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Sample records for aids dementia complex

  1. Communication Impairment in the AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC): A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Patricia J.; Sheard, Christine; Code, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This article details three examinations of communication impairment over 13 months in a man with AIDS dementia complex (ADC) and compares his performance on standardised language testing with that of two control participants. He had mild language impairments as measured on standardised tests but was severely impaired in pragmatic language skills.…

  2. The AIDS dementia complex: clinical and basic neuroscience with implications for novel molecular therapies.

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    Navia, B A; Rostasy, K

    2005-10-01

    The AIDS dementia complex (ADC, also referred to as HIV-associated cognitive impairment) is a common disorder among HIV-infected patients associated with both inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. This review describes recent advances in the clinical and basic neurosciences of HIV infection and discusses the multivariable nature of what has become a chronic disorder in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART). Since its initial description twenty years ago, advances in cell and molecular biology along with those in neuroimaging have furthered our understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical and neuropsychological profile of ADC is generally consistent with a "frontal-subcortical" pattern of injury. Neuropathogenesis is largely driven by indirect mechanisms mediated by infected, or more commonly, immune activated macrophages, which secrete viral and host-derived factors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a robust in vivo method to measure the inflammatory and neurotoxic events triggered by these factors and their associated signals. Although the use of combined or highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has significantly improved survival rates, cerebral injury and cognitive impairment remain common events. Factors such as aging and chronic infection will likely impact the course of this disease, its pathogenesis, and treatment. The combined observations presented in this review suggest a number of critical areas for future inquiry.

  3. Quinolinic acid selectively induces apoptosis of human astrocytes: potential role in AIDS dementia complex

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    Wang Lily

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP and particularly one of its end products, quinolinic acid (QUIN play a role in the pathogenesis of several major neuroinflammatory diseases, and more particularly AIDS dementia complex (ADC. We hypothesized that QUIN may be involved in astrocyte apoptosis because: 1 apoptotic astrocytes have been observed in the brains of ADC patients, 2 ADC patients have elevated cerebrospinal fluid QUIN concentrations, and 3 QUIN can induce astrocyte death. Primary cultures of human fetal astrocytes were treated with three pathophysiological concentrations of QUIN. Numeration of apoptotic cells was assessed using double immunocytochemistry for expression of active caspase 3 and for nucleus condensation. We found that treatment of human astrocytes with QUIN induced morphological (cell body shrinking and biochemical changes (nucleus condensation and over-expression of active caspase 3 of apoptosis. After 24 hours of treatment with QUIN 500 nM and 1200 nM respectively 10 and 14% of astrocytes were undergoing apoptosis. This would be expected to lead to a relative lack of trophic support factors with consequent neuronal dysfunction and possibly death. Astroglial apoptosis induced by QUIN provides another potential mechanism for the neurotoxicity of QUIN during ADC.

  4. High level HIV-1 DNA concentrations in brain tissues differentiate patients with post-HAART AIDS dementia complex or cardiovascular disease from those with AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li; GALLIGAN Derek C.; LAMERS Susanna L.; YU Stephanie; SHAGRUN Lamia; SALEMI Marco; MCGRATH Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has had a significant Impact on survival of individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); however, with the longer life-span of patients with AIDS, there is increasing prevalence of AIDS dementia complex (ADC) and other non-AIDS-defining illness, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are also common. The influence of these varied disease processes on HIV-1 DNA concentration in brain tissues has not been thoroughly assessed in the post-HAART era. The purpose of the current study is to clarify the impacts of ADC and other complications of HIV disease on the viral load in the brains in AIDS patients with post-HARRT. We examined autopsy specimens from the brains of thirteen patients who died from complications of AIDS with quantitative poiymerase chain reaction (QPCR). All but one patient had HAART prior to death since 1995. Two patients died with severe CVD, multiple cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (CVA)throughout the brain and five patients died with ADC. Six patients had no ADC/CVA. A QPCR was used to measure the presence of HIV-1 DNA in six brain tissues (meninges, frontal grey matter, frontal white matter, temporal subcortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia). In the post-HARRT era, for non-ADC/CVA patients, HIV-1 DNA concentration in brain tissues was statistically higher than that in patients with ADC. in a new finding, two patients who suffered from severe CVD, especially CVA, also had high concentrations of HIV-1 in brain compartments not showing ADC related changes. To our knowledge,this is the first report of a relationship between the CVA and HIV-1 viral burden in brain. The current observations suggest that HAART-resistant HIV reservoirs may survive within ADC lesions of the brain as well as the macrophage rich atherosclerosis, which needs to be confirmed by more AIDS cases with CVA.

  5. Persistent neuroleptic-induced rigidity and dystonia in AIDS dementia complex: a clinico-pathological case report.

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    Factor, S A; Podskalny, G D; Barron, K D

    1994-12-01

    Patients with AIDS dementia complex (ADC) appear to have an increased likelihood of developing acute onset parkinsonism and dystonia when treated with dopamine antagonists. It has been hypothesized, based on clinical evidence, that hypersensitivity to these drugs in ADC is probably related to direct invasion of the basal ganglia by the HIV virus and a secondary alteration in dopaminergic mechanisms. We report the first pathological description of a patient with ADC who developed acute onset, generalized rigidity and dystonia after a brief trial of low dose neuroleptic therapy administered for psychotic symptoms. An unusual clinical feature of this case was the persistence of his movement disorder. Pathological examination revealed a generalized encephalitic process with substantial neuronal loss observed primarily in the medial and lateral globus pallidus. Correlation with a current model of basal ganglia pathophysiology and other disorders with pallidal lesions is discussed. Clinical and pathological features of this case confirm the previous contention and indicate that dopamine antagonists should be utilized with extreme caution in patients with ADC.

  6. High level HIV-1 DNA concentrations in brain tissues differentiate patients with post-HAART AIDS dementia complex or cardiovascular disease from those with AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GALLIGAN; Derek; C.; LAMERS; Susanna; L.; YU; Stephanie; SHAGRUN; Lamia; SALEMI; Marco; MCGRATH; Michael; S.

    2009-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment(HAART) has had a significant impact on survival of individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome(AIDS);however,with the longer life-span of patients with AIDS,there is increasing prevalence of AIDS dementia complex(ADC) and other non-AIDS-defining illness,and cardiovascular diseases(CVD) are also common.The influence of these varied disease processes on HIV-1 DNA concentration in brain tissues has not been thoroughly assessed in the post-HAART era.The purpose of the current study is to clarify the impacts of ADC and other complications of HIV disease on the viral load in the brains in AIDS patients with post-HARRT.We examined autopsy specimens from the brains of thirteen patients who died from complications of AIDS with quantitative polymerase chain reaction(QPCR).All but one patient had received HAART prior to death since 1995.Two patients died with severe CVD,multiple cerebrovascular atherosclerosis(CVA) throughout the brain and five patients died with ADC.Six patients had no ADC/CVA.A QPCR was used to measure the presence of HIV-1 DNA in six brain tissues(meninges,frontal grey matter,frontal white matter,temporal subcortex,cerebellum and basal ganglia).In the post-HARRT era,for non-ADC/CVA patients,HIV-1 DNA concentration in brain tissues was statistically higher than that in patients with ADC.In a new finding,two patients who suffered from severe CVD,especially CVA,also had high concentrations of HIV-1 in brain compartments not showing ADC related changes.To our knowledge,this is the first report of a relationship between the CVA and HIV-1 viral burden in brain.The current observations suggest that HAART-resistant HIV reservoirs may survive within ADC lesions of the brain as well as the macrophage rich atherosclerosis,which needs to be confirmed by more AIDS cases with CVA.

  7. Effect of HIV-1 Tat on Secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β by U87 Cells in AIDS Patients with or without AIDS Dementia Complex

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    ZHAO Li; PUShuangShuang; GAO WenHua; CHIYuanYuan; WENHong Ling; WANG Zhi Yu; SONGYanYan; YU Xue Jie

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveToexplore the role of HIV-1 tat gene variations in AIDSdementia complex(ADC) pathogenesis. MethodsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia of anAIDSpatient with ADC and anAIDSpatientwithoutADC were cloned for sequence analysis. HIV-1 tat genesequence alignmentwasperformed by using CLUSTAL W andthephylogentic analysiswas conductedbyusing Neighbor-joining with MEGA4 software.All tat genes wereused to construct recombinant retroviral expressing vector MSCV-IRES-GFP/tat. The MSCV-IRES-GFP/tat was cotransfected into 293T cells with pCMV-VSV-G and pUMVC vectorsto assemble the recombinant retrovirus. After infection of gliomas U87 cells with equal amount of the recombinant retrovirus, TNF-α, and IL-1β concentrations inthe supernatant of U87 cells were determined with ELISA. ResultsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia ofthe AIDS patient with ADC andtheother onewithoutADCexhibited genetic variations.Tat variations and amino acid mutation sites existed mainly at Tat protein core functional area (38-47aa). All Tat proteinscould induce U87 cells to produce TNF-α and IL-1β, but thelevel of IL-1β production was different among Tatproteins derived fromtheADC patient’s spleen, basal ganglia, andthenon-ADC patient’s spleen.The level ofTat proteinsderived fromtheADC patient’s spleen,basal ganglia, andthenon-ADC patient’sspleen were obviously higher thanthat fromthe non-ADC patient’s basal ganglia. ConclusionTat protein core functional area (38-47aa) mayserve as the key area of enhancing the secretion of IL-1β.This may be related with the neurotoxicity of HIV-1 Tat. ObjectiveToexplore the role of HIV-1 tat gene variations in AIDSdementia complex(ADC) pathogenesis. MethodsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia of anAIDSpatient with ADC and anAIDSpatientwithoutADC were cloned for sequence analysis. HIV-1 tat genesequence alignmentwasperformed by using CLUSTAL W

  8. The complex relationship between depression and dementia

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    Muliyala Krishna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and depression are mental health problems that are commonly encountered in neuropsychiatric practice in the elderly. Approximately, half of the patients with late-onset depression have cognitive impairment. The prevalence of depression in dementias has been reported to be between 9 and 68%. Depression has been both proposed to be a risk factor for dementia as well as a prodrome of dementia. This article is a selective literature review of the complex relationship between the two conditions covering definitions, epidemiology, related concepts, treatment, and emerging biomarkers. The methodological issues and the mechanisms underlying the relationship are also highlighted. The relationship between the two disorders is far from conclusive.

  9. HIV-1B gp120 genes from one patient with AIDS dementia complex can affect the secretion of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin in glial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yu-fen; WANG Zhi-yu; PU Shuang-shuang; WEN Hong-ling; HUANG Tao; SONG Yan-yan; XU Hong-zhi; ZHAO Li

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infected and immune-activated macrophages and microglia secrete neurotoxins,such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β),which play major role in the neuronal death.It has been shown that different HIV-1 variants have varying abilities to elicit secretion of TNF-α by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC); however,whether the difference of gp120 gene could affect the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β by glial cells is unknown.The aim of this study was to explore the association between gene diversity and induction of neurotoxic cytokines.Methods In this study,we constructed retroviral vectors MSCV-IRES-GFP/gp120 using HIV-1 gp120 genes isolated from four different tissues of one patient who died of AIDS dementia complex (ADC).Recombinant retroviruses produced by cotransfection of MSCV-IRES-GFP/gp120,pCMV-VSV-G and pUMVC into 293T cells were collected and added into U87 glial cells.Concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β secreted by transduced U87 cells were assayed with ELISA separately.Results The four HIV-1 gp120 were in the different branch of the neighbor-joining tree.Compared to the pMIG retrovirus (gp120-negative) or U87 cells,all the gp120-positive recombinant retroviruses induced more TNF-α (P <0.01) and IL-1β (P <0.01).In addition,compared with the L/MIG retrovirus,all the three brain gp120-positive recombinant retroviruses induced less TNF-α (P <0.01) and IL-1β (P <0.01).Conclusions HIV-1 gp120 could induce U87 cells secret more TNF-α and IL-1β again.The more important is that difference of HIV-1 gp120,especially cell-tropism may account for the different ability in eliciting secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β,which might supply a novel idea helping understand the pathogenesis of ADC.

  10. EEG and dementia indicators in AIDS patients' Rorschach test

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    G. Fernandes do Prado

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the EEG and Rorschach test (RT of nineteen AIDS patients and eight normal people in the same age group. Eight patients presented slow alpha rhythms (8 to 9 Hz; three, not-slow alpha rhythms (>9 to 13Hz; and eight, beta rhythms in background activity. Paroxystic activity, characterized by diffuse theta or delta waves, was present in eleven patients. We observed Oberholzer syndrome (organic dementia diagnosed by RT in ten patients and Piotrowski syndrome (organic dementia diagnosed by RT in eleven patients; six presented both. When considering only the group of AIDS patients, we did not observe a significant relation among slow alpha rhythm, not-slow alpha rhythm and the presence of paroxystic activity with the above-mentioned syndromes. AIDS patients with slow alpha rhythms showed a significantly greater number of Piotrowski syndrome dementia indicators when compared to normal individuals or those with slow alpha rhythms. We did not observe the same with Oberholzer syndrome.

  11. The Complex Picture Test in Dementia

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    K. Gustaw Rothenberg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed Complex Picture Test (CPT examines main cognitive domains, especially perceptual and visual-spatial abilities. The potential usefulness of the CPT in the assessment of dementia was evaluated. Patients with different forms of dementia [14 vascular dementia (VaD, 30 Alzheimer’s disease (AD, 6 Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD], 12 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and 30 matched controls were examined by the CPT, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the WAIS-R Digit Span subtest, and the Clock Drawing Test (CDT. The CPT consists of 10 complex pictures, each presenting characteristics paradoxically in opposition to each other. The subjects scored points for naming the object and noticing the paradox. One point was added for commenting on the paradox without prompting (3 points each picture/maximum of 30. CPT scores were significantly higher in the control group (mean ± SD, 29.46 ± 1.43 than in the AD, VaD, MCI, and PDD groups (13.1 ± 2.3, 16.9 ± 3.5, 23.2 ± 1.4, and 23.6 ± 3.4, respectively; p < 0.05. Significant positive correlations between MMSE, Digit Span, CDT, and CPT scores were observed (rho 0.76, 0.35, and 0.56, respectively. These data show perception of complex pictures being compromised in dementia. The correlation between CPT scores and MMSE scores suggests that tests may be used as a brief screening tool for dementia.

  12. Communicating with Patients Who Have Advanced Dementia: Training Nurse Aide Students

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    Beer, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Susan R.; Skala-Cordes, Kristine K.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of dementia in older adults is changing how medical care is delivered. Recognizing symptoms of pain, managing behaviors, and providing quality of life for people who have advanced dementia requires a new skill set for caregivers. Researchers in this study targeted nurse aide students to test an educational module's effect on students'…

  13. Treatment of early AIDS dementia in intravenous drug users : High versus low dose peptide T

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    Kosten, TR; Rosen, MI; McMahon, TL; Bridge, TP; OMalley, SS; Pearsall, R; OConnor, PG

    1997-01-01

    This placebo-controlled, double blind, cross-over study tested the efficacy of two different doses of Peptide T in the treatment of nine intravenous drug users with early AIDS dementia who were also receiving methadone and AZT. Subjects received Peptide T doses of either 15 or 1.5 mg daily for four

  14. Usefulness of the HIV Dementia Scale in Nigerian patients with HIV/AIDS

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    Olubunmi A Ogunrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Information on the cognitive complications of HIV/AIDS from sub-Saharan Africa, where statistics on HIV is alarming, is sparse because of lack of validated cognitive tools. This study assessed the usefulness and predictive validity of the HIV Dementia Scale (HDS as a screening tool among HIV-positive Nigerian Africans. Design: HIV-positive patients were randomly selected over a period of two months. Setting: The HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic of the University teaching hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects: Asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV-positive patients were compared with age, sex and level of education-matched controls. Outcome measures: Cognitive performances on the modified HIV Dementia scale. Results: The performances of 160 HIV-positive (comprising 80 asymptomatic and 80 symptomatic subjects were compared with 80 age, sex and level of education-matched HIV-negative subjects on the HDS. The mean HDS scores (maximum =12 were 10.78±1.18 (comparison subjects, 8.85±1.38 (asymptomatic and 5.2±1.13 (symptomatic; p<0.01. The HDS has a sensitivity of 97.3%, specificity of 80.4%, accuracy of 91.9% and predictive value positive of 91.4% and negative of 93.2%. Conclusion: The utility of the HIV Dementia Scale as a sensitive screening tool for patients with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa was evident but insensitive to memory impairment among asymptomatic HIV patients.

  15. The Opinion of Professional Caregivers About The Platform UnderstAID for Patients with Dementia

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    Malak, Roksana; Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Mojs, Ewa; Grobelny, Bartosz; Głodowska, Katarzyna B.; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Núñez-Naveira, Laura; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Background The person with dementia should be treated as an unique person regarding symptoms directly associated with dementia, such as problems with memory, hallucinations, and delusions, as well as other physical, mental, or neurological deficits. The symptoms not directly typical of dementia, such as musculoskeletal disorders or depression, should be also be considered in order to improve the quality of life of a person with dementia. That is why professional caregivers have to broaden their current knowledge not only of medical symptoms but also of the patient’s psychosocial condition and increase their inquisitiveness about the individual condition of the patient. The aim of the study was to get to know the opinion of professional caregivers about the UnderstAID platform and its usefulness for informal caregivers. Material/Methods Participants in the study group consisted of professional caregivers: nurses, sociologists, psychologists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists, all of whom specialized in geriatrics and had experience in working with people with dementia. All professional caregivers answered 24 questions that refer to positive and negative aspects of the UnderstAID platform. Results The study group of professional caregivers highly appreciated that the application could give support to caregivers (mean score of 4.78; 5 points means that they totally agreed, and 1 point means that they totally disagreed) and that a wide range of multimedia materials helped the informal caregivers to gain a better understanding of the contents (mean score of 4.78). There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of the professional caregivers and the frequency of positive opinions that the UnderstAID application gave support to caregivers of relatives with dementia (p=0.028) and the opinion that videos, photos, and pictures may help the informal caregivers to gain a better understanding of the contents (p=0.028). Conclusions A group of

  16. Development and Testing of a Decision Aid on Goals of Care for Advanced Dementia

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    Einterz, Seth F.; Gilliam, Robin; Lin, Feng Chang; McBride, J. Marvin; Hanson, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Decision aids are effective to improve decision-making, yet they are rarely tested in nursing homes (NHs). Study objectives were to 1) examine the feasibility of a Goals of Care (GOC) decision aid for surrogate decision-makers (SDMs)of persons with dementia; and 2) test its effect on quality of communication and decision-making. Design Pre-post intervention to test a GOC decision aid intervention for SDMs for persons with dementia in NHs. Investigators collected data from reviews of resident health records and interviews with SDMs at baseline and 3-month follow up. Setting Two NHs in North Carolina. Participants 18 residents who were over 65 years of age, had moderate to severe dementia on the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS=5,6,7), and an English-speaking surrogate decision-maker. Intervention 1) GOC Decision Aid video viewed by the SDM, and 2) a structured care plan meeting between the SDM and interdisciplinary NH team Measurements Surrogate knowledge, quality of communication with health care providers, surrogate-provider concordance on goals of care, and palliative care domains addressed in the care plan. Results 89% of the SDMs thought the decision aid was relevant to their needs. After viewing the video decision aid, SDMs increased the number of correct responses on knowledge-based questions (12.5 vs 14.2, P<.001). At 3 months they reported improved quality of communication scores (6.1 vs 6.8, P=.01) and improved concordance on primary goal of care with nursing home team (50% vs 78%, P=.003). The number of palliative care domains addressed in the care plan increased (1.8 vs 4.3, P<.001). Conclusion The decision-support intervention piloted in this study was feasible and relevant for surrogate decision-makers of persons with advanced dementia in nursing homes, and it improved quality of communication between SDM and NH providers. A larger randomized clinical trial is underway to provide further evidence of the effects of this decision aid

  17. Exploring experience and perspectives of foreign-born direct care workers in dementia care: Accounts of Korean American personal care aides caring for older Korean Americans with dementia symptoms.

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    Lee, Sang E; Casado, Banghwa Lee; Hong, Michin

    2016-05-06

    This focus group study explored experience of Korean American personal care aides caring for older Korean Americans with dementia symptoms. Personal care aides described dementia caregiving as challenging, demanding and stressful, yet they cared for their clients with love and affection, particularly with jeong (i.e., a Korean cultural concept of love, affection, sympathy, and bondage). They learned about dementia mostly through their caregiving experience and expressed their need and strong desire to learn more about dementia. They felt for family struggle and observed family conflict and filial obligation. They advocated the value of personal care aides' involvement in dementia care. This study revealed a pressing need for dementia training for personal care aides and called for an outreach effort to recruit and train direct care workers with potential of providing culturally competent care for traditionally underserved ethnic minorities.

  18. Impact of a Decision Aid on Surrogate Decision-makers’ Perceptions of Feeding Options for Patients with Dementia

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    Snyder, E. Amanda; Caprio, Anthony J.; Wessell, Kathryn; Lin, Feng Chang; Hanson, Laura C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In advanced dementia, feeding problems are nearly universal, and families face difficult decisions about feeding options. Initial interviews for a randomized trial were used to describe surrogates’ perceptions feeding options, and to determine if a decision aid on feeding options in advanced dementia would improve knowledge, reduce expectation of benefit from tube feeding, and reduce conflict over treatment choices for persons with advanced dementia. Design Semi-structured interview with pre-post study design for surrogates in the intervention group. Setting Twenty-four skilled nursing facilities across North Carolina participating in a cluster randomized trial. Participants Two hundred fifty-five surrogate decision-makers for nursing home residents with advanced dementia and feeding problems, in control (n=129) and intervention (n=126) groups. Intervention For intervention surrogates only, an audiovisual-print decision aid provided information on dementia, feeding problems in dementia, advantages and disadvantages of feeding tubes or assisted oral feeding options and the role of surrogates in making these decisions. Measurements The interview included open-ended items asking surrogates to report advantages and disadvantages of tube feeding and assisted oral feeding. Knowledge of feeding options was measured with 19 true-false items, and items measuring expectation of benefit from tube feeding. Surrogates reported which of these two feeding options they preferred for the person with dementia, and how confident they were in this choice; their level of conflict about the choice was measured using the Decisional Conflict Scale. Results Prior to the decision aid, surrogates described advantages and disadvantages of assisted oral feeding and tube feeding in practical, ethical and medical terms. After review of the decision aid, intervention surrogates had improved knowledge scores (15.5 vs. 16.8; p<0.001), decreased expectation of benefits from tube feeding

  19. Multiparametric computer-aided differential diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia using structural and advanced MRI

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    E.E. Bron (Esther); M. Smits (Marion); J.M. Papma (Janne); R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca); R. Meijboom (Rozanna); M. de Groot (Mirthe); J.C. van Swieten (John); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); S.K. Klein (Stefan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To investigate the added diagnostic value of arterial spin labelling (ASL) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to structural MRI for computer-aided classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and controls. Methods: This retrospective study used M

  20. Decision aids for respite service choices by carers of people with dementia: development and pilot RCT

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    Stirling Christine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision aids are often used to assist individuals confronted with a diagnosis of a serious illness to make decisions about treatment options. However, they are rarely utilised to help those with chronic or age related conditions to make decisions about care services. Decision aids should also be useful for carers of people with decreased decisional capacity. These carers' choices must balance health outcomes for themselves and for salient others with relational and value-based concerns, while relying on information from health professionals. This paper reports on a study that both developed and pilot tested a decision aid aimed at assisting carers to make evaluative judgements of community services, particularly respite care. Methods A mixed method sequential study, involving qualitative development and a pilot randomised controlled trial, was conducted in Tasmania, Australia. We undertook 13 semi-structured interviews and three focus groups to inform the development of the decision aid. For the randomised control trial we randomly assigned 31 carers of people with dementia to either receive the service decision aid at the start or end of the study. The primary outcome was measured by comparing the difference in carer burden between the two groups three months after the intervention group received the decision aid. Pilot data was collected from carers using interviewer-administered questionnaires at the commencement of the project, two weeks and 12 weeks later. Results The qualitative data strongly suggest that the intervention provides carers with needed decision support. Most carers felt that the decision aid was useful. The trial data demonstrated that, using the mean change between baseline and three month follow-up, the intervention group had less increase in burden, a decrease in decisional conflict and increased knowledge compared to control group participants. Conclusions While these results must be interpreted with

  1. Use of a dementia training designed for nurse aides to train other staff.

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    Irvine, A Blair; Beaty, Jeff A; Seeley, John R; Bourgeois, Michelle

    2013-12-01

    Problematic resident behaviors may escalate in long-term care facilities (LTCs). If nurse aides (NAs) are not nearby, the nearest staff to intervene may be non-direct care workers (NDCWs), who have little or no dementia training. This pilot research tested Internet dementia-training program, designed for NAs, on NDCWs in a LTC setting. Sixty-eight NDCWs participated, filling out two baseline surveys at 1-month intervals and a posttest survey after training. The surveys included video-situation testing, items addressing psychosocial constructs associated with behavior change, and measures training-acceptance. Paired t tests showed significant positive effects on measures of knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions, with small-moderate effect sizes. Nursing staff as well as non-health care workers showed improved scores, and the web-site training program was well received by all participants. These results suggest that Internet training may allow staff development coordinators to conserve limited resources by cross-training of different job categories with the same program.

  2. Longitudinal change in language production: effects of aging and dementia on grammatical complexity and propositional content.

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    Kemper, S; Marquis, J; Thompson, M

    2001-12-01

    Mixed modeling was used to examine longitudinal changes in linguistic ability in healthy older adults and older adults with dementia. Language samples, vocabulary scores, and digit span scores were collected annually from healthy older adults and semiannually from older adults with dementia. The language samples were scored for grammatical complexity and propositional content. For the healthy group, age-related declines in grammatical complexity and propositional content were observed. The declines were most rapid in the mid 70s. For the group with dementia, grammatical complexity and propositional content also declined over time, regardless of age. Rates of decline were uniform across individuals. These analyses reveal how both grammatical complexity and propositional content are related to late-life changes in cognition in healthy older adults aswell as those with dementia. Alzheimer's disease accelerates this decline, regardless of age.

  3. A Novel Visual Method for Studying Complex Health Transitions for Older People Living With Dementia

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    Belinda Parke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the complexity of health services for older people living with dementia is a challenging research endeavor. We discuss a novel research approach that combines photographic methods with storyboarding techniques to understand the views of older people living with dementia who encounter the emergency department. A social ecological theoretical position was taken to study relationships between health care systems and processes and the social arrangements of those receiving care. The research approach uncovers complex contextual factors in health care systems that are amenable to change. The approach strengthens the contribution of older people living with dementia to have their voice included in research endeavors.

  4. Nonpharmacological therapies and provision of aids in outpatient dementia networks in Germany: utilization rates and associated factors

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    Wübbeler M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Markus Wübbeler,1 Jochen René Thyrian,1 Bernhard Michalowsky,2 Johannes Hertel,2 Franziska Laporte Uribe,3 Karin Wolf-Ostermann,4 Susanne Schäfer-Walkmann,6 Wolfgang Hoffmann2,5 1Interventional Health Care Research Group, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE Rostock/Greifswald, 2German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE Rostock/Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany; 3Implementation and Dissemination Research Group, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE, Witten, Germany; 4Department of Human and Health Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 5Epidemiology of Health Care and Community Health, Institute for Community Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany; 6Institute for Applied Social Sciences, Stuttgart, Germany Background: Nonpharmacological therapies and the provision of aids are described to be supportive in the treatment of persons with dementia (PWDs. These aim to maintain individuals' participation in daily activities as long as possible, to slow the progression of their disease, and to support their independent living at home. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the utilization of therapies and aids among community-dwelling PWDs.Objective: The aims of the study were a to describe the utilization of nonpharmacological therapies and aids among community-dwelling PWDs and b to analyze the factors associated with utilization.Method: As part of a cross-sectional study of n=560 caregivers of PWDs in dementia networks throughout Germany, we assessed sociodemographics, clinical variables, and the utilization of nonpharmacological therapies (physiotherapy [PT], occupational therapy [OT], and aids (sensory, mobility, and others, using face-to-face interviews and questionnaires.Results: Approximately every fourth PWD received PT and every seventh PWD received OT. Sensory aids were utilized by 91.1%, personal hygiene aids by 77.2%, mobility aids by 58.6%, and medical

  5. Microbial translocation is associated with increased monocyte activation and dementia in AIDS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela Ancuta

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an indicator of microbial translocation from the gut, is a likely cause of systemic immune activation in chronic HIV infection. LPS induces monocyte activation and trafficking into brain, which are key mechanisms in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD. To determine whether high LPS levels are associated with increased monocyte activation and HAD, we obtained peripheral blood samples from AIDS patients and examined plasma LPS by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL assay, peripheral blood monocytes by FACS, and soluble markers of monocyte activation by ELISA. Purified monocytes were isolated by FACS sorting, and HIV DNA and RNA levels were quantified by real time PCR. Circulating monocytes expressed high levels of the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, and harbored low levels of HIV compared to CD4(+ T-cells. High plasma LPS levels were associated with increased plasma sCD14 and LPS-binding protein (LBP levels, and low endotoxin core antibody levels. LPS levels were higher in HAD patients compared to control groups, and were associated with HAD independently of plasma viral load and CD4 counts. LPS levels were higher in AIDS patients using intravenous heroin and/or ethanol, or with Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection, compared to control groups. These results suggest a role for elevated LPS levels in driving monocyte activation in AIDS, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of HAD, and provide evidence that cofactors linked to substance abuse and HCV co-infection influence these processes.

  6. Dementia wander garden aids post cerebrovascular stroke restorative therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Mark B; Warf, Carlena

    2005-01-01

    An increasing amount of literature suggests the positive effects of nature in healthcare. The extended life expectancy in the US and the consequent need for long-term care indicates a future need for restorative therapy innovations to reduce the expense associated with long-term care. Moving carefully selected stroke patients' sessions to the peaceful setting of a dementia wander garden, with its designed paths and natural stimuli, may be beneficial. Natural settings have been shown to improve attention and reduce stress--both important therapy objectives in many post-stroke rehabilitation programs. In this case study, using the dementia wander garden for restorative therapy of a non-dementia patient was a novel idea for the restorative therapy group, which does not have a horticultural therapy program. The dementia wander garden stage of the post-stroke rehabilitation helped the patient through a period of treatment resistance. The garden provided both an introduction to the patient's goal of outdoor rehabilitation and a less threatening environment than the long-term care facility hallways. In part because the patient was less self-conscious about manifesting his post-stroke neurological deficits, falling, and being viewed as handicapped when in the dementia wander garden setting, he was able to resume his treatment plan and finish his restorative therapy. In many physical and mental rehabilitation plans, finding a treatment modality that will motivate an individual to participate is a principal goal. Use of a dementia wander garden may help some patients achieve this goal in post-stroke restorative therapy.

  7. Visually-aided smart kitchen environment for elderly suffering from dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was part of smart kitchen project, it aimed to use current technology to facilitate senior citizens with mild dementia’s cooking process in the kitchen. As different senior citizens with mild dementia had different living habit and kitchen environment, smart kitchen had context aware and learning ability to adapt itself to fit senior citizens with mild dementia’s habit and living condition to assist their cooking activities. This research applied scenario based design method, its ...

  8. ALS-parkinsonism-dementia complex of Kii and other related diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Ryuji; Izumi, Yishin; Adachi, Yoshiki; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    The ALS/parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) of Kii is an endemic disease with a diverse phenotypic expression characteristic of classical ALS, parkinsonism and dementia. Its clinical and neuropathological manifestations are similar to a syndrome found in Guam, sharing classical ALS pathology together with many neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. The incidence rates of ALS declined dramatically between the 1950s and 1980s. In the 1990 s, Kuzuhara found a high incidence of PDC with abundant neurofibrillary tangles, similar to Guamanian PDC. The incidence rates of PDC dramatically rose during the 1980s and 1990 s, and PDC replaced ALS. More than 70% of patients in the endemic region had a family history of ALS or PDC. We recently found a new gene OPTN causing ALS, and have extended its clinical survey in Japan. Two autopsied cases showed involvement of basal ganglia and/or cerebral cortex with neurofibrillary tangles. A few family members also showed dementia and parkinsonism without evidence of motor neuron disease. Moreover the penetrance seems to be incomplete. Despite these similarities, OPTN mutations were not found in the Kii patients. We speculate that the Kii/ALS-PDC could primarily be a genetic disease, and its clinical manifestation is modified by other genes or environmental factors.

  9. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J.; Zubarev, Dmitry; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reacti...

  10. Palliative care in advanced dementia; A mixed methods approach for the development of a complex intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tookman Adrian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in improving the quality of care that patients with advanced dementia receive when they are dying. Our understanding of the palliative care needs of these patients and the natural history of advanced disease is limited. Many people with advanced dementia have unplanned emergency admissions to the acute hospital; this is a critical event: half will die within 6 months. These patients have complex needs but often lack capacity to express their wishes. Often carers are expected to make decisions. Advance care planning discussions are rarely performed, despite potential benefits such more consistent supportive healthcare, a reduction in emergency admissions to the acute hospital and better resolution of carer bereavement. Design/Methods We have used the MRC complex interventions framework, a "bottom-up" methodology, to develop an intervention for patients with advanced dementia and their carers aiming to 1 define end of life care needs for both patients and carers, 2 pilot a palliative care intervention and 3 produce a framework for advance care planning for patients. The results of qualitative phase 1 work, which involved interviews with carers, hospital and primary care staff from a range of disciplines, have been used to identify key barriers and challenges. For the exploratory trial, 40 patients will be recruited to each of the control and intervention groups. The intervention will be delivered by a nurse specialist. We shall investigate and develop methodology for a phase 3 randomised controlled trial. For example we shall explore the feasibility of randomisation, how best to optimise recruitment, decide on appropriate outcomes and obtain data for power calculations. We will evaluate whether the intervention is pragmatic, feasible and deliverable on acute hospital wards and test model fidelity and its acceptability to carers, patients and staff. Discussion Results of qualitative phase 1 work

  11. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  12. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  13. Standardized evaluation of algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of dementia based on structural MRI: the CADDementia challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Esther E; Smits, Marion; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Papma, Janne M; Steketee, Rebecca M E; Méndez Orellana, Carolina; Meijboom, Rozanna; Pinto, Madalena; Meireles, Joana R; Garrett, Carolina; Bastos-Leite, António J; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Amoroso, Nicola; Bellotti, Roberto; Cárdenas-Peña, David; Álvarez-Meza, Andrés M; Dolph, Chester V; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Eskildsen, Simon F; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S; Franke, Katja; Gaser, Christian; Ledig, Christian; Guerrero, Ricardo; Tong, Tong; Gray, Katherine R; Moradi, Elaheh; Tohka, Jussi; Routier, Alexandre; Durrleman, Stanley; Sarica, Alessia; Di Fatta, Giuseppe; Sensi, Francesco; Chincarini, Andrea; Smith, Garry M; Stoyanov, Zhivko V; Sørensen, Lauge; Nielsen, Mads; Tangaro, Sabina; Inglese, Paolo; Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin; van Swieten, John C; Niessen, Wiro J; Klein, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of dementia based on structural MRI have demonstrated high performance in the literature, but are difficult to compare as different data sets and methodology were used for evaluation. In addition, it is unclear how the algorithms would perform on previously unseen data, and thus, how they would perform in clinical practice when there is no real opportunity to adapt the algorithm to the data at hand. To address these comparability, generalizability and clinical applicability issues, we organized a grand challenge that aimed to objectively compare algorithms based on a clinically representative multi-center data set. Using clinical practice as the starting point, the goal was to reproduce the clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we evaluated algorithms for multi-class classification of three diagnostic groups: patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, patients with mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The diagnosis based on clinical criteria was used as reference standard, as it was the best available reference despite its known limitations. For evaluation, a previously unseen test set was used consisting of 354 T1-weighted MRI scans with the diagnoses blinded. Fifteen research teams participated with a total of 29 algorithms. The algorithms were trained on a small training set (n=30) and optionally on data from other sources (e.g., the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, the Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle flagship study of aging). The best performing algorithm yielded an accuracy of 63.0% and an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) of 78.8%. In general, the best performances were achieved using feature extraction based on voxel-based morphometry or a combination of features that included volume, cortical thickness, shape and intensity. The challenge is open for new submissions via the web-based framework: http://caddementia.grand-challenge.org.

  14. Vulnerability to health problems in female informal caregivers of persons with HIV/AIDS and age-related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaskerud, J H; Lee, P

    2001-01-01

    The health of informal caregivers is often studied from the perspective of caregivers' and care receivers' personal and interpersonal characteristics. This study offers an alternative explanation based on a vulnerable populations framework and considers the role of resource availability to the health status of informal caregivers (n=76). Caregivers in a convenience sample were females of diverse ethnicity and socioeconomic status, and care recipients were diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) or age-related dementias (ARD). Personal interviews using structured instruments were conducted with caregivers who were attending outpatient clinics at a public hospital and a VA hospital. Instruments included the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-Scale (CES-D), the Global Health Assessment (GHA), the Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), the Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist (MBPC) and items from the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) measuring anger, anxiety and loneliness. Caregivers were experiencing both physical and mental health problems. Regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among resources available to caregivers, conditions that put caregivers at risk for poorer health, and health status itself. Analyses were conducted for each group of caregivers separately (HIV and ARD) and for the total group, using depressive symptoms and perception of physical health as dependent variables. In caregivers of people with HIV/AIDS (PWHIV), caregiver distress over care recipient symptoms, anxiety and education were related to depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms, anger and functional status of the PWHIV were related to caregivers' perception of poorer physical health. In caregivers of people with ARD, there were no significant predictors for depressive symptoms or perception of physical health. In the total group of caregivers, lower income and more anger were related to depressive symptom

  15. [Cyclothymia ending in dementia. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postrach, F

    1989-04-01

    Three cases of manic-depressive illness are presented which, with various manifestations of pseudodementia, end in dementia. The relationship of cyclothymia to dementia is discussed, and the need for diagnosis with the aid of equipment is stressed. Notwithstanding the absence of systematic theories, it seems most probable that senile dementia (Alzheimer dementia) may be associated with cyclothymia.

  16. When Rey-Osterrieth's Complex Figure Becomes a Church: Prevalence and Correlates of Graphic Confabulations in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelati, Oriana; Castiglioni, Stefania; Isella, Valeria; Zuffi, Marta; de Rino, Francesca; Mossali, Ilaria; Franceschi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Verbal confabulation (VC) has been described in several pathological conditions characterized by amnesia and has been defined as ‘statements that involve distortion of memories’. Here we describe another kind of confabulation (graphic confabulation, GC), evident at the recall of the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure (ROCF). In a retrospective study of 267 patients with mild-to-moderate dementia, 14 patients (4.9 %) recalled the abstract ROCF as drawings with recognizable semantic meaning. VC was evident at the story recall test in 19.8% of the study participants. VC and GC were homogeneously distributed among the different types of dementia. VC has been proposed to originate from complex interactions of amnesia, motivational deficit and dysfunction of monitoring systems. On the contrary, GC seems to be the result of a deficit in visual memory replaced by the semantic translation of isolated parts of the ROCF along with a source monitoring deficit. PMID:22187544

  17. Pathological TDP-43 in parkinsonism-dementia complex and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geser, Felix; Winton, Matthew J; Kwong, Linda K; Xu, Yan; Xie, Sharon X; Igaz, Lionel M; Garruto, Ralph M; Perl, Daniel P; Galasko, Douglas; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2008-01-01

    Pathological TDP-43 is the major disease protein in frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterized by ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-U) with/without motor neuron disease (MND) and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As Guamanian parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) or Guamanian ALS (G-PDC or G-ALS) of the Chamorro population may present clinically similar to FTLD-U and ALS, TDP-43 pathology may be present in the G-PDC and G-ALS. Thus, we examined cortical or spinal cord samples from 54 Guamanian subjects for evidence of TDP-43 pathology. In addition to cortical neurofibrillary and glial tau pathology, G-PDC was associated with cortical TDP-43 positive dystrophic neurites and neuronal and glial inclusions in gray and/or white matter. Biochemical analyses showed the presence of FTLD-U-like insoluble TDP-43 in G-PDC, but not in Guam controls (G-C). Spinal cord pathology of G-PDC or G-ALS was characterized by tau positive tangles as well as TDP-43 positive inclusions in lower motor neurons and glial cells. G-C had variable tau and negligible TDP-43 pathology. These results indicate that G-PDC and G-ALS are associated with pathological TDP-43 similar to FTLD-U with/without MND as well as ALS, and that neocortical or hippocampal TDP-43 pathology distinguishes controls from disease subjects better than tau pathology. Finally, we conclude that the spectrum of TDP-43 proteinopathies should be expanded to include neurodegenerative cognitive and motor diseases, affecting the Chamorro population of Guam.

  18. IgM, IgG and IgA rheumatoid factors and circulating immune complexes in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex with serological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccia, S; Lazzarin, A; Colucci, A; Gasparini, A; Forcellini, P; Lanzanova, D; Foppa, C U; Novati, R; Zanussi, C

    1987-01-01

    To investigate some humoral aspects which may reflect the involvement of B lymphocytes in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), we used an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) to determine the levels of IgM, IgG and IgA rheumatoid factors (RF) in 16 patients suffering from full-blown AIDS and 32 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC), in the clinical form of lymphoadenopathy syndrome (LAS), compared with 40 healthy, young heterosexual subjects. Both AIDS and ARC patients showed a greater incidence of high IgM RF levels, with mean values significantly higher than controls, but with no differences between the two pathological groups. IgG RF behaviour was similar in the two patient populations and the healthy subjects. IgA RF were significantly raised in AIDS and ARC. Further information on RF was obtained by determination of the immunoglobulin levels of the respective isotypes in the same patients. Mean IgG levels were above normal in AIDS and ARC patients, but the latter group showed a higher incidence of increased values and higher mean levels. The IgA isotype was significantly increased mainly in AIDS patients. The behaviour of IgM was virtually the same in the three groups studied. A difference between AIDS and ARC patients was established by the detection of circulating immune-complexes (IC) by the C1q-binding and CIC-conglutinin assays. IC were significantly high, by both methods, only in the ARC group, but normal or very low in AIDS. These overall findings suggest once again the impairment of B cell function in AIDS, with prevalent hyperactivation in ARC and exhaustion in full-blown AIDS, and apparent preservation, in the latter group, of the antibody responses which are more closely related to the activity of subsets of T helper cells. PMID:3608224

  19. Evaluating Evidence Aid as a complex, multicomponent knowledge translation intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Dominic

    2015-02-01

    Evidence Aid, an initiative established by members of The Cochrane Collaboration in the aftermath of the Indian Ocean Tsunami in December 2004, celebrates its first 10 years later this year. Whilst the principles of the Evidence Aid initiative are firmly rooted in evidence-based medicine and public health practice, the initiative itself was born of a humanitarian imperative, compassion and the expressed moral duty to help. The evidence-base for Evidence Aid, (that is, for knowledge translation interventions focused on dissemination of evidence), was not, and is not, well-established This article, which is based on a presentation at the Evidence Aid Symposium on 20 September 2014, at Hyderabad, India presents a unifying conceptual framework for use when researching the impact of Evidence Aid as a knowledge translation intervention. It highlights how each of the core activities can be mapped to this framework and identifies key outcomes of interest for evaluation.

  20. AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  1. [AIDS-complex and our Leviathan. Can and should the state educate us about AIDS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigusch, V

    1989-08-01

    Sigusch pleads for removing AIDS education from the jurisdiction of the state. He reasons that as caretaker of citizens' sexual lives the state cannot avoid consolidating their status as its subjects.

  2. [Vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, H.F. de; Gijn, J. van

    2004-01-01

    Vascular dementia is one of the most frequently occurring dementia syndromes. Its prevalence is about 5% among subjects above 85 years of age. Elevated blood pressure and atherosclerosis are the most important risk factors. According to international criteria, vascular dementia usually occurs within

  3. Mixed Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one type of dementia is present. Learn more: Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease , Key Types of Dementia Sign up for ... Message boards Get the facts 10 warning signs & symptoms What is dementia What is Alzheimer's Stages of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 ...

  4. A physical model for dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Gaggero-Sager, L. M.; Becker, J. T.; Maestu, F.; Sotolongo-Grau, O.

    2017-04-01

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  5. [Treatable dementia syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedert, S; Schreiter, U; Alm, B

    1987-03-01

    Dementia--a syndrome of acquired intellectual deterioration--is an etiologically non-specific condition which is permanent, progressive, or reversible. In the evaluation of demented patients, a careful exposure history will determine the possible role of drugs, metals, or toxins. The physical examination may reveal focal deficits in cases of intracranial mass lesions and spasticity or ataxia of the lower limbs if hydrocephalus is present. Coexistance of dementia and peripheral neuropathy usually indicates a toxic or metabolic disorder. Asterixis, myoclonus, and postural tremor are common in toxic-metabolic dementias, while resting tremor, choreoathetosis, and rigidity occur in progressive extrapyramidal disorders. EEG is focally abnormal in cases of cerebral mass lesions and exhibits generalized slowing in toxic-metabolic encephalopathies. CT will aid in the identification of hydrocephalus, subdural hematomas, and intracranial mass lesions. A thorough laboratory evaluation including complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen and blood sugar, liver and thyroid tests, calcium and phosphorus levels, B12 and folate levels, serum copper and ceruloplasmin, VDRL, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, and lumbar puncture may demonstrate treatable disorders that are adversely affecting intellectual function. Elderly individuals are particularly susceptible to the effects of toxic or metabolic disorders, and a mild dementia might be exaggerated by relatively minor fluctuations in metabolic status. Treatable causes of dementia should be considered in all demented patients.

  6. Behavioral and neurological correlates of ALS-parkinsonism dementia complex in adult mice fed washed cycad flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason M B; Khabazian, Iraj; Wong, Margaret C; Seyedalikhani, Arash; Bains, Jaswinder S; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Williams, David E; Andersen, Raymond J; Simpson, Rebecca J; Smith, Richard; Craig, Ulla-Kate; Kurland, Leonard T; Shaw, Christopher A

    2002-01-01

    Consumption of cycad seed products (Cycas circinalis) is one of the strongest epidemiological links to the Guamian neurological disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC), however, the putative toxin which causes neurodegeneration has never been identified definitively. To reexamine this issue, 6-7-mo-old, male CD-1 mice were assessed for motor and cognitive behaviours during and following feeding with pellets made from washed cycad flour. Cycad-fed animals showed early evidence of progressive motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Neurodegeneration measured using TUNEL and caspase-3 labeling was found in neocortex, various hippocampal fields, substantia nigra, olfactory bulb, and spinal cord. In vitro studies using rat neocortex have identified toxic compounds in washed cycad flour that induce depolarizing field potentials and lead to release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), both blocked by AP5. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/mass spectrometry of cycad flour samples failed to show appreciable amounts of other known cycad toxins, cycasin, MAM, or BMAA; only trace amounts of BOAA were present. Isolation procedures employing these techniques identified the most toxic component as beta-sitosterol beta-D-glucoside (BSSG). The present data suggest that a neurotoxin, or a toxic metabolite, not previously identified in cycad, is able to gain access to central nervous system (CNS) resulting in neurodegeneration of specific neural populations and in motor and cognitive dysfunctions. These data are consistent with a number of major features of ALS-PDC in humans.

  7. Analysis of primary visual cortex in dementia with Lewy bodies indicates GABAergic involvement associated with recurrent complex visual hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundakar, Ahmad A; Hanson, Peter S; Erskine, Daniel; Lax, Nichola Z; Roscamp, Joseph; Karyka, Evangelia; Tsefou, Eliona; Singh, Preeti; Cockell, Simon J; Gribben, Andrew; Ramsay, Lynne; Blain, Peter G; Mosimann, Urs P; Lett, Deborah J; Elstner, Matthias; Turnbull, Douglass M; Xiang, Charles C; Brownstein, Michael J; O'Brien, John T; Taylor, John-Paul; Attems, Johannes; Thomas, Alan J; McKeith, Ian G; Morris, Christopher M

    2016-06-30

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients frequently experience well formed recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH). This is associated with reduced blood flow or hypometabolism on imaging of the primary visual cortex. To understand these associations in DLB we used pathological and biochemical analysis of the primary visual cortex to identify changes that could underpin RCVH. Alpha-synuclein or neurofibrillary tangle pathology in primary visual cortex was essentially absent. Neurone density or volume within the primary visual cortex in DLB was also unchanged using unbiased stereology. Microarray analysis, however, demonstrated changes in neuropeptide gene expression and other markers, indicating altered GABAergic neuronal function. Calcium binding protein and GAD65/67 immunohistochemistry showed preserved interneurone populations indicating possible interneurone dysfunction. This was demonstrated by loss of post synaptic GABA receptor markers including gephyrin, GABARAP, and Kif5A, indicating reduced GABAergic synaptic activity. Glutamatergic neuronal signalling was also altered with vesicular glutamate transporter protein and PSD-95 expression being reduced. Changes to the primary visual cortex in DLB indicate that reduced GABAergic transmission may contribute to RCVH in DLB and treatment using targeted GABAergic modulation or similar approaches using glutamatergic modification may be beneficial.

  8. The effect of treatment with zidovudine with or without acyclovir on HIV p24 antigenaemia in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Cooper, D A; Brun-Vézinet, F;

    1992-01-01

    with AIDS, AIDS-related complex (ARC) or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of less than or equal to 6 months' therapy. SETTING: Samples were obtained from patients attending teaching hospital outpatient clinics in seven European countries and Australia...

  9. Complexity aided design. The FuturICT technological innovation paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, A.; Ajmone-Marsan, M.; Axhausen, K. W.; Batty, M.; Masera, M.; Rome, E.

    2012-11-01

    "In the next century, planet earth will don an electronic skin. It will use the Internet as a scaffold to support and transmit its sensations. This skin is already being stitched together. It consists of millions of embedded electronic measuring devices: thermostats, pressure gauges, pollution detectors, cameras, microphones, glucose sensors, EKGs, electroencephalographs. These will probe and monitor cities and endangered species, the atmosphere, our ships, highways and fleets of trucks, our conversations, our bodies-even our dreams ....What will the earth's new skin permit us to feel? How will we use its surges of sensation? For several years-maybe for a decade-there will be no central nervous system to manage this vast signaling network. Certainly there will be no central intelligence...some qualities of self-awareness will emerge once the Net is sensually enhanced. Sensuality is only one force pushing the Net toward intelligence". These statements are quoted by an interview by Cherry Murray, Dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Physics. It is interesting to outline the timeliness and highly predicting power of these statements. In particular, we would like to point to the relevance of the question "What will the earth's new skin permit us to feel?" to the work we are going to discuss in this paper. There are many additional compelling questions, as for example: "How can the electronic earth's skin be made more resilient?"; "How can the earth's electronic skin be improved to better satisfy the need of our society?";"What can the science of complex systems contribute to this endeavour?"

  10. A role for the RNA pol II–associated PAF complex in AID-induced immune diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Katharina L.; Milosevic, Sara; Pauklin, Siim; Schmitz, Kerstin-Maike; Rangam, Gopinath; Simon, Maria T.; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Robert, Isabelle; Heyer, Vincent; Schiavo, Ebe; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    Antibody diversification requires the DNA deaminase AID to induce DNA instability at immunoglobulin (Ig) loci upon B cell stimulation. For efficient cytosine deamination, AID requires single-stranded DNA and needs to gain access to Ig loci, with RNA pol II transcription possibly providing both aspects. To understand these mechanisms, we isolated and characterized endogenous AID-containing protein complexes from the chromatin of diversifying B cells. The majority of proteins associated with AID belonged to RNA polymerase II elongation and chromatin modification complexes. Besides the two core polymerase subunits, members of the PAF complex, SUPT5H, SUPT6H, and FACT complex associated with AID. We show that AID associates with RNA polymerase-associated factor 1 (PAF1) through its N-terminal domain, that depletion of PAF complex members inhibits AID-induced immune diversification, and that the PAF complex can serve as a binding platform for AID on chromatin. A model is emerging of how RNA polymerase II elongation and pausing induce and resolve AID lesions. PMID:23008333

  11. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex from bone marrow aspirates of AIDS patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, J A; Palaci, M; Ferrazoli, L; Martins, M C; Suleiman, J; Lorenço, R; Ferreira, O C; Riley, L W; Johnson, W D; Galvão, P A

    1993-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection has not been reported as a major opportunistic infection among patients with AIDS in Latin America or Africa. In this study, 125 AIDS patients who had persistent fever, anemia, and leukopenia were examined among 2628 AIDS patients admitted to Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas between May 1990 and April 1992. From the bone marrow aspirates of the 125 patients, MAC was isolated from 23 (18.4%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from 9 (7.2%). Between 1985 and 1990, only 11 MAC isolations among 60,000 cultures obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patients were documented in São Paulo. Hence, the minimal estimated rate of MAC infection in AIDS patients in this city was 23/2628, or 0.88%. These findings suggest that MAC infection is an important opportunistic infection, especially among a subset of patients with AIDS in Brazil who have clinical characteristics and risk activities similar to those associated with MAC infections in North America and Europe.

  12. Imaging dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  13. FlexAID: Revisiting Docking on Non-Native-Complex Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael J

    2015-07-27

    Small-molecule protein docking is an essential tool in drug design and to understand molecular recognition. In the present work we introduce FlexAID, a small-molecule docking algorithm that accounts for target side-chain flexibility and utilizes a soft scoring function, i.e. one that is not highly dependent on specific geometric criteria, based on surface complementarity. The pairwise energy parameters were derived from a large dataset of true positive poses and negative decoys from the PDBbind database through an iterative process using Monte Carlo simulations. The prediction of binding poses is tested using the widely used Astex dataset as well as the HAP2 dataset, while performance in virtual screening is evaluated using a subset of the DUD dataset. We compare FlexAID to AutoDock Vina, FlexX, and rDock in an extensive number of scenarios to understand the strengths and limitations of the different programs as well as to reported results for Glide, GOLD, and DOCK6 where applicable. The most relevant among these scenarios is that of docking on flexible non-native-complex structures where as is the case in reality, the target conformation in the bound form is not known a priori. We demonstrate that FlexAID, unlike other programs, is robust against increasing structural variability. FlexAID obtains equivalent sampling success as GOLD and performs better than AutoDock Vina or FlexX in all scenarios against non-native-complex structures. FlexAID is better than rDock when there is at least one critical side-chain movement required upon ligand binding. In virtual screening, FlexAID results are lower on average than those of AutoDock Vina and rDock. The higher accuracy in flexible targets where critical movements are required, intuitive PyMOL-integrated graphical user interface and free source code as well as precompiled executables for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS make FlexAID a welcome addition to the arsenal of existing small-molecule protein docking methods.

  14. Chloroform Aided Extraction Spectrophotometric Determination of Rhenium Using Thiocyanate Complexing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Keshavarz Alamdari; S.K. Sadrnezhaad; Z. Mos-hefi Shabestari

    2005-01-01

    A new technique is developed for quantitative determination of rhenium in aqueous media containing molybdenum,iron and copper ions. The method seems easier and more accurate than the traditional ones. It consists of the formation of rhenium thiocyanate complex, which is extracted with chloroform at the presence of hydrochloric acid.This complex is a highly visible light absorbent that can easily be detected with the aid of a spectrophotometer. The maximum absorbance (λmax) observed for this complex was in the visible range of 430~435 nm. The experimental results showed that in a concentration range from 0.5~8 mg/L, the absorbance behavior of the rhenium thiocyanate complex is followed to the Beer-Lambert law.

  15. Complex adaptive HIV/AIDS risk reduction: Plausible implications from findings in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Chris J; Aphane, Marota A

    2016-05-16

    This article emphasises that when working with complex adaptive systems it is possible to stimulate new social practices and/or cognitive perspectives that contribute to risk reduction, associated with reducing aggregate community viral loads. The process of achieving this is highly participatory and is methodologically possible because evidence of 'attractors' that influence the social practices can be identified using qualitative research techniques. Using findings from Limpopo Province, South Africa, we argue that working with 'wellness attractors' and increasing their presence within the HIV/AIDS landscape could influence aggregate community viral loads. While the analysis that is presented is unconventional, it is plausible that this perspective may hold potential to develop a biosocial response - which the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS) has called for - that reinforces the biomedical opportunities that are now available to achieve the ambition of ending AIDS by 2030.

  16. TGF-β suppression of HBV RNA through AID-dependent recruitment of an RNA exosome complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Liang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β inhibits hepatitis B virus (HBV replication although the intracellular effectors involved are not determined. Here, we report that reduction of HBV transcripts by TGF-β is dependent on AID expression, which significantly decreases both HBV transcripts and viral DNA, resulting in inhibition of viral replication. Immunoprecipitation reveals that AID physically associates with viral P protein that binds to specific virus RNA sequence called epsilon. AID also binds to an RNA degradation complex (RNA exosome proteins, indicating that AID, RNA exosome, and P protein form an RNP complex. Suppression of HBV transcripts by TGF-β was abrogated by depletion of either AID or RNA exosome components, suggesting that AID and the RNA exosome involve in TGF-β mediated suppression of HBV RNA. Moreover, AID-mediated HBV reduction does not occur when P protein is disrupted or when viral transcription is inhibited. These results suggest that induced expression of AID by TGF-β causes recruitment of the RNA exosome to viral RNP complex and the RNA exosome degrades HBV RNA in a transcription-coupled manner.

  17. Imaging of neuroinflammation in dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, James; O'Brien, John

    2016-01-01

    We are still very limited in management strategies for dementia, and establishing effective disease modifying therapies based on amyloid or tau remains elusive. Neuroinflammation has been increasingly implicated as a pathological mechanism in dementia and demonstration that it is a key event accelerating cognitive or functional decline would inform novel therapeutic approaches, and may aid diagnosis. Much research has therefore been done to develop technology capable of imaging neuroinflammation in vivo. The authors performed a systematic search of the literature and found 28 studies that used in vivo neuroimaging of one or more markers of neuroinflammation on human patients with dementia. The majority of the studies used positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the TSPO microglial marker and found increased neuroinflammation in at least one neuroanatomical region in dementia patients, most usually Alzheimer's disease, relative to controls, but the published evidence to date does not indicate whether the regional distribution of neuroinflammation differs between dementia types or even whether it is reproducible within a single dementia type between individuals. It is less clear that neuroinflammation is increased relative to controls in mild cognitive impairment than it is for dementia, and therefore it is unclear whether neuroinflammation is part of the pathogenesis in early stages of dementia. Despite its great potential, this review demonstrates that imaging of neuroinflammation has not thus far clearly established brain inflammation as an early pathological event. Further studies are required, including those of different dementia subtypes at early stages, and newer, more sensitive, PET imaging probes need to be developed.

  18. The contribution of process tracing to theory-based evaluations of complex aid instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beach, Derek; Schmitt, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    studies in demanding settings. For the specific task of evaluating the governance effectiveness of budget support interventions, we developed a more fine-grained causal mechanism for a subset of the comprehensive program theory of budget support. Moreover, based on the informal use of Bayesian logic, we......This article focuses on methodological challenges in evaluating complex program aid interventions like budget support. We show that recent innovations in process-tracing methodology can help to solve the identified challenges and increase the strength of causal inference made when using case...

  19. β-Caryophyllene/Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex Improves Cognitive Deficits in Rats with Vascular Dementia through the Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 -Mediated Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Teng, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liangke; Yang, Jiadan; Ma, Lianju; Wang, Fang; Tian, Xiaocui; An, Ruidi; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Lu; Dong, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    This work was conducted to prepare β-caryophyllene-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (HPβCD/BCP) and investigate its effects and mechanisms on cognitive deficits in vascular dementia (VD) rats. First, HPβCD/BCP was prepared, optimized, characterized, and evaluated. HPβCD/BCP and AM630 were then administered to VD rats to upregulate and downregulate the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Results showed that HPβCD/BCP can significantly increase the bioavailability of BCP. Through the Morris water maze test, HPβCD/BCP can attenuate learning and memory deficits in rats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) monitoring results indicated that HPβCD/BCP can promote the recovery of CBF. Moreover, molecular biology experiments showed that HPβCD/BCP can increase the expression levels of CB2 in brain tissues, particularly the hippocampus and white matter tissues, as well as the expression levels of PI3K and Akt. Overall, the findings demonstrated the protective effects of HPβCD/BCP against cognitive deficits induced by chronic cerebral ischemia and suggested the potential of HPβCD/BCP in the therapy of vascular dementia in the future. PMID:28154534

  20. Self-experience in Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Summa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a phenomenological analysis of the disturbances of self-experience in dementia. After considering the lack of conceptual clarity regarding the notions of self and person in current research on dementia, we develop a phenomenological theory of the structure of self-experience in the first section. Within this complex structure, we distinguish between the basic level of pre-reflective self-awareness, the episodic sense of self, and the narrative constitution of the self. In the second section, we focus on dementia and argue that, despite the impairment of narrative self-understanding, more basic moments of self-experience are preserved. In accordance with the theory developed in the first part, we argue that, at least until the final stages of the illness, these self-experience in dementia goes beyond the pure minimal self, and rather entail forms of self-reference and an episodic sense of self.

  1. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment in ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease ...

  2. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  3. Development cooperation for health: reviewing a dynamic concept in a complex global aid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Peter S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 4th High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, held in Busan, South Korea in November 2011 again promised an opportunity for a "new consensus on development cooperation" to emerge. This paper reviews the recent evolution of the concept of coordination for development assistance in health as the basis from which to understand current discourses. The paper reviews peer-reviewed scientific literature and relevant 'grey' literature, revisiting landmark publications and influential authors, examining the transitions in the conceptualisation of coordination, and the related changes in development assistance. Four distinct transitions in the understanding, orientation and application of coordination have been identified: coordination within the sector, involving geographical zoning, sub-sector specialisation, donor consortia, project co-financing, sector aid, harmonisation of procedures, ear-marked budgetary support, donor agency reform and inter-agency intelligence gathering; sector-wide coordination, expressed particularly through the Sector-Wide Approach; coordination across sectors at national level, expressed in the evolution of Poverty Strategy Reduction Papers and the national monitoring of the Millennium Development Goals; and, most recently, global-level coordination, embodied in the Paris Principles, and the emergence of agencies such as the International Health Partnerships Plus. The transitions are largely but not strictly chronological, and each draws on earlier elements, in ways that are redefined in the new context. With the increasing complexity of both the territory of global health and its governance, and increasing stakeholders and networks, current imaginings of coordination are again being challenged. The High Level Forum in Busan may have been successful in recognising a much more complex landscape for development than previously conceived, but the challenges to coordination remain.

  4. Development cooperation for health: reviewing a dynamic concept in a complex global aid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Peter S; Dodd, Rebecca; Brown, Scott; Haffeld, Just

    2012-03-15

    The 4th High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, held in Busan, South Korea in November 2011 again promised an opportunity for a "new consensus on development cooperation" to emerge. This paper reviews the recent evolution of the concept of coordination for development assistance in health as the basis from which to understand current discourses. The paper reviews peer-reviewed scientific literature and relevant 'grey' literature, revisiting landmark publications and influential authors, examining the transitions in the conceptualisation of coordination, and the related changes in development assistance. Four distinct transitions in the understanding, orientation and application of coordination have been identified: coordination within the sector, involving geographical zoning, sub-sector specialisation, donor consortia, project co-financing, sector aid, harmonisation of procedures, ear-marked budgetary support, donor agency reform and inter-agency intelligence gathering; sector-wide coordination, expressed particularly through the Sector-Wide Approach; coordination across sectors at national level, expressed in the evolution of Poverty Strategy Reduction Papers and the national monitoring of the Millennium Development Goals; and, most recently, global-level coordination, embodied in the Paris Principles, and the emergence of agencies such as the International Health Partnerships Plus. The transitions are largely but not strictly chronological, and each draws on earlier elements, in ways that are redefined in the new context. With the increasing complexity of both the territory of global health and its governance, and increasing stakeholders and networks, current imaginings of coordination are again being challenged. The High Level Forum in Busan may have been successful in recognising a much more complex landscape for development than previously conceived, but the challenges to coordination remain.

  5. Centered Kernel Alignment Enhancing Neural Network Pretraining for MRI-Based Dementia Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cárdenas-Peña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a growing problem that affects elderly people worldwide. More accurate evaluation of dementia diagnosis can help during the medical examination. Several methods for computer-aided dementia diagnosis have been proposed using resonance imaging scans to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI and healthy controls (NC. Nonetheless, the computer-aided diagnosis is especially challenging because of the heterogeneous and intermediate nature of MCI. We address the automated dementia diagnosis by introducing a novel supervised pretraining approach that takes advantage of the artificial neural network (ANN for complex classification tasks. The proposal initializes an ANN based on linear projections to achieve more discriminating spaces. Such projections are estimated by maximizing the centered kernel alignment criterion that assesses the affinity between the resonance imaging data kernel matrix and the label target matrix. As a result, the performed linear embedding allows accounting for features that contribute the most to the MCI class discrimination. We compare the supervised pretraining approach to two unsupervised initialization methods (autoencoders and Principal Component Analysis and against the best four performing classification methods of the 2014 CADDementia challenge. As a result, our proposal outperforms all the baselines (7% of classification accuracy and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve at the time it reduces the class biasing.

  6. Functional Neuroimaging in Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Papma (Janne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDementia refers to a clinical syndrome of cognitive deterioration and difficulty in the performance of activities of daily living. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), followed by vascular dementia (VaD) at old age and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) at young onse

  7. [Neuropathology of frontotemporal dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical phenotype of dementia, characterized by complex of clinical symptoms, including disinhibition, character change, increased appetite, sexual misconduct and language problems. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a pathological classification of neurodegenerative disorder and its core consists of Pick's disease (PiD). Historically, PiD was morphologically subclassified into three types, but recent immunocytochemical investigations defined type I as PiD with Pick bodies (three repeat tauopathy), type II as corticobasal degeneration (CBD, four repeat tauopathy) and type III as FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U). The recent progress provided an evidence that the majority of FTLD-U represented primary TDP 43 proteionopathy. Three major clinical phenotypes of FTLD consist of FTD, semantic dementia (SD) and progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA). Clinical and pathological correlative studies demonstrated that majority of the background pathology of FTD is PiD with Pick bodies, that of SD is FTLD-U and that of PNFA is CBD, although there are too many exceptions. Although FTD is one of the major clinical manifestations of FTLD, the most frequent pathological background of FTD is Alzheimer disease (AD). The degenerative processes causing FTD symptoms include dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and argyrophilic grain disease. Moreover, vascular process such as Binswanger disease and inflammatory process such as neurosyphilis could also present with FTD symptoms. Since FTD requires special clinical care distinct from AD, clinical diagnosis of FTD is quite important. But for the fundamental treatment based on background pathological processes, surrogate biomarkers, including structural and functional neuroimages and findings of cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, should be pursued for future progress in FTD research.

  8. Automated a complex computer aided design concept generated using macros programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal Ramly, Mohammad; Asrokin, Azharrudin; Abd Rahman, Safura; Zulkifly, Nurul Ain Md

    2013-12-01

    Changing a complex Computer Aided design profile such as car and aircraft surfaces has always been difficult and challenging. The capability of CAD software such as AutoCAD and CATIA show that a simple configuration of a CAD design can be easily modified without hassle, but it is not the case with complex design configuration. Design changes help users to test and explore various configurations of the design concept before the production of a model. The purpose of this study is to look into macros programming as parametric method of the commercial aircraft design. Macros programming is a method where the configurations of the design are done by recording a script of commands, editing the data value and adding a certain new command line to create an element of parametric design. The steps and the procedure to create a macro programming are discussed, besides looking into some difficulties during the process of creation and advantage of its usage. Generally, the advantages of macros programming as a method of parametric design are; allowing flexibility for design exploration, increasing the usability of the design solution, allowing proper contained by the model while restricting others and real time feedback changes.

  9. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72-have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel gene...

  10. Visuoconstructional Impairment in Dementia Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Reichman

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT affects most neuropsychological domains including language, memory, and visuo-spatial skills. The latter are usually assessed by poorly quantifiable copying tasks. We assessed constructional abilities using the Developmental Test of Visuomotor Integration (VMI comprised of a series of model drawings of increasing complexity. Twenty-six patients meeting NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for DAT, 21 normal aged subjects with normal mental status examinations, and 14 patients with vascular dementia were tested. In DAT, we found significant correlations between visuoconstructive ability and memory registration, delayed recall, and language functions such as confrontation naming and word-list generation. Less marked, but significant correlations were found in the vascular dementia group between visuoconstructive ability and memory registration and word-list generation. A few normal elderly subjects were unable to copy the most challenging figures. The study demonstrates that: (1 VMI is a convenient method for quantifying constructional deficits in DAT and other dementing illnesses; (2 constructional deficits are highly correlated with dementia severity and memory and language deficits in DAT; (3 neuropsychological deficits are less highly inter-correlated in vascular dementia than in DAT; and (4 abnormal constructional skills are present in some normal elderly.

  11. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  12. 3D Printing Aids Acetabular Reconstruction in Complex Revision Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Hughes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision hip arthroplasty requires comprehensive appreciation of abnormal bony anatomy. Advances in radiology and manufacturing technology have made three-dimensional (3D representation of osseous anatomy obtainable, which provide visual and tactile feedback. Such life-size 3D models were manufactured from computed tomography scans of three hip joints in two patients. The first patient had undergone multiple previous hip arthroplasties for bilateral hip infections, resulting in right-sided pelvic discontinuity and a severe left-sided posterosuperior acetabular deficiency. The second patient had a first-stage revision for infection and recurrent dislocations. Specific metal reduction protocols were used to reduce artefact. The images were imported into Materialise MIMICS 14.12®. The models were manufactured using selective laser sintering. Accurate templating was performed preoperatively. Acetabular cup, augment, buttress, and cage sizes were trialled using the models, before being adjusted, and resterilised, enhancing the preoperative decision-making process. Screw trajectory simulation was carried out, reducing the risk of neurovascular injury. With 3D printing technology, complex pelvic deformities were better evaluated and treated with improved precision. Life-size models allowed accurate surgical simulation, thus improving anatomical appreciation and preoperative planning. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the technique should prove invaluable as a tool to aid clinical practice.

  13. 3D Printing Aids Acetabular Reconstruction in Complex Revision Hip Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBuitleir, Cathal; Soden, Philip; O'Donnchadha, Brian; Tansey, Anthony; Abdulkarim, Ali; McMahon, Colm; Hurson, Conor J.

    2017-01-01

    Revision hip arthroplasty requires comprehensive appreciation of abnormal bony anatomy. Advances in radiology and manufacturing technology have made three-dimensional (3D) representation of osseous anatomy obtainable, which provide visual and tactile feedback. Such life-size 3D models were manufactured from computed tomography scans of three hip joints in two patients. The first patient had undergone multiple previous hip arthroplasties for bilateral hip infections, resulting in right-sided pelvic discontinuity and a severe left-sided posterosuperior acetabular deficiency. The second patient had a first-stage revision for infection and recurrent dislocations. Specific metal reduction protocols were used to reduce artefact. The images were imported into Materialise MIMICS 14.12®. The models were manufactured using selective laser sintering. Accurate templating was performed preoperatively. Acetabular cup, augment, buttress, and cage sizes were trialled using the models, before being adjusted, and resterilised, enhancing the preoperative decision-making process. Screw trajectory simulation was carried out, reducing the risk of neurovascular injury. With 3D printing technology, complex pelvic deformities were better evaluated and treated with improved precision. Life-size models allowed accurate surgical simulation, thus improving anatomical appreciation and preoperative planning. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the technique should prove invaluable as a tool to aid clinical practice. PMID:28168060

  14. Dementia in Taiwan area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanhan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Taiwan has an increasing aging population like other developed areas. The aging population will lead to an increased prevalence of dementia. Methods:This article will reflect the status of dementia in Taiwan, including updated epidemiology, diagnosis, subtypes, and optimal treatment of dementia. Results:The article also describes and interprets the Taiwan Dementia Policy to establish a clear, large view of the current state of management of dementia in Taiwan and future policy implementation. Conclusion:A comprehensive policy to dementia, from the basic researches to clinical care and treatment, is necessary to the increased aged population in Taiwan.

  15. Opening up the DNA methylome of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Morales, R; Esteller, M

    2017-01-03

    Dementia is a complex clinical condition characterized by several cognitive impairments that interfere with patient independence in executing everyday tasks. Various neurodegenerative disorders have dementia in common among their clinical manifestations. In addition, these diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia, share molecular alterations at the neuropathological level. In recent years, the field of neuroepigenetics has expanded massively and it is now clear that epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation, are mechanisms involved in both normal and pathological brain function. Despite the persistent methodological and conceptual caveats, it has been reported that several genes fundamental to the development of neurodegenerative disorders are deregulated by aberrant methylation patterns of their promoters, and even common epigenetic signatures for some dementia-associated pathologies have been identified. Therefore, understanding the epigenetic mechanisms that are altered in dementia, especially those associated with the initial phases, will allow us not only to understand the etiopathology of dementia and its progression but also to design effective therapies to reduce this global public health problem. This review provides an in-depth summary of our current knowledge about DNA methylation in dementia, focusing exclusively on the analyses performed in human brain.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 3 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.242.

  16. Complexity and Targeting in Federal Student Aid: A Quantitative Analysis. NBER Working Paper No. 13801

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Scott-Clayton, Judith E.

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of empirical evidence shows that some financial aid programs increase college enrollment. Puzzlingly, there is little compelling evidence that Pell Grants and Stafford Loans, the primary federal student aid programs, are effective in achieving this goal. In this paper, we provide an in-depth review of this evidence, which taken as a…

  17. [Prevention of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    The dementia prevention consists of three steps, primary prevention of dementia is to prevent from normal and mild cognitive impairment to dementia, secondary prevention is early detection and early treatment of dementia, and tertiary prevention is three stages of progress prevention of dementia. Primary prevention of dementia had been considered impossible until recently, but potential scientific evidence has been shown recently. The fact that 4.62 million people are person with dementia and 400 million people are person with mild cognitive impairment are considered to be urgent problem and we must intend to perform dementia prevention from primary to tertiary prevention thoroughly. We perform dementia screening using touch panel type computer and we recommend person with mild cognitive impairment to join dementia prevention classroom. Therefore, we can prevent progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia (primary prevention). Early diagnosis and introduction to the specialized medical institution are needed if you find early stage of dementia and treat early (secondary prevention). To prevent progression by the appropriate drug treatment and care for dementia is required (tertiary prevention).

  18. Lewy Body Dementia Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... promoting scientific advances. Featured LBD Stories & Tributes Dad's Dementia Journey It's been years since my father passed ... I received an email from the Lewy Body Dementia Association about a benefit... Read Story The Lewy ...

  19. Dementia and driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. If your loved one has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may ...

  20. Dementia - daily care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000030.htm Dementia - daily care To use the sharing features on ... prevent choking. Tips for Talking With Someone With Dementia Keep distractions and noise down: Turn off the ...

  1. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  2. Complexity analysis of EMG signals for patients after stroke during robot-aided rehabilitation training using fuzzy approximate entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents a novel viewpoint to monitor the motor function improvement during a robot-aided rehabilitation training. Eight chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend the 20-session training, and in each session, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flexion and extension together with the robotic system. The robotic system was continuously controlled by the electromyographic (EMG) signal from the affected triceps. Fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) was applied to investigate the complexity of the EMG segment, and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during elbow flexion and extension was applied to reflect force generating capacity of the affected muscles. The results showed that the group mean fApEn of EMG signals from triceps and biceps increased significantly after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was also significant increase in maximum voluntary flexion and extension torques after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was significant correlation between fApEn of agonist and MVC , which implied that the increase of motorneuron number is one of factors that may explain the increase in muscle strength. These findings based on fApEn of the EMG signals expand the existing interpretation of training-induced function improvement in patients after stroke, and help us to understand the neurological change induced by the robot-aided rehabilitation training.

  3. Dementia beyond 2025: Knowledge and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Alain; Gzil, Fabrice; Andrieu, Sandrine; Banerjee, Sube; Brémond, François; Buée, Luc; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Mangialasche, Francesca; Platel, Hervé; Salmon, Eric; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Given that there may well be no significant advances in drug development before 2025, prevention of dementia-Alzheimer's disease through the management of vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors may be a more realistic goal than treatment. Level of education and cognitive reserve assessment in neuropsychological testing deserve attention, as well as cultural, social, and economic aspects of caregiving. Assistive technologies for dementia care remain complex. Serious games are emerging as virtual educational and pleasurable tools, designed for individual and cooperative skill building. Public policies are likely to pursue improving awareness and understanding of dementia; providing good quality early diagnosis and intervention for all; improving quality of care from diagnosis to the end of life, using clinical and economic end points; delivering dementia strategies quicker, with an impact on more people. Dementia should remain presented as a stand-alone concept, distinct from frailty or loss of autonomy. The basic science of sensory impairment and social engagement in people with dementia needs to be developed. E-learning and serious games programs may enhance public and professional education. Faced with funding shortage, new professional dynamics and economic models may emerge through coordinated, flexible research networks. Psychosocial research could be viewed as an investment in quality of care, rather than an academic achievement in a few centers of excellence. This would help provide a competitive advantage to the best operators. Stemming from care needs, a logical, systems approach to dementia care environment through organizational, architectural, and psychosocial interventions may be developed, to help reduce symptoms in people with dementia and enhance quality of life. Dementia-friendly environments, culture, and domesticity are key factors for such interventions.

  4. Music and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia.

  5. [Informing of the diagnosis in dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, María José; Cucurella, Eulàlia; Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Rodríguez, Daniel; Barranco, Elena; Catena, Joan; Cubí, Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a syndrome characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive functions, accompanied by psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances that produce a progressive and irreversible disability. The way it should communicate the diagnosis of dementia is a key discussion point on which there is no unanimous agreement so far. The communicating of the diagnosis of dementia is a complex issue that affects not only, the patient but also to caregivers and health professionals who care and must conform to the ethical principles governing medical practice (autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice). Therefore, from the Dementia Working Group of the Catalan Geriatric Society (Grupo de Trabajo de Demencia de la Sociedad Catalana de Geriatría) arises the need to review the issue and propose a course of action for the disclosure of diagnosis.

  6. Return of the cycad hypothesis - does the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) of Guam have new implications for global health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, P G; Codd, G A

    2005-08-01

    Recently published work provides evidence in support of the cycad hypothesis for Lytico--Bodig, the Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC), based on a new understanding of Chamorro food practices, a cyanobacterial origin of beta-methylaminoalanine (BMAA) in cycad tissue, and a possible mechanism of biomagnification of this neurotoxic amino acid in the food chain. BMAA is one of two cycad chemicals with known neurotoxic properties (the other is cycasin, a proven developmental neurotoxin) among the many substances that exist in these highly poisonous plants, the seeds of which are used by Chamorros for food and medicine. The traditional diet includes the fruit bat, a species that feeds on cycad seed components and reportedly bioaccumulates BMAA. Plant and animal proteins provide a previously unrecognized reservoir for the slow release of this toxin. BMAA is reported in the brain tissue of Guam patients and early data suggest that some Northern American patients dying of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have detectable brain levels of BMAA. The possible role of cyanobacterial toxicity in sporadic neurodegenerative disease is therefore worthy of consideration. Recent neuropathology studies of ALS/PDC confirm understanding of this disorder as a 'tangle' disease, based on variable anatomical burden, and showing biochemical characteristics of 'AD-like' combined 3R and 4R tau species. This model mirrors the emerging view that other neurodegenerative disease spectra comprise clusters of related syndromes, owing to common molecular pathology, with variable anatomical distribution in the nervous system giving rise to different clinical phenotypes. Evidence for 'ubiquitin-only' inclusions in ALS/PDC is weak. Similarly, although there is evidence for alpha-synucleinopathy in ALS/PDC, the parkinsonian component of the disease is not caused by Lewy body disease. The spectrum of sporadic AD includes involvement of the substantia nigra and a high

  7. Sexual disinhibition and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Ulivi, Martina; Danti, Sabrina; Lucetti, Claudio; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    To describe inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) observed in patients with dementia, we conducted searches using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Web of Science to find relevant articles, chapters, and books published from 1950 to 2014. Search terms used included 'hypersexuality', 'inappropriate sexual behaviors', and 'dementia'. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. Sexuality is a human's need to express intimacy, but persons with dementia may not know how to appropriately meet their needs for closeness and intimacy due to their decline in cognition. Generally, the interaction among brain, physical, psychological, and environmental factors can create what we call ISB. The most likely change in the sexual behaviour of a person with dementia is indifference. However, ISB in dementia appear to be of two types--intimacy-seeking and disinhibited--that differ in their association with dementia type, dementia severity and, possibly, other concurrent behavioural disorder. Tensions develop from uncertainties regarding which, or when, behaviours are to be considered 'inappropriate' (i.e. improper) or abnormal. While most ISB occur in the moderate to severe stages of Alzheimer's dementia, they may also be seen in early stages of frontotemporal dementia because of the lack of insight and disinhibition. ISB are often better managed by non-pharmacological means, as patients may be less responsive to psychoactive therapies, but non-pharmacological interventions do not always stop the behaviour.

  8. Preventing and diagnosing dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Bernie; Jenkins, Catharine; Ginesi, Laura

    While dementia is an umbrella term for a range of degenerative brain disorders, many share similar presentations. Nurses are ideally placed to identify those at risk and empower them to access treatment and plan and prepare for their future needs--as such, they need up-to-date knowledge of the signs and symptoms of the different types of dementia to identify risk factors and make an informed diagnosis. This article, the third in a four-part series on dementia, examines the risk factors, signs, symptoms and diagnosis of dementia, as well as outlining lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise that may help to prevent the development of the condition.

  9. Cerebral imaging and dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rascol, A.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.

    1989-02-01

    Modern imaging techniques undoubtedly are of value when applied to the study of dementia. This value, however, varies with the technique utilized, and one must distinguish between acquired and potential knowledge. Morphological imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance detects or confirms certain causes of dementia (tumours, lacunae, hydrocephalus with normal CSF pressure), but it is still not sensitive and specific enough to be very useful in primary dementias. Functional imaging (essentially with emission tomography) has already provided interesting data in the study of degenerative dementia (correlations with neuropsychology, subtyping), but what is most promising is its possibilities in the physiopathological approach of the disease.

  10. Hearing and music in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2015-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  12. Smoking, dementia and cognitive decline in the elderly, a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Nicotine may aid reaction time, learning and memory, but smoking increases cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular risk factors have been linked to increased risk of dementia. A previous meta-analysis found that current smokers were at higher risk of subsequent dementia, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and cognitive decline. Methods In order to update and examine this further a systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out using different search and inclusion crit...

  13. Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies – epidemiology, risk factors and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Auning

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD are common and debilitating dementia syndromes accompanied by Parkinsonism and a range of other psychiatric, sleep and autonomic disturbances. Disease mechanisms are unknown, but aggregated Lewy bodies containing alpha-synuclein are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis. Point-prevalence of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD is approximately 30%, and the majority develop dementia as the disease progresses. Recent studies suggest that 25-30% of non-demented PD patients have mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and 15-20% already have it at the time of the diagnosis. PD-MCI is a strong predictor of PDD. There are few welldesigned epidemiological studies of DLB, but available evidence suggests that 15-20% of the total dementia population have DLB. Predicting future cognitive impairment is a priority, but the pre-dementia stage of DLB is essentially unexplored. Promising biomarkers are being researched, but, given the complexity of this disease, a multimodal approach is more likely to permit diagnostic precision in the future.

  14. What to Ask: Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for relatives with dementia run higher risks of depression, anxiety and other health problems. Caregivers who are struggling are also more likely to move loved ones with dementia to nursing homes or … more © 2017 Health in Aging. All rights ...

  15. Treatment of Frontotemporal Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Richard M.; Boxer, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and two predominant types of underlying neuropathology. FTD typically comprises three distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). FTD also frequently overlaps both clinically and neuropathologically with three other neuro...

  16. [Hypertension and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, O

    2014-06-01

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Several epidemiological studies have indicated a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the onset of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) several years later. Cognitive disorder may be related to focal cerebral lesions of vascular origin (infarctus, lacunae) and/or chronic ischemia of the white matter (white matter lesions) related to arteriosclerosis and/or lipohyalinosis of small perforating arteries high blood pressure in mid-life to later cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, disorders of cerebral microcirculation and endothelial dysfunction may be associated to blood brain barrier dysfunction and amyloid plaques formation leading to Alzheimer's process. Few randomized clinical trials have included a cognitive assessment and dementia as outcome in their design. They all raise some major criticisms: cognitive assessment was never the main outcome, too short follow-up to study dementia; incomplete assessment of cognition, lost of follow-up and a small proportion of subjects at risk for dementia at inclusion. However, the results of therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) or cognitive decline by antihypertensive treatments. A meta-analysis including randomized controlled studies, suggests a significant decrease in the risk of dementia with antihypertensive treatment compared to placebo.

  17. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...

  18. Early-Onset Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konijnenberg, Elles; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Kate, Mara Ten;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early-onset dementia (EOD) is a rare condition, with an often atypical clinical presentation, and it may therefore be challenging to diagnose. Specialized memory clinics vary in the type of patients seen, diagnostic procedures applied, and the pharmacological treatment given. The aim...... of this study was to investigate quality-of-care indicators in subjects with EOD from 3 tertiary memory clinics in 3 European countries. METHODS: We included 1325 newly diagnosed EOD patients, ages 65 years or younger, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, from the Danish Dementia Registry...... (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen), the Swedish Dementia Registry ("SveDem", Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm), and the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (VU University Medical Center). RESULTS: The frequency of EOD among all dementia patients was significantly lower in Copenhagen (410, 20%) and Stockholm (284, 21...

  19. Collage as a Therapeutic Modality for Reminiscence in Patients with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhiser Stallings, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Traditional therapy, with its emphasis on verbal communication between therapist and client, may not be appropriate for patients with dementia due to impaired cognitive and verbal abilities. This brief report presents a qualitative study on the use of collage in art therapy to aid in the process of reminiscence in individuals with dementia. Data…

  20. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  1. Rapunzel’s complex: Social relations, and sexuality affectivity of adolescents with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana França Cescon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to reflect on the influence of HIV / AIDS on social relations, sexuality and adolescent affectivity. We conducted a literature review and subsequent theoretical discussion on the topic, with the methodology of qualitative analysis of texts and scientific articles. The findings of the study demonstrated that it is necessary to fully consider the various psychosocial aspects of this dynamic, since the psychological aspects significantly influence disease progression and quality of life of HIV patient. For adolescents, this influence becomes even greater, because puberty is a specific stage of biological development, emotional and social, where social interaction plays an important role for the construction of the subject's personality. It is hoped that this study may contribute to the reflection on the importance of creating themselves coping strategies and health care interventions geared to this particular group, especially with regard to the psychologist, who should seek to accommodate these demands subjects, contributing to a healthy psychosocial development, considering its specific features.

  2. [Esquirol and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albou, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Jean Etienne Dominique Esquirol (1772-1840), after Pinel (1745-1826), stated precisely the symptoms of dementia according to the new medical definition of the word: a disease including all the states of intellectual weakness for various reasons. For example Esquirol clearly distinguished dementia from mania--that is to say our present psychoses--, and also from mental deficiency. In the same time Esquirol became more and more conscious, from 1814 (cf. his contributions to the Dictionnaire des sciences médicales, in 58 volumes, dir. Panckoucke) and 1838 (his famous work Des maladies mentales), of the very nature of senile insanity compared with other kinds of dementia.

  3. Pectoral fins aid in navigation of a complex environment by bluegill sunfish under sensory deprivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V

    2013-08-15

    Complex structured environments offer fish advantages as places of refuge and areas of greater potential prey densities, but maneuvering through these environments is a navigational challenge. To successfully navigate complex habitats, fish must have sensory input relaying information about the proximity and size of obstacles. We investigated the role of the pectoral fins as mechanosensors in bluegill sunfish swimming through obstacle courses under different sensory deprivation and flow speed conditions. Sensory deprivation was accomplished by filming in the dark to remove visual input and/or temporarily blocking lateral line input via immersion in cobalt chloride. Fish used their pectoral fins to touch obstacles as they swam slowly past them under all conditions. Loss of visual and/or lateral line sensory input resulted in an increased number of fin taps and shorter tap durations while traversing the course. Propulsive pectoral fin strokes were made in open areas between obstacle posts and fish did not use the pectoral fins to push off or change heading. Bending of the flexible pectoral fin rays may initiate an afferent sensory input, which could be an important part of the proprioceptive feedback system needed to navigate complex environments. This behavioral evidence suggests that it is possible for unspecialized pectoral fins to act in both a sensory and a propulsive capacity.

  4. Latino/Hispanic Alzheimer’s caregivers experiencing dementia-related dressing issues: corroboration of the Preservation of Self model and reactions to a “smart dresser” computer-based dressing aid

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Coon, David W; Lozano, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To gain an understanding of Latino/Hispanic caregivers’ dementia-related dressing issues, their impressions of using a “smart” context-aware dresser to coach dressing, and recommendations to improve its acceptability. Method The same Latina moderator conducted all the caregiver focus groups. She followed a semi-structured interview guide that was previously used with White and African American family caregivers who experienced Alzheimer’s disease related dressing challenges. From th...

  5. [The Charles Bonnet syndrome and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baerdemaeker, E; Bouckaert, F; D'Haenen, H

    2009-01-01

    An 83-year-old visually impaired woman was admitted to the hospital because of complex visual hallucinations. Her symptoms were indicative of the Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS). On the basis of this case we explore the relationship between CBS and dementia and discuss the different opinions on this topic.

  6. Sexuality and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... still alive," said Jerry, who cared for his wife with dementia. At a recent conference of the ... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance ...

  7. Dementia: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders of the nervous system, such as mitochondrial disorders, leukodystrophies, and lysosomal storage diseases, can lead to dementia. Metabolic problems and endocrine abnormalities such as thyroid problems, low blood sugar levels (called hypoglycemia), and ...

  8. Dementia - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help improve communication skills and prevent wandering. Calming music may reduce wandering and restlessness, ease anxiety, and improve sleep and behavior. People with dementia should have their eyes and ...

  9. Multi-infarct dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 104. Read More Delirium Depression - overview Diabetes High blood pressure Peripheral artery disease - legs Stroke Patient Instructions Dementia - what to ask your doctor Review Date 2/27/2016 Updated by: Amit M. ...

  10. Hearing and dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Chris J. D.; Marshall, Charles R.; Golden, Hannah L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing deficits associated with cognitive impairment have attracted much recent interest, motivated by emerging evidence that impaired hearing is a risk factor for cognitive decline. However, dementia and hearing impairment present immense challenges in their own right, and their intersection in the auditory brain remains poorly understood and difficult to assess. Here, we outline a clinically oriented, symptom-based approach to the assessment of hearing in dementias, informed by recent prog...

  11. Supporting people with dementia to eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah, Vicki

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify the best ways of supporting people with dementia to eat. Five electronic databases were searched, with a date range from January 2004 to July 2015. Following screening of the 233 studies identified, 22 were included in the final analysis. The study interventions focused on educational programmes, environmental or routine changes, and assistance with eating, with the strongest evidence shown in the more complex educational programmes for people with dementia. The evidence suggests that staff who support people with dementia to eat should undertake face-to-face education programmes and aim to give people enough time when helping them to eat. However, cultural change may be needed to ensure individual assessments are carried out to identify those having difficulty eating, and to ensure they are afforded enough time to eat their meals.

  12. Dementia with Parkinson's disease: Clinical diagnosis, neuropsychological aspects and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lorenzo Otero

    Full Text Available Abstract Dementia with Parkinson's disease represents a controversial issue in the complex group of alpha-synucleinopathies. The author acknowledges the concept of a "continuum" between Parkinson disease's (PD, Lewy body dementia (LBD, and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PDD. However, the practicing neurologist needs to identify the phenotypic signs of each dementia. The treatment and prognosis are different in spite of the overlaps between them. The main aim of this review was to characterize the clinical diagnoses of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD. Secondarily, the review discussed some epidemiological and neuropsychological issues. Selection of articles was not systematic and reflects the author's opinion, where the main text selected was the recommendations from the Movement Disorder Society Task Force for PDD diagnosis. The Pub Med, OVID, and Proquest data bases were used for the search.

  13. Quantitative Electroencephalography as a Diagnostic Tool for Alzheimer's Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Sabers, Anne; Kjaer, Troels W;

    2015-01-01

    be used as a diagnostic marker for dementia. The aim of this study was to examine the value of qEEG in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia in patients with Down syndrome (DS). METHOD: The study included 21 patients with DS and mild-to-moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (DS-AD) and 16 age......BACKGROUND: Assessment of dementia in individuals with intellectual disability is complex due to great inter-individual variability in cognitive function prior to dementia and a lack of standardized instruments. Studies have indicated that quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) results may...

  14. Fluorescence spectral analysis for the discrimination of complex, similar mixtures with the aid of chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yongnian; Lai, Yanhua; Kokot, Serge

    2012-07-01

    An analytical method for the classification of complex real-world samples was researched and developed with the use of excitation-emission fluorescence matrix (EEFM) spectroscopy, using the medicinal herbs, Rhizoma corydalis decumbentis (RCD) and Rhizoma corydalis (RC) as example samples. The data set was obtained from various authentic RCD-A and RC-A, adulterated AD, and commercial RCD-C and RC-C samples. The spectra (range: λ(ex) = 215∼395 nm and λ(em) = 290∼560 nm), arranged in two- and three-way data matrix formats, were processed using principal component analysis (PCA) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to produce two-dimensional component-by-component plots for qualitative data classification. The RCD-A and RC-A object groups were clearly discriminated, but the AD and the RCD-C as well as RC-C samples were less well separated. PARAFAC analysis produced somewhat better discrimination, and loadings plots revealed the presence of the marker compound Protopine-a strongly fluorescing substance-as well as at least two other unidentified fluorescent components. Classification performance of the common K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and linear discrimination analysis (LDA) methods was relatively poor when compared with that of the back propagation- and radial basis function-artificial neural networks (BP-ANN and RBF-ANN) models on the basis of two- and three-way formatted data. The best results were obtained with the three-way fingerprints and the RBF-ANN model. Subsequently, the quality of the commercial samples (RCD-C and RC-C) was classified on the best optimized RBF-ANN model. Thus, EEFM spectroscopy, which provides three-way measured data, is potentially a powerful analytical technique for the analysis of complex real-world substances provided the classification is performed by the RBF-ANN or similar ANN methods.

  15. Reduced-complexity Non-data-aided Timing Recovery for PAM-based M-ary CPM Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuous phase modulation (CPM is a widely used modulation scheme in communication systems. However, difficulties arise with the design of CPM receivers, due to the nonlinear nature of CPM. One popular solution is to linearize CPM with pulse amplitude modulation (PAM representation. In this paper, a reduced-complexity non-data-aided (NDA timing recovery method for PAM-based M-ary CPM receivers is proposed. The proposed method is based on the PAM representation and maximum likelihood principle. The merits of the proposed method are twofold. On one hand, the proposed method is reduced-complexity in nature for PAM-based CPM receivers, i.e., it shares the match filter bank with PAM-based detectors. On the other hand, it is shown that the performance of the proposed method is better than the existing method with some modulation schemes. Therefore, the proposed method provides an important synchronization component for PAM-based M-ary CPM receivers.

  16. Palliative care and dementia--A time and place?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Angela; Sharp, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The current focus in dementia care places emphasis on the potential of people to live well with the condition. Given the historical tendency to neglect the full rights and citizenship of people with dementia, such an emphasis gives hope and optimism that there is life after diagnosis. This paper seeks to explore the potential compromise of effective preparation for the complexities of advanced illness that may be presented by this consistently up-beat message. Dementia is a life limiting condition, currently without cure. Therefore, the appropriateness of palliative care may seem obvious. Yet, until relatively recently, palliative care was seen as an adjunct to oncology in the minds of professionals and public alike. However, there is a growing recognition that specialist palliative care has much to offer people with a range of long term conditions, including people with dementia. So, whilst 'living well' is an important message-especially following diagnosis-planning for advanced dementia and dying well is equally important. The aim of this paper is to highlight policy on the living well and the palliative care approach for people with dementia. A word limited narrative literature review was conducted to explore how policies have or have not informed the literature on both messages. The findings emphasise the need for a continuum approach to dementia care, with discussion on when, where, and how can palliative care be delivered for people with dementia.

  17. Computer-aided patch planning for treatment of complex coarctation of the aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietdorf, Urte; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Kuehne, Titus; Huebler, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2009-02-01

    Between five and eight percent of all children born with congenitally malformed hearts suffer from coarctations of the aorta. Some severe coarctations can only be treated by surgical repair. Untreated, this defect can cause serious damage to organ development or even lead to death. Patch repair requires open surgery. It can affect patients of any age: newborns with severe coarctation and/or hypoplastic aortic arch as well as older patients with late diagnosis of coarctation of the aorta. Another patient group are patients of varying age with re-coarctation of the aorta or hypoplastic aortic arch after surgical and/or interventional repair. If anatomy is complex and interventional treatment by catheterization, balloon angioplasty or stent placement is not possible, surgery is indicated. The choice of type of surgery depends not only on the given anatomy but also on the experience the surgical team has with each method. One surgical approach is patch repair. A patch of a suitable shape and size is sewed into the aorta to expand the aortic lumen at the site of coarctation. At present, the shape and size of the patch are estimated intra-operatively by the surgeon. We have developed a software application that allows planning of the patch pre-operatively on the basis of magnetic resonance angiographic data. The application determines the diameter of the coarctation and/or hypoplastic segment and constructs a patch proposal by calculating the difference to the normal vessel diameter pre-operatively. Evaluation of MR angiographic datasets from 12 test patients with different kinds of aortic arch stenosis shows a divergence of only (1.5+/-1.2) mm in coarctation diameters between manual segmentations and our approach, with comparable time expenditure. Following this proposal the patch can be prepared and adapted to the patient's anatomy pre-operatively. Ideally, this leads to shorter operation times and a better long-term outcome with a reduced rate of residual stenosis and

  18. Study Links Disasters to Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_161672.html Study Links Disasters to Dementia Losing home was tied to greater mental decline ... Earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters may raise dementia risk for seniors forced to leave their homes, ...

  19. Ethiologic diagnosis of dementia syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erélido Hernández Valero

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Dementia prevalence is between 4,5 and 18,5%, the inferior numbers are in the underdeveloped countries. Studies carried out in Cuba, shows approximately a 10% for more than 60 year old persons, what makes consider dementia as a health problem of huge importance. That is why the existence of a practical guide for its etiological diagnosis is of supreme necessity. This study engulfs diverse criteria to reach the diagnosis of dementia syndrome, as well as the diseases that may cause it, foretell it or accelerate it. Numbers are presented, and a series of valuations about dementia, the slight cognitive aggravation, Alzheimer disease, vascular dementia, dementia by Lewy bodies, and front temporal dementia, as well as other kinds of dementia.

  20. Dementia - behavior and sleep problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000029.htm Dementia - behavior and sleep problems To use the sharing ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. People with dementia , often have certain problems when it gets dark ...

  1. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Options Join the fight against LBD! Donate Symptoms Lewy body dementia symptoms and diagnostic criteria Every person with LBD is ... or Dementia plus one or more suggestive features. Symptoms Explained In this section we'll discuss each ...

  2. Vascular dementia: Facts and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most frequent dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, and is diagnosed during lifetime in 20% of demented patients. Five­year survival rate in VaD is 39%, while it is estimated to be 75% in healthy persons of the same age. It is therefore important to make correct diagnosis of VaD early in the course of the disease. Risk factors for VaD are identical to stroke risk factors, and there are significant possibilities for the prevention of vascular cognitive decline. Cognitive decline develops acutely or step­by­step within three months after stroke, but more gradual progression of intellectual decline is also possible. Neurological examination can reveal pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. Neuropsychological profile comprises the loss of cognitive set shifting, decline in word fluency, verbal learning difficulties, perseverations, difficulties in complex figure copying, and in patients with cortically located lesions also problems with speech and praxia. The basis of the diagnosis is, besides history, neurological examination and neuropsychological assessment, computed tomography and/ or magnetic resonance brain imaging. Vascular risk factors control is the most important measure in VaD prevention. Modern guidelines for the treatment of cognitive decline in VaD emphasize that donepezil can be useful in the improvement of cognitive status at the level of Class IIa recommendation at the level of evidence A, while memantine may be useful in patients with mixed VaD and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175022 i br. 175033

  3. Drug discovery from Chinese medicine against neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Kwok-Fai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are two major diseases associated with dementia, which is common among the elderly. While the etiology of dementia is multi-factorial and complex, neurodegeneration may be the major cause of these two diseases. Effective drugs for treating dementia are still to be discovered. Current western pharmacological approaches against neurodegeneration in dementia develop symptom-relieving and disease-modifying drugs. Current integrative and holistic approaches of Chinese medicine to discovering drugs for neurodegeneration in dementia include (1 single molecules from the herbs, (2 standardized extracts from a single herb, and (3 herbal formula with definite composition. This article not only reviews the concept of dementia in western medicine and Chinese medicine but also evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches.

  4. Influence of dementia on pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E

    2006-01-01

    In the next decades the number of older persons with dementia and with a painful condition will increase. This is an important conclusion since at this moment older persons with dementia and a painful condition receive less analgesic medication than older persons without dementia. One explanation fo

  5. Dementia as a cultural metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilig, Hannah

    2014-04-01

    This article contributes to debates about the category "dementia," which until recently has been dominated by biomedical models. The perspectives of critical gerontology are pertinent for extending knowledge about dementia and guiding this analysis. These perspectives encourage examination of cultural and historical influences and thus question how societies have constructed and defined dementia. This article queries the stories told about dementia and the language that we use to tell these stories. Central to the article is an analysis of some of the stories about dementia that are contained within and framed by contemporary culture. A number of films, TV documentaries, news reports, theatre, memoirs, novels, and poems that portray some of the experiences associated with dementia are interrogated. These representations are examined as they either perpetrate or challenge stereotypes about living with dementia. Analysis of these representations demonstrates the sociocultural construction of dementia and the extent to which dementia is a diachronic phenomenon. Above all, the article considers (a) the social and political dimensions of dementia, (b) the ways in which the metaphors persistently used to explain dementia shape our consciousness about this condition, and (c) the extent to which dementia is an inherent part of contemporary life.

  6. Neurobiology of Vascular Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Enciu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dementia is, in its current conceptual form, a distinct type of dementia with a spectrum of specific clinical and pathophysiological features. However, in a very large majority of cases, these alterations occur in an already aged brain, characterized by a milieu of cellular and molecular events common for different neurodegenerative diseases. The cell signaling defects and molecular dyshomeostasis might lead to neuronal malfunction prior to the death of neurons and the alteration of neuronal networks. In the present paper, we explore some of the molecular mechanisms underlying brain malfunction triggered by cerebrovascular disease and risk factors. We suggest that, in the age of genetic investigation and molecular diagnosis, the concept of vascular dementia needs a new approach.

  7. Dementia and Traffic Accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jindong Ding; Siersma, Volkert; Nielsen, Connie Thurøe;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a consequence of a rapid growth of an ageing population, more people with dementia are expected on the roads. Little is known about whether these people are at increased risk of road traffic-related accidents. OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to investigate the risk of road traffic......-related accidents for people aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of dementia in Denmark. METHODS: We will conduct a nationwide population-based cohort study consisting of Danish people aged 65 or older living in Denmark as of January 1, 2008. The cohort is followed for 7 years (2008-2014). Individual's personal...... data are available in Danish registers and can be linked using a unique personal identification number. A person is identified with dementia if the person meets at least one of the following criteria: (1) a diagnosis of the disease in the Danish National Patient Register or in the Danish Psychiatric...

  8. Music and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair BR

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Balakrishnan R Nair,1 William Browne,2 John Marley,3 Christian Heim41University of Newcastle and the Centre for Medical Education, HNE Health, Newcastle, NSW, 2Geriatric Medicine, Eastern Health, Melbourne, VIC, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, 4Toowong Private Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: As the population ages, the prevalence of dementia is increasing. Distressing behavioral problems are often part of the illness. This review considers the available evidence for cognitive effects related to music, evidence for the efficacy of music in the management of behavioral problems in dementia, and evidence about the effects of different types of music, their mode of delivery, and any adverse effects. Live music may be more beneficial than recorded. The effect of music may not be lasting, but there is evidence of benefit in studies, which to date are mostly not of high quality.Keywords: music, dementia, benefit

  9. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis.

  10. Montessori-based dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder.

  11. Latino/Hispanic Alzheimer’s caregivers experiencing dementia-related dressing issues: corroboration of the Preservation of Self model and reactions to a “smart dresser” computer-based dressing aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Coon, David W; Lozano, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To gain an understanding of Latino/Hispanic caregivers’ dementia-related dressing issues, their impressions of using a “smart” context-aware dresser to coach dressing, and recommendations to improve its acceptability. Method The same Latina moderator conducted all the caregiver focus groups. She followed a semi-structured interview guide that was previously used with White and African American family caregivers who experienced Alzheimer’s disease related dressing challenges. From that study, the Preservation of Self model emerged. Using a deductive qualitative analytic approach, we applied the thematic domains from the Preservation of Self model to ascertain relevance to Latino/Hispanic caregivers. Results Twenty Latino/Hispanic experienced caregivers were recruited, enrolled, and participated in one of three focus groups. The majority were female (75%) and either the spouse (25%) or adult child (35%). Striking similarities occurred with the dressing challenges and alignment with the Preservation of Self model. Ethnic differences arose in concerns over assimilation weakening the Latino culture of family caregiving. Regional clothing preferences were noted. Technology improvement recommendations for our system, called DRESS, included developing bilingual prompting dialogs and video modules using the local vernacular to improve cultural sensitivity. Caregivers identified the potential for the technology to enable user privacy, empowerment, and exercise as well as offering respite time for themselves. Conclusion Findings suggest dementia-related dressing issues were shared in common by different racial/ethnic groups but the response to them was influenced by cultural dynamics. For the first time Latino/Hispanic voices are heard to reflect their positive technology impressions, concerns, and recommendations in order to begin to address the cultural digital disparities divide. PMID:27928511

  12. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested.

  13. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF MCI and DEMENTIA TREATMENTS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED DEMENTIA PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Dementia; Hypoxia; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Iron Deficiency; Anemia; TBI; Neurodegenerative Disorders; Alzheimer's Disease; Vascular Dementia; Brain Injuries; Tauopathies; Parkinson's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Frontotemporal Dementia; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

  14. Dementia: Diagnosis and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Nutrition Prevention Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related News Older Adults with Cognitive Challenges Require Tests to Ensure They Can Drive ... dementia-like symptoms Ask questions about any noticeable changes in the ... or hallucinations the older person may have had Do tests of mental ...

  15. Lewy Body Dementia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a new treatment for hallucinations in Parkinson’s disease. Symptoms Differ in Alzheimer's when Lewy Bodies are Present June, 2015 - Lewy ... distinguish the underlying cause or causes of dementia symptoms. The diagnostic ... Alzheimer’s disease pathology alone versus those who have both ...

  16. Malnutrition and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Karen

    2016-07-13

    What was the nature of the CPD activity and/or practice-related feedback and/or event or experience in your practice? The CPD article outlined the effects dementia may have on a person's ability to eat and drink safely. It discussed assessment tools to identify patients at risk of malnutrition and management strategies to help maintain nutritional intake.

  17. Dementia and driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  18. Neuroimaging in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhof, Frederik [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (NL). Dept. of Radiology and Image Analysis Center (IAC); Fox, Nick C. [UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Dementia Research Centre; VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bastos-Leite, Antonio J. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Scheltens, Philip [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Alzheimer Center

    2011-07-01

    Against a background of an ever-increasing number of patients, new management options, and novel imaging modalities, neuroimaging is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of dementia. This up-to-date, superbly illustrated book aims to provide a practical guide to the effective use of neuroimaging in the patient with cognitive decline. It sets out the key clinical and imaging features of the wide range of causes of dementia and directs the reader from clinical presentation to neuroimaging and on to an accurate diagnosis whenever possible. After an introductory chapter on the clinical background, the available ''toolbox'' of structural and functional neuroimaging techniques is reviewed in detail, including CT, MRI and advanced MR techniques, SPECT and PET, and image analysis methods. The imaging findings in normal ageing are then discussed, followed by a series of chapters that carefully present and analyze the key imaging findings in patients with dementias. A structured path of analysis follows the main presenting feature: disorders associated with primary gray matter loss, with white matter changes, with brain swelling, etc. Throughout, a practical approach is adopted, geared specifically to the needs of clinicians (neurologists, radiologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians) working in the field of dementia, for whom this book should prove an invaluable resource. (orig.)

  19. Dementia and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and Diabetes mellitus (DM are major health problems nowadays. DM leads to a significant cognitive decline and increases the risk of dementia, mostly Alzheimer's Disease (AD and vascular dementia (VaD by 50-100% and 100-150%, respectively. Amyloid beta (Abeta, the main pathogenic factor in AD development, is eliminated by advanced glycation end products (AGEs and degraded by insulin degrading enzyme (IDE for which it competes with insulin. Insulin stimulates secretion of Abeta and promotes brain inflammation. DM I and II cause slowing down of mental speed, lowering of mental flexibility and DM II learning and memory disturbances. DM acts both directly by hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia and by the blood vessel changes. Hyperglycaemia changes synapse plasticity and leads to cognitive decline. AGEs disrupt the neuron function and bonding to Abeta increases its aggregability. Glycation of tau protein promotes production of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the main intracellular pathogenic factor in AD. AGE2 in DM causes pathological angiogenesis and apoptosis of neurons. AGE receptor (RAGE is also the specific Abeta receptor with which it produces reactive oxygen species that has, as a result, disruption of mitochondrial function and reduction of neuronal energy resources. Insulinoresistance is linked with the dysexecutive syndrome, and hyperinsulinaemia increases the risk of AD especially by enhancing phosphorylation of tau protein and formation of NFT. Application of insulin showed improvement of memory, behaviour and affect in AD patients. Good glycoregulation emerged as an important factor in dementia prevention, and a better insight in relations of DM and brain function will lead to new potential dementia therapies. .

  20. Dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, Ian G; Burn, David J; Ballard, Clive G; Collerton, Daniel; Jaros, Evelyn; Morris, Chris M; McLaren, Andrew; Perry, Elaine K; Perry, Robert; Piggott, Margaret A; O'Brien, John T

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to summarize recent findings about the clinical features, diagnosis and investigation of dementia with Lewy (DLB) bodies, together with its neuropathology, neurochemistry and genetics. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a primary, neurodegenerative dementia sharing clinical and pathological characteristics with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antiubiquitin immunocytochemical staining, developed in the early 1990s, allowed the frequency and distribution of cortical LBs to be defined. More recently, alpha-synuclein antibodies have revealed extensive neuritic pathology in DLB demonstrating a neurobiological link with other "synucleinopathies" including PD and multiple system atrophy (MSA). The most significant correlates of cognitive failure in DLB appear to be with cortical LB and Lewy neurites (LNs) rather than Alzheimer type pathology. Clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB, published in 1996, have been subjected to several validation studies against autopsy findings. These conclude that although diagnostic specificity is high (range 79- 100%, mean 92%), sensitivity is lower (range 0- 83 %, mean, 49%). Improved methods of case detection are therefore required. Fluctuating impairments in attention, visual recognition and construction are more indicative of DLB than AD. Relative preservation of medial temporal lobe volume on structural MRI and the use of SPECT tracers for regional blood flow and the dopamine transporter are the most reliable current biomarkers for DLB. There are no genetic or CSF tests recommended for the diagnosis of DLB at present. Between 15 and 20% of all elderly demented cases reaching autopsy have DLB, making it the most common cause of degenerative dementia after AD. Exquisite, not infrequently fatal, sensitivity to neuroleptic drugs and encouraging reports of the effects of cholinesterase inhibitors on cognitive, psychiatric and neurological features, mean that an accurate diagnosis of DLB is more

  1. Frontotemporal Dementias: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkins Kirsten

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dementia is a clinical state characterized by loss of function in multiple cognitive domains. It is a costly disease in terms of both personal suffering and economic loss. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the term now preferred over Picks disease to describe the spectrum of non-Alzheimers dementias characterized by focal atrophy of the frontal and anterior temporal regions of the brain. The prevalence of FTD is considerable, though specific figures vary among different studies. It occurs usually in an age range of 35–75 and it is more common in individuals with a positive family history of dementia. The risk factors associated with this disorder include head injury and family history of FTD. Although there is some controversy regarding the further syndromatic subdivision of the different types of FTD, the three major clinical presentations of FTD include: 1 a frontal or behavioral variant (FvFTD, 2 a temporal, aphasic variant, also called Semantic dementia (SD, and 3 a progressive aphasia (PA. These different variants differ in their clinical presentation, cognitive deficits, and affected brain regions. Patients with FTD should have a neuropsychiatric assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging studies to confirm and clarify the diagnosis. Treatment for this entity consists of behavioral and pharmacological approaches. Medications such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, mood stabilizer and other novel treatments have been used in FTD with different rates of success. Further research should be directed at understanding and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the patients' prognosis and quality of life.

  2. Apraxias in neurodegenerative dementias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer′s disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating.

  3. Music perception in dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD, n=16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n=5) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. No specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation. PMID:27802226

  4. Inappropriate sexual behaviour and dementia: an exploration of staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Laura E; Robertson, Noelle; Knight, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    Research assessing the impact of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) on staff working in dementia care is circumscribed, yet studies from comparable settings indicate that ISB appears uniquely challenging, particularly to personal and cultural values. This study explored staff experiences of ISB exhibited by older adults with a dementia. Fourteen staff working within an in-patient setting were interviewed. Participants' experiences of ISB appeared underpinned by complex social and psychological processes. Shock, embarrassment and incomprehension were prominent when ISB was initially encountered. Knowledge of dementia, familiarity with patients and social norms were important in contextualising ISB and staff often minimised its impact by construing a lack of capacity. Feelings about ISB appeared equivocal and findings suggest that the effect of ISB should be routinely considered in preparing staff who work within dementia care.

  5. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim eCerejeira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD, also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, represent a heterogeneous group of non-cognitive symptoms and behaviors occurring in subjects with dementia. BPSD constitute a major component of the dementia syndrome irrespective of its subtype. They are as clinically relevant as cognitive symptoms as they strongly correlate with the degree of functional and cognitive impairment. BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, anxiety, elation, irritability, depression, apathy, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, and sleep or appetite changes. It is estimated that BPSD affect up to 90% of all dementia subjects over the course of their illness, and is independently associated with poor outcomes, including distress among patients and caregivers, long term hospitalization, misuse of medication and increased health care costs. Although these symptoms can be present individually it is more common that various psychopathological features co-occur simultaneously in the same patient. Thus, categorization of BPSD in clusters taking into account their natural course, prognosis and treatment response may be useful in the clinical practice. The pathogenesis of BPSD has not been clearly delineated but it is probably the result of a complex interplay of psychological, social and biological factors. Recent studies have emphasized the role of neurochemical, neuropathological and genetic factors underlying the clinical manifestations of BPSD. A high degree of clinical expertise is crucial to appropriately recognize and manage the neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with dementia. Combination of non-pharmacological and careful use of pharmacological interventions is the recommended therapeutic for managing BPSD. Given the modest efficacy of current strategies, there is an urgent need to identify novel pharmacological targets and develop new non-pharmacological approaches to improve the adverse outcomes

  6. Dementia and legal competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaković, Pavo; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Mihanović, Mate; Glavina, Trpimir; Molnar, Sven

    2011-06-01

    The legal competency or capability to exercise rights is level of judgment and decision-making ability needed to manage one's own affairs and to sign official documents. With some exceptions, the person entitles this right in age of majority. It is acquired without legal procedures, however the annulment of legal capacity requires a juristic process. This resolution may not be final and could be revoked thorough the procedure of reverting legal capacity - fully or partially. Given the increasing number of persons with dementia, they are often subjects of legal expertise concerning their legal capacity. On the other part, emphasis on the civil rights of mentally ill also demands their maximal protection. Therefore such distinctive issue is approached with particular attention. The approach in determination of legal competency is more focused on gradation of it's particular aspects instead of existing dual concept: legally capable - legally incapable. The main assumption represents how person with dementia is legally capable and should enjoy all the rights, privileges and obligations as other citizens do. The aspects of legal competency for which person with dementia is going to be deprived, due to protection of one's rights and interests, are determined in legal procedure and then passed over to the guardian decided by court. Partial annulment of legal competency is measure applied when there is even one existing aspect of preserved legal capability (pension disposition, salary or pension disposition, ability of concluding contract, making testament, concluding marriage, divorce, choosing whereabouts, independent living, right to vote, right to decide course of treatment ect.). This measure is most often in favour of the patient and rarely for protection of other persons and their interests. Physicians are expected to precisely describe early dementia symptoms which may influence assessment of specific aspects involved in legal capacity (memory loss, impaired task

  7. Online resource music and dementia: engelstalig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenniscentrum Kunst & Samenleving, .

    2014-01-01

    These web pages contain information for musicians about the work method of Music and Dementia and provides further details concerning related concepts (such as dementia and mentoring) and describes the practical projects of creative workshops for people with dementia.

  8. [Dementia: clinic and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estol, C J

    2001-12-01

    Decline of the cognitive functions necessary for activities of daily living results in a spectrum ranging from benign forgetfulness and minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. The latter is characterized by personality and behavioral changes. Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent cause of dementia affecting almost one of two people older than 80 years. Lewy body and cerebrovascular disease are also frequent causes of cognitive decline. Recent studies have revealed genetic aspects of Alzheimer's disease and the role of certain enzymes in the pathophysiology of fibrillary amyloid deposition. The aim in cognitive disease is an early diagnosis to initiate therapy and adapting measures in the patient's daily routines. The diagnosis is basically clinical with neuroimaging and neuropsychological tests' support. The EEG, SPECT, LP and other studies are only useful in a few specific scenarios. At present, a few promising therapies are being evaluated. Family support is of vital importance.

  9. MRI evaluation of vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yicheng Liu; Hongxing Zhang; Wei Huang; Wenjun Wan; Hongfen Peng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTVE: To explain the association between vascular dementia and the cranial MRI manifestations, and recognize the value of cranial MRI in the early diagnosis of vascular dementia and the assessment of disease conditions.DATA SOURCES: Pubmed database was searched to identify articles about the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia published in English from January 1992 to June 2006 by using the key words of "MRI, vascular dementia". Others were collected by searching the name of journals and title of articles in the Chinese full-text journal database.STUDY SELECTTON: The collected articles were primarily checked, those correlated with the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia were selected, while the obviously irrelative ones were excluded, and the rest were retrieved manually, the full-texts were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 255 articles were collected, 41 of them were involved, and the other 214 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: MRI can be taken as one of the effective methods for the early diagnosis and disease evaluation of vascular dementia. White matter lesions are the important risk factors of vascular dementia.Vascular dementia is accompanied by the atrophy of related brain sites, but further confirmation is needed to investigate whether there is significant difference. MRI can be used to quantitatively investigate the infarcted sites and sizes of patients with vascular dementia after infarction, but there is still lack of systematic investigation on the association of the infarcted sites and sizes with the cognitive function of patients with vascular dementia.CONCLUSTON: Cranial MRI can detect the symptoms of vascular dementia at early period, so that corresponding measures can be adopted to prevent and treat vascular dementia in time.

  10. Dementia communication using empathic curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Phil; Eden, John; Plant, Rachel

    Communication skills training materials in dementia care usually focus on reminiscence. This is important because talking about past events can help people with dementia to retain their sense of self. This article examines the use of an alternative set of communication skills known as empathic curiosity, which may help to promote meaningful communication in the here and now with people who are living with dementia.

  11. Effectiveness of environment-based interventions for people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, René

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review of evidence for the efficacy of environment-based interventions on the affect, behavior, and performance of people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias was conducted as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Literature Review Project. Thirty-three reports met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that ambient music, aromatherapy, and Snoezelen are modestly effective in reducingagitation but do not consistently have long-term effects. Visually complex environments that give the illusion of barriers deter people from wandering to unsafe places but do not reduce the urge to wander. Evidence that bright light therapy can aid in regulating mood and the sleep-wake cycle and thus help people remain awake during the day is preliminary. Montessori-based programming can be useful in matching activities to the person's remaining skills. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effect, contraindications, and best dosages of these interventions.

  12. [Dementia and music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Steinberg, Reinhard; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from dementia are nevertheless still able to render exceptional musical performances. For example, they can recognize music from childhood and reproduce lyrics and melodies of songs with four verses. Furthermore, behavioural symptoms such as psycho- motor agitation and crying, but also aggressive behaviour can be positively influenced by music and motivation and positive emotions can be increased. A variety of physiological and psychological changes occur when patients are listening to music. Previous research could show that music activated different parts of the brain especially in the temporal cortex, but also motoric areas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and cerebellum were essential for rhythm, melody and harmony perception and processing. Music therapy is an interpersonal process in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals with various psychiatric or medical conditions. However, until now only little research has been directed towards non-pharmacological treatments like music therapy in dementia patients. Further research is warranted to investigate the long term influence of music therapy on patients suffering from dementia.

  13. Does wine prevent dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M Pinder

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Roger M PinderPharma Consultant, York, UKAbstract: There is substantial evidence that moderate consumption of alcohol reduces significantly the risks of coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the incidence of dementia, both of the Alzheimer’s type (AD and the vascular variety (VaD, is lower in societies which consume a Mediterranean diet of mainly fish, fruit, vegetables, olive oil, and wine. In particular, extensive evidence from both population-based cohort and case control studies in different areas of the world and across genders and racial groups suggests that regular consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol, especially in the form of wine, is associated with a lower risk of developing AD and VaD compared with abstention and heavy drinking. Carriers of the APOE ε4 allele seem to gain less benefit. Age-related cognitive decline, particularly in women, is lower in regular drinkers, while older drinkers with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI progress less frequently to AD than their abstaining counterparts. Plausible biological mechanisms for the neuroprotective effects of wine include its glucose-modifying, antioxidant and inflammatory properties, but it additionally seems to modify the neuropathology of AD, particularly the deposition of amyloid plaque. Indeed, some of these mechanisms are already targets for the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of dementia.Keywords: alcohol, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, epidemiology, polyphenols, wine

  14. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers.

  15. Dementia: getting the environment right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates-Bolton, Natalie; Codinhoto, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    An IHEEM-supported conference staged recently at Salford University by the University's Dementia Design Group (HEJ - November 2012), examined the impact that different hospital environments have on people with dementia. Ricardo Codinhoto of the International Dementia Design Network, a qualified architect with practical, teaching, and research experience, and his co-chair on the Network, Natalie Yates-Bolton, a lecturer in Nursing at the University, explain the thinking behind the Group's approach to well-designed mental healthcare environments, and report on some of the key topics discussed at this first ever National Dementia Design Conference.

  16. Inadequate Diagnostic Evaluation in Young Patients Registered with a Diagnosis of Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Nielsen, T Rune;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Establishing a diagnosis of dementia in young patients may be complex and have significant implications for the patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the diagnostic work-up in young patients diagnosed with dementia in the clinical routine. METHODS: Two hundred...... basic diagnostic evaluation was performed in only 24%, although more often (28%) in the subgroup of patients where dementia was confirmed by raters. CONCLUSION: This first nationwide study of unselected young patients registered with a diagnosis of dementia indicated that the concept of dementia may...... patients were randomly selected from 891 patients aged ≤65 years registered with a diagnosis of dementia for the first time in 2008 in Danish hospitals, and 159 medical records were available for review. Three raters evaluated their medical records for the completeness of the diagnostic work-up on which...

  17. Cognitive training for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the HTA report is to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training methods to treat cognitive disorders of dementia and other diseases with cognitive deficits. For this purpose, a systematic literature search was carried out first based on the DIMDI superbase retrieval. The identified publications were judged and selected by two independent, methodically competent experts. 33 publications were included in the report. Based on the studies for a normal cognitive development in old age a theory that healthy older people have a considerable capacity reserve for an improved performance in abstract abilities of thinking can be assumed. The first symptoms for older people at risk for dementia are a reduced cognitive capacity reserve. Cognitive training methods therefore focus abilities of abstract memory. Apart from types of dementia another two groups of diseases with cognitive deficits were included in the HTA report: cerebral lesions and schizophrenic psychoses. Studies with mild as well as forms of dementia heavy forms including the Alzheimer disease were included. The described training methods were very heterogeneous with regard to their contents, the temporal sequence and the outcome parameter. The studies were methodically partly contestable. Approximately a third of the studies of all publications could show improvements in the cognitive achievements by the training. Three studies concerning cognitive training methods in case of cerebral lesions were included. All three studies demonstrated a significant improvement in the training group in some outcome parameters. Special cognitive training methods were used for the treatment of cognitive deficits at schizophrenic psychoses. The neurocognitive training (NET, the "Cognitive Remediation Therapy" as well as the strategic training with coaching proved to be effective. The studies, however, were hardly comparable and very heterogeneous in detail. Summarising the cognitive training

  18. Exploring staff perceptions on the role of physical environment in dementia care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Y; Chaudhury, Habib; Hung, Lillian

    2016-07-01

    This study explored staff perceptions of the role of physical environment in dementia care facilities in affecting resident's behaviors and staff care practice. We conducted focus groups with staff (n = 15) in two purposely selected care facilities in Vancouver, Canada. Focus group participants included nurses, care aides, recreation staff, administrative staff, and family. Data analysis revealed two themes: (a) a supportive physical environment contributes positively to both quality of staff care interaction and residents' quality of life and (b) an unsupportive physical environment contributes negatively to residents' quality of life and thereby makes the work of staff more challenging. The staff participants collectively viewed that comfort, familiarity, and an organized space were important therapeutic resources for supporting the well-being of residents. Certain behaviors of residents were influenced by poor environmental factors, including stimulation overload, safety risks, wayfinding challenge, and rushed care This study demonstrates the complex interrelationships among the dementia care setting's physical environment, staff experiences, and residents' quality of life.

  19. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia.

  20. Animal models of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter aims to encourage scientists and others interested in the use of animal models of disease – specifically, in the study of dementia – to engage in ethical reflection. It opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. Three ethical approaches...... are here distinguished. These serve as points of orientation in the following discussion of four more specific ethical questions: Does animal species matter? How effective is disease modelling in delivering the benefits claimed for it? What can be done to minimize potential harm to animals in research? Who...... bears responsibility for the use of animals in disease models?...

  1. Chylous Ascites in a Patient with HIV/AIDS: A Late Complication of Mycobacterium avium Complex-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam H. Shaik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chylous ascites is very rare in HIV/AIDS and its association with Mycobacterium avium complex-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (MAC-IRIS has been rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a young African-American male who developed chylous ascites as a late sequela to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome while on treatment for MAC. Antiretroviral drug-naive patients who start HAART in close proximity to the diagnosis of an opportunistic infection and have a rapid decline in HIV RNA level should be monitored for development of IRIS. Although the long term prognosis is poor, early diagnosis and treatment help to improve quality of life.

  2. Teaching Mands to Older Adults with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Chelsey R.; Baker, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of Americans are diagnosed with dementia, and that number is only expected to rise. The diagnosis of dementia comes with impairments, especially in language. Furthermore, dementia-related functional declines appear to be moderated by environmental variables (Alzheimer's Association, "Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the…

  3. Culturally Sensitive Dementia Caregiving Models and Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Andrew P.; Mitcham-Smith, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Family caregiving for individuals with dementia is an increasingly complex issue that affects the caregivers' and care recipients' physical, mental, and emotional health. This article presents 3 key culturally sensitive caregiver models along with clinical interventions relevant for mental health counseling professionals.

  4. Robotherapy with Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Humanoids have increasingly become the focus of attention in robotics research in recent years, especially in service and personal assistance robotics. This paper presents the application developed for humanoid robots in the therapy of dementia patients as a cognitive stimulation tool. The behaviour of the robot during the therapy sessions is visually programmed in a session script that allows music to play, physical movements (dancing, exercises, etc., speech synthesis and interaction with the human monitor. The application includes the control software on board the robot and some tools like the visual script generator or a monitor to supervise the robot behaviour during the sessions. The robot applicationʹs impact on the patientʹs health has been studied. Experiments with real patients have been performed in collaboration with a centre of research in neurodegenerative diseases. Initial results show a slight or mild improvement in neuropsychiatric symptoms over other traditional therapy methods.

  5. Coping with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    -living with a spouse. The analysis revealed that the basic social psychological problem faced by patients with mild AD was their awareness of decline in personal dignity and value. Coping strategies used to meet these problems were adaptations to the altered situation in order to maintain a feeling of well......Abstract The aim of this study was to analyse how patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cope with the changes they face concerning everyday life and social relations. This study used a grounded theory approach in the analysis of interview data from 11 persons with mild AD, home......-being. The spouse appeared to be the most important social relation. The most significant worries of the patients were about communication in relation to their spouse, and about the reaction of the spouse to the consequences of the disease. Keywords coping; dementia; everyday life; patients’ perspective; social...

  6. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  7. Dementia, Caregiving, and Controlling Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of those with Alzheimer's disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's and other debilitating disorders that strike adults. FCA Fact Sheet: Caregiver’s Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors FCA Fact Sheet: ...

  8. Social commitment robots and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin; Guse, Lorna; Mordoch, Elaine; Osterreicher, Angela

    2012-03-01

    In 2010, approximately 500,000 Canadians suffered from a dementia-related illness. The number of sufferers is estimated to double in about 25 years. Due to this growing demographic, dementia (most frequently caused by Alzheimer's disease) will increasingly have a significant impact on our aging community and their caregivers. Dementia is associated with challenging behaviours such as agitation, wandering, and aggression. Care providers must find innovative strategies that facilitate the quality of life for this population; moreover, such strategies must value the individual person. Social commitment robots - designed specifically with communication and therapeutic purposes - provide one means towards attaining this goal. This paper describes a study in which Paro (a robotic baby harp seal) was used as part of a summer training program for students. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the integration of social commitment robots may be clinically valuable for older, agitated persons living with dementia in long-term care settings.

  9. Dementia: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to complications too. These include malnutrition, falls, osteoporosis (“thinning bones”), bone fractures, frailty, sleep problems, anxiety, agitation, delirium, and disturbed behavior. Caring for an older adult with dementia and other health problems can be ...

  10. Does lithium protect against dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treatment with lithium in patients with mania or bipolar disorder is associated with a decreased rate of subsequent dementia. METHODS: Linkage of register data on prescribed lithium in all patients discharged from psychiatric health care service with a diagnosis...... exposed to lithium (50.4%), 1,781 to anticonvulsants (36.7%), 4,280 to antidepressants (88.1%), and 3,901 to antipsychotics (80.3%) during the study period. A total of 216 patients received a diagnosis of dementia during follow-up (103.6/10,000 person-years). During the period following the second...... prescription of lithium, the rate of dementia was decreased compared to the period following the first prescription. In contrast, the rates of dementia during multiple prescription periods with anticonvulsants, antidepressants, or antipsychotics, respectively, were not significantly decreased compared...

  11. The Cost of Dementia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg Andersen, C; Søgaard, Jes; Hansen, E;

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based study of dementia, the cost of care for 245 demented elderly and 490 controls matched by age and gender was estimated. Dementia of Alzheimer's type was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, and vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed according...... to the DSM-IIIR criteria. Severity of dementia was determined by the Clinical Dementia Rating scale. The annual cost of medical care, domestic care, home help, nursing home and special equipment for nondemented patients was DKK 22,000 per person while the cost for very mildly, mildly, moderately and severely...... demented patients was DKK 49,000, DKK 93,000, DKK 138,000 and DKK 206,000, respectively. Except for very mild dementia the cost did not differ between elderly who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and those with other types of dementia. The net cost of dementia is the difference in cost between those...

  12. Dementia, depression, and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D

    1994-03-01

    Dementia, depression, and Parkinson's disease are in themselves challenging problems in old age. Recognition and diagnosis are often suboptimal. In dementia, many contributing factors must be considered, including nutrition, but in all these conditions the effects of the cognitive, attitudinal, and motor changes can produce permanent and severe nutritional compromise. Yet many simple steps can be taken to prevent poor nutrition in these diseases, and the primary care practitioner is central to this process of recognition and intervention.

  13. [Self-consciousness, consciousness of the other and dementias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Roger

    2007-06-01

    Studies of self-consciousness in dementia concern essentially anosognosia or the loss of insight. However, Self-consciousness is multifaceted: it includes awareness of the body, perceptions, one's own history, identity, and one's own projects. Self-consciousness is linked to consciousness of others i.e. to social cognition supported by identification of others, but also by comprehension of facial expression of emotions, comprehension and expression of emotional prosody, pragmatic abilities, ability to infer other's people's mental states, thoughts, and feelings (theory of mind and empathy), knowledge of social norms and rules, social reasoning. The subtypes of dementias (and namely Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia) affect heterogeneously the different aspects of the self-and other-consciousness. Further studies are needed for a better knowledge of the complex relationship between Self-consciousness, social cognition, decision making and neuropsychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances occurring in demented patients.

  14. Financial Difficulty Effects on Depressive Symptoms Among Dementia Patient Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ilsung

    2016-11-01

    The financial difficulty of dementia caregivers and its effects on mental health has gained increasing attention from researchers. The present study examines the longitudinal relationship between financial difficulty and the depressive symptoms of dementia caregivers using matching methods to account for potential selection bias. Propensity score matching methods and mixed-effects models were used to determine the effects of financial difficulty on depressive symptoms among caregivers participating in the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) intervention program. Propensity score matching confirmed that caregivers experiencing financial difficulty were more likely to have depressive symptoms. The results suggest that dementia caregivers require support for their financial difficulty. Future research should fully examine the complex relationship between financial difficulty and the mental health of caregivers and how this issue can be addressed through assessment and intervention methods.

  15. The 'ripple effect': Towards researching improvisational music therapy in dementia care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicevic, Mercédès; Tsiris, Giorgos; Wood, Stuart; Powell, Harriet; Graham, Janet; Sanderson, Richard; Millman, Rachel; Gibson, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Increased interest in, and demand for, music therapy provision for persons with dementia prompted this study's exploration of music therapists' strategies for creating musical communities in dementia care settings, considering the needs and resources of people affected by dementia. Focus group discussions and detailed iterative study of improvisational music therapy work by six experienced practitioners clarify the contextual immediacy and socio-musical complexities of music therapy in dementia care homes. Music therapy's 'ripple effect', with resonances from micro (person-to-person musicking), to meso (musicking beyond 'session time') and macro level (within the care home and beyond), implies that all who are part of the dementia care ecology need opportunities for flourishing, shared participation, and for expanded self-identities; beyond 'staff', 'residents', or 'being in distress'. On such basis, managers and funders might consider an extended brief for music therapists' roles, to include generating and maintaining musical wellbeing throughout residential care settings.

  16. Severe dementia: A review on diagnoses, therapeutic management and ethical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Schafirovits-Morillo

    Full Text Available Abstract North American data show that in the year 2000 around 4.5 million people had a diagnosis of dementia and more than a half were at moderate or severe stages of the disease. There is inevitable cognitive and functional decline caused by all etiologies of irreversible dementia as well as many behavioral symptoms that compromise the quality of life of both patients and caregivers. Few published studies have investigated issues concerning severe dementia such as predictors of mortality and life expectancy, nutrition, end of life issues and palliative care in terminal dementia, as well as best pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. Due to the complexity that characterizes advanced dementia, it is important that this discussion starts as early as possible allowing some decisions to be taken, preferably when the patients can still express their opinion.

  17. Dementia: sociological and philosophical constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H J

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents a challenge to the biomedical view of dementia as a disease. This view is critiqued from two perspectives: those of sociology and philosophy. Because these domains inform the creation of the medical discourse, their analysis provides an important refinement to the apprehension of the phenomenon of dementia. From the work of Foucault, and in particular his analysis of the historical origins of modern medicine, the sociological construction of dementia is considered. Following this, the philosophical question of Being is discussed, considering particularly the positions of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Lastly aspects of dementia nursing that are damaging to those relatives forced to take on the role of primary carer are isolated, in the context of Kitwood's view that it is possible to maintain personhood at the extremes of this condition. It is suggested that this critique of sociological and philosophical foundations of dementia might offer a way of approaching the dismantling of the self and revise current conceptions of dementia care for the better.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and other important predictors of maternal mortality in Mulago Hospital Complex Kampala Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khainza Betty

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. Results Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39, maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1. The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8, non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2, non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7, lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3 and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9 and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1. Conclusion The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortalitywere: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS. There is need to improve on the

  19. Mycobacterium avium complex in macaques with AIDS is associated with a specific strain of simian immunodeficiency virus and prolonged survival after primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, K G; Pauley, D; Young, H L; Lackner, A A

    1995-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques is a frequent opportunistic infection that shares many features with the condition in human AIDS patients. A retrospective analysis of necropsies on 135 macaques with SIV-induced simian AIDS that received neither antiretroviral nor antimicrobial therapy revealed that 17% (23/135) were infected with MAC. MAC developed in 31.3% (21/67) of the animals inoculated with uncloned SIVmac251 versus 1.9% (1/53) and 6.7% (1/15) of the animals inoculated with the molecular clones SIVmac239 and SIVmac239/316EM, respectively (P = .001). This is the first example in which the risk of infection with a specific opportunistic organism was affected by the infecting strain of immunodeficiency virus. In addition, animals with MAC had a longer mean survival after primary infection and lower CD4 cell counts at death than animals that did not develop this opportunistic infection. The SIV-inoculated macaque is a valuable model in which to study the pathogenesis of MAC in the immunocompromised host.

  20. The use of visual landmarks in a wayfinding system for elderly with beginning dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, D.; Hagethorn, F.; Kröse, B.; de Greef, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experiment carried out to study the design options of a GPS-based navigation aid for elderly with beginning dementia. Results suggest that landmark based instructions may yield higher performance of the system then left/right instructions.

  1. Early diagnosis of dementia based on intersubject whole-brain dissimilarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, S.; Loog, M.; Lijn, F. van der;

    2010-01-01

    . A kNN classifier was trained on the dissimilarity matrix and the performance was tested in a leave-one-out experiment. A classification accuracy of 81% was attained (spec. 83%, sens. 79%). This demonstrates the potential of whole-brain intersubject dissimilarities to aid in early diagnosis of dementia....

  2. Longitudinal assessment of global and regional atrophy rates in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Mak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: AD showed a faster rate of global brain atrophy compared to DLB, which had similar rates of atrophy to HC. Among dementia subjects, younger age was associated with accelerated atrophy, reflecting more aggressive disease in younger people. PBVC could aid in differentiating between DLB and AD, however its utility as an outcome marker in DLB is limited.

  3. Metal/graphene nanocomposites synthesized with the aid of supercritical fluid for promoting hydrogen release from complex hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Hao; Yang, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Chuan-Ming; Lee, Sheng-Long; Chang, Jeng-Kuei

    2014-11-07

    With the aid of supercritical CO2, Fe-, Ni-, Pd-, and Au-nanoparticle-decorated nanostructured carbon materials (graphene, activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanotubes) are synthesized for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of LiAlH4. The effects of the metal nanoparticle size and distribution, and the type of carbon structure on the hydrogen release properties are investigated. The Fe/graphene nanocomposite, which consists of ∼2 nm Fe particles highly dispersed on graphene nanosheets, exhibits the highest catalytic performance. With this nanocomposite, the initial dehydrogenation temperature can be lowered (from ∼135 °C for pristine LiAlH4) to ∼40 °C without altering the reaction route (confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction), and 4.5 wt% H2 can be released at 100 °C within 6 min, which is faster by more than 135-fold than the time required to release the same amount of H2 from pristine LiAlH4.

  4. [Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infections in AIDS. Apropos of 100 cases. Groupe d'Epidémiologie clinique du SIDA en Aquitaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasseur, C; Maugein, J; Pellegrin, J L; Dupon, M; Ragnaud, J M; Morlat, P; Pellegrin, I; Constans, J; Monlun, E; Chene, G

    1995-01-01

    The improvement of survival of AIDS patients allowed the emergence of disseminated Mycobacterium avium Complex infections (D.MAC). Here we report the experience of the group of "Epidémiologie clinique du sida en Aquitaine (GECSA)" about 100 patients. There were no differences according to sex, age and route of acquisition of HIV. Clinical and biological characteristics of the infections were not specific. The mean TCD4+ lymphocytes count was 18/mm3. The diagnostic was generally established by systematic blood culture on Septi-Chek in patients with TCD4+ lymphocytes count below 75/mm3. The recommendations on therapy for D.MAC are to use regimen containing azithromycin or clarithromycin, ethambutol and one of the following drugs, rifabutin, clofazimine, amikacin, or ciprofloxacin. Rifabutin is recommended for prophylaxis in patients with lymphocytes TCD4+ count below 100/mm3.

  5. Low incidence of colonization and no cases of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection (DMAC in Brazilian AIDS patients in the HAART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadelha Ângela

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the incidence of mycobacterial disease and the colonization of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC bacteria in AIDS patients. METHODS: Inclusion criteria: HIV-positive individuals with at least one CD4+ count 100 cells/mm³ (HR = 0.18; CI = 0.05 - 0.70 predicted a lower risk of death (P<0.05 but was not protective for MAC colonization (HR=0.52;CI =0.62 - 4.35, P=0.55. CONCLUSION: The absence of DMAC infection in colonized individuals argues in favor of a HAART protective effect against; DMAC; however, restoration of CD4 counts did not protect patients against MAC colonization.

  6. Mild behavioral impairment and risk of dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taragano, FE; Allegri, RF; Krupitzki, H; Sarasola, D; Serrano, CM; Loñ, L; Lyketsos, CG

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia, at least for some patients. Behavioral symptoms in MCI are associated with a higher risk of dementia, but their association with dementia risk in patients without MCI is unknown. Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI) refers to a late life syndrome with prominent psychiatric and related behavioral symptoms in the absence of prominent cognitive symptoms, which may also be a dementia prodrome. Objective To compare MCI and MBI patients and to estimate the risk of dementia development in these two groups. Method A consecutive series of 358 patients (239 with MCI; and 119 with MBI) presenting to an outpatient general hospital specialty clinic were followed for up to 5 years until conversion to dementia or censoring. Results 34% of MCI patients and over 70% of patients with MBI developed dementia (Logrank p=0.011). MBI patients without cognitive symptoms were more likely to develop dementia (Logrank p<0.001). MBI patients were more likely to develop dementia due to frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) as opposed to Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). Conclusion MBI appears to be a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia. MBI (specifically those without cognitive symptoms) may confer a higher risk for dementia than MCI and is likely an FTD prodrome in many cases. These findings have implications for the early detection, prevention, and treatment of patients with dementia in late life, by focusing on the emergence of new behavioral symptoms. PMID:19323967

  7. Can an EASYcare based dementia training programme improve diagnostic assessment and management of dementia by general practitioners and primary care nurses? The design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucassen PL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of dementia benefits both patient and caregiver. Nevertheless, dementia in primary care is currently under-diagnosed. Some educational interventions developed to improve dementia diagnosis and management were successful in increasing the number of dementia diagnoses and in changing attitudes and knowledge of health care staff. However, none of these interventions focussed on collaboration between GPs and nurses in dementia care. We developed an EASYcare-based Dementia Training Program (DTP aimed at stimulating collaboration in dementia primary care. We expect this program to increase the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses and to improve attitudes and knowledge of GPs and nurses. Methods The DTP is a complex educational intervention that consists of two workshops, a coaching program, access to an internet forum, and a Computerized Clinical Decision Support System on dementia diagnostics. One hundred duos of GPs and nurses will be recruited, from which 2/3 will be allocated to the intervention group and 1/3 to the control group. The effects of implementation of the DTP will be studied in a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Primary outcomes will be the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses in a period of 9 months following workshop participation. Secondary outcomes are measured on GP and nurse level: adherence to national guidelines for dementia, attitude, confidence and knowledge regarding dementia diagnosis and management; on patient level: number of emergency calls, visits and consultations and patient satisfaction; and on caregiver level: informal caregiver burden and satisfaction. Data will be collected from GPs' electronic medical records, self-registration forms and questionnaires. Statistical analysis will be performed using the MANOVA-method. Also, exploratory analyses will be performed, in order to gain insight into barriers and facilitators for implementation and

  8. [Personality and risk of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Jean-Pierre; Teissier, Marie-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    We review the personality construct and its disorders according to the categorical and dimensional approaches, and the present understanding of dementia and its risk factors. This study shows a relationship between pre-morbid personality and risk of developing dementia. Data with speculative character, and indirect proofs from studies on life style, habits and pathological behaviors are reported. Categorical and dimensional parameters of personality are studied respectively by cluster analysis of the DSM classification, and by two contributive instruments: the Cloninger's temperament and character inventory (TCI) with seven dimensions, and the Costa and McCrae's NEO personality inventory (NEO PI) with five factors. Risk of dementia is higher in patients with the DSM C personality cluster, and, by order of severity, the dependent, avoidant and obsessive types of personality. According to the TCI, these three personality types have a high score on the dimension "harm avoidance", which increases the risk of dementia. With the five factor model investigated by the NEO PI, the risk of dementia is increased by low levels of extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscienciousness, and high level of neuroticism. Biological correlations are mixed up with these two personality models, which have coherent correlations between their respective dimensions. High levels of neuroticism and harm avoidance are associated with low serotonin activity, deficient neuroplasticity, cortisol abnormalities and greater deleterious impact according to the type of stressing situations. Cortisol levels regulation differs according to the type of personality and cortisol axis dysregulation could play a key part in dementia occurrence. Detecting vulnerable personalities should lead to recommendations for dementia prevention.

  9. Development of a Curriculum for Long-Term Care Nurses to Improve Recognition of Depression in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L.; Molinari, Victor; Bond, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Hyer, Kathryn; Malphurs, Julie

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the severe consequences of depression in long-term care residents with dementia. Most health care providers are unprepared to recognize and to manage the complexity of depression in dementia. Targeted educational initiatives in nursing homes are needed to address this growing problem. This paper describes the…

  10. Dementia-Related and Other Factors to Be Taken into Account When Developing ICT Support for People with Dementia - Lessons from Field Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröes, Rose-Marie; Bentvelzen, Sanne; Meiland, Franka; Craig, David

    When developing assistive technology for people with dementia it is important to take into account their needs and wishes as well as their cognitive abilities and disabilities. In this chapter we describe how the disabilities accompanying dementia can be taken into account when developing assistive technological devices for this target group. As a case example, we used the COGKNOW project, which specifically focuses on developing ICT support for people with mild dementia in the areas of memory, social contact, daily activities and feelings of safety. Before device development in the first year of the project, workshops and interviews involving 17 persons with dementia and their carers were held to discuss their needs, wishes and disabilities and some background and environmental information were obtained. The main dementia-related disabilities that emerged from this cohort and that proved relevant for the development of an assistive technological device were memory and orientation problems, poor understanding of verbal instruction, difficulty with instrumental daily activities and recognizing/understanding the meaning of pictures. Relevant personal and environmental features were living alone or with a carer, the need for company and social contact, the need for support in doing things for fun, using aids like a walking cane, possessing technological appliances that could not be easily used anymore, living in a house with multiple rooms and levels and feeling insecure when being alone. Taken into account these disabilities, background and environmental features, functional requirements were specified and a device was developed, the COGKNOW Day Navigator Version 1 (CDNv-1). The aim of the CDN was to support people with dementia in reminding, social contact, daily activities and safety in a simple manner. After a development period, the user friendliness and usefulness of this device were assessed via a field test in which the CDNv-1 was tested with 16 people with

  11. [Aids-related toxoplasma-encephalitis presenting with acute psychotic episode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilniczky, Sándor; Debreczeni, Róbert; Kovács, Tibor; Várkonyi, Viktória; Barsi, Péter; Szirmai, Imre

    2006-07-20

    The most frequent neurological manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-(AIDS) are Cerebral Toxoplasmosis, Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL), Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) and AIDS-encephalitis (AIDS-dementia complex, multinucleated giant cell encephalitis, HIV-encephalopathy). Neurological complications usually occur in the advanced stages of the disease, and they are uncommon in the beginning as presenting illness, but may result in life-threatening condition or in death. Rarely the disease presents as a neuropsychiatric illness in an undiagnosed AIDS patient, delaying a proper diagnosis. We present the case of a 34 years old patient treated for AIDS-related Toxoplasma-encephalitis in our department. His illness started as an acute psychosis followed by rapid mental and somatic decline, leading to death in three months. His HIV-seropositivity was not known at his admission, and the extraneural manifestations were slight. The diagnosis was established by serology, imaging methods and histopathological investigation. After presenting the medical history and results of autopsy studies of the patient we discuss the problems of the differential diagnosis, especially regarding the findings of the imaging methods.

  12. International NeuroAIDS: prospects of HIV-1 associated neurological complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J; Roberto; TRUJILLO; Gilberto; JARAMILLO-RANGEL; Marta; ORTEGA-MARTINEZ; Augusto; C; PENALVA; de; OLIVEIRA; Jose; E; VIDAL; Joseph; BRYANT; Robert; C; GALLO

    2005-01-01

    Neurological complications associated with HIV-1/AIDS are being recognized with a high frequency that parallels the increased number of AIDS cases. The early infiltration by HIV- 1 into the nervous system can cause primary and/or secondary neurological complications. The most common neurocognitive disorder is AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC).In developing countries of Asia the three most opportunistic infections are tuberculosis (TB), cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Therefore, it is expected that secondary neurological complications due to TB and cryptococcosis will be the most common cause of morbility and mortality in HIV- 1/AIDS cases in China. Research of NeuroAIDS in China is necessary to understand the impact and the biology of HIV-1 in the nervous system. Future studies would include, the molecular epidemiology and the description of opportunistic infections associated to HIV-1;the neuropathological description of primary and secondary HIV-1 complications in different groups; the HIV-1 neurotropism and immune response studies for China's unique HIV-1 strains and recombinant forms derived from the nervous system, including experimental models such as the use of transgenic rats; and the study of potential resistant virus,primarily when the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has not full access in the brain.

  13. International NeuroAIDS: prospects of HIV-1 associated neurological complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, J Roberto; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martinez, Marta; Penalva de Oliveira, Augusto C; Vidal, Jose E; Bryant, Joseph; Gallo, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Neurological complications associated with HIV-1/AIDS are being recognized with a high frequency that parallels the increased number of AIDS cases. The early infiltration by HIV-1 into the nervous system can cause primary and/or secondary neurological complications. The most common neurocognitive disorder is AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC). In developing countries of Asia the three most opportunistic infections are tuberculosis (TB), cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Therefore, it is expected that secondary neurological complications due to TB and cryptococcosis will be the most common cause of morbility and mortality in HIV-1/AIDS cases in China. Research of NeuroAIDS in China is necessary to understand the impact and the biology of HIV-1 in the nervous system. Future studies would include, the molecular epidemiology and the description of opportunistic infections associated to HIV-1; the neuropathological description of primary and secondary HIV-1 complications in different groups; the HIV-1 neurotropism and immune response studies for China's unique HIV-1 strains and recombinant forms derived from the nervous system, including experimental models such as the use of transgenic rats; and the study of potential resistant virus, primarily when the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has not full access in the brain.

  14. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  15. AIDS (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  16. High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_161398.html High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk New statement from American Heart Association warns ... in middle age, might open the door to dementia, the American Heart Association warns in a new ...

  17. Comparative cardiovascular safety of dementia medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Peterson, Eric D; Holm, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark.......To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark....

  18. Brain networks in aging and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafkemeijer, A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes neuroimaging techniques to investigate brain networks in healthy aging and dementia. Functional and structural brain networks change with healthy and pathological aging, with differences in network degeneration between different types of dementia. These disease-specific network

  19. Dementia in the movies: the clinical picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.; Kuin, Y.; Nijboer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Visual media influence the general public's perceptions and attitudes regarding people with mental conditions. This qualitative study investigates the depiction accuracy of dementia's clinical features in motion pictures.Method: Using the search terms dementia', Alzheimer's disease' and

  20. Dementia in the movies: The clinical picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.L.; Kuin, Y.; Nijboer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Visual media influence the general public's perceptions and attitudes regarding people with mental conditions. This qualitative study investigates the depiction accuracy of dementia's clinical features in motion pictures.Method: Using the search terms 'dementia', 'Alzheimer's disease' an

  1. Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163264.html Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia Study found being sedentary may make you as ... TV may make you as likely to develop dementia as people genetically predisposed to the condition, a ...

  2. Dementia - keeping safe in the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000031.htm Dementia - keeping safe in the home To use the ... make sure the homes of people who have dementia are safe for them. Safety Tips for the ...

  3. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD constituting 10–15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed.

  4. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianxun; Bilinski, Kellie; Xu, Li; Seto, Sai W.

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD) constituting 10–15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed. PMID:28115971

  5. [Novel methods for dementia diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltfang, J

    2015-04-01

    Novel diagnostic methods, such as cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) and [18F] amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) are meanwhile recommended for specific indications by international guidelines for the improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenic (sporadic) Alzheimer's dementia (AD). In the case of CSF-NDD the German neuropsychiatric guidelines have already been validated on the S3 level of evidence (http://www.DGPPN.de) and the additional consideration of [18F] amyloid-PET in the current update of the guidelines is to be expected. By means of CSF-NDD and/or [18F] amyloid-PET a predictive diagnosis of incipient (preclinical) AD is also possible for patients at high risk for AD who are in prodromal stages, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). As accompanying (secondary) preventive therapy of AD cannot be offered a predictive molecular dementia diagnostics is not recommended by the German neuropsychiatric dementia guidelines (http://www.DGPPN.de). However, novel diagnostic approaches, which offer molecular positive diagnostics of AD have already gained high relevance in therapy research as they allow promising preventive treatment avenues to be validated directly in the clinical trial. Moreover, future blood-based dementia diagnostics by means of multiplex assays is becoming increasingly more feasible; however, so far corresponding proteomic or epigenetic assays could not be consistently validated in independent studies.

  6. How dementia differs from normal ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginesi, Laura; Jenkins, Catharine; Keenan, Bernie

    Dementia is a collective name for a set of symptoms that include memory loss, mood changes, confusion and increasing difficulty with everyday tasks. This four-part series provides an overview of dementia and its treatment, from its causes and pathophysiology to diagnosis and the nurse's role in its management. This first article reviews the main forms of dementia and how research is shedding new light on the differences between dementia and normal ageing.

  7. Alzheimer’s Dementia: Current Data Review

    OpenAIRE

    Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver; Folnegović-Šmalc, Vera

    2011-01-01

    The review focuses on current data on Alzhemier’s dementia, a clinical syndrom characterised with acquired deterioration of cognitive functioning and emotional capacities, which impaires everyday activity and quality of life. Alzheimer’s dementia is the most common type of dementia in clinical surveys. The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s dementia is primarily based on symptoms and signs and memory impairment is clinically most signifficant. Cholinesterase inhibitors – donepezil, rivastig...

  8. Neurophysiological biomarkers for Lewy body dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Cromarty, Ruth A.; Elder, Greg J.; Graziadio, Sara; Baker, Mark; Bonanni, Laura; Onofrj, Marco; O’Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lewy body dementias (LBD) include both dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD), and the differentiation of LBD from other neurodegenerative dementias can be difficult. Currently, there are few biomarkers which might assist early diagnosis, map onto LBD symptom severity, and provide metrics of treatment response. Traditionally, biomarkers in LBD have focussed on neuroimaging modalities; however, as biomarkers need to be simple, inexpensive and non-...

  9. Depression and the risk for dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2012-01-01

    Depression is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of dementia; however, the nature of the association is still poorly understood. The purpose of the review was based on recent studies to discuss whether depression is a prodromal state of dementia or an independent risk factor...... for dementia, as well as to discuss how the type of depression, the type of dementia, and antidepressant treatment influence the association....

  10. Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    Controversy over the aggregate impact of foreign aid has focused on reduced form estimates of the aid-growth link. The causal chain, through which aid affects developmental outcomes including growth, has received much less attention. We address this gap by: (i) specifying a structural model of th...

  11. Breaking it down is better: haptic decomposition of complex movements aids in robot-assisted motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julius; Spencer, Steven J; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-05-01

    Training with haptic guidance has been proposed as a technique for learning complex movements in rehabilitation and sports, but it is unclear how to best deliver guidance-based training. Here, we hypothesized that breaking down a complex movement, similar to a tennis backhand, into simpler parts and then using haptic feedback from a robotic exoskeleton would help the motor system learn the movement. We also examined how the particular form of the decomposition affected learning. Three groups of unimpaired participants trained with the target arm movement broken down in three ways: 1) elbow flexion/extension and the unified shoulder motion independently ("anatomical" decomposition), 2) three component shoulder motions in Euler coordinates and elbow flexion/extension ("Euler" decomposition), or 3) the motion of the tip of the elbow and motion of the hand with respect to the elbow, independently ("visual" decomposition). A control group practiced the same number of movements, but experienced the target motion only, achieving eight times more direct practice with this motion. Despite less experience with the target motion, part training was better, but only when the arm trajectory was decomposed into anatomical components. Varying robotic movement training to include practice of simpler, anatomically-isolated motions may enhance its efficacy.

  12. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare: An International Policy and Practice Imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Tolson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care ('Palliare', that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities

  13. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare): An International Policy and Practice Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Debbie; Fleming, Anne; Hanson, Elizabeth; de Abreu, Wilson; Crespo, Manuel Lillo; Macrae, Rhoda; Jackson, Graham; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Holmerová, Iva; Routasalo, Pirkko

    2016-12-31

    This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care (Palliare), that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities undertaken by the

  14. Radionuclide brain imaging in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D.C.; Gacinovic, S.; Miller, R.F. [London University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01

    Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) may produce a variety of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and signs. CNS involvement in patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) includes AIDS dementia complex or HIV-1 associated cognitive/motor complex (widely known as HIV encephalopathy), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), opportunistic infections such as Toxoplasma gondii, TB, Cryptococcus and infiltration by non-Hodgkin`s B cell lymphoma. High resolution structural imaging investigations, either X-ray Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have contributed to the understanding and definition of cerebral damage caused by HIV encephalopathy. Atrophy and mainly high signal scattered white matter abnormalities are commonly seen with MRI. PML produces focal white matter high signal abnormalities due to multiple foci of demyelination. However, using structural imaging techniques there are no reliable parameters to distinguish focal lesions due to opportunistic infection (Toxoplasma gondii abscess) from neoplasm (lymphoma infiltration). It is studied the use of radionuclide brain imaging techniques in the investigation of HIV infected patients. Brain perfusion Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET), neuroreceptor and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies are reviewed. Greater emphasis is put on the potential of some radiopharmaceuticals, considered to be brain tumour markers, to distinguish intracerebral lymphoma infiltration from Toxoplasma infection. SPET with {sup 201}Tl using quantification (tumour to non-tumour radioactivity ratios) appears a very promising technique to identify intracerebral lymphoma.

  15. Smoking, dementia and cognitive decline in the elderly, a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burch Lisa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine may aid reaction time, learning and memory, but smoking increases cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular risk factors have been linked to increased risk of dementia. A previous meta-analysis found that current smokers were at higher risk of subsequent dementia, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and cognitive decline. Methods In order to update and examine this further a systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out using different search and inclusion criteria, database selection and more recent publications. Both reviews were restricted to those aged 65 and over. Results The review reported here found a significantly increased risk of Alzheimer's disease with current smoking and a likely but not significantly increased risk of vascular dementia, dementia unspecified and cognitive decline. Neither review found clear relationships with former smoking. Conclusion Current smoking increases risk of Alzheimer's disease and may increase risk of other dementias. This reinforces need for smoking cessation, particularly aged 65 and over. Nicotine alone needs further investigation.

  16. Dementia worry and its relationship to dementia exposure, psychological factors, and subjective memory concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, Adrianna; Suhr, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    With increased societal awareness of dementia, older adults show increased concern about developing dementia, leading to misidentification of aging-related cognitive glitches as signs of dementia. While some researchers have suggested self-reported cognitive concerns accurately identify older adults with early signs of dementia, there is evidence that subjective cognitive decline is not associated with objective cognitive performance and instead reflects psychological factors consistent with models of health anxiety, including dementia worry. We examined the construct of dementia worry and its relationship to subjective memory concerns in 100 older adults (Mage = 69 years) without signs of dementia, using a recently developed measure of dementia worry. Consistent with hypotheses, dementia worry was related to exposure to dementia, having a high number of depressive or general worry symptoms, and having more memory concerns. Exposure to dementia moderated the relationship of dementia worry to depression and general worry. Furthermore, dementia worry moderated the relationship of objective memory impairment to subjective memory ratings. The results provide further evidence of the role of psychological factors such as dementia worry in subjective memory report and emphasize the need for objective cognitive testing before making determinations about dementia in older adults expressing memory concerns.

  17. Association between Frailty and Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, J; Nykänen, I; Mänty, Minna Regina;

    2014-01-01

    logistic regression. Results: A total of 93 (14%) participants were classified as frail. Cognitive impairment (MMSE score Alzheimer's disease, 19 (3%) had vascular dementia, 12 (2%) had.......0-15.9), almost 6 times more likely to have vascular dementia (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.2-25.8) and over 4 times more likely to have Alzheimer's disease (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.1-9.6) than persons who were robust. Conclusion: Frailty is strongly associated with cognitive impairment and clinically diagnosed dementia among...... persons aged 76 and older. It is possible that cognitive impairment is a clinical feature of frailty and therefore should be included in the frailty definition....

  18. Surface modification of cellulose fiber via supramolecular assembly of biodegradable polyesters by the aid of host-guest inclusion complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Shufang; Cheng, Xinjian; Yam, Richard C M; Kong, Deling; Li, Robert K Y

    2010-05-10

    In this article, we report a novel surface modification method for cellulose fiber that is based on supramolecular assembly. Beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) was first covalently grafted onto the fiber surface. Then poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) oligomers having both ends capped with adamantane motifs (i.e., PCL-AD) were immobilized to the cellulose fiber surface through the host-guest inclusion complexation between beta-CD and AD motif. FTIR-ATR and XPS analyses confirmed the successful assembly of PCL-ADs, which was further supported by the increasing trend of weight gain with the concentration of CDs on the fiber surface. Contact angle and TGA measurements reflect the enhanced hydrophobicity and thermal stability of the cellulose fiber as a consequence of this modification. The morphologies of the cellulose fiber before and after the assembly process have also been compared by SEM.

  19. Prediction of dementia in primary care patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Jessen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe. After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort. Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia in the test cohort. CONCLUSIONS: The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1 sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2 more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs.

  20. Aid Supplies Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    2015-01-01

    What determines how much foreign aid donors provide? Existing answers to this question point to a complex range of influences. However, the tasks of distinguishing between long- and short-run factors, as well as differences between donors, have not been adequately addressed. Taking advantage...... of data spanning nearly 50 years, this paper uses panel cointegration techniques to consider these issues. The analysis provides clear evidence for heterogeneity both between donors and over time, bandwagon effects, and a growing influence of security considerations in aid provision. Domestic...... macroeconomic shocks have a moderate but delayed effect on aid disbursements....

  1. Prognosis with dementia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, C; Andersen, K; Breteler, M M

    2000-01-01

    The effect of dementia on time to death and institutionalization in elderly populations is of importance to resource planning, as well as to patients and their carers. The authors report a collaborative reanalysis of nine population-based studies conducted in Europe to compare dementia cases...... and noncases in risk of and time to death and to institutionalization. Prevalent and incident cases were more likely than noncases to reside in an institution at baseline and were more likely to enter institutional care. Prevalent cases also had over twice the risk of death compared to noncases and survival...

  2. Dementia and visual hallucinations associated with limbic pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzakis, M E; Christian, L M; Moran, L B; Graeber, M B; Pearce, R K B; Gentleman, S M

    2009-03-01

    The pathological basis of dementia and visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not yet fully understood. To investigate this further we have conducted a clinico-pathological study based on 30 post-mortem PD brains. PD cases were stratified into groups according to clinical characteristics as follows: (1) cognitively intact (n=9); (2) cases with severe dementia and visual hallucinations (n=12); (3) cases with severe dementia and no visual hallucinations (n=4); and (4) cases with severe visual hallucinations and no dementia (n=5). The extent of alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn), tau and amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) deposition was then examined in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus and in neocortical and subcortical areas known to subserve cognitive function. We find that dementia in PD is significantly associated with alphaSyn in the anterior cingulate gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, temporal cortex, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and CA2 sector of the hippocampus. Abeta in the anterior cingulate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and nucleus basalis of Meynert is also associated with dementia as is tau in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus. alphaSyn burden in the amygdala is strongly related to the presence of visual hallucinations but only in those PD cases with concomitant dementia. Statistical analysis revealed that alphaSyn burden in the anterior cingulate gyrus could differentiate demented from non-demented PD cases with high sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that alphaSyn in limbic regions is related to dementia in PD as well as to visual hallucinations when there is an underlying dementia.

  3. [The prevalence of dementia in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kasper; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2014-11-24

    The exact prevalence of dementia in Denmark is unknown. Based on epidemiological data we have calculated possible estimates for the present Danish prevalence of dementia and prevalence projections through to 2030. The discrepancy between estimates based on epidemiological studies and the number of dementia diagnoses in registers indicates that dementia may be underdiagnosed. Even though results from recent epidemiological studies point to a possible decline in incidence we expect the future prevalence of dementia to increase due to an expected increase of the elderly population.

  4. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  5. Dementia-friendly communities’ and being dementia friendly in healthcare settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review This review discusses the concept of ‘dementia-friendly communities’ and summarizes the latest research and practice around such communities. This review also highlights important topic areas to be considered to promote dementia friendliness in healthcare settings. Recent findings Definitions of ‘dementia-friendly communities’ reflect the contemporary thinking of living with dementia (e.g., dementia as a disability, equal human rights, a sense of meaning). Existing research has covered a wide range of topic areas relevant to ‘dementia-friendly communities’. However, these studies remain qualitative and exploratory by nature and do not evaluate how dementia-friendly communities impact health and quality of life of people living with dementia and their caregivers. In healthcare settings, being dementia friendly can mean the inclusion of people with dementia in treatment discussion and decision-making, as well as the provision of first, adequate and appropriate service to people with dementia at an equivalent standard of any patient, second, person-centered care, and third, a physical environment following dementia-friendly design guidelines. Summary Research incorporating more robust study designs to evaluate dementia-friendly communities is needed. Being dementia-friendly in healthcare settings requires improvement in multiple areas – some may be achieved by environmental modifications while others may be improved by staff education. PMID:27997454

  6. Managing Urinary Incontinence in Patients with Dementia: Pharmacological Treatment Options and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Susie; Morris, Vikky; Gibson, William; Wagg, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in late life and are strongly associated with dementia and frailty. Incontinence is extremely common among those living in long-term care and is most commonly due to urgency incontinence. Although national and international guidelines for continence care exist, they often fail to consider the complex comorbidity found in patients with dementia and are often not followed; continence practices in long-term care may promote rather than prevent incontinence. The majority of those with dementia living in the community can be managed successfully with standard treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological; the expectations and aims of treatment of both the patient and their caregivers should be considered. A dementia diagnosis does not preclude management of incontinence, but treatment options may be more limited in those with advanced dementia who are unable to retain information and modify behaviors. High-quality data to guide the choice of pharmacological agent in those with dementia are lacking. Oxybutynin has been shown to have significant adverse cognitive effects, but data to support the use of trospium, solifenacin, darifenacin, and fesoterodine are limited. No data are available for mirabegron. Neither age, frailty, nor dementia should be considered a barrier to pharmacological management, but consideration should be given to the total anticholinergic load. Evidence to guide the treatment of incontinence in this vulnerable patient group is scarce, and available guidelines adapted for each individual's situation should be applied.

  7. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies.

  8. Healing words: A study of poetry interventions in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Aagje M C

    2016-11-01

    The personhood movement in dementia research has established the theoretical foundation for implementing cultural arts interventions in care practices. The underlying assumption is that professionals from the visual and the performance arts are well equipped to see the person behind the condition and to focus on possibilities for meaningful relationships in the here and now. This article focuses on poetry interventions as one example of cultural arts interventions. The use of poetry might seem counterintuitive, given that people with dementia lose their language abilities and that poetry is regarded to be the most complex literary form. I will argue that expanding on existing research on poetry interventions from a health and science perspective with a humanities approach will help illuminate how poetry works to enhance the exchange with people with dementia. Drawing on participant observations of poetry interventions by Gary Glazner (Alzheimer's Poetry Project, USA) at the New York Memory Center, I will frame poetry interventions as a specific form of oral poetry in which people with dementia are positioned as cocreators of embodied texts and directly benefit from the power of the spoken word.

  9. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impac

  10. Smart Living in Dementia Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, N.; Hoof, van J; Blom, M.M.; Gemert-Pijnen, van J.E.W.C.; Hoof, van Joost; Demiris, George; Wouters, Eveline J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide adequate care and housing to the growing number of people with dementia, new technologies are necessary to provide good care and reduce the costs for these care services. Numerous technologies are available, which decrease the need for care and increase the self-reliance of clien

  11. Study on Organic-mineral Complex Grinding Aid of Cement%有机-矿物复合水泥助磨剂的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江朝华

    2004-01-01

    将多孔性无机矿物与减水剂(FDN)复合成有机-矿物复合助磨剂(organic mineral complex grinding aid,简称OMC).通过水泥粉体的细度、勃氏比表面积及休止角等性能的测定,研究了OMC对水泥的助磨作用.结果表明,OMC对水泥具有助磨、增强、减水等作用,同时,还有效地提高了水泥的物理性能.其中掺量为3%的沸石基OMC使水泥的0.08mm方孔筛余值降低约28%,使水泥的3,28,90 d抗压强度分别提高了45.7%,8.6%,14.2%.并且由于其具有FDN缓释效果,还能有效延长水泥的净浆流动度,减少混凝土坍落度的经时损失.

  12. Genetic analysis of frontotemporal dementia and progressive supra nuclear palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, R.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is an effective method for mapping genetic variants underlying common and complex diseases. This thesis describes the investigation of the disorders, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). FTD affects the frontal/temporal lobes and presents behavioural changes (bvFTD), cognitive decline or language dysfunction (primary progressive aphasia [PPA]), whilst PSP affects predominantly the brain stem resulting in loss of balance, ...

  13. Dietary Patterns, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia: A Systematic Review12

    OpenAIRE

    van de Rest, Ondine; Berendsen, Agnes AM; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; de Groot, Lisette CPGM

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy bet...

  14. The Genetics of Monogenic Frontotemporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel T. Takada

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAround 10-15% of patients diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD have a positive family history for FTD with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Since the identification of mutations in MAPT(microtubuleassociated protein tau gene in 1998, over 10 other genes have been associated with FTD spectrum disorders, discussed in this review. Along with MAPT, mutations in GRN(progranulin and C9orf72(chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 are the most commonly identified in FTD cohorts. The association of FTD and motor neuron disease (MND can be caused by mutations in C9orf72and other genes, such as TARDBP(TAR DNA-binding protein, FUS(fused in sarcoma, UBQLN2(ubiquilin 2. Multisystem proteinopathy is a complex phenotype that includes FTD, Paget disease of the bone, inclusion body myopathy and MND, and can be due to mutations in VCP(valosing containing protein and other recently identified genes.

  15. Health Care Service Utilization of Dementia Patients before and after Institutionalization: A Claims Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Larissa; Hao, Yi; Holle, Rolf; Graessel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-based and institutional dementia care has been compared in cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal information on the effect of institutionalization on health care service utilization is sparse. Methods We analyzed claims data from 651 dementia patients via Generalized Estimation Equations to assess health care service utilization profiles and corresponding expenditures from four quarters before to four quarters after institutionalization. Results In all domains, utilization increased in the quarter of institutionalization. Afterwards, the use of drugs, medical aids, and non-physician services (e.g., occupational therapy and physiotherapy) remained elevated, but use of in- and outpatient treatment decreased. Cost of care showed corresponding profiles. Conclusion Institutional dementia care seems to be associated with an increased demand for supportive services but not necessarily for specialized medical care. PMID:25337076

  16. A smartphone application to evaluate technology adoption and usage in persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartin, Phillip J; Nugent, Chris D; McClean, Sally I; Cleland, Ian; Norton, Maria C; Sanders, Chelsea; Tschanz, JoAnn T

    2014-01-01

    Dementia affects a proportionally large number of the older population, presenting a set of symptoms that cause cognitive decline and negatively affect quality of life. Technology offers an assistive role for some of these symptoms, specifically in addressing forgetfulness. Current works have explored the benefits of reminding technology, which whilst useful is only effective for those who adopt the technology. Therefore it is of merit to establish the individual parameters that characterize an adopter and non-adopter, to better target future interventions and their deployment. To aid the collection of this data a smartphone app was developed for persons with dementia. It has been designed as both a reminder application to help those with dementia accommodate their forgetfulness and a data collection tool to log usage and compliance with reminders. The app has been evaluated by a pre-pilot cohort (n=9) and was found to have a mean reminder acknowledgement of 73.09%.

  17. Health Care Service Utilization of Dementia Patients before and after Institutionalization: A Claims Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Schwarzkopf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based and institutional dementia care has been compared in cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal information on the effect of institutionalization on health care service utilization is sparse. Methods: We analyzed claims data from 651 dementia patients via Generalized Estimation Equations to assess health care service utilization profiles and corresponding expenditures from four quarters before to four quarters after institutionalization. Results: In all domains, utilization increased in the quarter of institutionalization. Afterwards, the use of drugs, medical aids, and non-physician services (e.g., occupational therapy and physiotherapy remained elevated, but use of in- and outpatient treatment decreased. Cost of care showed corresponding profiles. Conclusion: Institutional dementia care seems to be associated with an increased demand for supportive services but not necessarily for specialized medical care.

  18. Brand Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    A critical account of the rise of celebrity-driven “compassionate consumption” Cofounded by the rock star Bono in 2006, Product RED exemplifies a new trend in celebrity-driven international aid and development, one explicitly linked to commerce, not philanthropy. Brand Aid offers a deeply informed...

  19. Foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles...

  20. The role of the bilingual/bicultural worker in dementia education, support and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughtwood, Desiree; Shanley, Christopher; Adams, Jon; Santalucia, Yvonne; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Rowland, Jeffrey; Pond, Dimity

    2013-01-01

    Members of minority populations often have difficulty knowing about and accessing dementia services. One of the strategies used to promote access is the employment of bilingual/bicultural workers (sometimes referred to as multicultural, link or outreach workers). This study involved interviews with 24 bilingual/bicultural workers in south western Sydney, Australia to gain a better understanding of their role within the dementia field. Seven themes emerged: importance of working with family; process of building trust when moving between two cultures; importance of understanding the culture; self-care and culture; flexibility of their role; linking community members; and linking communities to mainstream services. Bilingual/bicultural workers play a significant and complex role in supporting individuals and families within their community who are affected by dementia. The significance of their role needs to be more clearly acknowledged in the development of policy, further research and service provision within the dementia field.

  1. Medicinal plants and dementia therapy: herbal hopes for brain aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elaine; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R

    2011-12-01

    An escalating "epidemic" of diseases like Alzheimer's has not yet been met by effective symptomatic treatments or preventative strategies. Among a few current prescription drugs are cholinesterase inhibitors including galantamine, originating from the snowdrop. Research into ethnobotanicals for memory or cognition has burgeoned in recent years. Based on a multi-faceted review of medicinal plants or phytochemicals, including traditional uses, relevant bioactivities, psychological and clinical evidence on efficacy and safety, this overview focuses on those for which there is promising clinical trial evidence in people with dementia, together with at least one other of these lines of supporting evidence. With respect to cognitive function, such plants reviewed include sage, Ginkgo biloba, and complex mixtures of other traditional remedies. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) challenge carers and lead to institutionalization. Symptoms can be alleviated by some plant species (e.g., lemon balm and lavender alleviate agitation in people with dementia; St John's wort treats depression in the normal population). The ultimate goal of disease prevention is considered from the perspective of limited epidemiological and clinical trial evidence to date. The potential value of numerous plant extracts or chemicals (e.g., curcumin) with neuroprotective but as yet no clinical data are reviewed. Given intense clinical need and carer concerns, which lead to exploration of such alternatives as herbal medicines, the following research priorities are indicated: investigating botanical agents which enhance cognition in populations with mild memory impairment or at earliest disease stages, and those for BPSD in people with dementia at more advanced stages; establishing an ongoing authoritative database on herbal medicine for dementia; and further epidemiological and follow up studies of promising phytopharmaceuticals or related nutraceuticals for disease prevention.

  2. Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Rest, Ondine; Berendsen, Agnes Am; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm

    2015-03-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.

  3. Discovering the dementia evidence base: Tools to support knowledge to action in dementia care (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Sarah L; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2016-09-01

    Dementia requires expert care and decision making, based on sound evidence. Reliable evidence is difficult for busy dementia care professionals to find quickly. This study developed an experimentally tested search filter as an innovative tool to retrieve literature on dementia. It has a known retrieval performance and can be provided as an open access web link directly to current literature. The Dementia Search Filter was developed using validated methodology. An Expert Advisory Group of dementia care practitioners and researchers ratified a representative set of relevant studies and undertook post hoc relevance assessment, to ensure the usefulness of the search filter. The Dementia Search Filter is published on two websites and combined with expert searches to link to evidence on dementia, at end of life in aged care settings and more generally. Evidence accessed by the Dementia Search Filter will help overcome barriers to finding current relevant research in the field, for practitioners, researchers and decision makers.

  4. Staging casual conversations for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Zaneta; Müller, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Social isolation is a key concern for individuals with dementia in long-term care. A possible solution is to promote social interaction between residents. A first step toward facilitating positive relationships between residents with dementia is to understand the mechanisms behind their interactions with each other, and also how their relationships with each other are built through such interactions. Drawing on casual conversations between residents in a special care unit for dementia, this paper uses systemic functional linguistics to examine how people with dementia use language to enact and construct their role-relations with each other. Results suggest people with dementia are able and willing conversationalists. However, factors such as the extent of communication breakdown and compatibility of the interlocutors may influence whether positive relations develop or not. Casual conversation is suggested to be a promising activity to encourage positive interpersonal processes between individuals with dementia in residential care.

  5. Clinical Assessment And Diagnosis Of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is characterized by progressive decline in an alert individual, leading to loss of independence in day-to-day functioning. It is a generic term for a condition that has various causes and hence myriad clinical presentations. It has to be distinguished from age-related cognitive decline, depression and delirium all of which are common in the elderly population. Detailed history and mental status examination are necessary to identify dementia, fit it into one of the various bedside classifications and pursue the differential diagnosis. This teaching review summarizes current information on definition, differential diagnosis and classification of dementia and presents a brief elaboration of bedside cognitive testing pertaining to dementia. A bird′s eye view of the profiles of various dementia subtypes is also provided so that after reading this article the reader will able to recognize dementia, conduct clinical examination to identify the characteristic cognitive profile and formulate the differential diagnosis with confidence.

  6. Preliminary study of DTI on micro-structural white matter damage in patients with HIV-1 associated dementia complex%DTI评价不同期HIV相关性痴呆脑白质微细结构损害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞利; 李宏军

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the micro-structural white matter damage in patients with HIV-1 associated dementia complex (HAD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: 17 patients with HAD (moderate and severe group,9 cases;sub-clinical group,8 cases) and 10 age and sex matched normal controls (NO were recruited. Routine MRI and DTI were performed, and fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM ) in frontal,parietal,temporal,occipital lobes,genu and splenium of the corpus callosum,and anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule of the above-mentioned 3 groups were measured and compared. Results:Of the moderate and severe HAD group,the FA values in the frontal,parietal,temporal,occipital lobes were lower than that of the NC group, whereas the ADC values in the frontal,parietal,temporal lobes were higher,with significant statistical differences (all P< 0. 05). Of the moderate and severe HAD group, the FA values in frontal,occipital lobes were lower than that of the sub-clinical group,and the ADC values in the frontal, temporal lobes were higher (all P<0. 05) ;the FA values in the frontal, occipital lobes of sub-clinical group were lower than that of NC group,the ADC values in the frontal,parietal lobes were higher (all P<0. 05);There were no significant statistical differences in the FA values and ADC values in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule among the three groups (P> 0. 05). Conclusions:Quantitative DTI analysis was helpful in assessing the white matter damage and in monitoring the severity of cognitive impairment in HAD patients. Selective micro-structural white matter damage could be revealed in patients with different stages of HAD,the damage could be assessed firstly in the cerebral regions serving higher cortical functions (frontal,parietal lobes);as the damage progressed,then appeared at the regions serving

  7. Dance for Individuals With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapum, Jennifer L; Bar, Rachel J

    2016-03-01

    The movement and music associated with dance plays an important role in many individuals' lives and can become imprinted upon the body and mind. Dance is thus closely associated with memory because of these deep connections. Without conscious thought, dance has the potential to be initiated as individuals age. In the current article, the authors share narrative reflections about their experiences with, and the potential of, dance as an intervention for aging populations diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. They draw upon their experiences in working with the aging population and a dance program currently being developed by Canada's National Ballet School and Baycrest Health Sciences for individuals with dementia-related diseases in long-term care. The current article is structured as dialogue between the authors because it mimics dance as a dialogical encounter between movement and music, and/or between individuals.

  8. Therapeutic Architecture: Housing for People with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Elizabeth Ann

    2005-01-01

    An environment strongly influences the behavior of individuals with dementia. A well designed physical environment can maintain and enhance the ability to function and improve quality of life. My thesis uses a residential environment for people suffering from dementia as the basis for therapeutic intervention. Understanding the physical and psychological effects of architecture on a person with dementia is an important tool in slowing the progression and effects of the disease. The compet...

  9. A Dementia Case Presenting with Psychotic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ozdemir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a progressive clinical syndrome in which affected areas of brain function may be affected, such as memory, language, abstract thinking, problem solving and attention. Psychotic symptoms include auditory and visual hallucinations and delusions, which usually occur in the dementia. In this paper, a dementia case presenting with psychotic symptoms is presented. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 482-486

  10. Semantic and gender priming in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Claudia; Manenti, Rosa; Cappa, Stefano; Miniussi, Carlo; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of language processing can be observed both in normal aging and in the most common forms of degenerative dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease and the spectrum of frontotemporal dementias. The present experiment tests at the same time semantic and syntactic aspects of language processing in patients with frontotemporal dementia, using an online paradigm that allows researchers to evaluate the real linguistic competence of the patients.

  11. Extraordinary Vessels Needling for Vascular Dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin; LAI Xin-sheng; HUANG Qiu-tang; XIAO Yuan-chun

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe the clinical efficacy of extraordinary vessels needling in treating vascular dementia. Method 39 cases vascular dementia were treated by acupoints selected from the eight extraordinary meridians and the time needling techniques such as eight methods of spiritual turtle, in accordance with time period and pattern identifition. Results 2 cases were cured, 30 cases improved and 7 cases failed; the total effective rate was 82.1%. Conclusion Extraordinary vessels needling has positive effects in treating vascular dementia.

  12. Time to diagnosis in young-onset dementia as compared with late-onset dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, D. van; Vugt, M.E. de; Bakker, C.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which specific factors influence diagnostic delays in dementia is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare duration from symptom onset to diagnosis for young-onset dementia (YOD) and late-onset dementia (LOD) and to assess the effect of age at onset,

  13. Elder-clowning in long-term dementia care: Results of a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Miller, Karen-Lee; Colobong, Romeo; Lazgare, Luis Ivan Palma; Binns, Malcolm; Low, Lee-Fay; Surr, Claire; Naglie, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of elder-clowning on moderate to severe behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in nursing home residents with dementia, primarily of the Alzheimer’s type. Design Before-after study. Setting Nursing home. Participants Twenty-three nursing home residents with moderate to severe BPSD defined by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) score of ≥10, and their care aides. Intervention A pair of elder-clowns visited all residents twice weekly (approximately 10 minutes per visit) for 12 weeks. They utilized improvisation, humor and empathy, as well as expressive modalities such as song, musical instruments, and dance to individualize resident engagement. Measurements Primary outcomes were BPSD measured by the NPI-NH, quality of life measured by Dementia Care Mapping (DCM), and nursing burden of care measured by the Modified Nursing Care Assessment Scale (M-NCAS). Secondary outcomes included occupational disruptiveness measured by the NPI-NH, agitation measured by the Cohen Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), and psychiatric medication use. Results Over 12 weeks, NPI-NH scores significantly declined (t22 = −2.68, p = 0.01) and DCM quality of life scores significantly improved (F1,50 = 23.09, p clowning reduced moderate to severe BPSD of nursing home residents with dementia, primarily of the Alzheimer’s type. Elder-clowning is a promising intervention that may improve Alzheimer’s dementia care for nursing home residents. PMID:26889843

  14. Social robots in advanced dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell eValentí Soler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Testing the effect of the experimental robot-based therapeutic sessions for patients with dementia in: a controlled study of parallel groups of nursing home patients comparing the effects of therapy sessions utilizing a humanoid robot (NAO, an animal-shaped robot (PARO, or a trained dog (DOG, with conventional therapy (CONTROL on symptoms of dementia; and an experience for patients who attend a day care center, comparing symptom prevalence and severity before and after sessions utilizing NAO and PARO. Methods: In the nursing home, patients were randomly assigned by blocks, based on dementia severity, to one of the 3 therapeutic groups to compare: CONTROL, PARO and NAO (phase 1 and CONTROL, PARO and DOG (phase 2. In the day care center, all patients received therapy with NAO (phase 1 and PARO (phase 2. Therapy sessions were held 2 days/week for 3 months. Evaluation at baseline and follow-up was carried out by blind raters using: the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS, the Severe Mini Mental State Examination (sMMSE, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, the Apathy Scale for Institutionalized Patients with Dementia Nursing Home version (APADEM-NH, the Apathy Inventory (AI and the Quality of Life Scale (QUALID. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and non parametric tests performed by a blinded investigator. Results: In the nursing home, 101 patients (phase 1 and 110 patients (phase 2 were included. There were no significant differences at baseline. The relevant changes at follow-up were: (phase 1 patients in the robot groups showed an improvement in apathy; patients in NAO group showed a decline in cognition as measured by the MMSE scores, but not the sMMSE; the robot groups showed no significant changes between them; (phase 2 QUALID scores increased in the PARO group. In the day care center, 20 patients (phase 1 and 17 patients (phase 2 were included. The main findings were: (phase 1 imp

  15. Somatic complaints in frontotemporal dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Landqvist, Maria; Santillo, Alexander; Gustafson, Lars; Englund, Elisabet; Passant, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical characteristics. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of unexplained somatic complaints in neuropathologically verified FTD. We also examined whether the somatic presentations correlated with protein pathology or regional brain pathology and if the patients with these somatic features showed more depressive traits. Ninety-seven consecutively neuropathologically verified FTLD patients were select...

  16. Spotlight on cerebrolysin in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosker, Greg L; Gauthier, Serge

    2010-03-01

    Cerebrolysin is a parenterally administered, porcine brain-derived peptide preparation that has pharmacodynamic properties similar to those of endogenous neurotrophic factors. In several randomized, double-blind trials of up to 28 weeks' duration in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Cerebrolysin was superior to placebo in improving global outcome measures and cognitive ability. A large, randomized comparison of Cerebrolysin, donepezil or combination therapy showed beneficial effects on global measures and cognition for all three treatment groups compared with baseline. Although not as extensively studied in patients with vascular dementia, Cerebrolysin has also shown beneficial effects on global measures and cognition in this patient population. Cerebrolysin was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with dizziness (or vertigo) being the most frequently reported adverse event. Although further studies with Cerebrolysin, including longer term trials and further exploration of its use in combination with cholinesterase inhibitors, are needed to more clearly determine its place in the management of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, available data suggest that Cerebrolysin is a useful addition to the treatment options available for dementia.

  17. Diagnosing young onset dementia can be challenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia. The most common causes of young onset dementia are early onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions and alcohol. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Conventional vascular risk factors may be absent and diagnosis relies on imaging evidence of cerebrovascular disease. Obtaining a detailed history remains the most important part of the workup and usually requires corroboration by a third party. Undertaking a basic neurological examination is also important. Those with suspected young onset dementia should be referred to a neurology-led cognitive disorders clinic where available as the differenti diagnosis is considerably broader tha in older adults and requires specialist investigation.

  18. Genetics and underlying pathology of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Beata; Gerritsen, Lotte

    2015-03-01

    As the population steadily ages, dementia, in all its forms, remains a great societal challenge. Yet, our knowledge of their etiology remains rather limited. To this end, genetic studies can give us insight into the underlying mechanisms that lead to the development of dementia, potentially facilitating treatments in the future. In this review we cover the most recent genetic risk factors associated with the onset of the four most common dementia types today, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD). Moreover, we discuss the overlap in major underlying pathologies of dementia derived from their genetic associations. While all four dementia types appear to involve genes associated with tau-pathology and neuroinflammation only LBD, AD and VaD appear to involve amyloid genes while LBD and FTLD share alpha synuclein genes. Together these findings suggest that some of the dementias may exist along a spectrum and demonstrates the necessity to conduct large-scale studies pinpointing the etiology of the dementias and potential gene and environment interactions that may influence their development.

  19. Hearing Aid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A man realized that he needed to purchase ahearing aid, but he was unwilling to spend muchmoney. "How much do they run?"he asked theclerk. "That depends," said. the salesman. "Theyrun from 2 to 2000."

  20. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slightly different from the ITC and is nearly hidden in the ear canal. Both canal hearing aids ... Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  1. Electronic aids to conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Eugene E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented in viewgraph form are techniques to improve the conceptual design of complex systems. The paper discusses theory of design, flexible software tools for computer aided design, and methods for enhancing communication among design teams.

  2. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  3. Connecting research discovery with care delivery in dementia: the development of the Indianapolis Discovery Network for Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boustani MA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaz A Boustani,1–3 Amie Frame,1,2 Stephanie Munger,1,2 Patrick Healey,4 Jessie Westlund,5 Martin Farlow,6,7 Ann Hake,8 Mary Guerriero Austrom,6,9 Polly Shepard,10 Corby Bubp,10 Jose Azar,3 Arif Nazir,3 Nadia Adams,11 Noll L Campbell,1,2,12,13 Azita Chehresa,5 Paul Dexter2,31Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 2Regenstrief Institute, Inc, 3Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM, 4St Vincent Health Network, 5Community Health Network, 6Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, IUSM, 7Department of Neurology, IUSM, 8Eli Lilly and Company, 9Department of Psychiatry, IUSM, 10The Memory Clinic of Indianapolis, 11Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 12Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, IN, USA; 13Department of Pharmacy, Wishard Health Services, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The US Institute of Medicine has recommended an integrated, locally sensitive collaboration among the various members of the community, health care systems, and research organizations to improve dementia care and dementia research.Methods: Using complex adaptive system theory and reflective adaptive process, we developed a professional network called the “Indianapolis Discovery Network for Dementia” (IDND. The IDND facilitates effective and sustainable interactions among a local and diverse group of dementia researchers, clinical providers, and community advocates interested in improving care for dementia patients in Indianapolis, Indiana.Results: The IDND was established in February 2006 and now includes more than 250 members from more than 30 local (central Indiana organizations representing 20 disciplines. The network uses two types of communication to connect its members. The first is a 2-hour face-to-face bimonthly meeting open to all members. The second is a web-based resource center (http://www.indydiscoverynetwork.org. To date, the network has: (1 accomplished the

  4. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  5. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Brooke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  6. Policies in Dementia, comparing Germany and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov

    2017-01-01

    In Short Germany as well as Denmark are focusing on the same issues regarding Dementia, as other European Countries are, too. The key issues in the national strategies are: timely diagnosis, self-determination for the person with dementia, unbroken “care chain”, better possibilities for the relief...... of informal carers (relatives), balanced view on assistive technology, destigmatisation and support of autonomy....

  7. Stress Process Model for Individuals with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Katherine S.; Menne, Heather L.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with dementia (IWDs) face particular challenges in managing and coping with their illness. The experience of dementia may be affected by the etiology, stage, and severity of symptoms, preexisting and related chronic conditions, and available informal and formal supportive services. Although several studies have examined…

  8. Biomarkers and Risk Factors of Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.C. Schrijvers (Elisabeth M. C.)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDementia is a devastating disease that is common in elderly people. The prevalence increases from almost 1% at age 65 to over 40% of people older than 90 years.1 Because the population is aging, the number of people living with dementia world- wide is expected to double every 20 years wi

  9. Development of a dementia assessment quality database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, P.; Jørgensen, Kasper; Korner, A.

    2011-01-01

    database for dementia evaluation in the secondary health system. One volume and seven process quality indicators on dementia evaluations are monitored. Indicators include frequency of demented patients, percentage of patients evaluated within three months, whether the work-up included blood tests, Mini...

  10. Diagnosing dementia with confidence by GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, H.P.J. van; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier reports suggest limited clinical reasoning and substantial uncertainty of GPs in assessing patients suspected of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To explore the predictors of GPs to decide on the presence and absence of dementia as well as the predictors of diagnostic confidence of GPs. DESI

  11. Cerebral emboli and depressive symptoms in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hardicre, J.; Byrne, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vascular depression hypothesis and our recent findings of increased frequency of spontaneous cerebral emboli in dementia suggest that such emboli may be involved in the causation of depressive symptoms in dementia. AIMS: To evaluate the association between spontaneous cerebral emboli

  12. Vascular risk factors, cognitve decline, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Duron

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available E Duron, Olivier HanonBroca Hospital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer’s disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.Keywords: dementia, hypertension, diabetus mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic syndrome

  13. Designing for Quality: The Understanding Dementia MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carolyn; Kelder, Jo-Anne; Doherty, Kathleen; Phillips, Rob; McInerney, Fran; Walls, Justin; Robinson, Andrew; Vickers, James

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a vehicle for education delivery presents opportunities and challenges. In the context of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (Wicking Centre), the driver to develop a MOOC was the promise of addressing the international deficit in evidence-based dementia education, as well…

  14. Types of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  15. Heart failure and risk of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelborg, Kasper; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ording, Anne;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The association between heart failure and dementia remains unclear. We assessed the risk of dementia among patients with heart failure and members of a general population comparison cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Individual-level data from Danish medical registries were linked...... in this nationwide population-based cohort study comparing patients with a first-time hospitalization for heart failure between 1980 and 2012 and a year of birth-, sex-, and calendar year-matched comparison cohort from the general population. Stratified Cox regression analysis was used to compute 1-35-year hazard...... ratios (HRs) for the risk of all-cause dementia and, secondarily, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other dementias. Analyses included 324 418 heart failure patients and 1 622 079 individuals from the general population (median age 77 years, 52% male). Compared with the general population...

  16. Recognition of dementia in ancient China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning; Tian, Jin-Zhou

    2012-12-01

    A search of previous records in the literatures was done to summarize the opinions for dementia in ancient China. The earliest description of dementia was traced in the Yellow emperor's internal classic, a book written 2000 years ago. Hua Tuo (AD 140-208) in Han Dynasty first denominated "dementia" in the book, Hua Tuo Shen Yi Mi Zhuan. The pathogenesis of dementia could be generalized as the insufficiency of Qi, a flowing energy; the stagnation of phlegm, a harmful liquid substance in the body; and the blood stasis, which were also regarded as therapeutic targets. Therefore, we can conclude that dementia has been recognized and investigated in traditional Chinese medicine, which is definitely before the industrial civilization era.

  17. Social robots in advanced dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentí Soler, Meritxell; Agüera-Ortiz, Luis; Olazarán Rodríguez, Javier; Mendoza Rebolledo, Carolina; Pérez Muñoz, Almudena; Rodríguez Pérez, Irene; Osa Ruiz, Emma; Barrios Sánchez, Ana; Herrero Cano, Vanesa; Carrasco Chillón, Laura; Felipe Ruiz, Silvia; López Alvarez, Jorge; León Salas, Beatriz; Cañas Plaza, José M.; Martín Rico, Francisco; Abella Dago, Gonzalo; Martínez Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Pilot studies applying a humanoid robot (NAO), a pet robot (PARO) and a real animal (DOG) in therapy sessions of patients with dementia in a nursing home and a day care center. Methods:In the nursing home, patients were assigned by living units, based on dementia severity, to one of the three parallel therapeutic arms to compare: CONTROL, PARO and NAO (Phase 1) and CONTROL, PARO, and DOG (Phase 2). In the day care center, all patients received therapy with NAO (Phase 1) and PARO (Phase 2). Therapy sessions were held 2 days per week during 3 months. Evaluation, at baseline and follow-up, was carried out by blind raters using: the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Severe Mini Mental State Examination (sMMSE), the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), the Apathy Scale for Institutionalized Patients with Dementia Nursing Home version (APADEM-NH), the Apathy Inventory (AI) and the Quality of Life Scale (QUALID). Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests performed by a blinded investigator. Results: In the nursing home, 101 patients (Phase 1) and 110 patients (Phase 2) were included. There were no significant differences at baseline. The relevant changes at follow-up were: (Phase 1) patients in the robot groups showed an improvement in apathy; patients in NAO group showed a decline in cognition as measured by the MMSE scores, but not the sMMSE; the robot groups showed no significant changes between them; (Phase 2) QUALID scores increased in the PARO group. In the day care center, 20 patients (Phase 1) and 17 patients (Phase 2) were included. The main findings were: (Phase 1) improvement in the NPI irritability and the NPI total score; (Phase 2) no differences were observed at follow-up. PMID:26388764

  18. Communicating with people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McKillop

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It can be very difficult to communicate with people with dementia. Each case requires its own unique handling. Not every scenario is covered, as many times your own judgment is what will work, best according to the circumstances. These can change from dawn to evening and from day to day. Never assume things will be the way they were the last time you communicated. Be on your guard. Be adaptable. The article will help get you started to think of your own ways to communicate.

  19. Reversible dementia: The imitation game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly progressive dementia (RPD is an emergency in behavioural or cognitive neurology. Many rare neuroinfections like Neurosyphilis may be missed, if they are not thoroughly evaluated. We report a patient with subacute onset and progressive cognitive decline, extrapyramidal involvement and myoclonic jerks who was initially suspected as probable autoimmune encephalitis or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. Investigations revealed positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL. On treatment with penicillin, he developed Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction and was treated symptomatically. After two weeks of penicillin, he improved significantly and except for mild short term memory recall, he is asymptomatic for last two years.

  20. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olazarán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, with control of vascular factors (VFs. Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (nD, past depression (pD, present depression (prD, and present and past depression (prpD. Logistic regression was used. Results. Data of 1,807 subjects were investigated at baseline (mean age 74.3, 59.3% women, and 1,376 (81.6% subjects were evaluated after three years. The prevalence of dementia at baseline was 6.7%, and dementia incidence was 6.3%. An effect of depression was observed on dementia prevalence (OR [CI 95%] 1.84 [1.01–3.35] for prD and 2.73 [1.08–6.87] for prpD, and on dementia due to AD (OR 1.98 [0.98–3.99] for prD and OR 3.98 [1.48–10.71] for prpD (fully adjusted models, nD as reference. Depression did not influence dementia incidence. Conclusions. Present depression and, particularly, present and past depression are associated with dementia at old age. Multiple mechanisms, including toxic effect of depression on hippocampal neurons, plausibly explain these associations.

  1. Car drivers with dementia : different complications due to different aetiologies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, D. Waard, D. de Davidse, R. Tucha, O. & Brouwer,W.

    2015-01-01

    Older drivers with dementia are an at-risk group for unsafe driving. However, dementia refers to various aetiologies and the question is whether dementias of different aetiology have similar effects on driving ability. The literature on the effects of dementia of various aetiologies on driving abili

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of dementia in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarsland, Dag; Andersen, Kjeld; Larsen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown.......Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown....

  3. Embodiment and dementia: exploring critical narratives of selfhood, surveillance, and dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Martin, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade there has been a notable increase in efforts to expand understandings of dementia by incorporating the body and theorizing its interrelationship with the larger social order. This emerging subfield of dementia studies puts the body and embodied practices at the center of explorations of how dementia is represented and/or experienced. This shift towards a greater recognition of the way that humans are embodied has expanded the horizon of dementia studies, providing the intellectual and narrative resources to examine experiences of dementia, and their interconnections with history, culture, power, and discourse. Our aim in this paper is to critically explore and review dimensions of this expanding research and literature, specifically in relation to three key narratives: (1) rethinking selfhood: exploring embodied dimensions; (2) surveillance, discipline, and the body in dementia and dementia care; and (3) embodied innovations in dementia care practice. We argue that this literature collectively destabilizes dementia as a taken-for-granted category and has generated critical texts on the interrelationship between the body and social and political processes in the production and expression of dementia.

  4. Capacity issues and decision-making in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Soumya; Ellajosyula, Ratnavalli

    2016-10-01

    Capacity to make one's own decisions is fundamental to the autonomy of the individual. Capacity is a functional assessment made by a clinician to determine if a patient is capable of making a specific decision. Competency is a global assessment and legal determination made by a judge in court. Capacity evaluation for a patient with dementia is used to determine whether the patient is capable of giving informed consent, participate in research, manage their finances, live independently, make a will, and have ability to drive. Patients with dementia cannot be assumed to have impaired capacity. Even a patient with moderate or severe dementia, with obviously impaired capacity may still be able to indicate a choice and show some understanding. Four key components of decision-making in a capacity evaluation include understanding, communicating a choice, appreciation, and reasoning. Assessment of capacity requires a direct interview with the patient using open-ended questions and may include both informal and formal approaches depending on the situation and the context. A baseline cognitive evaluation with a simple test to assess executive function is often useful in capacity evaluation. All capacity evaluations are situation specific, relating to the particular decision under consideration, and are not global in scope. The clinician needs to spend adequate time with the patient and the family allaying their anxieties and also consider the sociocultural context. The area of capacity has considerable overlap with law and the clinician treating patients with dementia should understand the complexities of assessment and the implications of impaired capacity. It is also essential that the clinician be well informed and keep meticulous records. It is crucial to strike a balance between respecting the patient autonomy and acting in his/her best interest.

  5. Prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish populations: A reanalysis of dementia prevalence surveys, 1990-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boix Raquel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes the prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish elderly. Methods We identified screening surveys, both published and unpublished, in Spanish populations, which fulfilled specific quality criteria and targeted prevalence of dementia in populations aged 70 years and above. Surveys covering 13 geographically different populations were selected (prevalence period: 1990-2008. Authors of original surveys provided methodological details of their studies through a systematic questionnaire and also raw age-specific data. Prevalence data were compared using direct adjustment and logistic regression. Results The reanalyzed study population (aged 70 year and above was composed of Central and North-Eastern Spanish sub-populations obtained from 9 surveys and totaled 12,232 persons and 1,194 cases of dementia (707 of Alzheimer's disease, 238 of vascular dementia. Results showed high variation in age- and sex-specific prevalence across studies. The reanalyzed prevalence of dementia was significantly higher in women; increased with age, particularly for Alzheimer's disease; and displayed a significant geographical variation among men. Prevalence was lowest in surveys reporting participation below 85%, studies referred to urban-mixed populations and populations diagnosed by psychiatrists. Conclusion Prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Central and North-Eastern Spain is higher in females, increases with age, and displays considerable geographic variation that may be method-related. People suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Spain may approach 600,000 and 400,000 respectively. However, existing studies may not be completely appropriate to infer prevalence of dementia and its subtypes in Spain until surveys in Southern Spain are conducted.

  6. Neuronal changes after chronic high blood pressure in animal models and its implication for vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Gómez, Gabriel D; de Jesús Gomez-Villalobos, Ma

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia is a devastating disorder not only for the patient, but also for the family because this neurocognitive disorder breaks the patient's independence, and leads to family care of the patient with a high cost for the family. This complex disorder alters memory, learning, judgment, emotional control and social behavior and affects 4% of the elderly world population. The high blood pressure or arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, which in most cases leads to vascular dementia. Interestingly, this neurocognitive disorder starts after long lasting hypertension, which is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow or hypoperfusion, and complete or incomplete ischemia with cortical thickness. Animal models have been generated to elucidate the pathophysiology of this disorder. It is known that dendritic complexity determines the receptive synaptic contacts, and the loss of dendritic spine and arbor stability are strongly associated with dementia in humans. This review evaluates relevant data of human and animal models that have investigated the link between long-lasting arterial hypertension and neural morphological changes in the context of vascular dementia. We examined the effect of chronic arterial hypertension and aged in vascular dementia. Neural dendritic morphology in the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus and nucleus accumbens after chronic hypertension was diskussed in the animal models of hypertension. Chronic hypertension reduced the dendritic length and spine density in aged rats.

  7. Brand Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    activists, scholars and venture capitalists, discusses the pros and cons of changing the world by ‘voting with your dollars’. Lisa Ann Richey and Stefano Ponte (Professor at Roskilde University and Senior Researcher at DIIS respectively), authors of Brand Aid: Shopping Well to Save the World, highlight how...

  8. Neuroradiological findings in vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Miaux, Yves; Suhy, Joyce; Pauls, Jon; Lopez, Ria [Synarc, Inc., Department of Radiology Services, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rovira-Canellas, Alex [Hospital General Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Unita de Resonancia Magnetica, Barcelona (Spain); Posner, Holly [Eisai, Inc., Teaneck, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    There are multiple diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia (VaD) that may define different populations. Utilizing the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) has provided improved consistency in the diagnosis of VaD. The criteria include a table listing brain imaging lesions associated with VaD. The different neuroradiological aspects of the criteria are reviewed based on the imaging data from an ongoing large-scale clinical trial testing a new treatment for VaD. The NINDS-AIREN criteria were applied by a centralized imaging rater to determine eligibility for enrollment in 1,202 patients using brain CT or MRI. Based on the above data set, the neuroradiological features that are associated with VaD and that can result from cerebral small-vessel disease with extensive leukoencephalopathy or lacunae (basal ganglia or frontal white matter), or may be the consequence of single strategically located infarcts or multiple infarcts in large-vessel territories, are illustrated. These features may also be the consequence of global cerebral hypoperfusion, intracerebral hemorrhage, or other mechanisms such as genetically determined arteriopathies. Neuroimaging confirmation of cerebrovascular disease in VaD provides information about the topography and severity of vascular lesions. Neuroimaging may also assist with the differential diagnosis of dementia associated with normal pressure hydrocephalus, chronic subdural hematoma, arteriovenous malformation or tumoral diseases. (orig.)

  9. Cocaine: A Catalyst for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet K Dhillon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for AIDS from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States can both impair the functions of macrophages & CD4+ lymphocytes and also activate HIV-1 expression in these cells. Cocaine is a multifactorial agent that acts globally to impair the functioning of brain resident cells through multiple pathways. The drug not only promotes virus replication in macrophages, microglia and astrocytes, but can also upregulate CCR5 coreceptor, and reciprocally inhibit its ligands, thereby increasing virus infectivity. Cocaine is known to modulate astroglial function and activation. Cocaine causes a myriad of toxic responses in the neurons: a it synergizes with viral proteins, Tat and gp120 resulting in exacerbated neuronal apoptosis, b it causes calcium mobilization and, c generation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, cocaine also exerts potent effects on microvascular permeability, thereby impacting the influx of virus-infected inflammatory cells in brain parenchyma. By amplifying the various arms of the toxic responses that characterize HIV-associated dementia (HAD, cocaine skews the balance in favor of the virus leading to accelerated progression and severity of dementia.

  10. Ageing, dementia and society - an epistemological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Recent data show that as populations age, the number of people affected by neurodegenerative dementia is growing at an epidemic pace in various regions of the world. This cross-cultural study examined the relationships among age, gender, ethnicity, religion, and education as well as the attitudes and perceptions related to ageing and dementia. A random sample of 980 participants was selected to represent the multicultural population of Singapore. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires through online portals and by conducting interviews. These data were ultimately analysed by comparing percentage responses and correlation coefficients and by conducting a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that the perceptions and attitudes of individuals toward ageing and dementia differ among different age groups. Moreover, the level of education attained was significantly correlated with understanding dementia; regardless of education level, Christians had the most positive mindset toward dementia, although most religious individuals did not believe in divine healing. In this study, it was determined that attitudes and perceptions about ageing and dementia are influenced by multiple factors, such as education, age, and religion, and that it is imperative that younger generations develop coping strategies, including healthy lifestyles and social and/or religious communities to provide quality care to the elderly, in general, and to dementia patients, in particular.

  11. Origins of Montessori Programming for Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the evolution of the use of Montessori educational methods as the basis for creating interventions for persons with dementia. The account of this evolution is autobiographical, as the development of Montessori Programming for Dementia (MPD) initially was through the efforts of myself and my research associates. My initial exposure to Maria Montessori's work came as a result of my involvement with my own children's education. This exposure influenced ongoing research on development of cognitive interventions for persons with dementia. A brief description of Montessori's work with children and the educational methods she developed is followed by a description of how this approach can be translated into development of activities for persons with dementia. Assessment tools to document effects of MPD were created, focusing on observational tools to measure engagement and affect during individual and group activities programming for persons with dementia. Examples of the use of MPD by researchers, staff members, and family members are given, as well as examples of how persons with dementia can provide MPD to other persons with dementia or to children. Finally, examples of MPD's dissemination internationally and future directions for research are presented.

  12. Vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, E; Hanon, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer's disease) and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer's disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.

  13. Epidemiological surveillance of the HIV/AIDS complex through the analysis of trends in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in Cali, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga-Cantillo, Alejandra; Londoño, Óscar; García, Luz Stella; Collazos, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) incidence has markedly changed in the general population since the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the eighties and after the introduction of the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in the nineties. Objective: To investigate incidence rate trends for Kaposi's sarcoma before and during the (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in Cali, Colombia. Methods: Exploratory ecological study that included all Kaposi's sarcoma cases identified by the Cali Cancer Registry from 1962-2007, and 12,887 cases of HIV/AIDS recorded in the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali between 1986 and 2010. The joinpoint regression model was used to conduct the incidence rate analyses between the years 1962 and 2010. Results: A total of 349 KS cases were identified during the study period. Only 5.3% of the cases (n=20) were diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era (1963-1987), of these, 35% were women, and 90% of the tumors were located on the skin. In contrast, 94.7% of KS cases (n=329) were discovered after the emergence of HIV-AIDS. There was a significant decrease in the proportion of women (10.9%, p <0.001) and an increase in the frequency of tumors with an extra-cutaneous location (19.1%, p <0.01) compared to those cases diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era. Notification rates of HIV/AIDS have decreased since 2002 in both genders but KS incidence rates have decreased since 2004 in men only. Conclusion: The downward trend in the incidence of these diseases may be associated with factors that prevent the transmission of HIV infection or limit the spread of HIV in the community. Cancer registries represent a resource for timely, population-based surveil-lance of HIV-associated malignancies in Cali, Colombia. PMID:24893300

  14. Epidemiological surveillance of the HIV/AIDS complex through the analysis of trends in the incidence of Kaposi’s sarcoma in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saldarriaga-Cantillo, Alejandra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS incidence has markedly changed in the general population since the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the eighties and after the introduction of the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART in the nineties.Objective: To investigate incidence rate trends for Kaposi’s sarcoma before and during the (HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cali, Colombia. Methods: Exploratory ecological study that included all Kaposi’s sarcoma cases identified by the Cali Cancer Registry from 1962-2007, and 12,887 cases of HIV/AIDS recorded in the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali between 1986 and 2010. The joinpoint regression model was used to conduct the incidence rate analyses between the years 1962 and 2010.Results: A total of 349 KS cases were identified during the study period. Only 5.3% of the cases (n=20 were diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era (1963-1987, of these, 35% were women, and 90% of the tumors were located on the skin. In contrast, 94.7% of KS cases (n=329 were discovered after the emergence of HIV-AIDS. There was a significant decrease in the proportion of women (10.9%, p <0.001 and an increase in the frequency of tumors with an extra-cutaneous location (19.1%, p <0.01 compared to those cases diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era. Notification rates of HIV/AIDS have decreased since 2002 in both genders but KS incidence rates have decreased since 2004 in men only.Conclusion: The downward trend in the incidence of these diseases may be associated with factors that prevent the transmission of HIV infection or limit the spread of HIV in the community. Cancer registries represent a resource for timely, population-based surveil-lance of HIV-associated malignancies in Cali, Colombia.

  15. Neurochemical dementia diagnostics for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias: an ISO 15189 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waedt, Johanna; Kleinow, Martina; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2012-10-01

    Dementia is one of the most common causes of health problems in the elderly populations of Western industrialized countries. A combined analysis of cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics biomarkers (amyloid-β peptides, total tau and phosphorylated forms of tau) provides sensitivity and specificity in the range of 85% for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. The alterations occur very early in the course of neurodegeneration, enabling medical follow-up of persons with increased risk of developing dementia. With a growing number of laboratories performing neurochemical dementia diagnostics routinely, it is important to standardize protocols and laboratory performance to enable comparisons of results and their interpretations. Together with the recently published expert guidelines for sample handling and preparation, as well as the interpretation (post-analytical) algorithms developed by experienced centers, ISO 15189 norm provides an extremely useful tool for standardization of neurochemical dementia diagnostics.

  16. Validation of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group Diagnostic Assessment for Dementia in Arabic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Kieu T T; Chaaya, Monique; Waldemar, Gunhild;

    2014-01-01

    independently predicted dementia diagnosis. The predictive ability of the 10/66 DRG assessment was superior to that of its subcomponents. CONCLUSION: The 10/66 DRG diagnostic assessment for dementia is well suited for case ascertainment in epidemiological studies among Arabic-speaking older population with high......OBJECTIVES: In the North Africa and Middle East region, the illiteracy rates among older people are high, posing a great challenge to cognitive assessment. Validated diagnostic instruments for dementia in Arabic are lacking, hampering the development of dementia research in the region. The study...... aimed at validating the Arabic version of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group (DRG) diagnostic assessment for dementia to determine whether it is suitable for case ascertainment in epidemiological research. METHODS: A total of 244 participants older than 65 years were included, 100 with normal cognition...

  17. Dementia and assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaufort, Inez D; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The number of dementia patients requesting euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased over the past five years. The issue is highly controversial. In this contribution we discuss some of the main arguments: the nature of suffering, the voluntariness of the request and the role of the physician. We argue that society has a duty to care for patients who suffer from dementia and to make their lives as good and comfortable as possible. We also argue that it can be morally acceptable for those who do not want to continue their life with dementia to choose to die. The choice can be based on good reasons.

  18. [Quality of life in dementia, opinions among people with dementia, their professional caregivers, and in literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, D L; Dröes, R M; Ettema, T P; Boelens, E; Bos, J; Meihuizen, L; de Lange, J; Schölzel-Dorenbos, C J M; Hoogeveen, F

    2010-12-01

    Different definitions of quality of life (QOL) are found in the literature. This raised the question which domains are viewed as really important by persons with dementia. In an explorative study the opinions of persons with dementia (community-dwelling and living in nursing homes), were compared to those of professional carers and instruments for QOL in dementia. Data were gathered through interviews, focus groups and literature study. Most QOL-domains mentioned as important by persons with dementia were also acknowledged by carers and in measurement instruments. Some domains, however, were not mentioned by the carers ('sense of aesthetics', 'financial situation', 'being useful' and 'spirituality'), or not selected in the measuring instruments ('security and privacy', 'self-determination and freedom', 'being useful' and 'spirituality'). This indicates differences in perspectives on quality of life between persons with dementia, professional caregivers and researchers. Subsequently it was studied to what degree professionals focus on the QoL-domains that persons with dementia consider essential. Caregivers working on 29 units and 3 day care facilities of 13 nursing homes and in 12 meeting centers filled out a questionnaire (N = 374). They reported to focus at least to some degree on most domains considered important by persons with dementia. However, little attention was paid to the domains 'financial situation' and 'being useful'. Professionals offering daytime activities focused more than 24-hour care staff on 'attachment', 'enjoyment of activities', 'sense of aesthetics', and 'being useful'. This article is a translation and merging of 1) Dröes et al. Quality of life in dementia in perspective; an explorative study of variations in opinions among people with dementia and their professional caregivers, and in literature. Dementia: The International Journal 2006; 5 (4): 533-558, and 2) Gerritsen et al. Differences in perspective: do professional caregivers focus

  19. Tactile Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaramossadat Homayuni

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Tactile aids, which translate sound waves into vibrations that can be felt by the skin, have been used for decades by people with severe/profound hearing loss to enhance speech/language development and improve speechreading.The development of tactile aids dates from the efforts of Goults and his co-workers in the 1920s; Although The power supply was too voluminous and it was difficult to carry specially by children, it was too huge and heavy to be carried outside the laboratories and its application was restricted to the experimental usage. Nowadays great advances have been performed in producing this instrument and its numerous models is available in markets around the world.

  20. Negotiating Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Lindsay; Fraser, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new analytical approach to the study of aid negotiations. Building on existing approaches but trying to overcome their limitations, it argues that factors outside of individual negotiations (or the `game' in game-theoretic approaches) significantly affect the preferences...... of actors, the negotiating strategies they fashion, and the success of those strategies. This approach was employed to examine and compare the experiences of eight countries: Botswana, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia. The article presents findings from these country studies...... which investigated the strategies these states have adopted in talks with aid donors, the sources of leverage they have been able to bring to bear in negotiations, and the differing degrees of control that they have been able to exercise over the policies agreed in negotiations and those implemented...

  1. Being Dementia Smart (BDS): A Dementia Nurse Education Journey in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaden, Leah

    2016-06-24

    There is a global demographic transition secondary to population ageing. The number of older people living with multimorbidities including dementia has been significantly rising both in developed and developing countries. It is estimated that there would be 74.7 million people living with dementia by 2030 that would escalate to 135.46 million by 2050. 62 % of people with dementia currently live in low and middle income countries that are very poorly resourced to cope with this epidemic. Dementia is now duly recognised as a national priority within the UK and a global priority at the 2013 G8 Summit. Management and care of an individual with dementia requires a multidisciplinary approach with expertise and a competent skill base. Nurses are central to the delivery of dementia care delivery in hospitals, community and residential care settings. It is against this background that this pre-registration integrated dementia curriculum was developed to build capacity and capability with dementia expertise among the future nursing workforce in Scotland in line with the National Dementia Strategy.

  2. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: A genome-wide association study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Ferrari (Roberto); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); M.A. Nalls (Michael); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan Daniel); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); J.B.J. Kwok (John); C. Dobson-Stone (Carol); Brooks Brooks William S. (W.S.); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); G.M. Halliday (Glenda Margaret); J. Hodges (John); O. Piguet (Olivier); L. Bartley (Lauren); E. Thompson (Elizabeth); E. Haan (Eric); I. Hernández (Isabel); A. Ruiz (Agustin); M. Boada (Mercè); B. Borroni (Barbara); A. Padovani (Alessandro); C. Cruchaga (Carlos); N.J. Cairns (Nigel); L. Benussi (Luisa); G. Binetti (Giuliano); R. Ghidoni (Roberta); G. Forloni (Gianluigi); D. Galimberti (Daniela); C. Fenoglio (Chiara); M. Serpente (Maria); E. Scarpini (Elio); J. Clarimon (Jordi); A. Lleo (Alberto); R. Blesa (Rafael); M.L. Waldö (Maria Landqvist); K. Nilsson (Karin); C. Nilsson (Christer); I.R.A. Mackenzie (Ian); G.Y.R. Hsiung (Ging-Yuek); D.M.A. Mann (David); J. Grafman (Jordan); C.M. Morris (Chris); J. Attems (Johannes); T.D. Griffiths (Timothy); I.G. McKeith (Ian); A.W. Thomas (Alan); P. Pietrini (P.); E.D. Huey (Edward); E.M. Wassermann (Eric); A. Baborie (Atik); J.A.J. Jaros (Julian); M.C. Tierney (Michael); P. Pastor (Pau); C. Razquin (Cristina); S. Ortega-Cubero (Sara); E. Alonso (Elena); R. Perneczky (Robert); J. Diehl-Schmid (Janine); E.C. Alexopoulos (Evangelos); A. Kurz; I. Rainero (Innocenzo); M. Rubino (Maurizio); L. Pinessi (Lorenzo); E. Rogaeva (Ekaterina); P.H. St George-Hyslop (Peter); G. de Rossi (Giulio); F. Tagliavini (Fabrizio); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe); J.B. Rowe (James); J.C.M. Schlachetzki (Johannes C.); J. Uphill (James); J. Collinge (John); S. Mead (Simon); A. Danek (Adrian); V.M. Deerlin (Vivianna); M. Grossman (Murray); J.Q. Trojanowski (John); J. van der Zee (Jill); J. Deschamps (Jacqueline); T. van Langenhove (Tim); M. Cruts (Marc); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); S.F. Cappa (Stefano); I. Le Ber (Isabelle); D. Hannequin (Didier); V. Golfier (Véronique); M. Vercelletto (Martine); A. Brice; B. Nacmias (Benedetta); S. Sorbi (Sandro); S. Bagnoli (Silvia); I. Piaceri (Irene); J.E. Nielsen (Jorgen); L.E. Hjermind (Lena); M. Riemenschneider (Matthias); M. Mayhaus (Manuel); B. Ibach (Bernd); G. Gasparoni (Gilles); I. Pichler (Irene); W. Gu (Wei); M. Rossor (Martin); N.C. Fox (Nick); J.D. Warren (Jason); M.G. Spillantini; H. Morris (Huw); P. Rizzu (Patrizia); P. Heutink (Peter); J. Snowden (Julie); S. Rollinson (Sara); A. Richardson (Anna); A. Gerhard (Alex); A.C. Bruni (Amalia); R. Maletta (Raffaele); F. Frangipane (Francesca); C. Cupidi (Chiara); L. Bernardi (Livia); M. Anfossi (Maria); V. Gallo (Valentina); A. Conidi (Andrea); N. Smirne (Nicoletta); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); M.C. Baker (Matthew); D.W. Dickson (Dennis); N.R. Graff-Radford (Neill); R.C. Petersen (Ronald); D.S. Knopman (David); K.A. Josephs (Keith); B.F. Boeve (Bradley); J.E. Parisi (Joseph); W. Seeley (William); B.L. Miller (Bruce Lars); A. Karydas (Anna); H. Rosen (Howard); J.C. van Swieten (John); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); H. Seelaar (Harro); Y. Pijnenburg (Yolande); P. Scheltens (Philip); G. Logroscino (Giancarlo); R. Capozzo (Rosa); V. Novelli (Valeria); A.A. Puca (Annibale); C. Franceschi (Claudio); A. Postiglione (Alfredo); D.J. Milan (David); D. Sorrentino (Dario); M. Kristiansen (Mark); Y.T. Chiang; M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); F. Pasquier (Florence); P.E. Rollin (Pierre); V. Deramecourt (Vincent); F. Lebert (Florence); D. Kapogiannis (Dimitrios); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); S. Pickering-Brown (Stuart); A. Singleton (Andrew); J. Hardy (John); M. Momeni (Mona)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72-have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify n

  3. [Episodic manifestation of hemiparkinson syndrome with severe dementia personality change and precursors of paranoid hallucination symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postrach, F

    1989-09-01

    A case of episodic manifestation of semiparalysis agitans is described, accompanied by severe demential personality change and precursory hallucinatory symptoms, which is made the basis for the discussion of aspects of mental disorders, notably dementia and symptoms resembling schizophrenia, in Parkinsonian patients. By way of allusion to Glass, a diagnosis including a very extensive, complex, symptomatology is made of a Parkinsonian syndrome.

  4. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By providing a safe place, you may avoid confrontation. If this doesn't work, remind your loved ... September 2000 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis information provides a general overview and may not apply ...

  5. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not dress for situation and weather. Exhibits decreased empathy and inhibition in what he/she does and ... reality” is what is real.  All behaviors are communicating something.  Respect the person by treating him/her ...

  6. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Department of Housing and Urban Development Department of Justice Department of Labor Department of State Department of ... gov Español (Spanish) 繁體ä¸æ–‡ (Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) 한êµì–´ (Korean) ...

  7. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often greatly improve mental function. Such conditions include: Anemia Congestive heart failure Decreased blood oxygen ( hypoxia ) Depression Heart failure Infections Nutritional disorders Thyroid disorders Medicines may be used to: ...

  8. Cognitive impairment in patients with AIDS – prevalence and severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins CC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal C Watkins,1,2 Glenn J Treisman2 1The Memory Center in Neuropsychiatry, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of HIV patients and decreased the number of adults who progress to AIDS and HIV-associated dementia. However, neurocognitive deficits remain a pronounced consequence of HIV/AIDS. HIV-1 infection targets the central nervous system in subcortical brain areas and leads to high rates of delirium, depression, opportunistic central nervous system infections, and dementia. Long-term HIV replication in the brain occurs in astrocytes and microglia, allowing the virus to hide from antiviral medication and later compromise neuronal function. The associated cognitive disturbance is linked to both viral activity and inflammatory and other mediators from these immune cells that lead to the damage associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, a general term given for these disturbances. We review the severity and prevalence of the neuropsychiatric complications of HIV including delirium, neurobehavioral impairments (depression, minor cognitive-motor dysfunction, and HIV-associated dementia. Keywords: HIV, delirium, depression, HAND, dementia; HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

  9. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  10. A review of contemporary work on the ethics of ambient assisted living technologies for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitzky, Peter; Smeaton, Alan F; Chen, Cynthia; Irving, Kate; Jacquemard, Tim; O'Brolcháin, Fiachra; O'Mathúna, Dónal; Gordijn, Bert

    2015-06-01

    Ambient assisted living (AAL) technologies can provide assistance and support to persons with dementia. They might allow them the possibility of living at home for longer whilst maintaining their comfort and security as well as offering a way towards reducing the huge economic and personal costs forecast as the incidence of dementia increases worldwide over coming decades. However, the development, introduction and use of AAL technologies also trigger serious ethical issues. This paper is a systematic literature review of the on-going scholarly debate about these issues. More specifically, we look at the ethical issues involved in research and development, clinical experimentation, and clinical application of AAL technologies for people with dementia and related stakeholders. In the discussion we focus on: (1) the value of the goals of AAL technologies, (2) the special vulnerability of persons with dementia in their private homes, (3) the complex question of informed consent for the usage of AAL technologies.

  11. Alzheimer's and Dementia Testing for Earlier Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Today Major Milestones Treatment Horizon Earlier Diagnosis Prevention Alzheimer’s and Dementia Testing for Earlier Diagnosis What if we could diagnose Alzheimer's before symptoms started? The hope is, future treatments ...

  12. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common form ...

  13. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. The article also explores whether the inconsistent findings can be attributed to differences in study designs or the definitions of bilingualism used between studies. Based on current evidence, it appears that lifelong bilingualism, where individuals frequently use both languages, may be protective against dementia. However, becoming bilingual in adulthood or using the second language infrequently is unlikely to substantially delay onset of the disease.

  14. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  15. [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, G; Kövari, E

    2011-11-09

    Vascular dementia due to multiple large strokes (multi-infarct dementia) is a well known entity. However, new clinicopathologic and neuroimaging data have highlighted the common occurrence of small vessel and microscopic vascular pathology in aging brains and recognized that vascular dementia due to small lesions is probably the most common form. In such cases, cortical microinfarcts are the strongest correlate of global cognitive function followed by basal ganglia and thalamic lacunes. Demyelination is only weekly associated with cognition and this relation is no longer significant after adjustement for the presence of lacunes. Awareness of the importance of small vascular lesions in brain aging, can improve diagnostic accuracy and help identify new targets, that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches in old age dementia.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation, Cognitive Decline And Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alvaro; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia. Growing evidence supports a role for AF as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. In this review, we summarize epidemiologic observations linking AF with cognitive outcomes, describe potential mechanisms, and explore the impact of AF treatments on cognitive decline and dementia. Community-based, observational studies show a consistent higher rate of cognitive decline and risk of dementia in persons with AF. These associations are partly due to the increased risk of clinical stroke in AF, but other mechanisms, including incidence of silent cerebral infarcts, microbleeds, and cerebral hypoperfusion, are likely additional contributors. Adequate oral anticoagulation and improved management of the overall cardiovascular risk profile in persons with AF offer the promise of reducing the impact of AF on cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:27547248

  17. Dementia with Lewy bodies: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buracchio, Teresa; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gorbien, Martin

    2005-01-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase over time, dementia is becoming an increasingly more common problem and a major cause of disability in older persons. It is now more important than ever to identify and manage common causes of dementia given variations in disease course, treatments and the possibility for modification of risk factors. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a dementia syndrome characterized by progressive cognitive decline, with fluctuating cognition, recurrent detailed and well-formed hallucinations, and parkinsonism. This article aims to provide an overview of current concepts of DLB, including a description of the key clinical features and neuropathology, neurochemistry, and genetics of DLB, then a discussion of the relationship of DLB with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and, finally, a summary of current management strategies available for this disorder.

  18. Physical Activity and Exercise in Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Lok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a dynamic process that affects many systems in the body. Cognitive function with aging, including memory, intelligence, personality and behavior are affected at different levels. As time passes, durability of individuals and the amount of physical activity and exercise decrease. Apart from normal aging process, accompanying chronic brain syndrome of dementia will further reduce activities. Physical activity can provide opportunities for individuals with dementia in the path to socialize. Therefore, the role of physical activity and exercise in adapting an active lifestyle to protect the health of individuals with dementia is becoming increasingly important. Physical activity and exercise which would help in improvement of cognitive activity in dementia are briefly reviewed in this article. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 289-294

  19. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... who is losing or has lost their memory? What type of words should I use? What is ...

  20. CAMCOG as a screening instrument for dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolk, A; Nielsen, H; Andersen, K;

    2000-01-01

    The Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) score is correlated with age and sociodemographic variables. The aim of the study was to determine an individualized CAMCOG cut-off score for dementia, taking such correlates into account....

  1. Individual Music Therapy for Agitation in Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been...... methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants...... with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6...

  2. Music Therapy System for Patients with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    大島, 千佳; 中山, 功一; 安田, 清; 伊藤, 直樹; 西本, 一志; 細井, 尚人; 奥村, 浩

    2011-01-01

    We introduced three types of music therapy system. They were made for purpose of helping caregivers and/or patients with dementia enjoying a music performance. We discussed the efficacy of these systems for the caregivers and the patients.

  3. Prevalence of dementia among Kashmiri migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurological diseases are common disorders resulting in the loss of productive life and disability. Dementia is becoming a major public health problem in the developing world also. Aim: To ascertain the prevalence of dementia among Kashmiri Pandit population aged 60 years and above. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the elderly population of the Kashmiris living in a migrant camp. We developed and used a Kashmiri version of the Mini-Mental State Examination as the test instrument, and a score below 24 was considered indicative of dementia. A functional ability questionnaire was also administered to the subjects. A neurologist carried out the examinations. Results: A sample comprising 200 subjects (95 males and 105 females were evaluated. The prevalence of dementia is 6.5% among the Kashmiri Pandit population aged 60 years and above, which is higher than that reported from other parts of India.

  4. AIDS and associated malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles WOOD; William HARRINGTON Jr

    2005-01-01

    AIDS associated malignancies (ARL) is a major complication associated with AIDS patients upon immunosuppression.Chronically immunocompromised patients have a markedly increased risk of developing lymphoproliferative disease. In the era of potent antiretrovirals therapy (ARV), the malignant complications due to HIV- 1 infection have decreased in developed nations where ARV is administered, but still poses a major problem in developing countries where HIV- 1incidence is high and ARV is still not yet widely available. Even in ARV treated individuals there is a concern that the prolonged survival of many HIV- 1 carriers is likely to eventually result in an increased number of malignancies diagnosed.Malignancies that were found to have high incidence in HIV-infected individuals are Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The incidence of NHL has increased nearly 200 fold in HIV-positive patients, and accounts for a greater percentage of AIDS defining illness in the US and Europe since the advent of HAART therapy. These AIDS related lymphomas are distinct from their counterparts seen in HIV- 1 seronegative patients.For example nearly half of all cases of ARL are associated with the presence of a gamma herpesvirus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) or human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The pathogenesis of ARLs is complex. B-cell proliferation driven by chronic antigenemia resulting in the induction of polyclonal and ultimately monoclonal lymphoproliferation may occur in the setting of severe immunosuppression.

  5. Epidemiological surveillance of the HIV/AIDS complex through the analysis of trends in the incidence of Kaposi’s sarcoma in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Saldarriaga-Cantillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 Introduction: The Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS incidence has markedly changed in the general population since the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the eighties and after the introduction of the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART in the nine­ties. Objective: To investigate incidence rate trends for Kaposi’s sarcoma before and during the (HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cali, Colombia. Methods: Exploratory ecological study that included all Kaposi’s sarcoma cases identified by the Cali Cancer Registry from 1962-2007, and 12,887 cases of HIV/AIDS recorded in the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali between 1986 and 2010. The joinpoint regression model was used to conduct the incidence rate analyses between the years 1962 and 2010. Results: A total of 349 KS cases were identified during the study period. Only 5.3% of the cases (n=20 were diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era (1963-1987, of these, 35.0% were women, and 90.0% of the tumors were located on the skin. In contrast, 94.7% of KS cases (n=329 were discovered after the emergence of HIV-AIDS. There was a significant decrease in the proportion of women (10.9%, p <0.001 and an increase in the frequency of tumors with an extra-cutaneous location (19.1%, p <0.01 com­pared to those cases diagnosed in the pre-epidemic era. Notification rates of HIV/AIDS have decreased since 2002 in both genders but KS incidence rates have decreased since 2004 in men only. Conclusion: The downward trend in the incidence of these diseases may be associated with factors that prevent the trans­mission of HIV infection or limit the spread of HIV in the community. Cancer registries represent a resource for timely, population-based surveil-lance of HIV-associated malignancies in Cali, Colombia. Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE

  6. Preserving personhood: The strategies of men negotiating the experience of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Edward; Weicht, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of dementia requires sensitivity to the complex breadth of factors that comprise the person's experiential and social context. This is necessary to ensure that academic and public perspectives on dementia are not subsumed under homogenising discourses that prioritise the neurodegenerative basis of the condition. Gender is one such factor of this 'social location' that must be acknowledged. Cultural standards of masculinity have particular impacts upon men with the condition, thus generating distinctive challenges. This article draws upon qualitative research that included joint interviews with 14 men with dementia and their carers. The analytical focus is on the perspectives of the men with dementia and the strategies with which they respond to the condition. These perspectives are organised via four themes: remaining unmoved, fighting back, emphasising social contributions, and redefining services. This enables exploration of how men adopt particular strategies to preserve their own personhood, which include equable resilience, but also more agential measures to counter the influence of the condition. It is concluded that an approach to dementia research that is more sensitive to masculine-gendered experience is required so that the experience of men with the condition can be conveyed more cogently.

  7. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  8. Managing diabetes in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joe; Carson, Amanda; Waugh, Anna; Park, Douglas

    Diabetes and dementia may manifest simultaneously: one is potentially life threatening, the other causes severe, progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. Where they coexist, they present nurses with challenges such as administering life-saving interventions to patients who are unable to give informed consent. This article offers guidance on the clinical and ethical challenges involved in blood glucose monitoring and medicines administration in patients with dementia.

  9. Neuroregeneration and dementia: new treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Mitran, Smaranda Ioana; Catalin, Bogdan; Sfredel, Veronica; Balseanu, Tudor-Adrian

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, physiological aging became a general concept that includes all the changes that occur in organism with old age. It is obvious now, that in developing and developed countries, new health problems concerning older population appear. One of these major concerns is probably dementia. Sooner or later, all forms of dementia lead to learning deficit, memory loss, low attention span, impairment of speech and poor problem solving skills. Normal ageing is a physiological process that...

  10. Frontotemporal dementias: Recent advances and current controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Leyton Cristian; Hodges John

    2010-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes. Three main clinical variants are recognized: Behavioral variant (bv-FTD), Semantic dementia (SD), and Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA). However, logopenic/phonological (LPA) variant has been recently described, showing a distinctive pattern of brain atrophy and often associated to Alzheimer′s disease pathology. The diagno...

  11. Seminar: Music Therapy in Dementia Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2009-01-01

    This seminar presents music therapy in person centered dementia care. In the first part focus is on research and documentation. How can short term music therapy document changes in symptoms of depression? Is Dementia Care Mapping a valid assessment tool for documenting group music therapy......? In the next part focus is on clinical music therapy – in group work as well as in individual work – and how the music therapist works in the interdisciplinary field....

  12. Gender Differences in Dementia Spousal Caregiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Maria Pöysti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of male caregivers is rapidly increasing. However, there are few large scale studies exploring gender differences in the burden or coping with caregiving. We investigated this among caregivers of patients with dementia. The study cohort consisted of 335 dyads of wife-husband couples from two studies including dementia patients and their spousal caregivers. Baseline mini-mental state examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating scale (CDR, neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI, cornell depression scale and charlson comorbidity index (CCI were used to describe patients with dementia, Zarit burden scale and geriatric depression scale were used to measure experienced burden and depression of caregivers. Mean age of caregivers was 78 years. There were no differences in depression, satisfaction with life, or loneliness according to caregivers' gender. Male caregivers had more comorbidities than females (CCI 1.9 versus 1.1, P<0.001, and the wives of male caregivers had a more severe stage of dementia than husbands of female caregivers (CDR, P=0.048; MMSE14.0 versus 17.7, P<0.001. However, the mean Zarit burden scale was significantly lower among male than female caregivers (31.5 versus 37.5; P<0.001. Lower education of male caregivers tended to be associated with less experienced burden. In conclusion, male caregivers of dementia experienced lower burden than female caregivers despite care recipients' more severe disease.

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of mixed dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Haruo

    2012-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD)--secondary to cerebrovascular disease (CVD)--has been traditionally distinguished from Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is a purely neurodegenerative form of dementia. However, CVDs such as lacunes and white matter lesions are common in patients with AD, whereas certain pathological changes of AD, including senile plaques and tangles, are observed in elderly patients with VaD. These findings indicate that mixed vascular-degenerative dementia (MD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. In the treatment and prevention of dementia, the accurate diagnosis of each individual type of dementia is vital. However, recognizing the distinction between these diseases can be difficult in clinical practice. This article provides an overview of MD, including the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment. In particular, we emphasize that functional brain imaging, including perfusion single photon emission computed tomography and benzodiazepine receptor binding measurement, in combination with morphological imaging (such as magnetic resonance imaging) is useful for distinguishing AD, VaD and MD. In addition to antiplatelet medications, cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists may be effective in treating MD. Moreover the vascular risk factors also should be treated appropriately. The article describes the need for further studies to develop a better understanding of MD.

  14. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  15. Teaching AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R V

    1989-06-01

    This article reviews a peer group Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) educational program at a university in Australia. Studies in the US have shown that most adolescents, although sexually active, do not believe they are likely to become infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and therefore do not attempt to modify their sexual behavior. A 1st step in educating students is to introduce them to condoms and impress upon them the fact that condoms should be used at the beginning of all sexual relationships, whether homosexual or heterosexual. In this program 3rd year medical students were targeted, as they are effective communicators and disseminators of information to the rest of the student body. After class members blow up condoms, giving them a chance to handle various brands and observe the varying degrees of strength, statistical evidence about the contraceptive failure rate of condoms (0.6-14.7 per 100 women-years) is discussed. Spermicides, such as nonoxynol-9 used in conjunction with condoms, are also discussed, as are condoms for women, packaging and marketing of condoms, including those made from latex and from the caecum of sheep, the latter condoms being of questionable effectiveness in preventing transmission of the virus. The care of terminal AIDS cases and current global and national statistics on AIDS are presented. The program also includes cash prizes for the best student essays on condom use, the distribution of condoms, condom key rings and T-shirts, and a student-run safe sex stand during orientation week. All of these activities are intended to involve students and attract the interest of the undergraduate community. Questionnaires administered to students at the end of the course revealed that the lectures were received favorably. Questionnaires administered to new medical and English students attending orientation week revealed that 72% of students thought the stand was a good idea and 81% and 83%, respectively found it

  16. Brand Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    activists, scholars and venture capitalists, discusses the pros and cons of changing the world by ‘voting with your dollars’. Lisa Ann Richey and Stefano Ponte (Professor at Roskilde University and Senior Researcher at DIIS respectively), authors of Brand Aid: Shopping Well to Save the World, highlight how......Can Citizen Consumers Make a Difference? DIIS researcher contributes to a Boston Review - New Democracy Forum In the current issue of Boston Review (November/December 2011), contributors to a ‘New Democracy Forum’ debate whether Citizen Consumers can make a difference in stimulating responsible...

  17. Effect of the Goals of Care Intervention for Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Laura C.; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Song, Mi-Kyung; Lin, Feng-Chang; Rosemond, Cherie; Carey, Timothy S.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In advanced dementia, goals of care decisions are challenging and medical care is often more intensive than desired. OBJECTIVE To test a goals of care (GOC) decision aid intervention to improve quality of communication and palliative care for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A single-blind cluster randomized clinical trial, including 302 residents with advanced dementia and their family decision makers in 22 nursing homes. INTERVENTIONS A GOC video decision aid plus a structured discussion with nursing home health care providers; attention control with an informational video and usual care planning. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes at 3 months were quality of communication (QOC, questionnaire scored 0–10 with higher ratings indicating better quality), family report of concordance with clinicians on the primary goal of care (endorsing same goal as the “best goal to guide care and medical treatment,” and clinicians’ “top priority for care and medical treatment”), and treatment consistent with preferences (Advance Care Planning Problem score). Secondary outcomes at 9 months were family ratings of symptom management and care, palliative care domains in care plans, Medical Orders for Scope of Treatment (MOST) completion, and hospital transfers. Resident-family dyads were the primary unit of analysis, and all analyses used intention-to-treat assignment. RESULTS Residents’ mean age was 86.5 years, 39 (12.9%) were African American, and 246 (81.5%) were women. With the GOC intervention, family decision makers reported better quality of communication (QOC, 6.0 vs 5.6; P = .05) and better end-of-life communication (QOC end-of-life subscale, 3.7 vs 3.0; P = .02). Goal concordance did not differ at 3 months, but family decision makers with the intervention reported greater concordance by 9 months or death (133 [88.4%] vs 108 [71.2%], P = .001). Family ratings of treatment consistent with

  18. Cognitive impairment in patients with AIDS – prevalence and severity

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins CC; Treisman GJ

    2015-01-01

    Crystal C Watkins,1,2 Glenn J Treisman2 1The Memory Center in Neuropsychiatry, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of HIV patients and decreased the number of adults who progress to AIDS and HIV-associated dementia. However, neurocognitive deficits remain a pronounced consequence of HIV/...

  19. Partners in Dementia Care: A Care Coordination Intervention for Individuals with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Katherine S.; Bass, David M.; Snow, A. Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L.; Morgan, Robert; Looman, Wendy J.; McCarthy, Catherine; Kunik, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides a detailed description of a telephone-based care coordination intervention, Partners in Dementia Care (PDC), for veterans with dementia and their family caregivers. Essential features of PDC included (a) formal partnerships between Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers and Alzheimer's Association Chapters; (b) a…

  20. [Quality of life in dementia, opinions among people with dementia, their professional caregivers, and in literature].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsena, D.L.; Droes, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Boelens, E.; Bos, J.; Meihuizen, L.; Lange, J.; Schölzel-Dorenbos, C.J.M.; Hoogeveen, F.

    2010-01-01

    Different definitions of quality of life (QOL) are found in the literature. This raised the question which domains are viewed as really important by persons with dementia. In an explorative study the opinions of persons with dementia (community-dwelling and living in nursing homes), were compared to

  1. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and applicability of the Brazilian version of the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Bento Lima-Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Staging scales for dementia have been devised for grading Alzheimer's disease (AD but do not include the specific symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Objective: To translate and adapt the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS to Brazilian Portuguese. Methods: The cross-cultural adaptation process consisted of the following steps: translation, back-translation (prepared by independent translators, discussion with specialists, and development of a final version after minor adjustments. A pilot application was carried out with 12 patients diagnosed with bvFTD and 11 with AD, matched for disease severity (CDR=1.0. The evaluation protocol included: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Executive Interview (EXIT-25, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS and Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR. Results: The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seemed appropriate for use in this country. Preliminary results revealed greater levels of disability in bvFTD than in AD patients (bvFTD: 25% mild, 50% moderate and 25% severe; AD: 36.36% mild, 63.64% moderate. It appears that the CDR underrates disease severity in bvFTD since a relevant proportion of patients rated as having mild dementia (CDR=1.0 in fact had moderate or severe levels of disability according to the FTD-FRS. Conclusion: The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seems suitable to aid staging and determining disease progression.

  2. Screening for AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-29

    Tests to detect serum antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), based on an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses whole disrupted HTLV-III virus antigens, are now commercially available in the US. Recent surveys of groups at high risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have found that 22-65% of homosexual men, 87% of active intravenous drug users, 56-72% of hemophiliacs, and 35% of women who were sexual partners of men with AIDS have had postitive ELISA tests compared with fewer than 1% of those with no known risk factors. A positive ELISA test could be due to subclinical infection, immunity, or cross-reactivity with other viral antigens. Laboratory error can also produce false positive results. Thus, it is recommended that the ELISA test be repeated at least once on all seropositive specimens before the result is reported to the patient. The western blot test appears to be more specific and less sensitive than the ELISA. Studies of asymptomatic seropositive homosexual men followed for 2-5 years have found that over 50% remain asymptomatic, 5-19% develop full blown AIDS, and 25% develop signs suggestive of the AIDS-related complex. Asymptomatic patients with positive ELISA tests should be made aware of early signs and symptoms of AIDS. Other data suggest that seropositive patients have the HTLV-III virus in their blood, semen, and/or saliva and can transmit the infection. Precautions to prevent transmission, such as the use of condoms, should be taken by such patients. Physicians should be sensitive to the fear and anxiety that a positive ELISA test will create.

  3. Mycobacterial Infections in AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ross Hill

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains uniquely important among acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-associated opportunistic infections: it presents the greatest public health hazard worldwide, is the most readily curable, and is largely preventable with existing means. Given the expanding pool of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive persons, particularly in developing nations where Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading health problem, one can expect a continued rise in TB cases during the 1990s. Global efforts to eliminate TB are now inextricably entwined with the effectiveness of measures to curtail the HIV epidemic. Mycobacterium avium complex infection, currently an intractable late complication of aids, may increase in clinical importance as success in managing other opportunistic infections and HIV disease itself improves. Understanding of the pathogenesis and management of mycobacterial diseases should increase rapidly given the renewed research spurred on by the advent of HIV.

  4. Treatment of dementia with neurotransmission modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggrell, Sheila A; Evans, Suzanne

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of dementia is growing in developed countries where elderly patients are increasing in numbers. Neurotransmission modulation is one approach to the treatment of dementia. Cholinergic precursors, anticholinesterases, nicotine receptor agonists and muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonists are agents that enhance cholinergic neurotransmission and that depend on having some intact cholinergic innervation to be effective in the treatment of dementia. The cholinergic precursor choline alfoscerate may be emerging as a potential useful drug in the treatment of dementia, with few adverse effects. Of the anticholinesterases, donepezil, in addition to having a similar efficacy to tacrine in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), appears to have major advantages; its use is associated with lower drop-out rates in clinical trials, a lower incidence of cholinergic-like side effects and no liver toxicity. Rivastigmine is efficacious in the treatment in dementia with Lewy bodies, a condition in which the other anticholinesterases have not been tested extensively to date. Galantamine is an anticholinesterase and also acts as an allosteric potentiating modulator at nicotinic receptors to increase the release of acetylcholine. Pooled data from clinical trials of patients with mild-to-moderate AD suggest that the benefits and safety profile of galantamine are similar to those of the anticholinesterases. Selective nicotine receptor agonists are being developed that enhance cognitive performance without influencing autonomic and skeletal muscle function, but these have not yet entered clinical trial for dementia. Unlike the cholinergic enhancers, the M(1) receptor agonists do not depend upon intact cholinergic nerves but on intact M(1) receptors for their action, which are mainly preserved in AD and dementia with Lewy bodies. The M(1) receptor-selective agonists developed to date have shown limited efficacy in clinical trials and have a high incidence of side effects. A

  5. [Medical services for dementia in the Comprehensive Strategy to Accelerate Dementia Measures (New Orange Plan)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Shuichi

    2016-03-01

    The way to provide medical services for dementia was reviewed in the context of the Comprehensive Strategy to Accelerate Dementia Measures (New Orange Plan). The basic structure of service providing system consists of the primary and secondary care services. Both are expected to function in the context of the community-based integrated care system. Because of regional differences, prefectural government should take measures to make the Medical Center for Dementia function depending on local circumstances. Psychiatric services and general hospitals are expected to provide mental health services and treatment for concurrent medical conditions, respectively. Home medical care is expected to be fundamental services for persons with advanced-stage dementia. In super-aging society, the standard medical service for older persons should be adapted to older persons living with dementia.

  6. Imaging amyloid in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David J

    2009-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease with later dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are pathologically characterized by the presence of intraneuronal Lewy inclusion bodies, amyloid deposition is also associated to varying degrees with both these disorders. Fibrillar amyloid load can now be quantitated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) using imaging biomarkers. Here the reported findings of 11C-PIB PET studies concerning the amyloid load associated with PD and its influence on dementia are reviewed. It is concluded that the presence of amyloid acts to accelerate the dementia process in Lewy body disorders, though has little influence on its nature. Anti-amyloid strategies could be a relevant approach for slowing dementia in a number of DLB and PDD cases.

  7. Delirium and dementia with Lewy bodies: distinct diagnoses or part of the same spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Rachel L; Vardy, Emma R L C; O'Brien, John T

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is recognised as the second most common form of dementia in older people. Delirium is a condition of acute brain dysfunction for which a pre-existing diagnosis of dementia is a risk factor. Conversely delirium is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. The reasons for this bidirectional relationship are not well understood. Our aim was to review possible similarities in the clinical presentation and pathophysiology between delirium and DLB, and explore possible links between these diagnoses. A systematic search using Medline, Embase and Psychinfo was performed. References were scanned for relevant articles, supplemented by articles identified from reference lists and those known to the authors. 94 articles were selected for inclusion in the review. Delirium and DLB share a number of clinical similarities, including global impairment of cognition, fluctuations in attention and perceptual abnormalities. Delirium is a frequent presenting feature of DLB. In terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, cholinergic dysfunction and genetics may provide a common link. Neuroimaging studies suggest a brain vulnerability in delirium which may also occur in dementia. The basal ganglia, which play a key role in DLB, have also been implicated in delirium. The role of Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum biomarkers for both diagnoses is an interesting area although some results are conflicting and further work in this area is needed. Delirium and DLB share a number of features and we hypothesise that delirium may, in some cases, represent early or 'prodromal' DLB. Further research is needed to test the novel hypothesis that delirium may be an early marker for future DLB, which would aid early diagnosis of DLB and identify those at high risk.

  8. [Depression and dementia: perspectives from clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Shoko; Yoshimura, Kimio; Mimura, Masaru

    2012-12-01

    In this review, we present an overview of clinical studies that addressed the relationship between depression and dementia or cognitive decline. Cross-sectional studies and meta-analyses have repeatedly shown an association between late-life depression (LLD) and dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia; however, the findings of cohort studies have been inconsistent. Furthermore, studies on the association between depression with a younger age of onset and dementia have yielded inconsistent results. Regarding cognitive decline associated with LLD, several studies have reported an association between LLD and mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that depression itself can cause persistent cognitive impairment. Other studies have compared the cognitive profile between LLD and depression with a younger age of onset, but their results have been inconclusive, especially regarding the association between memory impairment and the age of onset of depression. LLD is associated with vascular change and white matter degeneration of the brain, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, several studies reported an association between gray matter change and LLD. Studies currently in progress employ functional brain imaging methods such as single-photon emission computed tomography, functional MRI, and positron emission tomography. Clinically, it is important to understand how subtypes of depression can be defined in terms of risk of developing dementia, and to devise effective treatments. One paper explored the possibility of detecting depression associated with AD by measuring the blood Aβ40/Aβ42 levels, and other studies have suggested that symptoms of apathy and loss of interest are associated with conversion of depression to AD. Unfortunately, current antidepressants may have limited efficacy on depression with dementia; therefore, further investigation for devising methods of predicting conversion of depression to dementia and

  9. 类获得性免疫缺陷(阴性HIV)“患者”的流行病学调查%Epidemiological investigation of cases with complained AIDS-related complex (HIV negative)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雅琼; 林辉; 于磊; 王清青; 王太武; 马翔宇; 凌华; 吴国辉; 张路

    2013-01-01

    目的 对社区类获得性免疫缺陷(AIDS)综合征(阴性HIV)“患者”进行病因探索.方法 采用定性系统分析筛检国内外相关综合征报道病例,探索类AIDS综合征“患者”临床特征可能的聚类属性;通过现况调查掌握“患者”人群的一般特征和临床特征.结果 定性系统分析显示,目前在世界范围,与类AIDS综合征(阴性HIV)“患者”相似的疾病有2种,即CD4+T淋巴细胞缺陷综合征(ICL)和非结核分枝杆菌感染(NTM感染);通过174例网络调查和52例现场观察,发现“患者”人群以男性为主,青、中年为主;在国内分布地区广泛;主诉症状涉及呼吸道、消化道、皮肤、肌肉、骨骼和神经系统;根据症状特点,病程有急性期和稳定期之分;群体症状及体征为:淋巴结部位肿胀感、骨痛、肌肉“跳”(痛)、淋巴结节、皮肤结节(皮疹)、舌苔白厚、关节弹响、皮肤干燥;52例“患者”检测发现CD4+T淋巴细胞< 500/μL 17例(32.69%)、CD4/CD8比值异常16例(30.77%)、干扰素-γ抗体阳性17例(36.69%)和PPD阳性39例(++~+++,75.00%);高危险性行为是可疑的暴露因素之一.结论 类AIDS综合征(阴性HIV)“患者”现象不能完全用心理因素予以解释,其呈现的临床特征有明显的一致性和规律性,亟待开展深入研究进行分析.%Objective To investigate the possible causes of AIDS-related complex (HIV negative) in community population. Methods Qualitative systematic analysis was used to screen the cases with AIDS-related complex (HIV negative) that had been reported. The possible clustering types of the clinical features of AIDS-related complex were explored based on a cross-section study that had been conducted to observe the personality and clinical features of the cases with AIDS-related complex. Results The qualitative systematic analysis suggested that the idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia (ICL) and infection of

  10. Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia Sedentary seniors more likely to suffer mental decline, ... Couch potatoes have a higher risk of developing dementia in old age, a new study reports. Seniors ...

  11. Couples constructing their experiences of dementia: A relational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Kimberley; Camic, Paul M; O'Shaughnessy, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Many people with dementia are cared for by their spouse or partner, therefore there is a need to understand the ways in which dementia and couple relationships impact upon each other. This study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the experience of dementia from a relational perspective. Seven couples, in which one person had a diagnosis of dementia, were interviewed about their experience of being in a couple where one partner had a diagnosis of dementia. Using interpretative phenomenological analysis, five master themes were identified, which illustrated how couples constructed their experience of dementia in order to make sense of it, and describe the processes that they adopt in order to adjust to dementia. Findings were supported by existing empirical and theoretical literature and suggest that services and interventions could be enhanced if a relational understanding of dementia were more fully considered.

  12. Core of schizophrenia: estrangement, dementia or neurocognitive disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Erik L; Urfer-Parnas, Annick; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature frequently represents schizophrenia as a deteriorating neurocognitive process similar to organic degenerative dementia. METHODS: This study addresses the following questions: (1) Did the classic authors equate degenerative dementia with schizophrenia? (2) Is ther...

  13. Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163123.html Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia But disorienting condition can ... WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, ...

  14. Busy Minds May Be Better At Fighting Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Busy Minds May Be Better at Fighting Dementia Computer use, crafting, social activities and games all ... aging, even if you're genetically predisposed toward dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports. Activities ...

  15. Gender differences in the prodromal signs of dementia: memory complaint and IADL-restriction. a prospective population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérès, Karine; Helmer, Catherine; Amieva, Hélène; Matharan, Fanny; Carcaillon, Laure; Jacqmin-Gadda, Hélène; Auriacombe, Sophie; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Subjective memory complaint (SMC) and restriction in cognitively-complex activities of daily living (such as instrumental ADL) are two early symptoms observed in the prodromal phase of dementia and may represent useful alarm signals for general practitioners for an increased risk of subsequent dementia. We here studied in a large population-based epidemiological cohort on aging, the risk of dementia associated with SMC and restriction in IADL, with a specific interest in a potential interaction by gender. The sample included 2,901 subjects, aged 65 years and over, initially free of dementia and followed over 15 years. After controlling for education, marital status, depressive symptomatology, and global cognition (MMSE), IADL-restriction was associated with an increased risk of dementia only in men (HR = 2.04, 1.27 to 3.29), whereas SMC was not (p = 0.95). The reverse was observed in females, in whom SMC almost doubled the risk of dementia (1.48 to 2.41), with no association with IADL-restriction (p = 0.74). Finally, we distinguished the risk of dementia at short-term (in the first 5 years), mid-term (between 5 and 10 years), and long-term (between 10 and 15 years). In women, SMC was significantly associated with greater risk of dementia whatever the risk period considered, even at longer term (HR = 1.61, p = 0.0216), whereas in men the increased risk was also observed with IADL-restriction and only in the first 5 years. To conclude, women would report the first symptoms very early in the process by SMC, whereas men would tend to later report their difficulties and only in terms of IADL-restriction.

  16. Care pathways for dementia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsi K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kritika Samsi, Jill ManthorpeSocial Care Workforce Research Unit, King’s College London, London, UKAbstract: Uncertainty appears to typify the experience of living with dementia. With an uncertain illness trajectory and unpredictable levels of deterioration and stability in symptoms, people with a diagnosis of dementia may live with uncertainty and anxiety and find it hard to make plans or decisions for their future. People with memory problems and caregivers seeking a diagnosis of dementia may also potentially find themselves navigating a labyrinth-like maze of services, practitioners, assessments, and memory tests, with limited understanding of test scores and little information about what support is available. In this context of uncertainty, the apparent clarity and certainty of a “dementia care pathway” may be attractive. However, the term “dementia care pathway” has multiple and overlapping meanings, which can potentially give rise to further confusion if these are ill-defined or a false consensus is presumed. This review distinguishes four meanings: 1 a mechanism for the management and containment of uncertainty and confusion, useful for the professional as well as the person with dementia; 2 a manual for sequencing care activities; 3 a guide to consumers, indicating eligibility for care activities, or a guide to self-management for dementia dyads, indicating the appropriateness of care activities; and 4 a manual for “walking with” the person. Examples of these approaches are presented from UK dementia services with illustrations of existing care pathways and associated time points, specifically focusing on: 1 early symptom identification and first service encounters, 2 assessment process, 3 diagnostic disclosure, 4 postdiagnostic support, and 5 appropriate interventions. We review the evidence around these themes, as well as discuss service pathways and referral routes used by some services in England and internationally. We

  17. Time trend in diagnosing dementia in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Waltoft, Berit Lindum; Kessing, Lars Vedel;

    2010-01-01

    To study the trend of diagnosing dementia in the secondary health care sector over time, we conducted a nationwide longitudinal study of the incidence and prevalence of registered dementia diagnoses in the Danish national hospital registers.......To study the trend of diagnosing dementia in the secondary health care sector over time, we conducted a nationwide longitudinal study of the incidence and prevalence of registered dementia diagnoses in the Danish national hospital registers....

  18. Assessment of nicotine dependence in subjects with vascular dementia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nicotine Dependence is an important public health issue. Nicotine Dependence is a risk factor for vascular diseases like Myocardial Infarction and Vascular dementia. The rate of nicotine dependence in Indian subjects with Vascular Dementia is not known. Hence we decided to assess Nicotine Dependence in subjects with Vascular Dementia Methods: Nicotine Dependence in subjects with Vascular Dementia was assessed among subjects presenting to Memory Clinic of a tertiary car...

  19. Systematic review of information and support interventions for caregivers of people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birks Yvonne

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dementia is an important health and social care problem and is one of the main causes of disability in later life. The number of families affected by dementia will dramatically increase over the next five decades. Despite the implications for health and social care services in the future, the overwhelming majority of care for people with dementia takes place away from health care settings. Providing informal care for someone with dementia can be psychologically, physically and financially expensive and a range of health service interventions aimed at supporting and providing information to these carers has developed to help carers meet these demands. This review examines whether information and support interventions improve the quality of life of people caring for someone with dementia. Methods A systematic review examining evidence from randomised controlled trials in which technology, individualised or group-based interventions built around the provision of support and/or information were evaluated. Results Forty-four studies were included in the review. Controlling for the quality of the evidence, we found statistically significant evidence that group-based supportive interventions impact positively on psychological morbidity. However, whilst the improvement was unlikely to be due to chance, the clinical significance of this finding should be interpreted tentatively, due to the difficulties in interpreting the standardised mean difference as a measure of effect and the complex aetiology of depression. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of any other form of intervention on a range of physical and psychological health outcomes. Conclusion There is little evidence that interventions aimed at supporting and/or providing information to carers of people with dementia are uniformly effective. There is a pressing need to ensure that supportive interventions at the development stage are accompanied by good quality

  20. AIDS.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concerns. Search Services Share This Help National HIV/AIDS Strategy Check out NHAS's latest progress in the ... from AIDS.gov Read more AIDS.gov tweets AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  1. Aids for Handicapped Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Div. for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The reference circular provides information on approximately 50 reading and writing aids intended for physically or visually handicapped individuals. Described are low vision aids, aids for holding a book or turning pages, aids for reading in bed, handwriting aids, typewriters and accessories, braille writing equipment, sound reproducers, and aids…

  2. AIDS and Africa. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Loretta M; van Niekerk, Anton A

    2002-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and in this issue of the Journal, seven authors discuss the moral, social and medical implications of having 70% of those stricken living in this area. Anton A. van Niekerk considers complexities of plague in this region (poverty, denial, poor leadership, illiteracy, women's vulnerability, and disenchantment of intimacy) and the importance of finding responses that empower its people. Solomon Benatar reinforces these issues, but also discusses the role of global politics in sub-Saharan Africa, especially discrimination, imperialism and its exploitation by first world countries. Given the public health crisis, Udo Schüklenk and Richard E. Ashcroft defend compulsory licensing of essential HIV/AIDS medications on consequentialist grounds. Keymanthri Moodley discusses the importance of conducting research and the need to understand a moderate form of communitarianism, also referred to as "ubuntu" or "communalism", to help some Africans understand research as an altruistic endeavour. Godfrey B. Tangwa also defends traditional African values of empathy and ubuntu, discussing how they should be enlisted to fight this pandemic. Loretta M. Kopelman criticizes the tendency among those outside Africa to dismiss the HIV/AIDS pandemic, attributing one source to the ubiquitous and misguided punishment theory of disease. The authors conclude that good solutions must be cooperative ventures among countries within and outside of sub-Saharan Africa with far more support from wealthy countries.

  3. Prevalence of very mild to severe dementia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Lolk, A; Nielsen, H;

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia has been estimated in several countries and a meta-analysis has shown moderate and severe dementia in people aged 65 years and older to be between 4% and 6%. The Odense study is aiming to estimate the prevalence and incidence of dementia and to identify risk factors....

  4. Depression in dementia: development and testing of a nursing guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.

    2009-01-01

    Guideline for pleasure in dementia care Depression in nursing home residents with dementia can be decreased by the introduction of a nursing guideline. This is the main conclusion of the PhD thesis on depression in dementia that was presented by researcher Renate Verkaik on April 20th at the Utrech

  5. Advanced MR Neuroimaging in Early Stage Presenile Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractDementia is a syndrome affecting cognitive functions and behavior, with an overwhelming impact on both patients and caregivers. An estimated number of 35.6 million patients suffers from dementia, with a subset affected before the age of 65 years, i.e. presenile dementia. Establishing

  6. Expanding Expectations for Narrative Styles in the Context of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendouzi, Jackie; Davis, Boyd H.; Maclagan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This article uses discourse analyses to examine the narrative styles produced by 2 women with a diagnosis of dementia. Because of constrained cognitive resources, people with dementia (PWD) often use alternative strategies to weave their stories into conversations. People with dementia have difficulty in initiating and maintaining a canonical…

  7. Genetics Home Reference: CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description CHMP2B -related frontotemporal dementia is a progressive brain disorder that affects personality, ...

  8. Macroeconomic Issues in Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter; Laursen, Jytte; White, Howard

    foreign aid, macroeconomics of aid, gap models, aid fungibility, fiscal response models, foreign debt,......foreign aid, macroeconomics of aid, gap models, aid fungibility, fiscal response models, foreign debt,...

  9. Prediction of dementia by hippocampal shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of predicting future onset of dementia in subjects who are cognitively normal, using hippocampal shape and volume information extracted from MRI scans. A group of 47 subjects who were non-demented normal at the time of the MRI acquisition, but were diagnosed...... and, if necessary, manually corrected by a trained observer. From this data a statistical model of hippocampal shape was constructed, using an entropy-based particle system. This shape model provided the input for a Support Vector Machine classifier to predict dementia. Cross validation experiments...... showed that shape information can predict future onset of dementia in this dataset with an accuracy of 70%. By incorporating both shape and volume information into the classifier, the accuracy increased to 74%....

  10. Hospital-diagnosed dementia and suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to examine the risk of suicide in persons diagnosed with dementia during a hospitalization and its relationship to mood disorders. DESIGN: Event-history analysis using time-varying covariates. SETTING: Population-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals...... aged 50+ living in Denmark (N=2,474,767) during January 1, 1990 through December 31, 2000. MEASUREMENTS: Outcome of interest is suicide. Relative risks are calculated based on person-days spent in each stratum. RESULTS: A total of 18,648,875 person-years were observed during the 11-year study period....... During this period, 136 persons who previously had been diagnosed with dementia died by suicide. Men and women aged 50-69 years with hospital presentations of dementia have a relative suicide risk of 8.5 (95% confidence interval: 6.3-11.3) and 10.8 (95% confidence interval: 7.4-15.7), respectively. Those...

  11. [Disruptive sexual behaviour among patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, C; Abderhalden, C

    2012-10-01

    In addition to diagnostically decisive cognitive problems, behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) are frequent among people with dementia, including sexually related behavioural problems. This paper provides an overview on the state of knowledge about these problems. Research on this topic is hampered by the absence of unanimous definitions, aetiological classifications, and diagnostic instruments. The wide range of prevalence rates reported (1.8 - 18 %) originate from the heterogenity of study samples as well as in the variety of definitions and instruments employed. Regarding aetiology, dysfunctions in various cortical regions are being discussed. Sexually related behavioural problems are more prevalent in men and among patients with vascular, frontotemporal and Parkinson-associated forms of dementia, as compared with dementias of the Alzheimer type. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment strategies published to date have not been sufficiently studied.

  12. [Montessori method applied to dementia - literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Daniela Filipa Soares; Martín, José Ignacio

    2012-06-01

    The Montessori method was initially applied to children, but now it has also been applied to people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the research on the effectiveness of this method using Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) with the keywords dementia and Montessori method. We selected lo studies, in which there were significant improvements in participation and constructive engagement, and reduction of negative affects and passive engagement. Nevertheless, systematic reviews about this non-pharmacological intervention in dementia rate this method as weak in terms of effectiveness. This apparent discrepancy can be explained because the Montessori method may have, in fact, a small influence on dimensions such as behavioral problems, or because there is no research about this method with high levels of control, such as the presence of several control groups or a double-blind study.

  13. Crawling Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential developed a device known as the Vehicle for Initial Crawling (VIC); the acronym is a tribute to the crawler's inventor, Hubert "Vic" Vykukal; is an effective crawling aid. The VIC is used by brain injured children who are unable to crawl due to the problems of weight-bearing and friction, caused by gravity. It is a rounded plywood frame large enough to support the child's torso, leaving arms and legs free to move. On its underside are three aluminum discs through which air is pumped to create an air-bearing surface that has less friction than a film of oil. Upper side contains the connection to the air supply and a pair of straps which restrain the child and cause the device to move with him. VIC is used with the intent to recreate the normal neurological connection between brain and muscles. Over repetitive use of the device the child develops his arm and leg muscles as well as coordination. Children are given alternating therapy, with and without the VIC until eventually the device is no longer needed.

  14. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura E; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L; Mahoney, Colin J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly.

  15. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  16. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  17. The role of phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Perry, Elaine

    2011-06-01

    constituents, that have shown relevant mechanistic effects for dementia and promising clinical data, but require more evidence for their clinical efficacy and safety. Such plants include Ginkgo biloba, which has been extensively studied in numerous clinical trials, with most outcomes showing positive effects on cognitive functions in dementia patients; however, more reliable and consistent clinical data are needed to confirm efficacy. Other plants and their extracts that have produced promising clinical data in dementia patients, with respect to cognition, include saffron (Crocus sativus), ginseng (Panax species), sage (Salvia species) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), although more extensive and reliable clinical data are required. Other plants that are used in traditional practices of medicine have been suggested to improve cognitive functions (e.g. Polygala tenuifolia) or have been associated with alleviation of BPSD (e.g. the traditional prescription yokukansan); such remedies are often prescribed as complex mixtures of different plants, which complicates interpretation of pharmacological and clinical data and introduces additional challenges for quality control. Evidence for the role of natural products in disease prevention, the primary but considerably challenging aim with respect to dementia, is limited, but the available epidemiological and clinical evidence is discussed, with most studies focused on ChEIs, nicotine (from Nicotiana species), curcumin, wine polyphenols such as resveratrol and G. biloba. Challenges for the development of phytochemicals as drugs and for quality control of standardized plant extracts are also considered.

  18. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  19. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  20. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difficulty breathing - first aid; Dyspnea - first aid; Shortness of breath - first aid ... Breathing difficulty is almost always a medical emergency. An exception is feeling slightly winded from normal activity, ...

  1. Everyday meal preparation for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine Friis; Nejsum, Hanne Lindberg; Bendtsen, Trine Vase

    2016-01-01

    in everyday life. Furthermore getting the appropriate and nutritious food will be a step in the right direction regarding prevention of malnutrition. The aim of this project is to develop a guide to increase the possibility for people with dementia to continue everyday life through participating in meal...... and/or refining their actions as they are the experts in their own life. Therefore, we have cooperated with people with dementia and professionals in several public settings in Jutland, Denmark, during the development and during tests of the guide. The guide can be used in professional settings...

  2. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    to analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi......In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...

  3. Research progress of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua GU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no epidemiological data of frontotemporal dementia (FTD in China. The application of updated diagnostic criteria, publishing of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD consensus in China, development of multimodal imaging and biomarkers promote the clinical understanding on behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD. There is still no drugs treating FTD approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Multidisciplinary intervention may delay the progression of bvFTD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.07.006

  4. Health, social and economic consequences of dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm-Falkenberg, S; Ibsen, R; Kjellberg, J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dementia causes morbidity, disability and mortality, and as the population ages the societal burden will grow. The direct health costs and indirect costs of lost productivity and social welfare of dementia were estimated compared with matched controls in a national register......, gender, geographical area and civil status. Direct health costs included primary and secondary sector contacts, medical procedures and medication. Indirect costs included the effect on labor supply. All cost data were extracted from national databases. The entire cohort was followed for the entire period...

  5. The forgotten: dementia and the aging LGBT community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Justine

    2014-01-01

    Although research documenting the experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT) aging in general is gaining traction, and literature on dementia continues to proliferate, few articles attend to how dementia affects members of the aging LGBT community. This article reviews the current state of knowledge on the experience of dementia for LGBT older adults, and suggests areas for further research. In addition, it aims to promote social work's engagement with related disciplines and global dementia care. The article's ultimate goal is to encourage development of care practices tailored to the experiences, expectations and needs of older LGBT individuals affected by dementia.

  6. Electroencephalography Is a Good Complement to Currently Established Dementia Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Jelic, Vesna; Cavallin, Lena;

    2016-01-01

    , 135 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 15 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease with dementia (DLB/PDD), 32 other dementias]. The EEG data were recorded in a standardized way. Structural imaging data were visually rated using scales of atrophy in the medial temporal, frontal, and posterior cortex......EEG to the diagnostic workup substantially increases the detection of AD pathology even in pre-dementia stages and improves differential diagnosis. EEG could serve as a good complement to currently established dementia biomarkers since it is cheap, noninvasive, and extensively applied outside academic centers....

  7. The development of the dementia concept in 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dementia concept has been reformulated through its history and the 19th century was remarkable in the construction of this concept as we understand it today. Like other syndromes, much of the history of the dementia concept comes from the attempt to separate it from other nosological conditions, giving it a unique identity. The fundamental elements for the arising of the dementia modern concept were: a correlation of the observed syndrome with organic-cerebral lesions; b understanding of the irreversibility of the dementia evolution; c its relation with human ageing; and d the choice of the cognitive dysfunction as a clinical marker of the dementia concept.

  8. Diagnostic evaluation of dementia in the secondary health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Kessing, Lars Vedel;

    2009-01-01

    to clinical guidelines concerning dementia work-up is inadequate in the secondary health care sector. Our findings call for improvement in the organization of clinical dementia care, for education of specialists and for changes in attitude towards making a diagnosis of dementia.......BACKGROUND: We conducted a nationwide registry-based study of the quality of diagnostic evaluation for dementia in the secondary health care sector. METHOD: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from the patient population (4,682 patients) registered for the first time with a dementia...

  9. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC isolated from AIDS patients and the criteria required for its implication in disease Complexo Mycobacterium avium (MAC isolado de pacientes com AIDS e os critérios exigidos para sua implicação em doença

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jamil Hadad

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Before the AIDS pandemia, the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC was responsible in most cases for the pneumopathies that attack patients with basic chronic pulmonary diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis36. In 1981, with the advent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, MAC started to represent one of the most frequent bacterial diseases among AIDS patients, with the disseminated form of the disease being the major clinical manifestation of the infection8. Between January 1989 and February 1991, the Section of Mycobacteria of the Adolfo Lutz Institute, São Paulo, isolated MAC from 103 patients by culturing different sterile and no-sterile processed specimens collected from 2304 patients seen at the AIDS Reference and Training Center and/or Emilio Ribas Infectology Institute. Disseminated disease was diagnosed in 29 of those patients on the basis of MAC isolation from blood and/or bone marrow aspirate. The other 74 patients were divided into categories highly (5, moderately (26 and little suggestive of disease (43 according to the criteria of DAVIDSON (198910. The various criteria for MAC isolation from sterile and non-sterile specimens are discussed.Anterior a pandemia de AIDS, o Complexo Mycobacterium avium (MAC era responsável pela maioria das vezes, por pneumopatias acometendo pacientes com doença pulmonar crônica de base como enfisema e bronquite crônica36. Em 1981, com o advento da síndrome de imunodeficiência adquirida (SIDA, o MAC passou a representar uma das doenças bacterianas mais frequentes em pacientes com esta síndrome, sendo a doença disseminada a principal forma de manifestação clínica da infecção8. Entre Janeiro de 1989 e Fevereiro de 1991, no Setor de Micobactérias do Instituto Adolfo Lutz em São Paulo, o MAC foi isolado de 103 pacientes a partir do cultivo de diferentes espécimes estéreis e não estéreis processados, coletados de 2.304 pacientes atendidos no Centro de Referência e

  10. Preferred computer activities among individuals with dementia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Sunghee H; Zhang, Hongmei; Hong, Song Hee

    2015-03-01

    Computers offer new activities that are easily accessible, cognitively stimulating, and enjoyable for individuals with dementia. The current descriptive study examined preferred computer activities among nursing home residents with different severity levels of dementia. A secondary data analysis was conducted using activity observation logs from 15 study participants with dementia (severe = 115 logs, moderate = 234 logs, and mild = 124 logs) who participated in a computer activity program. Significant differences existed in preferred computer activities among groups with different severity levels of dementia. Participants with severe dementia spent significantly more time watching slide shows with music than those with both mild and moderate dementia (F [2,12] = 9.72, p = 0.003). Preference in playing games also differed significantly across the three groups. It is critical to consider individuals' interests and functional abilities when computer activities are provided for individuals with dementia. A practice guideline for tailoring computer activities is detailed.

  11. Barriers to qualitative dementia research: the elephant in the room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, John; Traynor, Victoria; Marchetti, Elena

    2015-07-01

    As our population is aging, the global prevalence of dementia is rising. Recent extensive reviews of the dementia literature highlight a clear need for additional qualitative research to address the experiences of people with dementia and their carers. To date, the vast majority of published dementia research is quantitative in nature and, perhaps not surprisingly, attracts the bulk of government funding. In contrast, qualitative dementia research is poorly resourced and less frequently published. Although a myriad of factors are responsible for this dichotomy, we propose that inadequate funding represents the "elephant in the room" of dementia research. In this article, we describe and emphasize the need for qualitative dementia research, highlight existing barriers, and outline potential solutions. Examples of barriers are provided and theoretical underpinnings are proposed.

  12. The importance of music for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Orrell, Martin; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the popularity of music-based interventions in dementia care, there is a limited knowledge of how and why people with dementia find music beneficial for their well-being. A qualitative study was conducted to develop further insights into the musical experiences of people...... with dementia and explore the meaning of music in their lives.Method: Separate focus groups and interviews with (1) care home residents with dementia and their families, (2) day hospital clients with dementia, (3) care home staff, and (4) music therapists, were conducted. The findings of the thematic analysis...... were investigated further in the light of psychosocial factors with the aim of developing a theoretical model on music in dementia.Results: Six key themes were identified. The accessibility of music for people at all stages of dementia, close links between music, personal identity and life events...

  13. Validity of dementia diagnoses in the danish hospital registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.B.; Phung, T.K.T.; Høgh, P.;

    2007-01-01

    Background:The validity of dementia diagnoses in the Danish nationwide hospital registers was evaluated to determine the value of these registers in epidemiological research about dementia. Methods: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from 4,682 patients registered for the first time...... with a dementia diagnosis in the last 6 months of 2003. The patients' medical journals were reviewed to evaluate if they fulfilled ICD-10 and/or DSM-IV criteria for dementia and specific dementia subtypes. The patients who were still alive in 2006 were invited to an interview. Results: One hundred and ninety......-seven journals were available for review and 51 patients were interviewed. A registered diagnosis of dementia was found to be correct in 169 (85.8%) cases. Regarding dementia subtypes, the degree of agreement between the registers and the results of the validating process was low with a kappa of 0.36 (95% CI 0...

  14. Raman spectroscopy of blood serum for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: specificity relative to other types of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikova, Elena; Kazakov, Oleksandr; Halamkova, Lenka; Celmins, Dzintra; Malone, Paula; Molho, Eric; Zimmerman, Earl A; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-07-01

    The key moment for efficiently and accurately diagnosing dementia occurs during the early stages. This is particularly true for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this proof-of-concept study, we applied near infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy of blood serum together with advanced multivariate statistics for the selective identification of AD. We analyzed data from 20 AD patients, 18 patients with other neurodegenerative dementias (OD) and 10 healthy control (HC) subjects. NIR Raman microspectroscopy differentiated patients with more than 95% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrated the high discriminative power of artificial neural network (ANN) classification models, thus revealing the high potential of this developed methodology for the differential diagnosis of AD. Raman spectroscopic, blood-based tests may aid clinical assessments for the effective and accurate differential diagnosis of AD, decrease the labor, time and cost of diagnosis, and be useful for screening patient populations for AD development and progression. Multivariate data analysis of blood serum Raman spectra allows for the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer's disease, other types of dementia and healthy individuals.

  15. Forget Me Not: Dementia in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschi, Tina; Kwak, Jung; Ko, Eunjeong; Morrissey, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    The number of older adults with dementia in U.S. prisons is rapidly rising. Yet, the vast majority of this marginalized subgroup of the aging population is left neglected behind bars without access to adequate medical and mental health care services. We assert that proactive, interdisciplinary collaborative efforts to improve practice, policy, and…

  16. Neurochemistry of dementia: establishing the links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, P J; Gambetti, P; Harik, S I; Kalaria, R N; Perry, G; Younkin, S I; Tabaton, M; Unnerstall, J R

    1989-01-01

    Neurochemical research in dementia needs to move beyond descriptive inventories of neurotransmitter systems affected in the specific disorders and to link to molecular studies of mechanism and clinical studies of cognition. New advances in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Huntington's Disease (HD), and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are being guided by models of how nerve cells die in these disorders. Theories of pathophysiology which address the cellular level need to explain the selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the different diseases. Clinically, the importance of neurochemical studies will be increased by understanding the bridges between neural and cognitive processes. Clinicians are concerned about the nosology of dementias, diagnostic tests, and more effective therapies. The value of neurochemical studies will be enhanced to the extent that they can contribute to understanding and modifying the clinical phenomenology of these disorders. In this paper, we will briefly review what is known about the neurochemistry of dementia but focus most of our attention on establishing the linkage between this level of description and the levels of description which are either "downstream" (molecular biology) or "upstream" (cognition) in terms of a reductionistic conception of understanding the disease process. We will explore how understanding neurochemistry relates to our understanding of disease mechanism and what constraints neurochemical studies place on understanding clinical aspects of disease. We will conclude by briefly discussing some of the problems with our current understanding of the neurochemistry of dementia and how we can address those problems in the future.

  17. Dementia: The Experience of Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Barbara; Spencer, Beth

    1986-01-01

    Caregivers of family members with dementia of the Alzheimer's type were surveyed for their experiences with early symptoms, obtaining a diagnosis, home care, and institutionalization. At each stage in the process of providing care there are new and different stresses that can be ameliorated by appropriate professional assistance. (Author)

  18. Nonliteral language in Alzheimer dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Alexander M; Wild, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    The use of nonliteral language in clinical assessment, especially testing the patients' ability to interpret proverbs, has a long tradition in psychiatry. However, its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in dementias is not yet clear. The aim of this review article is to examine the current evidence on nonliteral/figurative language (proverb, metaphor, metonymy, idiom, irony, sarcasm) comprehension in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. A comprehensive literature search identified 25 studies (16 proverb, 3 metaphor, 0 metonymy, 5 idiom, 3 sarcasm) on nonliteral language comprehension in dementia. Studies predominantly indicate a deficit. Most studies investigated Alzheimer's dementia. Applied correctly, nonliteral language is a worthwhile diagnostic tool to evaluate language and abstract thinking in dementias. During assessment, familiarity testing (e.g., by asking "are you familiar with the proverb XY") is obligatory. Still, future research is needed in several areas: evidence on decline of nonliteral language over the course of the illness is limited. So far, almost no studies delineated proverb comprehension in high risk populations such as patients with mild cognitive impairment. Currently, there is a lack of studies addressing performance in direct comparison to relevant differential diagnosis like older-age depression, delirium, brain lesion, or other psychiatric conditions.

  19. Dementia and assisted suicide and euthanasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.D. de Beaufort (Inez); S. van de Vathorst (Suzanne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAbstract : The number of dementia patients requesting euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased over the past five years. The issue is highly controversial. In this contribution we discuss some of the main arguments: the nature of suffering, the voluntariness of the request and the rol

  20. Frontotemporal Dementia: clinical, genetic, and pathological heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Seelaar (Harro)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe current clinical syndrome frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was first described in 1892 by the Czech psychiatrist Arnold Pick. He described a patient with aphasia and behavioural changes with on macroscopic examination marked left frontotemporal atrophy. In 1911, Alois Alzheimer describe

  1. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...

  2. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, A.M.; Uden, I.W.M. van; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Lawrence, A.; Holst, H. van der; Norden, A.G.W. van; Laat, K.F. de; Dijk, E.J. van; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Markus, H.S.; Norris, D.G.; Leeuw, H.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen Dif

  3. [Quality of life in dementia: definitions, difficulties and interest of evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabire, Jean-Bernard; Gay, Marie-Claire

    2013-03-01

    The concept of quality of life appears to be easy to understand but, actually, is very complex when it comes to define it. Several notions are synonymous and often used indiscriminately such as happiness, life satisfaction and well-being. However, quality of life is dependant on several factors that, according to their presence or their absence, can change its perceptions and evaluation. Besides the difficulties of definition, methodological difficulties are added for its evaluation: how to measure a multi-factor concept whose definition is complex and non-consensual? What about its assessment in the elderly? Are the difficulties of definition and evaluation the same in studies involving elderly dementia patients? Starting from the historical context of quality of life we particularly discuss its definition and assessment in elderly patients with dementia.

  4. [Psychiatric manifestations in dementia: phenomenologic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, I

    1993-12-01

    The study of psychiatric manifestations in dementia has long been overshadowed by the more classical manifestations of the disease, such as memory loss and other cognitive deficits. In recent years, however, psychiatric symptoms as part of the demential process have attracted interest and research has become more specific. Clinicians are faced with diagnostic, treatment and management difficulties related to affective or psychotic symptoms, which account for much distress and morbidity. Several studies indicate that the prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in clinical populations of patients suffering from dementia is high: 15% to 30% for hallucinations, 15% to 30% for delusions, ten percent to 20% for major depression and 40% to 50% for depressed mood. These figures tend to confirm the hypothesis that psychiatric features in dementia are neither infrequent nor atypical. Thus, researchers have sought to link psychotic or depressive symptomatology with several clinical characteristics of dementia, namely stage, severity, prognosis or cognitive dysfunction. Some recent studies involving extensive neuropsychological evaluations indicate that subgroups of patients can be defined according to psychiatric criteria, as well as cognitive or neurological criteria. Unfortunately, results are inconsistent. Some of the contradictions in the literature are related to poorly defined terms and symptoms, a lack of reliable operational criteria, absence of validation of instruments and scales and heterogeneity of the populations studied. Ambiguous syndromes, such as pseudodementia, while illustrative of certain clinical situations, have not been helpful in categorizing demented patients. The author suggests that research focused on specific and clearly defined psychiatric symptoms in dementia will better serve our comprehension of mixed syndromes.

  5. Antihypertensive treatments, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hypertension is associated with an increased risk of both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this context, the role of anti-hypertensive therapy for the prevention and delay of cognitive decline and dementia is of central importance. Most longitudinal studies have shown a significant inverse association between anti-hypertensive therapies and dementia incidence and for some of these, particularly in AD. Seven randomized, double blind placebo-controlled trials have evaluated the benefit of antihypertensive treatments on cognition. Three of them found positive results in term of prevention of dementia (SYST-EUR) or cognitive decline (PROGRESS, HOPE). Others disclosed non-significant results (MRC, SHEP, SCOPE, HYVET-COG). This discrepancy emphasizes the difficulty to perform such trials: the follow-up has to be long enough to disclose a benefit, a large number of patients is needed for these studies, and because of ethical reasons some anti-hypertensive treatments are often prescribed in the placebo group. Results of the two more recent meta-analyses are inconsistent, possibly due to methodological issues. Antihypertensive treatments could be beneficial to cognitive function by lowering blood pressure and/or by specific neuroprotective effect. Three main antihypertensive subclasses have been associated with a beneficial effect on cognitive function beyond blood pressure reduction (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin-AT1-receptor-blockers). Further long-term randomized trials, designed especially to assess a link between antihypertensive therapy and cognitive decline or dementia are therefore needed with cognition as the primary outcome. A low blood pressure threshold that could be deleterious for cognitive function should also be determined.

  6. Home Health Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specifications Help to keep clients engaged in their social networks and communities Home health aides, unlike personal care aides , typically work ... self-care and everyday tasks. They also provide social supports and assistance that enable clients to participate in their ... more information about home health aides, including voluntary credentials for aides, visit ...

  7. Economic Impact of Dementia by Disease Severity: Exploring the Relationship between Stage of Dementia and Cost of Care in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jung Elizabeth Ku

    Full Text Available Given the shortage of cost-of-illness studies in dementia outside of the Western population, the current study estimated the annual cost of dementia in Taiwan and assessed whether different categories of care costs vary by severity using multiple disease-severity measures.This study included 231 dementia patient-caregiver dyads in a dementia clinic at a national university hospital in southern Taiwan. Three disease measures including cognitive, functional, and behavioral disturbances were obtained from patients based on medical history. A societal perspective was used to estimate the total costs of dementia according to three cost sub-categories. The association between dementia severity and cost of care was examined through bivariate and multivariate analyses.Total costs of care for moderate dementia patient were 1.4 times the costs for mild dementia and doubled from mild to severe dementia among our community-dwelling dementia sample. Multivariate analysis indicated that functional declines had a greater impact on all cost outcomes as compared to behavioral disturbance, which showed no impact on any costs. Informal care costs accounted for the greatest share in total cost of care for both mild (42% and severe (43% dementia patients.Since the total costs of dementia increased with severity, providing care to delay disease progression, with a focus on maintaining patient physical function, may reduce the overall cost of dementia. The greater contribution of informal care to total costs as opposed to social care also suggests a need for more publicly-funded long-term care services to assist family caregivers of dementia patients in Taiwan.

  8. Multiplex analyte assays to characterize different dementias: brain inflammatory cytokines in poststroke and other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqing; Oakley, Arthur E; Monteiro, Maria; Tuomela, Katri; Allan, Louise M; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B; O'Brien, John T; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-02-01

    Both the inflammatory potential and cognitive function decline during aging. The association between the repertoire of inflammatory biomarkers and cognitive decline is unclear. Inflammatory cytokines have been reported to be increased, decreased, or unchanged in the cerebrospinal fluid and sera of subjects with dementia. We assessed 112 postmortem brains from subjects diagnosed with poststroke dementia (PSD), vascular dementia, mixed dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), comparing those to poststroke nondemented (PSND) subjects and age-matched controls. We analyzed 5 brain regions including the gray and white matter from the frontal and temporal lobes for a panel of cytokine and/or chemokine analytes using multiplex-array assays. Of the 37 analytes, 14 were under or near the detection limits, 7 were close to the lowest detection level, and 16 cytokines were within the linear range of the assay. We observed widely variable concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A at the high end (1-150 ng/mg protein), whereas several of the interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor) at the low end (1-10 pg/mg). There were also regional variations; most notable being high concentrations of some cytokines (e.g., CRP and angiogenesis panel) in the frontal white matter. Overall, we found decreased concentrations of several cytokines, including IL-1 beta (p = 0.000), IL-6 (p = 0.000), IL-7 (p = 0.000), IL-8 (p = 0.000), IL-16 (p = 0.001), interferon-inducible protein-10 (0.044), serum amyloid A (p = 0.011), and a trend in IL-1 alpha (p = 0.084) across all dementia groups compared to nondemented controls. IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly lower in dementia subjects than in nondemented subjects in every region. In particular, lower levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were notable in the PSD compared to PSND subjects. Because these 2 stroke groups had comparable degree of vascular pathology, the lower production of IL-6 and IL-8 in PSD reaffirms a

  9. Pain in dementia: prevalence and associated factors: protocol of a multidisciplinary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Kooten; S. Delwel; T.T. Binnekade; M. Smalbrugge; J.C. van der Wouden; R.S.G.M. Perez; D. Rhebergen; W.W.A. Zuurmond; M.L. Stek; F. Lobbezoo; C.M.P.M. Hertogh; E.J.A. Scherder

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain is a common problem in people with dementia, however the exact prevalence of pain in dementia subtypes, e.g. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), is unknown, as is the relation between pain and the diffe

  10. Creating space for citizenship: The impact of group structure on validating the voices of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Elaine C; O'Connor, Deborah L; Loiselle, Lisa; Hickman, Kathy; Heibein, Bill; Hounam, Brenda; Mann, Jim

    2016-05-01

    Recently, there has been increasing attention given to finding ways to help people diagnosed with dementia 'live well' with their condition. Frequently however, the attention has been placed on the family care partner as the foundation for creating a context that supports the person with dementia to live well. A recent participatory action research (PAR) study highlighted the importance of beginning to challenge some of the assumptions around how best to include family, especially within a context of supporting citizenship. Three advisory groups consisting of 20 people with dementia, 13 care partners, and three service providers, were set up in three locations across Canada to help develop a self-management program for people with dementia. The hubs met monthly for up to two years. One of the topics that emerged as extremely important to consider in the structuring of the program revolved around whether or not these groups should be segregated to include only people with dementia. A thematic analysis of these ongoing discussions coalesced around four inter-related themes: creating safe spaces; maintaining voice and being heard; managing the balancing act; and the importance of solidarity Underpinning these discussions was the fifth theme, recognition that 'one size doesn't fit all'. Overall an important finding was that the presence of family care-partners could have unintended consequences in relation to creating the space for active citizenship to occur in small groups of people with dementia although it could also offer some opportunities. The involvement of care partners in groups with people with dementia is clearly one that is complex without an obvious answer and dependent on a variety of factors to inform a solution, which can and should be questioned and revisited.

  11. Aid and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    Foreign aid looms large in the public discourse; and international development assistance remains squarely on most policy agendas concerned with growth, poverty and inequality in Africa and elsewhere in the developing world. The present review takes a retrospective look at how foreign aid has...... evolved since World War II in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. I review the aid process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of aid and categorize some of the key goals, principles and institutions of the aid system. The evidence on whether aid has...... for aid in the future...

  12. Types of Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    Foreign aid is given for many purposes and different intentions, yet most studies treat aid flows as a unitary concept. This paper uses factor analysis to separate aid flows into different types. The main types can be interpreted as aid for economic purposes, social purposes, and reconstruction......; a residual category captures remaining purposes. Estimating the growth effects of separable types of aid suggests that most aid has no effects while reconstruction aid has direct positive effects. Although this type only applies in special circumstances, it has become more prevalent in more recent years....

  13. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  15. Trends in the Prevalence of Dementia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko H. Dodge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data regarding trends in dementia and its subtype prevalence in Japan. Our aims in the current paper are to: (1 summarize epidemiological studies of dementia in Japan including relevant details of study protocol and diagnostic criteria, (2 compare the age-specific prevalence of all-cause dementia among studies, and (3 assess the trends in Alzheimer's disease (AD versus vascular dementia (VaD over time. We reviewed diagnostic criteria, all-cause dementia prevalence, and the AD/VaD ratio from 8 large population studies of dementia in Japan. Compared with the Okinawa 1992 study, studies conducted in 1994, 1998, 2005, and 2008 had a higher prevalence of all-cause dementia using Poisson regression models, after controlling for age and sex. In contrast to the US and some European countries, all-cause dementia prevalence is increasing in Japan. The prevalence of AD as opposed to VaD seems to be increasing over time, but large variability in diagnostic criteria, possible regional variability, and differences in prevalence of subtypes of dementia between men and women make it difficult to draw a conclusion about this trend at the national level. Further studies, for example, comparing the population attributable risk of vascular diseases to the prevalence and incidence of dementia could help to clarify the regional variations in etiological subtypes.

  16. Trends in the prevalence of dementia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Hiroko H; Buracchio, Teresa J; Fisher, Gwenith G; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Meguro, Kenichi; Tanizaki, Yumihiro; Kaye, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding trends in dementia and its subtype prevalence in Japan. Our aims in the current paper are to: (1) summarize epidemiological studies of dementia in Japan including relevant details of study protocol and diagnostic criteria, (2) compare the age-specific prevalence of all-cause dementia among studies, and (3) assess the trends in Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus vascular dementia (VaD) over time. We reviewed diagnostic criteria, all-cause dementia prevalence, and the AD/VaD ratio from 8 large population studies of dementia in Japan. Compared with the Okinawa 1992 study, studies conducted in 1994, 1998, 2005, and 2008 had a higher prevalence of all-cause dementia using Poisson regression models, after controlling for age and sex. In contrast to the US and some European countries, all-cause dementia prevalence is increasing in Japan. The prevalence of AD as opposed to VaD seems to be increasing over time, but large variability in diagnostic criteria, possible regional variability, and differences in prevalence of subtypes of dementia between men and women make it difficult to draw a conclusion about this trend at the national level. Further studies, for example, comparing the population attributable risk of vascular diseases to the prevalence and incidence of dementia could help to clarify the regional variations in etiological subtypes.

  17. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person’s ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient’s current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient’s skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level. PMID:28182172

  18. Bilingualism delays the onset of behavioral but not aphasic forms of frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Shailaja, Mekala; Gollahalli, Divyaraj; Rajan, Amuya; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Hornberger, Michael; Duggirala, Vasanta; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kaul, Subhash

    2017-03-18

    Bilingualism has been found to delay onset of dementia and this has been attributed to an advantage in executive control in bilinguals. However, the relationship between bilingualism and cognition is complex, with costs as well as benefits to language functions. To further explore the cognitive consequences of bilingualism, the study used Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, to examine whether bilingualism modifies the age at onset of behavioral and language variants of Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) differently. Case records of 193 patients presenting with FTD (121 of them bilingual) were examined and the age at onset of the first symptoms were compared between monolinguals and bilinguals. A significant effect of bilingualism delaying the age at onset of dementia was found in behavioral variant FTD (5.7 years) but not in progressive nonfluent aphasia (0.7 years), semantic dementia (0.5 years), corticobasal syndrome (0.4 years), progressive supranuclear palsy (4.3 years) and FTD-motor neuron disease (3 years). On dividing all patients predominantly behavioral and predominantly aphasic groups, age at onset in the bilingual behavioral group (62.6) was over 6 years higher than in the monolingual patients (56.5, p=0.006), while there was no difference in the aphasic FTD group (60.9 vs. 60.6 years, p=0.851). The bilingual effect on age of bvFTD onset was shown independently of other potential confounding factors such as education, gender, occupation, and urban vs rural dwelling of subjects. To conclude, bilingualism delays the age at onset in the behavioral but not in the aphasic variants of FTD. The results are in line with similar findings based on research in stroke and with the current views of the interaction between bilingualism and cognition, pointing to advantages in executive functions and disadvantages in lexical tasks.

  19. 1H-MRS metabolites in adults with Down syndrome: Effects of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-L. Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine if proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS detect differences in dementia status in adults with Down syndrome (DS, we used 1H-MRS to measure neuronal and glial metabolites in the posterior cingulate cortex in 22 adults with DS and in 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We evaluated associations between 1H-MRS results and cognition among DS participants. Neuronal biomarkers, including N-acetylaspartate (NAA and glutamate-glutamine complex (Glx, were significantly lower in DS patients with Alzheimer's should probably be changed to Alzheimer (without ' or s through ms as per the new naming standard disease (DSAD when compared to non-demented DS (DS and healthy controls (CTL. Neuronal biomarkers therefore appear to reflect dementia status in DS. In contrast, all DS participants had significantly higher myo-inositol (MI, a putative glial biomarker, compared to CTL. Our data indicate that there may be an overall higher glial inflammatory component in DS compared to CTL prior to and possibly independent of developing dementia. When computing the NAA to MI ratio, we found that presence or absence of dementia could be distinguished in DS. NAA, Glx, and NAA/MI in all DS participants were correlated with scores from the Brief Praxis Test and the Severe Impairment Battery. 1H-MRS may be a useful diagnostic tool in future longitudinal studies to measure AD progression in persons with DS. In particular, NAA and the NAA/MI ratio is sensitive to the functional status of adults with DS, including prior to dementia.

  20. Motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia: One, two, or three diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bak Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between motor neurone disease (MND and frontotemporal dementia (FTD has been a topic of scientific exploration for over hundred years. A connection between both diseases was first postulated in 1932 and has been strengthened by a steady stream of case reports since then. By the late 20th century, the link between both diseases was firmly established, with the resulting condition often referred to as MND/FTD. Several strands of evidence support the notion of an MND/FTD overlap. First, a small but well-documented group of patients present with a full-blown FTD, associated with MND. Second, subtle but characteristic changes in frontal-executive functions and social cognition have been described in non-demented MND patients, often in association with frontal atrophy/hypoactivity on neuroimaging. Third, amyotrophic features have been documented in patients primarily diagnosed with FTD. Moreover, the same genetic defect can lead to FTD and MND phenotypes in different members of the same family. However, as the current research is moving toward a more fine-grained evaluation, an increasingly complex picture begins to emerge. Some features, such as psychotic symptoms or severe language deficits (particularly in comprehension and verb processing, seem to occur more often in MND/dementia than in the classical FTD. On the basis of the review of 100 years of literature as well as 10 years of clinical experience of longitudinal follow-up of MND/dementia patients, this review argues in favor of MND/dementia (or, more precisely, MND/dementia/aphasia as a separate clinical entity, not sufficiently explained by a combination of MND and FTD.

  1. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person's ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient's current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient's skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level.

  2. Participatory Research to Design a Novel Telehealth System to Support the Night-Time Needs of People with Dementia: NOCTURNAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Martin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to support people living with dementia are broad in scope, proposing both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions as part of the care pathway. Assistive technologies form part of this offering as both stand-alone devices to support particular tasks and the more complex offering of the “smart home” to underpin ambient assisted living. This paper presents a technology-based system, which expands on the smart home architecture, orientated to support people with daily living. The system, NOCTURNAL, was developed by working directly with people who had dementia, and their carers using qualitative research methods. The research focused primarily on the nighttime needs of people living with dementia in real home settings. Eight people with dementia had the final prototype system installed for a three month evaluation at home. Disturbed sleep patterns, night-time wandering were a focus of this research not only in terms of detection by commercially available technology but also exploring if automated music, light and visual personalized photographs would be soothing to participants during the hours of darkness. The NOCTURNAL platform and associated services was informed by strong user engagement of people with dementia and the service providers who care for them. NOCTURNAL emerged as a holistic service offering a personalised therapeutic aspect with interactive capabilities.

  3. Dementia, preclinical studies in neurodegeneration and its potential for translational medicine in SouthAmerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Patricia Cardona Gomez

    2016-12-01

    in these human populations, and go to favour of the basic and clinical researchers interaction for a better understanding and medical care of mix dementias, which have more complex factors than pure ones. However, to promove the translation of any therapeutical alternative is neccesary to clarify the normative and protocols for developing clinical trials with original candidates or strategies proposed from South-American countries.

  4. Difference in MRI findings and risk factors between multiple infarction without dementia and multi-infarct dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Masashi; Kaieda, Makoto; Nagatsumi, Atsushi; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    MRI findings and risk factors for vascular dementia were evaluated with multi-variate analysis in 96 multi-infarct patients without dementia and 40 multi-infarct patients with dementia (MID). Only subjects with small infarcts in the territory of the perforator artery or deep white matter were studied. The diagnosis of MID was diagnosed according to DMS-III criteria and Hachinski`s ischemia score. Location and area of patchy high-intensity areas including small infarcts, the degree of periventricular high intensity (PVH), and the degree of brain atrophy were examined with MR images. Independent variables were: history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, other complications; systolic and diastolic blood pressure, atherosclerotic index, hematocrit, history of smoking, level of education, and activities of daily life (ADL). Hayashi`s quantification method II was used to analyze the data. The most significant correlation was found between history of hypertension and dementia (partial correlation coefficient: 0.39). Significant correlations were also found between ADL and dementia (0.32), between thalamic infarction and dementia (0.31), and between PVH and dementia (0.27). Age, brain atrophy index, and history of diabetes mellitus contributed little to dementia. The contribution to dementia did not differ significantly between right and left patchy high-intensity areas on MR images. Location of infarcts, except for bilateral thalamic infarcts and large PVH, contributed little to dementia. Thus it would be difficult to base a prediction of the prevalence of vascular dementia on MRI findings. However, both hypertention and ADL contribute to vascular dementia and both are treatable, which may be significant for the prevention of dementia. (author).

  5. Liver transplantion in a patient with rapid onset parkinsonism-dementia complex induced by manganism secondary to liver failure Transplante hepático em um paciente com complexo parkinsonismo-demência rapidamente progressivo induzido por manganismo devido a insuficiência hepática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fabiani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral and symmetric globus-pallidus hyperintensities are observed on T1-weighted MRI in most of the patients with chronic liver failure, due to manganese accumulation. We report a 53-year-old man, with rapid onset parkinsonism-dementia complex associated with accumulation of manganese in the brain, secondary to liver failure. A brain MRI was performed and a high signal on T1-weighted images was seen on globus-pallidus, as well as on T2-weighted images on the hemispheric white-matter. He was referred to a liver-transplantation. The patient passed away on the seventh postoperative day. Our findings support the concept of the toxic effects of manganese on the globus-pallidus. The treatment of this form of parkinsonism is controversial and liver-transplantation should not be considered as first line treatment but as an alternative one.Hiperintesidades simétricas e bilaterais dos gânglios da base são observadas em imagens de ressonância magnética encefálica (RM ponderadas em T1 na maioria dos pacientes com insuficiência hepática crônica devidas ao acúmulo de manganês. Nós relatamos o caso de um homem, com 53 anos de idade, com um complexo parkinsonismo-demência rapidamente progressivo associado com o acúmulo de manganês no cérebro, secundariamente a insuficiência hepática. Uma RM encefálica foi realizada e foram observadas imagens hiperintensas/hipersinal nas imagens ponderadas em T1 no globo pálido e, também, na substância branca dos hemisférios cerebrais ponderadas em T2. Devido à falta de resposta ao tratamento clinico optamos pelo transplante hepático. O paciente faleceu no 7º dia de PO. Nossos achados corroboram o conceito dos efeitos tóxicos do manganês nos gânglios da base/globo pálido. O tratamento desta forma de parkinsonismo é controverso e o transplante hepático não deverá ser considerada uma opção terapêutica de primeira linha, porém como um tratamento alternativo considerando-se os riscos

  6. The use of socially assistive robots for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huschilt, Julie; Clune, Laurie

    2012-10-01

    Innovative solutions for dementia care are required to address the steady rise in adults living with dementia, lack of adequate staffing to provide high-quality dementia care, and the need for family caregivers to provide care for their loved ones in the home. This article provides an overview of the use of socially assistive robots (SARs) to offer support as therapists, companions, and educators for people living with dementia. Social, ethical, and legal challenges associated with the use of robotic technology in patient care and implications for the use of SARs by nurses are discussed. These items considered, the authors conclude that SARs should be considered as a viable way to assist people living with dementia to maintain their highest possible level of independence, enhance their quality of life, and provide support to overburdened family caregivers. Further research is needed to evaluate the merits of this technological approach in the care of adults with dementia.

  7. Prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in the Chinese populations: a meta-analysis of dementia prevalence surveys, 1980-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaodong; Xu, Yong; Nie, Hongwei; Lei, Ting; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Minjie

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dementia and its major subtypes in China. Forty-eight eligible studies were included in this review. The pooled prevalence for the population aged 60 years and older of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was 1.9%, vascular dementia (VaD) was 0.9%, and total dementia was 3.0%. The prevalence of VaD was significantly higher in Northern China than in Southern China. The prevalence of VaD was significantly higher in urban compared to rural areas. The prevalence of dementia and prevalence of AD increased with age in both males and females, and a higher prevalence of AD than VaD was observed in all age groups. AD has become more common than VaD in China since 1990. The current prevalence of dementia in China may be similar to that of developed countries.

  8. Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    burden. In order to reduce agitation, it is important to focus on the cause and not merely the symptoms. In spite of this, agitation is frequently treated with psychotropic medications with commonly associated severe adverse effects. A growing number of studies lend evidence indicating that music therapy...... interventions decrease agitation. According to the latest Cochrane review (Vink, Bruinsma, & Scholten, 2011), however, studies examined as part of the 2011 systematic review were methodologically weak, resulting in authors not being able to draw conclusions regarding the effectiveness of music therapy...... people around the world. Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias affect neurocognition and associated functioning, including memory, thinking, behavior, and activities of daily living. Agitation in later stages of dementia is the most significant symptom contributing to patient distress and caregiver...

  9. VGKC positive autoimmune encephalopathy mimicking dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Anna; Cassidy, Eugene; Ryan, Aisling; O' Toole, Orna

    2011-12-01

    Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Abs) are known to cause three rare neurological syndromes- neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis although an increasing array of other associated neurological symptoms are becoming recognised. The authors describe the case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the neurology clinic with an apparent early onset dementing process. She was noted to have both extrapyramidal and frontal release signs on examination and was admitted for further evaluation. Her dementia investigation including a neoplastic screen was negative except for VGKC antibody positivity. Her symptoms dramatically improved with commencement of immunosuppression. A non-paraneoplastic VGKC antibody associated dementia-like syndrome has rarely been described. The authors add to the few existing reports of what represents an important reversible cause of cognitive impairment.

  10. Vascular dementia: Pharmacological treatment approaches and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Baskys

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrius Baskys1,3, Anthony C Hou21Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; 2Program in Geriatrics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California; 3Memory Disorders Program, VA Health Care System Long Beach, Long Beach, California, USAAbstract: Vascular dementia is a common condition for which there are no effective approved pharmacological treatments available. Absence of effective treatments creates a difficult situation for those suffering from the disease, their caregivers, and healthcare providers. This review will address our current understanding of the mechanisms of nerve cell damage due to ischemia and summarize available clinical trial data on several commonly used compounds including memantine, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, nimodipine, hydergine, nicergoline, CDPcholine, folic acid, as well as such nonpharmacological approaches as validation therapy.Keywords: vascular dementia, excitotoxicity, treatment, NMDA, memantine, donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, nimodipine, hydergine, nicergoline, CDP-choline, folic acid

  11. Dementia of Frontal Lobe Type and Amyotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ferrer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia of frontal lobe type may precede motor signs in a number of adult patients with amyotrophy. Neuropathological studies have shown neuron loss, spongiosis and gliosis mainly in layers II and III of the frontal and temporal lobes, together with myelin pallor of the subcortical white matter. Golgi studies revealed loss of dendritic spines on the apical dendrite of layer III pyramidal neurons, decreased numbers of dendrites, amputation and tortuosities of dendrites, and distal and proximal dendritic swellings and enlargements. Calbindin D-28K immunocytochemistry revealed a marked decrease in the number of cortical immunoreactive neurons and loss of immunoreactivity in dendrites of the remaining cells. These features indicate that pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons in layers II and III are severely damaged, and suggest that cortical processing is seriously impaired in patients with frontal lobe type dementia.

  12. VGKC positive autoimmune encephalopathy mimicking dementia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Abs) are known to cause three rare neurological syndromes- neuromyotonia, Morvan\\'s syndrome and limbic encephalitis although an increasing array of other associated neurological symptoms are becoming recognised. The authors describe the case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the neurology clinic with an apparent early onset dementing process. She was noted to have both extrapyramidal and frontal release signs on examination and was admitted for further evaluation. Her dementia investigation including a neoplastic screen was negative except for VGKC antibody positivity. Her symptoms dramatically improved with commencement of immunosuppression. A non-paraneoplastic VGKC antibody associated dementia-like syndrome has rarely been described. The authors add to the few existing reports of what represents an important reversible cause of cognitive impairment.

  13. Acupuncture Therapy for Multiple Infarctional Dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-dong; XIAO Yuan-chun

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe the clinical efficacy of combined electro-acupuncture and moxibustion in the treatment of multiple infarctional dementia. Methods Eighty-eight patients were randomized into two groups:treatment group in which 48 cases were treated by combined electro-acupuncture and moxibustion and control group in which 40 cases were treated by oral administration of Huperzine A. Results The total effective rate was 90% in treatment group and 71% in control group,with a significant difference ( P < 0.05 ); the score of Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) increased more obviously in treatment group than in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Combined electro-acupuncture and moxibustion is effective in improving the clinical symptoms of multiple infarctional dementia.

  14. Aid and growth regressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Tarp, Finn

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between foreign aid and growth in real GDP per capita as it emerges from simple augmentations of popular cross country growth specifications. It is shown that aid in all likelihood increases the growth rate, and this result is not conditional on ‘good’ policy....... There are, however, decreasing returns to aid, and the estimated effectiveness of aid is highly sensitive to the choice of estimator and the set of control variables. When investment and human capital are controlled for, no positive effect of aid is found. Yet, aid continues to impact on growth via...

  15. Aid and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    evolved since World War II in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. I review the aid process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of aid and categorize some of the key goals, principles and institutions of the aid system. The evidence on whether aid has......Foreign aid looms large in the public discourse; and international development assistance remains squarely on most policy agendas concerned with growth, poverty and inequality in Africa and elsewhere in the developing world. The present review takes a retrospective look at how foreign aid has...

  16. Aid and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2006-01-01

    evolved since World War II in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. I review the aid process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of aid and categorize some of the key goals, principles and institutions of the aid system. The evidence on whether aid has......Foreign aid looms large in the public discourse; and international development assistance remains squarely on most policy agendas concerned with growth, poverty and inequality in Africa and elsewhere in the developing world. The present review takes a retrospective look at how foreign aid has...

  17. Arts therapy with older people in dementia care units

    OpenAIRE

    Šoštarko, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    This specialist thesis proposes a model of dance-movement therapy for groups of elderly people with dementia. As a theoretical backdrop to this work, it first looks into dementia and discusses its most common types and causes, risk-factors, diagnostic procedures, as well as the course of the illness and treatment methods. There then follows an examination of the different models of dementia care, and, in particular, a reflection upon the person-centered care which focuses on the physical, emo...

  18. Feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Dementia Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, FA; Nazarian, N.; Lavretsky, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Family dementia caregivers are at high risk of depression and burnout. We assessed the feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers (CMIT-C), a novel 8-week group meditation and guided imagery group therapy program, for dementia caregivers reporting stress because of caregiving responsibilities. Methods: Twelve family dementia caregivers enrolled in CMIT-C. Primary outcomes included depression and anxiety, and secondary outcomes included insomnia, quality o...

  19. Animal-assisted therapy for clients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Linda L; Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Barba, Beth

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase nurses' awareness of animal-assisted therapy as a treatment option for older adults with dementia. We describe the differences between animal visitation programs and goal-directed therapy. We also address credentials of human-animal teams and provide an overview of possible therapeutic outcomes for older adults with dementia. Step-by-step methods are outlined for nurses to advocate for clients with dementia to receive these services.

  20. Visual signs and symptoms of dementia with Lewy bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies ('Lewy body dementia' or 'diffuse Lewy body disease') (DLB) is the second most common form of dementia to affect elderly people, after Alzheimer's disease. A combination of the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease is present in DLB and the disorder is classified as a 'parkinsonian syndrome', a group of diseases which also includes Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and multiple system atrophy. Ch...

  1. Considering people living with dementia when designing interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ancient, Claire; Good, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is an escalating problem which is estimated to affect 35.6 million people worldwide. In an environment which is becoming increasingly dependent on technology, the interaction needs of people living with dementia is being ignored by interface designers. This paper aims to highlight the factors which should be considered when designing interfaces to be "dementia-friendly". The article draws on the limited previous research to suggest that interfaces need to consider two main factors: p...

  2. Progress in Research on Acupuncture Treatment of Senile Dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hai-ying; CHENG Dong-qi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Senile dementia is a chronic retrograde encephalopathy seriously jeopardizing the health of elderly people. It is clinically manifested by progressive remote and recent dysmnesia, declined ability in analysis and judgment, emotional changes,abnormal behaviors, and even disturbances of consciousness.In recent years, acupuncture has been used to treat dementia with satisfactory therapeutic effects.The following is a survey for the progress in research on acupuncture treatment of senile dementia in the past 10 years.

  3. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE ON THE INTELLIGENCE OF CEREBROVASCULAR DEMENTIA PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈邦国

    2000-01-01

    Cerebrovascular dementia is a common disese in the old and medium-aged people. Its morbidity constitutes about 10-20% of all the dementia patients and results mainly from all-round decline of the brain function due to cerebral atheroscleorsis and cerebral infarction. The author of the present paper adopted acupuncture therapy to; treat this kind of disease and observed its effect on dementia patient's intelligence. Here is the report.

  4. Effective public involvement in the HoST-D Programme for dementia home care support: From proposal and design to methods of data collection (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Clarissa; Roe, Brenda; Hodgson, Anthony; Britt, David; Clarkson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Public involvement is an important element in health and social care research. However, it is little evaluated in research. This paper discusses the utility and impact of public involvement of carers and people with dementia in a five-year programme on effective home support in dementia, from proposal and design to methods of data collection, and provides a useful guide for future research on how to effectively involve the public. The Home SupporT in Dementia (HoST-D) Programme comprises two elements of public involvement, a small reference group and a virtual lay advisory group. Involving carers and people with dementia is based on the six key values of involvement - respect, support, transparency, responsiveness, fairness of opportunity, and accountability. Carers and people with dementia gave opinions on study information, methods of data collection, an economic model, case vignettes, and a memory aid booklet, which were all taken into account. Public involvement has provided benefits to the programme whilst being considerate of the time constraints and geographical locations of members.

  5. Frontotemporal Dementia: clinical, genetic, and pathological heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Seelaar, Harro

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe current clinical syndrome frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was first described in 1892 by the Czech psychiatrist Arnold Pick. He described a patient with aphasia and behavioural changes with on macroscopic examination marked left frontotemporal atrophy. In 1911, Alois Alzheimer described the detailed microscopic changes, including argyrophilic neuronal inclusions, which are still known as Pick bodies. The term Pick’s disease was introduced in 1926 and was used till the early 90’s...

  6. Acid rain may cause senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, F.

    1985-04-25

    Aluminium, released from the soil by acid rain, may be a cause of several forms of senile dementia including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Many upland reservoirs, fed by acid rain, supply homes with water laced with significant amounts of aluminium. Studies in the Pacific have shown that communities living on soils that are extremely rich in bauxite, the rock containing aluminium, have a very high incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. QIU Chang-lin's Experience in the Differential Treatment of Senile Dementia Based on Phlegm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zu-hui

    2009-01-01

    @@ Senile dementia refers to the various dementia syndromes occurring in the geratic period, including Alzheimer's dementia (AD), vascular dementia (VD),and mixed type dementia. It is mainly manifested by disturbance of intelligence and cognition, which falls into the TCM category of 'dementia', 'idiocy','amnesia', and 'melancholia'. At present, this disease is considered by TCM differentiation to be excess in superficiality and deficiency in origin, and should be treated for cleating away pathogens and strengthening the body resistance at the same time.

  8. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution.

  9. Satisfação de pacientes protetizados em um serviço de alta complexidade Satisfaction of patients fit with a hearing aid in a high complexity clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Soares Aurélio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available O processo de seleção e adaptação de próteses auditivas só será eficaz e terá bons resultados se o indivíduo fizer uso efetivo deste dispositivo. Para isto, é necessário que o mesmo esteja satisfeito com os resultados sentidos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a satisfação auditiva de pacientes adultos e idosos protetizados em um serviço de alta complexidade, credenciado ao Sistema Único de Saúde, e relacionar este achado com as variáveis idade, gênero, tempo de adaptação, tempo de uso diário e tipo de aparelho de amplificação sonora. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal de caráter descritivo no qual foram avaliados 60 sujeitos com utilização do questionário Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life, aplicado por meio de apresentação oral, em entrevista individual, pelas pesquisadoras. Este instrumento é dividido nas subescalas efeitos positivos, serviços e custos, fatores negativos e imagem pessoal. RESULTADOS: Foi evidenciado que os sujeitos encontram-se muito satisfeitos com a utilização do aparelho auditivo. Verificou-se diferença significativa ao relacionar o tempo de uso diário dos aparelhos com a satisfação global e o escore da subescala imagem pessoal. CONCLUSÃO: Constatou-se que os participantes do estudo estão muito satisfeitos com a utilização dos aparelhos auditivos, porém, satisfação não tem relação com as variáveis idade, gênero, tempo de adaptação e tipo de dispositivo. De maneira geral, os participantes com maior tempo de uso diário estão mais satisfeitos.The process of selecting and fitting hearing aid devices is only effective and only bring about good outcomes if the individual makes effective use of the device. Therefore, the individuals need to be happy with the outcome. AIM: To check the satisfaction of adults and elderly patients concerning their hearing aid in a high complex care clinic accredited by the Unified Health System, and to correlate this outcome with the variables related to

  10. Ethnic minority, young onset, rare dementia type, depression: A case study of a Muslim male accessing UK dementia health and social care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Jemma L

    2016-07-01

    A case study comprised of formal interviews, formal observations and informal discussions investigated the motivations and experiences accessing dementia care health and social care services for a Muslim, Pakistani male with dementia. Motivations derived from 'desperation' and an inability to access support from family or religious community. Experiences of accessing services were mostly negative. Dementia services were ill-informed about how to support persons with young onset dementia, with pre-existing mental health conditions, from an ethnic minority. Education and training to remove barriers to all dementia care services is required for persons with dementia, their families and within dementia services and religious communities.

  11. Reminiscence in dementia: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Laura; Murphy, Kathy; Cooney, Adeline; Casey, Dympna; O'Shea, Eamon; Devane, Declan; Jordan, Fionnuala; Hunter, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of reminiscence in dementia and highlights its uses as a therapeutic intervention used on individuals with dementia. No single definition of reminiscence exists in healthcare literature; however, definitions offered have similar components. The term life review is commonly used when discussing reminiscence; however, both terms are quite different in their goals, theory base and content. This concept analysis identified reminiscence as a process which occurs in stages, involving the recalling of early life events and interaction between individuals. The antecedents of reminiscence are age, life transitions, attention span, ability to recall, ability to vocalise and stressful situations. Reminiscence can lead to positive mental health, enhanced self esteem and improved communication skills. It also facilitates preparation for death, increases interaction between people, prepares for the future and evaluates a past life. Reminiscence therapy is used extensively in dementia care and evidence shows when used effectively it helps individuals retain a sense of self worth, identity and individuality.

  12. Dignity-preserving dementia care: a metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Oscar; Petersen, Karin A; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2013-12-01

    Research indicates the essentiality of dignity as a vital component for quality of life, reconfirming the emphasis on dignity preservation in the international code of nursing ethics. Applying Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography, the aim of the study was to develop a theory model by synthesizing 10 qualitative articles from various cultural contexts, exploring nurse and allied healthcare professional perception/practice concerning dignity-preserving dementia care. "Advocating the person's autonomy and integrity," which involves "having compassion for the person," "confirming the person's worthiness and sense of self," and "creating a humane and purposeful environment," was identified as a primary foundation for dignity-preserving dementia care. "Balancing individual choices among persons no longer able to make sound decisions, against the duty of making choices on behalf of the person," which involves "persuasion" and/or "mild restraint," was considered a crucial aspect in certain situations. "Sheltering human worth-remembering those who forget" was identified as a comprehensive motive and core value within dignity-preserving dementia care.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Mare Orgogozo

    2001-01-01

    @@ Dementia is becoming a major concern worldwide because its prevalence and incidence rise exponentially with increasing age. The prevalence rates double with every 5 years of age, from about 5% (4-12%depending on the studies) in those aged 65 and older to about 40% over 90[1], and up to 58% in those 95 and older[2]. The annual incidence rate of dementia is 2.2% per year over age 65[3]. According to 1996 United Nations projections, the number of individuals ~ed 65 and older in the more developed countries will increase from 169 million (14.2% of the population) to 287 million (24. 7% of the population)[3]. Besides the huge human and social costs, the economic burden of dementia is enormous in countries with a long lifeexpectancy[3], both from direct costs, i.e., those that result in actual monetary expenditures, such as hospital care, physician visits, medications, home health care workers or institutional care and indirect costs, i.e.,those that do not result in actual monetary expenditures, such as time spouses or other caregivers spend helping and caring.

  14. Dementia and the Power of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is now a leading cause of both mortality and morbidity, particularly in western nations, and current projections for rates of dementia suggest this will worsen. More than ever, cost effective and creative non-pharmacological therapies are needed to ensure we have an adequate system of care and supervision. Music therapy is one such measure, yet to date statements of what music therapy is supposed to bring about in ethical terms have been limited to fairly vague and under-developed claims about an improvement in well-being. This article identifies the relevant sense of wellbeing at stake in the question of dementia therapies of this type. In broad terms the idea is that this kind of therapy has a restorative effect on social agency. To the extent that music arouses a person through its rhythms and memory-inducing effects, particularly in communal settings, it may give rise to the recovery of one's narrative agency, and in turn allow for both carer and patient to participate in a more meaningful and mutually engaging social connection.

  15. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  16. [Physician-assisted suicide in dementia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, H

    2011-01-01

    Physician-assisted suicide in Germany is limited by criminal law and disapproved by professional authorities. A physician who is willing to help a demented patient in terminating his life has to be definitely sure that the disease does not interfere with the patient's capacity for decision-making. In cases of early dementia the reason why assisted suicide will usually be requested is not the actual suffering of the patient but his negative expectations for the future. As long as there are sufficient opportunities for palliative care, the progressive course of the dementia process does not imply a state of unbearable suffering which could justify an assisted suicide. Nevertheless there may be certain circumstances--as for instance the value that an individual attributes to his integrity or to the narrative unity of his life--which might possibly provide an ethical justification for the assistance in life termination. A physician who helps a demented person in performing a suicidal act does not necessarily oppose essential principles of medical ethics. Yet, especially with regard to possible societal consequences of physician-assisted suicide in dementia, the rejecting attitude of medical authorities against that activity must be considered as well founded and legitimate. Deviations from these general guidelines ought to be respected as long as they are limited to exceptional situations and correspond to a thorough consideration of a physician's professional duties. They should remain open to public control, but not be ultimately specified by unequivocal normative regulations.

  17. Nicotinic receptors in aging and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotto, Marina R; Zoli, Michele

    2002-12-01

    Activation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been shown to maintain cognitive function following aging or the development of dementia. Nicotine and nicotinic agonists have been shown to improve cognitive function in aged or impaired subjects. Smoking has also been shown in some epidemiological studies to be protective against the development of neurodegenerative diseases. This is supported by animal studies that have shown nicotine to be neuroprotective both in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with nicotinic agonists may therefore be useful in both slowing the progression of neurodegenerative illnesses, and improving function in patients with the disease. While increased nicotinic function has been shown to be beneficial, loss of cholinergic markers is often seen in patients with dementia, suggesting that decreased cholinergic function could contribute to both the cognitive deficits, and perhaps the neuronal degeneration, associated with dementia. In this article we will review the literature on each of these areas. We will also present hypotheses that might address the mechanisms underlying the ability of nAChR function to protect against neurodegeneration or improve cognition, two potentially distinct actions of nicotine.

  18. Healthy cognitive aging and dementia prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn E

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral prevention strategies can help maintain high levels of cognition and functional integrity, and can reduce the social, medical, and economic burden associated with cognitive aging and age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Interventions involving physical exercise and cognitive training have consistently shown positive effects on cognition in older adults. "Brain fitness" interventions have now been shown to have sustained effects lasting 10 years or more. A meta-analysis suggests these physical exercise and brain fitness exercises produce nearly identical impact on formal measures of cognitive function. Behavioral interventions developed and deployed by psychologists are key in supporting healthy cognitive aging. The National Institutes of Health should expand research on cognitive health and behavioral and social science to promote healthy aging and to develop and refine ways to prevent and treat dementia. Funding for adequately powered, large-scale trials is needed. Congress must maintain support for crucial dementia-related initiatives like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthy Brain Initiative and fund training programs to insure there is a work force with skills to provide high quality care for older adults. Insurers must provide better coverage for behavioral interventions. Better coverage is needed so there can be increased access to evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion services with the potential for reducing dementia risk. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Dementias show differential physiological responses to salient sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip David Fletcher

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal responsiveness to salient sensory signals is often a prominent feature of dementia diseases, particularly the frontotemporal lobar degenerations, but has been little studied. Here we assessed processing of one important class of salient signals, looming sounds, in canonical dementia syndromes. We manipulated tones using intensity cues to create percepts of salient approaching (‘looming’ or less salient withdrawing sounds. Pupil dilatation responses and behavioural rating responses to these stimuli were compared in patients fulfilling consensus criteria for dementia syndromes (semantic dementia, n=10; behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, n=16, progressive non-fluent aphasia, n=12; amnestic Alzheimer’s disease, n=10 and a cohort of 26 healthy age-matched individuals. Approaching sounds were rated as more salient than withdrawing sounds by healthy older individuals but this behavioural response to salience did not differentiate healthy individuals from patients with dementia syndromes. Pupil responses to approaching sounds were greater than responses to withdrawing sounds in healthy older individuals and in patients with semantic dementia: this differential pupil response was reduced in patients with progressive nonfluent aphasia and Alzheimer’s disease relative both to the healthy control and semantic dementia groups, and did not correlate with nonverbal auditory semantic function. Autonomic responses to auditory salience are differentially affected by dementias and may constitute a novel biomarker of these diseases.

  20. Emergency Department Use Among Older Adults With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Michael A; Stump, Timothy E; Messina, Frank C; Miller, Douglas K; Callahan, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Although persons with dementia are frequently hospitalized, relatively little is known about the health profile, patterns of health care use, and mortality rates for patients with dementia who access care in the emergency department (ED). We linked data from our hospital system with Medicare and Medicaid claims, Minimum Data Set, and Outcome and Assessment Information Set data to evaluate 175,652 ED visits made by 10,354 individuals with dementia and 15,020 individuals without dementia over 11 years. Survival rates after ED visits and associated charges were examined. Patients with dementia visited the ED more frequently, were hospitalized more often than patients without dementia, and had an increased odds of returning to the ED within 30 days of an index ED visit compared with persons who never had a dementia diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.29; Pdementia status (Pdementia. These results show that older adults with dementia are frequent ED visitors who have greater comorbidity, incur higher charges, are admitted to hospitals at higher rates, return to EDs at higher rates, and have higher mortality after an ED visit than patients without dementia.

  1. Enabling hospital staff to care for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Jennifer; Evans, Simon; Bruce, Mary; Carter, Christine; Brooker, Dawn; Milosevic, Sarah; Thompson, Rachel; Woods, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    This is the fourth and final article in a short series that presents case study examples of the positive work achieved by trusts who participated in the Royal College of Nursing's development programme to improve dementia care in acute hospitals. Dementia training in hospitals is often inadequate and staff do not always have sufficient knowledge of dementia to provide appropriate care. It can also be difficult for them to identify when patients with dementia are in pain, especially when their communication skills deteriorate. The case studies presented illustrate how two NHS trusts have worked to ensure that their staff are fully equipped to care for people with dementia in hospital. Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in Essex made dementia training a priority by including dementia awareness in staff induction across a range of roles and providing additional training activities tailored to meet staff needs. Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust focused on pain assessment, aiming to standardise its approach for patients with dementia. The pain assessment in advanced dementia tool was chosen and piloted, and is being implemented across the trust after a positive response.

  2. What can imaging tell us about cognitive impairment and dementia?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leela Narayanan; Alison Dorothy Murray

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a contemporary global health issue with far reaching consequences, not only for affected individuals and their families, but for national and global socioeconomic conditions. The hallmark feature of dementia is that of irreversible cognitive decline, usually affecting memory, and impaired activities of daily living. Advances in healthcare worldwide have facilitated longer life spans, increasing the risks of developing cognitive decline and dementia in late life. Dementia remains a clinical diagnosis. The role of structural and molecular neuroimaging in patients with dementia is primarily supportive role rather than diagnostic, American and European guidelines recommending imaging to exclude treatable causes of dementia, such as tumor, hydrocephalus or intracranial haemorrhage, but also to distinguish between different dementia subtypes, the commonest of which is Alzheimer’s disease. However, this depends on the availability of these imaging techniques at individual centres. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) techniques, such as functional connectivity MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular imaging techniques, such as 18 F fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography(PET), amyloid PET, tau PET, are currently within the realm of dementia research but are available for clinical use. Increasingly the research focus is on earlier identification of at risk preclinical individuals, for example due to family history. Intervention at the preclinical stages before irreversible brain damage occurs is currently the best hope of reducing the impact of dementia.

  3. Palliative and end of life care for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison Dening, Karen

    2016-02-03

    Dementia is a life-limiting condition that is largely a disease of ageing. However, older people in general, and older people with dementia in particular, have not always had equal access to effective palliative and end of life care. As a result, people with dementia at the end of life often receive aggressive and burdensome interventions, or inadequate assessment and management of their symptoms. Patterns in how people with dementia experience and present symptoms as they near the end of life can indicate when the goals of care should change and a palliative approach should be adopted.

  4. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with dominant gait disturbances - case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Presented case emphasises the significance of accurately gathered anamnesis with patient and his family. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia should be considered in cases of unexplained gait abnormalities.

  5. Assessment of nicotine dependence in subjects with vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nicotine dependence is an important public health issue. Nicotine dependence is a risk factor for vascular diseases like myocardial infarction and vascular dementia. The rate of nicotine dependence in Indian subjects with vascular dementia is not known. Hence we decided to assess nicotine dependence in subjects with vascular dementia. Methods: Nicotine dependence in subjects with vascular dementia was assessed among subjects presenting to memory clinic of a tertiary care hospital over a period of 16 months. Data regarding sociodemographic profile and severity of nicotine dependence as per Fagerstrom nicotine dependence scale for smoking and smokeless tobacco was analysed using SPSS version 17. Results: Our study shows that in 159 subjects with vascular dementia continuing nicotine dependence was seen in nearly 12% of the subjects. Though the rates are less than the population prevalence for India, it is still relevant as nicotine is not just a risk factor for development of vascular dementia but severe nicotine dependence and longer duration of nicotine use were found to be poor prognostic factors associated with severe dementia. Further as all subjects continued to be nicotine dependent despite having been advised to quit tobacco, suggesting the need for a more comprehensive tobacco cessation intervention be offered to subjects with vascular dementia to improve outcomes. Conclusion: In subjects with vascular dementia continuing nicotine dependence is an important risk factor which must be addressed. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 711-714

  6. Trinidad and Tobago: A decade of dementia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelleen Baboolal

    Full Text Available In 2003, academic staff members at The University of the West Indies Faculty of Medical Sciences St Augustine Trinidad and Tobago combined their expertise to make strides in Alzheimer's and Dementia research in Trinidad and Tobago. Dr. Nelleen Baboolal, Dr. Gershwin Davis and Professor Amanda McRae began developing a project that has produced significant results by examining not only the epidemiology of dementia, but the associated risk factors; caregiver burden and ultimately establishing biomarkers for the disease. This review is an account of our results from a decade of dementia research and how they are contributing toward mitigating the dementia tsunami in Trinidad and Tobago.

  7. Dementia Still Diagnosed Too Late - Data from the Czech Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Luzny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to evaluate the sensitivity of Czech physicians to the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with memory impairment.A retrospective observational study was designed. We have reviewed the electronic medical records of patients who have been hospitalized for the first time due to dementia of any type at the Kromeriz Mental hospital from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2013 (24-month period. Pluralistic methods combining the qualitative and quantitative approach were used in this study.Dementia of any type was diagnosed in 125 patients in the monitored period. The mean time between patient memory complaints and his / her admission to our facility for their first hospitalization due to dementia was 7.1 years (+- 3.7 years. Most patients with dementia had no prior outpatient treatment of their memory impairment (56.2%; a minority of patients (43.8% had treatment of their memory impairment by an outpatient physician.The sensitivity of Czech physicians to the early diagnosis of dementia is very low. Any delay in starting the treatment of dementia means a worsened effectiveness of this treatment, a worsened quality of life of patients with dementia and their caregivers. Our recommendations for both the early diagnosis and treatment of dementia should be involved in guidelines and should become a part of the pregraduate and postgraduate education of all physicians.

  8. Caffeine as a protective factor in dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Marjo H; Kivipelto, Miia

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine has well-known short-term stimulating effects on central nervous system, but the long-term impacts on cognition have been less clear. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rapidly increasing public health problems in ageing populations and at the moment curative treatment is lacking. Thus, the putative protective effects of caffeine against dementia/AD are of great interest. Here, we discuss findings from the longitudinal epidemiological studies about caffeine/coffee/tea and dementia/AD/cognitive functioning with a special emphasis on our recent results from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study. The findings of the previous studies are somewhat inconsistent, but most studies (3 out of 5) support coffee's favorable effects against cognitive decline, dementia or AD. In addition, two studies had combined coffee and tea drinking and indicated some positive effects on cognitive functioning. For tea drinking, protective effects against cognitive decline/dementia are still less evident. In the CAIDE study, coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life. In conclusion, coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD. This may be mediated by caffeine and/or other mechanisms like antioxidant capacity and increased insulin sensitivity. This finding might open possibilities for prevention or postponing the onset of dementia/AD.

  9. HIV-associated dementia in the Dominican Republic: a consequence of stigma, domestic abuse and limited health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Laura Frances; Erkkinen, Emily E; Deb, Anindita; Adon, Carlos

    2016-04-20

    A 38-year-old Dominican woman presented at an infectious disease clinic in Santo Domingo, with subacute dementia and psychomotor slowing. Based on physical findings and laboratory results, she was diagnosed with AIDS and HIV-associated dementia (HAD). She subsequently began combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Psychiatric complications later emerged: the patient developed suicidal ideation and her partner expressed homicidal thoughts. After extensive interviewing, it was revealed that the patient had known her HIV-positive serostatus for years. However, several factors, including HIV stigma, mental illness stigma, domestic abuse and limited health literacy, had prevented her from seeking treatment and from disclosing her status to her partner. This patient's HIV was unmanaged as a consequence of social and educational circumstance, which resulted in severe sequelae, namely HAD. Compounded barriers to care can lead to the presentation of disease complications that are rarely seen today in countries with widespread access to antiretroviral therapy.

  10. Dementia RED (Respect Empathy Dignity): Collaborating to build dementia supportive communities in North Wales--reporting on a pilot project (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Annabel; Page, Sean

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in developing dementia supportive communities world wide. Dementia RED (Respect Empathy Dignity) is a unique example from North Wales which is based on the twin concepts of people living with dementia as citizens in their community and developing 'bottom up' rather than 'top down' approaches to dementia supportive communities. Most people with dementia prefer to live at home thus making community connectivity key to maintaining healthy relationships and wellbeing. For those living with dementia, the community plays a pivotal role in providing value, meaning, purpose and acceptance. Building dementia supportive communities helps to raise awareness about dementia in the community through engagement and from identifying champions in the locality to voice issues. Dementia RED is an initiative and service which helps to develop such a philosophy in creating a dementia supportive community.

  11. Dementia-Free Survival and Risk Factors for Dementia in a Hospital-Based Korean Parkinson's Disease Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Yun; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Noh, Maeng-Seok; Cheon, Sang-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) have had long-term follow-ups. Moreover, information on the duration from the onset to the development of dementia in patients with PD is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the median dementia-free survival time from the onset of PD to the development of dementia. Methods In total, 1,193 Korean patients with PD were recruited and assessed at regular intervals of 3–6 months. We interviewed the patients and other informants to identify impairments in the activities of daily living. The Hoehn and Yahr stage and scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Mini Mental State Examination were evaluated annually. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to estimate the cumulative proportion of dementia-free patients over time. Risk factors predicting dementia were also evaluated using Cox proportional-hazards regression models. Results The median dementia-free survival time in the Korean PD population was 19.9 years. Among the 119 patients who subsequently developed dementia, the mean duration from the onset of PD to the development of dementia was 10.6 years. A multivariate analysis identified age at onset and education period as the significant predictors of dementia. Conclusions This is the first report on dementia-free survival in patients with PD based on longitudinal data analysis from the disease onset. The median dementia-free survival time in Korean PD patients was found to be longer than expected. PMID:27730764

  12. Validation of the Arabic Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (A-RUDAS) in elderly with mild and moderate dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaaya, M; Phung, T.K.T.; El Asmar, K;

    2016-01-01

    Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) was especially designed to minimize the effects of cultural learning and education. The aim of this study was to validate the RUDAS in the Arabic language (A-RUDAS), evaluate its ability to screen for mild and moderate dementia, and assess the effect of education, sex, age......-IV diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The A-RUDAS is proposed for dementia screening in clinical practice and in research in Arabic-speaking populations with an optimal cutoff of ≤22....

  13. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  14. HIV/AIDS Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  15. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in recent years has improved significantly because of new drugs and treatments. AIDS clinicians often fail to recognize ... in recent years has improved significantly because of new drugs and treatments. AIDS clinicians often fail to recognize ...

  16. Ever decreasing circles: Speech production in semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyard, Lotte; Quain, Emma; Patterson, Karalyn

    2014-06-01

    We explored the impact of a degraded semantic system on lexical, morphological and syntactic complexity in language production. We analysed transcripts from connected speech samples from eight patients with semantic dementia (SD) and eight age-matched healthy speakers. The frequency distributions of nouns and verbs were compared for hand-scored data and data extracted using text-analysis software. Lexical measures showed the predicted pattern for nouns and verbs in hand-scored data, and for nouns in software-extracted data, with fewer low frequency items in the speech of the patients relative to controls. The distribution of complex morpho-syntactic forms for the SD group showed a reduced range, with fewer constructions that required multiple auxiliaries and inflections. Finally, the distribution of syntactic constructions also differed between groups, with a pattern that reflects the patients' characteristic anomia and constraints on morpho-syntactic complexity. The data are in line with previous findings of an absence of gross syntactic errors or violations in SD speech. Alterations in the distributions of morphology and syntax, however, support constraint satisfaction models of speech production in which there is no hard boundary between lexical retrieval and grammatical encoding.

  17. Aid and growth regressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Tarp, Finn

    2001-01-01

    . There are, however, decreasing returns to aid, and the estimated effectiveness of aid is highly sensitive to the choice of estimator and the set of control variables. When investment and human capital are controlled for, no positive effect of aid is found. Yet, aid continues to impact on growth via...... investment. We conclude by stressing the need for more theoretical work before this kind of cross-country regressions are used for policy purposes....

  18. Increase in CD3+ CD4- T lymphocytes in patients with AIDS and disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex infection: a prospective study. GECSA. Groupe d'Epidemiologie Clinique du SIDA en Aquitaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, F; Dequae-Merchadou, L; Taupin, J L; Sire, S; Dupon, M; Ragnaud, J M; Lacoste, D; Texier-Maugein, J; Romagné, F; Dabis, F; Pellegrin, J L; Moreau, J F

    1999-08-01

    In a retrospective study, an increase in double-negative (CD3+ CD4- CD8-) (DN) T lymphocytes has been shown to be an independent predictor of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (D.MAC) infection in patients with less than 100 CD4+ T cells per mm3. To better characterize this cell expansion, a prospective study was designed. From July 1995 to April 1997, 206 HIV-infected patients with less than 100 CD4+ T cells per mm3 were prospectively followed up and immunophenotyped. The median followup was 1.1 year (+/-0.5 year), and 14 new D.MAC infections were diagnosed among 84 first AIDS-defining events. In univariate and multivariate analyses, D.MAC infections were the only opportunistic infection with a significant increase in DN T-cell percentage (median = 6.6; range = 1.7 to 24.5, P = 0.004) compared with patients without any opportunistic infection. This alteration in T-lymphocyte count could constitute a predictor for D.MAC infection in clinical practice.

  19. The role of higher education in transforming the quality of dementia care: dementia studies at the University of Bradford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, M; Capstick, A; Baldwin, P C; Surr, C; Bruce, E

    2009-04-01

    There is now widespread concern about the inadequate care and support provided to people with dementia from diagnosis to death. It is acknowledged that while there is a range of effective ways to care for and support people with dementia and their families from diagnosis to death, these have yet to become integral to practice. In England, for example, the National Dementia Strategy seeks to transform the quality of dementia care. One of the key components to transforming the quality of care is to ensure we have an informed and effective workforce. We argue here that in order to transform the quality of care we need to distinguish between the aims of training and education. Whilst there is a place for skills-based workplace training, Higher Education in dementia studies has a key role to play in the provision of specialist knowledge and skills in dementia care emphasizing as it does the development of critical thinking, reflection and action. In this paper we describe dementia studies at Bradford University available at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We outline their aims and learning outcomes, curricula, approach to teaching, learning and assessment. We describe the nature of students who study with us, noting their fit with the Higher Education Funding Council in England's agenda for widening participation in higher education. Higher Education in dementia studies has a unique role to play in equipping practitioners and professionals with the information, skills and attitudes to realize the potential for quality of life for people with dementia and their families.

  20. Designing State Aid Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Bradbury, Katharine

    2009-01-01

    This paper designs a new equalization-aid formula based on fiscal gaps of local communities. When states are in transition to a new local aid formula, the issue of whether and how to hold existing aid harmless poses a challenge. The authors show that some previous studies and the formulas derived from them give differential weights to existing and…

  1. Determinants of State Aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiren, K.; Brouwer, E.

    2010-01-01

    From economic theory we derive a set of hypotheses on the determination of state aid. Econometric analysis on EU state aid panel data is carried out to test whether the determinants we expect on the basis of theory, correspond to the occurrence of state aid in practice in the EU. We find that politi

  2. Fever: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fever: First aid Fever: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fever is a rise in body temperature. It's usually a sign of infection. The ... 2 C) or higher Should I treat a fever? When you or your child is sick, the ...

  3. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  4. Aid and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn; Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel

    inputs. We take as our point of departure a growth accounting analysis and review both intended and unintended effects of aid. Mozambique has benefited from sustained aid inflows in conflict, post-conflict and reconstruction periods. In each of these phases aid has made an unambiguous, positive...

  5. Evaluation of the influence of metabolic processes and body composition on cognitive functions: Nutrition and Dementia Project (NutrDem Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierski, R; Kłoszewska, I; Sobow, T

    2014-11-01

    The global increase in the prevalence of dementia and its associated comorbidities and consequences has stimulated intensive research focused on better understanding of the basic mechanisms and the possibilities to prevent and/or treat cognitive decline or dementia. The etiology of cognitive decline and dementia is very complex and is based upon the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. A growing body of epidemiological evidence has suggested that metabolic syndrome and its components may be important in the development of cognitive decline. Furthermore, an abnormal body mass index in middle age has been considered as a predictor for the development of dementia. The Nutrition and Dementia Project (NutrDem Project) was started at the Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychotic Disorders with close cooperation with Department of Medical Psychology. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of dietary patterns, nutritional status, body composition (with evaluation of visceral fat) and basic regulatory mechanisms of metabolism in elderly patients on cognitive functions and the risk of cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment and/or dementia).

  6. [The loss of a common shared world. Ethical problems in palliative care for people with advanced dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertogh, C M P M; The, B A M

    2008-12-01

    Person-centred (nursing home) care for people with dementia is a specific form of ('non cancer') palliative care. In order to elucidate how caregivers in nursing homes give shape to the nurse-patient relationship in people with advanced dementia and how they deal with the ethical questions that pose themselves in this realm of care ethnographial field research was conducted by two researchers in two Dutch nursing homes. It was found that in both facilities--despite differences in organization and quality of care--many forms of what Kitwood has termed 'malignant social psychology' were prevalent. A more detailed analysis of our research data revealed a relation--not only with staffshortages and a lack of professionalism--but also and primarily with the 'intrinsic complexity' of care giving in this field of palliative care. This complexity has its origin in the key problem of dementia, namely the loss of a common shared world of meaning. We discovered three features of this core problem: the dilemma(s) of truth speaking and truthfulness, the struggle to hold on to reciprocity in care giving and the paradoxes of normality nurses face in their treatment of people with dementia. In order to help caregivers cope with these problems we recommend to invest seriously in diverse forms of supportive care for nurses.

  7. Conditional Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) studies the effect of development aid using econometrics on macro data. It contains about 100 papers of which a third analyzes conditional models where aid effectiveness depends upon z, so that aid only works for a certain range of the variable. The key term...... in this family of AEL models is thus an interaction term of z times aid. The leading candidates for z are a good policy index and aid itself. In this paper, meta-analysis techniques are used (i) to determine whether the AEL has established the said interaction terms, and (ii) to identify some of the determinants...... of the differences in results between studies. Taking all available studies in consideration, we find no support for conditionality with respect to policy, while conditionality regarding aid itself is dubious. However, the results differ depending on the authors’ institutional affiliation....

  8. Aid and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn; Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel

    This paper considers the relationship between external aid and development in Mozambique from 1980 to 2004. The main objective is to identify the specific mechanisms through which aid has influenced the developmental trajectory of the country and whether one can plausibly link outcomes to aid...... inputs. We take as our point of departure a growth accounting analysis and review both intended and unintended effects of aid. Mozambique has benefited from sustained aid inflows in conflict, post-conflict and reconstruction periods. In each of these phases aid has made an unambiguous, positive...... contribution both enabling and supporting rapid growth since 1992. At the same time, the proliferation of donors and aid-supported interventions has burdened local administration and there is a distinct need to develop government accountability to its own citizens rather than donor agencies. In ensuring...

  9. China vs. AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LURUCAI

    2004-01-01

    CHINA's first HIV positive diagnosis was in 1985, the victim an ArgentineAmerican. At that time most Chinese,medical workers included, thought of AIDS as a phenomenon occurring outside of China. Twenty years later, the number of HIV/AIDS patients has risen alarmingly. In 2003, the Chinese Ministry of Health launched an AIDS Epidemiological Investigation across China with the support of the WHO and UN AIDS Program. Its results show that there are currently 840,000 HIV carriers, including 80,000 people with full-blown AIDS, in 31 Chinese provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions. This means China has the second highest number of HIV/AIDS cases in Asia and 14th highest in the world. Statistics from the Chinese Venereal Disease and AIDS Prevention Association indicate that the majority of Chinese HIV carriers are young to middle aged, more than half of them between the ages of 20 and 29.

  10. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... betweenstudies is real. In particular, the aid-growth association is stronger for Asian countries, and the aid-growth association is shown to have been weaker in the 1970s....

  11. Cholinergic and other neurotransmitter mechanisms in Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Paul T; Perry, Elaine K

    2007-09-01

    It is now 30 years since the beginning of intensive efforts to understand the neurotransmitter biochemistry of dementia as exemplified by Alzheimer's disease and such studies have led to the development of rational treatment strategies, which are continuing to benefit patients. However, as studies became more sophisticated and clinicians rediscovered an interest in dementia, because of the potential for symptomatic treatment, it has become clear that there are several different neurodegenerative conditions that gives rise to dementia syndromes and that each has distinct neurochemical pathology. This has important treatment implications since what works for one may not work for another or at the extreme, may make matters worse. Therefore it is clear that a detailed understanding of the neurotransmitter function in each condition is not merely academic but can lead to rationale drug design and treatment strategies appropriate for that group of patients. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) has clinico-pathological features, which overlap with either AD or Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as features that help to distinguish it, such as fluctuations in cognitive impairment and a higher prevalence of visual hallucinations. On this basis, it would be expected that the neurochemistry would have some similarities with both disorders.

  12. The impact of dementia severity on caregiver burden in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioshi, Eneida; Foxe, David; Leslie, Felicity; Savage, Sharon; Hsieh, Sharpley; Miller, Laurie; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Caregiver burden is greater in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) than in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, little is known of the impact of the 3 main clinical variants of FTD- behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SemDem), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA)-or the role of disease severity in caregiver burden. The Zarit Burden Inventory was used to measure caregiver burden of bvFTD (n=17), SemDem (n=20), PNFA (n=20), and AD (n=19) patients. Symptom duration, caregiver age, and relationship type were matched across groups. Moreover, a number of caregiver (mood, social network) and patient variables (functional disability, behavioral changes, relationship with caregiver, and dementia stage) were addressed to investigate their impact on caregiver burden. Caregivers of bvFTD patients reported the highest burden, whereas SemDem and PNFA caregivers reported burden similar to AD. A regression analysis revealed that caregiver burden in FTD, regardless of subtype, was explained by a model combining disease staging, relationship changes, and caregiver depression. Burden increased with disease severity in FTD. This study is the first to show that caregivers of SemDem, PNFA, and AD patients show similar burden, while confirming that bvFTD caregivers show higher burden than AD caregivers. More importantly, this study demonstrates that burden worsens with disease progression in FTD.

  13. Distinct perfusion patterns in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Center and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimercenter and Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benedictus, Marije R.; Moeller, Christiane M.; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; Lemstra, Afina W.; Prins, Niels D.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimercenter and Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To compare pseudo-continuous arterial spin-labelled (PCASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and controls, in a region of interest (ROI) and voxel-wise fashion. We analysed whole-brain 3D fast-spin-echo PCASL images of 20 FTD patients, 14 DLB patients, 48 AD patients and 50 controls from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. Regional CBF patterns were compared using analyses of variance for repeated measures. Permutation tests were used for voxel-wise comparisons. Analyses were performed using uncorrected and partial volume corrected (PVC) maps. All analyses were corrected for age and sex. There was an interaction between diagnosis and region (p < 0.001), implying differences in regional CBF changes between diagnostic groups. In AD patients, CBF was decreased in all supratentorial regions, most prominently so in the posterior regions. DLB patients showed lowest CBF values throughout the brain, but temporal CBF was preserved. Supratentorial PVC cortical CBF values were lowest in the frontal lobes in FTD patients, and in the temporal lobes in AD patients. Patients with AD, FTD and DLB display distinct patterns of quantitative regional CBF changes. 3D-PCASL may provide additional value in the workup of dementia patients. (orig.)

  14. Overdiagnosing Vascular Dementia using Structural Brain Imaging for Dementia Work-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Feyen, Bart F. E.; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Goeman, Johan; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesizing that non-significant cerebrovascular lesions on structural brain imaging lead to overdiagnosis of a vascular etiology of dementia as compared to autopsy-confirmed diagnosis, we set up a study including 71 patients with autopsy-confirmed diagnoses. Forty-two patients in the population (

  15. Green care farms promote activity among elderly people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, S.R. de; Oosting, S.J.; Kuin, Y.; Hoefnagels, E.C.M.; Blauw, Y.H.; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, an increasing number of green care farms are providing day care to community-dwelling elderly people with dementia. Currently, it is unknown whether activities, activity participation, and facility use of elderly people with dementia at green care farms differ from those at regul

  16. Dementia care and labour market : the role of job satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Faber, M.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Braat, D.D.M.; Raas, G.P.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A labour shortage in the dementia care sector is to be expected in the near future in the Netherlands and in many other European states. The objective of this study is to analyse why people quit or avoid jobs in dementia care. METHOD: An integrative analysis was used to study reports, ar

  17. A Landscape for Training in Dementia Knowledge Translation (DKT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Judy; Chahal, Neil; Beattie, B. Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Meaningful translation of dementia research findings from the bench to the bedside is dependent on the quality of the knowledge to transfer and the availability and skills of investigators engaged in the knowledge translation process. Although there is no shortage of research on dementia, the latter has been more challenging. Results from a survey…

  18. Dementia with impaired glucose metabolism in late onset metachromatic leukodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, P.; Ehlers, L.; Hansen, Hans Jacob

    2001-01-01

    An unusual case of very-late-onset metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) with dementia was studied. The patient was a 41-year-old male who presented with mild dementia and a single generalized tonic clonic seizure. Neuropsychological assessment demonstrated mild amnesia, visuospatial dysfunction...

  19. Advances in art therapy for patients with dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Yue Wang; Dong-Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the theoretical basis and development status of art therapy are introduced, and the intervention methods and effectiveness of art therapy in patients with dementia are reviewed. To date, nursing intervention via art therapy with dementia patients in China has been rarely investigated, and the design of this type of investigation must be improved.

  20. Gait in ageing and associated dementias; its relationship with cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, Erik; Eggermont, Laura; Swaab, Dick; van Heuvelen, Marieke; Kamsma, Yvo; de Greef, Mathieu; van Wijck, Ruud; Mulder, Theo

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this review is on the close relationship between gait and cognition in ageing and associated dementias. This close relationship is supported by epidemiological studies, clinical studies of older people with and without dementia that focused on the intensity of the physical activity, cli