these sub classified into subtype 2a and 2b. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: GBV-C infection is common in recently HIV -1 infected patients in Sao Paulo, Brazil and the predominant genotype is 2b. This study provides the first report of the GBV-C prevalence at the time of diagnosis of HIV-1 and the incidence density of GBV-C infection in one year.

  11. Cell-intrinsic mechanism involving Siglec-5 associated with divergent outcomes of HIV-1 infection in human and chimpanzee CD4 T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Paula C.; Karris, Maile Y.; Celsa A Spina; Richman, Douglas D.; Varki, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Human and chimpanzee CD4+ T cells differ markedly in expression of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-5, which contributes towards differential responses to activating stimuli. While CD4+ T cells from both species are equally susceptible to HIV-1 infection, chimpanzee cells survive better, suggesting a cell-intrinsic difference. We hypothesized that Siglec-5 expression protects T cells from activation-induced and HIV-1-induced cell death. Transduction of human CEM T cells with Siglec-5 decreased ...

  12. Seroprevalence of antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella, and serologic responses after vaccination among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected adults in Northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Chaiwarith, Romanee; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Nuket, Khanuengnit; Kotarathitithum, Wilai; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2016-01-01

    Background After the global implementation of national immunization programs for prevention of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR), the prevalences of protective antibodies to these viruses are high in general population. However, there are limited data among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected individuals. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies to these viruses, and the serologic responses after vaccination among HIV-infected adults in Northern Thailand. Metho...

  13. Breast milk from Tanzanian women has divergent effects on cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro.

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    Magdalena A Lyimo

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 during breastfeeding is a significant source of new pediatric infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Breast milk from HIV-positive mothers contains both cell-free and cell-associated virus; however, the impact of breast milk on HIV-1 infectivity remains poorly understood. In the present study, breast milk was collected from HIV-positive and HIV-negative Tanzanian women attending antenatal clinics in Dar es Salaam. Milk was analyzed for activity in vitro against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. Potent inhibition of cell-free R5 and X4 HIV-1 occurred in the presence of milk from all donors regardless of HIV-1 serostatus. Inhibition of cell-free HIV-1 infection positively correlated with milk levels of sialyl-Lewis(X from HIV-positive donors. In contrast, milk from 8 of 16 subjects enhanced infection with cell-associated HIV-1 regardless of donor serostatus. Milk from two of these subjects contained high levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1 and IP-10, and enhanced cell-associated HIV-1 infection at dilutions as high as 1∶500. These findings indicate that breast milk contains innate factors with divergent activity against cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 in vitro. Enhancement of cell-associated HIV-1 infection by breast milk may be associated with inflammatory conditions in the mother and may contribute to infant infection during breastfeeding.

  14. Four years of natural history of HIV-1 infection in African women : a prospective cohort study in Kigali (Rwanda), 1988-1993

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, V.; Msellati, Philippe; Lepage, P; Batungwanayo, J.; Hitimana, D.G.; Taelman, H.; Bogaerts, J.; Boineau, F.; Van De Perre, P.; Simonon, A; Salamon, R.; Dabis, F

    1995-01-01

    Clinical features and mortality due to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection in women are described as part of a prospective 4-year cohort study on perinatal transmission of HIV in Kigali, Rwanda. Two hundred fifteen HIV-positive (HIV+) and 216 HIV-negative (HIV-) pregnant women were enrolled at delivery between November 1988 and June 1989. Clinical information collected during systematic quarterly examinations was compared. HIV antibody tests were performed at delivery and CD...

  15. Factors associated with antiretroviral treatment interruption in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected children attending the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ebonyi, Augustine O; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Okpe, Sylvanus E.; Shwe, David D.; Yiltok, Esther S.; Martha O Ochoga; Stephen Oguche

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interrupting anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for any number of reasons is an indication of a compromised adherence to ART. Several factors, including the pill burden from other drugs used in treating co-infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), may influence ART adherence. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with ART interruption in HIV-1-infected children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study analysing data on 580 childr...

  16. Brief Report: L-Selectin (CD62L) Is Downregulated on CD4+ and CD8+ T Lymphocytes of HIV-1-Infected Individuals Naive for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassena, Lia; Giuliani, Erica; Buonomini, Anna R; Malagnino, Vincenzo; Andreoni, Massimo; Doria, Margherita

    2016-08-15

    The expression of L-selectin (CD62L) in HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we measured CD62L expression on T-cell subsets of HIV-1-infected individuals naive for antiretroviral therapy (ART-naive) or receiving therapy (ART), and seronegative control subjects (HIV-neg). We found reduced frequencies of CD62L cells among CD4 and CD8 T cells from ART-naive as compared with ART and HIV-neg groups, particularly within naive and central memory subsets. CD62L expression on T cells inversely correlated with viral load and rapidly increased after ART initiation. Plasma sCD62L levels did not correlate with CD62L expression, being higher in all HIV-1-infected individuals as compared with HIV-neg subjects. Finally, CD62L downregulation was found associated with the expression of the CD38 activation marker in CD8 T cells, but not in CD4 T cells. We suggest that CD62L downregulation due to unconstrained HIV-1 replication may have important consequences for T-cell circulation and function and for disease progression. PMID:27003497

  17. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  18. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  19. Correlation of Increases in 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D During Vitamin D Therapy With Activation of CD4+ T Lymphocytes in HIV-1-Infected Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Background: In HIV-1-infected individuals, levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes are depleted and regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) are elevated. In vitro studies have demonstrated effects of vitamin D on the growth and differentiation of these cells. We speculated whether supplementation with vitamin D...... could have an effect on CD4+ T lymphocytes or Tregs in HIV-1-infected males. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled randomized study that ran for 16 weeks and included 61 HIV-1-infected males, of whom 51 completed the protocol. The participants were randomized to 1 of 3 daily treatments: (1) 0.......5-1.0 µg calcitriol and 1200 IU (30 µg) cholecalciferol, (2) 1200 IU cholecalciferol, (3) placebo. Percentages of the following T-lymphocyte subsets were determined: naïve CD4+ and CD8+ cells, activated CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Tregs. Furthermore 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25...

  20. PD-1 blockade in chronically HIV-1-infected humanized mice suppresses viral loads.

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    Edward Seung

    Full Text Available An estimated 34 million people are living with HIV worldwide (UNAIDS, 2012, with the number of infected persons rising every year. Increases in HIV prevalence have resulted not only from new infections, but also from increases in the survival of HIV-infected persons produced by effective anti-retroviral therapies. Augmentation of anti-viral immune responses may be able to further increase the survival of HIV-infected persons. One strategy to augment these responses is to reinvigorate exhausted anti-HIV immune cells present in chronically infected persons. The PD-1-PD-L1 pathway has been implicated in the exhaustion of virus-specific T cells during chronic HIV infection. Inhibition of PD-1 signaling using blocking anti-PD-1 antibodies has been shown to reduce simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV loads in monkeys. We now show that PD-1 blockade can improve control of HIV replication in vivo in an animal model. BLT (Bone marrow-Liver-Thymus humanized mice chronically infected with HIV-1 were treated with an anti-PD-1 antibody over a 10-day period. The PD-1 blockade resulted in a very significant 45-fold reduction in HIV viral loads in humanized mice with high CD8(+ T cell expression of PD-1, compared to controls at 4 weeks post-treatment. The anti-PD-1 antibody treatment also resulted in a significant increase in CD8(+ T cells. PD-1 blockade did not affect T cell expression of other inhibitory receptors co-expressed with PD-1, including CD244, CD160 and LAG-3, and did not appear to affect virus-specific humoral immune responses. These data demonstrate that inhibiting PD-1 signaling can reduce HIV viral loads in vivo in the humanized BLT mouse model, suggesting that blockade of the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients already infected with the AIDS virus.

  1. Endotoxemia is associated with altered innate and adaptive immune responses in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Anne Roslev Bukh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial translocation may contribute to the immunopathogenesis in HIV infection. We investigated if microbial translocation and inflammation were associated with innate and adaptive immune responses in adults with HIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an observational cohort study. Sera from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals were analyzed for microbial translocation (soluble CD14, lipopolysaccharides [LPS], endotoxin core antibody, and anti-α-galactosyl antibodies and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II, and IL-10 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from HIV-infected persons and healthy controls (primed with single-stranded HIV-1-derived RNA were stimulated with LPS, and cytokine production was measured. Finally, HIV-infected patients were immunized with Prevnar 7vPnC±CpG 7909 followed by Pneumo Novum PPV-23. Effects of microbial translocation and inflammation on immunization were analyzed in a predictive regression model. We included 96 HIV-infected individuals, 76 on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, 20 HAART-naive, and 50 healthy controls. Microbial translocation and inflammatory markers were higher among HIV-infected persons than controls. Cytokine levels following LPS stimulation were increased in PBMCs from HAART-naive compared to HAART-treated HIV-infected persons. Further, RNA-priming of PBMCs from controls acted synergistically with LPS to augment cytokine responses. Finally, high serum LPS levels predicted poor vaccine responses among HAART-naive, but not among HAART-treated HIV-infected individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LPS acts synergistically with HIV RNA to stimulate innate immune responses in vitro and increasing serum LPS levels seem to predict poor antibody responses after vaccination among HAART-naive HIV-infected persons. Thus, our

  2. French 2013 guidelines for antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1 infection in adults

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    Bruno Hoen

    2014-06-01

    with or without identified opportunistic infection, and person who injects drugs are addressed. Options for optimization of ART once virologic suppression is achieved are discussed. Evaluation and management of virologic failure are described, the aim of any intervention in such situation being to reduce plasma viral load to <50 copies/ml. Conclusion: These guidelines recommend that any HIV-positive individual should be treated with ART. This recommendation was issued both for the patient's own sake and for promoting treatment as prevention.

  3. The brain-specific factor FEZ1 is a determinant of neuronal susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haedicke, Juliane

    2009-08-18

    Neurons are one of the few cell types in the human body that do not support HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication. Although the lack of key receptors is a major obstacle to infection, studies suggest that additional functions inhibit virus replication to explain the exquisite resistance of neurons to HIV-1. However, specific neuronal factors that may explain this resistance remain to be discovered. In a screen for antiviral factors using a fibroblast line chemically mutagenized and selected for resistance to retroviral infection, we recently identified induction of rat FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta-1), a brain-specific protein, as the cause of this resistance. When exogenously expressed in nonneuronal cell lines rat FEZ1 blocked nuclear entry of retroviral DNA. Here, we demonstrate that among human brain cells, neurons naturally express high levels of FEZ1 compared to astrocytes or microglia cells and are correspondingly less susceptible to infection with pseudotyped HIV-1 that bypasses receptor-mediated viral entry. Demonstrating that endogenous FEZ1 was functionally important in the resistance of neurons to HIV-1 infection, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous FEZ1 increased the infectivity of neurons while sensitive brain cell types like microglia became more resistant upon FEZ1 overexpression. In addition, FEZ1 expression was not induced in response to IFN treatment. As such, in contrast to other widely expressed, IFN-inducible antiviral factors, FEZ1 appears to represent a unique neuron-specific determinant of cellular susceptibility to infection in a cell type that is naturally resistant to HIV-1.

  4. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

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    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  5. Global epidemiology of drug resistance after failure of WHO recommended first-line regimens for adult HIV-1 infection: a multicentre retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for controlling HIV-1 infection through wide-scale treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Potent tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing regimens are increasingly used to treat and prevent HIV, although few data exist for frequency and risk factors of acquired drug resistance in regions hardest hit by the HIV pandemic. We aimed to do a global assessment of drug resistance after virological failure with first-line tenofovir-containing ART. Methods The TenoRes collaboration comprises adult HIV treatment cohorts and clinical trials of HIV drug resistance testing in Europe, Latin and North America, sub-Saharan Africa, and Asia. We extracted and harmonised data for patients undergoing genotypic resistance testing after virological failure with a first-line regimen containing tenofovir plus a cytosine analogue (lamivudine or emtricitabine) plus a non-nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI; efavirenz or nevirapine). We used an individual participant-level meta-analysis and multiple logistic regression to identify covariates associated with drug resistance. Our primary outcome was tenofovir resistance, defined as presence of K65R/N or K70E/G/Q mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene. Findings We included 1926 patients from 36 countries with treatment failure between 1998 and 2015. Prevalence of tenofovir resistance was highest in sub-Saharan Africa (370/654 [57%]). Pre-ART CD4 cell count was the covariate most strongly associated with the development of tenofovir resistance (odds ratio [OR] 1·50, 95% CI 1·27–1·77 for CD4 cell count <100 cells per μL). Use of lamivudine versus emtricitabine increased the risk of tenofovir resistance across regions (OR 1·48, 95% CI 1·20–1·82). Of 700 individuals with tenofovir resistance, 578 (83%) had cytosine analogue resistance (M184V/I mutation), 543 (78%) had major NNRTI resistance, and 457 (65%) had both. The mean plasma

  6. Correlation between cytokine serum levels, number of CD4+ T cells/mm³ and viral load in HIV-1 infected individuals with or without antiretroviral therapy

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    D. A. Meira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-nine HIV-1 infected patients were studied in three groups: Group G1 - 11 patients with no antiretroviral therapy; G2 - 40 patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy, 33 with only two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI, and seven with two NRTI and one protease inhibitor (PI, all with viral load (VL equal or higher than 80 copies of plasma RNA/ml; Group G3 - 28 patients, 23 on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, 18 with two NRTI and one PI, and five with two NRTI and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI, the remaining five with combination of two NRTI. All G3 patients had undetectable viral load for at least the past six months. The control group (Gc included 20 normal blood donors without clinical complaints or signs of disease and negative for anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies. Serum cytokine levels pg/ml (TNF-alpha, INF-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 were determined in all patients including controls. CD4+ T and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts were made in the 79 patients by flow cytometry; VL determination was by NASBA technology. Analysis of results showed that the number of CD4+ T and CD8+ T lymphocytes were higher in G2 than G1, while VL was 0.5 log lower. G3 patients had similar lymphocyte values to G2, however they were chosen for G3 because their VL was undetectable, different by 4.0 log to G2. These results show the effect of antiretroviral treatment in G2 and G3 patients with better performance in the latter. Statistical difference was seen between the three groups and controls for serum cytokine behavior: TNF-alpha [H=48.323; pGc]; INF-gamma[H=28.992; pGc]; IL-4[H=48.323; pGc]; IL-10[H=47.256; pGc. There was no statistical difference in IL-2 values between all groups (H=6.071; p>0.10; G1=G2=G3=Gc. In absolute values however, G3 showed slightly lower TNF-alpha, IL-4, and IL-10, and higher INF-gamma and IL-2, to G1 and G2. This suggests a better performance in G3 patients, especially in IL-2 behavior

  7. Dendritic cells exposed to MVA-based HIV-1 vaccine induce highly functional HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in HIV-1-infected individuals.

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    Núria Climent

    Full Text Available Currently, MVA virus vectors carrying HIV-1 genes are being developed as HIV-1/AIDS prophylactic/therapeutic vaccines. Nevertheless, little is known about the impact of these vectors on human dendritic cells (DC and their capacity to present HIV-1 antigens to human HIV-specific T cells. This study aimed to characterize the interaction of MVA and MVA expressing the HIV-1 genes Env-Gag-Pol-Nef of clade B (referred to as MVA-B in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC and the subsequent processes of HIV-1 antigen presentation and activation of memory HIV-1-specific T lymphocytes. For these purposes, we performed ex vivo assays with MDDC and autologous lymphocytes from asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. Infection of MDDC with MVA-B or MVA, at the optimal dose of 0.3 PFU/MDDC, induced by itself a moderate degree of maturation of MDDC, involving secretion of cytokines and chemokines (IL1-ra, IL-7, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IP-10, MIG, and IFN-α. MDDC infected with MVA or MVA-B and following a period of 48 h or 72 h of maturation were able to migrate toward CCL19 or CCL21 chemokine gradients. MVA-B infection induced apoptosis of the infected cells and the resulting apoptotic bodies were engulfed by the uninfected MDDC, which cross-presented HIV-1 antigens to autologous CD8(+ T lymphocytes. MVA-B-infected MDDC co-cultured with autologous T lymphocytes induced a highly functional HIV-specific CD8(+ T cell response including proliferation, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES and IL-6, and strong cytotoxic activity against autologous HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T lymphocytes. These results evidence the adjuvant role of the vector itself (MVA and support the clinical development of prophylactic and therapeutic anti-HIV vaccines based on MVA-B.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for Hepatitis C and HIV-1 infections among pregnant women in Central Brazil

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    Stefani Mariane MA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections are a major burden to public health worldwide. Routine antenatal HIV-1 screening to prevent maternal-infant transmission is universally recommended. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of and potential risk factors for HCV and HIV infection among pregnant women who attended prenatal care under the coverage of public health in Central Brazil. Methods Screening and counselling for HIV and HCV infections was offered free of charge to all pregnant women attending antenatal clinic (ANC in the public health system, in Goiania city (~1.1 million inhabitants during 2004–2005. Initial screening was performed on a dried blood spot collected onto standard filter paper; positive or indeterminate results were confirmed by a second blood sample. HCV infection was defined as a positive or indeterminate sample (EIA test and confirmed HCV-RNA technique. HIV infection was defined according to standard criteria. Factors associated with HIV and HCV infections were identified with logistic regression. The number needed to screen (NNS to prevent one case of infant HIV infection was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Results A total of 28,561 pregnant women were screened for HCV and HIV-1 in ANC. Mean maternal age was 23.9 years (SD = 5.6, with 45% of the women experiencing their first pregnancy. Prevalence of HCV infection was 0.15% (95% CI 0.11%–0.20%, and the risk increased with age (p Conclusion The prevalence of HIV and HCV infections were low among pregnant women, with high acceptability rates in the opt-in strategy in primary care. Older maternal age was a risk factor for HCV and antenatal HCV testing does not fulfill the requirements for screening recommendation. The finding of higher risk of HIV-1 infection among black women despite being in consonance with the HIV-1 ethnic pattern in some American regions cannot be ruled out to be a surrogate

  9. High resolution human leukocyte antigen class I allele frequencies and HIV-1 infection associations in Chinese Han and Uyghur cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhou Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Host immunogenetic factors such as HLA class I polymorphism are important to HIV-1 infection risk and AIDS progression. Previous studies using high-resolution HLA class I profile data of Chinese populations appeared insufficient to provide information for HIV-1 vaccine development and clinical trial design. Here we reported HLA class I association with HIV-1 susceptibility in a Chinese Han and a Chinese Uyghur cohort. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our cohort included 327 Han and 161 Uyghur ethnic individuals. Each cohort included HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative subjects. Four-digit HLA class I typing was performed by sequencing-based typing and high-resolution PCR-sequence specific primer. We compared the HLA class I allele and inferred haplotype frequencies between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative groups. A neighbor-joining tree between our cohorts and other populations was constructed based on allele frequencies of HLA-A and HLA-B loci. We identified 58 HLA-A, 75 HLA-B, and 32 HLA-Cw distinct alleles from our cohort and no novel alleles. The frequency of HLA-B*5201 and A*0301 was significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The frequency of HLA-B*5101 was significantly higher in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group. We observed statistically significant increases in expectation-maximization (EM algorithm predicted haplotype frequencies of HLA-A*0201-B*5101 in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group, and of Cw*0304-B*4001 in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The B62s supertype frequency was found to be significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group than in the Han HIV-1 positive group. CONCLUSIONS: At the four-digit level, several HLA class I alleles and haplotypes were associated with lower HIV-1 susceptibility. Homogeneity of HLA class I and Bw4/Bw6 heterozygosity were not associated with HIV-1 susceptibility in our cohort. These observations contribute to the Chinese HLA database and could prove useful in the

  10. Anal cytological abnormalities and epidemiological correlates among men who have sex with men at risk for HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donà Maria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of anal cancer, a Human Papillomavirus (HPV-related neoplasia, has been increasing in recent decades, mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM. Cytological changes of the anal epithelium induced by HPV can be detected through an anal pap smear. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiological correlates of anal cytological abnormalities among relatively young MSM at risk for HIV-1 infection, to help clarify whether or not this population deserves further investigation to assess the presence of anal cancer precursor lesions. Methods MSM were recruited among attendees of a large STI clinic for a HIV-1 screening program. Anal samples, collected with a Dracon swab in PreservCyt, were used both for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior were collected in face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 346 MSM were recruited (median age 32 years. Overall, 72.5% of the individuals had an anal HPV infection, with 56.1% of them being infected by oncogenic HPV genotypes. Anal cytological abnormalities were found in 29.8% of the cases (16.7% ASC-US and 13.1% L-SIL. Presence of ASC-US+ was strongly associated with infection by any HPV type (OR=4.21, 95% CI: 1.97-9.23, and particularly by HPV 16 and/or 18 (OR=5.62, 95% CI: 2.33-13.81. A higher proportion of ASC-US+ was found in older MSM, in those with a higher number of lifetime partners and in those with a history of ano-genital warts. However, none of these variables or the others analyzed showed any significant association with abnormal cytological findings. Conclusions The presence of anal cytological abnormalities in about one third of the recruited MSM and their strong association with HPV infection, in particular that caused by HPV 16 and/or 18, might provide a further complement to the data that now support the introduction of HPV vaccination among

  11. CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype improves the assessment of AIDS Risk in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kulkarni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether vexing clinical decision-making dilemmas can be partly addressed by recent advances in genomics is unclear. For example, when to initiate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART during HIV-1 infection remains a clinical dilemma. This decision relies heavily on assessing AIDS risk based on the CD4+ T cell count and plasma viral load. However, the trajectories of these two laboratory markers are influenced, in part, by polymorphisms in CCR5, the major HIV coreceptor, and the gene copy number of CCL3L1, a potent CCR5 ligand and HIV-suppressive chemokine. Therefore, we determined whether accounting for both genetic and laboratory markers provided an improved means of assessing AIDS risk. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a prospective, single-site, ethnically-mixed cohort of 1,132 HIV-positive subjects, we determined the AIDS risk conveyed by the laboratory and genetic markers separately and in combination. Subjects were assigned to a low, moderate or high genetic risk group (GRG based on variations in CCL3L1 and CCR5. The predictive value of the CCL3L1-CCR5 GRGs, as estimated by likelihood ratios, was equivalent to that of the laboratory markers. GRG status also predicted AIDS development when the laboratory markers conveyed a contrary risk. Additionally, in two separate and large groups of HIV+ subjects from a natural history cohort, the results from additive risk-scoring systems and classification and regression tree (CART analysis revealed that the laboratory and CCL3L1-CCR5 genetic markers together provided more prognostic information than either marker alone. Furthermore, GRGs independently predicted the time interval from seroconversion to CD4+ cell count thresholds used to guide HAART initiation. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of the laboratory and genetic markers captures a broader spectrum of AIDS risk than either marker alone. By tracking a unique aspect of AIDS risk distinct from that captured by the laboratory parameters

  12. Immune responses to recombinant hepatitis B virus vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients with different CD4~+ T-lymphocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡琳

    2014-01-01

    Objective.To compare the difference of immune responses to hepatitis B virus(HBV)vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-1-infected patients with different CD4+T-lymphocyte counts.Methods HIV-1 infected patients who visited clinic at the Public Health Clinical Center of Chengdu were enrolled and divided in-+

  13. Controle de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1: relato de caso Recurrent polyhydramnios management in an HIV-1 infected pregnant woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Duarte

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A redução da transmissão vertical (TV do vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1 utilizando a profilaxia com a zidovudina (AZT representa significativo avanço na assistência pré-natal e obstétrica destas pacientes. Condutas obstétricas invasivas são contra-indicadas em gestantes portadoras do HIV-1, em face do risco de aumento da taxa de TV deste vírus. Os autores relatam um caso de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1, que exigiu drenagem por amniocentese. Foram realizadas quatro punções ao longo da gestação, na 23ª, 26ª, 27ª e 29ª semanas, todas guiadas por ultra-sonografia, drenando, respectivamente, 1.800, 1.450, 1.700 e 1.960 mL de líquido amniótico claro em cada punção. Com 30 semanas e 5 dias de gestação a paciente apresentou trabalho de parto pré-termo, evoluindo para parto vaginal de recém-nato (RN pesando 1.690 g e medindo 43 cm. O RN evoluiu com diagnóstico de nefropatia perdedora de sódio, tendo três aferições de reação em cadeia de polimerase para HIV-1 negativas. Os autores ilustram uma opção no manejo de situações que envolvam gestantes portadoras do HIV-1 que necessitem de procedimentos obstétricos invasivos, utilizando AZT endovenoso (2 mg/kg previamente ao procedimento, medida que apresentou excelente resultado no caso descrito, evitando a infecção perinatal pelo HIV-1.The reduction of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of the HIV-1 using zidovudine (ZDV represents a cornerstone in the prenatal and obstetrical care to these patients. The invasive fetal and obstetric procedures are proscribed in HIV-1 infected pregnant patients, to avoid the increased risk of MTCT of this virus. The authors present a case of an HIV-1 infected woman with recurrent polyhydramnios. Four ultrasound-guided amniotic punctures were performed in the 23rd, 26th, 27th and 29th weeks of gestation, each one draining the respective volumes of 1,800, 1,450, 1,700 and 1,960 ml of clear amniotic

  14. Expansion of CD8+ T cells lacking Sema4D/CD100 during HIV-1 infection identifies a subset of T cells with decreased functional capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Emily M.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; Ho, Emily L.; Batista, Mariana D.; Holditch, Sara J.; Keh, Chris E.; Norris, Philip J.; Keating, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Sema4D, also known as CD100, is a constitutively expressed immune semaphorin on T cells and NK cells. CD100 has important immune regulatory functions that improve antigen-specific priming by antigen-presenting cells, and can also act as a costimulatory molecule on T cells. We investigated the consequence of HIV-1 infection on CD100 expression by T cells, and whether CD100 expression signifies functionally competent effector cells. CD100 expression on T cells from healthy individuals was compa...

  15. Breast Milk from Tanzanian Women Has Divergent Effects on Cell-Free and Cell-Associated HIV-1 Infection In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lyimo, Magdalena A.; Matilda Ngarina Mosi; Housman, Molly L.; Muhammad Zain-Ul-Abideen; Lee, Frederick V; Howell, Alexandra L; Connor, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of HIV-1 during breastfeeding is a significant source of new pediatric infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Breast milk from HIV-positive mothers contains both cell-free and cell-associated virus; however, the impact of breast milk on HIV-1 infectivity remains poorly understood. In the present study, breast milk was collected from HIV-positive and HIV-negative Tanzanian women attending antenatal clinics in Dar es Salaam. Milk was analyzed for activity in vitro against both cell-free...

  16. Seroincidence of HIV-1 infection in african women of reproductive age: a prospective cohort study in Kigali, Rwanda, 1988-1992

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, V.; Van De Perre, P.; Lepage, P; Sab, J.; Nsengumuremyi, F.; Simonon, A; Karita, E; Msellati, Philippe; Salamon, R.; Dabis, F

    1994-01-01

    To estimate the seroincidence of HIV-1 infection among women of reproductive age in Kingali, Rwanda. A total of 216 HIV-seronegative women were enrolled at delivery between November 1988 and June 1989. A blood sample was obtained at delivery to test for HIV antibodies (by enzyme-linked immunoassay and Western blot). Serum was tested every 3 months during follow-up. Incidence density rates of HIV seroconversion were estimated. The follow-up rate after 3 years was 89%, assessed by the maximum p...

  17. A cost-effective melting temperature assay for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MBL2 gene of HIV-1-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arraes L.C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a fast (less than 3 h and cost-effective melting temperature assay method for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. The protocol, which is based on the Corbett Rotor Gene real time PCR platform and SYBR Green I chemistry, yielded, in the cohorts studied, sensitive (100% and specific (100% PCR amplification without the use of costly fluorophore-labeled probes or post-PCR manipulation. At the end of the PCR, the dissociation protocol included a slow heating from 60º to 95ºC in 0.2ºC steps, with an 8-s interval between steps. Melting curve profiles were obtained using the dissociation software of the Rotor Gene-3000 apparatus. Samples were analyzed in duplicate and in different PCR runs to test the reproducibility of this technique. No supplementary data handling is required to determine the MBL2 genotype. MBL2 genotyping performed on a cohort of 164 HIV-1-positive Brazilian children and 150 healthy controls, matched for age and sex and ethnic origin, yielded reproducible results confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicon performed in blind. The three MBL2 variants (Arg52Cys, Gly54Asp, Gly57Glu were grouped together and called allele 0, while the combination of three wild-type alleles was called allele A. The frequency of the A/A homozygotes was significantly higher among healthy controls (0.68 than in HIV-infected children (0.55; P = 0.0234 and the frequency of MBL2 0/0 homozygotes was higher among HIV-1-infected children than healthy controls (P = 0.0296. The 0 allele was significantly more frequent among the 164 HIV-1-infected children (0.29 than among the 150 healthy controls (0.18; P = 0.0032. Our data confirm the association between the presence of the mutated MBL2 allele (allele 0 and HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed children. Our results are in agreement with the literature data which indicate that the presence of the allele 0 confers a relative risk of 1.37 for HIV-1 infection through

  18. Effector mechanisms of immune responses in HIV-1 infected elite controllers%艾滋病病毒杰出控制感染者中的免疫效应机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爽; 赵艳; 张永宏; 闫惠平

    2011-01-01

    HIV感染者在没有抗病毒治疗的情况下其病毒复制控制在<50拷贝/mL水平的,被称为杰出控制者(EC),这些患者也被称为杰出抑制者,或是HIV控制者,同时他们又区别于传统的长期不进展者,在没有抗病毒治疗的情况下能维持稳定的CD4细胞数以及无症状状态.此文对这类患者中被认为在控制病毒复制中发挥作用的效应机制进行了综述.%HIV-1 infected patients whose viral replication can control to a level of < 50 copies/mL without antiretroviral therapy are called elite controllers (EC). These patients are also known as elite suppressors, or HIV controllers, and they differ from traditional long-term non-progressors who maintain stable CD4 counts and are asymptomatic without antiretroviral therapy. In this article, the effective mechanisms that are thought to play a role in the remarkable control of viral replication in these patients are reviewed.

  19. TLR2 and TLR4 triggering exerts contrasting effects with regard to HIV-1 infection of human dendritic cells and subsequent virus transfer to CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fromentin Rémi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLRs initiates inflammatory responses orchestrated by innate immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs. As these cells are patrolling mucosal surfaces, a portal of entry for various pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1, we investigated the impact of TLR stimulation on productive HIV-1 infection of DCs and viral spreading to CD4+ T cells. Results We report here that engagement of TLR2 on DCs increases HIV-1 transmission toward CD4+ T cells by primarily affecting de novo virus production by DCs. No noticeable and consistent effect was observed following engagement of TLR5, 7 and 9. Additional studies indicated that both HIV-1 infection of DCs and DC-mediated virus transmission to CD4+ T cells were reduced upon TLR4 triggering due to secretion of type-I interferons. Conclusion It can thus be proposed that exposure of DCs to TLR2-binding bacterial constituents derived, for example, from pathogens causing sexually transmissible infections, might influence the process of DC-mediated viral dissemination, a phenomenon that might contribute to a more rapid disease progression.

  20. Impacts of Humanized Mouse Models on the Investigation of HIV-1 Infection: Illuminating the Roles of Viral Accessory Proteins in Vivo

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    Eri Yamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes four accessory genes: vif, vpu, vpr, and nef. Recent investigations using in vitro cell culture systems have shed light on the roles of these HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef, in counteracting, modulating, and evading various cellular factors that are responsible for anti-HIV-1 intrinsic immunity. However, since humans are the exclusive target for HIV-1 infection, conventional animal models are incapable of mimicking the dynamics of HIV-1 infection in vivo. Moreover, the effects of HIV-1 accessory proteins on viral infection in vivo remain unclear. To elucidate the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in the dynamics of viral infection in vivo, humanized mouse models, in which the mice are xenotransplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells, has been utilized. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of HIV-1 accessory proteins in viral infection, replication, and pathogenicity in vivo, which are revealed by the studies using humanized mouse models.

  1. Reappearance of an 11-year-old sequence in an HIV-1 infected patient during treatment interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T.V.; Gerstoft, J.; Nielsen, C.;

    2008-01-01

    and 2 treatment interruptions were analysed in both pol and env. The wild type virus found in the sample from the second treatment interruption in 2002 had not been present as a dominant population since 1994. Phylogeny showed that the 2002 sample was more closely related to wild type sequences than...... to other sequences sampled in 2002. This indicated that the wild type virus was caused by recruitment from the viral archives rather than reversion of previously circulating resistant strains. A few weeks after re-initiated treatment, virus showed full resistance, indicating that resistant virus was...

  2. Guillain-Barré Syndrome Associated with Primary Parvovirus B19 Infection in an HIV-1-Infected Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Bucher Praz; Cédric Dessimoz; Frank Bally; Sitthided Reymond; Nicolas Troillet

    2012-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection has rarely been reported as responsible for Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We present the case of a 63-year-old man with AIDS who presented with rapidly progressing weakness of his inferior limbs and a newly appeared pancytopenia. CSF examination and electromyography were characteristic for GBS. Very high CSF and serum B19V DNA concentrations were present, in the absence of IgG or IgM against B19V. The neurologic and hematologic abnormalities improved after a 5...

  3. Modulation of the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 infected patients by drugs of abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Reynolds; Supriya D Mahajan; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E; Agosto-Mujica, Arnadri; Hsiao, Chiu Bin; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2009-01-01

    We used proteomic analyses to assess how drug abuse modulates immunologic responses to infections with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was utilized to determine changes in the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from HIV-1 positive donors that occurred after treatment with cocaine or methamphetamine. Both drugs differentially regulated the expression of several functional classes of proteins. We fu...

  4. Efficacy of etravirine combined with darunavir or other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingerhoets, J; Calvez, V; Flandre, P;

    2015-01-01

    data. METHODS: Two international (EuroSIDA; EUResist Network) and five national (France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK) cohorts provided data (collected in 2007-2012). Stratum-adjusted (for confounding factors) Mantel-Haenszel differences in virological responses (viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies...

  5. 3型天然淋巴细胞在HIV-1慢性感染中的免疫特征及其与疾病进展的关系研究%Characteristics of group 3 innate lymphoid cells in chronic HIV-1 infection and their associations with disease progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昕; 涂波; 赵娟娟; 聂为民; 陈威巍; 王福生; 张政

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the changes of the frequency of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) in peripheral blood in patients with chronic HIV-1 infection and its association with disease progression.MethodsA total of 48 patients with chronic HIV-1 infection and 17 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to detect the frequency of ILC3s. In addition, the associations between the frequency of ILC3s and peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts and plasma HIV-1 load were further analyzed.ResultsAs compared with healthy controls, the frequency of ILC3s decreased significantly in patients with chronic HIV-1 infection (P<0.001), particularly that of ILC3s with natural cytotoxicity receptors negative decreased more significantly. Further analysis indicated that the frequency of ILC3s was weakly positively correlated with peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts (r=0.461,P=0.001) and weakly negatively correlated with plasma HIV-1 load (r=-0.399,P=0.005).ConclusionsThe frequency of peripheral blood ILC3s decreases significantly in patients with chronic HIV-1 infection, and is associated with disease progression. This study highlights a novel mechanism in the immune pathogenesis in chronic HIV-1 infection.%目的:探讨HIV-1慢性感染过程中,外周血3型天然淋巴细胞(group 3 innate lymphoid cells, ILC3s)的频率变化及其与疾病进展的关系。方法募集48例HIV-1慢性感染者和17例健康对照,留取外周血并分离单个核细胞,进行流式细胞检测ILC3s频率,同时分析ILC3s频率与患者外周血CD4+ T淋巴细胞计数和病毒载量的相关性。结果与健康对照比较, HIV-1感染者外周血总的ILC3s频率显著下降(P<0.001);其中尤以NCR-ILC3s下降更为显著(P<0.001)。进一步分析显示:HIV-1感染者外周血ILC3s频率与CD4+ T淋巴细胞计数呈弱正相关(r=0.461,P=0.001),而与血浆病毒载量呈弱负相关(r=-0

  6. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounerou Salou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods: HIV viral load (VL testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014. Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA. Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion: Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59% were adolescents and 116 (41% were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months. For 228 (80.6%, the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs (zidovudine and lamivudine and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI (nevirapine or efavirenz. Only 28 (9.9% were on a protease inhibitor (PI-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml for 102 (36%, between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4% and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%. Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%; 110/125 (88.0% were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8% to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2% to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125 of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  7. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by TNPO3 depletion is determined by capsid and detectable after viral cDNA enters the nucleus

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    De Iaco Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 infects non-dividing cells. This implies that the virus traverses the nuclear pore before it integrates into chromosomal DNA. Recent studies demonstrated that TNPO3 is required for full infectivity of HIV-1. The fact that TNPO3 is a karyopherin suggests that it acts by directly promoting nuclear entry of HIV-1. Some studies support this hypothesis, while others have failed to do so. Additionally, some studies suggest that TNPO3 acts via HIV-1 Integrase (IN, and others indicate that it acts via capsid (CA. Results To shed light on the mechanism by which TNPO3 contributes to HIV-1 infection we engineered a panel of twenty-seven single-cycle HIV-1 vectors each bearing a different CA mutation and characterized them for the ability to transduce cells in which TNPO3 had been knocked down (KD. Fourteen CA mutants were relatively TNPO3-independent, as compared to wild-type (WT HIV-1. Two mutants were more TNPO3-dependent than the WT, and eleven mutants were actually inhibited by TNPO3. The efficiency of the synthesis of viral cDNA, 2-LTR circles, and proviral DNA was then assessed for WT HIV-1 and three select CA mutants. Controls included rescue of TNPO3 KD with non-targetable coding sequence, RT- and IN- mutant viruses, and pharmacologic inhibitors of RT and IN. TNPO3 KD blocked transduction and establishment of proviral DNA by wild-type HIV-1 with no significant effect on the level of 2-LTR circles. PCR results were confirmed by achieving TNPO3 KD using two different methodologies (lentiviral vector and siRNA oligonucleotide transfection; by challenging three different cell types; by using two different challenge viruses, each necessitating different sets of PCR primers; and by pseudotyping virus with VSV G or using HIV-1 Env. Conclusion TNPO3 promotes HIV-1 infectivity at a step in the virus life cycle that is detectable after the preintegration complex arrives in the nucleus and CA is the viral determinant for TNPO3

  8. High grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia among HIV-1-infected men screening for a multi-center clinical trial of a human papillomavirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Timothy; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Aboulafia, David M.; Einstein, Mark H.; Saah, Alfred; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) is the precursor lesion to invasive anal cancer. HPV vaccination holds great promise for preventing anal cancer. Methods We examined 235 HIV-1-infected men screening for participation in a multi-site clinical trial of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine. All participants had anal swabs obtained for HPV testing and cytology, and high resolution anoscopy with biopsies of visible lesions to assess for HGAIN. Results HPV 16 and 18 were detected in 23% and 10%, respectively; abnormal anal cytology was found in 56% and HGAIN in 30%. HGAIN prevalence was significantly higher in those with HPV 16 detection compared to those without (38% vs. 17%, P=.01). Use of antiretroviral therapy, nadir and current CD4+ cell count were not associated with abnormal anal cytology or HGAIN. Conclusion HGAIN is highly prevalent in HIV-infected men. Further studies are needed on treatment and prevention of HGAIN. PMID:23611828

  9. Plectin regulates the signaling and trafficking of the HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 and plays a role in HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CXC chemokine CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 play an important role in inflammation, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and cancer metastasis. The signal transduction and intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 are involved in these functions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the CXCR4 formed a complex with the cytolinker protein plectin in a ligand-dependent manner in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CXCR4 C-terminal fusion proteins co-precipitated with the full-length and the N-terminal fragments of plectin isoform 1 but not with the N-terminal deletion mutants of plectin isoform 1, thereby suggesting an interaction between the N-terminus of plectin and the C-terminus of CXCR4. This interaction was confirmed by confocal microscopic reconstructions showing co-distribution of these two proteins in the internal vesicles after ligand-induced internalization of CXCR4 in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. Knockdown of plectin with RNA interference (RNAi) significantly inhibited ligand-dependent CXCR4 internalization and attenuated CXCR4-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4 and of Jurkat T cells was inhibited by the plectin RNAi. Moreover, CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 infection in MAGI (HeLa-CD4-LTR-Gal) cells was inhibited by the RNAi of plectin. Thus, plectin appears to interact with CXCR4 and plays an important role in CXCR4 signaling and trafficking and HIV-1 infection

  10. 中国HIV-1急性期感染25例患者临床特点分析%The clinical characteristics of twenty-five cases of acute HIV-1 infection in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 郭伏平; 李冠群; 韩扬; 谢静; 李雁凌; 祝婷; 李太生

    2015-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical features,immunological and virological characteristics of HIV-1 infected patients in the acute phase for the sake of improving the understanding of acute HIV-1 infection and early diagnosis.Methods To retrospectively analyze the clinical manifestation and laboratory data of 25 patients with acute HIV infection,who were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases,Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 2006 to 2013.Results Among the total 25 patients,19 (76%) patients were sexually transmitted,including 17 (68%) of whom were homosexual.Twenty two (88%) patients presented significant symptoms.Common symptoms consisted of fever (15 patients,60%),cervical lymphoadenopathy (8 patients,32%),skin rashes (6 patients,24%),diarrhea (5 patients,20%),shortness of breath (3 patients,12%),sore throat (3 patients,12%),and cough (3 patients,12%),while only one case represented as Guillain-Barré syndrome,upper arm cellulitis,headache and vomiting,and perianal abscess.Laboratory examination indicated elevated peripheral lymphocytes (13 patients,52%),abnormal liver function (11 patients,44%),thrombocytopenia (1 patients,4%).Notably,2 patients (8%) revealed negative results of HIV antibody,who were diagnosed with positive plasma viral load.The average viral load was (4.68 ± 0.83) lg copies/ml.CD4+ T cell count was 473 (343,621) cells/μl.CD8+ T cell count was 1 296 (997,2 177) cells/pl with maximal value of 7 984 cells/μl.The CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.33 (0.22,0.53) including 24 (96%) patients with obvious inverted ratio.The positive rates of immune activation markers HLA-DR and CD38 on the surface of CD8+ T cells were (74.9 ± 16.1) % and (84.9 ± 12.5) % respectively.The viral load had a significant positive correlation with the expression of HLA-DR and CD38.Conclusions The most common symptoms of acute HIV-1 infection are fever,cervical lymphadenopathy,skin rashes and diarrhea.Significantly elevated CD8+ T

  11. Binding of HIV-1 virions to α4β7 expressing cells and impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang; Li; Wei; Jin; Tao; Du; Biao; Wu; Yalan; Liu; Robin; J; Shattock; Qinxue; Hu

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein is reported to interact with α4β7, an integrin mediating the homing of lymphocytes to gut-associated lymphoid tissue, but the significance of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection remains controversial. Here, using HIV-1 strain Ba L, the gp120 of which was previously shown to be capable of interacting with α4β7, we demonstrated that α4β7 can mediate the binding of whole HIV-1 virions to α4β7-expressing transfectants. We further constructed a cell line stably expressing α4β7 and confirmed the α4β7-mediated HIV-1 binding. In primary lymphocytes with activated α4β7 expression, we also observed significant virus binding which can be inhibited by an anti-α4β7 antibody. Moreover, we investigated the impact of antagonizing α4β7 on HIV-1 infection of primary CD4+ T cells. In α4β7-activated CD4+ T cells, both anti-α4β7 antibodies and introduction of shorthairpin RNAs specifically targeting α4β7 resulted in a decreased HIV-1 infection. Our findings indicate that α4β7 may serve as an attachment factor at least for some HIV-1 strains. The established approach provides a promising means for the investigation of other viral strains to understand the potential roles of α4β7 in HIV-1 infection.

  12. 桂林市经性传播的HIV-1的流行特征和亚型分析%Epidemiology and gene analysis of HIV-1 infections in Guilin who infected by sexually transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔衍琳; 王海泉; 李林; 孙常荣; 李敬云; 梁浩; 梁冰玉; 张奇; 张帅; 王雪雯; 李赫伟; 胡婷婷; 蒋骞; 蒋就喜; 潘定权; 张振开

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the epidemiological situation of confirmed HIV-1 infections in Guilin after 2008 who were infected by sexually transmission, and to understand the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes. Methods To make epidemiological survey on the 100 confirmed HIV-1 infections, extract HIV-1 RNA from their whole blood and amplified by RT-PCR. HIV-1 gag gene was sequenced directly from the PCR product. Results In the chosen patients, male to female ratio was 2. 125 ∶ 1. Patients aged ≥20 and ≤49 years old accounted for 54% in total, and patients aged 50 years old or older accounted for 45%. Farmers accounted for 40% and students accounted for 6%. Patients with education level of junior middle school or below accounted for 69%. The proportions which were transmitted through heterosexual and homosexual contact were 93% and 7% respectively. 61 specimens were gained in 100 specimens, then sequence analysis showed that there were 3 HIV-1 subtypes, CRF01-AE(48 samples),B (5 samples),CRF-07BC(8 samples). Conclusion The more attentions should be paid to the HIV/AIDS antibody screening in marriage and pregnancy inspection, focus on HIV/AIDS infection though sexual transmission in elderly people, and more effective ways to prevent HIV/AIDS infection for the population with poor education level should be explored. With the change of the main transmission and subtype, the more education and behavioral interven-tions should be done to prevent the spread of HIV/ AIDS.%目的:了解桂林市2008年及以后确诊的经性传播的人类免疫缺陷病毒1型( HIV-1)感染者的流行病学及亚型的分布情况。方法选取样本100例,收集流行病学资料,采集抗凝全血,提取病毒RNA,RT-PCR法行gag基因扩增,对产物进行测序和分析。结果100例样本中男女比例为2.125∶1;青壮年年龄组(20~49岁)患者为54%,>50岁年龄组患者为45%;职业为农民的患者为40%,学生为6%;初中及以下文化水平患者占69%;经异

  13. ART therapy affect CD4+FoxP3+regulatory T cells in disease progression of HIV-1 infection%ART治疗对HIV感染者CD4+FoxP3+T细胞水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊竑冶; 董冠军; 傅更锋; 还锡萍; 羊海涛; 王建军; 侯亚义

    2012-01-01

    目的:探索抗逆转录病毒疗法(ART)治疗在HIV-1疾病进程中对调节性T细胞(Treg细胞)的影响,并探讨Treg细胞频率在HIV-1疾病进程中的作用.方法:抽取114例(男96例、女18例)HIV-1阳性患者及17例健康对照者外周血,应用流式细胞术检测Treg细胞,并分析其表达水平(频率和绝对数)在 HIV-1疾病进程中的变化趋势及其与CD4+细胞绝对数之间的相关性.结果:随着HIV-1感染者病情进展,患者外周血中Treg细胞绝对数趋向下降并且与CD4+T细胞绝对数呈正相关,而Treg细胞频率趋向升高并且与CD4+T细胞绝对数呈负相关.Treg细胞频率及绝对数在ART治疗无症状HIV-1阳性感染者中显著降低,而在AIDS患者中却显著升高.结论:Treg细胞参与艾滋病免疫发病过程,并且在HIV-1感染的不同阶段,ART治疗对Treg细胞水平具有一定的影响,提示通过控制Treg细胞的水平可能有助于HIV-1感染疾病的临床控制.%Objective: To understand the changes of CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T cells during disease progression of HIV-1 infection with anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methods: 114 patients HIV-1 positively infected and 17 healthy controls were randomly enrolled. The percentages and absolute counts of Treg cells were detected by using flow cytometry and the correlation of Treg cells with the absolute CD4 + T cells was analyzed in the process of disease progression of HIV-1 infection with ART. Results: With HIV-1 disease progression, the absolute counts of Treg cells in HIV-1 positive peripheral blood tended to decrease and positively correlated with the absolute counts of CD4 + T cells, while the frequency of Treg cells increased and negatively correlated with the absolute counts of CD4 + T cells. Both the frequency and absolute number of Treg cells in HIV-1 positive infected asymptomatic patients with ART treatment were significantly reduced, on the contrary they were significantly higher in patients with AIDS

  14. Accelerated in vivo proliferation of memory phenotype CD4+ T-cells in human HIV-1 infection irrespective of viral chemokine co-receptor tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available CD4(+ T-cell loss is the hallmark of HIV-1 infection. CD4 counts fall more rapidly in advanced disease when CCR5-tropic viral strains tend to be replaced by X4-tropic viruses. We hypothesized: (i that the early dominance of CCR5-tropic viruses results from faster turnover rates of CCR5(+ cells, and (ii that X4-tropic strains exert greater pathogenicity by preferentially increasing turnover rates within the CXCR4(+ compartment. To test these hypotheses we measured in vivo turnover rates of CD4(+ T-cell subpopulations sorted by chemokine receptor expression, using in vivo deuterium-glucose labeling. Deuterium enrichment was modeled to derive in vivo proliferation (p and disappearance (d* rates which were related to viral tropism data. 13 healthy controls and 13 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects (CD4 143-569 cells/ul participated. CCR5-expression defined a CD4(+ subpopulation of predominantly CD45R0(+ memory cells with accelerated in vivo proliferation (p = 2.50 vs 1.60%/d, CCR5(+ vs CCR5(-; healthy controls; P<0.01. Conversely, CXCR4 expression defined CD4(+ T-cells (predominantly CD45RA(+ naive cells with low turnover rates. The dominant effect of HIV infection was accelerated turnover of CCR5(+CD45R0(+CD4(+ memory T-cells (p = 5.16 vs 2.50%/d, HIV vs controls; P<0.05, naïve cells being relatively unaffected. Similar patterns were observed whether the dominant circulating HIV-1 strain was R5-tropic (n = 9 or X4-tropic (n = 4. Although numbers were small, X4-tropic viruses did not appear to specifically drive turnover of CXCR4-expressing cells (p = 0.54 vs 0.72 vs 0.44%/d in control, R5-tropic, and X4-tropic groups respectively. Our data are most consistent with models in which CD4(+ T-cell loss is primarily driven by non-specific immune activation.

  15. Genetic characterization of natural variants of Vpu from HIV-1 infected individuals from Northern India and their impact on virus release and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Verma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic studies reveal that vpu is one of the most variable regions in HIV-1 genome. Functional studies have been carried out mostly with Vpu derived from laboratory adapted subtype B pNL 4-3 virus. The rationale of this study was to characterize genetic variations that are present in the vpu gene from HIV-1 infected individuals from North-India (Punjab/Haryana and determine their functional relevance. METHODS: Functionally intact vpu gene variants were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of HIV-1 infected individuals. These variants were then subjected to genetic analysis and unique representative variants were cloned under CMV promoter containing expression vector as well as into pNL 4-3 HIV-1 virus for intracellular expression studies. These variants were characterized with respect to their ability to promote virus release as well as cell death. RESULTS: Based on phylogenetic analysis and extensive polymorphisms with respect to consensus Vpu B and C, we were able to arbitrarily assign variants into two major groups (B and C. The group B variants always showed significantly higher virus release activity and exhibited moderate levels of cell death. On the other hand, group C variants displayed lower virus release activity but greater cell death potential. Interestingly, Vpu variants with a natural S61A mutation showed greater intracellular stability. These variants also exhibited significant reduction in their intracellular ubiquitination and caused greater virus release. Another group C variant that possessed a non-functional β-TrcP binding motif due to two critical serine residues (S52 and S56 being substituted with isoleucine residues, showed reduced virus release activity but modest cytotoxic activity. CONCLUSIONS: The natural variations exhibited by our Vpu variants involve extensive polymorphism characterized by substitution and deletions that contribute toward positive selection. We identified two major groups and an extremely

  16. HIV-1 infected lymphoid organs upregulate expression and release of the cleaved form of uPAR that modulates chemotaxis and virus expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Nebuloni

    Full Text Available Cell-associated receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR is released as both full-length soluble uPAR (suPAR and cleaved (c-suPAR form that maintain ability to bind to integrins and other receptors, thus triggering and modulating cell signaling responses. Concerning HIV-1 infection, plasma levels of suPAR have been correlated with the severity of disease, levels of immune activation and ineffective immune recovery also in individuals receiving combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART. However, it is unknown whether and which suPAR forms might contribute to HIV-1 induced pathogenesis and to the related state of immune activation. In this regard, lymphoid organs represent an import site of chronic immune activation and virus persistence even in individuals receiving cART. Lymphoid organs of HIV-1(+ individuals showed an enhanced number of follicular dendritic cells, macrophages and endothelial cells expressing the cell-associated uPAR in comparison to those of uninfected individuals. In order to investigate the potential role of suPAR forms in HIV-1 infection of secondary lymphoid organs, tonsil histocultures were established from HIV-1 seronegative individuals and infected ex vivo with CCR5- and CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 strains. The levels of suPAR and c-suPAR were significantly increased in HIV-infected tonsil histocultures supernatants in comparison to autologous uninfected histocultures. Supernatants from infected and uninfected cultures before and after immunodepletion of suPAR forms were incubated with the chronically infected promonocytic U1 cell line characterized by a state of proviral latency in unstimulated conditions. In the contest of HIV-conditioned supernatants we established that c-suPAR, but not suPAR, inhibited chemotaxis and induced virus expression in U1 cells. In conclusion, lymphoid organs are an important site of production and release of both suPAR and c-suPAR, this latter form being endowed with the capacity of

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety of E/C/F/TDF vs EFV/FTC/TDF and ATV+RTV+FTC/TDF in HIV-1-infected treatment-naïve subjects ≥50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Gazzard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In high-income countries, ≥30% of HIV-infected patients are ≥50 years (yrs old (UNAIDS 2013. In two phases, three clinical trials (Studies 102 and 103 elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (E/C/F/TDF; STB had non-inferior efficacy and favourable safety vs efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (EFV/FTC/TDF; ATR or ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV+RTV+FTC/TDF (TVD in HIV-infected, treatment-naïve subjects at Week 144. The efficacy and safety of STB in subjects < or ≥50 yrs is described. Materials and Methods: Post hoc analysis of efficacy, tolerability and safety in subjects < or ≥50 yrs at Week 144. Results: Subjects ≥50 yrs in Study 102: STB: 14% (49/348, ATR: 16% (56/352; in Study 103: STB: 14% (48/353, ATV+RTV+TVD: 14% (48/355. Efficacy, safety and tolerability by age and study endpoint are shown in Table 1. Regardless of age, STB had robust efficacy at Week 144 with similar virologic outcomes vs ATR or ATV+RTV+TVD. Discontinuations (DC due to AE on STB were similar to the comparators, most occurred by Week 48. Median changes in eGFR on STB were similar by age; DC with renal PRT was rare [STB: 4 (0.6%; ATV: 3 (0.8%; ATR: 0], 2 and 1 in ≥50 yrs old strata, respectively. Conclusions: STB compared to ATR or ATV+RTV+TVD, is an efficacious, well-tolerated and safe regimen for HIV-1-infected, treatment-naïve subjects

  18. Psychopathology and psychosocial adjustment in patients with HIV-associated lipodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Barata; Jorge Malouf; Mar Gutierrez; Gracia María Mateo; Maria Antònia Sambeat; Ignasi Gich; Josep Cadafalch; Juan Wulff; Pere Domingo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether patients with HIV-1 associated lipodystrophy (LD) on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) have more psychopathology and worse psychosocial adjustment than a similar group without this syndrome. METHODS: In a cross-sectional, observational study we compared 47 HIV-1 infected patients with LD (LD group) with 39 HIV-1 infected patients without LD (non-LD group). All participants were on HAART. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State and Trait Anxiety ...

  19. FAS -670 A/G polymorphism may be associated with the depletion of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Renata Bezerra; Santana, Bárbara Brasil; Lima, Sandra Souza; Neris Martins Feitosa, Rosimar; de Oliveira Guimarães Ishak, Marluísa; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the polymorphisms in the FAS and FASL genes was investigated in a sample of 198 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 191 seronegative controls to evaluate a possible association between polymorphisms and the infection. The identification of the A and G alleles of the FAS -670 polymorphism was accomplished through polymerase chain reaction assays followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme MvaI. The identification of the A and G alleles of the FAS -124 polymorphism and the T and delT alleles of the FAS -169 polymorphism were performed using the amplification-created restriction site method followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism reactions. The comparative analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies between the groups did not reveal any significant differences. However, the quantitative analysis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes suggests that the G allele of the FAS -670 A/G polymorphism can be a protective factor against the depletion of these cells in the course of an HIV-1 infection. Polymorphisms in the FAS and FASL genes were not associated with the number of CD8(+) T lymphocytes or the plasma viral load. Our findings suggest that the FAS -670 polymorphism may be associated with apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes after infection by HIV-1. PMID:26429326

  20. Polymorphisms of chemokine receptors and its ligand alleles influencing genetic suscepti-bity to HIV-1 infection in eight ethnic groups in Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Limited genetic information is available concerning the polymorphisms of HIV-1 resistant genes in indigenous Chinese populations. The aim of this study is to identify the allelic frequencies of the chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the Chinese mainland. Genomic DNA samples extracted from whole blood of 2318 subjects were analyzed by using PCR or PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assays, and further confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Higher frequencies of mutant CCR2-64I (19.15%-28.79%) and SDF1-3'A (19.10%-29.86%) alleles were found in subjects of 8 ethnic groups in the Chi-nese mainland. In contrast, the △32 mutation in CCR5 gene occurs at a very low frequency (0.0016, n=1287) in Han population. A relatively high frequency of CCR5- wt/D32 heterozygotes was observed in Uygurian and Mongolian populations. No △32 mutation allele was detected in Ti-betan and other 4 ethnic groups in Yunnan Province. There was no CCR5-m303 mutation in subjects of any ethnic group in the Chinese mainland. Our results suggest that the CCR5-△32 mutation is not a major resistant factor against HIV-1 infection and disease progression in Han, Tibetan and other ethnic groups in Yunnan Province. Whether higher frequen-cies of CCR2-64I and SDF1-3′A alleles constitute major genetic resistant factors or not remains to be clarified.

  1. Higher pre-infection vitamin E levels are associated with higher mortality in HIV-1-infected Kenyan women: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavreys Ludo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low vitamin E levels are often found in HIV-1 infection, and studies have suggested that higher levels may decrease the risk of disease progression. However, vitamin E supplementation has also been reported to increase CCR5 expression, which could increase HIV-1 replication. We hypothesized that vitamin E levels at HIV-1 acquisition may influence disease progression. Methods Vitamin E status was measured in stored samples from the last pre-infection visit for 67 Kenyan women with reliably estimated dates of HIV-1 acquisition. Regression analyses were used to estimate associations between pre-infection vitamin E and plasma viral load, time to CD4 count Results After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 1 mg/L increase in pre-infection vitamin E was associated with 0.08 log10 copies/mL (95% CI -0.01 to +0.17 higher set point viral load and 1.58-fold higher risk of mortality (95% CI 1.15–2.16. The association between higher pre-infection vitamin E and mortality persisted after adjustment for set point viral load (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.13–2.13. Conclusion Higher pre-infection vitamin E levels were associated with increased mortality. Further research is needed to elucidate the role vitamin E plays in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  2. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of dolutegravir used as a single tablet regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, P.; Reiss, P.; Schapiro, J.; Burger, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: With the introduction of the coformulated dolutegravir, abacavir and lamivudine , a new single tablet regimen (STR) is made available for the use in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients. This drug combination is the fourth STR that will be positioned next to

  3. p24 as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected adults in rural Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, C.; Kallestrup, P.; Zinyama-Gutsire, R.B.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation of antiretroviral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa requires efficient tools to monitor HIV patients. p24 measurements have been proposed as an alternative to HIV-RNA because of the low cost of reagents and equipment needed. Here, we evaluate p24 as a prognostic marker in...

  4. Increase in transmitted resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infections in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Frentz (Dineke); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A.B. Abecasis (Ana ); J. Albert (Jan); O. Hamouda (Osamah); L.B. Jørgensen (Louise); C. Ku¨cherer (Claudia); D. Struck (Daniel); J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); B. A˚sjo¨ (Birgitta); C. Balotta (Claudia); D. Beshkov (Danail); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); S. Coughlan (Suzie); A. Griskevicius (Algis); Z. Grossman (Zehava); A. Horban (Andrzej); T. Kolupajeva (Tatjana); K. Korn (Klaus); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Linka (Marek); C. Nielsen (Claus); D. Otelea (Dan); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Sto¨ckl (Elisabeth); A. So¨nnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); E. van Wijngaerden (Eric); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); M. Sarcletti (M.); B. Schmied (B.); M. Geit (M.); G. Balluch (G.); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); I. Derdelinck (Inge); A. Sasse (A.); M. Bogaert (M.); H. Ceunen (H.); A. de Roo (Annie); M. De Wit (Meike); F. Echahidi (F.); K. Fransen (K.); J.-C. Goffard (J.); P. Goubau; E. Goudeseune (E.); J.-C. Yombi (J.); P. Lacor (Patrick); C. Liesnard (C.); M. Moutschen; L.A. Pierard; R. Rens (R.); J. Schrooten; D. Vaira (D.); L.P.R. Vandekerckhove; A. van den Heuvel (A.); B. van der Gucht (B.); M. van Ranst (Marc); E. Van Wijngaerden; B. Vandercam; M. Vekemans (M.); C. Verhofstede; N. Clumeck (N.); K. van Laethem (Kristel); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); I. Demetriades (I.); I. Kousiappa (Ioanna); V.L. Demetriou (Victoria); J. Hezka (Johana); M. Bruckova (Marie); M. Linka; L. Machala (L.); C. Nielsen; L.B. Jørgensen; J. Gerstoft (J.); L. Mathiesen (L.); C. Pedersen (Court); H. Nielsen; A. Laursen (A.); B. Kvinesdal (B.); M. Salminen (Mika); M. Ristola (M.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); J. Suni (J.); J. Sutinen (J.); K. Korn; C. Ku¨cherer; T. Berg (Trine); P. Braun (P.); G. Poggensee (G.); M. Da¨umer; D. Eberle (David); O. Hamouda (Osamah); H. Heiken; R. Kaiser (R.); H. Knechten (H.); H. Mu¨ller; S. Neifer; J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); H. Walter (Hauke); B. Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer (B.); T. Harrer (T.); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); E. Hatzitheodorou (E.); C. Haida; A. Zavitsanou (A.); G. Magiorkinis (Gkikas); M. Lazanas; L. Chini; N. Magafas (N.); N. Tsogas (N.); V. Paparizos (V.); S. Kourkounti (S.); A. Antoniadou (A.); A. Papadopoulos; P. Panagopoulos (P.); G. Poulakou; V. Sakka (V.); G. Chryssos (G.); S. Drimis (S.); P. Gargalianos; M. Lelekis (M.); G. Chilomenos; M. Psichogiou (M.); G.L. Daikos (G.); G. Panos (G.); G. Haratsis (G.); T. Kordossis (T.); A. Kontos (Angelos); G. Koratzanis (G.); M. Theodoridou; G. Mostrou (G.); V. Spoulou; S. Coughlan (Suzie); C. de Gascun (Cillian); C. Byrne; M. Duffy; P. Bergin; D. Reidy; G. Farrell; J. Lambert (Julien); E. O'Connor; A. Rochford; J. Low (J.); P. Coakely (P.); S. O'Dea; W. Hall (W.); Z. Grossman (Zehava); I. Levi (I.); D. Chemtob (D.); C. Balotta (Claudia); C. Riva (Chiara); C. Mussini (C.); I. Caramma (I.); A. Capetti (A.); M.C. Colombo (M.); C. Rossi; F. Prati (Francesco); F. Tramuto; F. Vitale (F.); M. Ciccozzi; G. Angarano (Guiseppe); G. Rezza (G.); J.C. Schmit; D. Struck (Daniel); R. Hemmer (R.); V. Arendt (V.); T. Staub (T.); F. Schneider (François); F. Roman; A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A. van Kessel; P.H.M. Van Bentum; K. Brinkman; E.L.M. Op de Coul (Eline); M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); I. Hoepelman (M.); M. Van Kasteren (Marjo); J. Juttmann (Job); M. Kuipers; N. Langebeek (Nienke); C. Richter (Clemens); R. Santegoets (M.W.J.); L. Schrijnders-Gudde (L.); R. Schuurman (Rob); B.J.M. van de Ven (B. J M); B. A˚sjo¨; V. Ormaasen (Vidar); P. Aavitsland (P.); A. Horban (Andrzej); J. Stanczak (J.); G.P. Stanczak (G.); E. Firlag-Burkacka (E.); A. Wiercinska-Drapalo; E. Jablonowska (E.); E. Malolepsza (E.); M. Leszczyszyn-Pynka (M.); W. Szata (W.); R. Camacho; A. de Palma (Andre); F. Borges (F.); T. Paixa&tild; o; V. Duque (V.); F. Araújo; D.J. Jevtovic (D.); D. Salemovic (D.); D. Stanekova; M. Habekova (M.); M. Mokras; P. Truska; M. Poljak (Mario); M.M. Lunar (Maja M.); D. Babic; J. Tomazic (J.); S. Vidmar (Suzanna); T. Vovko; P. Karner (P.); B. Clotet (Bonaventura); P. Domingo; M.J. Galindo; C. Miralles; M.A. del Pozo; E. Ribera; C. Iribarren (Carlos); L. Ruiz (Lidia); J. de la Torre; F. Vidal; F. Garcia; R. Paredes (Roger); J. Albert (Jan); A. Heidarian; K. Aperia-Peipke (K.); M. Axelsson; M. Mild; A. Karlsson; A. So¨nnerborg; A. Thalme; L. Nave´r; G. Bratt (G.); A. Karlsson; A. Blaxhult; M. Gissle´n; B. Svennerholm; I.-M. Bergbrant (I.); P. Bjo¨rkman; C. Sa¨ll; A. Mellgren; A. Lindholm; N. Kuylenstierna; R. Montelius; F. Azimi; B. Johansson; M. Carlsson; E. Johansson; B. Ljungberg; H. Ekvall; A. Strand; S. Ma¨kitalo; S. o¨berg; P. Holmblad; M. Ho¨fer; H. Holmberg; P. Josefson; U. Ryding

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: One out of ten newly diagnosed patients in Europe was infected with a virus carrying a drug resistant mutation. We analysed the patterns over time for transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) using data from the European Spread program.Methods: Clinical, epidemiological a

  5. HIV-1 infection is associated with changes in nuclear receptor transcriptome, pro-inflammatory and lipid profile of monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renga Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent residual immune activation and lipid dysmetabolism are characteristics of HIV positive patients receiving an highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Nuclear Receptors are transcription factors involved in the regulation of immune and metabolic functions through the modulation of gene transcription. The objective of the present study was to investigate for the relative abundance of members of the nuclear receptor family in monocytic cells isolated from HIV positive patients treated or not treated with HAART. Methods Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were used for analysis of the relative mRNA expressions of FXR, PXR, LXR, VDR, RARα, RXR, PPARα, PPARβ, PPARγ and GR by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The expression of a selected subset of inflammatory and metabolic genes MCP-1, ICAM-1, CD36 and ABCA1 was also measured. Results Monocytes isolated from HIV infected patients expressed an altered pattern of nuclear receptors characterized by a profound reduction in the expressions of FXR, PXR, PPARα, GR, RARα and RXR. Of interest, the deregulated expression of nuclear receptors was not restored under HAART and was linked to an altered expression of genes which supports both an immune activation and altered lipid metabolism in monocytes. Conclusions Altered expression of genes mediating reciprocal regulation of lipid metabolism and immune function in monocytes occurs in HIV. The present findings provide a mechanistic explanation for immune activation and lipid dysmetabolism occurring in HIV infected patients and could lead to the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets.

  6. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  7. Control and non-progression of HIV-1 infection in sub-Saharan Africa: A case and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Patel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Elite and viraemic controllers represent unique subsets of HIV-infected patients who may also be long-term non-progressors (LTNPs. LNTPs constitute an estimated 1 - 15% of the total HIV-positive population in the USA and Europe, but less is known about their epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. Though the exact mechanisms for long-term non-progression appear to be numerous and are still under investigation, research on elite controllers may hold the key to new therapeutics and vaccine development. The clinical management of such patients can be challenging, as there are no standard guidelines for treatment, particularly in resource-limited settings. We describe the case of an HIV-infected Botswanan man who is likely an elite or viraemic controller.

  8. A cross-sectional serological study of cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis and echinococcosis in HIV-1 infected people in Beira, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Virginia Noormahomed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helminthic infections are highly endemic in Mozambique, due to limited access to healthcare and resources for disease prevention. Data on the subclinical prevalence of these diseases are scarce due to the fact that an immunological and imaging diagnosis is not often available in endemic areas. We conducted a cross-sectional study on HIV1(+ patients from Beira city in order to determine the seroprevalence of cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis and echinoccocosis and its possible interaction with HIV infection.Patients (601 were voluntarily recruited at the Ponta Gea Health Center and their demographic and clinical data were recorded (including CD4(+ cell count and antiretroviral regimen. Mean age was 39.7 years, 378 (62.9% were women and 223 (37.1% were men. Four hundred seventy-five (475 patients (79% were already on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, and 90 started therapy after being enrolled in the study. For serological testing we used a Multiplex Western Blot IgG from LDBIO Diagnostics. The overall seroprevalence was 10.2% for cysticercosis, 23% for schistosomiasis, 7.3% for toxocariasis and 17.3% for echinococcosis.Neither age nor the CD4(+ count were significantly associated with the seroprevalence of the helminths studied. However, patients with CD4(+ between 200-500/µl had a higher seroprevalence to all helminths than those with less than 200/µl cells/and those with more than 500 cells/µl. Female gender was significantly associated with cysticercosis and schistosomiasis, and being in HAART with toxocariasis. Headache was significantly associated with cysticercosis and toxocariasis. There was no association between epilepsy and seropositivity to any of the parasites. The study concluded that a clear understanding of the prevalence and manifestations of these coinfections, how best to diagnose subclinical cases, and how to manage diseases with concomitant antiretroviral therapy is needed.

  9. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: A small randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Creswell, J. David; Myers, Hector F.; Cole, Steven W.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and...

  10. Impact of the DNA extraction method on 2-LTR DNA circle recovery from HIV-1 infected cells

    OpenAIRE

    Badralmaa, Yunden; Natarajan, Ven

    2013-01-01

    Detection of episomal 2-LTR DNA circles is used as a marker for the ongoing virus replication in patients infected with HIV-1, and efficient extraction of episomal DNA is critical for accurate estimation of the 2-LTR circles. The impact of different methods of DNA extraction on the recovery of 2-LTR circles was compared using mitochondrial DNA extracted as an internal control. The bacterial plasmid DNA isolation method extracted less than 10% of cellular DNA, 40% of mitochondrial DNA and 12-2...

  11. miRNA在HIV-1感染中的生物学功能%Biological function of microRNA in HIV-1 infection: summary of recent progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴还梅; 孟哲峰; 张晓燕

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is one of the multifunctional small RNAs that have been extensively investigated in recent years. MiRNA-mediated RNA interference regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, development and plays a critical role in many infectious diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MiRNA inhibits HIV-1 replication by targeting the genome RNA or interacting with protein-coding mRNA but it also facilitates HIV-1 infection and AIDS progress by promoting T cell proliferation that is mediated by activating innate immune system and producing cytokines. Meanwhile, miRNA can also affect HIV-1 replication by interacting with viral accessory proteins and host cellular factors. Some miRNAs are involved in HIV-1 latency. Furthermore, miRNA expression profile could be fluctuated with HIV-1 infection which can be used as a diagnostic indicator in the near future.

  12. A novel toll-like receptor-9 agonist, MGN1703, enhances HIV-1 transcription and NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infected autologous CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Rasmus; Nissen, Sara Konstantin; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Denton, Paul W; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    currently undergoing phase 3 clinical testing for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer) induces potent antiviral responses in immune effector cells from HIV-1-infected on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The significant improved safety and tolerability profile of MGN1703 versus TLR9 agonists of......Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent enhancers of innate antiviral immunity and may also reverse HIV-1 latency. Therefore, TLR agonists have a potential role in the context of a 'shock and kill' approach to eradicate HIV-1. Our extensive preclinical evaluation suggests that a novel TLR9...... induced strong antiviral innate immune responses, enhanced HIV-1 transcription and boosted NK cell-mediated suppression of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4+ T cells. These findings support clinical testing of MGN1703 in HIV-1 eradication trials. IMPORTANCE: We demonstrate, that MGN1703 (a TLR9 agonist...

  13. 趋化因子复合受体在HIV-1感染中的作用%Effect of chemokine co-receptor on HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙利; 黄长形; 白雪帆

    2008-01-01

    趋化因子复合受体与HIV-1感染关系密切.此文简要回顾了HIV-1复合受体以及它们在病毒膜融合和HIV-1发病机制中的作用,以期为将来研究趋化因子复合受体抗HIV-1感染提供理论依据.%The chemokine co-receptor has close relations to HIV-1 infection.Binding to CD4 typically is followed by binding to either the CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptor,which is required for fusion to proceed.The development of chemokine co-receptor may provide new tools to address this important pathogenesis question about HIV-1 infection.

  14. P24 antigen detection, viral isolation, DNA-PCR and in vitro antibody production for the diagnosis of HIV-1 latent infection in heterosexual women at high risk for HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Di Stefano; J.R. Fiore; M. Chironna; G. Buccoliero; Romanelli, C.; La Grasta, L; QUARTO, M.; Angarano, G.; Pastore, G.

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION--The report of the existence of at-risk seronegative subjects, latently infected with HIV-1 and producing "in vitro" HIV-1 specific antibodies, prompted the authors to evaluate extensively twenty-five heterosexual HIV-1 seronegative women at high risk for HIV-1 infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS--The capability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from such subjects to produce "in vitro" HIV-1 specific antibodies after pokeweed-mitogen stimulation, was studied. Silent HIV-1 infecti...

  15. Randomized comparison of renal effects, efficacy, and safety with once-daily abacavir/lamivudine versus tenofovir/emtricitabine, administered with efavirenz, in antiretroviral-naive, HIV-1-infected adults: 48-week results from the ASSERT study

    OpenAIRE

    Post, F; Moyle, G.; Stellbrink, H; Domingo, P.; D Podzamczer; Fisher, M.; Norden, A; Cavassini, M; A Rieger; Khuong-Josses, MA; Branco, T; Pearce, H.; Givens, N; Vavro, C; Lim, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abacavir/lamivudine and tenofovir/emtricitabine fixed-dose combinations are commonly used first-line antiretroviral therapies, yet few studies have comprehensively compared their safety profiles. METHODS: Forty-eight-week data are presented from this multicenter, randomized, open-label study comparing the safety profiles of abacavir/lamivudine and tenofovir/emtricitabine, both administered with efavirenz, in HLA-B*5701-negative HIV-1-infected adults. RESULTS: Three hundred e...

  16. HIV-1 infection leads to increased HLA-E expression resulting in impaired function of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattermann, Jacob; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Hofmeister, Valesko; Kupfer, Bernd; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Feldmann, Georg; Rockstroh, Jiirgen; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    HIV has evolved several strategies to evade recognition by the host immune system including down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. However, reduced expression of MHC class I molecules may stimulate natural killer (NK) cell lysis in cells of haematopoietic lineage. Here, we describe how HIV counteracts stimulation of NK cells by stabilizing surface expression of the non-classical MHC class I molecule, HLA-E. We demonstrate enhanced expression of HLA-E on lymphocytes from HIV-infected patients and show that in vitro infection of lymphocytes with HIV results in up-regulation of HLA-E expression and reduced susceptibility to NK cell cytotoxicity. Using HLA-E transfected K-562 cells, we identified the well-known HIV T-cell epitope p24 aa14-22a as a ligand for HLA-E that stabilizes surface expression of HLA-E, favouring inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. These results propose HIV-mediated up-regulation of HLA-E expression as an additional evasion strategy targeting the antiviral activities of NK cells, which may contribute to the capability of the virus in establishing chronic infection. PMID:15751767

  17. Bryostatin modulates latent HIV-1 infection via PKC and AMPK signaling but inhibits acute infection in a receptor independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Mehla

    Full Text Available HIV's ability to establish long-lived latent infection is mainly due to transcriptional silencing in resting memory T lymphocytes and other non dividing cells including monocytes. Despite an undetectable viral load in patients treated with potent antiretrovirals, current therapy is unable to purge the virus from these latent reservoirs. In order to broaden the inhibitory range and effectiveness of current antiretrovirals, the potential of bryostatin was investigated as an HIV inhibitor and latent activator. Bryostatin revealed antiviral activity against R5- and X4-tropic viruses in receptor independent and partly via transient decrease in CD4/CXCR4 expression. Further, bryostatin at low nanomolar concentrations robustly reactivated latent viral infection in monocytic and lymphocytic cells via activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC -alpha and -delta, because PKC inhibitors rottlerin and GF109203X abrogated the bryostatin effect. Bryostatin specifically modulated novel PKC (nPKC involving stress induced AMP Kinase (AMPK inasmuch as an inhibitor of AMPK, compound C partially ablated the viral reactivation effect. Above all, bryostatin was non-toxic in vitro and was unable to provoke T-cell activation. The dual role of bryostatin on HIV life cycle may be a beneficial adjunct to the treatment of HIV especially by purging latent virus from different cellular reservoirs such as brain and lymphoid organs.

  18. Imbalanced production of IL-18 and its antagonist in human diseases, and its implications for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarani, Suzanne; Allam, Ossama; Sagala, Patrick; Aldabah, Zainab; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Mehraj, Vikram; Tremblay, Cécile; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Amre, Devendra; Ahmad, Ali

    2016-06-01

    IL-18 is a pleiotropic and multifunctional cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. It is produced as a biologically inactive precursor, which is cleaved into its active mature form mainly by caspase-1. The caspase becomes active from its inactive precursor (procaspase-1) upon assembly of an inflammasome. Because of IL-18's potential pro-inflammatory and tissue destructive effects, its biological activities are tightly controlled in the body by its naturally occurring antagonist called IL-18BP. The antagonist is produced in the body both constitutively and in response to an increased production of IL-18 as a negative feedback mechanism. Under physiological conditions, most of IL-18 in the circulation is bound with IL-18BP and is inactive. However, an imbalance in the production of IL-18 and its antagonist (an increase in the production of IL-18 with a decrease, no increase or an insufficient increase in the production of IL-18BP) has been described in many chronic inflammatory diseases in humans. The imbalance results in an increase in the concentrations of free IL-18 (unbound with its antagonist) resulting in increased biological activities of the cytokine that contribute towards pathogenesis of the disease. In this article, we provide an overview of the current biology of IL-18 and its antagonist, discuss how the imbalance occurs in HIV infections and how it contributes towards development of AIDS and other non-AIDS-associated clinical conditions occurring in HIV-infected individuals undergoing combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). Finally, we discuss challenges facing immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at restoring balance between IL-18 and its antagonist in these patients. PMID:26898120

  19. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  20. CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio as a quantitative measure of immunologic health in HIV-1 infection: findings from an African cohort with prospective data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianming; Li, Xuelin; Price, Matthew A.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Karita, Etienne; Kamali, Anatoli; Lakhi, Shabir; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Kaslow, Richard A.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio is often recognized as a quantitative outcome that reflects the critical role of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in HIV-1 pathogenesis or disease progression. Our work aimed to first establish the dynamics and clinical relevance of CD4:CD8 ratio in a cohort of native Africans and then to examine its association with viral and host factors, including: (i) length of infection, (ii) demographics, (iii) HIV-1 viral load (VL), (iv) change in CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4 slope), (v) HIV-1 subtype, and (vi) host genetics, especially human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants. Data from 499 HIV-1 seroconverters with frequent (monthly to quarterly) follow-up revealed that CD4:CD8 ratio was stable in the first 3 years of infection, with a modest correlation with VL and CD4 slope. A relatively normal CD4:CD8 ratio (>1.0) in early infection was associated with a substantial delay in disease progression to severe immunodeficiency (hazards ratio (HR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.29-0.63, P 1.0, but HLA variants (e.g., HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*81) previously associated with VL and/or CD4 trajectories in eastern and southern Africans had no obvious impact on CD4:CD8 ratio. Collectively, these findings suggest that CD4:CD8 ratio is a robust measure of immunologic health with both clinical and epidemiological implications. PMID:26191056

  1. Aqueous extracts of the marine brown alga Lobophora variegata inhibit HIV-1 infection at the level of virus entry into cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kremb

    Full Text Available In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs. Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  2. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  3. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruizhong Shen

    Full Text Available Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT. Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  4. Randomized trial of time-limited interruptions of protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy (ART vs. continuous therapy for HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Firnhaber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical outcomes of short interruptions of PI-based ART regimens remains undefined. METHODS: A 2-arm non-inferiority trial was conducted on 53 HIV-1 infected South African participants with viral load 450 cells/µl on stavudine (or zidovudine, lamivudine and lopinavir/ritonavir. Subjects were randomized to a sequential 2, 4 and 8-week ART interruptions or b continuous ART (cART. Primary analysis was based on the proportion of CD4 count >350 cells(c/ml over 72 weeks. Adherence, HIV-1 drug resistance, and CD4 count rise over time were analyzed as secondary endpoints. RESULTS: The proportions of CD4 counts >350 cells/µl were 82.12% for the intermittent arm and 93.73 for the cART arm; the difference of 11.95% was above the defined 10% threshold for non-inferiority (upper limit of 97.5% CI, 24.1%; 2-sided CI: -0.16, 23.1. No clinically significant differences in opportunistic infections, adverse events, adherence or viral resistance were noted; after randomization, long-term CD4 rise was observed only in the cART arm. CONCLUSION: We are unable to conclude that short PI-based ART interruptions are non-inferior to cART in retention of immune reconstitution; however, short interruptions did not lead to a greater rate of resistance mutations or adverse events than cART suggesting that this regimen may be more forgiving than NNRTIs if interruptions in therapy occur. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00100646.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  6. Drug-Based Lead Discovery: The Novel Ablative Antiretroviral Profile of Deferiprone in HIV-1-Infected Cells and in HIV-Infected Treatment-Naive Subjects of a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Exploratory Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Deepti; Spino, Michael; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; D’Alliessi Gandolfi, Darlene; Mathews, Michael B.; Karn, Jonathan; Holland, Bart; Park, Myung Hee; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiretrovirals suppress HIV-1 production yet spare the sites of HIV-1 production, the HIV-1 DNA-harboring cells that evade immune detection and enable viral resistance on-drug and viral rebound off-drug. Therapeutic ablation of pathogenic cells markedly improves the outcome of many diseases. We extend this strategy to HIV-1 infection. Using drug-based lead discovery, we report the concentration threshold-dependent antiretroviral action of the medicinal chelator deferiprone and validate preclinical findings by a proof-of-concept double-blind trial. In isolate-infected primary cultures, supra-threshold concentrations during deferiprone monotherapy caused decline of HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 DNA; did not allow viral breakthrough for up to 35 days on-drug, indicating resiliency against viral resistance; and prevented, for at least 87 days off-drug, viral rebound. Displaying a steep dose-effect curve, deferiprone produced infection-independent deficiency of hydroxylated hypusyl-eIF5A. However, unhydroxylated deoxyhypusyl-eIF5A accumulated particularly in HIV-infected cells; they preferentially underwent apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Since the threshold, ascertained at about 150 μM, is achievable in deferiprone-treated patients, we proceeded from cell culture directly to an exploratory trial. HIV-1 RNA was measured after 7 days on-drug and after 28 and 56 days off-drug. Subjects who attained supra-threshold concentrations in serum and completed the protocol of 17 oral doses, experienced a zidovudine-like decline of HIV-1 RNA on-drug that was maintained off-drug without statistically significant rebound for 8 weeks, over 670 times the drug’s half-life and thus clearance from circulation. The uniform deferiprone threshold is in agreement with mapping of, and crystallographic 3D-data on, the active site of deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase (DOHH), the eIF5A-hydroxylating enzyme. We propose that deficiency of hypusine-containing eIF5A impedes the translation of mRNAs encoding proline

  7. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

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    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  8. Escape of HIV-1-infected dendritic cells from TRAIL-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity during NK-DC cross-talk--a pivotal role of HMGB1.

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    Marie-Thérèse Melki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Early stages of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 infection are associated with local recruitment and activation of important effectors of innate immunity, i.e. natural killer (NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs capture HIV-1 through specific receptors and can disseminate the infection to lymphoid tissues following their migration, which is associated to a maturation process. This process is dependent on NK cells, whose role is to keep in check the quality and the quantity of DCs undergoing maturation. If DC maturation is inappropriate, NK cells will kill them ("editing process" at sites of tissue inflammation, thus optimizing the adaptive immunity. In the context of a viral infection, NK-dependent killing of infected-DCs is a crucial event required for early elimination of infected target cells. Here, we report that NK-mediated editing of iDCs is impaired if DCs are infected with HIV-1. We first addressed the question of the mechanisms involved in iDC editing, and we show that cognate NK-iDC interaction triggers apoptosis via the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 (DR4 pathway and not via the perforin pathway. Nevertheless, once infected with HIV-1, DC(HIV become resistant to NK-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This resistance occurs despite normal amounts of TRAIL released by NK cells and comparable DR4 expression on DC(HIV. The escape of DC(HIV from NK killing is due to the upregulation of two anti-apoptotic molecules, the cellular-Flice like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (c-IAP2, induced by NK-DC(HIV cognate interaction. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, an alarmin and a key mediator of NK-DC cross-talk, was found to play a pivotal role in NK-dependent upregulation of c-FLIP and c-IAP2 in DC(HIV. Finally, we demonstrate that restoration of DC(HIV susceptibility to NK-induced TRAIL killing can be obtained either by silencing c-FLIP and c-IAP2 by specific

  9. A randomized comparative trial of continued abacavir/lamivudine plus efavirenz or replacement with efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF in hypercholesterolemic HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme J Moyle

    Full Text Available Drug choice and metabolic changes with antiretroviral therapy contribute to cardiovascular risk in persons with HIV-1 infection.A randomized, 12 week, open-label, comparative study of the impact on lipids of continuation of abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC plus efavirenz (EFV or replacement with the single tablet regimen of EFV/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (EFV/FTC/TDF in hypercholesterolaemic subjects on successful antiretroviral therapy, with a 12-week extension with all subjects on EFV/FTC/TDF.157 subjects received study drug, 79 switched to EFV/FTC/TDF and 78 subjects continued ABC/3TC+EFV. At Week 12, 73 subjects on ABC/3TC+EFV switched to EFV/FTC/TDF. The switch was well tolerated and no subject experienced viral rebound. Median baseline fasting total cholesterol was 6.32 mmol/L. 12 weeks following switch, the difference in the means (LSM between treatment groups (EFV/FTC/TDF minus ABC/3TC+EFV in total cholesterol change from baseline was -0.74 mmol/l (95% CI -1.00, -0.47, p < 0.001. The median change from baseline in total cholesterol following switch in the EFV/FTC/TDF arm was -0.86 mmol/l (p < 0.001 compared with +0.01 mmol/l (p = 0.45 in the continuation arm at Week 12. Significant (p < 0.001 differences between treatment groups following switch were seen for all lipid fractions from baseline to Week 12: LDL cholesterol (-0.47 mmol/L [-0.70, -0.25], HDL cholesterol (-0.15 mmol/L [-0.21, -0.08], triglycerides (-0.43 mmol/L [-0.75, -0.11], and non HDL cholesterol (-0.56 mmol/L [-0.80, -0.31]. In the extension phase, similar declines in total cholesterol were observed with a median change from Week 12 to Week 24 of -0.73 mmol/L (p < 0.001.Switching from ABC/3TC+EFV to EFV/FTC/TDF in persons with hypercholesterolemia maintains virological control and significantly improves key lipid parameters.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00615810.

  10. Discordance between Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific Gamma Interferon-Producing CD4+ T Cells and HIV-1-Specific Lymphoproliferation in HIV-1-Infected Subjects with Active Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, B. E.; Boritz, E; Blyveis, N.; Wilson, C C

    2002-01-01

    One hallmark of uncontrolled, chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the absence of strong HIV-1-specific, CD4+ T-cell-proliferative responses, yet the mechanism underlying this T helper (Th)-cell defect remains controversial. To better understand the impact of HIV-1 replication on Th-cell function, we compared the frequency of CD4+ Th-cell responses based on production of gamma interferon to lymphoproliferative responses directed against HIV-1 proteins in HIV-1-infe...

  11. Cost of switching darunavir+ritonavir (DRV+RTV to lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r in HIV-1-infected treatment-naïve women of child-bearing age (WOCBA

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    R Baran

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines consider LPV/r a preferred protease inhibitor for use during pregnancy. When an HIV-infected woman receiving DRV+RTV becomes pregnant, a switch to LPV/r may be warranted. The budget implications of proactively initiating LPV/r versus initiating DRV+RTV and then switching has not been examined. A cost-minimization analysis was performed from the US healthcare perspective for HIV-1-infected, treatment-naïve WOCBA comparing: initiating LPV/r in all patients versus initiating DRV+RTV and switching to LPV/r when pregnant. A discrete event simulation was employed to represent antiretroviral (ARV therapy management. Healthcare utilization and clinical trial data [1] were used to model pregnancy rates [2], ARV regimen switch rates, and impact of treatment as a function of CD4-cell count and viral load, adherence, treatment response, acquired resistance mutations, and ensuing treatment changes. Five- and 10-year costs incurred due to ARV therapy, clinician visits and management of AIDS-related, non-AIDS related, and cardiovascular events were estimated. Base-case analysis assumptions: switching to LPV/r can occur only once at first pregnancy, 30% of WOBCA switch to LPV/r circa time of pregnancy, and women's adherence to medication improves by 15% when becoming pregnant. Sensitivity analyses varied the rate of switching to LPV/r at time of pregnancy, pregnancy rates, adherence improvement, and healthcare costs. Daily drug cost of LPV/r + TDF/FTC was $56.59 while DRV+RTV+TDF/FTC was $73.89. Costs were discounted at 3% per annum. Survival was similar in both groups. Five- and 10-year total healthcare costs of ARV-naïve HIV-positive WOCBA who initiate LPV/r were $108,200 and $192,600 per patient, respectively, compared to $132,200 and $234,400 when women initiated DRV+RTV and then 30% switched to LPV/r. Initiating with LPV/r resulted in 5- and 10-year savings of $24,000 and $41,800 per patient, respectively. If 100% of patients who initiated

  12. Reactivation of Latent Infection of Human Herpesvirus 8 in BC-3 Cells from Primary Effusion Lymphoma by Recombinant CytokinesSimilar to that Produced by HIV-1-infected T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢春; 曾怡; 黄丽

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study and confirm that recombinant cytokines similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T cells induced lytic cycle replication of human pervirus 8(HHV-8) in BC-3 cells,another cell line from primary effusion lymphoma(PEL).Methods:The persistent stimulation of BC-3 was conducted by several cytokines known to be produced by HIV-1-infected T cells and important in grouth and proliferation of Kaposi's sarcoma(KS) cells in vitro,such as the inter feron-γ(IFN-γ),the hepatocyte grouth factor /scatter factor (HGF/SF),the Oncostain M(OSM),and the tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)which is not produced by HIV-1-infeted T cells.Treated and antrented BC-3 cells were collected at the 3rd and 7th day of persistent stimulation,respeclively.Immunohistochemical(IHC) staining. Northern blot,quantitative PCR(real-time PCR) and electron microscopy(EM) were carried out to detect the expression of immumogenic protein ORF59,messenger RNA(mRNA) of minor capsid protein ORF26,and the presence of viral particles of HHV-8 from treated and untreated BC-3 cells.Results:It showed that IFN-γ,HGF/SF/OSM,and TNF-α were found to induce an increase in mRNA expression of ORF26 when added individually to BC-3 cells.Particularly,ORF26 expression stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α respectively,increased 6.1 and 2.5-fold(from,real-time PCR results) at the 7th day when compared with untreated BC-3 cells.Meanwhile ,about 20% of IFN-γ stimulated BC-3 cells expressed ORF59 at the 7th day as compared with 1.5% of untreated BC-3 cells when IHC staining was employed.In addition,viral particles of HHV-8 were readily idelified in BC-3 cells stimulated with IFN-γ at the 7th day with EM analysis.Conclusion:TNF-α and recombinant cytokines being similar to those produced by HIV-1 infected T Cells could really induce HHV-8 lytic cycle replication in BC-3 cells,another cell line of PEL.

  13. Impact of injecting drug use on response to highly active antiretroviral treatment in HIV-1-infected patients: a nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vang; Omland, Lars Haukali Hvass; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    .0002). Absolute CD4(+) cell count and survival were lower for IDUs compared to non-IDUs (adjusted mortality rate ratio 3.6 (95% CI 2.9-4.3)). IDUs were more likely to receive a first regimen based on protease inhibitors (PIs) compared to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens for...

  14. P26Evaluation of HIV-1 genotypic tropism among HIV-1 infected patients failing HAART in Santos and São Paulo cities, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, M; Cohen, M.; Bautista, S.; Perno, C-F; I Weller; R. Gulick; Soto-Ramirez, L; Cortes, C.; Padget, D; Grinsztejn, B; Gotuzzo, E; Bacon, M; Jayathilake, K.; Shepherd, B.; Zaire, C

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of HIV/AIDS While an outright cure or a preventive vaccine for HIV/AIDS remains elusive, remarkable advances in HIV treatment have been achieved over the past two decades. Most significant among these advances is the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Two international clinical trials presented at the 1996 International AIDS Conference in Vancouver, served as the cornerstone for the emergence of triple therapy regimens based on the use of two nucleosides pl...

  15. Significance and Clinical Management of Persistent Low-Level Viremia and Very-Low-Level Viremia in HIV-1-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ryscavage, Patrick; Kelly, Sean; Li, Jonathan Z.; Harrigan, P. Richard; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2014-01-01

    A goal of HIV therapy is to sustain suppression of the plasma viral load below the detection limits of clinical assays. However, widely followed treatment guidelines diverge in their interpretation and recommended management of persistent viremia of low magnitude, reflecting the limited evidence base for this common clinical finding. Here, we review the incidence, risk factors, and potential consequences of low-level HIV viremia (LLV; defined in this review as a viremia level of 50 to 500 cop...

  16. The incidence of multidrug and full class resistance in HIV-1 infected patients is decreasing over time (2001–2006 in Portugal

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    Peres Susana

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite improvements in HIV treatment, the prevalence of multidrug resistance and full class resistance is still reported to be increasing. However, to investigate whether current treatment strategies are still selecting for multidrug and full class resistance, the incidence, instead of the prevalence, is more informative. Temporal trends in multidrug resistance (MDR defined as at most 1 drug fully susceptible and full class resistance (FCR defined as no drug in this class fully susceptible in Portugal based on 3394 viral isolates genotyped from 2000 to 2006 were examined using the Rega 6.4.1 interpretation system. From July 2001 to July 2006 there was a significant decreasing trend of MDR with 5.7%, 5.2%, 3.8%, 3.4% and 2.7% for the consecutive years (P = 0.003. Multivariate analysis showed that for every consecutive year the odds of having a new MDR case decreased with 20% (P = 0.003. Furthermore, a decline was observed for NRTI- and PI-FCR (both P

  17. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

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    Emily E I M Mouser

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62 from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

  18. Predictors of trend in CD4-positive T-cell count and mortality among HIV-1-infected individuals with virological failure to all three antiretroviral-drug classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledergerber, Bruno; Lundgren, Jens D; Walker, A Sarah;

    2014-01-01

    Treatment strategies for patients in whom HIV replication is not suppressed after exposure to several drug classes remain unclear. We aimed to assess the inter-relations between viral load, CD4-cell count, and clinical outcome in patients who had experienced three-class virological failure....

  19. Weight evolution in HIV-1 infected women in Rwanda after stavudine substitution due to lipoatrophy: comparison of zidovudine with tenofovir/abacavir.

    OpenAIRE

    VAN GRIENSVEN, Johan; Zachariah, R.; Rasschaert, F; Atté, EF; Reid, T

    2009-01-01

    This cohort study was conducted amongst female patients manifesting lipoatrophy while receiving stavudine-containing first-line antiretroviral treatment regimens at two urban health centres in Rwanda. The objectives were to assess weight evolution after stavudine substitution and to describe any significant difference in weight evolution when zidovudine or tenofovir/abacavir was used for substitution. All adult patients on stavudine-containing first-line regimens who developed lipoatrophy (di...

  20. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy and risk of cardiovascular disease in persons with HIV-1 infection: exploratory analyses from the SMART trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Carr, Andrew; Neuhaus, Jacquie;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SMART trial found a raised risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients undergoing CD4+ T cell-count guided intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with patients on continuous ART. Exploratory analyses were performed to better understand the reasons for this ......BACKGROUND: The SMART trial found a raised risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients undergoing CD4+ T cell-count guided intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with patients on continuous ART. Exploratory analyses were performed to better understand the reasons...... for this observation. METHODS: A total of 5,472 patients with CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/mm3 were recruited and randomized to either continuous ART (the viral suppression arm; VS) or CD4+ T-cell count-guided use of ART (the drug conservation arm; DC). RESULTS: Major CVD events developed in 79 patients. The hazard...... ratio (HR) for risk of CVD events for DC versus VS was 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.00-2.46; P=0.05). There was no evidence that being off ART or a higher current HIV viral load were associated with increased CVD risk. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were reduced as a result...

  1. Determinants of highly active antiretroviral therapy duration in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents in Madrid, Spain, from 1996 to 2012.

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    Claudia Palladino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the duration of sequential HAART regimens and predictors of first-line regimen discontinuation among HIV-1 vertically infected children and adolescents. DESIGN: Multicentre survey of antiretroviral-naïve patients enrolled in the HIV-Paediatric Cohor,t CoRISpeS-Madrid Cohort, Spain. METHODS: Patients with a follow-up of ≥ 1 month spent on HAART, with available baseline CD4 count and HIV-viral load (VL were included. Time spent on sequential HAART regimens was estimated and multivariable regression was used to identify predictors of time to first-line regimen discontinuation. RESULTS: 104 patients were followed for a median 8 years after starting HAART among 1996-2012; baseline %CD4 was 21.5 (12.3-34.0and viral load was 5.1 (4.6-5.6 log10 copies/mL. Patients received a mean of 1.9 regimens. Median time on first-line HAART (n = 104 was 64.5 months; second HAART (n = 56 69.8 months; and third HAART (n = 21 66.5 months. Eleven (11% patients were lost to follow-up while on first-line HAART and 54% discontinued (cumulative incidence of 16% and 38% by 1 and 3-year, respectively. The main predictor of first-line regimen discontinuation was suboptimal adherence to antiretrovirals (AHR: 2.60; 95% CI: 1.44-4.70. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to therapy was the main determinant of the duration of the first-line HAART regimen in children. It is important to identify patients at high risk for non-adherence, such as very young children and adolescents, in provide special care and support to those patients.

  2. Pharmacotherapy of HIV: A Focus on Atazanavir/Ritonavir a Potent and Convenient Once Daily Ritonavir Boosted Protease-Inhibitor for HIV-1 Infected Adults

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    Clotilde Allavena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atazanavir is the first azapeptide protease inhibitor. As a consequence of metabolism by the Cytochrome P450 system and excretion by drug-transporters such as P-Glycoprotein, drug interactions are considerable. They can be used to improve efficacy (ritonavir boosting but may also cause adverse effects. Efficacy of ATV/RTV has been shown to be comparable to lopinavir/ritonavir in antiretroviral naïve patients, providing even better results in patients with high viral load. Efficacy has also been demonstrated in maintenance therapy in antiretroviral-experienced patients, and in patients with previous virologic failure, providing the best virologic response when the virus harbors less than four resistance PI mutations. The gastrointestinal tolerability and the lipid profile are better than with other PIs. The major side effect is a jaundice caused by unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia that rarely leads to discontinuation. ATV/RTV simple administration as well as tolerability may be linked with better treatment adherence. ATV/RTV is simple, potent and well tolerated. Thus it takes an important place in the treatment of HIV-infected patients, preferentially in antiretroviral-naïve or moderately pretreated populations.

  3. Treatment discontinuation in HIV-1-infected individuals starting their first-line HAART after 2008: data from the ICONA Foundation Study Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Di Biagio; Alessandro Cozzi-Lepri; Roberta Prinapori; Gioacchino Angarano; Andrea Gori; Tiziana Quirino; Andrea De Luca; Andrea Costantini; Cristina Mussini; Giuliano Rizzardini; Andrea Antinori; Foundation Study d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella on behalf of the ICONA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to analyze the likelihood and the predictors of discontinuation of first-line regimen in the late HAART era. Methodology: An observational multi-center analysis of HIV-positive patients enrolled in ICONA. Patients eligible were those starting a first-line HAART after 1 January 2008. Discontinuation was defined as stop and/or switch of at least one drug of the regimen. All causes of discontinuation, as reported by the treating physician, were evaluated a...

  4. Predictors of immunological failure after initial response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected adults: a EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Mocroft, Amanda; Vella, Stefano;

    2004-01-01

    , observational human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 cohort. RESULTS: Of 2347 patients with an increase in CD4(+) cell count >or=100 cells/microL within 6-12 months of the initiation of HAART, 550 (23%) subsequently experienced immunological failure (CD4(+) count less than or equal to the pre-HAART value...... hazard [RH], 2.05; 95% CI, 1.83-2.31; P<.0001), time-updated virus load (per 1 log(10) higher; RH, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.64-1.92; P<.0001), and HIV-1 risk behavior (P=.047 for a global comparison of risk groups). CONCLUSION: The risk of immunological failure in patients with an immunological response to HAART...... diminishes with a longer time receiving treatment and is associated with pretreatment CD4(+) cell count, ongoing viral replication, and intravenous drug use....

  5. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen

    Full Text Available Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI.

  6. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G.; Jorge Garcia-Campos; Rocio Ortiz-Lopez; Marc Noguera-Julian; Roger Paredes; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J.; Ramirez, Teresa J.; Marcelino Chavez-Garcia; Paulo Lopez-Guillen; Evangelina Briones-Lara; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M.; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A.; Cristina Rodriguez-Padilla

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with ...

  7. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J; Ramirez, Teresa J; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI. PMID:26807922

  8. The Virological and Immunological Characteristics of the HIV-1-Infected Population in Brazil: From Initial Diagnosis to Impact of Antiretroviral Use.

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    Ricardo Sobhie Diaz

    Full Text Available Immunological and virological status of HIV-infected individuals entering the Brazilian public system over time was analyzed. We evaluated the impact of ART on virological, immunological and antiretroviral resistance over time.CD4+ T cell counts, viral loads and genotypes from patients over 13 years old from 2001-2011 were analyzed according to demographic data. We compared groups using parametric t-tests and linear regression analysis in the R statistical software language.Mean baseline CD4+ T cell counts varied from 348 (2003 to 389 (2009 and was higher among women (p = 1.1 x 10(-8, lower in older patients (p< 1 x 10(-8 and lower in less developed regions (p = 1.864 x 10(-5. Percentage of treated patients with undetectable viral loads increased linearly from 46% (2001 to 77% (2011, was lower among women (p = 2.851 x 10(-6, younger ages (p = 1 x 10(-3, and in less developed regions (p = 1.782 x 10(-4. NRTI acquired resistance was 86% in 2001-3 and decreased over time. NNRTI resistance increased from 2001-3(50% to 2006-9 (60%, PI resistance decreased from 2001-3 (60% to 2009 (40%, and 3-class resistance was stable over time around 25%. Subtype prevalence comprised B (75.3%, B/F recombinants (12.2%, C (5.7%, F (5.3% and B/C recombinants (1.5%, with regional variations. Three-class resistance was 26.5% among Bs, 22.4% among Fs and 17.2% among Cs.HIV diagnosis occurs late, especially among elderly Brazilians. Younger individuals need special attention due to poor virological response to treatment. Antiretroviral Resistance profile is subtype related.

  9. Treatment discontinuation in HIV-1-infected individuals starting their first-line HAART after 2008: data from the ICONA Foundation Study Cohort

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    Antonio Di Biagio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to analyze the likelihood and the predictors of discontinuation of first-line regimen in the late HAART era. Methodology: An observational multi-center analysis of HIV-positive patients enrolled in ICONA. Patients eligible were those starting a first-line HAART after 1 January 2008. Discontinuation was defined as stop and/or switch of at least one drug of the regimen. All causes of discontinuation, as reported by the treating physician, were evaluated and cumulative risk of stopping was investigated according to age, gender, co-morbidity, years since starting HAART, immuno-virological status, third drug and backbone of the first regimen. Kaplan Meier (KM analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were used for the outcome discontinuation of ≥1 drug regardless of the reason. For the KM estimates a competing risk approach was used to estimate the contribution of each of the reasons over time to the cumulative risk of stopping over time. Results: Data of 1759 patients who started first HAART and had at least one month of clinical follow-up were analyzed. The overall discontinuation risk was 33% over a median follow-up of 12 months. The likelihood of discontinuation by KM was 27% by one year (95% CI 25–29 and 41% by two years (95% CI 38–44. Main reason for stopping at least one drug in regimen was simplification (10%, followed by intolerance (7%, toxicity (5%, failure (2% and other causes (8%. Estimates of the cumulative risk of discontinuation of ≥1 drug over time and according to reason are shown in Figure 1. In a multivariable Cox model independent predictors of discontinuation regardless of the reason were: longer time from HIV diagnosis to date of starting HAART (hazard ratio [HR] 0.96; 95% CI 0.93–1.00; p=0.039, regimens containing ZDV/3TC (HR 2.86; 95% CI 1.42–5.76; p=0.003 vs TDF/FTC and an NNRTI-based regimen (HR 2.47; 95% CI 0.91–6.72; p=0.07 vs regimens not NNRTI-based. Conclusions

  10. Factors associated with development of opportunistic infections in HIV-1 infected adults with high CD4 cell counts: a EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Mocroft, A; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on factors predicting the development of opportunistic infections (OIs) at higher-than-expected CD4(+) cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected adults. METHODS: Multivariate Poisson regression models were used to determine factors related to...... the development of groups of OIs above their respective traditional upper CD4(+) cell count thresholds: group 1 (>or=100 cells/ microL), OIs caused by cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Toxoplasma gondii; group 2 (>or=200 cells/ microL), Pneumocystis pneumonia and esophageal candidiasis......; and group 3 (>or=300 cells/ microL), pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. RESULTS: In groups 1, 2, and 3, 71 of 9,219, 125 of 7,934, and 36 of 7,838 patients, respectively, developed >or=1 intragroup OI. The strongest predictor of an OI in groups 1 and 2 was current CD4(+) cell count (for group...

  11. An oral high dose of cholecalciferol restores vitamin D status in deficient postmenopausal HIV-1-infected women independently of protease inhibitors therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Jessica; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Falciano, Mario; Salotti, Alessandra; Di Traglia, Mario; Diacinti, Daniele; Biondi, Piergianni; Cipriani, Cristiana; Cilli, Mirella; Minisola, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    The best repletion and maintenance dosing regimens with cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 patients remain unknown. Protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to inhibit vitamin D 1α- and 25α-hydroxylation in hepatocyte and monocyte cultures. We therefore evaluated the effect of a single high dose of cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with and without PIs. Forty HIV-1 postmenopausal women treated with cART, with hypovitaminosis D (ng/ml), were enrolled. We measured serum changes of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium, and urinary calcium excretion following a loading dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol after 3, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. Patients were divided into two groups, whether or not they were taking PI. A significant increase in mean 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels at day 3 and throughout the entire observation period was found in both groups (p < 0.001). PTH levels concomitantly decreased in both groups (p < 0.001). Mean albumin-adjusted serum calcium increases with respect to baseline were significant only at day 3 and day 30 for both groups (p < 0.01). Considering remaining parameters, there were no significant differences between the groups at any time, by two-way RM ANOVA. An oral dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol in HIV-1 postmenopausal women rapidly increases 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels reducing PTH levels, regardless of the presence of PIs in the cART scheme. PMID:26254790

  12. The prevalence and determinants of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the HIV-1-infected MSM population of Henan Province in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Juan; Wang, Hong-Wei; Duan, Shu-Peng; Zhuo, Ya; Zhou, Yan-Cai; Wu, Hong-Jie; Shen, Bao-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (DR) in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM) from Henan Province of China and to identify the DR-associated HIV-1 mutations in these MSM. The HIV-positive status of the MSM subjects in this study was confirmed using ELISA and Western blotting. The MSM subjects were classified into non-treatment group (n = 106) and treatment group (n = 313). CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts were obtained by flow cytometry, and viral load was measured by branched DNA (bDNA) signal amplification assay. HIV-1 genotypic resistance tests were performed by sequence analysis of the HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase genes. In the non-treatment group, 15 patients (14.2 %) displayed DR to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). In the treatment group, the failure rate of viral suppression was 38.33 % and the DR rate was 33.2 %, which was higher than the rate observed in the non-treatment group (P homosexual orientation are the major risk factors for DR in this MSM population (all P homosexual orientation were identified as the risk factors for DR in the MSM population from Henan Province in China. PMID:26077516

  13. Tratamiento conjunto con mirtazapina y terapia antiretroviral para la leucoencefalopatía multifocal progresiva asociada a infección por VIH-1: presentación de un caso clínico y revisión de la literatura Mirtazapine and antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy associated with HIV-1 infection: report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Lasso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso cl��nico de un paciente de sexo masculino, de 43 años portador de VIH que desarrolló un grave daño neurológico subagudo debido a una leucoencefalopatía multifocal progresiva diagnosticada mediante reacción de polimerasa en cadena de virus JC. El paciente fue tratado con terapia anti-retroviral de penetración eficiente al SNC y con mirtazapina, un antidepresivo inhibidor de los receptores de serotonina. Su evolución durante un año de seguimiento ha sido favorable tanto del punto de vista clínico como de imágenes.We report a 43 years old HIV-1 infected male who developed a severe subacute neurological damage because of a progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy confirmed by PCR for JC virus. The patient was treated with antiretroviral therapy in adequate doses for CNS penetration and mirtazapine, an antidepressant inhibitor of serotonin receptors. His evolution during one year follow up has been favorable in both, clinically and images.

  14. The effect of combined polymorphisms in chemokines and chemokine receptors on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection in a Brazilian population

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    Valdimara Corrêa Vieira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in genes that encode chemokines or their receptors can modulate susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and disease progression. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of polymorphisms CCR5-Δ32, CCR2-64I, CCR5-59029A and SDF1-3'A and their role in the course of HIV infection in a Southern Brazilian population. Clinical data were obtained from 249 patients for an average period of 6.4 years and genotypes were determined by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Survival analyses were conducted for three outcomes: CD4+ T-cell counts below 200 cells/µL, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS or death. The frequency of the polymorphisms CCR5-Δ32, CCR2-64I, CCR5-59029A and SDF1-3'A were 0.024, 0.113, 0.487 and 0.207, respectively. CCR5-Δ32 was associated with a reduction in the risk for CD4+ T-cell depletion and with an increased risk for death after AIDS diagnosis. CCR2-64I was associated with a reduction in the risk for developing AIDS. SDF1-3'A was also associated with decreased risk for AIDS, but its effect was only evident when CCR2-64I was present as well. These results highlight the possibility of using these markers as indicators for the prognosis of disease progression and provide evidence for the importance of analysing the effects of gene polymorphisms in a combined fashion.

  15. Evaluation of the Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay for HIV-1 RNA viral load detection and quantitation in plasma of HIV-1-infected individuals: A comparison with Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Alessandra; Pisciotta, Maria; Aleo, Loredana; Ferraioli, Valeria; Angeletti, Claudio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-09-01

    The Hologic Aptima(®) HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima HIV) is a real-time transcription-mediated amplification method CE-approved for use in diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-1 infection. The analytical performance of this new assay was compared to the FDA-approved Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime). The evaluation was performed using 220 clinical plasma samples, the WHO 3rd HIV-1 International Standard, and the QCMD HIV-1 RNA EQA. Concordance on qualitative results, correlation between quantitative results, accuracy, and reproducibility of viral load data were analyzed. The ability to measure HIV-1 subtypes was assessed on the second WHO International Reference Preparation Panel for HIV-1 Subtypes. With clinical samples, inter-assay agreement for qualitative results was high (91.8%) with Cohen's kappa statistic equal to 0.836. For samples with quantitative results in both assays (n = 93), Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.980 (P R(2)  > 0.970) and showed higher sensitivity compared to RealTime being able to detect HIV-1 RNA in 10 out of 10 replicates containing down to 7 cp/ml (20 IU/ml). Reproducibility was very high, even at low HIV-1 RNA values. The Aptima HIV was able to detect and accurately quantify all the main HIV-1 subtypes in both reference panels and clinical samples. Besides excellent performance, Aptima HIV shows full automation, ease of use, and improved workflow compared to RealTime. J. Med. Virol. 88:1535-1544, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864171

  16. Peptide P5 (residues 628–683, comprising the entire membrane proximal region of HIV-1 gp41 and its calcium-binding site, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavel François

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The membrane proximal region (MPR of the transmembrane subunit, gp41, of the HIV envelope glycoprotein plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection of CD4+ target cells and CD4-independent mucosal entry. It contains continuous epitopes recognized by neutralizing IgG antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and Z13, and is therefore considered to be a promising target for vaccine design. Moreover, some MPR-derived peptides, such as T20 (enfuvirtide, are in clinical use as HIV-1 inhibitors. We have shown that an extended MPR peptide, P5, harbouring the lectin-like domain of gp41 and a calcium-binding site, is implicated in the interaction of HIV with its mucosal receptor. We now investigate the potential antiviral activities of P5 and other such long MPR-derived peptides. Structural studies of gp41 MPR-derived peptides using circular dichroism showed that the peptides P5 (a.a.628–683, P1 (a.a.648–683, P5L (a.a.613–683 and P7 (a.a.613–746 displayed a well-defined α-helical structure. Peptides P5 inhibited HIV-1 envelope mediated cell-cell fusion and infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by both X4- and R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, whereas peptides P5 mutated in the calcium binding site or P1 lacked antiviral activity, when P5L blocked cell fusion in contrast to P7. Strikingly, P5 inhibited CD4-dependent infection by T20-resistant R5-tropic HIV-1 variants. Cell-cell fusion studies indicated that the anti-HIV-1 activity of P5, unlike T20, could not be abrogated in the presence of the N-terminal leucine zipper domain (LZ. These results suggested that P5 could serve as a potent fusion inhibitor.

  17. Neurologic Complications in Treated HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nisha S; Chow, Felicia C

    2016-07-01

    Effective combination antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease, with HIV-infected individuals living longer and reaching older age. Neurological disease remains common in treated HIV, however, due in part to ongoing inflammation and immune activation that persist in chronic infection. In this review, we highlight recent developments in our understanding of several clinically relevant neurologic complications that can occur in HIV infection despite treatment, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, symptomatic CSF escape, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27170369

  18. Synthetic antibodies targeting HIV-1 infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Andreia Domingos, 1976-

    2011-01-01

    A Síndrome da Imunodeficiência Adquirida (SIDA) representa hoje um dos principais problemas de Saúde Pública a nível mundial, tendo contraído a doença mais de 60 milhões de pessoas em todo o mundo desde a sua descoberta em 1981, um terço das quais faleceram subsequentemente. Apesar dos grandes progressos realizados no tratamento da SIDA, especialmente desde a introdução do regime terapêutico HAART em 1996, as alternativas terapêuticas actuamente disponíveis não permitem erradicar completament...

  19. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. PMID:26774171

  20. Immune pathogenesis of pediatric HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemessen, Caroline T.; Kuhn, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Vertical exposure to HIV occurs at a time when functional capacity of the infant’s immune system is attenuated through immaturity. Immune response capability is rooted in host genetic makeup, and the broad and fine specificity of innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively, shape the outcomes of HIV encounter in some instances and imprint viral changes through selective immune pressure in others. Findings from recent studies have profound implications for understanding immune pathogene...

  1. Dendritic cells during the HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Julio Montoya; Leidy Diana Piedrahita

    2009-01-01

    Las células dendríticas son un componente de la inmunidad innata que cumple con la función crucial de activar los linfocitos T vírgenes. Son una de las células blanco de la infección por el VIH-1, aunque la replicación de este virus en las células dendríticas es muy inferior a la observada en los linfocitos T CD4+. Sin embargo, las células dendríticas almacenan viriones por largo tiempo, para transmitirlos después a otras células susceptibles, y se convierten en uno de los reservorios más imp...

  2. Comparison of genotypic resistance profiles and virological response between patients starting nevirapine and efavirenz in EuroSIDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Ruiz, Lidia; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare virological outcome and genotypic resistance profiles in HIV-1-infected patients starting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing regimens. METHODS: NNRTI-naive patients were included who started treatment with nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV) with...

  3. IL-1Β enriched monocytes mount massive IL-6 responses to common inflammatory triggers among chronically HIV-1 infected adults on stable anti-retroviral therapy at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Jalbert

    Full Text Available Chronic infection by HIV increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. The mechanisms linking HIV to CVD have yet to be fully elucidated. High plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, which may be triggered by IL-1β, is a biomarker of CVD risk in HIV-negative adults, and of all-cause mortality in HIV disease. Monocytes play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, and may be major mediators of HIV-associated inflammation. We therefore hypothesized that monocytes from HIV-infected adults would display high inflammatory responses. Employing a 10-color flow cytometry intracellular cytokine staining assay, we directly assessed cytokine and chemokine responses of monocytes from the cryopreserved peripheral blood of 33 chronically HIV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 45 years or older, on virologically suppressive ART and at risk for CVD. This group was compared to 14 HIV-negative subjects matched for age and gender, with similar CVD risk. We simultaneously detected intracellular expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in blood monocytes in the basal state and after stimulation by triggers commonly found in the blood of treated, chronically HIV-infected subjects: lipopolysaccharide (LPS and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL. In the absence of stimulation, monocytes from treated HIV-infected subjects displayed a high frequency of cells producing IL-1β (median 19.5%, compared to low levels in HIV-uninfected persons (0.9% p<0.0001. IL-8, which is induced by IL-1β, was also highly expressed in the HIV-infected group in the absence of stimulation, 43.7% compared to 1.9% in HIV-uninfected subjects, p<0.0001. Strikingly, high basal expression of IL-1β by monocytes predicted high IL-6 levels in the plasma, and high monocyte IL-6 responses in HIV-infected subjects. Hyper-inflammatory IL-1β enriched monocytes may be a major source of IL-6 production and systemic inflammation in HIV

  4. Analysis of Th17 and Tc17 Frequencies and Antiviral Defenses in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue of Chronic HIV-1 Positive Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella d’Ettorre; Giancarlo Ceccarelli; Mauro Andreotti; Carla Selvaggi; Noemi Giustini; Sara Serafino; Ivan Schietroma; Giuseppe Nunnari; Guido Antonelli; Vincenzo Vullo; Carolina Scagnolari

    2015-01-01

    The complex relationship between both the Th1/Th17 and Tc1/Tc17 axis and innate defences in the intestinal mucosa during HIV-1 infection has not been well characterized. This study examined the frequency, phenotype, and functional status of T cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients on therapy, focusing on the Th1, Th17, Tc1, and Tc17 cell subsets. We found a persistent immune cell activation (CD38 and HLAD...

  5. Incidence, risk factors and mortality of tuberculosis in Danish HIV patients 1995-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarnhøj, Gry A; Engsig, Frederik N; Ravn, Pernille;

    2011-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection predisposes to tuberculosis (TB). We described incidence, risk factors and prognosis of TB in HIV-1 infected patients during pre (1995-1996), early (1997-1999), and late Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) (2000-2007) periods....

  6. Antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 in mucosal specimens of asymptomatic HIV-1-infected volunteers parenterally immunized with an experimental recombinant HIV-1 IIIB gp160 vaccine. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, J S; Viscidi, R; Walker, M. C.; Clayman, B; Winget, M; Wolff, M.; Schwartz, D H

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-two human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected, asymptomatic volunteers with CD4 cell counts of >600 cells/mm3 who were enrolled in a phase I immunotherapy trial comparing two schedules of immunization of an HIV-1 IIIB-based recombinant gp160 (rgp160) experimental vaccine were evaluated for rgp160-specific antibodies in parotid saliva, genital secretions, and serum. When the study was unblinded, it was determined that five volunteers had received rgp160 on a month 0, 1, 2, 3,...

  7. D-dimer and CRP levels are elevated prior to antiretroviral treatment in patients who develop IRIS

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Brian O.; Ouedraogo, G. Laissa; Hodge, Jessica; Smith, Margo; Pau, Alice; Roby, Gregg; Kwan, Richard; Bishop, Rachel; Rehm, Catherine; Mican, JoAnn; Sereti, Irini

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers could be useful in evaluating immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). A cohort of 45 HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve patients with baseline CD4 T cell counts ≤100 cells/μL who were started on ART, suppressed HIV-RNA to

  8. Imaturidade imunológica fetal e neonatal: implicações na evolução clínica da infecção pelo HIV-1 em crianças Immaturity of the fetal and neonatal immune systems: influences on the clinical evolution of HIV-1 infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Ortigão-de-Sampaio

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Crianças infectadas pelo HIV-1, por via vertical, apresentam uma evolução clínica mais grave do que crianças infectadas por outras vias e adultos. A imaturidade fisiológica dos sistemas imunitários fetal e neonatal, no momento da infecção, parece ter papel crucial na progressão da infecção pelo HIV-1 em crianças. Neste artigo, fazemos revisão da ontogenia do sistema imunológico humano, correlacionando-a com a imunopatogenia da síndrome de imunodeficiência adquirida (AIDS, em crianças infectadas por transmissão vertical, em suas diferentes fases.Children born to HIV-1 infected mothers present a more severe clinical evolution than adults or children infected by other routes. The physiologic immaturity of the fetal and neonatal immune systems at the time of the infection probably plays an essential role in the progression of HIV-1 infection in these children. This paper describes the development of the normal human immune system and its correlation with the immunopathogenicity of vertical acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS.

  9. Low yield of screening for cryptococcal antigen by latex agglutination assay on serum and cerebrospinal fluid from Danish patients with AIDS or ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, S; Stenderup, J; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1991-01-01

    From July 1, 1989 to September 5, 1990, 530 serum specimens and 50 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 334 HIV-1 infected patients, most of whom had AIDS or ARC, were analysed in a cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination assay, and all were negative. Three cases of meningitis due to...

  10. 天津市不同感染途径HIV-1感染者流行毒株亚型分析%The genetic subtype of HIV-1 in different groups of HIV-1 infected person in Tianjin City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣; 郑敏娜; 郭燕; 柏建芸; 程绍辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in different groups of HIV-1 infected person in Tianjin, and compare the genetic subtype of HIV-1 in this region. Methods Whole blood samples were collected from 100 HIV-1 infected individuals whose routes of infection were confirmed. Nested PCR method was used to amplify gag genes sequences of HIV-1 after DNA extracted. The nucleotide sequence of amplification products was determined, and the genetic subtype was identified by comparative analysis. Results Gag gene fragments of HIV-1 were successfully amplified for 87 samples and 4 kinds of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant gene were found. CRP01-AE was major subtype, accounted for 59.77% ( 52/87) of all positives, which were mainly distributed in the homosexuals and heterosexuals. CRP07_BC was mainly distributed among the intravenous drug users. Conclusions There are at least 4 kinds of HIV-1 gene subtypes in Tianjin, and the distribution of genetic subtype of HIV-1 was a little different among different routes of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, the surveillance in the subtype variation of HIV-1 strains should be strengthened for the better prevention and control of the HIV-1 infection in this area.%目的 了解天津市HIV-1毒株的流行情况,比较不同感染途径HIV-1感染者中流行毒株的亚型分布.方法 采集100例感染途径已知的HIV-1感染者抗凝全血标本,提取DNA,用巢式聚合酶链式反应扩增病毒gag基因,并进行序列测定和亚型分析.结果 100份样品中,有87份样品被成功扩增出HIV-1的gag基因片段,通过系统进化分析,确定天津市HIV-1流行毒株分属4个亚型和重组型,其中CRF01 _AE比例最大,达59.77%(52/87),主要分布在通过同性和异性性传播的HIV-1感染者中,而在通过静注吸毒感染的HIV-1感染者中以CRF07_BC亚型为主.结论 天津市HIV-1流行株至少有4种基因亚型,且不同感染途径HIV-1感染

  11. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  12. Efficacy and safety of rilpivirine in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected patients with hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection enrolled in the Phase III randomized, double-blind ECHO and THRIVE trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Mark Jason; Amaya, Gerardo; Clumeck, Nathan;

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and hepatic safety of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors rilpivirine (TMC278) and efavirenz were compared in treatment-naive, HIV-infected adults with concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the pooled week 48 analysis of the...

  13. Increased Tryptophan Catabolism is Associated with Increased Frequency of CD161+Tc17/MAIT Cells, and Lower CD4+ T cell Count in HIV-1 infected Patients on cART after Two Years of Follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Trøseid, Marius; Stiksrud, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV infection is associated with increased ratio between kynurenine and tryptophan (KTR) in plasma, increased microbial translocation, expansion of Tregs and depletion of Tc17/mucosa associated invariant T cells (MAIT) cells. The association between these parameters and the impact of ...

  14. Brief Report: Dolutegravir Plus Abacavir/Lamivudine for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Patients: Week 96 and Week 144 Results From the SINGLE Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Walmsley, Sharon; Baumgarten, Axel; Berenguer, Juan; Felizarta, Franco; Florence, Eric; Khuong-Josses, Marie-Aude; Kilby, J Michael; Lutz, Thomas; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquin; Roth, Norman; Wong, Deborah; Granier, Catherine; Wynne, Brian; Pappa, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The SINGLE study was a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of 50 mg dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine versus efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in 833 ART-naive HIV-1 + participants. Of 833 randomized participants, 71% in the dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine arm and 63% in the efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine arm maintained viral loads of

  15. Brief Report: Dolutegravir Plus Abacavir/Lamivudine for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Patients: Week 96 and Week 144 Results From the SINGLE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Sharon; Baumgarten, Axel; Berenguer, Juan; Felizarta, Franco; Florence, Eric; Khuong-Josses, Marie-Aude; Kilby, J Michael; Lutz, Thomas; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquin; Roth, Norman; Wong, Deborah; Granier, Catherine; Wynne, Brian; Pappa, Keith

    2015-12-15

    The SINGLE study was a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of 50 mg dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine versus efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in 833 ART-naive HIV-1 + participants. Of 833 randomized participants, 71% in the dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine arm and 63% in the efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine arm maintained viral loads of abacavir/lamivudine arm [dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine arm, 16 (4%); efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine arm, 58 (14%)] through W144 [corrected]. No treatment-emergent integrase or nucleoside resistance was observed in dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine recipients through W144. PMID:26262777

  16. Predictors of CD4 count change over 8 months of follow up in HIV-1-infected patients with a CD4 count>or=300 cells/microL who were assigned to 7.5 MIU interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe; Antunes, Francisco; Davey, Rick;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ESPRIT is a randomized trial comparing the clinical impact of interleukin (IL)-2 plus antiretrovirals vs antiretrovirals alone. Identification of factors that influence the relationship between IL-2 and CD4 count recovery will enable better personalization of treatment with IL-2 in HIV...

  17. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  18. Persistence of HIV-1 structural proteins and glycoproteins in lymph nodes of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Popovic, Mikulas; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Pelser, Colleen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; van Lunzen, Jan; Lewis, George; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Gallo, Robert C.; Racz, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Here we report a long-term persistence of HIV-1 structural proteins and glycoproteins in germinal centers (GCs) of lymph nodes (LNs) in the absence of detectable virus replication in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The persistence of viral structural proteins and glycoproteins in GCs was accompanied by specific antibody responses to HIV-1. Seven patients during the chronic phase of HIV-1 infection were analyzed for the presence of the capsid protein (HIV-1p24), ma...

  19. Low Primary and Secondary HIV Drug-Resistance after 12 Months of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immune-Deficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Infected Individuals from Kigali, Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rusine, John; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Boer, Kimberly Rachel; Mukantwali, Enatha; Karita, Etienne; Gasengayire, Agnes; Jurriaans, Suzanne; de Jong, Menno; Ondoa, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Treatment outcomes of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Rwanda are scarcely documented. HIV viral load (VL) and HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR) outcomes at month 12 were determined in a prospective cohort study of antiretroviral–naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Kigali. Treatment response was monitored clinically and by regular CD4 counts and targeted HIV viral load (VL) to confirm drug failure. VL measurements and HIVDR genotyping were performed retrospecti...

  20. Ultrasound-assessed perirenal fat is related to increased ophthalmic artery resistance index in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiavaroli Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has dramatically changed the prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, with a significant decline in morbidity and mortality. Changes in body fat distribution are a common finding in individuals with HIV infection being treated with antiretrovirals, and this condition (collectively termed lipodystrophy syndrome is associated with depletion of subcutaneous fat, increased triglycerides and insulin resistance. Obesity, particularly visceral obesity, is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, estimating visceral fat distribution is important in identifying subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether perirenal fat thickness (PRFT, a parameter of central obesity, is related to ophthalmic artery resistance index (OARI, an index of occlusive carotid artery disease in HIV-1 infected patients. Methods We enrolled 88 consecutive HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy for more than 12 months, in a prospective cohort study. Echographically measured PRFT and OARI, as well as serum metabolic parameters, were evaluated. PRFT and OARI were measured by 3.75 MHz convex and 7.5 MHz linear probe, respectively. Results The means of PRFT and OARI in HIV-1-infected patients with visceral obesity was considerably higher than in patients without it (p 0.74 (sensitivity 78.9%, specificity 82.8%. Conclusions Our data indicate that ultrasound assessment of PRFT may have potential as a marker of increased endothelial damage with specific involvement of the ocular vascular region in HIV-1-infected patients.

  1. Cardiovascular risk in patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus compared with that of uninfected patients and general population = Estudio del riesgo cardiovascular en pacientes infectados por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana respecto a pacientes no infectados y población general

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: So far, HIV patients-tailored clinical guidelines, are based on the available recommendations for the general population plus on considering earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy. This is a basic approach that although correct is likely amenable for optimization. A better understanding of the differences regarding pathogenesis, epidemiology and clinical characteristics of cardiovascular disease between HIV- 1-infected patients and uninfected individuals can help to de...

  2. Low primary and secondary HIV drug-resistance after 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in human immune-deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1-infected individuals from Kigali, Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rusine

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in Rwanda are scarcely documented. HIV viral load (VL and HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR outcomes at month 12 were determined in a prospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in Kigali. Treatment response was monitored clinically and by regular CD4 counts and targeted HIV viral load (VL to confirm drug failure. VL measurements and HIVDR genotyping were performed retrospectively on baseline and month 12 samples. One hundred and fifty-eight participants who completed their month 12 follow-up visit had VL data available at month 12. Most of them (88% were virologically suppressed (VL≤1000 copies/mL but 18 had virological failure (11%, which is in the range of WHO-suggested targets for HIVDR prevention. If only CD4 criteria had been used to classify treatment response, 26% of the participants would have been misclassified as treatment failure. Pre-therapy HIVDR was documented in 4 of 109 participants (3.6% with an HIVDR genotyping results at baseline. Eight of 12 participants (66.7% with virological failure and HIVDR genotyping results at month 12 were found to harbor mutation(s, mostly NNRTI resistance mutations, whereas 4 patients had no HIVDR mutations. Almost half (44% of the participants initiated ART at CD4 count ≤200 cell/µl and severe CD4 depletion at baseline (<50 cells/µl was associated with virological treatment failure (p = 0.008. Although the findings may not be generalizable to all HIV patients in Rwanda, our data suggest that first-line ART regimen changes are currently not warranted. However, the accumulation of acquired HIVDR mutations in some participants underscores the need to reinforce HIVDR prevention strategies, such as increasing the availability and appropriate use of VL testing to monitor ART response, ensuring high quality adherence counseling, and promoting earlier identification of HIV patients

  3. Low Sensitivity of Peripheral Blood Smear for Diagnosis of Subclinical Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado, J.; Pineda, J. A.; Macías, J.; Regordán, C.; Gallardo, J. A.; Leal, M.; Sanchez-Quijano, A.; Lissen, E.

    1998-01-01

    The peripheral blood smear is an easy method for the diagnosis of symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. However, its efficiency in diagnosing subclinical VL remains unknown. In this study, Leishmania amastigotes were seen in blood smears from 1 of 13 HIV-1-positive individuals with subclinical VL. This shows that this procedure is not suitable for subclinical-VL diagnosis.

  4. Increasing Obesity in Treated Female HIV Patients from Sub-Saharan Africa: Potential Causes and Possible Targets for Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Claire L.; Francis, Arianne M.; Iliffe, Kim; Webb, Helen; Douch, Catherine J.; Pakianathan, Mark; Macallan, Derek C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate changing nutritional demographics of treated HIV-1-infected patients and explore causes of obesity, particularly in women of African origin. Methods: We prospectively reviewed nutritional demographics of clinic attenders at an urban European HIV clinic during four one-month periods at three-yearly intervals (2001, 2004, 2007, and 2010) and in two consecutive whole-year reviews (2010–2011 and 2011–2012). Risk-factors for obesity were assessed by multiple linear re...

  5. EDICIÓN POR APOBEC, UN NUEVO MECANISMO DE RESISTENCIA A LA INFECCIÓN POR EL VIH-1 EDITION BY APOBEC, A NEW RESISTANCE MECHANISM TO HIV-1 INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El HIV/SIDA afecta a más de 40 millones de personas en todo el mundo. Los altos costos de los antiretrovirales, y la resistencia a estos fármacos han obligado a la búsqueda de nuevas moléculas bioactivas enfocadas a bloquear proteínas celulares o virales, o moléculas que participen en el ciclo de replicación del virus, y que permitan aumentar la supervivencia y la calidad de vida de las personas infectadas. Recientemente se describieron ciertos factores celulares con actividad anti-VIH-1, los cuales por sus características, constituyen una familia de proteínas celulares conocidas como APOBEC. Los miembros de esta familia son enzimas deaminasas que modifican citosinas por uracilos en DNA/RNA celulares o extraños. La subfamilia de proteínas APOBEC3 es la más estudiada, ya que está implicada en la respuesta inmune innata, es decir, presentan actividad antiviral contra diferentes virus, entre ellos, el HIV-1. APOBEC3, no sólo es capaz de editar el genoma viral, sino que participa en diferentes etapas del ciclo replicativo. En esta revisión se discuten hasta donde es posible, los diferentes mecanismos en los cuales esta subfamilia de proteínas participa activamente en la respuesta antiviral, mediante la inhibición de la replicación de virus.HIV/AIDS affects more of 40 million people in the world. The high costs of the antiretroviral compounds, and the resistance to these medicines has led to intense search for new antiviral, focused on substances to be actives white proteins or other molecules that participates in the virus's cycle, in order to increase the survival and the quality of life of infected patients. Recently, certain cellular factors were described by their anti-HIV- 1 activity. According to their characteristics, they constitute a family of cellular proteins known as APOBEC. The members of this family are deaminases enzymes that modify cytosine to uracilo in cellular or foreign DNA/RNA. The sub-family APOBEC 3 is the

  6. Cellular resistance to HIV-1 infection in target cells coincides with a rapid induction of X-DING-CD4 mRNA: indication of the unique host innate response to virus regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpi, Rasheda Y; Sachdeva, Rakhee; Simm, Malgorzata

    2012-08-01

    Clinical reports indicate that some infected individuals control HIV-1 replication through undefined mechanisms. Our group reported that a human protein named X-DING-CD4 holds a potent antiviral activity, blocking transcription of HIV-1 LTR through the inhibition of NF-κB/DNA binding. Based on observations that transformed HIV-1 resistant CD4(+) T cells produce higher levels of soluble X-DING-CD4 protein upon their exposure to virus, we hypothesized that resistance to HIV-1 in these cells may be regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene. Real-time PCR evaluations of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression confirmed our hypothesis; HIV-1 exposure caused rapid up-regulation of X-DING-CD4 mRNA in resistant, but not susceptible, cells; and the burst of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression correlated with restriction of HIV-1 transcription. Subsequently, we examined the activity of the X-DING-CD4 gene in monocytes and macrophages from (n = 13) HIV-negative donors. The assessment of HIV-1 gag mRNA showed that the majority of cells were permissive to virus replication; however, macrophages from four donors were refractory to HIV-1 infection. In response to virus, these cells up-regulated X-DING-CD4 gene expression by 2- to 1000-fold. These data provide evidence that the X-DING-CD4 gene contributes to early cellular protection from HIV infection in some individuals and this protection depends solely on the unique genetic regulation of the host. PMID:22042911

  7. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions. PMID:20055590

  8. Neutralizing antibodies in slowly progressing HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Nielsen, C; Iversen, Johan; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1995-01-01

    with SPI generally neutralized the contemporaneous isolate, whereas serum from individuals with RPI did not [geometric mean antibody titer (GMT), 45 vs. 3; p = 0.0047]. There was no difference in neutralizing ability against HIVMN (GMT,2,593 vs. 2,263; p = 0.74) and only a small difference against...

  9. HIV-1 infected monozygotic twins: a tale of two outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Losada Marcos; Orsega Susan; Metcalf Julia A; Hirschfeld Steven; Imamichi Hiromi; Tazi Loubna; Posada David; Lane H Clifford; Crandall Keith A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Replicate experiments are often difficult to find in evolutionary biology, as this field is inherently an historical science. However, viruses, bacteria and phages provide opportunities to study evolution in both natural and experimental contexts, due to their accelerated rates of evolution and short generation times. Here we investigate HIV-1 evolution by using a natural model represented by monozygotic twins infected synchronically at birth with an HIV-1 population from ...

  10. Selection dramatically reduces effective population size in HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittler John E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In HIV-1 evolution, a 100–100,000 fold discrepancy between census size and effective population size (Ne has been noted. Although it is well known that selection can reduce Ne, high in vivo mutation and recombination rates complicate attempts to quantify the effects of selection on HIV-1 effective size. Results We use the inbreeding coefficient and the variance in allele frequency at a linked neutral locus to estimate the reduction in Ne due to selection in the presence of mutation and recombination. With biologically realistic mutation rates, the reduction in Ne due to selection is determined by the strength of selection, i.e., the stronger the selection, the greater the reduction. However, the dependence of Ne on selection can break down if recombination rates are very high (e.g., r ≥ 0.1. With biologically likely recombination rates, our model suggests that recurrent selective sweeps similar to those observed in vivo can reduce within-host HIV-1 effective population sizes by a factor of 300 or more. Conclusion Although other factors, such as unequal viral reproduction rates and limited migration between tissue compartments contribute to reductions in Ne, our model suggests that recurrent selection plays a significant role in reducing HIV-1 effective population sizes in vivo.

  11. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N;

    2008-01-01

    recipients (1.5%) and 6 of the 237 placebo recipients (2.5%). The results of the two studies were consistent. At week 16, counting noncompletion as treatment failure, 355 of 458 raltegravir recipients (77.5%) had HIV-1 RNA levels below 400 copies per milliliter, as compared with 99 of 236 placebo recipients...

  12. nef gene sequence variation among HIV-1-infected African children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chakraborty, R.; Reiniš, Milan; Rostron, T.; Philpott, S.; Dong, T.; D'Agostino, A.; Musoke, R.; de Silva, E.; Stumpf, M.; Weiser, B.; Burger, H.; Rowland-Jones, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2006), s. 75-84. ISSN 1464-2662 Grant ostatní: Fogarty International Center, NIH(US) 3D43TW00915; NIH(US) RO1 AI 42555 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HIV-1 nef gene * non-clade B * Kenya Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2006

  13. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature un...

  14. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luban, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:22701176

  15. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 Infection and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Talia H.; Dubyak, George R.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 30 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent antiretroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV-1 have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV-1 pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are ...

  16. HIV-1 infected monozygotic twins: a tale of two outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Losada Marcos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replicate experiments are often difficult to find in evolutionary biology, as this field is inherently an historical science. However, viruses, bacteria and phages provide opportunities to study evolution in both natural and experimental contexts, due to their accelerated rates of evolution and short generation times. Here we investigate HIV-1 evolution by using a natural model represented by monozygotic twins infected synchronically at birth with an HIV-1 population from a shared blood transfusion source. We explore the evolutionary processes and population dynamics that shape viral diversity of HIV in these monozygotic twins. Results Despite the identical host genetic backdrop of monozygotic twins and the identical source and timing of the HIV-1 inoculation, the resulting HIV populations differed in genetic diversity, growth rate, recombination rate, and selection pressure between the two infected twins. Conclusions Our study shows that the outcome of evolution is strikingly different between these two "replicates" of viral evolution. Given the identical starting points at infection, our results support the impact of random epigenetic selection in early infection dynamics. Our data also emphasize the need for a better understanding of the impact of host-virus interactions in viral evolution.

  17. Cytokine therapies in HIV-1 infection: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Sarah L; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2003-06-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-related deaths have declined dramatically in the developed world. However, HAART is neither able to eradicate the virus nor are its immunomodulatory effects sufficient to effect complete control of the virus. In addition, the long-term use of HAART is complicated by drug-related toxicities and compliance issues, both of which impact upon the development of viral resistance. The failure of structured treatment interruption strategies in those with chronic HIV-infection combined with the above limitations, has prompted renewed interest in immunotherapy. Cytokines and therapeutic vaccination have been proposed as HAART-adjunctive and HAART-sparing treatments in HIV-infection, and the current and future role of cytokine therapy in this disease will be the subject of this review. PMID:15482104

  18. TRIM5 and the Regulation of HIV-1 Infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Luban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past ten years have seen an explosion of information concerning host restriction factors that inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses. Among these factors is TRIM5, an innate immune signaling molecule that recognizes the capsid lattice as soon as the retrovirion core is released into the cytoplasm of otherwise susceptible target cells. Recognition of the capsid lattice has several consequences that include multimerization of TRIM5 into a complementary lattice, premature uncoating of the virion core, and activation of TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Unattached, K63-linked ubiquitin chains are generated that activate the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream inflammatory mediators. Polymorphisms in the capsid recognition domain of TRIM5 explain the observed species-specific differences among orthologues and the relatively weak anti-HIV-1 activity of human TRIM5. Better understanding of the complex interaction between TRIM5 and the retrovirus capsid lattice may someday lead to exploitation of this interaction for the development of potent HIV-1 inhibitors.

  19. High risk populations and HIV-1 infection in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuo Fu ZHU; Chun Hui WANG; Peng LIN; Na HE

    2005-01-01

    China is currently experiencing one of the most rapidly expanding HIV epidemics in the world. Although the overall prevalence rate is still low, with a population of 1.3 billion, high-risk factors which have contributed to the HIV/AIDS epidemics worldwide continue to prevail in China, including a high rate of injecting drug use and needle sharing,commercial sex with low rates of condom use, and concurrent sex with both commercial sex workers and noncommercial casual or steady sex partners. In addition, there are increasing "double risk" populations overlapping drug users and sex workers, as well as increasing rates of STDs and HIV among high-risk populations. Sexual transmission,therefore, may serve as a bridge connecting high-risk populations with general populations. There is an urgent need to prevent the spread of HIV from these high-risk populations into the general population of China.

  20. Guatemalan plants extracts as virucides against HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Luis M; Alvarez, Amparo; Bermejo, Mercedes; González, Nuria; Beltrán, Manuela; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Cruz, Sully M; Gaitán, Isabel; del Olmo, Esther; Escarcena, Ricardo; García, Pablo A; Cáceres, Armando; San Feliciano, Arturo; Alcamí, José

    2008-06-01

    Prevention methods to avoid transmission of pathogens, including HIV, are crucial in the control of infectious diseases, not only to block epidemic spread but to avoid long-term treatments leading to emergence of resistances and drug associated side effects. Together with vaccine development, the discovery of new virucidal agents represents a research priority in this setting. In the screening of new compounds with antiviral activity, three Guatemalan plant extracts from Justicia reptans, Neurolaena lobata and Pouteria viridis were evaluated with a classic antiviral assay and were found to inhibit HIV replication. This activity was corroborated by an original recombinant virus assay, leading us to perform a deeper study of the virucidal activity. Active fractions were non-toxic in vitro and also inhibited other enveloped viruses. Moreover, these fractions were able to inhibit the transfer of HIV from dendritic cells (DCs) to lymphocytes, that represents the main way of HIV spread in vivo. PMID:18068962

  1. Cerebrovascular disease in children with HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Charles K; Eley, Brian; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Ndondo, Alvin; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 3.2 million children worldwide have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in prolonged survival, leading to an increase in complications previously recognized in adults. Children with HIV infection have increased risk of cerebrovascular disease from multiple aetiologies including HIV-associated vasculopathy, opportunistic vasculitis, cardioembolism or coagulopathy, all of which may be secondary to the infection. Prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children is underestimated because of limited neuroimaging in low and middle income countries, silent events without overt motor manifestations, and mislabeling as HIV encephalopathy for non-motor manifestations such as behavioural and cognitive difficulties. No management guidelines for cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children exist but common practices target risk factors for stroke in low and middle income countries. Where capacity permits, screening for opportunistic infections, vasculitis, coagulopathy and cardioembolism is important. Optimising virological suppression, correction of anaemia, control of seizures and aspirin prophylaxis are management priorities. Neurosurgical interventions may have a role. PMID:26890389

  2. Abundance of early functional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells does not predict AIDS-free survival time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M M Schellens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T-cell immunity is thought to play an important role in controlling HIV infection, and is a main target for HIV vaccine development. HIV-specific central memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 have been associated with control of viremia and are therefore hypothesized to be truly protective and determine subsequent clinical outcome. However, the cause-effect relationship between HIV-specific cellular immunity and disease progression is unknown. We investigated in a large prospective cohort study involving 96 individuals of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies with a known date of seroconversion whether the presence of cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD8(+ T cells early in infection was associated with AIDS-free survival time. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and percentage of IFNgamma and IL-2 producing CD8(+ T cells was measured after in vitro stimulation with an overlapping Gag-peptide pool in T cells sampled approximately one year after seroconversion. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models showed that frequencies of cytokine-producing Gag-specific CD8(+ T cells (IFNgamma, IL-2 or both shortly after seroconversion were neither associated with time to AIDS nor with the rate of CD4(+ T-cell decline. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that high numbers of functional HIV-specific CD8(+ T cells can be found early in HIV infection, irrespective of subsequent clinical outcome. The fact that both progressors and long-term non-progressors have abundant T cell immunity of the specificity associated with low viral load shortly after seroconversion suggests that the more rapid loss of T cell immunity observed in progressors may be a consequence rather than a cause of disease progression.

  3. HIV Antiretroviral Resistance Mutations Among Antiretroviral Treatment-Naive and -Experienced Patients in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Yong Chan; Oh, Dong Hyun; Choi, Heun; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Sun Bean; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of HIV drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive and ART-experienced patients in South Korea. A total of 50 ART-naive and 34 ART-experienced Korean HIV-1-infected patients who visited an urban hospital from February 2007 to March 2011 were included. Most patients (86.9%) were infected with clade B HIV-1. Six (12%) ART-naive and 22 (64.7%) ART-experienced patients had HIV strains with resistance...

  4. Diphtheria Antibodies and T lymphocyte Counts in Patients Infected with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. B. Speranza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the IgG levels anti-diphtheria (D-Ab and T cell counts (CD4+ and CD8+ in HIV-1 infected subjects undergoing or not highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Approximately 70% of all HIV-1 patients were unprotected against diphtheria. There were no differences in D-Ab according to CD4 counts. Untreated patients had higher D-Ab (geometric mean of 0.62 IU/ml than HAART-patients (geometric mean of 0.39 IU/ml. The data indicated the necessity of keeping all HIV-1 patients up-to-date with their vaccination.

  5. Comparison of hydroxychloroquine with zidovudine in asymptomatic patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, K; Chiang, G; Chen, H; Ross, W; Chusid, E; Gonchar, M; Chow, R; Liriano, O

    1997-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an antimalarial agent used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, has been shown to suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in T cells and monocytes in vitro by inhibiting posttranscriptional modification of the virus. An initial randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in 38 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients who had CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3 demonstrated that the amount of recoverable virus declined significantly in the HCQ group compared with the placebo group over the 8-week study period. These preliminary observations were expanded into a second 16-week clinical trial comparing the efficacy of HCQ with that of zidovudine (ZDV) in 72 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients with CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either HCQ 800 mg/d (n = 35) or ZDV 500 mg/d (n = 37) for 16 weeks. No adverse reactions to the study medications were observed in either the HCQ or ZDV group. Patients in both groups had reduced levels of recoverable HIV-1 RNA in the plasma, reduced levels of cultured virus, and reduced levels of serum p24 antigen after the 16-week study period. However, no difference was noted in absolute CD4+ counts between the two groups. Interleukin-6 and serum immunoglobulin G levels were significantly reduced in the HCQ group but not in the ZDV group. These findings support the results of the previous clinical trial. Thus HCQ may be potentially useful in the treatment of patients with HIV-1 infection. PMID:9385480

  6. Differential effects of sex in a West African cohort of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Esbjörnsson, Joakim;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Several studies have reported conflicting effects of sex on HIV-1 infection. We describe differences in baseline characteristics and assess the impact of sex on HIV progression among patients at a clinic with many HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. METHODS: This study utilised...... visit until initiation of ART, death or loss to follow-up using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: A total of 5694 patients were included in the study, 3702 women (65%) and 1992 men (35%). Women were more likely than men to be infected with HIV-2 (19% vs. 15%, P < 0.01) or dually infected with HIV...

  7. CD4、CCR5、CXCR4和DC-SIGN分子在 HIV-1感染者及正常人晚孕胎盘及早孕绒毛的表达%Experssion ofCD4, CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN in chorionic villi and human placentae with or without HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董晓梅; 董杉; 彭淋; 蔡卫平; 禤庆山; 王辉; 王自能; 王声湧

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of HIV-1 receptors CD4, co-receptors CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN in human placenta and chorionic villi and to explore the mechanism of in-utero transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1( HIV-1). Methods 11 placentas from HIV-1 seropositive women, 13 placentas from normal placentas and 10 cases of early pregnancy abortion villi were collected. Immunohistochemistry method was used to detect the expression of CD4, CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN. Results There were individual differences of CD4 expression in placenta , the positive rate of the three groups was 70.00% , 61. 54% and 72. 73% , respectively. There was no statistical difference among three groups. All of CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN had positive expression in the placenta, they all located at the trophoblast cells and stromal of villi. The level of CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN expression in chorionic villi from first trimester were lower than those in placentas from the third trimester, the difference among the three groups was significant (t1=-4. 09,P1<0.001;t2 =-4. 80,P2<0. 001;t3 = -4. 57,P3 =0. 001). Conclusions With the expression of CD4, CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN, placenta possessed the molecular basis of HIV-1 infection. There are individual differences in the expression of CD4 molecules in trophoblast cells. The expressions of CCR5 , CXCR4 and DC-SIGN molecules in the placenta from the third trimester were higher than those in chorionic villi from first trimester, which might be related with the fact that most of MTCT occurred at the third trimester stage.%目的 明确CD4、CCR5、CXCR4和DC-SIGN分子在HIV-1不同感染状态晚孕胎盘和早孕绒毛的存在及表达情况,为探索HIV-1宫内传播的分子机制提供理论依据.方法 收集11例HIV-1感染孕妇胎盘、13例正常孕妇胎盘和10例早孕流产绒毛,免疫组化检测并比较3组孕妇胎盘或绒毛组织中HIV-1相关受体CD4、CCR5、CXCR4和DC -SIGN分子的存在

  8. Predictors of attrition and immunological failure in HIV-1 patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy from different healthcare settings in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palladino

    Full Text Available In Mozambique, the evaluation of retention in HIV care and ART programmes is limited. To assess rate and predictors of attrition (no retention in care and HAART effectiveness in HIV-1 infected patients who pay for medication and laboratory testing in Mozambique, we conducted a multicenter survey of HIV-1-infected patients who started HAART during 2002-2006. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess risk of attrition and of therapy failure. Overall, 142 patients from 16 healthcare centers located in the capital city Maputo were followed-up for 22.2 months (12.1-46.7. The retention rate was 75%, 48% and 37% after one, two and three years, respectively. Risk of attrition was lower in patients with higher baseline CD4 count (P = 0.022 and attending healthcare center 1 (HCC1 (P = 0.013. The proportion of individuals with CD4 count ≤ 200 cells/µL was 55% (78/142 at baseline and decreased to 6% (3/52 at 36 months. Among the patients with available VL, 86% (64/74 achieved undetectable VL levels. The rate of immunologic failure was 17.2% (95% CI: 12.6-22.9 per 100 person-years. Risk of failure was associated to higher baseline CD4 count (P = 0.002, likely reflecting low adherence levels, and decreased with baseline VL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL (P = 0.033. These results suggest that HAART can be effective in HIV-1 infected patients from Mozambique that pay for their medication and laboratory testing. Further studies are required to identify the causes for low retention rates in patients with low CD4 counts and to better understand the association between healthcare setting and attrition rate.

  9. Disseminated cryptococcosis in a patient with advanced HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krishna Prasad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients has prolonged survival and reduced the frequency of opportunistic infections (OI. However, following starting of antiretroviral therapy (ART, some patients experience a paradoxical worsening of clinical condition termed as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS an entity, characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to a preexisting antigen or pathogen. Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the important pathogens that can cause an IRIS, in patients with low CD 4 cell counts in HIV patients. It is important to consider the possibility of cryptococcal infection in patients with advanced HIV infection, look for cryptococcal antigen in serum and cerebrospinal fluid along with blood culture. Blood cultures should be kept for further incubation for slow growing organisms by as demonstrated in the present case. We herewith report a case of IRIS due to cryptococcal meningitis in a patient with HIV1 infection with very low CD4 counts.

  10. Affective disorders in patients with HIV infection: impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, affective disorders (such as depressed mood) were seen in a considerable number of HIV-1-infected individuals. These disorders were a result of the poor physical condition of the patients, brain involvement by the virus (e.g. encephalopathy) or a reaction to disadvantageous living conditions (losing friends, jobs, etc.). In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), mental illness related to physical weakness is declining, as is the incidence of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. However, depressed mood and fatigue caused by efavirenz (a standard component of HAART) is becoming increasingly important, particularly in individuals who are infected long-term with HIV-1. Whatever the cause of affective disorders, their presence has been shown to negatively influence adherence to HAART and HIV-1 disease progression. Specialist knowledge of HIV-1 infection, and HAART and its psychiatric complications (particularly in subgroups of patients such as drug abusers and older people), is needed to care adequately for patients. Furthermore, prospective studies are needed to more fully differentiate between the various aetiologies of affective disorders seen in individuals living with HIV/AIDS and to determine their incidence and prevalence. Such information is important to ensure that affective disorders are recognised and adequately treated, which will in turn improve the efficacy of HAART. PMID:16734500

  11. Expression of Interleukin-15 and Interleukin-15Rα in Monocytes of HIV Type 1-Infected Patients with Different Courses of Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Tarkowski, Maciej; Ferraris, Laurenzia; Martone, Sara; Strambio de Castillia, Francesco; Misciagna, Donatella; Mazzucchelli, Renata I.; Lattuada, Emanuela; Paraninfo, Giuseppe; Galli, Massimo; Riva, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) enhances the effector mechanisms of anti-HIV immune responses and thus is considered a potential adjuvant of HIV-1 vaccine. However, there are a lack of data concerning the relationships between IL-15 expression and regulation in HIV-1-infected patients and the course of disease progression. We found that IL-15, but not IL-15Rα, is expressed at significantly higher levels in the CD14+ monocytes [stimulated or not with interferon (IFN)-γ] of long-term nonprogressors (LTN...

  12. Astrocyte apoptosis induced by HIV-1 transactivation of the c-kit protooncogene

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jianglin; Decastro, Carlos M.; Vandenbark, George R.; Busciglio, Jorge; Gabuzda, Dana

    1997-01-01

    HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS) frequently causes dementia and other neurological disorders. The mechanisms of CNS injury in HIV-1 infection are poorly understood. Apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes is induced by HIV-1 infection in vitro and in brain tissue from AIDS patients, but the apoptotic stimuli have not been identified. We report herein that HIV-1 infection of primary brain cultures induces the receptor tyrosine kinase protooncogene c-kit and that high levels of c...

  13. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case.

  14. Analysis of Th17 and Tc17 Frequencies and Antiviral Defenses in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue of Chronic HIV-1 Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella d’Ettorre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex relationship between both the Th1/Th17 and Tc1/Tc17 axis and innate defences in the intestinal mucosa during HIV-1 infection has not been well characterized. This study examined the frequency, phenotype, and functional status of T cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients on therapy, focusing on the Th1, Th17, Tc1, and Tc17 cell subsets. We found a persistent immune cell activation (CD38 and HLADR expression into the GALT despite the higher levels of Th17 and Tc17 in respect to peripheral blood. An upregulation of type I IFN response in GALT compared to the peripheral blood compartment was also recorded. Furthermore, IFN-α/β levels were negatively related to the frequencies of Th1 naïve cells and Tc1 cell subsets (naïve, central memory, and effector memory in the GALT. In contrast, no relationships between type I IFN response and Th1 or Tc1 cell subsets in peripheral blood compartment and between IFN-α/β and Th17/Tc17 in both GALT and peripheral blood district were recorded. These data indicate that prolonged antiretroviral treatment improves GALT immune function despite the persistence of immune activation and type I IFN response in chronic HIV-1 positive patients.

  15. Analysis of Th17 and Tc17 Frequencies and Antiviral Defenses in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue of Chronic HIV-1 Positive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Andreotti, Mauro; Selvaggi, Carla; Giustini, Noemi; Serafino, Sara; Schietroma, Ivan; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido; Vullo, Vincenzo; Scagnolari, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The complex relationship between both the Th1/Th17 and Tc1/Tc17 axis and innate defences in the intestinal mucosa during HIV-1 infection has not been well characterized. This study examined the frequency, phenotype, and functional status of T cell populations in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients on therapy, focusing on the Th1, Th17, Tc1, and Tc17 cell subsets. We found a persistent immune cell activation (CD38 and HLADR expression) into the GALT despite the higher levels of Th17 and Tc17 in respect to peripheral blood. An upregulation of type I IFN response in GALT compared to the peripheral blood compartment was also recorded. Furthermore, IFN-α/β levels were negatively related to the frequencies of Th1 naïve cells and Tc1 cell subsets (naïve, central memory, and effector memory) in the GALT. In contrast, no relationships between type I IFN response and Th1 or Tc1 cell subsets in peripheral blood compartment and between IFN-α/β and Th17/Tc17 in both GALT and peripheral blood district were recorded. These data indicate that prolonged antiretroviral treatment improves GALT immune function despite the persistence of immune activation and type I IFN response in chronic HIV-1 positive patients. PMID:26221062

  16. CD8+ T lymphocytes of patients with AIDS maintain normal broad cytolytic function despite the loss of human immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the authors have investigated the potential mechanisms responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of HIV-1 infection. They have demonstrated that HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are predominantly contained within the CD8+DR+ subset. Furthermore, they have shown by a redirected killing assay that there is a dichotomy between HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity and broad cytolytic potential since the cytolytic machinery of CD8+DR+ cells is still functioning even in patients with AIDS who have lost their HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity. In addition, by comparative analysis of these two types of cytolytic activity over time they have demonstrated a progressive loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of the disease, whereas the cytolytic potential remained unchanged regardless of the clinical stage. On the basis of these results, they propose that the loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in HIV-1-infected individuals may result at least in part from a progressive decrease in the pool of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes belonging to the CD8+DR+ subset whose ability to expand has been impaired

  17. HIV-1 Continues To Replicate and Evolve in Patients with Natural Control of HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Kearney, Mary; Wiegand, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms leading to the natural control of HIV-1 infection is of great importance for vaccine design and for understanding viral pathogenesis. Rare HIV-1-infected individuals, termed HIV-1 controllers, have plasma HIV-1 RNA levels below the limit of detection by standard clinical...

  18. HIV-1 primary drug resistance mutations in antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients in Istanbul, Turkey

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    F Tabak

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the official information of Turkish Ministry of Health of HIV/AIDS surveillance data, in the period 1985 to the end of 2011, there are 4826 HIV-1 infected cases in Turkey. However, there is no data available on the antiretroviral (ART drug resistance. The objective of this study was to determine primary drug resistance in HIV-1 infections in newly diagnosed, ART-naïve Turkish patients in Istanbul, Turkey. The study was carried out between June 2009 and June 2012 and 59 HIV-1-infected patients were included (gender; 52 male/7 female, age, median years (range; 37.9 (20–57, CD4+ T-cell count, median mm3 (range; 280 (3–813, HIV-RNA load, median IU/ml (range; 4.1 + E5 (2.6 + E3–2.9 + E6. For HIV-1 subtyping most widely known algorithm; the HIVdb-Stanford University genotypic resistance interpretation algorithm has been used. According to population-based sequencing of the reverse transcriptase and protease genes of HIV-1, the patients had pre-existing primary ART drug resistance mutations and were related to NRTIs (M41L, D67N, T215D, T215E, T215S, NNRTIs (V179D and PIs (I54V, V82A. The prevalence of overall primary ART drug resistance were 11.8% (7/59 in Turkish patients and according to NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs drug groups were 10% (6/59, 1.7% (1/59 and 1.7% (1/59, respectively (in one patient has been either NRTIs and PIs resistance detected. The high prevalence of HIV-1 primary drug resistance in ART-naïve patients suggested the resistance testing must be an integral part of the management of HIV infection and the choice of first-line therapy regime should be guided by genotypic resistance interpretation in Turkey.

  19. Diversidade e prevalência das mutações de resistência genotípica aos antirretrovirais entre crianças infectadas pelo HIV-1 Diversity and prevalence of antiretroviral genotypic resistance mutations among HIV-1-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia J. Almeida

    2009-04-01

    que é compatível com o uso ARV nesses pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate genotyping and subtyping in antiretroviral (ARV naïve and experienced children, as well as drug resistance profiles through genotyping in these children. METHODS: This retrospective study assessed ARV-naïve HIV children and HIV children failing highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART followed up at Santa Casa de São Paulo. Genotyping was performed using purified polymerase chain reaction (PCR products from retrotranscribed RNA using Kit Viroseq HIV-1 Genotyping System 2.0 or nested PCR in-house. Sequencing was performed using automatic equipment (ABI 3100. ARV resistance mutations were analyzed in the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database and subtyping was performed at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, using SimPlot analysis, together with phylogenetic analysis. RESULTS: No primary ARV resistance mutation was detected in the 24 ARV-naïve children, although there were mutations that may contribute to resistance to nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI (12.5% and to protease inhibitors (PI (95.8%. For the 23 children failing HAART, we found ARV resistance mutations to NRTI in 95.6% and to non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI in 60.8%. For PI, we found ARV resistance mutations in 95.7%, 47.8% of which had only polymorfisms. In the subtyping analyses, 78.3% of the sequences clustered in HIV-1 subtype B, 4.3% in C, 13% in F and 4.4% in recombinant forms. CONCLUSION: Our results show low rates of primary resistance in ARV-naïve children and high rates of resistance in children failing ARV treatment, which is compatible with ARV use in these patients.

  20. PENTA 2009 guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy in paediatric HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Welch, Steve; Sharland, Mike;

    2009-01-01

    either a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a boosted protease inhibitor (PI) remains the first choice combination. Lamivudine and abacavir are the NRTI backbone of choice for most children, based on long-term follow-up in the PENTA 5 trial. Stavudine is no longer recommended...

  1. DMPD: HIV-1 infection and regulation of Tat function in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  2. Safeguard against DNA sensing: The role of TREX1 in HIV-1 infection and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eYan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune recognition is crucial for host responses against viral infections, including infection by human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1. Human cells detect such invading pathogens with a collection of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that activate the production of antiviral proteins, such as the cytokine interferon-type I, to initiate antiviral responses immediately as well as the adaptive immune response for long-term protection. To establish infection in the host, many viruses have thus evolved strategies for subversion of these mechanisms of innate immunity. For example, acute infection by HIV-1 and other retroviruses have long been thought to be non-immunogenic, signifying suppression of host defenses by these pathogens. Studies in the past few years have begun to uncover a multifaceted scheme of how HIV-1 evades innate immune detection, especially of its DNA, by exploiting host proteins. This review will discuss the host mechanisms of HIV-1 DNA sensing and viral immune evasion, with a particular focus on TREX1, a host 3’ to 5’ exodeoxyribonuclease (also known as DNase III.

  3. HLA-C increases HIV-1 infectivity and is associated with gp120

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    Beretta Alberto

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recently identified genetic polymorphism located in the 5' region of the HLA-C gene is associated with individual variations in HIV-1 viral load and with differences in HLA-C expression levels. HLA-C has the potential to restrict HIV-1 by presenting epitopes to cytotoxic T cells but it is also a potent inhibitor of NK cells. In addition, HLA-C molecules incorporated within the HIV-1 envelope have been shown to bind to the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and enhance viral infectivity. We investigated this last property in cell fusion assays where the expression of HLA-C was silenced by small interfering RNA sequences. Syncytia formation was analyzed by co-cultivating cell lines expressing HIV-1 gp120/gp41 from different laboratory and primary isolates with target cells expressing different HIV-1 co-receptors. Virus infectivity was analyzed using pseudoviruses. Molecular complexes generated during cell fusion (fusion complexes were purified and analyzed for their HLA-C content. Results HLA-C positive cells co-expressing HIV-1 gp120/gp41 fused more rapidly and produced larger syncytia than HLA-C negative cells. Transient transfection of gp120/gp41 from different primary isolates in HLA-C positive cells resulted in a significant cell fusion increase. Fusion efficiency was reduced in HLA-C silenced cells compared to non-silenced cells when co-cultivated with different target cell lines expressing HIV-1 co-receptors. Similarly, pseudoviruses produced from HLA-C silenced cells were significantly less infectious. HLA-C was co-purified with gp120 from cells before and after fusion and was associated with the fusion complex. Conclusion Virionic HLA-C molecules associate to Env and increase the infectivity of both R5 and X4 viruses. Genetic polymorphisms associated to variations in HLA-C expression levels may therefore influence the individual viral set point not only by means of a regulation of the virus-specific immune response but also via a direct effect on the virus replicative capacity. These findings have implications for the understanding of the HIV-1 entry mechanism and of the role of Env conformational modifications induced by virion-associated host proteins.

  4. Evidence for biphasic uncoating during HIV-1 infection from a novel imaging assay

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Hongzhan; Franks, Tamera; Gibson, Gregory; Huber, Kelly; Rahm, Nadia; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Luban, Jeremy; Aiken, Christopher; Watkins, Simon; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Uncoating of the HIV-1 core plays a critical role during early post-fusion stages of infection but is poorly understood. Microscopy-based assays are unable to easily distinguish between intact and partially uncoated viral cores. Results In this study, we used 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to label viral-associated RNA during HIV production. At early time points after infection with EU-labeled virions, the viral-associated RNA was stained with an EU-specific dye and was detected by confoca...

  5. Human defensins 5 and 6 enhance HIV-1 infectivity through promoting HIV attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wuyuan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent sexually transmitted infections (STIs increase the likelihood of HIV transmission. The levels of defensins are frequently elevated in genital fluids from individuals with STIs. We have previously shown that human defensins 5 and 6 (HD5 and HD6 promote HIV entry and contribute to Neisseria gonorrhoeae-mediated enhancement of HIV infectivity in vitro. In this study, we dissect the molecular mechanism of the HIV enhancing effect of defensins. Results HD5 and HD6 primarily acted on the virion to promote HIV infection. Both HD5 and HD6 antagonized the anti-HIV activities of inhibitors of HIV entry (TAK 779 and fusion (T-20 when the inhibitors were present only during viral attachment; however, when these inhibitors were added back during viral infection they overrode the HIV enhancing effect of defensins. HD5 and HD6 enhanced HIV infectivity by promoting HIV attachment to target cells. Studies using fluorescent HIV containing Vpr-GFP indicated that these defensins enhanced HIV attachment by concentrating virus particles on the target cells. HD5 and HD6 blocked anti-HIV activities of soluble glycosaminoglycans including heparin, chondroitin sulfate, and dextran sulfate. However, heparin, at a high concentration, diminished the HIV enhancing effect of HD5, but not HD6. Additionally, the degree of the HIV enhancing effect of HD5, but not HD6, was increased in heparinase-treated cells. These results suggest that HD5 and haparin/heparan sulfate compete for binding to HIV. Conclusions HD5 and HD6 increased HIV infectivity by concentrating virus on the target cells. These defensins may have a negative effect on the efficacy of microbicides, especially in the setting of STIs.

  6. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  7. Diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants using dried blood spots in Tamil Nadu, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Anitha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis of HIV infection in infants is difficult due to the presence of maternal antibodies; only nucleic acid assays are very helpful in early detection. Filter papers are especially useful for blood collection in resource-poor settings with limited access to diagnostic facilities. Materials & Methods: DBS samples were collected from the infants born to HIV seropositive mothers who had received single dose nevirapine at onset of labor. The samples were directly spotted onto the Whatman 903 cards from heel, big toe or finger prick depending on the age of the infants. A total of 766 infant samples were collected on dried blood spots (DBS and transported to the Department of Experimental Medicine (DEM, Chennai, for testing from different government hospitals of rural and urban parts of Tamil Nadu, South India. According to National AIDS Control Organization′s (NACO protocol DNA was extracted from all these DBS and PCR was performed using the Roche kit version 1.5. Results: Fifteen infants were found to be HIV positive and 751 were HIV negative; all these 15 positive infants and 49 negative infants who were in the age group between 10 and 18 months were repeated with another DBS and compared with whole blood. The DBS results were concordant with the whole blood method and the sensitivity and specificity were 100%.

  8. Neurobehavioral effects of HIV-1 infection in China and the United States: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Cysique, Lucette A.; Jin, Hua; Franklin, Donald R.; Morgan, Erin E.; Shi, Chuan; Yu, Xin; Wu, Zunyou; Taylor, Michael J.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Letendre, Scott; Ake, Christopher; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in China has been increasing exponentially, yet there have been no studies of the neurobehavioral effects of HIV infection in that country. Most neuroAIDS research has been conducted in Western countries using Western neuropsychological (NP) methods, and it is unclear whether these testing methods are appropriate for use in China. Twenty-eight HIV seropositive (HIV+) and twenty-three HIV seronegative (HIV−) individuals with comparable gender, age, and education distributions ...

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid signs of neuronal damage after antiretroviral treatment interruption in HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Deeks Steven G; Hagberg Lars; Rosengren Lars; Gisslén Magnus; Price Richard W

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The neurofilament is a major structural component of myelinated axons. Increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the light chain of the neurofilament protein (NFL) can serve as a sensitive indicator of central nervous system (CNS) injury. To assess whether interrupting antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection might have a deleterious effect on the CNS, we measured NFL levels in HIV-infected subjects interrupting therapy. We identified subjects who had CSF HIV ...

  10. Plasma cytokine levels in Tanzanian HIV-1-infected adults and the effect of antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haissman, J.M.; Vestergaard, L.S.; Sembuche, S.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role immune activation leading to the production and circulation of cytokines has in the pathogenesis of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa and the effect of antiretroviral treatment (ART) on these parameters. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TN...

  11. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J;

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the im...

  12. New therapy to revert dysfunctional antibody responses during HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chiodi, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Individuals infected with HIV-1 progress to AIDS at different rates. Rapid progressors develop AIDS within 2–5 years of initial infection, compared with approximately 10 years in typical progressors. Progression to AIDS is associated with impaired humoral and cellular immunity. In this issue of the JCI, Titanji and colleagues report that activated memory B (mBAct) cells are depleted in SIV-infected macaques defined as rapid progressors. Depletion was mediated by programmed death-1 (PD-1) and ...

  13. PENTA 2009 guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy in paediatric HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Steve; Sharland, Mike; Lyall, E G Hermione; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Niehues, Tim; Wintergerst, Uwe; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Hainaut, Marc; Della Negra, Marinella; Pena, Maria José Mellado; Amador, José Tomas Ramos; Gattinara, Guido Castelli; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Faye, Albert; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gibb, Diana M; Gandhi, Kate; Forcat, Silvia; Buckberry, Karen; Harper, Lynda; Königs, Christoph; Patel, Deepak; Bastiaans, Diane

    2009-11-01

    PENTA Guidelines aim to provide practical recommendations for treating children with HIV infection in Europe. Changes to guidance since 2004 have been informed by new evidence and by expectations of better outcomes following the ongoing success of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participation in PENTA trials of simplifying treatment is encouraged. The main changes are in the following sections: 'When to start ART': Treatment is recommended for all infants, and at higher CD4 cell counts and percentages in older children, in line with changes to adult guidelines. The number of age bands has been reduced to simplify and harmonize with other paediatric guidelines. Greater emphasis is placed on CD4 cell count in children over 5 years, and guidance is provided where CD4% and CD4 criteria differ. 'What to start with': A three-drug regimen of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) with either a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a boosted protease inhibitor (PI) remains the first choice combination. Lamivudine and abacavir are the NRTI backbone of choice for most children, based on long-term follow-up in the PENTA 5 trial. Stavudine is no longer recommended. Whether to start with an NNRTI or PI remains unclear, but PENPACT 1 trial results in 2009 may help to inform this. All PIs should be ritonavir boosted. Recommendations on use of resistance testing, therapeutic drug monitoring and HLA testing draw from data in adults and from European paediatric cohort studies. Recently updated US and WHO paediatric guidelines provide more detailed review of the evidence base. Differences between guidelines are highlighted and explained. PMID:19878352

  14. Once vs. twice-daily lopinavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected children

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether once daily (q.d.) lopinavir/ritonavir is noninferior to twice daily (b.i.d.) dosing in children. Design: International, multicentre, phase II/III, randomized, open-label, noninferiority trial (KONCERT/PENTA18/ANRS150). Setting: Clinical centres participating in the PENTA, HIV-NAT and PHPT networks. Participants: Children/adolescents with HIV-1 RNA viral load less than 50 copies/ml for at least 24 weeks on lopinavir/ritonavir-containing antiretroviral therapy. In...

  15. Once-Daily, Single-Tablet Regimens For the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, William R.; Schafer, Jason J.; Short, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Once-daily, single-tablet regimens have become integral to the management of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection, partly because they may improve adherence due to a lower pill burden. This article reviews the single-tablet options.

  16. Molecular signatures of T-cell inhibition in HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M.; Che, Karlhans F; Saeidi, Alireza; Ellegård, Rada; Barathan, Muttiah; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2013-01-01

    Cellular immune responses play a crucial role in the control of viral replication in HIV-infected individuals. However, the virus succeeds in exploiting the immune system to its advantage and therefore, the host ultimately fails to control the virus leading to development of terminal AIDS. The virus adopts numerous evasion mechanisms to hijack the host immune system. We and others recently described the expression of inhibitory molecules on T cells as a contributing factor for suboptimal T-ce...

  17. Complement-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, A M; Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1997-01-01

    We investigated if complement-mediated enhancement of HIV infection occurs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In 7 experiments, we evaluated the effect of human complement on HIVIIIB infection in vitro. We measured HIV antigen production on day 4 and found that pre-incubation of HIV with...

  18. Hormonal Contraception and HIV-1 Infection: Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Huijbregts, Richard P. H.; Helton, E. Scott; Katherine G Michel; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Richter, Holly E.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Hel, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    Recent observational studies indicate an association between the use of hormonal contraceptives and acquisition and transmission of HIV-1. The biological and immunological mechanisms underlying the observed association are unknown. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a progestin-only injectable contraceptive that is commonly used in regions with high HIV-1 prevalence. Here we show that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) suppresses the production of key regulators of cellular and humora...

  19. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Bhavna H; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-08-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants. PMID:25819584

  20. HIV-1 Infection of Placental Cord Blood Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    FOLCIK, RENEE M.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Li, Yuan; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Douglas, Steven D.; STARR, STUART E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), have been implicated as the initial targets of HIV infection in skin and mucosal surfaces. DC can be generated in vitro from blood-isolated CD14+ monocytes or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells in the presence of various cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether monocytes obtained from placental cord blood are capable of differentiation into dendritic cells when cultured with a combination of cytokines—granulocyte...

  1. The growth of human HIV-1 infected U937 cells in immune-deprived mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernukhin, I V; Chepurnov, A A; Gaidul, K V

    1995-01-01

    We report in vivo growth of human promonocytic cells infected with HIV-1 presented in new mouse model. Cloned U937 cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were grafted in (CBA*C57B1/6)F1 mice deprived of immunity by thymectomia and total body irradiation with subsequent marrow reconstitution. Nine weeks after cell inoculation, HIV-1-positive cells were found only in mice that received an additional single dose of cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg bw) prior to transplantation, whereas, in mice without further immune deprivation, the complete elimination of cells bearing viral antigen occurred already on the seventh day after transplantation. The approach described may be suitable for in vivo development of antiviral drugs against latent infection in macrophage-like cells which represent a serious problem in therapy of AIDS in humans. PMID:8562863

  2. Inter-Laboratory Assessment of a Prototype Multiplex Kit for Determination of Recent HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Kelly A.; Longosz, Andrew F.; Kennedy, M. Susan; Keating, Sheila; Heitman, John; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Owen, S. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. Methods To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laborator...

  3. CCL3L gene copy number and survival in an HIV-1 infected Zimbabwean population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Wegner, Lise Thørner; Zinyama, Rutendo;

    2012-01-01

    The C-C motif chemokine ligand 3-like (CCL3L) protein is a potent chemoattractant which by binding to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry. Copy number variation (CNV) of the CCL3L has been shown to be associated with HIV susceptibility and progre.......9), viral load (P=0.9), or CCL3 protein levels (P=1.0). Survival among the HIV infected individuals did not differ according to CCL3L copy number. In this cohort, CCL3L CNV did not affect HIV status, pathogenesis, or survival.......The C-C motif chemokine ligand 3-like (CCL3L) protein is a potent chemoattractant which by binding to C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry. Copy number variation (CNV) of the CCL3L has been shown to be associated with HIV susceptibility and...... progression to AIDS, but these results have been inconsistent. We examined a Zimbabwean study population for an association of CCL3L CNV with HIV status, progression (CD4 T-cells and viral load), and survival. Another aim was to investigate the possible effects of CCL3L CNV on CCL3 protein concentration. A...

  4. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    .35 [95% CI, 1.13-1.63], respectively). CONCLUSIONS:  Plasma sCD163 was an independent marker of all-cause mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may play a role in HIV pathogenesis and be a target of intervention....... immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). METHODS:  Plasma sCD163 levels were measured in 933 HIV-infected individuals. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with mortality were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS:  At baseline, 86% were receiving antiretroviral...... treatment, 73% had plasma a HIV RNA level of <50 copies/mL, and the median CD4(+) T-cell count was 503 cells/µL. During 10.5 years of follow-up, 167 (17.9%) died. Plasma sCD163 levels were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (4.92 mg/L [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.29-8.65 mg/L] vs 3.16 mg/L [IQR, 2...

  5. Reduced release of intact and cleaved urokinase receptor in stimulated whole-blood cultures from human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Piironen, T; Høyer-Hansen, G;

    2005-01-01

    The blood levels of the soluble forms of the urokinase receptor (suPAR) are increased in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected patients. This study investigated whether the release of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in whole-blood cultures was affected by HIV infection...... controls, whereas the correlation was weaker to leucocytes and nonexisting to circulating suPAR levels in HIV patients. These findings demonstrate that HIV infection affects stimulated and spontaneous uPAR release in whole-blood cultures. Given that high blood levels of suPAR in HIV patients are linked to....... The release of different uPAR forms in whole-blood cultures incubated 24 h with or without phytohemagglutinin and lipopolysaccharide was analysed in 47 HIV patients and 19 controls. suPAR was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (bulk-suPAR) and three different time...

  6. Application of neural networks to the follow-up of AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, M; Ruggiero, C; Maillard, M; Lillo, F B; Varnier, O E

    1997-01-01

    The present work aims to obtain groups of patients with similar profiles of p24 antigen concentration and of CD4+ cell counts. These two markers were chosen because their evaluation represents a significant step in the clinical follow up of HIV-1 infected subjects. The classifications were obtained by a Kohonen neural net trained in three ways: with p24 antigen profiles only, with CD4+ cell count profiles only and with both sets of profiles. The results show that the clustering fashion of the two parameters closely resembles the clustering fashion of CD4+ only rather than the one of p24Ag, both with reference to cluster formation and with reference to distance among clusters. PMID:10179579

  7. Specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in Chinese HIV/AIDS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚红; 韩晓旭; 王亚男; 周立平; 张子宁; 姜拥军; 张旻; 于旭

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are considered to play a central role in the immune response against HIV-1. During untreated acute HIV-1 infection, virus-specific CTL activity is associated with the initial decrease in viremia.1 After HIV infection, those individuals with a slow progressive course develop stronger CTL responses than those with typical disease progression.2,3 Restoring HIV-1-specific CTL responses have been considered a key factor in immune reconstitution and vaccine development. Here we present the analysis of HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL responses in 23 Chinese HIV/AIDS cases in order to take the initial steps at identifying the epitopes that dominate the CTL response in Chinese patients.

  8. Pain and sensory function in HIV-infection : with and without antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Claes

    2000-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom throughout the course of HIV-1 infection, with a prevalence ranging between 30-80%, varying with study methodology and patient selection. Neurogenic pain may appear as a consequence of distal predominantly sensory neuropathy (DSP), a common HIV-1 related neurological complication of late HIV-1 infection, usually during the AIDS-stage of the disease. This study set out to analyse pain and sensory function in HIV-1 infected patients with and without hi...

  9. The Effect of Antiretroviral Combination Treatment on Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Genome Load in HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. C. Friis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of combination anti-retroviral treatment (cART on the host control of EBV infection in moderately immunosuppressed HIV-1 patients. Twenty HIV-1 infected individuals were followed for five years with repeated measurements of EBV DNA load in peripheral blood lymphocytes in relation to HIV-RNA titers and CD4+ cell counts. Individuals with optimal response, i.e. durable non-detectable HIV-RNA, showed a decline of EBV load to the level of healthy controls. Individuals with non-optimal HIV-1 control did not restore their EBV control. Long-lasting suppression of HIV-replication after early initiation of cART is a prerequisite for re-establishing the immune control of EBV.

  10. Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in treatment naive East-African and Caucasian patients detected by allele-specific real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halime Ekici

    Full Text Available To assess the presence of two major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI drug resistance mutations (DRMs, Y181C and K103N, in minor viral quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected East-African and Swedish patients by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR.Treatment naïve adults (n=191 with three epidemiological backgrounds were included: 92 Ethiopians living in Ethiopia; 55 East-Africans who had migrated to Sweden; and 44 Caucasians living in Sweden. The pol gene was analysed by standard population sequencing and by AS-PCR for the detection of Y181C and K103N.The Y181C was detected in the minority quasispecies of six Ethiopians (6.5%, in two Caucasians (4.5%, and in one East-African (1.8%. The K103N was detected in one East- African (1.8%, by both methods. The proportion of mutants ranged from 0.25% to 17.5%. Additional DRMs were found in all three treatment naïve patient groups by population sequencing.Major NNRTI mutations can be found by AS-PCR in minor quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected Ethiopians living in Ethiopia, in East-African and Caucasian patients living in Sweden in whom population sequencing reveal wild-type virus only. Surveys with standard sequencing are likely to underestimate transmitted drug resistance and the presence of resistant minor quasispecies in treatment naïve patients should be topic for future large scale studies.

  11. Neurologic complications of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, SangYun; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang Won

    2003-01-01

    A wide variety of neurologic complications associated with human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection result from HIV-1 itself or secondarily related to immunosuppression. In Korea, the number of HIV-1 seropositive populations is increasing, but little has been known about the neurologic complications of HIV-1 infection. To investigate the neurologic complications in HIV-1 infected Korean patients, we performed a cross-sectional study in consecutive admissions to the Seoul National...

  12. Hydroxychloroquine treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, K; Louie, M; Kraus, T; Proner, J; Sapira, E; Lin, S; Stecher, V; Mayer, L

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an antimalarial agent used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, has been shown to suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro in T cells and monocytes by inhibiting posttranscriptional modification of the virus. These in vitro observations have been expanded into an in vivo study of HCQ as a potential anti-HIV-1 agent in HIV-1-infected patients. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 40 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients who had CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either HCQ 800 mg/d or placebo for 8 weeks. Virologic and immunologic parameters, including HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) via use of polymerase chain reaction, viral culture, antigen and mitogen responses, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study. The amount of recoverable HIV-1 RNA in plasma declined significantly in the HCQ group over the 8-week period (P = 0.022), while it increased in the placebo group. The percentage of CD4+ T cells remained stable in the HCQ-treated group (18.1 +/- 9.2% before treatment vs 18.6 +/- 10.5% after treatment) and fell significantly in the placebo group (21 +/- 7% before treatment vs 19.3 +/- 6.3% after treatment; P = 0.032). However, this was not reflected as a change in absolute CD4+ counts for either group (HCQ, 262.8 +/- 166 cells/mm3 vs 251 +/- 163 cells/mm3; placebo, 312 +/- 121 cells/mm3 vs 321 +/- 124 cells/mm3). Mitogen- and antigen-specific responses remained constant in the HCQ group while T cell proliferative responses to Candida decreased in the placebo group (4.8 +/- 3.6 x 10(3) SI [stimulation index] vs 3.0 +/- 3.0 x 10(3) SI; P = 0.032). Lastly, serum interleukin 6 levels declined in the HCQ group (14.3 +/- 13.5 U/mL vs 12.0 +/- 16.7 U/mL; P = 0.023) but not in the placebo group (11.3 +/- 8.8 U/mL vs 7.0 +/- 11.7 U/mL); this was coincident with a decrease in

  13. Impact of hepatitis C virus coinfection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...

  14. HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Newly Diagnosed Antiretroviral-Naive Patients in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayan, Murat; Sargin, Fatma; Inan, Dilara; Sevgi, Dilek Y; Celikbas, Aysel K; Yasar, Kadriye; Kaptan, Figen; Kutlu, Selda; Fisgin, Nuriye T; Inci, Ayse; Ceran, Nurgul; Karaoglan, Ilkay; Cagatay, Atahan; Celen, Mustafa K; Koruk, Suda T; Ceylan, Bahadir; Yildirmak, Taner; Akalın, Halis; Korten, Volkan; Willke, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication is rapid and highly error-prone. Transmission of a drug-resistant HIV-1 strain is possible and occurs within the HIV-1-infected population. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs) in 1,306 newly diagnosed untreated HIV-1-infected patients from 21 cities across six regions of Turkey between 2010 and 2015. TDRMs were identified according to the criteria provided by the World Health Organization's 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations. The HIV-1 TDRM prevalence was 10.1% (133/1,306) in Turkey. Primary drug resistance mutations (K65R, M184V) and thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs) were evaluated together as nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations. NRTI TDRMs were found in 8.1% (107/1,306) of patients. However, TAMs were divided into three categories and M41L, L210W, and T215Y mutations were found for TAM1 in 97 (7.4%) patients, D67N, K70R, K219E/Q/N/R, T215F, and T215C/D/S mutations were detected for TAM2 in 52 (3.9%) patients, and M41L + K219N and M41L + T215C/D/S mutations were detected for the TAM1 + TAM2 profile in 22 (1.7%) patients, respectively. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated TDRMs were detected in 3.3% (44/1,306) of patients (L100I, K101E/P, K103N/S, V179F, Y188H/L/M, Y181I/C, and G190A/E/S) and TDRMs to protease inhibitors were detected in 2.3% (30/1,306) of patients (M46L, I50V, I54V, Q58E, L76V, V82A/C/L/T, N83D, I84V, and L90M). In conclusion, long-term and large-scale monitoring of regional levels of HIV-1 TDRMs informs treatment guidelines and provides feedback on the success of HIV-1 prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:26414663

  15. Association of variations of NAb 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes and disease progression in Chinese antiretroviral treatment-na(i)ve patients infected with HIV-1 clade B'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-li; JIANG Yong-jun; SHANG Hong; HAN Xiao-xu; DAI Di; BAO Ming-jia; XU Dong-bing; ZHANG Zi-ning; WANG Ya-nan; ZHAO Min; Tristan Bice

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines have recently focused on targeting the conserved neutralizing epitopes 2F5 and 4E10, and hence it is important to understand the extent of mutations in these two viral epitopes. Here, we investigated the amino acid mutations in epitopes of 2F5 (ELDKWA, HIV-1 HXB2 env 662-667 aa) and 4E10 (NWFDIT, HIV-1 HXB2 env 671-676 aa) in the membrane proximal-external region of gp41 from clade B' HIV-1-infected individuals living in Henan province, China. We also examined the frequency of a mutation and its relation to disease progression.Methods A cohort of 54 treatment-na(i)ve HIV-1-infected individuals was recruited in this study, and 16 individuals were selected for a short-term longitudinal study on sequence evolution. The HIV-1 env gp41 gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced, and predicted amino acid sequences were aligned for analysis.Results The mutations E662A and K665E on the 2F5 epitope and N671S and T676S on the 4E10 epitope were seen.Simultaneous RNA sequencing showed some discrepancies with proviral DNA sequences. In our longitudinal study,mutation levels of these two neutralizing epitopes were low but diverse and persistent. The frequencies of mutations within the 4E10 peptide NWFDIT in slow progressors were noticeably lower than those in AIDS patients (P <0.05).Conclusions Antigenic variation of the neutralizing epitopes 2F5 and 4E10 is limited in subtype B' infection, and that 4E10 peptide mutation is correlated with disease progression. Monitoring epitope mutations will offer useful data for development of the candidate 2F5-like and 4E10-like antibodies to prevent and treat AIDS.

  16. Transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey

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    Murat Sayan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs in newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive patients in Turkey. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out between 2009 and 2014 and antiretroviral naïve 774 HIV-1 infected patients from 19 Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Departments in Turkey were included; gender: 664 (86% male, median age: 37 (range; 1–77, median CD4+T-cell: 360 (range; 1–1320 count/mm3, median HIV-RNA load: 2.10+E6 (range; 4.2+E2–7.41+E8 IU/mL. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were detected by population based sequencing of the reverse transcriptase (codon 41–238 and protease (codon 1–99 domains of pol gene of HIV-1, and analyzed according to the criteria by the World Health Organization 2009 list of surveillance drug resistance mutations [1]. Results: The patients had TDRMs to NRTIs (K65R, M184V, NNRTIs (K101E, K103N/S, G190A/E/S, Y181I/C, Y188H/L and PIs (M46L, I54V, L76V, V82L/T, N83D, I84V, L90M. The prevalence of overall TDRMs was 6.7% (52/774. Resistance mutations were found to be 0.7% (6/774, 4.1% (32/774 and 2.1% (17/774 to NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs drug groups, respectively. Three patients had NRTIs+NNRTs resistance mutations (M184V+K103N as multi-class drug resistance. However, thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs determined two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and TAM2: D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and T215F. The prevalence of TAM1 and TAM2 were 7.7% (60/774 and 4.3% (34/774, respectively. Conclusions: The TDRMs prevalence of antiretroviral naïve HIV-1 infected patients may be suggested current situation of Turkey. These long-term and large-scale results show that the resistance testing must be an integral part of the management of HIV infection in Turkey.

  17. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells accumulate and secrete interferon alpha in lymph nodes of HIV-1 patients.

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    Clara Lehmann

    Full Text Available Circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC decline during HIV-1 infection, but at the same time they express markedly higher levels of interferon alpha (IFNalpha, which is associated with HIV-1 disease progression. Here we show an accumulation of pDC in lymph nodes (LN of treatment-naïve HIV-1 patients. This phenomenon was associated with elevated expression of the LN homing marker, CCR7, on pDC in peripheral blood of HIV-1 patients, which conferred increased migratory capacity in response to CCR7 ligands in ex vivo functional assays. LN-homed pDC of HIV-1 patients presented higher CD40 and lower BDCA2 levels, but unchanged CD83 and CD86 expression. In addition, these cells expressed markedly higher amounts of IFNalpha compared to uninfected individuals, and were undergoing faster rates of cell death. These results demonstrate for the first time that in asymptomatic, untreated HIV-1 patients circulating pDC up-regulate CCR7 expression, accumulate in lymph nodes, and express high amounts of IFNalpha before undergoing cell death. Since IFNalpha inhibits cell proliferation and modulates immune responses, chronically high levels of this cytokine in LN of HIV-1 patients may impair differentiation and immune function of bystander CD4(+ T cells, thus playing into the mechanisms of AIDS immunopathogenesis.

  18. Combination dolutegravir–abacavir–lamivudine in the management of HIV/AIDS: clinical utility and patient considerations

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    Cruciani M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mario Cruciani, Marina Malena Center of Community Medicine and HIV Outpatient Clinic, Infectious Diseases Unit, San Bonifacio Hospital, Verona, Italy Abstract: The current standard of care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV treatment is a three-drug regimen containing a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, a protease inhibitor, or an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI plus two nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Given their potency, safety, and distinctive mechanism of action, INSTIs represent an important advance in HIV type 1 (HIV-1 therapy. Dolutegravir (DTG is a new-generation INSTI recently approved for the treatment of HIV-1-infected adult patients, with distinct advantages compared with other available antiretroviral agents. In well-designed, large clinical trials, DTG-containing regimens have demonstrated either noninferiority or superiority to current first-line agents such as raltegravir-, darunavir/ritonavir-, and efavirenz-containing regimens. The favorable safety profile, low potential for drug interactions, minimal impact on lipids, good tolerability, and high resistance barrier of DTG makes this compound one of the preferred choices for HIV therapy in multiple clinical scenarios, including treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. DTG is the only antiretroviral drug not yet associated with de novo emergence of resistance mutations in treatment-naïve individuals. However, data from in vitro studies and clinical trial suggest the possibility of cross-resistance between first- and second-generation INSTIs. Even though these profiles are infrequent at the moment, they need to be monitored in all current patients treated with INSTIs. With its potent activity, good tolerability, simplicity of dosing, and minimal drug interaction profile, DTG will likely play a major role in the management of patients with HIV-1 infection. On the basis of clinical trial data, current guidelines endorse DTG

  19. Risk-based assessment does not distinguish between recent and chronic HIV-1 infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Monica Merçon

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the risk factors associated with recent and chronic HIV infections among individual attending a voluntary counseling and testing (VCT site in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In a cross-sectional study, recent HIV infections were detected by the sensitive/less-sensitive test, using Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS strategy, and compared to chronic HIV infection and HIV negative individuals. Seroincidence was estimated and risk factors associated with recent and chronic infections were assessed using multinomial logistic regression. Among the 7,379 individuals tested between June 2006 and April 2007, the overall prevalence and incidence of HIV infection were 7.5%; and 1.39/100 PY, respectively. In multivariate analysis, having a HIV positive steady partner was a risk factor for recent and for chronic HIV infection for MSM, heterosexual male and women. No differences in risk factors for recent and chronic infections were found between MSM and heterosexual males. Among women, chronic infected individuals were more likely than HIV negatives to be older. Recently HIV infected women were more likely than HIV negatives to be less educated; and more likely than HIV negatives and chronically infected to report having more partners. Routinely used risk-based assessment in testing centers in Brazil lack sensitivity to distinguish between recent and chronic infections, particularly among MSM and heterosexual males. Steady relationships and serosorting may be playing a key role in maintaining the HIV epidemics in Brazil.

  20. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    An, Ping; Duggal, Priya; Wang, Li Hua; O'Brien, Stephen J; Donfield, Sharyne; Goedert, James J; Phair, John; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2007-01-26

    Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3) antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein) on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+) T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+) T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009), in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10) (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001), possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+) T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+) T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy. PMID:17257057

  1. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Ping An

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3 antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+ T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+ T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009, in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10 (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001, possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+ T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+ T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy.

  2. Increased dose of lopinavir/ritonavir compensates for efavirenz-induced drug-drug interaction in HIV-1-infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, A.S.; Fraaij, P.L.; Ndagijimana, J.; Verweel, G.; Hartwig, N.G.; Niehues, T.; Groot, R. de; Burger, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimens have not yet been systematically evaluated in children. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors nevirapine and efavirenz lower plasma levels of protease inhibitors in adults and children. Therefore, coadministration o

  3. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection.

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    Holger B Kramer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, beta-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP, was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies.

  4. Utility of total lymphocyte count as a surrogate marker for CD4 counts in HIV-1 infected children in Kenya

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    Wamalwa Dalton C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In resource-limited settings, such as Kenya, access to CD4 testing is limited. Therefore, evaluation of less expensive labora