WorldWideScience

Sample records for agronomy

  1. Agronomie Africaine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International journal published by The Ivorian Association for Agricultural Sciences (A.I.S.A) The creation of a scientific journal called "AGRONOMIE AFRICAINE" (Agron. Afr.) by the Ivorian Association for ... Table of Contents. Articles ...

  2. Archives: Agronomie Africaine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 55 ... Archives: Agronomie Africaine. Journal Home > Archives: Agronomie Africaine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 55 Items, 1 2 > >>. 2017 ...

  3. Agronomie Africaine: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , (AISA), leur Association, d'une Revue Scientifique dénommée "AGRONOMIE AFRICAINE" (Agron. Afr.) les chercheurs Ivoiriens engagés dans la recherché agronomique entendent apporter leur modeste contribution la diffusion de ...

  4. Diversity - Essential quality for agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity is an essential quality for success in agronomy because agronomy touches everyone, everywhere in some way, and food production is crucial for every society around the world. Consider, for example, our membership, which is diverse in almost every way imaginable. This diversity brings differ...

  5. Agriculture & Agronomy: A Dissertation Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978

    This bibliography presents a compilation of Agriculture and Agronomy doctoral research for the years 1973-1976. Each of the 3,386 doctoral dissertations cited herein has been accepted by accredited degree-granting universities in North America and published by University Microfilms International (UMI). Dissertations are arranged alphabetically in…

  6. An "Environmental Issues in Agronomy" Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarick, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the format and grading procedure of an Environmental Agronomy course offered at Colorado State University. Teaching methods include videotape use, field trips, and lectures addressing topics such as integrated pest management, land application of sewage sludge, pesticide degradation, and organic farming. Standard course…

  7. Agronomy of metal crops used in agromining

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the agronomy of metal crops used in agromining/phytomining summarizes the history of the development of phytomining and the experimental work to identify the agronomic practices most important to high annual nickel yield when hypernickelophore (accumulate over 1% Ni in dry shoots). Th...

  8. L’agronomie au sens large

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    L’agronomie comme champ disciplinaire large regroupant l’ensemble des sciences agricoles n’a pas la même identité selon les pays, entre certains, notamment la France, où son autonomie institutionnelle et socioculturelle est forte, et d’autres, tels les États-Unis, où cette autonomie est faible, les sciences agricoles étant beaucoup plus éclatées institutionnellement, très généralement inscrites dans le cadre des universités. C’est donc avant tout dans un pays comme la France que faire l’histo...

  9. NOTES. A Course Relating Agronomy and Science to Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Marla S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a course designed to teach the relationship between science, agronomy, and society. Includes course and class description, course content, and evaluation of the course. (11 references) (MCO)

  10. Marketing and Branding the Agronomy Major at Iowa State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bradley A.

    2011-01-01

    The decline of enrollments in agronomy programs across the United States has been a concern for more than a decade. In an effort to reverse this trend, the Agronomy Department at Iowa State University (ISU) launched the "I'm An Agronomist" marketing campaign in 2006. This article reports on these efforts and the change in the…

  11. [Using ecology thinking reconstructing traditional agronomy: role of production ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song-Liang

    2012-08-01

    Traditional agronomy, as a discipline or specialty, is originated from the reductionism thinking of neoteric experimental sciences and motivated by the great success of industrialized revolution, but loses the ensemble grasp of the relationships between agricultural organisms and their resources and environment, i.e., agroecosystem mechanism. Moreover, due to the excessively relying on exogenous fossil energy input and the monoculture with a few highly productive crop cultivars, the agricultural interior sustainability has unceasingly lost, making our mankind facing the double crises of grain security and food safety. Therefore, it is imperative to reconstruct the traditional agronomy and its educational system. In this paper, the author proposed to link traditional agronomy with ecology, establishing agroecology as the core subject and agroecosystem management as the core applied system, and in particular, establishing 'production ecology' to fill up the wide gap between the crop cultivation and farming system and the crop genetics and breeding, the two second grade disciplines under agronomy. Ideologically and methodologically, this proposal could provide disciplinary, scientific, and educational bases to authentically implement the strategy of sustainable development of agriculture.

  12. Interpreting treatment x environment interaction in agronomy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas, M.; Crossa, J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Sayre, K.; Reynolds, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Multienvironment trials are important in agronomy because the effects of agronomic treatments can change differentially in relation to environmental changes, producing a treatment × environment interaction (T × E). The aim of this study was to find a parsimonious description of the T × E existing in

  13. Agronomy Students at Southern Land-Grant Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkelberger, John E.; Molnar, Joseph J.

    The background characteristics, occupational goals, and attitudes of agriculture students enrolled in 1890 and 1862 land grant universities in 1977 were examined by questionnaire, to construct a profile of agronomy majors as compared to animal science majors and to agriculture majors as a whole. Females comprised 38.2% of animal science majors but…

  14. Growing the science of agronomy by growing the profession: a Message from the President of the American Society of Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    We often refer to the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) as being both a scientific and professional society. Membership within the organization includes a wide range of people from diverse regions and cultures of the world working with complex and diverse cropping systems. Yet members are unified...

  15. French research in the field of nuclear agronomy; Les recherches francaises en agronomie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin De Montgareuil, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This report presents a survey of the most important work in the field of nuclear agronomy carried out in France since the second international conference, ranging from pure research to the most direct application. As the programmes develop, so to an ever decreasing degree does this differentiation cover the distinction made in the report between the biological radiations effects and the other uses of nuclear techniques. Thus research on agricultural radio-genetics is carried on in two directions: from the theoretical and methodological angle, with comparative studies of the action of various types of radiation, the influence of dose rate and temperature, the action of chemical mutation agents, the production of chimera by gamma irradiation; and on the practical side, leading to the creation of new, hardier or earlier varieties (rice, millet, ground-nuts). Problems of pest destruction (eradication) and the preservation of foodstuffs by irradiation are also tackled by widely varied means and for totally different purposes. One operation consisting of a simple irradiation (moist seeds, potatoes...) will sometimes be associated with original studies of a biochemical or microbiological nature (for example: decomposition of starch, glucide metabolism of irradiated tubers, radiation resistance of yeasts). The nuclear technique side is represented mainly by radioisotopes (carbon 14, phosphorus 32, sulphur 35, calcium 45, potassium 42, copper 64, gold 198) and stable isotopes analysed by mass spectrometer (nitrogen 15, oxygen 18) or by neutron activation (boron 10). The studies mentioned refer to problems on different levels concerning plant physiology, agrology, agricultural entomology and zootechny. Results obtained from measurements of the humidity (neutron thermalization) and density (gamma diffusion) of a soil are also given. Numerous organisations take part in these various research programmes, each according to its speciality: cooperative private enterprise

  16. French research in the field of nuclear agronomy; Les recherches francaises en agronomie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin De Montgareuil, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This report presents a survey of the most important work in the field of nuclear agronomy carried out in France since the second international conference, ranging from pure research to the most direct application. As the programmes develop, so to an ever decreasing degree does this differentiation cover the distinction made in the report between the biological radiations effects and the other uses of nuclear techniques. Thus research on agricultural radio-genetics is carried on in two directions: from the theoretical and methodological angle, with comparative studies of the action of various types of radiation, the influence of dose rate and temperature, the action of chemical mutation agents, the production of chimera by gamma irradiation; and on the practical side, leading to the creation of new, hardier or earlier varieties (rice, millet, ground-nuts). Problems of pest destruction (eradication) and the preservation of foodstuffs by irradiation are also tackled by widely varied means and for totally different purposes. One operation consisting of a simple irradiation (moist seeds, potatoes...) will sometimes be associated with original studies of a biochemical or microbiological nature (for example: decomposition of starch, glucide metabolism of irradiated tubers, radiation resistance of yeasts). The nuclear technique side is represented mainly by radioisotopes (carbon 14, phosphorus 32, sulphur 35, calcium 45, potassium 42, copper 64, gold 198) and stable isotopes analysed by mass spectrometer (nitrogen 15, oxygen 18) or by neutron activation (boron 10). The studies mentioned refer to problems on different levels concerning plant physiology, agrology, agricultural entomology and zootechny. Results obtained from measurements of the humidity (neutron thermalization) and density (gamma diffusion) of a soil are also given. Numerous organisations take part in these various research programmes, each according to its speciality: cooperative private enterprise

  17. [Evaluation of a teaching program of nutrition in agronomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, S; Andrade, M; Harper, L; Kain, J; Eskenazi, M E; Sánchez, F; Domínguez, J I; Valiente, S

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a set of teaching materials on food, nutrition and agriculture, adapted at the Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, within the scope of a project with AID and the School of Agronomy of the Chilean Catholic University (U. C.) aimed at incorporating the teaching of human nutrition into the curriculum of Latin American agronomists. A one semester course (54 hours) was given to 22 students of the 7th semester of Agronomy and two Ecuatorian agronomists (with AID scholarships). A set of knowledge evaluation instruments was applied at the beginning and at the end of the course. A total of 83.3% of the students passed the final examination (with more than 75% of correct answers). The difference between the initial and final performance was highly significant (p less than 0.001). According to the students' and teachers' opinions, the general textbook and the teachers book contributed effectively to meet the learning objectives whereas the students handbook needed some modifications. In conclusion, the program is an important contribution to the education of agronomists in a new conception of their role in regard to improvement of the nutritional status and quality of life of the rural population. With a few minor modifications, a final version to be used in the countries of the Region, shall soon become available.

  18. Recent Trends in Soil Science and Agronomy Research in the Northern Great Plains of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book “Recent Trends in Soil Science and Agronomy Research in the Northern Great Plains of North America” summarizes published research in soil science and agronomy from various field experiments conducted in the soil-climatic/agro-ecological regions of the Northern Great Plains of North America....

  19. Agronomy towards the Green Economy. Optimization of metal phytoextraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchiol

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional techniques for remediation of polluted soils are based on a physical-chemical approach; such techniques are expensive, have adverse effects on soil quality and are often highly expensive. In the scenario of the Green Economy, low cost and impact technologies should be promoted. Phytotechnologies are remediation technologies that use plants for the containment, degradation or removal of contaminants from polluted matrices for the restoration of degraded ecosystems. The process of phytoextraction is substantially based on plant-soil interactions that involves the mass transfer of an inorganic pollutant from the bulk soil to the plant biomass. This implies that the management of the two elements of the system (plant and soil should have effects on the efficiency of the process. As phytoremediation is essentially an agronomic approach, its success depends ultimately on standard agronomic practices. The present paper aims give an overview on the role of agronomy in the optimization of metal phytoextraction is focused.

  20. Nature or Artifice? Grafting in Early Modern Surgery and Agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoia, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    In 1597, Gaspare Tagliacozzi published a famous two-volume book on “plastic surgery.” The reconstructive technique he described was based on grafting skin taken from the arm onto the mutilated parts of the patient's damaged face – especially noses. This paper focuses on techniques of grafting, the “culture of grafting,” and the relationships between surgery and plant sciences in the sixteenth century. By describing the fascination with grafting in surgery, natural history, gardening, and agronomy the paper argues that grafting techniques were subject to delicate issues: to what extent it was morally acceptable to deceive the eye with artificial entities? and what was the status of the product of a surgical procedure that challenged the traditional natural/artificial distinction? Finally, this paper shows how in the seventeenth century grafting survived the crisis of Galenism by discussing the role it played in teratology and in controversies on the uses the new mechanistic anatomy.

  1. French research in the field of nuclear agronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin De Montgareuil, P.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents a survey of the most important work in the field of nuclear agronomy carried out in France since the second international conference, ranging from pure research to the most direct application. As the programmes develop, so to an ever decreasing degree does this differentiation cover the distinction made in the report between the biological radiations effects and the other uses of nuclear techniques. Thus research on agricultural radio-genetics is carried on in two directions: from the theoretical and methodological angle, with comparative studies of the action of various types of radiation, the influence of dose rate and temperature, the action of chemical mutation agents, the production of chimera by gamma irradiation; and on the practical side, leading to the creation of new, hardier or earlier varieties (rice, millet, ground-nuts). Problems of pest destruction (eradication) and the preservation of foodstuffs by irradiation are also tackled by widely varied means and for totally different purposes. One operation consisting of a simple irradiation (moist seeds, potatoes...) will sometimes be associated with original studies of a biochemical or microbiological nature (for example: decomposition of starch, glucide metabolism of irradiated tubers, radiation resistance of yeasts). The nuclear technique side is represented mainly by radioisotopes (carbon 14, phosphorus 32, sulphur 35, calcium 45, potassium 42, copper 64, gold 198) and stable isotopes analysed by mass spectrometer (nitrogen 15, oxygen 18) or by neutron activation (boron 10). The studies mentioned refer to problems on different levels concerning plant physiology, agrology, agricultural entomology and zootechny. Results obtained from measurements of the humidity (neutron thermalization) and density (gamma diffusion) of a soil are also given. Numerous organisations take part in these various research programmes, each according to its speciality: cooperative private enterprise

  2. Agronomy towards the Green Economy: optimization of phytoremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchiol

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional techniques for remediation of polluted soils are based on a physical-chemical approach; such techniques are expensive, have adverse effects on soil quality and are often highly expensive. In the scenario of the Green Economy, low cost and impact technologies should be promoted. Phytotechnologies are remediation technologies that use plants for the containment, degradation or removal of contaminants from polluted matrices for the restoration of degraded ecosystems. The process of phytoextraction is substantially based on plant-soil interactions that involves the mass transfer of an inorganic pollutant from the bulk soil to the plant biomass. This implies that the management of the two elements of the system (plant and soil should have effects on the efficiency of the process. As phytoremediation is essentially an agronomic approach, its success depends ultimately on standard agronomic practices. The present paper aims give an overview on the role of agronomy in the optimization of metal phytoextraction is focused.

  3. The LPC-INRA double gamma sensor: definition, experimental use, and applications in agronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stengel, P.; Bertuzzi, P.; Gaudu, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    After a brief review of the value of double gammametric sensors in civil engineering and agronomy, and an account of the principle of measurement, the characteristics adopted for the construction of the instrument are described. Its description and method of calibration are dealt with in detail, together with precision, horizontal resolution, and interface problems. With regard to its use in agronomy, a number of precautions to be taken in order to ensure satisfactory measurements are specified. In conclusion, the authors make a circumstantial judgement of the technique of double sensor measurement [fr

  4. Evaluasi keseragaaman, keragaman, dan kestabilan karakter agronomi galur-galur padi haploid ganda hasil kultur antera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRIATNA SASMITA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sasmita P. 2011. Evaluasi keseragaman, keragaman, dan kestabilan karakter agronomi galur-galur padi haploid ganda hasil kultur antera. Bioteknologi 8: 10-17. Pembentukan galur haploid ganda dalam kultur antera bertujuan untuk mempercepat perolehan galur murni. Seleksi karakter yang diinginkan dapat dilakukan langsung terhadap progeni hasil kultur antera pada generasi awal. Percobaan ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui karakteristik agronomi, keseragaman, dan kestabilan galur haploid ganda, serta mendapatkan putatif galur-gallur haploid ganda sebagai bahan evaluasi lebih lanjut untuk mendapatkan galur harapan. Percobaan pertama menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap diulang lima kali. Perlakuannya aadalah 111 galur haploid ganda hasil kultur antera generasi pertama (DH1. Percobaan kedua menggunakan rancangan petak terpisah dengan perlakuan petak utama adalah galur haploid ganda hasil kultur antera dan perlakuan anak petaknya generasi galur haploid ganda kedua (DH2 hingga kelima (DDH5. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa setiap tanaman dalam galur yang sama memiliki karakter agronnomi seragam, sedangkan tanaman antar galur berbeda memiliki karakter agronomi beragam. Hasil evaluasi lebih lanjut terhadap tiga dari 111 galur haploid ganda yang berasal dari generasi kedua hingga kelima menunjukkan tidak terdapat perbedaan karakter antar generasi untuk setiap p galur yang sama. Hasil penelitian tersebut menunjukkan pula bahwa karakteristik agronomi galur haploid ganda stabil dari generasi ke generasi.

  5. Using Alumni Input as a Reality Check of Agronomy Teaching and Advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveel, John G.; Vorst, James J.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a systematic review of the undergraduate curricula and courses, the perceptions of Purdue agronomy alumni who graduated between 1960 and 2003 were obtained. A survey was administered to assess outcomes, identify gaps in the curriculum, measure how well the program addresses current and future needs, and provide a direction for change.…

  6. Relationships among Learning Styles and Motivation with Computer-Aided Instruction in an Agronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Gina M.; Mullen, Russell E.; Chadwick, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Multi-media learning tools were developed to enhance student learning for an introductory agronomy course at Iowa State University. During fall 2002, the new interactive computer program, called Computer Interactive Multimedia Program for Learning Enhancement (CIMPLE) was incorporated into the teaching, learning, and assessment processes of the…

  7. Survey of Mathematics and Science Requirements for Production-Oriented Agronomy Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aide, Michael; Terry, Danny

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes course requirements to determine the amount of required mathematics and science for production-oriented agronomy majors. Reports that mathematics requirements center around college algebra and statistics; science requirements generally include chemistry, biology, plant physiology, and genetics; and land-grant institutions have a…

  8. PRE-COLLEGE EXPERIENCES AS PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE COURSES IN AGRONOMY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BEEKS, JOHN C.

    TO DETERMINE THE KNOWLEDGE OF AGRONOMY POSSESSED BY ENTERING FRESHMEN IN THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI, STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE REQUIRED COURSE AGRICULTURE IN THE ECONOMY DURING THE YEARS 1962 AND 1963 RESPONDED TO A 100-ITEM MULTIPLE CHOICE INSTRUMENT. A TOTAL OF 310 USABLE ANSWER SHEETS FURNISHED DATA ON STUDENTS--(1)…

  9. Ten Years of Plant Pathology Research at the Cook Agronomy Farm: What Have We Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cook Agronomy Farm has provided important information for understanding root diseases under directseeded conditions in the higher rainfall annual cropping zones of the Palouse, at a landscape scale. This farm has served as an important outdoor laboratory to test disease management techniques suc...

  10. Experiences from a winter school on landscape agronomy : stakes, difficulties, perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rapey, Hélène; Lardon, Sylvie; Galli, Mariassunta; Moonen, Camilla; Benoit, Marc; Thenail, Claudine; Barberi, Paolo; Caron, Patrick; Marraccini, Elisa; Rizzo, Davide; Bonari, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    In the latest fifteen years, agronomic reserach has shown a growing interst for studies which link farm or field scale to landscape scale. Thus, agronomy is called to renew its research questions and methodologies, and as well its educational programmes. In this context, some French and Italian researchers interested in these topics, coming from different scientific fields but sharing interests on landscape scale issues in research and higher education, decided to join their efforts eround a ...

  11. Linking the Lab Experience with Everyday Life: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment for Agronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Sônia Maria N.; Yabe, Maria Josefa S.; Kondo, Neide K.; Mouriño, Rodrigo O.; Moura, Graziela Cristina R.

    2000-02-01

    Agronomy students generally lack interest in chemistry. The objective of this work was to modify the analytical chemistry curriculum to increase student interest. Samples of soils and plants prepared by students were introduced. Soil was treated with molasses residue, organic matter (chicken manure and humus obtained from goat excrement), and lime. The response of plants to the different soil treatments increased student interest in chemical analyses. Evaluation of several chemical and physicochemical parameters of samples demonstrated in a clear way the application of the theoretical and practical concepts of chemistry.

  12. Un exemple de coopération interuniversitaire en agronomie tropicale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymans, JC.

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available An example of inter-university cooperation in tropical agronomy. The citrus and mangoes production in Senegal must be valorised. The starting of a preliminary phasis of formation and equipment has showed clearly the necessity of creation of fruits-trees nurseries to corne up to the request in fruits plants of quality. The test has showed clearly that the period of production of a citrus plant must be cut down 12 months and 14 months for a mango plant. It proves the rentability of this kind of investment.

  13. [Analysis of genetic models and gene effects on main agronomy characters in rapeseed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Qiu, J; Tang, Z; Shen, L

    1992-01-01

    According to four different genetic models, the genetic patterns of 8 agronomy traits were analysed by using the data of 24 generations which included positive and negative cross of 81008 x Tower, both of the varieties are of good quality. The results showed that none of 8 characters could fit in with additive-dominance models. Epistasis was found in all of these characters, and it has significant effect on generation means. Seed weight/plant and some other main yield characters are controlled by duplicate interaction genes. The interaction between triple genes or multiple genes needs to be utilized in yield heterosis.

  14. Applications of nuclear techniques in agronomy as a contribution to the integral formation of agronomical engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Núñez Meireles, Mónica; Hernández Martínez, Asiel; Charbonet Martell, Miguel Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, nuclear research applied to agriculture and food is a reality, and is being supported by institutions like the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Stable and radioactive isotopes are used in different ways in agricultural research mainly in the determination of required conditions to optimize efficiency in the use of fertilizers and water, the development of high yield agricultural and horticultural varieties, reduction of diseases due to contaminated food, and soil erosion studies among others. Accordingly to the study carried out, there is not much knowledge about nuclear phenomena applied to agronomy. Nevertheless there is a positive criterion about the introduction of these topics in Agronomical Engineers education, by mean of implementing an optional subject, aimed at explaining different spheres of action of nuclear techniques in Agriculture. Consequently, it would be possible achieving the linkage of agronomical engineers with the nuclear techniques, though respecting at the same time the professional model of this career. Moreover, it is also proposed to include laboratory practices in the curriculum of this career, using nuclear techniques and showing their proper linkage with Agronomy. (author)

  15. Improving intercropping: a synthesis of research in agronomy, plant physiology and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rob W; Bennett, Alison E; Cong, Wen-Feng; Daniell, Tim J; George, Timothy S; Hallett, Paul D; Hawes, Cathy; Iannetta, Pietro P M; Jones, Hamlyn G; Karley, Alison J; Li, Long; McKenzie, Blair M; Pakeman, Robin J; Paterson, Eric; Schöb, Christian; Shen, Jianbo; Squire, Geoff; Watson, Christine A; Zhang, Chaochun; Zhang, Fusuo; Zhang, Junling; White, Philip J

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping is a farming practice involving two or more crop species, or genotypes, growing together and coexisting for a time. On the fringes of modern intensive agriculture, intercropping is important in many subsistence or low-input/resource-limited agricultural systems. By allowing genuine yield gains without increased inputs, or greater stability of yield with decreased inputs, intercropping could be one route to delivering ‘sustainable intensification’. We discuss how recent knowledge from agronomy, plant physiology and ecology can be combined with the aim of improving intercropping systems. Recent advances in agronomy and plant physiology include better understanding of the mechanisms of interactions between crop genotypes and species – for example, enhanced resource availability through niche complementarity. Ecological advances include better understanding of the context-dependency of interactions, the mechanisms behind disease and pest avoidance, the links between above- and below-ground systems, and the role of microtopographic variation in coexistence. This improved understanding can guide approaches for improving intercropping systems, including breeding crops for intercropping. Although such advances can help to improve intercropping systems, we suggest that other topics also need addressing. These include better assessment of the wider benefits of intercropping in terms of multiple ecosystem services, collaboration with agricultural engineering, and more effective interdisciplinary research.

  16. [Comparison on agronomy and quality characters of selective strain of Schizonepeta tenuifolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Jin, Yue; Wei, Jianhe; Chu, Qinglong; Zhao, Runhuai; Wang, Weiquan

    2009-05-01

    With the purpose of selecting adequate quality and high production of Schizonepeta tenuifolia, the comparative experiments were carried out on different strain of S. tenuifolia in 2007. The test fields were divided into blocks randomly, and the agronomy characters were investigated in harvest time; the content of volatile oil was measured by steam distillation and the pulegone were determined by HPLC. The yield of S4 was 18.63% and 29.99% higher than that of CK1 and CK2, respectively. The contents of volatile oil and pulegone were also higher than those of CK and other strains in this test. S4 shows the advantages of high production, strong disease resistance and high active components. S4 would be extended as the good breed in production.

  17. Introduction to Agronomy, Grain Crops, Weeds and Controls. A Learning Activity Pac in Agricultural Education Courses in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This learning activity pac contains information to help the teachers of high school vocational agriculture in the instructional area of agronomy. Each of the two main sections, grain crops and weeds and controls, includes teacher and student units for the section lessons. Teacher units include special instructions--equipment needed (film…

  18. The Cook Agronomy Farm LTAR: Knowledge Intensive Precision Agro-ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drowning in data and starving for knowledge, agricultural decision makers require evidence-based information to enlighten sustainable intensification. The agro-ecological footprint of the Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) site is embedded within 9.4 million ha of diverse land uses primarily cropland (2.9 million ha) and rangeland (5.3 million ha) that span a wide annual precipitation gradient (150 mm through 1400 mm) with diverse social and natural capital (see Figure). Sustainable intensification hinges on the development and adoption of precision agro-ecological practices that rely on meaningful spatio-temporal data relevant to land use decisions at within-field to regional scales. Specifically, the CAF LTAR will provide the scientific foundation (socio-economical and bio-physical) for enhancing decision support for precision and conservation agriculture and synergistic cropping system intensification and diversification. Long- and short-term perspectives that recognize and assess trade-offs in ecosystem services inherent in any land use decision will be considered so as to promote the development of more sustainable agricultural systems. Presented will be current and future CAF LTAR research efforts required for the development of sustainable agricultural systems including cropping system cycles and flows of nutrients, water, carbon, greenhouse gases and other biotic and abiotic factors. Evaluation criteria and metrics associated with long-term agro-ecosystem provisioning, supporting, and regulating services will be emphasized.

  19. Climate change affecting oil palm agronomy, and oil palm cultivation increasing climate change, require amelioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2018-01-01

    Palm oil is used in various valued commodities and is a large global industry worth over US$ 50 billion annually. Oil palms (OP) are grown commercially in Indonesia and Malaysia and other countries within Latin America and Africa. The large-scale land-use change has high ecological, economic, and social impacts. Tropical countries in particular are affected negatively by climate change (CC) which also has a detrimental impact on OP agronomy, whereas the cultivation of OP increases CC. Amelioration of both is required. The reduced ability to grow OP will reduce CC, which may allow more cultivation tending to increase CC, in a decreasing cycle. OP could be increasingly grown in more suitable regions occurring under CC. Enhancing the soil fauna may compensate for the effect of CC on OP agriculture to some extent. The effect of OP cultivation on CC may be reduced by employing reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation plans, for example, by avoiding illegal fire land clearing. Other ameliorating methods are reported herein. More research is required involving good management practices that can offset the increases in CC by OP plantations. Overall, OP-growing countries should support the Paris convention on reducing CC as the most feasible scheme for reducing CC.

  20. Marine macroalgae in the agronomy and potential use of floating sargassum for manure production in the San Andres and Providencia Archipelago, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bula Meyer, German

    2004-01-01

    An account is made on the use of marine macroalgae in agronomy and the potential that floating Sargassum arriving to san Andres and Providencia has for this activity. This Sargassum, which has been a nuisance for the tourist economy of the islands, promises to be an excellent resource for manure production

  1. Eksplorasi dan Karakterisasi Tanaman Genjer (Limnocharis flava (L. Buch di Kabupaten Pangandaran Berdasarkan Karakter Morfologi dan Agronomi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberty Chaidir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genjer merupakan tanaman yang tumbuh liar di area persawahan, rawa, atau sungai yang keberadaannya sering dianggap sebagai gulma. Tanaman genjer memiliki banyak manfaat, diantaranya sebagai bahan penyerap logam berat dalam tanah dan sebagai obat yang memiliki banyak kandungan gizi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui variasi karakter morfologi dan karakter agronomi untuk mengetahui hubungan kekerabatan tanaman genjer antar daerah di Kabupaten Pangandaran. Penelitian dilaksanakan di Kabupaten Pangandaran pada Mei sampai Oktober 2015. Metode yang digunakan adalah metode eksplorasi purposive sampling pada 77 aksesi genjer yang diambil dari Kabupaten Pangandaran. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan terdapat keragaman fenotipik yang luas pada karakter morfologi ujung daun, warna batang, tekstur daun, warna daun, panjang lekukan bawah daun, warna kelopak bunga dan warna bunga. Karakter agronomi yang mempunyai keragaman yang luas ialah tinggi tanaman, jumlah batang per rumpun, panjang daun, lebar daun, jumlah daun, jumlah bunga dan diameter batang. Tanaman genjer di Kabupaten Pangandaran memiliki kekerabatan yang jauh dengan rentang jarak Euclidian 0,48 sampai 10,17. Aksesi yang memiliki hubungan kekerabatan paling jauh yaitu Ciakar (001 dengan jarak Euclidian 10,17, sedangkan yang memiliki hubungan kekerabatan paling dekat yaitu Cikalong (003 dan Cikalong (004 dengan jarak Euclidian 0,48. Genjer or Yellow velvetleaf is a plant that grows wild in lowland area, swamp or river which existence is considered as a weed. Genjer has a lot of benefits, such as material absorbent for heavy metals in the soil and medicine that has a lot of nutrition. This study aimed to determine the variety of morphological and agronomic characters of Genjer in Pangandaran Regency and to determine the genetic relationship of genjer between regions in Pangandaran. The research was conducted in the Pangandaran Regency on May to October 2015. The method used purposive sampling

  2. Biofortified Crops Generated by Breeding, Agronomy, and Transgenic Approaches Are Improving Lives of Millions of People around the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Garg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofortification is an upcoming, promising, cost-effective, and sustainable technique of delivering micronutrients to a population that has limited access to diverse diets and other micronutrient interventions. Unfortunately, major food crops are poor sources of micronutrients required for normal human growth. The manuscript deals in all aspects of crop biofortification which includes—breeding, agronomy, and genetic modification. It tries to summarize all the biofortification research that has been conducted on different crops. Success stories of biofortification include lysine and tryptophan rich quality protein maize (World food prize 2000, Vitamin A rich orange sweet potato (World food prize 2016; generated by crop breeding, oleic acid, and stearidonic acid soybean enrichment; through genetic transformation and selenium, iodine, and zinc supplementation. The biofortified food crops, especially cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruits, are providing sufficient levels of micronutrients to targeted populations. Although a greater emphasis is being laid on transgenic research, the success rate and acceptability of breeding is much higher. Besides the challenges biofortified crops hold a bright future to address the malnutrition challenge.

  3. Accelerating Genetic Gains in Legumes for the Development of Prosperous Smallholder Agriculture: Integrating Genomics, Phenotyping, Systems Modelling and Agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K; Tardieu, Francois; Ojiewo, Chris; Vadez, Vincent; Whitbread, Anthony M; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Nguyen, Henry T; Carberry, Peter S; Bergvinson, David

    2018-03-05

    Grain legumes form an important component of the human diet, feed for livestock and replenish soil fertility through biological nitrogen fixation. Globally, the demand for food legumes is increasing as they complement cereals in protein requirements and possess a high percentage of digestible protein. Climate change has enhanced the frequency and intensity of drought stress that is posing serious production constraints, especially in rainfed regions where most legumes are produced. Genetic improvement of legumes, like other crops, is mostly based on pedigree and performance-based selection over the last half century. For achieving faster genetic gains in legumes in rainfed conditions, this review article proposes the integration of modern genomics approaches, high throughput phenomics and simulation modelling as support for crop improvement that leads to improved varieties that perform with appropriate agronomy. Selection intensity, generation interval and improved operational efficiencies in breeding are expected to further enhance the genetic gain in experiment plots. Improved seed access to farmers, combined with appropriate agronomic packages in farmers' fields, will deliver higher genetic gains. Enhanced genetic gains including not only productivity but also nutritional and market traits will increase the profitability of farmers and the availability of affordable nutritious food especially in developing countries.

  4. Biofortified Crops Generated by Breeding, Agronomy, and Transgenic Approaches Are Improving Lives of Millions of People around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Saloni; Kapoor, Payal; Kumar, Aman; Chunduri, Venkatesh; Arora, Priya

    2018-01-01

    Biofortification is an upcoming, promising, cost-effective, and sustainable technique of delivering micronutrients to a population that has limited access to diverse diets and other micronutrient interventions. Unfortunately, major food crops are poor sources of micronutrients required for normal human growth. The manuscript deals in all aspects of crop biofortification which includes-breeding, agronomy, and genetic modification. It tries to summarize all the biofortification research that has been conducted on different crops. Success stories of biofortification include lysine and tryptophan rich quality protein maize (World food prize 2000), Vitamin A rich orange sweet potato (World food prize 2016); generated by crop breeding, oleic acid, and stearidonic acid soybean enrichment; through genetic transformation and selenium, iodine, and zinc supplementation. The biofortified food crops, especially cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruits, are providing sufficient levels of micronutrients to targeted populations. Although a greater emphasis is being laid on transgenic research, the success rate and acceptability of breeding is much higher. Besides the challenges biofortified crops hold a bright future to address the malnutrition challenge.

  5. Family sucession in rural properties: A study of the succession situation among academics of UFFS Agronomy Course Erechim and their parents

    OpenAIRE

    S. Paula; A. B. Moreira,; D. A. Mota

    2017-01-01

    Among the numerous studies dealing with the issue of family succession, the majority cities the succession process as a key issue in social reproduction and perpetuation of family farms. Thus, the study aimed to identify the actual situation among academics of UFFS Agronomy Course and their parents when the topic family succession is placed in focus. The methodology used was the application of a structured survey prepared in order to answer the doubts. The survey was designed in online way be...

  6. Retrieval of LAI and leaf chlorophyll content from remote sensing data by agronomy mechanism knowledge to solve the ill-posed inverse problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhai; Nie, Chenwei; Yang, Guijun; Xu, Xingang; Jin, Xiuliang; Gu, Xiaohe

    2014-10-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and LCC, as the two most important crop growth variables, are major considerations in management decisions, agricultural planning and policy making. Estimation of canopy biophysical variables from remote sensing data was investigated using a radiative transfer model. However, the ill-posed problem is unavoidable for the unique solution of the inverse problem and the uncertainty of measurements and model assumptions. This study focused on the use of agronomy mechanism knowledge to restrict and remove the ill-posed inversion results. For this purpose, the inversion results obtained using the PROSAIL model alone (NAMK) and linked with agronomic mechanism knowledge (AMK) were compared. The results showed that AMK did not significantly improve the accuracy of LAI inversion. LAI was estimated with high accuracy, and there was no significant improvement after considering AMK. The validation results of the determination coefficient (R2) and the corresponding root mean square error (RMSE) between measured LAI and estimated LAI were 0.635 and 1.022 for NAMK, and 0.637 and 0.999 for AMK, respectively. LCC estimation was significantly improved with agronomy mechanism knowledge; the R2 and RMSE values were 0.377 and 14.495 μg cm-2 for NAMK, and 0.503 and 10.661 μg cm-2 for AMK, respectively. Results of the comparison demonstrated the need for agronomy mechanism knowledge in radiative transfer model inversion.

  7. Synthèse des résultats de recherche sur l'agronomie du caféier arabica (Coffea arabica L.) au Rwanda au 31 mars 1994

    OpenAIRE

    Rutunga, V.; Kavamahangat, F.; Nsengimana, C.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of Results on Coffee Agronomy Research in Rwanda on 31 March 1994. Arabica coffee plays an important role in the macro-economic performance of Rwanda. As a result, Agricultural Research Institutes have done research on coffee agronomy, aimed at improving coffee productivite The ecological conditions for coffee in Rwanda are characterized by inadequate rainfall and high light intensity. Soil parental material and chemical properties are variable amongst different small holders coffee...

  8. Agronomie Africaine: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  9. Agronomie Africaine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    caractères de taille 12), avec une marge de 4 cm, et expédiés en quatre exemplaires sur du papier format 21 x 29,7 cm à l'éditeur, en plus de la version électronique sur disquette 3.5 , et en fichier joint à l'adresse postale suivante : La Rédaction de ...

  10. Impact of agronomy practices on the effects of reduced tillage systems on CH4 and N2O emissions from agricultural fields: A global meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinfei; Li, Fengbo; Zhou, Xiyue; Xu, Chunchun; Ji, Long; Chen, Zhongdu; Fang, Fuping

    2018-01-01

    The effect of no- and reduced tillage (NT/RT) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission was highly variable and may depend on other agronomy practices. However, how the other practices affect the effect of NT/RT on GHG emission remains elusive. Therefore, we conducted a global meta-analysis (including 49 papers with 196 comparisons) to assess the effect of five options (i.e. cropping system, crop residue management, split application of N fertilizer, irrigation, and tillage duration) on the effect of NT/RT on CH4 and N2O emissions from agricultural fields. The results showed that NT/RT significantly mitigated the overall global warming potential (GWP) of CH4 and N2O emissions by 6.6% as compared with conventional tillage (CT). Rotation cropping systems and crop straw remove facilitated no-tillage (NT) to reduce the CH4, N2O, or overall GWP both in upland and paddy field. NT significantly mitigated the overall GWP when the percentage of basal N fertilizer (PBN) >50%, when tillage duration > 10 years or rainfed in upland, while when PBN agronomy practices and land use type.

  11. [Genetic improvement of cotton varieties in Huang-Huai region in China since 1950's. III. Improvement on agronomy properties, disease resistance and stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, B G; Kong, F L; Zhang, Q Y; Yang, F X; Jiang, R Q

    2000-01-01

    Data from a set of 5-location and 2-year experiments on 10 representative historical cotton varieties and the data of Huang-Huai Regional Cotton Trials from 1973 to 1996 were analyzed to estimate the effects of genetic improvement in agronomy properties, disease resistance and stability of cotton in Huang-Huai Region in China. The results indicated that a great genetic progress of earliness and disease resistance had been achieved by breeding programs since 1950's. The maturity was shortened 3-5 days; The rate of preforst yield was increased about 7 percentages. The problem of resistance to Fususium wilt has been solved and the resistance to Verticillum wilt was improving. Some progress in stability of cotton varieties also has been achieved by breeding programs since 1950.

  12. Family sucession in rural properties: A study of the succession situation among academics of UFFS Agronomy Course Erechim and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Paula

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the numerous studies dealing with the issue of family succession, the majority cities the succession process as a key issue in social reproduction and perpetuation of family farms. Thus, the study aimed to identify the actual situation among academics of UFFS Agronomy Course and their parents when the topic family succession is placed in focus. The methodology used was the application of a structured survey prepared in order to answer the doubts. The survey was designed in online way being sent an access link to the e-mail address previously, and then collected from every academic who had links with the countryside. For others, it was printed, delivered, and then collected. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. As a result was obtained that even though there are differences of opinion, the vast majority of young people show comfortable in become a farmer and to continue the current business of the parents. Over 83% of men and 92% of women in the parent class intend to hold family succession still alive, and the children respect this opinion giving autonomy to the parents to carry out the succession when they consider most appropriate.

  13. The Effect of Monitoring: How Data Collection Type and Frequency Boosts Participation and the Adoption of Best Practices in a Coffee Agronomy Training Program in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathani, Sachin; Gomez, Maria Paula; Sabates, Ricardo; Stoelinga, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    The impact of surveying on individuals' behavior and decision making has been widely studied in academic literature on market research but not so much the impact of monitoring on economic development interventions. To estimate whether different monitoring strategies lead to improvement in participation levels and adoption of best practices for coffee production for farmer who participated in TechnoServe Agronomy Training Program in Rwanda. Farmers were identified randomly for monitoring purposes to belong to two different groups and then selected depending on the additional criterion of having productive coffee trees. We estimate treatment-on-the-treated and intention-to-treat effects on training attendance rates and farmers best-practice adoptions using difference-in-differences estimation techniques. Farmers were randomly identified to a high or low monitoring with different type and frequency of data collection and selected if they had productive coffee trees as part of the monitoring strategy. Attendance to training sessions by all farmers in the program and best-practice adoption data for improving coffee yield. We find that monitoring led to surprisingly large increases in farmer participation levels in the project and also improved best-practice adoption rates. We also find that higher frequency of data collection has long-lasting effects and are more pronounced for low-attendance farmers. Monitoring not only provides more data and a better understanding of project dynamics, which in turn can help improve design, but can also improve processes and outcomes, in particular for the least engaged. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Plasma-activation of tap water using DBD for agronomy applications: Identification and quantification of long lifetime chemical species and production/consumption mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judée, F; Simon, S; Bailly, C; Dufour, T

    2018-04-15

    Cold atmospheric plasmas are weakly ionized gases that can be generated in ambient air. They produce energetic species (e.g. electrons, metastables) as well as reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, UV radiations and local electric field. Their interaction with a liquid such as tap water can hence change its chemical composition. The resulting "plasma-activated liquid" can meet many applications, including medicine and agriculture. Consequently, a complete experimental set of analytical techniques dedicated to the characterization of long lifetime chemical species has been implemented to characterize tap water treated using cold atmospheric plasma process and intended to agronomy applications. For that purpose, colorimetry and acid titrations are performed, considering acid-base equilibria, pH and temperature variations induced during plasma activation. 16 species are quantified and monitored: hydroxide and hydronium ions, ammonia and ammonium ions, orthophosphates, carbonate ions, nitrite and nitrate ions and hydrogen peroxide. The related consumption/production mechanisms are discussed. In parallel, a chemical model of electrical conductivity based on Kohlrausch's law has been developed to simulate the electrical conductivity of the plasma-activated tap water (PATW). Comparing its predictions with experimental measurements leads to a narrow fitting, hence supporting the self-sufficiency of the experimental set, I.e. the fact that all long lifetime radicals of interest present in PATW are characterized. Finally, to evaluate the potential of cold atmospheric plasmas for agriculture applications, tap water has been daily plasma-treated to irrigate lentils seeds. Then, seedlings lengths have been measured and compared with untreated tap water, showing an increase as high as 34.0% and 128.4% after 3 days and 6 days of activation respectively. The interaction mechanisms between plasma and tap water are discussed as well as their positive synergy on

  15. Sweet clover production and agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goplen, B P

    1980-05-01

    Sweetclover has a notorious reputation for causing "sweetclover disease" when improperly cured. In spite of this, however, sweetclover remains a useful forage legume with valuable agronomic traits. It is drought-resistant and well adapted to Western Canada. Sweetclover is the highest yielding legume forage in this region and is valuable in soil improvement, silage, hay and pasture production and a prized crop for the honey producer. It is the most saline-tolerant of the legumes and is particularly useful on saline "white alkali" soils where cereals and other crops cannot grow. Special precautions are necessary to avoid spoilage and concomitant dicoumarol formation in preserving sweetclover hay and silage. Feeding recommendations are suggested for the safe utilization of spoiled forage. Low coumarin cultivars of sweetclover are completely safe and will not result in sweetclover disease despite spoilage. The breeding program at Saskatoon is expected to produce a new low coumarin (yellow flowered) sweetclover cultivar within the next two years.

  16. Synthèse des résultats de recherche sur l'agronomie du caféier arabica (Coffea arabica L. au Rwanda au 31 mars 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutunga, V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of Results on Coffee Agronomy Research in Rwanda on 31 March 1994. Arabica coffee plays an important role in the macro-economic performance of Rwanda. As a result, Agricultural Research Institutes have done research on coffee agronomy, aimed at improving coffee productivite The ecological conditions for coffee in Rwanda are characterized by inadequate rainfall and high light intensity. Soil parental material and chemical properties are variable amongst different small holders coffee producers. The available results indicate that spacing in coffee planting of 2 m x 2 m or 2, 5 m x 1, 5 m are convenient. Higher density with "multicaule"planting provided better production with some varieties. Pruning regime has been established but should still be correctly followed. Mulching is the best cultural technique to improve production. It improves soil physical and chemical properties and water storage. It can also improve minerai fertilizer use efficiency. The mulching materials are variable but not enough for ail coffee plantations. Mulch is applied late (July, August in Rwanda. Living cover with different species including legumes cannot replace efficiently the mulch, although the cover of Desmodium sp. and other few species can offer some advantages. Shade trees in coffee plantations have not been successful. N fertilizer followed by K improved coffee production. The effect of P was not clear while Mg deficiency was observed in some plantations. The formula of N.P.K. and N.P.K. Mg. were recommended but their rates should vary according to the sites. Finally, a beneficial effect was observed in using rotted coffee rinds compost.

  17. Effects of nitrogen fertilization strategies on nitrogen use efficiency in physiology, recovery, and agronomy and redistribution of dry matter accumulation and nitrogen accumulation in two typical rice cultivars in Zhejiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-xia; Wang, Guang-huo; Zhang, Qi-chun; Guo, Hai-chao

    2007-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted in farmers' rice fields in 2001 and 2002 to study the effects of nitrogen (N) management strategies on N use efficiency in recovery (RE), agronomy (AE) and physiology (PE) and redistribution of dry matter accumulation (DMA) and nitrogen accumulation (NA) in two typical rice cultivars in Jinhua, Zhejiang Province. This study aimed mainly at identifying the possible causes of poor fertilizer N use efficiency (NUE) of rice in Zhejiang by comparing farmers' fertilizer practice (FFP) with advanced site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) and real-time N management (RTNM). The results showed that compared to FFP, SSNM and RTNM reduced DMA and NA before panicle initiation and increased DMA and NA at post-flowering. There is no significant difference between SSNM and FFP in post-flowering dry matter redistribution (post-DMR) and post-flowering nitrogen redistribution (post-NR). These results suggest that high input rate of fertilizer N and improper fertilizer N timing are the main factors causing low NUE of irrigated rice in the farmer's routine practice of Zhejiang. With SSNM, about 15% of the current total N input in direct-seeding early rice and 45% in single rice could be reduced without yield loss in Zhejiang, China.

  18. THE FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL CULTURE FROM THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF THE CAREER OF AGRONOMY / LA FORMACIÓN Y DESARROLLO DE LA CULTURA AGROAMBIENTAL DESDE EL PROCESO DOCENTE – EDUCATIVO DE LA CARRERA DE AGRONOMÍA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida Almaguer Álvarez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of achieving the sustainable development in the ecosystems of Cuba in that the professionals of the agricultural sciences, it constitutes a priority of the State and the Cuban Government. Therefore, it is required of the development of a formative process in the career of Agronomy that keeps in mind the resulting logic of the environmental qualities in the agricultural means, so that makes sure a culture, distinctive of this professional in their acting and performance, what will mean that the sense of ownership is achieved toward the environment and the sustainable development, of sharing the personal objectives with the social ones, of developing feelings, human qualities and ethical values that are expressed in the ideal of human behavior regarding the relationships nature - man - society - environment - develop sustainable.RESUMENLos retos de lograr el desarrollo sostenible en los agroecosistemas cubanos en que se desempeñan los profesionales de las ciencias agrícolas, constituye una prioridad del Estado y el Gobierno cubanos. Por tanto, se requiere del desarrollo de un proceso formativo en la carrera de Agronomía que tenga en cuenta la lógica resultante de las cualidades: perceptibilidad – reflexibilidad – integrabilidad agroambientales, de manera que se asegure una cultura agroambiental, distintiva de este profesional en su desempeño y actuación, lo que significará que se logre el sentido de pertenencia hacia el medio ambiente y el desarrollo sostenible, de compartir los objetivos personales con los sociales, de desarrollar sentimientos, cualidades humanas y valores éticos, que se expresen en el ideal de comportamiento humano respecto a las relaciones naturaleza – hombre – sociedad - medio ambiente - desarrollo sostenible.

  19. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 19, No 2 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... De L\\'utilisation Des Engrais Mineraux Dans Les Zones De Production Du Riz : Cas Du Centre-Ouest De La Côte D\\'ivoire · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JTB Gala, M Camara, A Assa, JZ Keli, 173-185. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aga.v19i2.1711 ...

  20. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 12, No 1 (2000)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... en Côte d'lvoire : Pluridisciplinary research approach to in Vitro tissue culture for the improvement of rubber tree cultivation en Côte d'lvoire, EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. G.B. DEA, M. P. CARRON, E.K. KOFFI, J.Z. KELI, A. LECONTE, C. DRENOU ...

  1. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 17, No 1 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Associations culturales à base d\\'hévéa : bilan de 20 années d\\'expérimentations en Côte d\\'Ivoire. Partie 1 : Comportement végétatif · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JZ Keli, H Omont, AA Assiri, KA Boko, S Abouayebe, BG Dea, A Doumbia, 37-52.

  2. Agronomy, sustainability and good agricultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caliman Jean-Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable palm oil production needs to be based on the application of a code of good practices, respecting a certain number of criteria related to economic, environmental and social aspects. We focus here on economic and environmental aspects, attempting to take stock of the current situation regarding the management of inputs (fertilizers, pesticides, and of oil mill waste (empty fruit bunches, effluent. We also take a look at the main agricultural research required if we are to be able to assess the situation on different scales and see how it is evolving, and also provide assistance for rational management that is compatible with farmers’ production targets.

  3. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 26, No 3 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les hybridations interspecifiques dans le genre Phaseolus : selection des genotypes compatibles et caracterisation des hybrides interspecifiques · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S Silue, IJ Fofana, N Diarrassouba, A Toussaint, G Mergeai, JP Baudoin ...

  4. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 18, No 3 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amélioration génétique de Coffea canephora Pierre par hybridation interspécifique : étude de descendances de première génération de Coffea canephora Pierre x Coffea congensis Froenhner · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AS N'Guetta, KB ...

  5. Department of Agronomy/Sugar Research Institute,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... percent extraction. Chaudhary (2001) in his own study reported high heritability estimates for millable cane population. (88%), stalk diameter (85%) and sugarcane weight (84%) whereas low heritability estimates were recorded for germination at. 45 days after planting (45%) and sucrose in the juice (32%).

  6. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 18, No 2 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidémiologie comparée de la cercosporiose noire et de la cladosporiose chez le bananier en Côte d\\'Ivoire · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. D Kone, JY Kouadio, S Traore, K Kobenan, S Ake, 175-185. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aga.v18i2.1691 ...

  7. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 23, No 2 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dynamique foliaire et croissance du maïs: Application du modèle «STICS» en conditions tropicales en RD-Congo · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. MM Lufuluabo, RV Kizungu, KK Nkongolo, 91-102 ...

  8. Cocoa agronomy, quality, nutritional, and health aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrie, Neela; Bekele, Frances; Sikora, Elzbieta; Sikora, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The history of cocoa and chocolate including the birth and the expansion of the chocolate industry was described. Recent developments in the industry and cocoa economy were briefly depicted. An overview of the classification of cacao as well as studies on phenotypic and genetic diversity was presented. Cocoa agronomic practices including traditional and modern propagation techniques were reviewed. Nutrition-related health benefits derived from cocoa consumption were listed and widely reviewed. The specific action of cocoa antioxidants was compared to those of teas and wines. Effects of adding milk to chocolate and chocolate drinks versus bioavailability of cocoa polyphenols were discussed. Finally, flavor, sensory, microbiological, and toxicological aspects of cocoa consumption were presented.

  9. Chayanov and Social Agronomy in Russia (1918).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez de Puerta, F.

    1994-01-01

    Chayanov's ideas on rural development (farmer participation in agricultural evolution, increasing the scope and differentiation of extension activities, and using methods adapted to farmers' characteristics) could be usefully applied today in reforming Russian agriculture. (SK)

  10. Agronomie Africaine - Vol 26, No 2 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence du système de logement sur quelques performances zootechniques et économiques des poules pondeuses au Sud-Bénin · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. ML Tossou, CAAM Chrysostome, MF Houndonougbo, A Missohou, FA Abiola, 147- ...

  11. METHODOLOGY FOR DESIGNING TEACHING DEVELOPING-TASKS OF DEPTH OF THOUGHT WHICH APPRECIATE THE QUALITY OF THE GRADUATE PROFFESIONALS OF AGRONOMY / METODOLOGÍA PARA ELABORAR TAREAS DOCENTES DESARROLLADORAS DE LA PROFUNDIDAD DEL PENSAMIENTO QUE PROPICIE LA CALIDAD DEL EGRESO DE PROFESIONALES DE LA AGRONOMÍA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilka Sosa Oliva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work has as a general objective to contribute to guarantee the quality of the enrollment of the professionals of junior level in the specialty of Agronomy, from the direction of the process of thinking. As a result, a methodology is offered for the elaboration of teaching tasks which favor the development of thought from the work done to skills. This is a result of a Project of investigation: an alternative for the direction of the teaching-learning process in the Technical and Professional Level of Teaching and this constitute a pre-liminary result of a thesis in option to get a PhD.

  12. 279 Department of Agronomy/Sugar Research Institute, University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2014-04-09

    Apr 9, 2014 ... collected on weed density, weed biomass, sugarcane tiller count and cane yield. Our results ... marginal productivity of their farm land and high cost of inputs ..... Pakistan reported similar results between number of tillers and ...

  13. Introduction to nuclear techniques in agronomy and plant biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vose, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: nature of isotopes and radiation; nuclear reactions; working with radioisotopes; detection systems and instrumentation; radioassay; radioisotopes and tracer principles; stable isotopes as tracers - mainly the use of 15 N; activation analysis for biological samples; x-ray fluorescence spectrography for plants and soils; autoradiography; isotopes in soils studies; isotopic tracers in field experimentation; nuclear techniques in plant science; nuclear techniques for soil water; radiation and other induced mutation in plant breeding. (author)

  14. Introduction to nuclear techniques in agronomy and plant biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vose, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A scientific textbook concerning the use of nuclear techniques in agricultural and biological studies has been written. In the early chapters, basic radiation physics principles are described including the nature of isotopes and radiation, nuclear reactions, working with radioisotopes, detection systems and instrumentation, radioassay and tracer techniques. The remaining chapters describe the applications of various nuclear techniques including activation analysis for biological samples, X-ray fluorescence spectrography for plants and soils, autoradiography, isotopes in soils studies, isotopic tracers in field experimentation, nuclear techniques in plant function and soil water studies and radiation-induced mutations in plant breeding. The principles and methods of these nuclear techniques are described in a straightforward manner together with details of many possible agricultural and biological studies which students could perform. (U.K.)

  15. 279 Department of Agronomy/Sugar Research Institute, University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2014-04-09

    Apr 9, 2014 ... sugarcane production in Nigeria. The competition for water, light, nutrients and space between weeds and the crop can reduce sugarcane stalk population and yield. Weed interference is a major biotic constraint to optimal crop production. Singh et al. (1980) reported that weed. - crop competition is effective ...

  16. On the agronomy and botany of salak (Salacca zalacca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashari, S.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Salak, Salacca zalacca, Palmae, dioecious, haustorium, simple leaf, compound leaf, sucker, phyllotaxis, seedling, inflorescence, fruit, hand pollination, farm yard manure, fertilizer, shading, walking palm.


    Salak is a dioecious, suckering

  17. Neutron and gamma probes: Their use in agronomy. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Water is an essential requirement for life on the planet. It is often the single most limiting factor in crop and livestock production. Water is a scarce resource in many urban and rural environments worldwide. According to the FAO, the global demand for fresh water is doubling every 21 years. The quality of the finite water supplies is also under threat from industrial, agricultural and domestic sources of pollution. The majority of crops are grown under rain-fed conditions and adequate water supply is the main factor limiting crop production in semi-arid and sub-humid regions. On the other hand, currently 20% of the world's arable land is under irrigation providing 35 to 40% of all agricultural production. Irrigation mismanagement poses a serious threat to the environment through groundwater pollution and salinization. It is therefore, essential that water resources be used efficiently by regular monitoring of soil-water status in the unsaturated zone. The neutron depth probe, a nuclear-based technique, is utilized worldwide for this purpose. The neutron moisture gauge, since its introduction some 40 years ago, can now be considered a routine method in soil water studies. Many developments have since been introduced, in particular electronic components, which have significantly improved performance and expanded applications. Although the neutron scattering method is routinely utilised in many developed countries, its use is still limited in developing countries due to several factors. Neutron depth probes contain radioactive sources, which will present health and environmental hazards if a probe is improperly used, stored or disposed of. National and international legislation and regulations must be complied with. The strategic objective of the sub-program Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is to develop and promote the adoption of nuclear-based technologies for optimising soil, water and nutrient management within cropping systems. In this context, neutron moisture probes in combination with isotope techniques are utilized to obtain precise and quantitative data on water and nutrient dynamics in the soil-plant system. The Centre for Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture (CENA) of the University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil is an institute established with IAEA support, with skilled and experienced staff and facilities to utilize nuclear techniques in agronomic and related environmental research. Many training events and formal undergraduate and post-graduate courses involving the use of neutron moisture meters have been offered by CENA. The concept of a training manual originated during a regional training workshop on the use of the neutron probe in water and nutrient balance studies, organized in 1997 in the frame of an IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America entitled Plant Nutrition, Water and Soil Management (RLA/5/036-ARCAL XXII), for which the integrated approach was adopted. The original version (in Spanish) was a comprehensive manual covering theoretical and practical aspects required for the proper utilization of the equipment. It is hoped that this manual will be useful for future training events and serve as a key reference to soil/water scientists in the field of sustainable management of scarce water resources in both rain-fed and irrigated agricultural production systems

  18. Neutron and gamma probes: Their use in agronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchi, O.O.; Reichart, K.; Calvache, M.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of this training manual originated during a regional training workshop on the use of neutron probe in water and nutrient balance studies, organized in 1997 in the frame of an IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America entitle Plant Nutrition, Water and Soil Management, for which the integrated approach was adopted. The original version (in Spanish) was a comprehensive manual covering theoretical and practical aspects required for the proper utilization of the equipment. The contributions of the peer reviewers, editors and technical translators of the three versions in English, French and Spanish have greatly enhanced the content and quality of the manual. It is hoped that this manual will be useful for future training events and serve as a key reference to soil/water scientists in the field of sustainable management of scarce water resources in both rain-fed and irrigated agricultural production systems

  19. Agronomy and photosynthesis physiology of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Kailei

    2018-01-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a sustainable high-yielding crop that delivers valuable fibres, seeds and psychoactive substances. However, there is a lack of field experimental data on the cultivation of hemp because its production was largely abandoned in the last century. Hemp is now

  20. Scale and scaling in agronomy and environmental sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scale is of paramount importance in environmental studies, engineering, and design. The unique course covers the following topics: scale and scaling, methods and theories, scaling in soils and other porous media, scaling in plants and crops; scaling in landscapes and watersheds, and scaling in agro...

  1. Academic Value of Internships in Agronomy: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Matthew D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the academic requirements of internships, benefits in taking part in an internship, and problems encountered in internship programs are described. Results indicated that one of the problems with internship programs occurred when faculty did not have direct control over the experience. (CW)

  2. Integrating Agronomic Principles with Management Experience in Introductory Agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorst, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Explains the use of a cropping systems project to teach agronomic principles and crop management techniques, and to enhance communication skills. Provides a sample progress report instructions sheet which was used for the project. (Author/RT)

  3. Lutte Contre Les Parasites Chez Le Karite | Soro | Agronomie Africaine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This butter is used in many products, such as local food, chocolate, cosmetic and pharmacopoeia. Nevertheless,shea orchards are more and more subject to severe attacks by Loranthaceae, a vascular parasite plants, commonly called guis. Therefore, a pest management study was carried out on Tengrela\\'s natural shea ...

  4. Studies on the agronomy of Al-Andalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia María Carabaza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Comme il peut être déduit du titre donné à ce travail, le principal objectif que nous nous sommes fixées, c'est de procéder à une mise à jour de la recherche en ce qui concerne les œuvres agricoles écrites à Al-Andalus. Pour ce faire, nous analyserons dans un premier temps, les manuscrits que l'on connaît de ces œuvres en question et qui appartiennent aussi bien aux bibliothèques du monde arabe qu’à des bibliothèques occidentales. Ensuite, nous mentionnerons les traités agronomiques qui sont actuellement édités et traduits, accompagnés de quelques notes critiques concernant les travaux qui ont été mis en œuvre jusqu'à présent dans ce domaine, pour terminer avec l'exposé des différents projets qui sont actuellement en cours et qui sont relatifs à ces traités agricoles d’Al-Andalus.

  5. Some applications of neutron activation analysis in plant biology and agronomy; Quelques applications de l'analyse par radioactivation neutronique en biologie vegetale et en agronomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourcy, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    Plants materials are not so commonly analysed by radioactivation than biological extracts of medical importance. With help of concrete examples, applications of neutrons activation analysis to the determination of some metals (Mn, Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, and K) in plant materials, are proposed. Samples are activated in a swimming-pool reactor at the thermal flux of 5.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} for a time varying between few minutes and several days according to the element being analysed. The induced radioactivity is measured by spectrometry, with radiochemical separation ( Cu, Co, Fe, Zn and K) or without separation in best cases (Mn,Cu, K). Described dosages are related to: manganese in a graminaceous plant, copper in vine treatments, cobalt, iron and zinc in animal feeding, potassium in a radiological experiment. (author) [French] Les produits vegetaux sont beaucoup moins souvent soumis a l'analyse par activation que les extraits biologiques d'interet medical. En s'appuyant sur des cas concrets, nous proposons des applications de l'analyse par activation neutronique au dosage de differents metaux (Mn, Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, et K) dans la matiere vegetale. Les echantillons sont actives en pile piscine au flux thermique de 5.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} pendant des temps variant de quelques minutes a plusieurs jours selon les elements a analyser. le comptage de la radioactivite induite est effectue par spectrometrie gamma apres separation radiochimique (Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, et K) ou sans separation dans les cas favorables (Mn, Cu, K). Les dosages decrits concernent: le manganese dans une graminee, le cuivre en viticulture, le cobalt, le fer, et le zinc dans un aliment du betail, le potassium dans une experience de radioecologie. (auteur)

  6. Debated agronomy: public discourse and the future of biotechnology policy in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Braimah, Joseph A.; Atuoye, Kilian N.; Vercillo, Siera; Warring, Carrie; Luginaah, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper examines the highly contested and ongoing biotechnology (Bt) policy-making process in Ghana. We analyse media content on how Bt is viewed in the context of Ghana’s parliamentary debate on the Plant Breeders Bill and within the broader public policy-making literature. This paper does not seek to take a position on Bt or the Bill, but to understand how policy actors influence the debate with political and scientific rhetoric in Ghana. The study reveals that in the midst of s...

  7. Respons Agronomi Tiga Varietas Ubi Kayu pada Berbagai Tingkat Kadar Air Tanah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassava has been cultivated in almost the all region of Indonesia as a raw material of food, feed, and industries. The productivity of cassava was varied among the region due to the variation of varieties used and growth environment, especially rainfall or water availability. Water deficit or drought stress will decrease the growth and yield of cassava. Selecting tolerant variety to drought will be important to get high productivity. An experimental pot in the greenhouse has been conducted to know the growth and yield response to drought. Three varieties of cassava i.e Adira-1, Gajah, and Mangu were planted in the pot at three level of soil moisture content (SMC 4060, 6080, and 80100% of field capacity (FC. The cassava growth traits were influenced by SMC starting at 6 weeks after planting (WAP for a number of leaves, at 8 WAP for stem girth, at 10 WAP for plant height, at 14 WAP for lobus width, and 15 WAP for lobus length. Root, stem, and leaves dry weight in the SMC of 4060% FC were 64.4; 43.98, and 31.19% of the dry weight in 8000% FC. Roots yield in the soil moisture content of 4060% FC decreased by 76.2% and in the SMC of 4060%, FC decreased by 38.4% compared to in the SMC of 80100% FC. The water use efficiency and roots yield of Gajah variety were highest.

  8. Pendugaan Parameter Genetik Karakter Morfo-Agronomi dan Seleksi Genotipe untuk Perbaikan Genetik Jarak Pagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Novita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe recent scarcity of fuel has stimulated many efforts to remove dependence on petroleum oil by finding alternative sources of new and renewable energy. Jatropha curcas L. has been chosen as a source of biofuel that has an important role as a petroleum oil substitute, especially for producing biodiesel. Possible efforts for the development of Jatropha in Indonesia include exploration of Jatropha plants from various regions of Indonesia, introducing the plants from abroad and plant breeding. The purpose of this study was to study the genetic parameters of morpho-agronomic traits and selection of potential genotype for genetic improvement of Jatropha curcas. The experiment was conducted at the Biotech Center, BPPT from November 2011 to July 2012. The experiment was performed using a complete randomized block design with sixteen genotypes of J. curcas. Five plants were used for each genotype, with three replications. Results of this study showed that genetic diversity of the genotypes based on morpho-agronomic characters was relatively narrow, with genetic diversity coefficient ranged from 2.73% to 9.02%. The broad-sense heritability was high for all characters, ranged from 32.26% to 85.89%. None of morpho-agronomic characters observed in the 16 genotypes was directly correlated to productivity and seed oil content. Number of fruit and total seed number per bunch were the best characters for selection criteria to obtain high dry seed weight. Based on the bi-plot analysis on seed oil content and dry weight characters among the observed genotypes, LMP and CRP x PDI could be recommended as potential F1 parents to be used in constructing F2 population.Keywords: biplot analysis, broad-sense heritability, genetic diversity coefficient

  9. Some applications of neutron activation analysis in plant biology and agronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourcy, A.

    1966-06-01

    Plants materials are not so commonly analysed by radioactivation than biological extracts of medical importance. With help of concrete examples, applications of neutrons activation analysis to the determination of some metals (Mn, Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, and K) in plant materials, are proposed. Samples are activated in a swimming-pool reactor at the thermal flux of 5.10 12 n.cm -2 s -1 for a time varying between few minutes and several days according to the element being analysed. The induced radioactivity is measured by spectrometry, with radiochemical separation ( Cu, Co, Fe, Zn and K) or without separation in best cases (Mn,Cu, K). Described dosages are related to: manganese in a graminaceous plant, copper in vine treatments, cobalt, iron and zinc in animal feeding, potassium in a radiological experiment. (author) [fr

  10. Vine spacing on cv. Tempranillo in the Appellation of Origin Cigales (Spain: Agronomy and quality effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuste Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the vegetative, productive and qualitative behavior of the Tempranillo variety, vertically trellised trained, according to a placement of vines with three different distances (1.04, 1.40 and 1.80 meters in the row and a common distance between rows (2.40 meters, in order to determine the most suitable vine distance for the growing conditions. The experimental test has been developed for the period 2007–2011 in the Appellation of Origin Cigales, in Valladolid (Spain. The reduction of vine distance has favored the vegetative growth, through the shoot weight, while the grape yield has been slightly higher in the intermediate vine distance, 1.40 m, through the cluster weight. Ravaz index showed some increase with the increasing of vine distance, derived from the decrease of pruning wood. In qualitative terms, the variation of the vine distance did not significantly modify the basic composition of the grape. Therefore, the choice of the vine distance involves the convenience to assess both potential effects in terms of production and economic objectives of the new plantations, in accordance with the characteristics of each growing situation.

  11. Studies on agronomy and crop physiology of Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.

    2008-01-01


    Keywords: Development, morphology, plant density, potato, radiation interception, radiation use efficiency, seed size, seed tuber, spacing, stolon, tipping, tuber


    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew (Lamiaceae) is an ancient Ethiopian tuber crop grown in mid and high altitude

  12. Monitoring the progress of NFFO-3 projects: short rotation willow coppice - agronomy and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twemlow, R.K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of Sidney C. Banks p.l.c., and the subsidiary company Banks Agriculture, in fuel supply for biofuelled power stations started some 4 years ago. When identifying possible opportunities and crops it was apparent that, with the third tranche of Non-Fossil Fuel Obligations (NFFO3) coming up, there were companies looking at developing biofuelled power stations, using Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and for this they needed to link with potential fuel suppliers. Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. linked with South Western Power (SWP) (a subsidiary of South Western Electricity p.l.c. (SWEB)) to act as their sole fuel supplier on projected biofuel wood power stations. Subsequently two wood fuelled power stations were awarded to SWP and Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. in the 3rd Tranche from NFFO, in December 1994. The objectives of this project were to: establish a network of SRC growers to produce fuel for a NFFO project; monitor the success of the enterprise; implement a programme of constant improvement to optimise the fuel supply strategy; and provide valuable information as to the performance of the SRC crop in large scale commercial production. (author)

  13. Heavy metals balance in Polish and Dutch agronomy : Actual state and previsions for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dach, J.; Starmans, D.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the state of agro-ecosystem contamination with heavy metals in relation to the level of agricultural development. For this, the Polish and Dutch agricultural situations were compared. The intensive animal and vegetable production observed in the Netherlands over the past 20-30

  14. Maths for plants and plants for maths. Mathematics applied to agronomy and crop protection

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Crop Protection, and more generally Food Security, is considered as one of the greatest World challenges in the forthcoming decades. Currently, they are more that 1 billion undernourished people. It has been estimated that up to 40 percent of the world's potential crop production is already lost annually because of the effects of weeds, pests and diseases. This is particularly true in Southern countries. Moreover, taking into account climate change, these losses may increase. That is why it i...

  15. Agronomy of strip intercropping broccoli with alyssum for biological control of aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic broccoli growers in California typically control aphids by intercropping broccoli with strips of alyssum (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.) which attracts hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) that are important predators of aphids. A three year study with transplanted organic broccoli in Salinas, ...

  16. Plant biotechnology and implications for rapeseed agronomy: development of new methods of pest and disease control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, C. [Hoechst Schering AgrEvo GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The last years several strategies are becoming available for molecular breeding to improve resistance of transgenic plants against pests. Generally, transgenic plants expressing antifungal proteins (chitinase, glucanase and RIP) have been effectively protected against a variety of fungal diseases, whereas symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi remain unaffected. Other antifungal strategies, such as artificial localized cell death, do exist for pyramiding strategies against fungal diseases. Insect predation has been controlled by expression of insect specific proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringensis (B.t.-toxin). A combination with other genes coding for insecticidal proteins in a transgenic plant could further enhance protection of plants against insect pests. Control of viral diseases in transgenic plants was achieved by overexpression of coat- or movement protein from the virus itself, which limits replication and spread in the plants. Other viral genes, or subgenomic fragments, either in sense or antisense orientation effectively conferred resistance to viral diseases. Several strategies also become available to engineer resistance against bacterial diseases and nemathode attack. Expression of proteinase inhibitors, active against nematodes, or specific physiological manipulation which leads to the collapse of feeding cells of sedentary nematodes has been shown to control nematode pests. This demonstrates that a fair number of strategies already exists to control plant pests by molecular breeding. In several cases a combination of different resistance strategies in one and the same plant has been shown to exert synergistic protective effects. In future, this probably will reduce the emergence of resistance breaking strains leading to genetically engineered plants with improved and stable resistance characteristics. The use of genetic engineering in resistance breeding as part of integrated pest management clearly could lead to a more ecologically sustainable agriculture. (orig.)

  17. Weed Control Strategies for Organic Peanut Production and Transition: A Lesson in Basic Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly. The only production inputs that consistently improved weed management in organic peanut production were modified production practices and intense cultivation with a tine weeder. Research trials evaluated row patterns, seeding rates...

  18. Engineering and agronomy aspects of a long-term precision agriculture field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much research has been conducted on specific precision agriculture tools and implementation strategies, but little has been reported on long-term evaluation of integrated precision agriculture field experiments. In 2004 our research team developed and initiated a multi-faceted “precision agriculture...

  19. [Comparison on agronomy and quality characters and breeding of new strains of Erigeron breviscapus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengchao; Yang, Jianwen; Pan, Yinghua; Li, Guoxing; Liu, Binghua; Zhang, Qiong; Wen, Guosong; Wang, Pingli

    2010-03-01

    To explore breeding method and breed new varieties of Erigeron breviscapus. Superior individual were selected from natural outcrossing population of E. breviscapus, lines and strains were established and selected and compared. The scutellarin contents of two E. breviscapus strains of 2003-15 and 2003-6 through line breeding were 3.21% and 3.01%, respectively, and increased 15.77% and 23.46% comparing with the control strain (QS-1), respectively, the yield increased 20.37% and 17.59%, scutellarin yield per hectare enhanced 39.31% and 44.82%. New varieties of E. breviscapus can be bred through lines breeding.

  20. Improving the Agronomy of Alyssum murale for Extensive Phytomining: A Five-Year Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Aida; Echevarria, Guillaume; Sulçe, Sulejman; Morel, Jean Louis

    2015-01-01

    Large ultramafic areas exist in Albania, which could be suitable for phytomining with native Alyssum murale. We undertook a five-year field experiment on an ultramafic Vertisol, aimed at optimizing a low-cost Ni-phytoextraction crop of A. murale which is adapted to the Balkans. The following aspects were studied on 18-m2 plots in natural conditions: the effect of (i) plant phenology and element distribution, (ii) plant nutrition and fertilization, (iii) plant cover and weed control and (iv), planting technique (natural cover vs. sown crop). The optimal harvest time was set at the mid-flowering stage when Ni concentration and biomass yield were highest. The application of N, P, and K fertilizers, and especially a split 100-kg ha(-1) N application, increased the density of A. murale against all other species. It significantly increased shoot yield, without reducing Ni concentration. In natural stands, the control of graminaceous weeds required the use of an anti-monocots herbicide. However, after the optimization of fertilization and harvest time, weed control procured little benefit. Finally, cropping sown A. murale was more efficient than enhancing native stands and gave higher biomass and phytoextraction yields; biomass yields progressively improved from 0.3 to 9.0 t ha(-1) and phytoextracted Ni increased from 1.7 to 105 kg ha(-1).

  1. Five species, many genotypes, broad phenotypic diversity: When agronomy meets functional ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ivan; Litrico, Isabelle; Violle, Cyrille; Barre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Current ecological theory can provide insight into the causes and impacts of plant domestication. However, just how domestication has impacted intraspecific genetic variability (ITV) is unknown. We used 50 ecotypes and 35 cultivars from five grassland species to explore how selection drives functional trait coordination and genetic differentiation. We quantified the extent of genetic diversity among different sets of functional traits and determined how much genetic diversity has been generated within populations of natural ecotypes and selected cultivars. In general, the cultivars were larger (e.g., greater height, faster growth rates) and had larger and thinner leaves (greater SLA). We found large (average 63%) and trait-dependent (ranging from 14% for LNC to 95.8% for growth rate) genetic variability. The relative extent of genetic variability was greater for whole-plant than for organ-level traits. This pattern was consistent within ecotypes and within cultivars. However, ecotypes presented greater ITV variability. The results indicated that genetic diversity is large in domesticated species with contrasting levels of heritability among functional traits and that selection for high yield has led to indirect selection of some associated leaf traits. These findings open the way to define which target traits should be the focus in selection programs, especially in the context of community-level selection. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  2. Real-time detection and quantification of Rhizoctonia and Pythium species on the Cook Agronomy Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Rhizoctonia and Pythium are diverse in eastern Washington, with multiple species/anastomosis groups present throughout the region and within individual fields. The process of identifying the pathogen present in a sample is laborious and the high diversity increases the difficulty in a...

  3. Environmental Resource Management Issues in Agronomy: A Lecture/Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental Sciences Technology T272 is a course with a laboratory addressing problems in soil and water quality and organic wastes utilization to serve students from associate degree programs in laboratory science and environmental resources management at a 2-year technical college. Goals are to build basic lab skills and understand the role…

  4. Field research on the spectral properties of crops and soils, volume 1. [Purdue Agronomy Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment design, data acquisition and preprocessing, data base management, analysis results and development of instrumentation for the AgRISTARS Supporting Research Project, Field Research task are described. Results of several investigations on the spectral reflectance of corn and soybean canopies as influenced by cultural practices, development stage and nitrogen nutrition are reported as well as results of analyses of the spectral properties of crop canopies as a function of canopy geometry, row orientation, sensor view angle and solar illumination angle are presented. The objectives, experiment designs and data acquired in 1980 for field research experiments are described. The development and performance characteristics of a prototype multiband radiometer, data logger, and aerial tower for field research are discussed.

  5. Advising Undergraduates in a Department of Soil Science and/or Agronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gerhard B.

    1987-01-01

    Offers suggestions to advisers of undergraduate students in agriculture. Recommends that advisers be competent, concerned, compassionate, and provide an open-door attitude toward their advisees. Suggests that students be guided toward good study habits and participation in intern programs. (TW)

  6. Introducing Agronomy Students to the Concepts of Indigenous and Cultural Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, John

    1993-01-01

    Presents a role for indigenous knowledge in extension education and research programs. Defines indigenous knowledge and then predicts efforts to utilize indigenous knowledge to facilitate the development of agriculture systems that will be agronomically, environmentally, and economically sound and enhance acceptance by practitioners because of the…

  7. Debated agronomy: public discourse and the future of biotechnology policy in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimah, Joseph A; Atuoye, Kilian N; Vercillo, Siera; Warring, Carrie; Luginaah, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the highly contested and ongoing biotechnology (Bt) policy-making process in Ghana. We analyse media content on how Bt is viewed in the context of Ghana's parliamentary debate on the Plant Breeders Bill and within the broader public policy-making literature. This paper does not seek to take a position on Bt or the Bill, but to understand how policy actors influence the debate with political and scientific rhetoric in Ghana. The study reveals that in the midst of scientific uncertainties of Bt's potential for sustainable agriculture production and food security, policy decisions that encourage its future adoption are heavily influenced by health, scientific, economic, environmental and political factors dictated by different ideologies, values and norms. While locally pioneered plant breeding is visible and common in the Ghanaian food chain, plant breeding/GMOs/Bt from international corporations is strongly resisted by anti-GMO coalitions. Understanding the complex and messy nature of Bt policy-making is critical for future development of agricultural technology in Ghana and elsewhere.

  8. Subjective Theories of Indonesian Agronomy and Biology Teacher Students on Environmental Commons Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sebastian; Barkmann, Jan; Sundawati, Leti; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Fostering the cognitive skills to analyse environmental "commons dilemmas" is an urgent task of environmental education globally. Commons dilemmas are characterised by structural incentives to overexploit a natural resource; their solution is particularly pressing in threatened biodiversity "hotspot" areas. Solutions to these…

  9. Climate strategy: Agriculture. A follow-up of knowledge report 'Better agronomy' and other relevant reports of climate and agriculture; Klimastrategi: jordbruk. En oppfoelging av kunnskapsrapporten 'Bedre agronomi' og andre relevante rapporter inn klima og jordbruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    From the preface: This report takes a 5-10-year perspective of research priorities in agriculture related climate research and includes research to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and adaptation of food production to climate change.(eb)

  10. PENGARUH APLIKASI URIN KAMBING DAN PUPUK CAIR ORGANIK KOMERSIAL TERHADAP BEBERAPA PARAMETER AGRONOMI PADA TANAMAN PAKAN INDIGOFERA SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Abdullah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An experiment has been done during 6 months period in order to study the effect of goat urine and comersial liquid organic fertilizer (NASA® as fertizers on some agronomic parameters which are related with potential forage production. Completely randomized design was used in this experiment which is consist of PO = control, P1 = 50% goat urine + 50% mineral water, P2= 100% urine, P3= NASA 0.25%, P4 NASA= NASA 0.50% and P5 = NASA 0.75%, with 5 repetitions. Some agronomic parameters observed were biomass production of tajuk, leaves dry matter production, numbers of leafs and leaf square. To observe the effect of goat urine observation were conducted in two growth periodes. The results of the experiment showed that the application of goat urine and comercial liquid organic fertilizer produce better results in all treatments compared to control. 100% goat urine treatment showed that better results in all parameters compared to commercial liquid organic fertilizers

  11. PENGARUH RADIASI SINAR GAMMA COBALT-60 TERHADAP SIFAT MORFOLOGI DAN AGRONOMI KETIGA VARIETAS JAGUNG (ZEA MAYS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhziah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutation is one of the ways to improve genetic variation in plant breeding so the target traits were more easily obtained. Grains of three varieties of maize (Bisma, Madura local, and Gumarang were treated with gamma 60cobalt irradiation doses (0, 100, 200, and 300 Gy before sowing then planted in a split plot randomized block design with three replication, to be evaluated for their morphology and agronomic traits. The Main plot was cultivars and sub plot was gamma radiation rates. There was no interaction between gamma rates and cultivars of maize, but increasing of gamma rates caused decreasing of some traits. Some traits such as plant height and leaves number were decreased significantly when gamma rate increased 100 to 300 Gy as well yield components such as grain weight and grain number per ear. Gamma 200 caused produce more ears than other rates. Bisma exhibited greater performance than Madura and Gumarang both of morphology and agronomic traits.

  12. Genetic variation in the US Peanut Mini-core collection for agronomy, seed chemistry and nutrient quality traits in peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ongoing genome sequencing effort in peanut will result in numerous molecular markers that can be applied to the diverse collection of recently purified mini-core germplasm. This will provide an opportunity to mine valuable genes for peanut cultivar improvement. Association mapping based on linka...

  13. Effects of nitrogen nutrition on the growth, yield and reflectance characteristics of corn canopies. [Purdue Agronomy Farm, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Walburg, G.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral and agronomic measurements were collected from corn (Zea mays L.) canopies under four nitrogen treatment levels (0, 67, 134, and 202 kg/ha) on 11 dates during 1978 and 12 dates during 1979. Data were analyzed to determine the relationship between the spectral responses of canopies and their argonomic characteristics as well as the spectral separability of the four treatments. Red reflectance was increased, while the near infrared reflectance was decreased for canopies under nitrogen deprivation. Spectral differences between treatments were seen throughout each growing season. The near infrared/red reflectance ratio increased spectral treatment differences over those shown by single band reflectance measures. Of the spectral variables examined, the near infrared/red reflectance ratio most effectively separated the treatments. Differences in spectral response between treatments were attributed to varying soil cover, leaf area index, and leaf pigmentation values, all of which changed with N treatment.

  14. Neutron and gamma probes: Their use in agronomy. Second edition; Sondas de neutrones y gamma: Sus aplicaciones en agronomia. Segunda edicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    Water is an essential requirement for life on the planet. It is often the single most limiting factor in crop and livestock production. Water is a scarce resource in many urban and rural environments worldwide. According to the FAO, the global demand for fresh water is doubling every 21 years. The quality of the finite water supplies is also under threat from industrial, agricultural and domestic sources of pollution. The majority of crops are grown under rain-fed conditions and adequate water supply is the main factor limiting crop production in semi-arid and sub-humid regions. On the other hand, currently 20% of the world's arable land is under irrigation providing 35 to 40% of all agricultural production. Irrigation mismanagement poses a serious threat to the environment through groundwater pollution and salinization. It is therefore, essential that water resources be used efficiently by regular monitoring of soil-water status in the unsaturated zone. The neutron depth probe, a nuclear-based technique, is utilized worldwide for this purpose. The neutron moisture gauge, since its introduction some 40 years ago, can now be considered a routine method in soil water studies. Many developments have since been introduced, in particular electronic components, which have significantly improved performance and expanded applications. Although the neutron scattering method is routinely utilised in many developed countries, its use is still limited in developing countries due to several factors. Neutron depth probes contain radioactive sources, which will present health and environmental hazards if a probe is improperly used, stored or disposed of. National and international legislation and regulations must be complied with. The strategic objective of the sub-program Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is to develop and promote the adoption of nuclear-based technologies for optimising soil, water and nutrient management within cropping systems. In this context, neutron moisture probes in combination with isotope techniques are utilized to obtain precise and quantitative data on water and nutrient dynamics in the soil-plant system. The Centre for Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture (CENA) of the University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil is an institute established with IAEA support, with skilled and experienced staff and facilities to utilize nuclear techniques in agronomic and related environmental research. Many training events and formal undergraduate and post-graduate courses involving the use of neutron moisture meters have been offered by CENA. The concept of a training manual originated during a regional training workshop on the use of the neutron probe in water and nutrient balance studies, organized in 1997 in the frame of an IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America entitled Plant Nutrition, Water and Soil Management (RLA/5/036-ARCAL XXII), for which the integrated approach was adopted. The original version (in Spanish) was a comprehensive manual covering theoretical and practical aspects required for the proper utilization of the equipment. It is hoped that this manual will be useful for future training events and serve as a key reference to soil/water scientists in the field of sustainable management of scarce water resources in both rain-fed and irrigated agricultural production systems.

  15. The Effects of Seed Inoculation with Rhizobium and Nitrogen Application on Yield and some Agronomi Characterstics of Soybean (Glycine max L. under Ardabil Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N Seiedi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of seed inoculation with rhizobium and nitrogen application on yield and some agronomic characterstics of soybean (Glycine max L., a spilt plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted in 2011 at the research farm of the Islamic Azad University, Ardabil Branch. Factors were inorganic nitrogen fertilizer urea at four levels (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg urea/ha in the main plot and two levels of inoculation with Rhizobium japanicum bacteria (with and without inoculation assigned to the sub plots. Study the growth indices showed that the maximum total dry matter (435.4 gr/m2 , crop growth rate (6.75 gr/m2.day and relative growth rate (0.1003 gr/gr.day were obtained from compound of treatments high levels of urea application × inoculation with rhizobium while, the minimum values of these indices recorded in without nitrogen application×non inoculation with rhizobium. The highest plant height, number of pod per plant and grain yield were obtained from the highest level of nitrogen fertilizer (90 kg/ha urea and seed inoculation with rhizobium. Number and dry weight of nodules per plant increased significantly with increasing nitrogen application till 60 kg/ha in seed inoculation with rhizobium. The lowest values of these traits recorded in non application of urea×non inoculation with rhizobium. Inoculation with rhizobium bacteria increased the number and dry weight of nodules per plant. Thus, it can be suggested that in order to increasing of grain yield, seed can be inoculated with rhizobium bacteria × application of 60 kg urea/ha in conditions of Ardabil region.

  16. Proceedings of 6. Symposium on Nuclear Agronomy Among Youths and 2011 Annual Academic Conference of Nuclear Agriculture Branch Society of Chinese Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    The symposium was held by Chinese Society of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences in Guiyang, Oct. 2011. The proceedings contains 27 articles, the contents refer to the irradiation application of γ ray and electron beam, isotope labeling, isotope tracer techniques and mutation breeding.

  17. Characterization of Agronomy, Grain Physicochemical Quality, and Nutritional Property of High-Lysine 35R Transgenic Rice with Simultaneous Modification of Lysine Biosynthesis and Catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingqing; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Qianfeng; Duan, Ruxu; Zhang, Changquan; Sun, Samuel Saiming; Liu, Qiaoquan

    2017-05-31

    Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in rice. We previously constructed a series of transgenic rice lines to enhance lysine biosynthesis (35S), down-regulate its catabolism (Ri), or simultaneously achieve both metabolic effects (35R). In this study, nine transgenic lines, three from each group, were selected for both field and animal feeding trials. The results showed that the transgene(s) caused no obvious effects on field performance and main agronomic traits. Mature seeds of transgenic line 35R-17 contained 48-60-fold more free lysine than in wild type and had slightly lower apparent amylose content and softer gel consistency. Moreover, a 35-day feeding experiment showed that the body weight gain, food efficiency, and protein efficiency ratio of rats fed the 35R-17 transgenic rice diet were improved when compared with those fed wild-type rice diet. These data will be useful for further evaluation and potential commercialization of 35R high-lysine transgenic rice.

  18. 40 CFR 257.3-5 - Application to land used for the production of food-chain crops (interim final).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Analysis, Agronomy Monograph No. 9.” C. A. Black, ed., American Society of Agronomy, Madison, Wisconsin. pp..., and analyzing by the electrometric method. (“Methods of Soil Analysis, Agronomy Monograph No. 9,” C.A. Black, ed., American Society of Agronomy, Madison, Wisconsin, pp. 914-926, 1965.) [44 FR 53460, Sept. 13...

  19. 贵州大豆脂肪氧化酶缺失体的农艺和品质性状分析%AGRONOMY AND QUALITY CHARATER ANALYSIS OF GUIZHOU SOYBEAN VARIETIES LACKING LIPOXYGENASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张太平; 朱星陶

    2000-01-01

    从贵州大豆品种中随机抽取144份进行脂肪氧化酶测定、豆奶加工试验和品质、农艺性状分析。结果发现了33份脂氧酶缺失品种(其中包括2份育成品种),占鉴定总数的22.9%,包括缺失Lox2、Lox3和Lox2、3几种类型,以缺失Lox3类型较多。脂氧酶缺失的地方品种的蛋白质、脂肪含量较低,其氨基酸成分及比例与正常品种一样,而缺失的育成品种的蛋白质含量则高达47%以上。利用强碱高温消除豆浆中的豆腥味后,正常品种豆浆中的氨基酸总量减少较多且部分氨基酸成分消失,缺失品种则减少较少且氨基酸成分全部保持。Lox3缺失品种的脂氧酶活性与百粒重、株粒重负相关。脂氧酶缺失的育成品种有着较大的直接应用价值,而多数缺失的地方品种表现为重感病毒病和生育期太长的缺点,需进行改造才能在生产上利用。%144 random samples of Guizhou soybean local varieties wereidentified for lipoxygenase (Lox), tested for soybean milk and appraised for quality and agronomoical characters. 33 of those including 2 registered cultivars were lacked in Lox2, Lox3 and Lox2,3. Most of them were lacked in Lox3, which accounted for 22 9 per cent of total samples. Protein and oil content of local varieties lacking Lox is lower than mormal varities,and their amino acid compoments were the same as the morrnal's, but protein content of one registered improved cultivar lacking Lox was more then 47 percent that is much higher then the normals. Amount of amino acid reduced in soybean milk produced under high alkali (pH 11 -12) treatment in order to eliminate grass-beany flaver, and some amino-acids in mormai varieties were dismissed. Lox activity of varieties lacking Lox3 was negatively correlated with 100-seed weight and single plant seed yield. Most of varieties can't be used directly in production because they had too long growth period and were infect soybean mosaic virus (SMV), but the registered improved cultivars lacking in Lox are promising for direct use in production.

  20. 7 CFR 610.13 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... from the American Society of Agronomy, Madison, Wisconsin. In addition, the use of the WEQ in NRCS is explained in the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) National Agronomy Manual, 190-V-NAM, second...

  1. A Agronomia e o Desenvolvimento Sustentável: Por uma Ciência da Complexidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Silva Neto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hegemonic conception of Agronomy has shown increasing difficulties in dealing with the complexity of the problems generated by the current pattern of development of agriculture. From an interpretation of the concept of paradigm based on Critical Realism, which seeks to exempt such a concept of elements of irrationality, the article discusses the possibilities of a paradigm shift in Agronomy. The discussion stresses that the Theory of Complexity and Critical Realism can provide consistent theoretical and epistemological bases for the formation of Agronomy as one of the "sciences of complexity." Thus, according to the Theory of Complexity, the consideration of agriculture as an activity constitutive of open systems is of fundamental importance for the possibility of Agronomy contributes effectively to the promotion of sustainable development. However, for that the hegemony exercised by positivism on Agronomy must be overcome. Therefore, the contributions of Critical Realism in this field are considered of fundamental importance. From these considerations, it is made the characterization of the hegemonic paradigm in Agronomy, called the Normal Agronomy, and the existing elements of a new paradigm, that of Agronomy as a science of complexity. Finally, the article emphasize that the discussion of the concept of paradigm developed indicates that, beyond a purely academic debate, this change in Agronomy is included in the broader field of the social correlation of forces and conflicts of interest. The formation of Agronomy as a science of complexity is, therefore, in an activity essentially emancipatory.

  2. Sub-Saharan Africa Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    Partial Contents: Oil Installations, Defense Minister, Polices, Electricity Crisis, Agronomy, Popularity, Universal Suffrage, Radio Services, Internal Children Protested, Sociopolitical,Warning, Black Education...

  3. Summary Information on Employment, Characteristics, Supply, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-05-01

    AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES and pest GS 406 Agricultural extension serv- ice GS 471 Agronomy GS 437 Horticulture GS 450 General agricultural admin...sciences Agronomy Animal husbandry Fish and wildlife Forestry and range sciences Horticulture Soil specialties Biological sciences Anatomy...enzymology 7704—Experimental therapeutics , clin- ical 770&—Industrial chemicals 7706 —Neuropharmacology 7707—Pharmacodynamics 7708

  4. Effect of foliar nutrition on the essential oil yield of Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavela, R.; Žabka, M.; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Tříska, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 112 (2018), s. 762-765 ISSN 0926-6690 R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QJ1510160 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Thymus * Essential oils * Aromatic plants * Plant nutrition * Plant technology Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 3.181, year: 2016

  5. Agronomy—A Multidisciplinary and Open Access Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Langridge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Agronomy is a highly multidisciplinary area of science. It includes all aspects of science and technology related to the production and utilization of plants for food, feed, fuel, fiber and even land reclamation. In many respects, agronomy represents the integration of activities and disciplines ranging from genetics, chemistry and biotechnology to ecology, soil science and meteorology. [...

  6. Mokřadní pryskyřníky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 6 (2017), s. 20-21 ISSN 0139-7761 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Buttercup * cultivation * water plants Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  7. Mokřadní přesličky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2017), s. 20-21 ISSN 0139-7761 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Horsetail * cultivation * water plants Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  8. Switchgrass growth and pine–switchgrass interactions in established intercropping systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tian, S.; Cacho, J. F.; Youssef, M. A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Fischer, Milan; Nettles, J. E.; King, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2017), s. 845-857 ISSN 1757-1693 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : agroforestry * competition * grass growth * interspecific interactions * loblolly pine * switchgrass Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 4.655, year: 2016

  9. Sensitivity of short rotation poplar coppice biomass productivity to the throughfall reduction Estimating future drought impacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Tripathi, Abishek; Žalud, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 109 (2018), s. 182-189 ISSN 0961-9534 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : water -use * energy * stand * systems * dominance * density * l. * Dominance * Drought * Mortality * Productivity * Short-rotation coppice * Throughfall manipulation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  10. Is crop growth model able to reproduce drought stress caused by rain-out shelters above winter wheat?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wimmerová, Markéta; Hlavinka, Petr; Pohanková, Eva; Kersebaum, K. C.; Trnka, Miroslav; Klem, Karel; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2018), s. 225-233 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe QJ1310123 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Leaf area index * Rain-out shelters * Soil water content * Water balance * Yields Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  11. Light Use Efficiency of Aboveground Biomass Production of Norway Spruce Stands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellan, Michal; Marková, I.; Zaika, A.; Krejza, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2017), s. 9-16 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : absorbed photosynthetically active radiation * aboveground biomass increment * allometric relation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  12. Voďanka

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2017), s. 17-17 ISSN 0139-7761 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Frog -bit * cultivation * water plants Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  13. Classifying multi-model wheat yield impact response surfaces showing sensitivity to temperature and precipitation change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fronzek, S.; Pirttioja, N. K.; Carter, T. R.; Bindi, M.; Hoffmann, H.; Palosuo, T.; Ruiz-Ramos, M.; Tao, F.; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, M.; Asseng, S.; Baranowski, P.; Basso, B.; Bodin, P.; Buis, S.; Cammarano, D.; Deligios, P.; Destain, M. F.; Dumont, B.; Ewert, F.; Ferrise, R.; Francois, L.; Gaiser, T.; Hlavinka, Petr; Jacquemin, I.; Kersebaum, K. C.; Kollas, C.; Krzyszczak, J.; Lorite, I. J.; Minet, J.; Ines Minguez, M.; Montesino, M.; Moriondo, M.; Mueller, C.; Nendel, C.; Öztürk, I.; Perego, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruane, A. C.; Ruget, F.; Sanna, M.; Semenov, M. A.; Slawinski, C.; Stratonovitch, P.; Supit, I.; Waha, K.; Wang, E.; Wu, L.; Zhao, Z.; Rötter, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 159, jan (2018), s. 209-224 ISSN 0308-521X Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : climate - change * crop models * probabilistic assessment * simulating impacts * british catchments * uncertainty * europe * productivity * calibration * adaptation * Classification * Climate change * Crop model * Ensemble * Sensitivity analysis * Wheat Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 2.571, year: 2016

  14. Agronomy—A Multidisciplinary and Open Access Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Langridge

    2011-01-01

    Agronomy is a highly multidisciplinary area of science. It includes all aspects of science and technology related to the production and utilization of plants for food, feed, fuel, fiber and even land reclamation. In many respects, agronomy represents the integration of activities and disciplines ranging from genetics, chemistry and biotechnology to ecology, soil science and meteorology. [...

  15. Monitoring zemědělského suchav České republice – průběh suché epizody v roce 2015

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartošová, Lenka; Trnka, Miroslav; Hlavinka, Petr; Semerádová, Daniela; Balek, Jan; Štěpánek, Petr; Zahradníček, Pavel; Možný, M.; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 9-10 (2016), s. 280-284 ISSN 1210-3306 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : drought * monitoring * drought forecast * year 2015 Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 0.218, year: 2016

  16. Pairing Courses across the Disciplines: Effects on Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Julie; Burnett, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    Writing performance of a complex recommendation report produced by student teams for an actual client during a 15-week semester was compared in a writing-intensive Agronomy 356 course and in paired Agronomy 356/English 309 courses. The longitudinal study investigated differences that existed between reports produced for each learning environment…

  17. Plavíny

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2017), s. 20-21 ISSN 0139-7761 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/9 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : floating heart * cultivation * water plants Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  18. Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs (OWCP). Data Codebook. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    0635 Corrective therapist 0436 Plant protection and quarantine 0636 Rehabilitation therapy assistant 0437 Horticulture 0637 Manual arts therapist 0440... Therapeutic radiologic technician 0471 Agronomy 0649 Medical machine technician 0475 Agricultural management 0650 Medical technical assistant 0480

  19. A systematic approach for re-assembly of crop models: An example to simulate pea growth from wheat growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, M.Y.O.; Wery, J.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Ewert, F.; Corbeels, M.; Keulen, van H.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crop modelling to develop operational software requires different skills, from conceptualization of the biophysical system to computer programming, involving three main scientific disciplines: agronomy, mathematics, and software engineering. Model building implies transforming a

  20. Dynamics of MODIS evapotranspiration in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-13

    May 13, 2014 ... 2Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, College of Forestry and Conservation, University .... The term Es consists of Soil E from dry soil surface and wet soil surface: ...... American Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI, USA.

  1. Sciences & Nature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... Sciences & Nature, the Scientific Journal edited by the University of ... Subjects covered include agronomy, sciences of the earth, environment, biological, ...

  2. Crop growth rate differs in warm season C4-grasses grown in pure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-23

    Jul 23, 2014 ... Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Crop Production Sciences, The University of Agriculture Peshawar-Pakistan- ... plus root dry weights) per unit ground area per unit time] ... below-ground total biomass (Rubio et al., 2001).

  3. Triticum durum Desf.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    duration of the vegetative phase, above ground biomass accumulated at headiny and plant height to the ... Key words: durum wheat, adaptation, biomass, plant height, grain yield, harvest index, semi-arid ...... Pakistan Journal of Agronomy, vol.

  4. Differential effects of aluminium on the seedling parameters of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ALADDIN

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... 4Department of Agronomy and Plant breeding, Urmia University, Urmia, Iran. Accepted 23 ... productivity in acidic soils that cover almost 40% of world's arable land ..... Plant adaptation to acid, aluminum-toxic soils. Commun.

  5. Scientometric Analysis of the Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ismail - [2010

    The number of papers in agronomy, field crop breeding and crop protection ... During the last 34 years, the necessity of permanent staff and budget has .... During 2010 to 2013, an average of 12 papers per volume were published every year.

  6. yield and yield components of intercropped dual-purpose lablab and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user pc

    1,3 Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. 2Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. *Corresponding author: ...... Bangladesh. Journal of ...

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are an alternative to the application of chemical fertilizer in the production of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oliviera, R. S.; Ma, Y.; Rocha, I.; Carvalho, M. F.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 7 (2016), s. 320-328 ISSN 1528-7394 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * Coriandrum sativum Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.731, year: 2016

  8. Seed coating with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as an ecotechnological approach for sustainable agricultural production of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oliviera, R. S.; Rocha, I.; Ma, Y.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 7 (2016), s. 329-337 ISSN 1528-7394 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * phosphorus uptake * soil Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.731, year: 2016

  9. Kenaf as a potential source of pulp in Australia. Proceedings of Kenaf Conference, May 28-29, 1981, Brisbane, Queensland. [Hibiscus Cannabinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, I.M.; Stewart, G.A. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    Papers by different authors are presented in 8 sections on kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus), a possible substitute for wood pulp. Agronomy and physiology; Selection and breeding; Pests and diseases; By-products; Harvesting; Farming systems; Pulping techniques; and Economics and marketing.

  10. glucuronidase (GUS)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-24

    Jan 24, 2011 ... Department of Horticulture, College of Agronomy and Biological Technology, China Agricultural ..... tions were the disadvantages of using visual evaluation ... ImageMasterTM 2D Platinum (GE Healthcare) was used to.

  11. 7 CFR 600.1 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authorized by the Federal Crop Insurance Reform and Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (Pub... specialties, including soil science, soil conservation, agronomy, biology, agroecology, range conservation, forestry, engineering, geology, hydrology, wetlands science, cultural resources, and economics. NRCS was...

  12. 75 FR 41166 - Notice of Solicitation of Nominations for Appointment as a Member of the Biomass Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... biology and biomass feedstock development; (L) an individual with expertise in agronomy, crop science, or soil science; and (M) at the option of the points of contact, other members (REF: FCEA 2008 section...

  13. Does it matter what we call it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agronomy, soil science, plant science, crop science, agricultural science, computer science, environmental science, environmental engineering, agricultural and irrigation engineering, hydrology, meteorology – all are names that describe fields of study relevant to agriculture and the environment in ...

  14. Effects of ensiling of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize (MON810) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... Agathar Kamota, Pardon Muchaonyerwa* and Pearson N. S. Mnkeni. Department of Agronomy .... The management and harvesting of the ..... (Crude) in Animal. Feed: Combustion Method (15th. Edition). Association of Official.

  15. 1 Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics under different plantation crops of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decreased in the following order SOC in young cocoa (1 year) > young coffee (6 years)> old ... of establishment will necessitate the need to produce a suitable habitat for ..... America and America Society of Agronomy, SSSA Book series No. 5,.

  16. 13 The Effect of Benmyl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana, P. O. Box 8, Tafo-Akim, Ghana. 2.Department ... Cocoa production is bedevilled with low inherent soil fertility, pests and diseases, which cause substantial reduction in the ..... American Society of Agronomy.

  17. Earth study from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  18. yield and yield componemts of extra early maize (zea mays l.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SHARIFAI

    Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 5(1): 113 – 122 ... Department of Agronomy Institute of Agricultiral Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria ..... Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased extra early maize development.

  19. 8 Sources of Pod Yield Losses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2Department of Agronomy, University for Development Studies (UDS), P. O. Box 1350,. Tamale, Ghana ..... Effects of delay in harvesting of groundnut on 100 seed weight (g) in 2007 and 2008. Harvesting date ..... economic botany. Macmillan ...

  20. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of Agricultural Sciences including Animal Production, Fisheries, Agronomy, Processing and Agricultural Mechanization. Related ...

  1. New evidence of QTLs attributed to salinity tolerance in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... 1Department of Plant Production, Gonbad High Education Center, Gorgan University of Agriculture Science and Natural. Resource, Iran. 2Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, Faculty of Agriculture ...... Austin, Texas.

  2. Breeding biology of African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) in Kom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Physiology and Animal Production, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural ... Predation (47.37%) was the most important cause of nest failure. ... of conservation actions are essential to avoid future extinction of grey parrots.

  3. The Effect of Aviation Selection Test Battery Waivers on Marine Student-Aviator Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Aerospace Studies Chemistry Naval Architecture Aerospace Technology Computer Science Neuroscience Aircraft Maintenance Electronics Oceanic Science...Studies Aerospace Administration General Studies Natural Resources Agriculture Geography Nursing Agronomy Graphic Design Philosophy Anthropology

  4. Journal of Agricultural Research and Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Agricultural Research and Development aims at publishing research reports, short communications, Critical Reviews in Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, Agronomy, Forestry, Animal Science, Food Technology, Soil Science, Home Economics, Agricultural Extension, Rural development, ...

  5. Effect of phosphorus and potassium on seed production of berseem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... 1Department of Agronomy, Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Agricultural University, Peshawar, Pakistan. ... Key words: Berseem, seed production, phosphorus, potassium. ... important forage legumes in Pakistan and India which belongs ...

  6. Selenium in bread and durum wheats grown under a soil-supplementation regime in actual field conditions, determined by cyclic and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galinha, C.; Pacheco, A. M. G.; Freitas, M. C.; Fikrle, Marek; Kučera, Jan; Coutinho, J.; Macas, B.; Almeida, A. S.; Wolterbeek, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, AUG (2014), s. 3499 ISSN 1588-2780 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : agronomy * biofortification * Selenium * supplementation * wheat * NAA Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing

  7. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic and genotype × environment interaction effects for the content of seven ... rice grain and can affect the health of people who depend on rice as a staple food. ... Agronomy Department, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang ...

  8. Cameroon Journal of Agricultural Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Camerounais des Sciences Agricoles The Cameroon Journal of Agricultural Science publishes new information on all aspects of agricultural science – agronomy, breeding, crop protection, economics, rural sociology, forestry and animal science, health and production ...

  9. Impacts of water availability and drought on maize yield – A comparison of 16 indicators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žalud, Zdeněk; Hlavinka, Petr; Prokeš, K.; Semerádová, Daniela; Balek, Jan; Trnka, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 188, JUL (2017), s. 126-135 ISSN 0378-3774 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe QJ1310123; GA MZe(CZ) QJ1610072 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Drought * Hybrids * Precipitation * Soil water holding capacity * Water balance * Water use efficiency Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 2.848, year: 2016

  10. Advantage of multispectral imaging with sub-centimeter resolution in precision agriculture: generalization of training for supervised classification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez-Moreno, Fernando; Křen, J.; Zemek, František; Novák, J.; Lukas, V.; Pikl, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2017), s. 615-634 ISSN 1385-2256 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI111A133; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Cereals * decision tree * maximum likehood * spectral angle mapper * suntarget- sensor geometry * uncontrolled conditions Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 2.012, year: 2016

  11. Interactive effects of high temperature and drought stress during stem elongation, anthesis and early grain filling on the yield formation and photosynthesis of winter wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčová, Marcela; Klem, Karel; Rapantová, Barbora; Novotná, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar; Hlavinka, Petr; Smutná, P.; Horáková, V.; Škarpa, P.; Pohanková, Eva; Wimmerová, Markéta; Orság, Matěj; Jurečka, František; Trnka, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 221, MAY (2018), s. 182-195 ISSN 0378-4290 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015061; GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001609 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : carbon-isotope discrimination * triticum-aestivum-l. * heat-stress * climate-change * reproductive growth * leaf senescence * gas-exchange * water -stress * durum-wheat * responses * Drought stress * Heat stress * Photosynthesis * Triticum aestivum * Yield formation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 3.048, year: 2016

  12. Multi-model uncertainty analysis in predicting grain N for crop rotations in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yin, X.; Kersebaum, K. C.; Kollas, C.; Baby, S.; Beaudoin, N.; Manevski, K.; Palosuo, T.; Nendel, C.; Wu, L.; Hoffmann, M.; Hoffmann, H. D.; Sharif, B.; Armas-Herrera, C.; Bindi, M.; Charfeddine, M.; Conradt, T.; Constantin, J.; Ewert, F.; Ferrise, R.; Gaiser, T.; de Cortazar-Atauri, I. G.; Giglio, L.; Hlavinka, Petr; Lana, M.; Launay, M.; Louarn, G.; Manderscheid, R.; Mary, B.; Mirschel, W.; Moriondo, M.; Oeztuerk, M.; Pacholski, A.; Ripoche-Wachter, D.; Roetter, R. P.; Ruget, F.; Trnka, Miroslav; Ventrella, D.; Weigel, H-J.; Olesen, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 84, mar (2017), s. 152-165 ISSN 1161-0301 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : air co2 enrichment * climate-change * catch crops * nitrogen-fertilization * wheat production * winter-wheat * model stics * sugar-beet * wide-range * growth * Continuous simulation * Grain N * Model calibration * Model ensemble * Model inter-comparison * Single year simulation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy , plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 3.757, year: 2016

  13. Review of the Designation of Acquisition Positions in the Department of Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    PROTECTION AND QUARANTINE HORTICULTURE GENETICS RANGE CONSERVATION SOIL CONSERVATION FORESTRY SOIL SCIENCE AGRONOMY AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT...Algorithm Results by Occupational Series Occupational series 0435 * PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 0437 * HORTICULTURE 0440 * GENETICS 0454 * RANGE CONSERVATION...TECHNICIAN 0647 DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST 0648 THERAPEUTIC RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST 0649 MEDICAL INSTRUMENT TECHNICIAN 0651 RESPIRATORY

  14. Occupational Conversion Index: Enlisted/Officer/Civilian

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    90300 Radiologic Manaer GENERAL SCHEDULE 0647 Diagnostic Radiologic Technologist 0648 Therapeutic Radiologic Technologist 32 Biomedical Sciences and...Quarantine 0437 Horticulture 0440 b Genetics 0454 Rai ,ge Conservation 0457 Soil Conservation 0460 Forestry 0470 Soil Science 0471 Agronomy 0475 b... Therapeutic Radiologist 131R Diagnostic Radiogist NAVY-DUTY 0131 Radiologist (Diagnostic) 0135 Radiologist ( Therapeutic , NAVY-SECONDARY 1070 q

  15. Changes in time of sowing, flowering and maturity of cereals in Europe under climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olesen, J. E.; Borgesen, C. D.; Elsgaard, L.; Palosuo, T.; Rotter, R.; Skjelvag, A. O.; Peltonen-Sainio, P.; Borjesson, T.; Trnka, Miroslav; Ewert, F.; Siebert, S.; Brisson, N.; Eitzinger, J.; van Asselt, E. D.; Oberforster, M.; van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2012), s. 1527-1542 ISSN 1944-0049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : phenology * wheat * oats * maize * climate change * temperature Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.220, year: 2012

  16. Allelopathic appraisal effects of straw extract wheat varieties on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-29

    Nov 29, 2010 ... Ben HM, Ghorbal H, Kremer RJ, Oussama O (2001). Allelopathic effects of barley extracts on germination and seedlings growth of bread and durum wheats. Agronomie, 21: 65-71. Dias LS (1991). Allelopathic activity of decomposing straw of wheat and oat and associated soil on some crop species. Soil Till.

  17. Storage temperature affects fruit quality attributes of Ber (Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... 2Department of Agricultural Research and Extension Services, Agronomy Research Institute, Box CY 550, Causeway, ... Fruit utilization is affected by quality attributes and shelf life. ... preserve fresh and dried fruits can ensure its availability ... Vitamin C was determined using titrimetric method with 2,6-.

  18. Ideal and saturated soil fertility as bench marks in nutrient management; 1 outline of the framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.H.; Willigen, de P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for nutrient management that takes sustainable soil fertility, environmental protection and balanced plant nutrition as starting points, and integrates concepts from plant physiology, soil chemistry and agronomy. The framework is meant as a tool that can be applied

  19. Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, Shandong Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, and 2Agronomy College,. Shandong ... other clinical benefits have been reported, but not limited to antibacterial .... tute for Control of Pharmaceuticals and Biological Products. (Beijing, China). ... The quality and concentrations of RNAs were.

  20. Enhanced Production of Palmarumycins C12 and C13 in Mycelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MOA Key Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China. Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China. *For correspondence: Email: lgzhou@cau.edu.cn; Tel: +86-10-62731199; Fax: +86-10-62731062. Received: 28 November 2014. Revised accepted: 23 ...

  1. Page 1 Rev. Sci. Technol., Synthese 26: 57 - 64 (2013) D. Ali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une augmentation de la teneur en proline est observee dans les plantes traitees ou non par !'hormone la kinetine. Mots cles: ... hormone in plants under stress induced a proportional increase in chlorophyll (a) and (b) with the concentration of used salt. ..... grains and vegetables, Agronomy Journal, Vol. 66,. 412-421.

  2. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-12-15

    Dec 15, 2016 ... Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, Ejigbo, Osun State University,. Osogbo, Nigeria ... THI Equation. The dry-bulb temperature and humidity through. Temperature-. Humidity Index (THI) are two environmental parameters developed by. Thom in 1958 ... crop yield (P) per cubic metre of water.

  3. Crop Protection in Medieval Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadoks, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Mediterranean and West European pre-modern agriculture (agriculture before 1600) was by necessity ‘organic agriculture’. Crop protection is part and parcel of this agriculture, with weed control in the forefront. Crop protection is embedded in the medieval agronomy text books but specialised

  4. Sensitivity of short rotation poplar coppice biomass productivity to the throughfall reduction – Estimating future drought impacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Tripathi, Abishek; Žalud, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 109 (2018), s. 182-189 ISSN 0961-9534 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe(CZ) QJ1610072 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Dominance * Drought * Mortality * Productivity * Short-rotation coppice * Throughfall manipulation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  5. Effect of the relative time of emergence on the growth allometry of Galium aparine in competition with Triticum aestivum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klem, Karel; Rajsnerová, Petra; Novotná, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar; Marek, Michal V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2014), s. 262-270 ISSN 1444-6162 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI111A133; GA TA ČR TA02010780 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : cleaver * competition * growth allometry * relative time of emergence * wheat Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 0.537, year: 2014

  6. Soil CO2 efflux in young Norway spruce stands with different silviculture practices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosík, J.; Fabiánek, Tomáš; Marková, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 6 (2013), s. 1845-1851 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : seasonal changes in soil respiration * growing season * thinning Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  7. Changes in vertical distribution of spectral reflectance within Spring barley canopy as an indicator of nitrogen nutrition, canopy structure and yield parametrs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klem, Karel; Rajsnerová, Petra; Novotná, Kateřina; Míša, P.; Křen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2014), s. 50-59 ISSN 0551-3677 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI111A133; GA TA ČR TA02010780 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Hordeum vulgare * spectral reflectance * vertical gradient * vegetation indices * nitrogen * grain yield * protein content Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  8. The innovation of nuclear science and technology supporting for the central plains economic zone construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the nuclear agronomy support for the central plains economic zone construction, radiation chemical new material support for the central plains economic zone construction, nuclear medical support for the central plains economic zone construction, nuclear instrument and meter industry support for the central plains economic zone construction and the development trend of related disciplines. (author)

  9. Selection of reference genes for transcriptional analysis of edible tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariot, Roberta Fogliatto; Oliveira, De Luisa Abruzzi; Voorhuijzen, M.M.; Staats, Martijn; Hutten, R.C.B.; Dijk, Van J.P.; Kok, Esther; Frazzon, Jeverson

    2015-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) yield has increased dramatically over the last 50 years and this has been achieved by a combination of improved agronomy and biotechnology efforts. Gene studies are taking place to improve new qualities and develop new cultivars. Reverse transcriptase quantitative

  10. Larvicidal activity of extracts from Ammi visnaga Linn. (Apiaceae) seeds against Culex quinquefasciatus Say. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavela, R.; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Tříska, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 165, mar (2016), s. 51-57 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : botanical larvicide * Furanochromenes * Visnagin * Khellin * Sublethal effect * Mosquito Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 1.724, year: 2016

  11. Local vegetables in Cameroon: Corchorus species used as a vegetable.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westphal-Stevels, J.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    An agro-botanical study of local vegetables in Cameroon is in preparation, including the taxonomy, identity, morphology, agronomy and nutritional value of about 70 species. Corchorus olitorius L. and other edible species of the genus Corchorus L. (Tiliaceae) are part of this study. The wide

  12. Predator preference for Bt-fed Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) prey: implications for insect resistance management in Bt maize seed blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Burkness, E. C.; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Hutchison, W. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 3 (2017), s. 1317-1325 ISSN 0022-0493 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) L200961652 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cry1Ab * fall armyworm * multicolored Asian lady beetle Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 1.824, year: 2016

  13. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, Fiorela L.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Giordano, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences…

  14. Evaluation des conditions de germination des noyaux de Grewia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    personnel

    31 janv. 2014 ... 1Laboratoire de Physiologie et Production Végétales, Université Marien NGOUABI,. Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP.69. Brazzaville, Republique du Congo. 2Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'Agronomie et Forestérie, Université Marien NGOUABI,. BP. 69. Brazzaville, Republique du Congo.

  15. Effect of stage of maturity on dry matter yield, morphological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment evaluated effect of stage of maturity on dry matter yield, morphological characteristics and nutritive value of burgundy bean (Macroptilium bracteatum) at the screen house of Department of Agronomy, Bayero University Kano, Nigeria. The treatments were 3 stages of growth repeated 3 times in a completely ...

  16. Crop Registration: The Pathway to Public Access of Plant Genetic Materials to Build Crops for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting as Crop Science Registrations in the American Journal of the Society of Agronomy in 1926, and continuing 80+ years later in the Journal of Plant Registrations, 11,241 plant cultivars, germplasm, parental lines, genetic stocks and mapping populations have been registered as of December 31, 2...

  17. 1701-IJBCS-Article-Camara Mameri

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    d'Ivoire. Agronomie Africaine, 19(2):. 173-185. Gamouh A. 2005. Effets comparés et interactifs des pesticides et facteurs physiques sur la minéralisation de substrats carbonés dans le sol. Bull. Inst. Scientifique Sci. Vie, 26-27. Hartemink AE, O'Sullivan JN. 2001. Leaf litter decomposition of Piper aduncum,. Glyricidia sepium.

  18. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among different genetic systems, nutrition quality traits were mainly controlled by the accumulative or net maternal main effects and their GE interaction effects, except at ... Department of Agronomy, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310029, People's Republic of China; School of Agriculture and Food Science, Zhejiang A & F ...

  19. Pylové alergie - negativní vliv dřevin ve městech

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerá, Božena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2014), s. 104-109 ISSN 0044-4863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11040 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : city greenery * tree * pollen * allergy * flower * urban planning Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  20. 947-IJBCS-Article-Nacro Hassan Bismark

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    Optimal spacing of soil conservation barriers: example of rock bunds in Burkina Faso. Agronomy. Journal, 92: 361-368. Zougmoré R, Gnankambary Z, Guillobez S,. Stroosnijder L. 2002. Effect of stone lines on soil chemical characteristics under continuous sorghum cropping in semi-arid Burkina Faso. Soil and Tillage.

  1. champ ecole paysan, une approche participative pour l'amelioration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroosnijder.1995. Choix et modalités d'exécution des mesures de conservation de l'eau et des sols au Sahel. Department of Agronomy, Wageningen Agricultural Uni- versity (WAU), PO Box 341, 6700 AH Wa- geningen, The Netherlands, 94 p. Khosa T.B., Van Averbek W., Böhringer R. et E. Albertse. 2002. Enriching the ...

  2. Analyse de l'effet de la concurrence végétale sur la croissance du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIBOUM

    Agronomie et des Sciences Agricoles, .... concilier les aspects environnementaux et économiques de gestion des forêts tropicales, des stratégies de gestion responsable (aménagement forestier) ont été développées, et les forêts continuent de ...

  3. Effects of Phosphorus Fertilization and Seed Dressing Fungicide on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... ... density, sowing date, phosphorus fertilization and ethephon application in the absence of moisture stress. J. Agronomy & Crop. Science 189 : 1-6. Weisser WW and C Braendle. 2001. Body colour and genetic variation in winged morph production in the pea aphid. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata.

  4. Effects of spacing on the growth and yield of Okra ( Abelmochus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of plant population on growth and yield of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) was investigated for two planting seasons (2008 and 2009) in the teaching and research farm, Department of Agronomy, Cross River University of Technology, Obubra . Treatments were five Okra plant populations : 111,111, ...

  5. Data Management and Sharing from the Perspective of Graduate Students: An Examination of the Culture and Practice at the Water Quality Field Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jake; Stowell-Bracke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are actively seeking to identify and respond to the data management and curation needs of researchers. One important perspective often overlooked in acquiring an understanding is that of graduate students. This case study used the Data Curation Profile Toolkit to interview six graduate students working for agronomy researchers at the…

  6. Effect of intercropping varieties of sweet potato and okra in an ultisol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... 2Department of Agronomy, College of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michael ... Land equivalent ratio was higher with intercropping TAE 38 okra and TIS ... to the use of low yield crop cultivars, resulting in low yield ... The top soil (0 - 20 cm) texture of .... sweet potato conserved soil moisture and reduced weed.

  7. 127 Field Practical Training Programme of Faculties of Agriculture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Keywords: Practical training, students of agriculture faculty ... fertility, agronomy and horticultural practices, crop protection activities, ... and Frick (2004) submitted that companies of today want graduates with ... The State accounts for 2.3% of Nigeria's total population. ..... Carrying out appropriate husbandry measures for.

  8. Zinc allocation and re-allocation in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stomph, T.J.; Jiang, W.; Putten, van der P.E.L.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Agronomy and breeding actively search for options to enhance cereal grain Zn density. Quantifying internal (re-)allocation of Zn as affected by soil and crop management or genotype is crucial. We present experiments supporting the development of a conceptual model of whole plant Zn allocation

  9. The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... The effect of plant growth regulators, explants and cultivars on spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) tissue culture. Taha Roodbar Shojaei1*, Vahid Salari2, Darioush Ramazan3, Mahdi Ehyaei1, Javad. Gharechahi4 and Roya Motallebi Chaleshtori5. 1Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, College of ...

  10. Antifungal activity of Boerhavia diffusa L. extract against Phytophthora spp. in tomato and pepper

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, Eva; Colla, G.; Crino, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 1 (2017), s. 27-34 ISSN 0929-1873 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : antifungal activity * phytophora * plant extract Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 1.478, year: 2016

  11. Growth response of Amaranthus caudatus to earthworm casts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of earth worm cast on the physiomorphological differences of Amaranthus caudatus was studied in the green house of the Department of Agronomy, University of Ibadan for seven weeks in 1998. Earthworm casts were collected from soils cultivated with maize, cassava and oil palm fields and secondary forest.

  12. From science to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, D.J.M.; Koenderink, N.J.J.P.; Top, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of the work presented here is to make innovative research output in the agronomy and forestry domain accessible to end-users, so that it can be practically applied. We have developed an approach that consists of three key-elements: an ontology with domain knowledge, a set of documents

  13. performances de trois varietes de canne a sucre soumises au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Performances de trois variétés de canne à sucre et rationnement hydrique. Agronomie Africaine 17 .... boréal), un vent chaud et sec de secteur nord-est en provenance ..... la non prise en compte de la loi de croissance racinaire qui fait varier ...

  14. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *1Department of Plant Sciences, Wollega University, Post Box No: 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia. 2BOKU- University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Department of Applied Plant. Sciences and Plant Biotechnology, Institute of Agronomy and Plant Breeding,. Vienna, Austria, A-1180. Abstract. Article Information.

  15. Challenges facing European agriculture and possible biotechnological solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ricroch, A.; Harwood, W.; Svobodová, Zdeňka; Sági, L.; Hundleby, P.; Badea, E. M.; Rosca, I.; Cruz, G.; Favereiro, M. P. S.; Rieira, V. M.; Jansson, S.; Morandini, P.; Bojinov, B.; Cetiner, S.; Custers, R.; Schrader, U.; Jacobsen, H.-J.; Martin-Laffon, J.; Boisron, A.; Kuntz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 5 (2016), s. 875-883 ISSN 0738-8551 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : automated literature analysis * biotic stress * breeding Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 6.542, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/07388551.2015.1055707

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Singh, Bhola Nath D.Sc. (London), FNA. Date of birth: 22 September 1898. Date of death: 7 June 1984. Specialization: Plant Physiology, Agronomy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. Energy performances of intensive and extensive short rotation cropping systems for woody biomass production in the EU

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Djomo, S. N.; Ač, Alexander; Zenone, T.; De Groote, T.; Bergante, S.; Facciotto, G.; Sixto, H.; Ciria Ciria, P.; Weger, J.; Ceulemans, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, jan (2015), s. 845-854 ISSN 1364-0321 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : poplar * willow * bioenergy crops * energy balance * energy efficiency Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 6.798, year: 2015

  18. Functional analysis of a gene encoding homoserine kinase from rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    1Faculty of Biotechnology, Jeju National University, Jeju, 690-756, Korea. 2Department of Agronomy, Hajee .... was purified from a pellet harvested from a liquid culture containing ampicillin (Amp), the ORF of OsHSK was .... and genomic approches to improve the value of plant foods and feeds. Critical Rev. Plant Sci.

  19. Callus induction, regeneration and transformation of sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-22

    Mar 22, 2012 ... 2Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khonkaen 40002, Thailand. ... The genetic transformation was achieved ..... image processing. Int. J. Eng. Technol. 3(5): 297-301. Nasir NM, Qureshi RH, Aslam M (2000). Effect of salinity on emergence of sugarcane lines. Pak.

  20. Analysis of growth dynamics of Mediterranean bioenergy crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archontoulis, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the rapidly growing bioenergy production worldwide, there is lack of field experience and experimental data on the cultivation of bioenergy crops. This study aims to advance crop management operations and modelling studies by providing essential information on phenology, agronomy and

  1. The effect of brassinosteroids on the morphology, development and yield of field-grown maize

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, D.; Rothová, O.; Kočová, M.; Kohout, Ladislav; Kvasnica, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2010), s. 29-43 ISSN 0167-6903 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601110611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : flowering * genotypes * growth * Zea mays L Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2010

  2. Adapting to Climate Change in the Illimani Watershed in the Bolivian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Using scientific evidence from glaciology, hydrology and agronomy, researchers will assess the evolution and prepare a model of water supply and demand in the region. Taking into consideration indigenous knowledge and local risk mitigation strategies, they will identify ways of minimizing conflict over water resources ...

  3. Transitions - opportunities for growth, renewal, and gratitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transitions in life and career represent significant milestones and are cause for both celebration and renewed interest and commitment. The new year brings a transition in leadership of the American Society of Agronomy, and new leadership is welcomed. Transitions can include retirement, as in the c...

  4. Aromatic and proteomic analyses corroborate the distinction between Mediterranean landraces and modern varieties of durum wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Federico, V.; Pompeiano, Antonio; Gu, Z.; Lo Presti, E.; Whitney, L.; Monti, M.; Di Miceli, G.; Giambalvo, D.; Ruisi, P.; Guglielminetti, L.; Mancuso, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, oct (2016), č. článku 34619. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : PTR-TOF-MS * volatile compounds * gluten strength * rapid characterization * protein-composition * extrusion-cooking * quality * cultivars * flour * subunits Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  5. Susceptibility of sweet and sour cherry cultivars/genotypes to feeding damage caused by Bryobia rubrioculus (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honarparvar, N.; Khanjani, M.; Zemek, Rostislav; Bouzari, N.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2018), s. 78-90 ISSN 1362-1971 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Prunus * brown mite * fee ding damage Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2016

  6. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  7. The Crop Journal Call for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  8. The Crop Journal Call for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer-reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  9. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  10. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer-reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  11. Stacked Bt maize and arthropod predators: exposure to insecticidal Cry proteins and potential hazards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Shu, Y.; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Romeis, J.; Meissle, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1859 (2017), č. článku 20170440. ISSN 0962-8452 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bt maize * Cry proteins * environmental risk assessment Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 4.940, year: 2016 http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/284/1859/20170440

  12. Biodegradation of RDX by Stimulating Humic Substance- and Fe(III) - Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-19

    30. Lovley, D. R. 1995. Microbial Reduction of Iron, Manganese, and Other Metals. Adv. Agronomy 54:175-231. 31. Lovley, D. R., and E. L. Blunt...167. 57. Stevenson, F. J. 1982. Humus chemistry genesis, composition, reactions. Wiley Interscience, New York. 58. Stolz, J. F., D. R. Lovley, and

  13. Forensic Analysis Demonstration via Hawaii Five-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    "Forensics," in its most universal sense, is defined as the use of science or technology in the investigation and establishment of facts or evidence for determining identity or relatedness. Most forensic reasoning is used for arguing legal matters. However, forensic studies are also used in agronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and…

  14. A Multivariate Analysis of Lost Work Time Due to On-the-Job Injuries at Marine Corps Commands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    00893 F Chemistry 01320 F Civil Engineering 00810 F Communications Clerical 00394 F Computer Engineering 00854 F Computer Operation 00332 F...69001 H Packing 70002 H Small-Arms Repairing 66010 H Transportation Loss and Damage Claims Examining 02135 H Agronomy 00471 H Animal Caretaking

  15. Analyzing Carbohydrate-Based Regenerative Fuel Cells as a Power Source for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    University Center for Strategy and Technology. Bishop, M. (2005), An introduction to chemistry . Buchmann, I. (2006), Battery University. Chaudhuri, S...Penetration of photosynthetically active and ultraviolet radiation into alfalfa and tall fescue canopies, Agronomy Journal, 96 (6), 1562–1571. Turns, S. R

  16. Acoustic Determination of Near-Surface Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    requiring geostatistical analysis, while nearby others are spatially independent. In studies involving many different soil properties and chemistry ...Am 116(6), p. 3354-3369. Kravchenko, N., C.W. Boast, D.G. Bullock, 1991. Fractal analysis of soil spatial variability. Agronomy Journal 91

  17. Aplikace tvrdokovových nástřiků u nožového segmentu ořezávacího ústrojí sklízečů cukrové řepy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votava, J.; Luptáková, Natália; Kumbár, V.; Polcar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 11 (2015), s. 341-346 ISSN 1210-3306 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : sugar beet harvester * cutting unit * blade * hard-metal spray * abrasive wear Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 0.317, year: 2015

  18. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-23

    Oct 23, 2012 ... 1Department of Agronomy, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice, 5700, South Africa. 2School of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Agriculture. University of KwaZulu-Natal,. Private Bag X01 Scottsville, 3209, South Africa. 3Department of Crop Science, Bindura University of ...

  19. Resource Conservation Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    This glossary is a composite of terms selected from 13 technologies, and is the expanded revision of the original 1952 edition of "The Soil and Water Conservation Glossary." The terms were selected from these areas: agronomy, biology, conservation, ecology, economics, engineering, forestry, geology, hydrology, range, recreation, soils, and…

  20. Scientometric analysis of the Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Scientometric analysis of the Ethiopian Journal of Agricultural Sciences from volume 1 to 24 covering 279 papers is reported. The journal was covering all areas of agriculture with most papers having single, two or three authors and; in a rare cases up to nine and twelve authors. The number of papers in agronomy, field ...

  1. Quality and selected metals content of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain after the treatment with brassinosteroids druing cultivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroutil, M.; Hradecká, D.; Kohout, Ladislav; Lachman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 2 (2010), s. 65-72 ISSN 1211-3174 Grant - others:GA MZe(CZ) QH92111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : brassinosteroids * carotenoids * chlorophylls * heterosis Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  2. Agro-science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGRO-SCIENCE

    CYTOGENETIC STUDIES ON BAMBARA GROUNDNUT (VIGNA SUBTERRANEA (L.) VERDC). Uguru, M.I.. 1 *. Agwatu, U.K.. 2 and Faluyi J. O.. 3. 1. Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. 2. Department of Agronomy, Micheal Okpara University of Agriculture,. Umudike, Nigeria. 3. Departmment ...

  3. Proceedings of 1. Regional Meeting on Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Meeting describes nuclear methods and techniques, emphasizing the development or adaptation of methodologies and instrumentations for national conditions. The works present here comprise several field of nuclear application as agronomy; industry; nuclear medicine; dosimetry; radiological protection and instrumentation. (C.G.C.)

  4. Influence of abiotic stresses on the winter wheat sprouting plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, L.; Hnilička, F.; Kadlec, P.; Smrčková-Jankovská, P.; Macháčková, Ivana; Sychrová, E.; Kohout, Ladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2008), s. 389-390 ISSN 1125-4718. [Congress of the European Society for Agronomy /10./. 15.09.2008-19.09.2008, Bologna] R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : brassinosteroids * abiotic stress * emergency Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  5. What is "Fate" of 24-epibrassinolide after its application on plants before flowering?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, L.; Swaczynová, Jana; Kohout, Ladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2008), s. 437-438 ISSN 1125-4718. [Congress of the European Society for Agronomy /10./. 15.09.2008-19.09.2008, Bologna] R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : brassinosteroids * seed content Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Carbon sequestration potential in agroforestry system in India: an analysis for carbon project

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sharma, R.; Sanjeev, K.; Chauhan, D. K.; Tripathi, Abishek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2016), s. 631-644 ISSN 0167-4366 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Agroforestry * Biophysical and practical potential * Carbon sequestration * Poplar based agroforestry * Institutional mechanism Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 1.170, year: 2016

  7. Crop rotation modelling-A European model intercomparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kollas, C.; Kersebaum, K. C.; Nendel, C.; Manevski, K.; Müller, C.; Palosuo, T.; Armas-Herrera, C.; Beaudoin, N.; Bindi, M.; Charefeddine, M.; Conradt, T.; Constantin, J.; Eitzinger, J.; Ewert, F.; Ferrise, R.; Gaiser, T.; de Cortazar-Atauri, I. G.; Giglio, L.; Hlavinka, Petr; Hoffman, H.; Hofmann, M.; Launay, M.; Manderscheid, R.; Mary, B.; Mirschel, W.; Moriondo, M.; Olesen, J. E.; Öztürk, I.; Pacholski, A.; Ripoche-Wachter, D.; Roggero, P. P.; Roncossek, S.; Rötter, R. P.; Ruget, F.; Sharif, B.; Trnka, Miroslav; Ventrella, D.; Waha, K.; Wegehenkel, M.; Weigel, H-J.; Wu, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, oct (2015), s. 98-111 ISSN 1161-0301 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : model ensemble * crop simulation models * catch crop * intermediate crop * treatment * Multi-year Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 3.186, year: 2015

  8. Selenium in bread and durum wheats grown under a soil-supplementation regime in actual field conditions, determined by cyclic and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galinha, C.; Pacheco, A. M. G.; Freitas, C.; Fikrle, Marek; Kučera, Jan; Coutinho, J.; Macas, B.; Almeida, A. S.; Wolterbeek, H. T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, APR (2015), s. 139-143 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 283883 - NMI3-II Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : agronomy * biofortification * Selenium * supplementation * wheat * NAA Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  9. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, .... embryo rescue or hormone treatment was applied on the F1 seeds. ... genies of S1 plants, treated and fixed as described above, ..... Comai L. 2000 Genetic and epigenetic interactions in allopolyploid plants.

  10. Current developments in soil water sensing for climate, environment, hydrology and agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of the four dimensional spatio-temporal status and dynamics of soil water content is becoming indispensable to solutions of agricultural, environmental, climatological and engineering problems at all scales. In agronomy alone, science is severely limited by scant or inaccurate knowledge of...

  11. Využití dálkového průzkumu pro hodnocení stavu porostů zemědělských plodin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukas, V.; Neudert, L.; Novák, J.; Širůček, P.; Kramář, M.; Rodriguez-Moreno, Fernando; Zemek, František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 12 (2016), s. 67-73 ISSN 0139-6013 R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QJ1610289 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : precision agriculture * vegetation indices * spectral measurement * crop nutrient status Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  12. Huang et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(1):33 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF ADEWUNMI

    3 Department of Computer Science, University of Education, Lahore 54000, Pakistan. Corresponding authors: ... Some studies use bibliometric tools to examine a specific field: Agronomy (Canas-Guerrero et al., 2013), Computer Science. (Guan et al., 2004; .... Drugs, Chinese Herbal/*administration & dosage. 81. 10.37. 4.

  13. Comparing predictive ability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to visible near-infrared spectroscopy for soil property determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Gislum, René; Hermansen, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and particle size fractions have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to replace the expensive conventional analyses of soil are needed. Visible near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (viseNIRS) has already shown potential...

  14. CULTIVAR RELEASE - FAEM Carlasul: new white oat cultivar with high grain yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Costa de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The white oat cultivar FAEM Carlasul was developed at the Plant Genomics and Breeding Center, Faculty of Agronomy Eliseu Maciel, Federal University of Pelotas, as a result of the cross between UFRGS 10 and 90SAT-28 (Coronado2/Cortez3/Pendek/ME 1563. It is characterized by high yield and grain quality.

  15. Forecasting value added of agricultural sub-sectors during fourth five-year development plan in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassabian, S.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on forecasting the values added of agricultural sub-sectors, including agronomy, fishing, forestry, animal husbandry and agricultural services, using the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) model. It compares the resulting figures with the target estimates throughout the plan within the years 1384-1388 (2005-2009). It turns out that the forecasted values added in the sub-sectors of agronomy and agricultural services are higher and slower than the estimated values added required due to the plan, respectively. Also the high conformity of the estimated and forecasted value added on the horizon of the fourth five-year plan, while the other sub-sectors both the values are close to each other. The results indicate that the capability of ANN method for forecasting variables is more suitable than the other methods. (author)

  16. The centenary of the School Botanical Garden from Blaj

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Sorin MUNTEAN

    1982-01-01

    The development of the first school-botanical garden from Blaj is strongly connected with the development of botanical research at the University and Agronomy Insitute from Cluj-Napoca. The first curators of the garden A. Uilacan, A. Cheteanu, Al. Borza and I. Popu-Cimpeanu studied in Cluj. Prof. Al. Borza developed the medicinal and crop plant collections in collaboration with B. Pater, former head of our agrobotanical garden. Later the botanical garden of the University, became famous under...

  17. H:\\PMKER 25(3)\\TRAORE K..xps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Laboratoire de Phytopathologie de la Faculté d'Agronomie de l'Université de Parakou (Bénin) pour confirmer ou non la présence des trois virus responsables de maladies chez les Solanaceae à savoir le CMV, le PVMV et le PVYN. Des tampons ont été préparés conformément aux directives de Clarck et al. (1977), il s'agit.

  18. Rehabilitation of a semiarid ecosystem in Senegal : 1. Experiments at the hillside scale

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, P.; Albergel, Jean; Diatta, M.; Grouzis, Michel; Sene, B.

    1997-01-01

    The groundnut cropping basin of Senegal suffers environmental degradation, with a negative impact on local agriculture, shown by intense soil erosion. Despite the existence of many extensive programmes, there are few results concerning actual effects, at the hillside scale, of rehabilitation practices. The objective of the study, carried out from 1983 to 1993, was to give evidence of the actual effects, in terms of hydrology and agronomy, of conservation measures set-up in a small cultivated ...

  19. Projections of uncertainties in climate change scenarios into expected winter wheat yields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, M.; Dubrovský, Martin; Semerádová, Daniela; Žalud, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 77, - (2004), s. 229-249 ISSN 0177-798X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/02/0827 Grant - others:Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry Brno(CZ) J 08/98:432100001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : climate change scenarios * wheat yields Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2004

  20. Split application of glyphosate in herbicide-tolerant maize provides efficient weed control and favors beneficial epigeic arthropods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Zdeňka; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Holec, J.; Holec, M.; Boháč, J.; Jursík, M.; Soukup, J.; Sehnal, František

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 251, JAN 01 (2018), s. 171-179 ISSN 0167-8809 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) L200961652 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : herbicide-tolerant maize * weed management * conventional tillage Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880917304188

  1. Regional climate change impacts on agricultural crop production in Central and Eastern Europe – hotspots, regional differences and common trends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eitzinger, Josef; Trnka, Miroslav; Semerádová, Daniela; Thaler, S.; Svobodová, Eva; Hlavinka, P.; Šiška, B.; Takáč, J.; Malatinská, L.; Nováková, M.; Dubrovský, Martin; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 6 (2013), s. 787-812 ISSN 0021-8596 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : water-use efficiency * winter-wheat * change scenarios * elevated co2 * soil workability * atmospheric co2 * atmospheric co2 * yield * variability * model Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.891, year: 2013

  2. The history of genetics in Mexico in the light of A Cultural History of Heredity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I analyze the conditions for scientific research and the social relationships that allowed the establishment of genetics in Mexico, in the laboratory, the clinic and in agronomy. I give three examples to illustrate how the cultural history of heredity has enlightened this work: the introduction and institutionalization of Mendelism in Mexico, the hereditarian ideas of medical doctors in the late nineteenth century, and the introduction of medical genetics in Mexico.

  3. The Reconstituited Soils: The Technology and Its Possible Implementation in the Remediation of Contaminated Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Adriano Manfredi

    2016-01-01

    Reconstitution technology is a pedotechnique whose action supplements soil structure with organic and mineral components that are quality and origin certified. The treatment procedure performs a mechanical action which forms an organic matter lining within the mineral fraction by means of soil structure disintegration and subsequent reconstitution. Results produced by the technology in the field of agronomy suggest that such method may be employed to remediate contaminated soil by altering it...

  4. The Reconstituited Soils: The Technology and Its Possible Implementation in the Remediation of Contaminated Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Adriano Manfredi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution technology is a pedotechnique whose action supplements soil structure with organic and mineral components that are quality and origin certified. The treatment procedure performs a mechanical action which forms an organic matter lining within the mineral fraction by means of soil structure disintegration and subsequent reconstitution. Results produced by the technology in the field of agronomy suggest that such method may be employed to remediate contaminated soil by altering its properties according to need.

  5. 1814-IJBCS-Article-Aziadekey Guido

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Mawuli AZIADEKEY 1*, Komi ODAH 2 et Ayayi ATAYI 1. 1Département de Production Végétale, Ecole Supérieure d'Agronomie, Université de Lomé,. BP : 1515, Lomé, Togo. 2Laboratoire de Physiologie et Biotechnologie Végétales, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Lomé,. BP : 1515 Lomé, Togo. *Auteur correspondant ...

  6. Stakeholder Analysis for Sharing Agro-environment Issues Towards Concerted Action: A Case Study on Diffuse Nitrate Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Roggero

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing need for participatory approaches to support the development of sustainable farming systems, based on the active involvement of stakeholders in the definition of research objectives and priorities. This paper reports the experience of a team of agronomy researchers involved in the SLIM project (http://slim.open.ac.uk, around a case study of nitrate pollution. The agro-ecosystem analysis included biophysical processes at microcatchment scale and the stakeholders’ perceptions, interests and practices related to the nitrate issue (stakeholders analysis. The conceptual SLIM framework model supported new interactions among stakeholders, that were facilitated by researchers, using dialogical tools to enable them to use scientific data and to integrate their own knowledge on the farming system. The agro-environment policies, based on compulsory prescriptions, revealed weak assumptions and insufficient integration of scientific knowledge. The stakeholder analysis contributed to the identification of priorities both for scientific research and agro-environment policies. Researchers provided the site-specific scientific knowledge, in a way that enabled stakeholders to identify the relationships between agricultural practices, landscape values and the nitrate pollution issue and to elaborate shared strategies to develop concerted actions. New spaces for interaction between researchers and stakeholders should be created to face complex agro-environment issues at catchment scale, such as the nitrate pollution of groundwater. The implication for agronomy research is that the experiments should be designed to produce suitable results to facilitate participatory sessions and that it is worthwhile to invest in specific skills of communication science and group dynamics management within the agronomy researchers’ community, in order to integrate agronomy knowledge into high quality participatory processes.

  7. Stakeholder Analysis for Sharing Agro-environment Issues Towards Concerted Action: A Case Study on Diffuse Nitrate Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toderi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing need for participatory approaches to support the development of sustainable farming systems, based on the active involvement of stakeholders in the definition of research objectives and priorities. This paper reports the experience of a team of agronomy researchers involved in the SLIM project (http://slim.open.ac.uk, around a case study of nitrate pollution. The agro-ecosystem analysis included biophysical processes at microcatchment scale and the stakeholders’ perceptions, interests and practices related to the nitrate issue (stakeholders analysis. The conceptual SLIM framework model supported new interactions among stakeholders, that were facilitated by researchers, using dialogical tools to enable them to use scientific data and to integrate their own knowledge on the farming system. The agro-environment policies, based on compulsory prescriptions, revealed weak assumptions and insufficient integration of scientific knowledge. The stakeholder analysis contributed to the identification of priorities both for scientific research and agro-environment policies. Researchers provided the site-specific scientific knowledge, in a way that enabled stakeholders to identify the relationships between agricultural practices, landscape values and the nitrate pollution issue and to elaborate shared strategies to develop concerted actions. New spaces for interaction between researchers and stakeholders should be created to face complex agro-environment issues at catchment scale, such as the nitrate pollution of groundwater. The implication for agronomy research is that the experiments should be designed to produce suitable results to facilitate participatory sessions and that it is worthwhile to invest in specific skills of communication science and group dynamics management within the agronomy researchers’ community, in order to integrate agronomy knowledge into high quality participatory processes.

  8. MCEM algorithm for the log-Gaussian Cox process

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, Celine; Dubois-Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Regis

    2014-01-01

    Log-Gaussian Cox processes are an important class of models for aggregated point patterns. They have been largely used in spatial epidemiology (Diggle et al., 2005), in agronomy (Bourgeois et al., 2012), in forestry (Moller et al.), in ecology (sightings of wild animals) or in environmental sciences (radioactivity counts). A log-Gaussian Cox process is a Poisson process with a stochastic intensity depending on a Gaussian random eld. We consider the case where this Gaussian random eld is ...

  9. French days on stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These first French days on stable isotopes took place in parallel with the 1. French days of environmental chemistry. Both conferences had common plenary sessions. The conference covers all aspects of the use of stable isotopes in the following domains: medicine, biology, environment, tracer techniques, agronomy, food industry, geology, petroleum geochemistry, cosmo-geochemistry, archaeology, bio-geochemistry, hydrology, climatology, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, isotope separations etc.. Abstracts available on CD-Rom only. (J.S.)

  10. Pakistan's experience in application of nuclear techniques in agriculture and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujtaba Naqvi, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The history of the use of nuclear techniques describes the range of activities and the practical results obtained in Pakistan so far. Agricultural research in PAEC are mutation breeding of important crops, agronomy of selected mutants, entomology, plant pathology, plant nutrition studies on macro and micro nutrients and their interactions, plant physiology and food preservation. Other activities include national and international co-operation, teaching, training and symposia. (author)

  11. Uncertainties in climate change scenarios for the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubrovský, Martin; Nemešová, Ivana; Kalvová, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2005), s. 139-156 ISSN 0936-577X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/02/0827; GA MŽP(CZ) SM/640/18/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Climate change scenarios * Uncertainty analysis * Global climate models * Pattern scaling Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2005

  12. Escalonando la agroecologia : Procesos y aprendizajes de cuatro ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2007 ... Escalonando la agroecologia : Procesos y aprendizajes de cuatro experiencias en Chile, Cuba, Honduras y Perú ... Carlos Venegas est directeur régional pour le Centro de Educación y Tecnología (CET) et coordonne le programme d'études de premier cycle sur l'agronomie et le développement rural ...

  13. Performance de deux techniques d'extraction des phénols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence in vitro des composes phénoliques des jeunes feuilles du pécher. Prunus persica (1) Batsch, sur le puceron vert du pecher, Myzus persicae sulzer. Agronomie 8 (9) : 787-792. Bell J.N., Dixon R.A., Bailey J.A., Rowell P.M. &. Lamb C.J., 1984. Differential induction of chalcone synthase mRNA activity at the onset.

  14. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... ¹Département d'Agronomie, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Batna, 05000, Algérie. ²INRA Centre de .... Fishers PLSD test was then used for pair-wise compa- risons of all the ..... proteinase inhibitor II, and pathogenesis-related protein P4 in tomato ... Les principales viroses limitant la culture de la fève.

  15. Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    We have the pleasure of informing our readers that after 31 years since the creation of the journal Agronomia Colombiana and the publication of 830 tropical agronomy articles, the journal will no longer charge authors for the privilege of publication beginning with issue here of 2014 and for the year 2015. The aim is to facilitate the publication of research results from a higher number of authors, increase the quantity of published articles, and increase the impact of these articles. Since t...

  16. North Dakota State University Sunflower Research: A Summary of Selected Research Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Roy M.; Sell, Randall S.; Watt, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Sunflower research in North Dakota focuses on variety testing. Additional research has been conducted on cost-effective cultural practices, possible use to produce a red dye food colorant, and the estimated economic impact of banning an insecticide. Variety testing has been conducted at most state experiment sites in North Dakota, including, Casselton Agronomy Seed Farm, Carrington Research Extension Center, Langdon, Minot, Williston, Dickinson, and Hettinger Experiment Stations. A comparison...

  17. Characterization of New Maize Genes Putatively Involved in Cytokinin Metabolism and Their Expression during Osmotic Stress in Relation to Cytokinin Levels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyroubalová, Š.; Václavíková, Kateřina; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Šmehilová, M.; Hluska, T.; Ohnoutková, Ludmila; Frébort, Ivo; Galuszka, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2009), s. 433-447 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/06/0703; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/08/0920; GA MŠk ME 861; GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : ABSCISIC-ACID BIOSYNTHESIS * MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION * CIS- ZEA TIN Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 6.235, year: 2009

  18. ALFALFA

    OpenAIRE

    Mirko Stjepanović; Robert Zimmer; Marijana Tucak; Gordana Bukvić; Svetislav Popović; Zvonimir Štafa

    2009-01-01

    The academic textbook Alfalfa contains the following chapters: Review outline, Foreword, Origin and spread of alfalfa, Economic importance of alfalfa, Biological properties and breeding alfalfa, Morphological traits of alfalfa, Growth and development of alfalfa, Ecological conditions for alfalfa growth, Agronomy of alfalfa for fodder production, Pests and diseases of alfalfa and their control, Usage of alfalfa and hay, silage and haylage production, Alfalfa seed production, Prospects for alfa...

  19. Evaluation of Indirect Measurement Method of Seasonal Patterns of Leaf Area Index in a High-Density Short Rotation Coppice Culture of Poplar

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tripathi, Abishek; Fischer, Milan; Orság, Matěj; Marek, Michal V.; Žalud, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2016), s. 549-556 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13030; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : SunScan Plant Canopy Analyzer * litterfall * specific leaf area * poplar clone J-105 Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  20. Comparing the performance of 11 crop simulation models in predicting yield response to nitrogen fertilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salo, T.; Palosuo, T.; Kersebaum, K. C.; Nendel, C.; Angulo, C.; Ewert, F.; Bindi, M.; Calanca, P.; Klein, T.; Moriondo, M.; Ferrise, R.; Olesen, J. E.; Patil, R. H.; Ruget, F.; Takáč, J.; Hlavinka, Petr; Trnka, Miroslav; Rötter, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 154, č. 7 (2016), s. 1218-1240 ISSN 0021-8596 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MZe QJ1310123; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13030 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268277; European Commission(XE) 292944 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Northern growing conditions * climate change impacts * spring barley * system simulations * soil properties * winter-wheat * dynamics * growth Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 1.291, year: 2016

  1. THE CHEMICAL TEACHING MATTER AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE WAYS OF PERFORMANCE OF THE AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER / LA DÍSCIPLINA QUÍMICA Y SU CONTRIBUCIÓN A LOS MODOS DE ACTUACIÓN DEL INGENIERO AGRÓNOMO

    OpenAIRE

    Yamilé Batista Yero; Belisario Tomás Cedeño García; Juana López Toranzo; Luritza Peña Molina

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows an activity system from Chemistry for the development of the research and field experience for first year students of the agronomy career. They are aimed to contribute to the knowledge acquisition about the application of chemistry by the professional of agricultural branch, because they make use of the tools offered by chemistry as basic discipline to solve professional problems encountered at the base of their profession. The results are directed to achieve the systematizat...

  2. Department of Defense Laboratory Civilian Science and Engineering Workforce - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Aerospace Engineering 1,995 2,207 2,166 -41 -1.9% Electrical Engineering 982 1,193 1,413 220 18.4% Chemistry 744 873 804 -69 -7.9% Operations Research...1313 Geophysics 180 Psychology 690 Industrial Hygiene 1315 Hydrology 184 Sociology 701 Veterinary Medical Science 1320 Chemistry 190 General...Engineering 1520 Mathematics 470 Soil Science 861 Aerospace Engineering 1529 Mathematical Statistician 471 Agronomy 871 Naval Architecture 1530

  3. Clean Energy for the Commonwealth Powered by UMass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Nanomagnetics Zeolite membranes Polymer-inorganic nanocomposites MEMS Nanostructured catalysts Plant Biotechnology Biochem., Cell wall struct., Agronomy Crambe...power management Low-power device networks Energy scavenging Flame Modeling Combustion chemistry Molecular-beam mass spectrometry Building Design...Thayumanavan, PhD. UMass Amherst Professor of Chemistry and Director, Fueling the Future Center for Chemical Innovation – Paul Osenar, PhD. Chief

  4. Možné využití entomopatogenních hub proti roztoči Rhizoglyphus robini (Acari: Acaridae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konopická, Jana; Zemek, Rostislav; Bohatá, A.; Nermuť, Jiří; Mráček, Zdeněk; Palevsky, E.; Čurn, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 12 (2017), s. 73-80 ISSN 0139-6013 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TG02010034; GA MŠk(CZ) 8G15006 Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 120/2016/Z Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : entomopathogenic fungi * Rhizoglyphus robini * biological control Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  5. Do Estimates of Water Productivity Enhance Understanding of Farm-Level Water Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Wichelns

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of water productivity are appearing with increasing frequency in the literature pertaining to agronomy, water management, and water policy. Some authors report such estimates as one of the outcome variables of experiment station studies, while others calculate water productivities when comparing regional crop production information. Many authors suggest or imply that higher values of water productivity are needed to ensure that future food production goals are achieved. Yet maximizi...

  6. Neutron activation analysis with a deuteron accelerator. Application to the determination of copper in a Cu-Sn mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodia, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis allows a rapid determination of trace elements. It has many applications in vegetal biology, agronomy, animal biology, medicine and industry. This report presents the different devices used (deuteron accelerator, 3 H-Ti/Zr target, NaI(Tl) scintillation counter, Li-drifted Ge detector), the theory of the method and an application to the determination of copper in a copper-mixture [fr

  7. Evaluation de la qualité des eaux des ruisseaux du cours moyen de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Laboratoire d'Hydrobiologie et d'Aquaculture, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-. Calavi (LHA/FSA/UAC), 01 BP : 526 Cotonou, Bénin. 2 Unité de Recherche en Aquaculture et Ecotoxicologie Aquatique (URAEAq), Faculté d'Agronomie,. Université de Parakou, 03 BP : 61 Parakou-URAEAq, Bénin ...

  8. Evaluation of Lands for Recreational Snowmobile Use (Guidelines for Natural Resources Management and Land Use Compatibility).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    Percy , E. C., "The Snowmobile: Friend or Foe?" Journal of Trauma, Vol 12, No. 5 (May 1972), pp 444-446. Price, V. J., "Snowmobiles, The Winter Revolution...Fort Dix, NJ Hasset, John J., Agronomy Department, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL Huber, Phil, Environmental Offices, Fort Benning, GA Jackson ...Outdoor Recreation Director, Fort McCoy, WI Houser, James, Forester, Fort McCoy, WI Hutchinson, Julian, Land Manager, Fort McCoy, WI Jackson , Gary

  9. The academic majors of students taking American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Many papers have been written in recent years discussing the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of soil science. Therefore, it would make sense that soil science courses would be taken by students in a wide array of academic majors. To investigate this, we collected data from eight different American universities on the declared academic majors of students enrolled in soil science courses over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Data was collected for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level: introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. Overall trends and trends for each class were evaluated. Generally, environmental science and crop science/horticulture/agronomy students were enrolled in soil science courses in the greatest numbers. Environmental science and engineering students showed rapid increases in enrollment over the 10 years of the study, while the number of crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students declined. In the introduction to soil science classes, environmental science and crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students were enrolled in the greatest numbers, while declared soil science majors only made up 6.6% of the average enrollment. The highest enrollments in soil fertility were crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students and other agricultural students (all agricultural majors except crop science, horticulture, agronomy, or soil science). In both the soil management and pedology classes, environmental science and other agricultural students were the largest groups enrolled. Other agricultural students and students from other majors (all majors not otherwise expressly investigated) were the largest enrolled groups in soil biology/microbiology courses, and environmental science and soil science students were the largest enrolled groups in soil chemistry classes. Soil physics was the only class

  10. LA COSTANERA SUR, BUENOS AIRES - EDGE AND HORIZON OF THE CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Martire, Agustina

    2008-01-01

    NOTE May 2016:Sonia Berjman, who edited the textbook of Benito Carrasco, asks that the author recognize the origin in the article. The book of compiled writings of Benito Carrasco, edited by Dr. Sonia Berjman: Benito Javier Carrasco: his texts. (Faculty of Agronomy, University of Buenos Aires, 1997, 258 p.) Has been largely the source of the texts of Carrasco used in this article.Buenos Aires has a river. Although it has been repeated for decades that the city gave it back, the recent interve...

  11. Utilization of magnetically responsive cereal by-product for organic dye removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldíková, Eva; Politi, D.; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Pospíšková, K.; Sidiras, D.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2016), s. 2204-2214 ISSN 0022-5142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13709S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : modified rice straw * aqueous-solution * methylene-blue * wheat-straw * activated carbon * cost adsorbents * crystal violet * anionic dyes * adsorption * acid * barley straw * magnetic modification * magnetic adsorbent * microwave-assisted synthesis * organic dyes Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2016

  12. Comparing predictive ability of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Near Infrared Spectroscopy for soil texture and organic carbon determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi; Gislum, René

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) and texture have a practical value for agronomy and the environment. Thus, alternative techniques to supplement or substitute for the expensive conventional analysis of soil are developed. Here the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine SOC...... and texture was tested and compared with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique and traditional laboratory analysis. Calibration models were developed on 50 topsoil samples. For all properties except silt, higher predictive ability of LIBS than NIRS models was obtained. Successful calibrations indicate...... that LIBS can be used as a fast and reliable method for SOC and texture estimation....

  13. Utilisation d'un modèle distribué sur un petit bassin versant de savane (Booro-Borotou, Côte d'Ivoire)

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallier, Pierre; Girard, Georges

    1990-01-01

    Le programme Hyperbav a pour cadre un petit bassin versant du Nord-Ouest de la Côte d'Ivoire. Sur une superficie de 136 hectares des observations fines ont été conduites de 1984 à 1988 sur toutes les grandeurs intéressant le fonctionnement hydrique (hydrologie, climatologie, pédologie, hydrogéologie, botanique, agronomie). Il est intéressant de tenter d'intégrer ces informnations dans une représentation modéliste des échanges hydriques superficiels et internes. Le "modèle couplé" développé co...

  14. Water requirements of short rotation poplar coppice: Experimental and modelling analyses across Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Milan; Zenone, T.; Trnka, Miroslav; Orság, Matěj; Montagnani, L.; Ward, E. J.; Tripathi, Abishek; Hlavinka, Petr; Seufert, G.; Žalud, Zdeněk; King, J.; Ceulemans, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 250, MAR (2018), s. 343-360 ISSN 0168-1923 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : energy-balance closure * dual crop coefficient * radiation use efficiency * simulate yield response * below-ground carbon * vs. 2nd rotation * flux data * biomass production * forest model * stand-scale * Bioenergy * Bowen ratio and energy balance * Crop coefficient * Eddy covariance * Evapotranspiration * Water balance Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agriculture Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  15. LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES: NANOMATERIALS FOR APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luíz Paulo Figueredo Benício

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to introduce Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH as nanomaterials to be used in agriculture, with particular reference to its use as storage and slow release matrix of nutrients and agrochemicals for plant growing. Structural characteristics, main properties, synthesis methods and characterization of LDH were covered in this study. Moreover, some literature data have been reported to demonstrate their potential for storage and slow release of nitrate, phosphate, agrochemicals, besides as being used as adsorbent for the wastewater treatment. This research aims to expand, in near future, the investigation field on these materials, with application in agriculture, increasing the interface between chemistry and agronomy.

  16. Contribution to the studies on the mineral content of plant material through radioactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourcy, A.

    1968-03-01

    Radioactivation analysis is by its great sensibility or its rapidity quite helpful in plant biology and agronomy. Specific composition of plants and results to obtain in biological experimentation have needed a practical research on analytical methods for plant materials, using for radioactivation swimming-pool reactor neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons from a generator. Dosage process for 25 elements is exposed, taking account of the interest of the analysis for each element, the average amount occurring in plants and the result obtained. Many applications are developed, concerning nutrition physiology, genetics, parasitology, toxicology, control of manufactured agricultural and pharmaceutical products industrial and pesticides residues, ecology, radioecology and biochemistry. (author) [fr

  17. etudes ethnomycologiques et identification des champignons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agronomie Africaine 29 (1) : 93 - 109 (2017). 100. FADEYI O. G. et al. 7 cf. Amanita s p. A m a n ita c e a e. E k ika n c o. L ia n d jo. -. -. Sy m biote. -. (FOG. 0. 00. 8). (c h a m p ig n o n. + m ycorrh izie ns b la n c. ) +. 8. Ikou an. -y o y i. -. -. Ikou anyo y i. -. Sy m biote. -. (FOG. 0. 01. 6). + m ycorrh izie ns. 9. T ermito myc es.

  18. Use of thermoluminescent dosimetry in gamma radiation fields studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, W.

    1987-01-01

    The depth-dose curves for gamma rays in material of interest to agronomy were obtained using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters. The dose conversion factors for LiF were determined from curves of the absorved dose versus depth in water, wood and soil. Mathematics equations were chosen to best fit these curves. In the view of the results we came to the conclusion that in the studied materials the absorved radiation dose presents a great variation to the depth and could be correlated through of the exponential regression. (author)

  19. Geophysics and nutritional science: toward a novel, unified paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Gidon; Martin, Pamela A

    2009-05-01

    This article discusses a few basic geophysical processes, which collectively indicate that several nutritionally adverse elements of current Western diets also yield environmentally harmful food consumption patterns. We address oceanic dead zones, which are at the confluence of oceanography, aquatic chemistry, and agronomy and which are a clear environmental problem, and agriculture's effects on the surface heat budget. These exemplify the unknown, complex, and sometimes unexpected large-scale environmental effects of agriculture. We delineate the significant alignment in purpose between nutritional and environmental sciences. We identify red meat, and to a lesser extent the broader animal-based portion of the diet, as having the greatest environmental effect, with clear nutritional parallels.

  20. THE CHEMICAL TEACHING MATTER AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE WAYS OF PERFORMANCE OF THE AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER / LA DÍSCIPLINA QUÍMICA Y SU CONTRIBUCIÓN A LOS MODOS DE ACTUACIÓN DEL INGENIERO AGRÓNOMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilé Batista Yero

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows an activity system from Chemistry for the development of the research and field experience for first year students of the agronomy career. They are aimed to contribute to the knowledge acquisition about the application of chemistry by the professional of agricultural branch, because they make use of the tools offered by chemistry as basic discipline to solve professional problems encountered at the base of their profession. The results are directed to achieve the systematization of academic, field experience and research components from a chemistry perspective for the formation of an integral professional bestowed of knowledge and abilities which contributes the foundation of their professional performance.

  1. Pretreatment of spent mushroom substrate for enhancing the conversion of fermentable sugar

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, S.; Lan, Y.; Wu, Z.; Peng, Y.; Chen, S.; Huang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gelbič, Ivan; Guan, X.; Zhang, L.; Zou, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 148, NOV 9 (2013), s. 596-600 ISSN 0960-8524 Grant - others:National High Technology Research and Development Program 863(CN) 2011AA10A203; National Natural Science Foundation of China(CN) 31301724; Forestry University(CN) xjq201203; China National Engineering Research Center of Juncao Technology(CN) JCJJ13021 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bacillus thuringiensis * high performace liquid chromatography * pretreatment Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 5.039, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960852413013734#

  2. The analysis of mass and energy transfer from a surface by means of a physical model conceived as a teaching tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressotti, A.; Zerbi, G.; Delle Vedove, G.; Ham, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    A physical model representing an evapotranspirating field on a scale 1:100 is described. The model, having a moderate cost, was devised as a teaching tool for agronomy and agrometeorology classes; it permits the measurement and the continuous monitoring of the parameters involved in mass and energy transfer over an evaporating surface (radiation, turbulence, temperature of the air and of the surface, heat fluxes, vapor pressure gradients). The physical characteristics of the surface can be changed to simulate different situations of a cultivated field. The surface resistance is calculated by the measurement of the Bowen ratio and directly from the measurement of the surface temperature [it

  3. Breeding of a new early season indica rice variety Ganzaoxian 56 by irradiation, anther culture and hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yingjin; Liu Yibai; Kuang Huiyun; Xu Zhengjin

    2005-01-01

    Ganzaoxian 56 is a new early season indica rice variety, which was bred in the College of Agronomy of Jiangxi Agricultural University by the integrative breeding techniques of radiation, anther culture and hybridization. Its main characteristics were as follows: super quality, high yield, high tolerance to heat-forced maturity, suitable maturity and high resistance to rice blast. It was registered by Crop Cultivar Registration Committee of Jiangxi Province on March 19, 2004. The breeding process of Ganzaoxian 56, main characteristics and the value of its exploitation and application were described in this paper. (authors)

  4. Soil physics and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado Neto, Durval; Reichardt, K.; Sparovek, G.

    2004-01-01

    The approach that integrates knowledge is very important in Agriculture, including farmers, extensionists, researchers and professors. The specialists, including the soil physicists, must have a global view of the crop production system. Therefore, their expertise can be useful for the society. The Essence of scientific knowledge is its practical application. The soil physics is a sub area of Agronomy. There are many examples of this specific subject related to Agriculture. This paper will focus, in general, the following cases: (i) erosion, environmental pollution and human health, (ii) plant population and distribution, soil fertility, evapo-transpiration and soil water flux density, and (iii) productivity, effective root depth, water deficit and yield

  5. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  6. Introduction to environmental engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šalić, Anita; Zelić, Bruno

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays we can easily say that environmental engineering is truly an interdisciplinary science. Combining biology, ecology, geology, geography, mathematics, chemistry, agronomy, medicine, economy, etc. environmental engineering strives to use environmental understanding and advancements in technology to serve mankind by decreasing production of environmental hazards and the effects of those hazards already present in the soil, water, and air. Major activities of environmental engineer involve water supply, waste water and solid management, air and noise pollution control, environmental sustainability, environmental impact assessment, climate changes, etc. And all this with only one main goal - to prevent or reduce undesirable impacts of human activities on the environment. To ensure we all have tomorrow.

  7. Beneficial uses of nuclear byproducts/sewage sludge irradiation project. Progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, B.D.

    1982-12-01

    A cooperative agreement was made between Albuquerque and DOE during FY81 for sewage sludge irradiation in upgrading the sewage treatment facilities. Other potential sites for implementation of sludge irradiation technology were also considered. Sludge was irradiated in the SIDSS for agronomy and animal feeding experiments. Sludge was also irradiated for use on turf areas. Cooperative work was also performed on grapefruit irradiation for fruit fly disinfestation, and on irradiation of sugar cane waste (bagasse) for enhanced ruminant digestibility. Preliminary design work began on a shipping cask to accomodate WESF Cs-137 capsules. The shielding performance, steady-state thermal response, and response to specified regulatory accident sequences have been evaluated. Work has been initiated on pathogen survival and post-irradiation pathogen behavior. Agronomy field, greenhouse, and soil chemistry studies continue. Various field experiments are ongoing. The fifth year of a five-year program to evaluate the potential use of a sludge product as a range feed supplement for cows is now in its fifth year. In agricultural economics, a preliminary marketing plan has been prepared for Albuquerque

  8. An analytical review of statistical methods and designs in agricultural science Una revisión analítica de diseños y métodos estadísticos en ciencias agrícolas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez W. Orlando

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientilic papers of six wellknown international journal of agricultural research (Agronomy Journal, Crop Science, Plant Physiology, Phytopathology, Plant Disease, Journal of Economic Entomology and the Revista ICA of Colombia, were revised taking the 1990-1992 years as a sample periodo The objective of this review was to evaluate the frequency of the experimental designs commonly used in agricultural research, to observe the statistical techniques more frequently applied in data analysis, and to assess the importance and acceptance of these statistical tools in agronomy. According to the results, the Randomized Complete Block Design and the Completely Random Design were observed in 71% of the experiments. The Fisher LSD was used to separate treatment means in 49% of the cases.
    The frequency of factorial experiments, regression analysis, subsampling techniques and repetitions in time and space were also analized. Despite of the size of some experiments with more than 50 treatments, the frequency of incomplete Block Designs was very low.
    Con el fin de evaluar la frecuencia del uso de diferentes diseños experimentales y técnicas estadísticas aplicadas a la investigación agrícola, se realizó una revisión de los articulos de seis revistas científicas intemacionales (Agronomy Journal, Crop Science, Plant Physiology, Phytopathology, Plant Disease, Journal of Economic Entomology y de la revista ICA para el período 1990 - 1992. Se observó la concentración del uso de los diseños Completamente al Azar y Bloques al Azar en un 71% de los experimentos y la prueba DSM de Fisher en un 49% de los casos, para la comparación de medias de tratamientos. También, se midió la frecuencia del uso de los arreglos Factoriales y Análisis de Regresión, muestreo dentro del diseño y repeticiones en el tiempo y el espacio. Se destacó la poca utilización de diseños incompletos, a pesar de haber un gran número de ensayos con más de 50

  9. El Diseño Curricular por Competencias Laborales en la Carrera de Ingeniero Agrónomo de la Universidad de Guanajuato El Diseño Curricular por Competencias Laborales en la Carrera de Ingeniero Agrónomo de la Universidad de Guanajuato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briseida Mendoza Celedon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was done to meet the demand for modernizing the curriculum in agronomy. It is based on a documental review following the methodology of Hanel [et al.], in 1997. The results were: identification of the main problems in agriculture, agronomy, and the career of agronomist, and in educational policies and university philosophy; determination of the four careers in agronomy; definition of the graduate profile in terms of knowledge, ability, attitudes, and values; requirement of professors with postgraduate studies and pedagogical and axiological updating; a flexible curricular structure tied to the logic of the discipline; an integral evaluation from curriculum to administration; identification of complementary activities that contribute to the formation of the student; the socializing of the curriculum with participation of academics and their introduction in distinct forums. Thus the institutional demand was met in a search for excellence in student preparation, quality in the educational process, and encouragement of evaluation practices. Este trabajo se realizó para responder la demanda de modernización del currículo de la carrera de Agronomía. Se basó en una revisión documental, siguiendo la metodología de Hanel et al., en 1997. Los resultados fueron: identificación de la problemática agropecuaria, disciplinar y laboral del Ingeniero Agrónomo, políticas educativas y filosofía universitaria; determinación de cuatro competencias laborales; definición del perfil de egreso en términos de conocimientos, habilidades, actitudes y valores; el requerimiento de un profesor con posgrado, actualización pedagógica y axiológica; una estructura curricular flexible y apegada a la lógica disciplinaria; evaluación integral que involucra desde el currículo hasta la administrativa; la identificación de actividades complementarias que coadyuvan a la formación del educando; la socialización del currículo con la participación de

  10. Modified Ishikawa Diagram as a Tool for Knowledge-Mapping of Agronomic Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kedaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a novel method of graphical representation of agronomic practices in crop production. The influence of initial factors, the need to follow a chronology of individual operations and the possibility of using this information for creating a knowledge base are all considered in the method designed. Consequently, alternate methods of knowledge mapping are described: Mind maps, conceptual maps, cognitive maps as well as Ishikawa diagram, which is the main inspiration for our method. These established methods of knowledge mapping have been confronted with the method proposed by our research team using a qualitative survey. Results of this study suggest a high potential of use of our method in agronomy. At the end of this article, we propose additional steps for possible improvements in usability of the method described.

  11. Salt Tolerance in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsui-Hung Phang; Guihua Shao; Hon-Ming Lam

    2008-01-01

    Soybean is an Important cash crop and its productivity is significantly hampered by salt stress. High salt Imposes negative impacts on growth, nodulation, agronomy traits, seed quality and quantity, and thus reduces the yield of soybean. To cope with salt stress, soybean has developed several tolerance mechanisms, including: (I) maintenance of ion homeostasis; (ii) adjustment in response to osmotic stress; (iii) restoration of osmotic balance; and (iv) other metabolic and structural adaptations. The regulatory network for abiotic stress responses in higher plants has been studied extensively in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Some homologous components involved in salt stress responses have been identified in soybean. In this review, we tried to integrate the relevant works on soybean and proposes a working model to descdbe Its salt stress responses at the molecular level.

  12. Hydric transfer in swelling clayey soils: influence of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, S.

    2002-01-01

    Description of imbibition and swelling mechanisms in clayey soils represents an important stake in different scientific domains such as agronomy, geotechnics or petroleum industry. The aim of the present work is to show the effects of hydro-mechanical couplings during imbibition in a swelling clayey medium, under different confinement conditions. Our material is a bentonite-silt mixture, prepared with a known water content and compacted with a double-piston technique. This method allows us to produce uniform soil samples, in terms of humidity and bulk density. Experiments related to bottom imbibition are then carried out for three types of mechanical boundary conditions (free, oedometric, fixed volume). The non-intrusive dual-energy gamma-ray technique is used to assess the local variation of bulk density and humidity. Finally, the three imbibition kinetics are compared for each experiment in terms of hydraulic diffusivity, described in a Lagrangian way. (author)

  13. ALFALFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Stjepanović

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The academic textbook Alfalfa contains the following chapters: Review outline, Foreword, Origin and spread of alfalfa, Economic importance of alfalfa, Biological properties and breeding alfalfa, Morphological traits of alfalfa, Growth and development of alfalfa, Ecological conditions for alfalfa growth, Agronomy of alfalfa for fodder production, Pests and diseases of alfalfa and their control, Usage of alfalfa and hay, silage and haylage production, Alfalfa seed production, Prospects for alfalfa in Croatia, Index and interpreter of terms and abbreviations, About authors. How to satisfy requirements of the “queen of fodder crops“ to achieve high yields of high quality fodder is the issue presented in the book Alfalfa is being grown in Croatia on about 42 000 hectares. Average fodder yields are low, about 5 t ha1, so the employment of genetical potential of varieties in rainfed farming is 35 to 40%, making the production more expensive.

  14. Investigation of the Transcriptome of Prairie Cord Grass, a New Cellulosic Biomass Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristene Gedye

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prairie cordgrass ( Bosc ex Link is being developed as a cellulosic biomass crop. Development of this species will require numerous steps, including breeding, agronomy, and characterization of the species genome. The research in this paper describes the first investigation of the transcriptome of prairie cordgrass via Next Generation Sequencing Technology, 454 GS FLX. A total of 556,198 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were produced from four prairie cordgrass tissues: roots, rhizomes, immature inflorescence, and hooks. These ESTs were assembled into 26,302 contigs and 71,103 singletons. From these data were identified, EST–SSR (simple sequence repeat regions and cell wall biosynthetic pathway genes suitable for the development of molecular markers which can aid the breeding process of prairie cordgrass by means of marker assisted selection.

  15. Gene and antigen markers of Shiga-toxin producing E. coli from Michigan and Indiana river water: Occurrence and relation to recreational water quality criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, J.W.; Haack, S.K.; Fogarty, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    The relation of bacterial pathogen occurrence to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations used for recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) is poorly understood. This study determined the occurrence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) markers and their relation to FIB concentrations in Michigan and Indiana river water. Using 67 fecal coliform (FC) bacteria cultures from 41 river sites in multiple watersheds, we evaluated the occurrence of five STEC markers: the Escherichia coli (EC) O157 antigen and gene, and the STEC virulence genes eaeA, stx1, and stx2. Simple isolations from selected FC cultures yielded viable EC O157. By both antigen and gene assays, EC O157 was detected in a greater proportion of samples exceeding rather than meeting FC RWQC (P public health decision-making. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  16. Groundwater Ecosystems Vary with Land Use across a Mixed Agricultural Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, K L; Hancock, P J; Serov, P; Lim, R P; Hose, G C

    2013-01-01

    Changes in surface land use may threaten groundwater quality and ecosystem integrity, particularly in shallow aquifers where links between groundwater and surface activities are most intimate. In this study we examine the response of groundwater ecosystem to agricultural land uses in the shallow alluvial aquifer of the Gwydir River valley, New South Wales, Australia. We compared groundwater quality and microbial and stygofauna assemblages among sites under irrigated cropping, non-irrigated cropping and grazing land uses. Stygofauna abundance and richness was greatest at irrigated sites, with the composition of the assemblage suggestive of disturbance. Microbial assemblages and water quality also varied with land use. Our study demonstrates significant differences in the composition of groundwater ecosystems in areas with different surface land use, and highlights the utility of groundwater biota for biomonitoring, particularly in agricultural landscapes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Detection of potassium deficiency on palm oil tree (Elaeis guineensis (jacq)) by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diomande, K.; Konate, A.; Krou Adjo, V.; Soro, A.; Ebby, N.; Ballo, K.

    1998-02-01

    The potassium is the main nutrient element which plays a significant role on oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis (jacq)) production and its resistance to the dry season. One can observe 30% decrease of the production in case of potassium deficiency. The potassium nutrition control of an oil palm tree field is a very important activity and leads to the fertilization policy. The Laser Induced Fluorescence (L.I.F.) is a fast and simple method compared to the classical one, ''Diagnostic Foliaire'', usually used in agronomy. We used the L.I.F. method to detect the oil palm tree stress caused by potassium deficiency, analysing the fluorescence spectrum of the chlorophyll a. We proved that the intensity ratio of the fluorescence spectrum R=F690/F73S is superior to 0.5 when the tree is under stress and its value is around 0.4 in case of intact tree. (author)

  18. System for automatic crate recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Kukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes usage of computer vision and artificial intelligence methods for application. The method solves abuse of reverse vending machine. This topic has been solved as innovation voucher for the South Moravian Region. It was developed by Mendel university in Brno (Department of informatics – Faculty of Business and Economics and Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Engineering – Faculty of Agronomy together with the Czech subsidiary of Tomra. The project is focused on a possibility of integration industrial cameras and computers to process recognition of crates in the verse vending machine. The aim was the effective security system that will be able to save hundreds-thousands financial loss. As suitable development and runtime platform there was chosen product ControlWeb and VisionLab developed by Moravian Instruments Inc.

  19. Medical and agricultural entomology in Brazil: a historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol, J L

    2008-12-01

    Medical Entomology emerged in Brazil in the late nineteenth century, through the initiative of a group of physicians dedicated to researching microorganisms related to diseases of public health importance, especially yellow fever and malaria. They led the institutionalization of Bacteriology and Tropical Medicine in southeast Brazil and the sanitation of coastal cities and, subsequently, rural areas. Medical Entomology provided the professionals who would undertake campaigns against agricultural plagues, as well as the institutionalization of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine. In the present article, I intend to show how relations between the professionals who gave life to Medical Entomology in Brazil were interwoven and to illustrate their relations with entomologists in other countries. I will also present an overview of the research problems faced by Brazilian entomologists at the turn of the nineteenth century and early decades of the twentieth.

  20. Les voyages de savants en Europe et le développment des Idées géographiques dans le Portugal du XIXe siècle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Dévy-Vareta

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available SCIENTIFIC TRAVELS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF GEOGRAPHICAL IDEAS IN PORTUGAL DURING THE 19TH CENTURY - The main goal of this paper is to establish the relationship between scientists movements, the circulation of ideas and the appearance of some basic works for modern Portuguese geography, around 1870. The break between a purely descriptive geography and modern geography is traditionally situated in the 1870's. Perhaps it was prepared by the contacts established inside Europe between scientists. It seems that natural sciences, agronomy and forest science had leading roles in this process. On this subject, we will try to explore the official missions and the stay of portuguese students in Northern Europe. This way, we will be able to trace the contribution of the ideas of Bernardino de Barros Gomes, who contributed towards the development of geographic thought a long time before geography became a University institution.

  1. Outils et leviers pour favoriser le développement d'une génétique animale adaptée aux enjeux de l'agroécologie : Rapport final de l’étude n° SSP-2014-061

    OpenAIRE

    Phocas, Florence; Belloc, Catherine; Delaby, Luc; Dourmad, Jean-Yves; Ducrot, Christian; Dumont, Bertrand; Ezanno, Pauline; Foucras, Gilles; González García, Eliel; Hazard, Dominique; Lamothe, Laurence; Larzul, Catherine; Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Moreno, Carole; Tixier-Boichard, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Le néologisme « agro-écologie » est apparu dans la littérature dans les années 30, d’abord pour désigner une discipline scientifique au carrefour de l’écologie et de l’agronomie, puis à partir des années 70 un ensemble de pratiques et un mouvement social en réaction à l’intensification de l’agriculture (Wezel et al., 2009). Francis et al. (2003) ont encore élargi cette définition en considérant l’ensemble des dimensions environnementales et socio-économiques à l’échelle des filières. Dans son...

  2. Accounting for the risks of phosphorus losses through tile drains in a phosphorus index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, D Keith; Ball, Bonnie; Zhang, T Q

    2012-01-01

    Tile drainage systems have been identified as a significant conduit for phosphorus (P) losses to surface water, but P indices do not currently account for this transport pathway in a meaningful way. Several P indices mention tile drains, but most account for either the reduction in surface runoff or the enhanced transport through tiles rather than both simultaneously. A summary of the current state of how tile drains are accounted for within P indices is provided, and the challenges in predicting the risk of P losses through tile drains that are relative to actual losses are discussed. A framework for a component P Index is described, along with a proposal to incorporate predictions of losses through tile drains as a component within this framework. Options for calibrating and testing this component are discussed. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Inter-relações entre a anatomia vegetal e a produção vegetal Interrelations between plant anatomy and plant production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenir Maristela Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available É realizada uma revisão de literatura que procura aproximar a anatomia vegetal do contexto da produção vegetal. O principal objetivo é o de contribuir para que o professor de Botânica possa proporcionar aos alunos dos cursos de Agronomia compreensão da diversidade da organização estrutural do vegetal.A literature revision is accomplished to approach the plant anatomy within the context of the plant production. The main objective is to contribute so that the Botany teacher will be able to make it provide for the students of the Agronomy courses to understand the diversity of behaviors in the structural organization of the plant.

  4. [Teaching, research, and extension service: botanist Honório da Costa Monteiro Filho].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovini, Massimo G; Peixoto, Ariane Luna

    2012-12-01

    The article revisits the work of Honório da Costa Monteiro Filho, highlighting his contribution to the study of economic botany and the taxonomy of Brazilian Malvaceae. Many of his seventy articles, are still cited. Yet little is known about his important role in educating agronomists involved with Brazilian flora and the creation of the Botanical Society of Brazil. These topics are discussed in the article, along with his work on a project to reform the teaching of agronomy in Brazil. The entire works of Monteiro Filho, archival documents, his correspondence with other scientists, and his observations on plant labels in herbaria were researched; interviews were also conducted with people with ties to him.

  5. The Distribution of Road Salt in Private Drinking Water Wells in a Southeastern New York Suburban Township.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Victoria R; Cunningham, Mary Ann; Curri, Neil; Findlay, Stuart E; Carroll, Sean M

    2018-05-01

    We used a GIS analysis of sodium and chloride concentrations in private water wells in a southeastern New York township to describe the pattern of distribution of road salt in aquifers tapped for drinking water. The primary source of road salt was sodium chloride, and sodium and chloride concentrations were significantly correlated ( = 0.80, road ( = 0.76, road had higher concentrations of chloride than wells that were higher than the nearest road, but this occurred only when the nearest road was >30 m from the wells ( road type (major or minor roads). Surface geology and hydrologic soil class had significant effects ( road salt contamination of groundwater is unevenly distributed and is affected by landscape factors that can be used to guide well testing and best management practices of deicing salt distribution. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. The FARMING approach: main results and perspectives of the French FARMING groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, T.; Reales, N.; Gallay, F.; Lepicard, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a long-term crisis that affected agriculture, food and living conditions in complex ways, and that modified the usual economical, political and social relations between public and private stakeholders at local, national and international level. The EC FARMING project aims to create a European stakeholder network to consider possible rehabilitation strategies for rural areas contaminated after a nuclear accident. The Institute of Patrimonial Strategies of the National Institute on Agronomy had responsibility for setting up the French stakeholder group. The objective was to develop favourable conditions and ways whereby stakeholders could deal with such a complex situation as a nuclear emergency and develop rehabilitation strategies. The results from the 3-year work programme on both strategic and technical aspects, showed an increasing commitment from the stakeholders that led to the building up of a common understanding of what a nuclear accident could be and how it could be dealt with

  7. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    These 1974 Proceedings of the European Society of Nuclear Methods in Agriculture contain reports in the form of minutes of the meetings of various working groups of the Society, the programme and official addresses of the fifth annual meeting including annual reports of the chairman and the secretary of the Society, and the reports of each of the eleven working groups as well as the four following surveys entitled: 1) some aspects of research in plant breeding, conservation of genetic resources in connection with irradiation processes (by A. Jacques from FAO), 2) our responsibility for the environment (by D. Zeeuw from ITAL), 3) pilot plant for the irradiation of sewage sludge (by A. Suesz from Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Bodenkultur und Pflanzenbau, Munich), 4) nuclear agronomy in France (by P. Guerin de Montgareuil from CEN, Cadarache). Summaries and provisional papers on presented topics will be published in ''ESNA Newsletter''

  8. Croatian Chemistry in the 20th Century. II. From the Collapse of Independent State of Croatia on May 8th, 1945 to the Establishment of the Republic of Croatia on June 25th, 1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vancik, H.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of Croatian chemistry from the end of the Second World War to the establishment of the Republic of Croatia is outlined. Briefly discussed is the founding and development of the Chemistry Department of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Rugjer Bošković Institute. Also presented is the postwar structure and organization of the chemical-technological study at the Technical Faculty and later at the Faculty of Technology. The chemical lectures and research in chemistry at the Faculty of Nutrition and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Facultyof Agronomy and Faculty of Forestry are reviewed. This article follows logically our first article in this series entitled Croatian Chemistry in the 20th Century. I. From the Turn of the Century to May 8,th 1945 (Kem. Ind. 56 (2007 403–416.

  9. Impacts and adaptation of European crop production systems to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E; Trnka, M; Kersebaum, K C

    2011-01-01

    The studies on anthropogenic climate change performed in the last decade over Europe show consistent projections of increases in temperature and different patterns of precipitation with widespread increases in northern Europe and decreases over parts of southern and eastern Europe. In many...... countries and in recent years there is a tendency towards cereal grain yield stagnation and increased yield variability. Some of these trends may have been influenced by the recent climatic changes over Europe. A set of qualitative and quantitative questionnaires on perceived risks and foreseen impacts...... of climate and climate change on agriculture in Europe was distributed to agro-climatic and agronomy experts in 26 countries. Europe was divided into 13 Environmental Zones (EZ). In total, we had 50 individual responses for specific EZ. The questionnaires provided both country and EZ specific information...

  10. Characteristics and influencing factors of crop coefficient for drip-irrigated cotton under plastic mulch conditions in arid environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Zhipin; Yang, Yonghui; Wang, Qinxue

    2017-01-01

    agronomy practice such as plastic mulching and drip irrigation in arid environments. This study calculated and analyzed Kc of a drip-irrigated and plastic-mulched cotton field in Aksu Oasis of the arid Tarim River Basin, China, and its relationships with several crop-, soil- and management variables......-mulched condition already published, the Kc of mulched cotton for the entire growth season decreased by 16 to 39%. The largest reductions in Kc due to plastic mulch were found in the initial and developmental growth stage. Kc could be calculated by a third-degree polynomial model in relation to RGD, which...... significantly increased Kc, i.e., 29% on average, partly due to arid advection. This study provided up-to-date and detailed information on cotton crop coefficient under plastic mulching and drip irrigation conditions in arid environment, and it is useful for improved management of agricultural water resources....

  11. Compte rendu de la 18e Conférence Internationale sur le Tournesol : Mar del Plata & Balcarce (Argentine, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilorgé Étienne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The 18th International Sunflower Conference took place in Mar del Plata, Argentina, in February, 2012. The key-points and evolutions of sunflower research were presented, in the fields of agronomy, physiology, genetics and genomics, crop protection, quality and markets. Major evolutions can be observed concerning the sequencing of sunflower genome, announced to be complete by the end of 2012, but also concerning the use of models and the progress in the studies on the interactions between varieties genetic pattern, environment and crop management practices. In crop protection aspects, the evolutions of the major pathogens, downy mildew and Orobanche cumana, have been discussed, as well as the breeding efforts for genetic resistances, or the advances concerning the herbicides tolerant varieties. Evolutions in oil quality aspects have been exposed too, such as varieties enriched in stearic acid, or tocopherols, or with low contents in saturated fatty acids.

  12. Formation agronomique originale à trois niveaux au Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardouin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Original education in agronomical sciences at three levels in Cameroon. The University Centre of Dschang is composed of the National Advanced School of Agriculture and of the Institute of Agricultural Technology. There are five Departments in the N.A.S.A. (Forestry, Agronomy, Plant Protection, Soil Sciences and Rural Engineering and three options in the I.A. T (Plant Production, Animal Production, Rural Economy and Vulgarization. The studies last five years after High School at the N.A.S.A. and three years at the I.A. T Successful students are respectively graduated as Engineer Agronomist or Engineer Forester or diplomated as Agricultural Technology Engineer. Agricultural technicians are also trained at the LA. T. The professors and lecturers of the N.A.S.A. are bound to give also course at the I.A.T. and vice versa.

  13. Investigation of the Transcriptome of Prairie Cord Grass, a New Cellulosic Biomass Crop

    KAUST Repository

    Gedye, Kristene

    2010-09-15

    Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Bosc ex Link) is being developed as a cellulosic biomass crop. Development of this species will require numerous steps, including breeding, agronomy, and characterization of the species genome. The research in this paper describes the first investigation of the transcriptome of prairie cordgrass via Next Generation Sequencing Technology, 454 GS FLX. A total of 556,198 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced from four prairie cordgrass tissues: roots, rhizomes, immature inflorescence, and hooks. These ESTs were assembled into 26,302 contigs and 71,103 singletons. From these data were identified, EST-SSR (simple sequence repeat) regions and cell wall biosynthetic pathway genes suitable for the development of molecular markers which can aid the breeding process of prairie cordgrass by means of marker assisted selection.

  14. National, holistic, watershed-scale approach to understand the sources, transport, and fate of agricultural chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; McCarthy, K.A.; Barbash, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the following series of papers that report on in-depth investigations that have been conducted at five agricultural study areas across the United States in order to gain insights into how environmental processes and agricultural practices interact to determine the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in the environment. These are the first study areas in an ongoing national study. The study areas were selected, based on the combination of cropping patterns and hydrologic setting, as representative of nationally important agricultural settings to form a basis for extrapolation to unstudied areas. The holistic, watershed-scale study design that involves multiple environmental compartments and that employs both field observations and simulation modeling is presented. This paper introduces the overall study design and presents an overview of the hydrology of the five study areas. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydric transfer in swelling clayey soils: influence of confinement; Transfert hydrique dans des sols argileux gonflants: influence du confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, S

    2002-01-01

    Description of imbibition and swelling mechanisms in clayey soils represents an important stake in different scientific domains such as agronomy, geotechnics or petroleum industry. The aim of the present work is to show the effects of hydro-mechanical couplings during imbibition in a swelling clayey medium, under different confinement conditions. Our material is a bentonite-silt mixture, prepared with a known water content and compacted with a double-piston technique. This method allows us to produce uniform soil samples, in terms of humidity and bulk density. Experiments related to bottom imbibition are then carried out for three types of mechanical boundary conditions (free, oedometric, fixed volume). The non-intrusive dual-energy gamma-ray technique is used to assess the local variation of bulk density and humidity. Finally, the three imbibition kinetics are compared for each experiment in terms of hydraulic diffusivity, described in a Lagrangian way. (author)

  16. A possible model of growth and production of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) in relation to meteorological parameters in Mediterranean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttobene, R.; Cosentino, S.; Cavallaro, V.

    1993-01-01

    This research aimed at studying a simulation model to describe the growth and yield of durum wheat in relation to meterological parameters in Mediterranean environment, using data of trials carried out by the Institute of Agronomy and filed crops of the University of Catania in two years and three localities of the Eastern Sicily. The model is divided into four modules which determine separately main phenological phases, leaf area index, total biomass and yield and soil water balance. The model uses air maximum and minimum temperature, photoperiod, solar radiation, rainfall and evaporation from a class A pan. Simulation carried out on the data of the trials showed a good interpretation of the variability of the actual data in relation to meteorological parameters. The model could simulate the variation due to plant density and sowing date. The model should be verified using independent data [it

  17. Sensory acceptance tests of red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), cv. Early Wonder, minimally processed and irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandes, Nilber Kenup; Vital, Helio de Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    Red beet (Early Wonder) was cultivated in an experimental area of the Department of Fitotecnia at the Institute of Agronomy at the Rural Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. After harvest, the roots were minimally processed; packed; exposed to different doses of gamma radiation (0; 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 kGy) and stored for 20 days at 8.0 deg C. Sensory evaluations were performed 1; 9; 13 and 20 days after irradiation by 12 testers who rated the overall appearance and aroma on a hedonic scale. The results indicated that the irradiated samples remained within the limit of acceptance for 20 days. In addition, the aroma was found to be a more sensitive indicator of the effect of different doses of radiation to the acceptance of the product. (author)

  18. Sensory acceptance tests of red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), cv. Early Wonder, minimally processed and irradiated; Testes sensoriais de aceitacao da beterraba vermelha (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), cv. Early Wonder, minimamente processada e irradiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandes, Nilber Kenup; Vital, Helio de Carvalho, E-mail: nilberkenup@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Defesa Nuclear; Coneglian, Regina Celi Cavestre [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Agronomia. Dept. de Fitotecnia; Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira; Freire Junior, Murillo [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-08-15

    Red beet (Early Wonder) was cultivated in an experimental area of the Department of Fitotecnia at the Institute of Agronomy at the Rural Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. After harvest, the roots were minimally processed; packed; exposed to different doses of gamma radiation (0; 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 kGy) and stored for 20 days at 8.0 deg C. Sensory evaluations were performed 1; 9; 13 and 20 days after irradiation by 12 testers who rated the overall appearance and aroma on a hedonic scale. The results indicated that the irradiated samples remained within the limit of acceptance for 20 days. In addition, the aroma was found to be a more sensitive indicator of the effect of different doses of radiation to the acceptance of the product. (author)

  19. Biological activity of Fe(III) aquo-complexes towards ferric chelate reductase (FCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Rosa; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Romano, Santiago; Fernández, Israel; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Ángel; Sierra, Miguel A; López-Rayo, Sandra; Nadal, Paloma; Lucena, Juan J

    2012-03-21

    In this study we have obtained experimental evidence that confirms the high activity of aquo complexes III and IV towards the enzyme FCR, responsible for the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the process of iron acquisition by plants. The in vivo FCR assays in roots of stressed cucumber plants have shown a higher efficiency of the family of complexes III and a striking structure-activity relationship with the nature of the substituent placed in a phenyl group far away from the metal center. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that all the aquo compounds tested interact efficiently with the enzyme FCR and hence constitute a new concept of iron chelates that could be of great use in agronomy.

  20. Handbook of soil analysis. Mineralogical, organic and inorganic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pansu, M. [Centre IRD, 34 - Montpellier (France); Gautheyrou, J.

    2006-07-01

    This handbook is a reference guide for selecting and carrying out numerous methods of soil analysis. It is written in accordance with analytical standards and quality control approaches.It covers a large body of technical information including protocols, tables, formulae, spectrum models, chromatograms and additional analytical diagrams. The approaches are diverse, from the simplest tests to the most sophisticated determination methods in the physical chemistry of mineralogical and organic structures, available and total elements, soil exchange complex, pesticides and contaminants, trace elements and isotopes.As a basic reference, it will be particularly useful to scientists, engineers, technicians, professors and students, in the areas of soil science, agronomy, earth and environmental sciences as well as in related fields such as analytical chemistry, geology, hydrology, ecology, climatology, civil engineering and industrial activities associated with soil. (orig.)

  1. The green alga, Cladophora, promotes Escherichia coli growth and contamination of recreational waters in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvel, A.V.; McDermott, C.; Pillsbury, R.; Sandrin, T.; Kinzelman, J.; Ferguson, J.; Sadowsky, M.; Byappanahalli, M.; Whitman, R.; Kleinheinz, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    A linkage between Cladophora mats and exceedances of recreational water quality criteria has been suggested, but not directly studied. Th is study investigates the spatial and temporal association between Escherichia coli concentrations within and near Cladophora mats at two northwestern Lake Michigan beaches in Door County, Wisconsin. Escherichia coli concentrations in water underlying mats were significantly greater than surrounding water (p bacterial pathogens, however, could not be detected by microbiological culture methods either attached to mat biomass or in underlying water. Removal of Cladophora mats from beach areas may improve aesthetic and microbial water quality at affected beaches. These associations and potential natural growth of E. coli in bathing waters call into question the efficacy of using E. coli as a recreational water quality indicator of fecal contaminations. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  2. Agroecology Development in Eastern Europe—Cases in Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Moudrý

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Agroecology is a discipline of science that is based on several disciplines, primarily ecology and agronomy. Although the first mention of agroecology was more than 100 years ago, it has recently been more intensely developed throughout Eastern European countries, beginning in the 1990s. Basically, such interest developed due to the intensification of agriculture in the second half of the 20th century, which was based on the premise of agricultural research, and related specifically to production. Agroecology is also strongly associated with sustainable agricultural activities, especially organic farming, which began to develop in Eastern European countries around 1990. Due to the unique environment of Eastern European countries, and a combination of several disciplines within them as well as other factors, agroecology in these differing countries can be perceived as somewhat different from one another. This overview focuses on the current state of agroecology in the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, and Slovakia.

  3. Use of passive microwave remote sensing to monitor soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigneron, J.P.; Schmugge, T.; Chanzy, A.; Calvet, J.C.; Kerr, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is a key variable to describe the water and energy exchanges at the land surface/atmosphere interface. However, soil moisture is highly variable both spatially and temporally. Passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with good temporal repetition (on a daily basis) and at regional scale (∼ 10 km). This paper reviews the various methods for remote sensing of soil moisture from microwave radiometric systems. Potential applications from both airborne and spatial observations are discussed in the fields of agronomy, hydrology and meteorology. Emphasis in this paper is given to relatively new aspects of microwave techniques and of temporal soil moisture information analysis. In particular, the aperture synthesis technique allows us now to a address the soil moisture information needs on a global basis, from space instruments. (author) [fr

  4. Physical root-soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legué, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-12-01

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to aerial organs, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex.

  5. Boosting innate immunity to sustainably control diseases in crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Valerie

    2017-10-01

    Viruses cause epidemics in all major crops, threatening global food security. The development of efficient and durable resistance able to withstand viral attacks represents a major challenge for agronomy, and relies greatly on the understanding of the molecular dialogue between viral pathogens and their hosts. Research over the last decades provided substantial advances in the field of plant-virus interactions. Remarkably, the advent of studies of plant innate immunity has recently offered new strategies exploitable in the field. This review summarizes the recent breakthroughs that define the mechanisms underlying antiviral innate immunity in plants, and emphasizes the importance of integrating that knowledge into crop improvement actions, particularly by exploiting the insights related to immune receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Organic and Conventional Crop Nutrition on Profiles of Polar Metabolites in Grain of Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter; Rakszegi, Marianna; Lovegrove, Alison; Amos, Dominic; Corol, Delia-Irina; Tawfike, Ahmed; Mikó, Péter; Ward, Jane L

    2018-05-16

    The profiles of polar metabolites were determined in wholemeal flours of grain from the Broadbalk wheat experiment and from plants grown under organic and low-input systems to study the effects of nutrition on composition. The Broadbalk samples showed increased amino acids, acetate, and choline and decreased fructose and succinate with increasing nitrogen fertilization. Samples receiving farm yard manure had similar grain nitrogen to those receiving 96 kg of N/ha but had higher contents of amino acids, sugars, and organic acids. A comparison of the profiles of grain from organic and low-input systems showed only partial separation, with clear effects of climate and agronomy. However, supervised multivariate analysis showed that the low-input samples had higher contents of many amino acids, raffinose, glucose, organic acids, and choline and lower sucrose, fructose, and glycine. Consequently, although differences between organic and conventional grain occur, these cannot be used to confirm sample identity.

  7. Pages from the Past: Part I [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stefanova Strigacheva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pages from the past are recollections written in 1970s by Ferdinanda - Venka Stefanova Strigacheva (1897-1976. A large period of time after 1910 is covered. She was born in the village of Targovishte, Belogradchik region. She graduated from the Secondary School for Girls in Vidin. Then she became a teacher. Later she studied agronomy in Wien and Berlin. Ferdinanda Strigacheva was an active and influential communist. However, when the communists became in power in Bulgaria in the autumn of 1944, she left aside from the policy disappointed from the actions of the Bulgarian Communist Party; nevertheless Strigacheva kept her loyality to the Party and beliefs into the communism. Strigacheva son Dr. Atanas Strigachev and his son Dr. Anton Strigachev prepared the text for publishing, mainly with changing the spelling into the modern one.

  8. Contribution to the studies on the mineral content of plant material through radioactivation analysis; Contribution a l'etude de la composition minerale des matieres vegetales au moyen de l'analyse par radioactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourcy, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-15

    Radioactivation analysis is by its great sensibility or its rapidity quite helpful in plant biology and agronomy. Specific composition of plants and results to obtain in biological experimentation have needed a practical research on analytical methods for plant materials, using for radioactivation swimming-pool reactor neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons from a generator. Dosage process for 25 elements is exposed, taking account of the interest of the analysis for each element, the average amount occurring in plants and the result obtained. Many applications are developed, concerning nutrition physiology, genetics, parasitology, toxicology, control of manufactured agricultural and pharmaceutical products industrial and pesticides residues, ecology, radioecology and biochemistry. (author) [French] L'analyse par radioactivation, par sa grande sensibilite ou sa rapidite, est susceptible de rendre de nombreux services en biologie vegetale et en agronomie. La composition particuliere des plantes et les buts recherches dans l'experimentation ont exige une etude concrete des methodes d'analyse propres a la matiere vegetale en utilisant, pour la radioactivation, soit un reacteur de type piscine a eau legere, soit un accelerateur generateur de neutrons de 14 MeV. Le mode de dosage de 25 elements est expose en tenant compte de l'interet de l'analyse de chaque element, des teneurs moyennes rencontrees dans les plantes, et du resultat atteint. De nombreuses applications sont developpees qui touchent a la physiologie de la nutrition, la genetique, la parasitologie, la toxicologie, le controle des fabrications, les pollutions industrielles, l'ecologie, la radioecologie et la biochimie. (auteur)

  9. Cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be in atmospheric fallouts, weather factors and solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungurov, F.R.

    2011-11-01

    Key words: 7 Be activity, atmospheric fallouts, solar activity, gamma spectroscopy. Subjects of research: cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in atmospheric fallouts and surrounding objects of environment, its migrational distribution connected to solar activity and weather meteorologic parameters of the region studied. Purpose of work: Defining correlation between atmospheric humidity and solar activity with concentration and distribution of cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be. Methods of research: gamma-spectrometry method of activity measurements. The results obtained and their novelty: Cycle of research works on definition of concentration and migrational distribution of CRN 7 Be in Samarkand region during 2002-2005 was carried out for the first time. Volumetric activity of 7 Be in squat air layer of Samarkand was determined. Average density of 7 Be fallouts for the four years of studies was determined. Qualitative correlation bet ween 7 Be fallouts density variations and solar activity, expressed through Wolf number has been found. Qualitative correlation between 7 Be fallouts density variations and amount of precipitations has been found. Regularity in 7 Be concentration decrease towards north latitudes has been detected. Practical value: Developed scintillation method of 7 Be activity detection in atmospheric fallouts was used in works performed in the framework of republican grants 2F-No 1.2.3, CNT RUz PFNI 2F-No 2.1.39 and ITD-7-024. Methodology was used for the estimation of the velocity of erosion processes in the soils of different regions of Uzbekistan. Methodology is used in the works on 7 Be radioactivity measurements. Degree of embed and economic effectivity: Gained results replenish database on 7 Be isotope distribution on Earth regions and its role in formation of some processes, connected with meteorology, agronomy and radioecology of Samarkand region. Field of application: meteorology, agronomy and radioecology. (author)

  10. Dendroagricultural Signal in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchan, R.; Kherchouche, D.; Anchukaitis, K. J.; Oudjehih, B.; Touchane, H.; Slimani, S.; Meko, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Dalila Kherchouche2, Kevin J. Anchukaitis3, Bachir Oudjehih2, Hayat Touchan4, Said Slimani5, and David M. Meko1Drought is one of the main natural factors in declining tree-ring growth and the production of agricultural crops in Algeria. Here we will address the variability of growing conditions for wheat in Algeria with climatic data and a tree-ring reconstruction of January-June precipitation from ten Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronologies. A regression-based reconstruction equation explains up to 74% of the variance of precipitation in the 1970-2011 calibration period and cross validates well. Classification of dry years by the 30% percentile of observed precipitation (131 mm) yields a maximum length of drought of five years (1877-1881) and increasing frequency of dry years in the late 20th and early 21stcenturies. A correlation-based sensitivity analysis shows a similar pattern of dependence of tree-growth and wheat production on monthly and seasonal precipitation, but contrasting patterns of dependence on temperature. The patterns are interpreted by reference to phenology, growth phases, and - for wheat agricultural practices. We apply these interpretations to understand possible impacts of climate variability on the agricultural productivity of past civilizations in the Mediterranean. 2Institute of Veterinary and Agronomy Sciences, The University Hadj-Lakhdar, Batna 05000, Algeria, d.kherchouche@yahoo.fr and oudjehihbachir@yahoo.fr3University of Arizona, ENR2 Building, 1064 E Lowell Street, PO Box 210137, Tucson, AZ 85721-0137, kanchukaitis@email.arizona.edu4Faculty of Agriculture, University of Aleppo, Aleppo-Syria, dr.htouchan@gmail.com5Faculty of Biological Sciences and Agronomy, The University Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi Ouzou 15000, Algeria, slimanisaid@yahoo.fr1Laboratory of Tree Ring Research, The University of Arizona, 1215 E. Lowell St. Bldg. 45B, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA, dmeko@ltrr.arizona.edu

  11. Review on sugar beet salt stress studies in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayamim, S.; Noshad, H.; Jahadakbar, M. R.; Fotuhi, K.

    2017-07-01

    Increase of saline lands in most regions of the world and Iran, limit of production increase based on land enhancement and also threat of saline water and soils for crop production make related researches and production of salt tolerant variety to be more serious. There have been many researches about salt stress in Sugar Beet Seed Institute of Iran (SBSI) during several years. Accordingly, the new screening methods for stress tolerance to be continued based on these researches. Previous researches in SBSI were reviewed and results concluded to this study which is presented in this article in three categories including: Agronomy, Breeding and Biotechnology. In agronomy researches, suitable planting medium, EC, growth stage and traits for salinity tolerance screening were determined and agronomic technique such as planting date, planting method and suitable nutrition for sugar beet under salt stress were introduced. Sand was salinizied by saline treatments two times more than Perlit so large sized Perlit is suitable medium for saline studies. Sugar beet genotypes screening for salt tolerance and should be conducted at EC=20 in laboratory and EC= 16 dS/M in greenhouse. Although sugar beet seed germination has been known as more susceptible stage to salinity, it seems establishment is more susceptible than germination in which salinity will cause 70-80% decrease in plant establishment. Measurements of leaves Na, K and total carbohydrate at establishment stage would be useful for faster screening of genotypes, based on high and significant correlation of these traits at establishment with yield at harvest time. In breeding section, SBSI genotypes with drought tolerance background would be useful for salinity stress studies and finally there is a need for more research in the field of biotechnology in Iran.

  12. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. LA REVISTA FACULTAD NACIONAL DE AGRONOMÍA, MEDELLÍN COMO INDICADOR DEL FRACCIONAMIENTO ESPECIALIZADO DEL SABER AGRONÓMICO THE REVISTA FACULTAD NACIONAL DE AGRONOMÍA, MEDELLÍN AS AN INDICATOR OF THE SPECIALIZED FRAGMENTATION OF AGRONOMIC KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Arango Marín

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como en otras áreas del conocimiento, la fragmentación especializada y el régimen disciplinar del saber agronómico fue correspondientemente necesario para el despliegue discursivo del desarrollo, y dentro del mismo, el desdoble de la Revolución verde a mediados del siglo XX. Con este objetivo, y en cumplimiento del convenio de 1950 entre el Ministerio de Agricultura colombiano y la Fundación Rockefeller, se definió la intervención de varias misiones estadounidenses en los programas curriculares y planes de estudio de la Facultad Nacional de Agronomía. Una de las expresiones que caracteriza la citada orientación de la agronomía colombiana, se deduce del análisis temático comparativo que este trabajo hace de los artículos publicados por la Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, Medellín, en cuatro períodos: 1939-1952, 1953-1976, 1977-1989 y 1990-2002.As in other academic areas, specialized fragmentation and regime of the discipline in agronomic knowledge was correspondingly needed for the discursive unfolding of development, and in of itself, the unfolding of the «Green Revolution» in the middle of the 20th century. With this objective, and in compliance with the 1950 agreement between the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture and the Rockefeller Foundation, the intervention of several American missions in the syllabi and curricula of the National Faculty of Agronomy was defined. One of the manifestations that characterizes the mentioned guidance of Colombian agronomy may be deduced through a comparative thematic analysis that this study undertakes for articles published by the Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, Medellín during four periods: 1939-1952; 1953-1976; 1977-1989 and 1990-2002.

  14. Contribution to the studies on the mineral content of plant material through radioactivation analysis; Contribution a l'etude de la composition minerale des matieres vegetales au moyen de l'analyse par radioactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourcy, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-15

    Radioactivation analysis is by its great sensibility or its rapidity quite helpful in plant biology and agronomy. Specific composition of plants and results to obtain in biological experimentation have needed a practical research on analytical methods for plant materials, using for radioactivation swimming-pool reactor neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons from a generator. Dosage process for 25 elements is exposed, taking account of the interest of the analysis for each element, the average amount occurring in plants and the result obtained. Many applications are developed, concerning nutrition physiology, genetics, parasitology, toxicology, control of manufactured agricultural and pharmaceutical products industrial and pesticides residues, ecology, radioecology and biochemistry. (author) [French] L'analyse par radioactivation, par sa grande sensibilite ou sa rapidite, est susceptible de rendre de nombreux services en biologie vegetale et en agronomie. La composition particuliere des plantes et les buts recherches dans l'experimentation ont exige une etude concrete des methodes d'analyse propres a la matiere vegetale en utilisant, pour la radioactivation, soit un reacteur de type piscine a eau legere, soit un accelerateur generateur de neutrons de 14 MeV. Le mode de dosage de 25 elements est expose en tenant compte de l'interet de l'analyse de chaque element, des teneurs moyennes rencontrees dans les plantes, et du resultat atteint. De nombreuses applications sont developpees qui touchent a la physiologie de la nutrition, la genetique, la parasitologie, la toxicologie, le controle des fabrications, les pollutions industrielles, l'ecologie, la radioecologie et la biochimie. (auteur)

  15. Chernobyl post-accident management: the ETHOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, G H; Lochard, J; Girard, P; Guyonnet, J F; Le Cardinal, G; Lepicard, S; Livolsi, P; Monroy, M; Ollagnon, H; Pena-Vega, A; Pupin, V; Rigby, J; Rolevitch, I; Schneider, T

    1999-10-01

    ETHOS is a pilot research project supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (DG XII). The project provides an alternative approach to the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the CIS in the post-accident context of Chernobyl. Initiated at the beginning of 1996, this 3-y project is currently being implemented in the Republic of Belarus. The ETHOS project involves an interdisciplinary team of European researchers from the following institutions: the Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire CEPN (radiological protection, economics), the Institute National d'Agronomie de Paris-Grignon INAPG (agronomy, nature & life management), the Compiegne University of Technology (technological and industrial safety, social trust), and the Mutadis Research Group (sociology, social risk management), which is in charge of the scientific co-ordination of the project. The Belarussian partners in the ETHOS project include the Ministry of Emergencies of Belarus as well as the various local authorities involved with the implementation site. The ETHOS project relies on a strong involvement of the local population in the rehabilitation process. Its main goal is to create conditions for the inhabitants of the contaminated territories to reconstruct their overall quality of life. This reconstruction deals with all the day-to-day aspects that have been affected or threatened by the contamination. The project aims at creating a dynamic process whereby acceptable living conditions can be rebuilt. Radiological security is developed in the ETHOS project as part of a general improvement in the quality of life. The approach does not dissociate the social and the technical dimensions of post-accident management. This is so as to avoid radiological risk assessment and management being reduced purely to a problem for scientific experts, from which local people are excluded, and to take into

  16. Evaluación de actividades educativas ambientales en licenciaturas agroambientales Evaluación de actividades educativas ambientales en licenciaturas agroambientales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Barrera Guerra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the environmental education activities implemented in the Agronomy and Environmental Engineering Degrees at the University of Guanajuato. A survey pool was designed, tested and implemented on teachers responsible for subjects related to environmental education. Questions were asked about teaching and learning techniques, as well as jobs and tasks, practices and evaluation forms. These variables were evaluated by frequency and percentage. Teacher-centered education is promoted, and it is the teacher who outlines the course topics and asks for literature reviews; laboratory practice assists in the acquisition of the basics in the discipline, whereas in the case of Agronomy Engineering, field practice focuses on conservation of natural resources, and in the case of the Environmental Engineering, contextual visits are used; course evaluation is predominantly by testing. The paper concludes that the integration of environmental education is incipient, isolated and non-systematic at the level of the curricula.En el trabajo se evaluaron las actividades de educación ambiental implementadas en las carreras de Ingeniero Agrónomo e Ingeniero Ambiental de la Universidad de Guanajuato. Se diseñó, piloteo y aplicó una encuesta a los académicos responsables de materias vinculadas con la educación ambiental. Se preguntó sobre las técnicas de enseñanza-aprendizaje, trabajos y tareas, prácticas y formas de evaluación, dichas variables se evaluaron mediante la frecuencia y el porcentaje. La educación fomentada está centrada en el profesor, que expone los temas del curso y deja revisiones bibliográficas; las prácticas de laboratorio atienden a los aspectos básicos de la disciplina, mientras que las de campo, a la conservación de los recursos naturales, en el caso del Ingeniero Agrónomo, y a visitas, del tipo contextual, para el Ingeniero Ambiental; en la evaluación de los cursos predomina el examen. Por ello, la integraci

  17. How to engage undergraduate students in Soil Science: some strategies to enhance their motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Acosta, Jose A.; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Faz, Angel

    2017-04-01

    Teaching soil science can be a challenge in those degrees where students are not familiar with the soil system and do not understand the importance of soil science for their future career. This is the case of students of Biology, Agronomy or Environmental Science, who normally consider soil as a mere substrate for vegetation development, with no interest about how soil determines productivity and quality of terrestrial ecosystems. Thus, students lack of initial motivation to study Soil Science, and just attend lectures and practical lessons as mandatory procedure to get the degree. To engage undergraduate students from Biology, Agronomy and Environmental Sciences in Soil Science, we developed a strategy to enhance their motivation by means of making them participants of the selection of the soils and analyses used for their training. By means of dichotomous keys, students, grouped in pairs, first select the main purpose of their study from different options (land productivity, soil biodiversity, soil fertility, effectiveness of restoration, effect of land use, effect of management, etc). Once objective is decided, we give them some information about sampling strategies, so that they select how soil sampling is going to be performed, and the number of samples to be taken. In terms of the initial objective, they also decide from a given list the properties they should measure. In a practical basis, from the list of selected properties to be measured, professors decide the ones they can really develop in terms of timing, resources and space demand. After that, they are aware about the fact that they have an experimental design developed by them to achieve the goal they meant. Under this perspective, their motivation is enhanced since students are the ones deciding what to study in terms of their personal and professional interests, so that learning is more effective. The negative aspect of this strategy is that it involves many hours of tutorials for the professor

  18. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: research challenges concerning the impact of airborne micro-organisms on the atmosphere and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Morris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  19. NEW WAY OF EVALUATING COW MILK IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pero Mijić

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available It can be rightfally said that cow breeding is the «generator» of livestock and therefore of the hole agronomy. Stressing the quality of the product developed countries as well as the EU countries have introduced the new control regulations and evaluations of milk and dairy products. The number of somatic cells, microorganisms, protein and milk fat contents have become very important elements in valorisation and classification of milk. The Republic of Croatia also has the «New standard of the Quality of Fresh and Raw Milk» and the «Regulation of the Target Price of Fresh Raw Milk». Due to the wide spectre of the parameters controlled and paid by the new Standards and Regulations, every error and inadequate reaction of the manufacturer or the veterinarian during the health protection over the lactation cycle will have a reflection on a financial aspect of the business. The branch should start as earlier as possible using the domestic and international knowledge about livestock thereby animal health and better quality of milk will be in the priority.

  20. Radiation Processing of Marine Algal Polysaccharides as Plant Growth Promoters. Chapter 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolko, E.; Cerchietti, L. [National Atomic Energy Commission, Ezeiza Atomic Centre, Ezeiza (Argentina); Clozza, M.; Giardina, E. B.; Villela, F.; Divo, M. D. [Faculty of Agronomy, Buenos Aires University (Argentina)

    2014-07-15

    After having participated in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the “Development of radiation-processed products of natural polymers for application in agriculture, health care, industry and environment” with a project entitled “Assay oligosaccharides as plant growth promoters”, Argentina started mobilizing technical experts from diverse fields to introduce the technology in the country. Agronomers, radiation research scientists, and resource persons from seaweed industries were invited to participate in the project. The project team members consisted of Dr. Mario Clozza and his group from the Faculty of Agronomy of the Buenos Aires University, members of the radiation processing division of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Ezeiza Atomic Centre, and resource persons from the Soriano S.A., a seaweed industry. Under the scope of the CRP, degraded alginic acid from Macrocystis perifera and other algae from the coastal areas were used for the study. Despite the fact that Argentina has huge brown algae farms in the Patagonia region, these are not commercially available due to the lack of specialized vessels for harvesting. Soriano S.A. produces good quality carrageenan from red algae, sourced from the northern part of the extended national maritime littoral of more than 2000 km long. The project involved the utilization of radiation-processed polysaccharides such as carrageenan, alginic acid, and chitosan of commercial origins on tomato, lettuce, spinach, and cabbage plants. (author)

  1. Sharka: The Past, The Present and The Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Krska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Members the Potyviridae family belong to a group of plant viruses that are causing devastating plant diseases with a significant impact on agronomy and economics. Plum pox virus (PPV, as a causative agent of sharka disease, is widely discussed. The understanding of the molecular biology of potyviruses including PPV and the function of individual proteins as products of genome expression are quite necessary for the proposal the new antiviral strategies. This review brings to view the members of Potyviridae family with respect to plum pox virus. The genome of potyviruses is discussed with respect to protein products of its expression and their function. Plum pox virus distribution, genome organization, transmission and biochemical changes in infected plants are introduced. In addition, techniques used in PPV detection are accentuated and discussed, especially with respect to new modern techniques of nucleic acids isolation, based on the nanotechnological approach. Finally, perspectives on the future of possibilities for nanotechnology application in PPV determination/identification are outlined.

  2. Estrategias de enseñanza basadas en el estudiante para el aprendizaje del equilibrio químico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Domitila Asuaje Cordero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available El estudio compara el efecto en el rendimiento estudiantil por la estrategia de Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas (ABP y la enseñanza por descubrimiento guiado, para el aprendizaje del equilibrio químico en estudiantes cursantes del primer semestre de la asignatura Química I de la carrera de Agronomía de la Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado de Venezuela, durante el año académico 2010. Se utilizó una muestra de 40 estudiantes, que se dividió en dos grupos (A y B. Los resultados indican que los estudiantes objeto del ABP registraron un rendimiento significativamente superior en terminos del promedio de las calificaciones, todo ello en contraste con el desempeño de los estudiantes a quienes se les aplicó la estrategia enseñanza por descubrimiento guiado. AbstractThis research study aims to campare the effects of problem-based learning and guided learning on students' academic performance, in a first-semester group of Agronomy students at Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado de Venezuela in 2010. The study was carried out in Chemistry I, when they learnt about chemical equilibrium. A sample of 40 students divided into two groups (A and B was used. The results show that the students taught with problem-based learning technique obtained a higher academic performance in relation to the students' mark promedy; in contrast with the students who were applied the guided learning strategy.

  3. Characterisation of Agri-Landscape Systems at a Regional Level: A Case Study in Northern Tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariassunta Galli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Preserving our landscape in sustainable development processes is now widely considered as fundamental. It is a complex and evolving issue that can be tackled from several perspectives. Agronomy can contribute to analyzing the relationships between agricultural production systems (cropping, farming and agricultural systems at different levels (field, farm, and region and the agricultural landscape (in terms of patches, matrixes, dynamics, etc. This is of particular interest where the relationships between “what and how” are produced by agricultural activities and the landscape are changing. In this case their own reciprocity may represent an opportunity to analyze complex systems, such as the characterization of agri-landscapes at a regional level. We propose a case study developed as an up-scaling analytical process from a farm to a regional level. The result was the identification of six main agri-landscape systems highlighting the landscape drivers that are changing the traditional landscape of a rural region in Northern Tuscany (Lunigiana.

  4. Response of Sorghum bicolor L. to Residual Phosphate on Two Contrasting Soils Previously Planted to Cowpea or Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tola Omolayo Olasunkanmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper fertilizer nutrient management through adequate utilization of the residual value coupled with healthy crop rotation contributes significantly to sustainable crop production. This study was conducted to evaluate the direct and residual effects of two rock phosphate (RP materials on two contrasting soils previously planted with either the cereal crop or the leguminous crop. The effectiveness of the RP materials as substitute for the conventional P fertilizers was evaluated using single superphosphate as reference at the Department of Agronomy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. The experiments were 2 × 2 × 4 factorial in completely randomized design. The test crops in the first cropping performed better on the slightly acidic loamy sand than on the strongly acidic sandy clay loam. Performance of each crop was improved by P supply in the first and second cropping. Single superphosphate proved to be more efficient than the RPs in the first cropping but not as effective as MRP in the second cropping. In the second cropping, sorghum performed better on the soil previously cropped to cowpea while Morocco RP had the highest residual effect among the P-fertilizer sources. It is evident that rock phosphates are better substitutes to the conventional phosphorus fertilizers due to their long term residual effect in soils. The positive effects of healthy rotation of crops as well as the negative effects of low soil pH are also quite obvious.

  5. Tree Species Suitability to Bioswales and Impact on the Urban Water Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Morgenroth, Justin; Maule, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Water movement between soil and the atmosphere is restricted by hardscapes in the urban environment. Some green infrastructure is intended to increase infiltration and storage of water, thus decreasing runoff and discharge of urban stormwater. Bioswales are a critical component of a water-sensitive urban design (or a low-impact urban design), and incorporation of trees into these green infrastructural components is believed to be a novel way to return stored water to the atmosphere via transpiration. This research was conducted in The Morton Arboretum's main parking lot, which is one of the first and largest green infrastructure installations in the midwestern United States. The parking lot is constructed of permeable pavers and tree bioswales. Trees in bioswales were evaluated for growth and condition and for their effects on water cycling via transpiration. Our data indicate that trees in bioswales accounted for 46 to 72% of total water outputs via transpiration, thereby reducing runoff and discharge from the parking lot. By evaluating the stomatal conductance, diameter growth, and condition of a variety of tree species in these bioswales, we found that not all species are equally suited for bioswales and that not all are equivalent in their transpiration and growth rates, thereby contributing differentially to the functional capacity of bioswales. We conclude that species with high stomatal conductance and large mature form are likely to contribute best to bioswale function. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Elemental Concentrations in Urban Green Stormwater Infrastructure Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Michelle C; Sharma, Raghav; Plante, Alain F; Yang, Yunwen; Burstyn, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) is designed to capture stormwater for infiltration, detention, evapotranspiration, or reuse. Soils play a key role in stormwater interception at these facilities. It is important to assess whether contamination is occurring in GSI soils because urban stormwater drainage areas often accumulate elements of concern. Soil contamination could affect hydrologic and ecosystem functions. Maintenance workers and the public may also be exposed to GSI soils. We investigated soil elemental concentrations, categorized as macro- and micronutrients, heavy metals, and other elements, at 59 GSI sites in the city of Philadelphia. Non-GSI soil samples 3 to 5 m upland of GSI sites were used for comparison. We evaluated differences in elemental composition in GSI and non-GSI soils; the comparisons were corrected for the age of GSI facility, underlying soil type, street drainage, and surrounding land use. Concentrations of Ca and I were greater than background levels at GSI sites. Although GSI facilities appear to accumulate Ca and I, these elements do not pose a significant human health risk. Elements of concern to human health, including Cd, Hg, and Pb, were either no different or were lower in GSI soils compared with non-GSI soils. However, mean values found across GSI sites were up to four times greater than soil cleanup objectives for residential use. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  8. Filter Membrane Effects on Water-Extractable Phosphorus Concentrations from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Jessica; Strawn, Daniel; Brooks, Erin

    2018-03-01

    To accurately assess P concentrations in soil extracts, standard laboratory practices for monitoring P concentrations are needed. Water-extractable P is a common analytical test to determine P availability for leaching from soils, and it is used to determine best management practices. Most P analytical tests require filtration through a filter membrane with 0.45-μm pore size to distinguish between particulate and dissolved P species. However, filter membrane type is rarely specified in method protocols, and many different types of membranes are available. In this study, three common filter membrane materials (polyether sulfone, nylon, and nitrocellulose), all with 0.45-μm pore sizes, were tested for analytical differences in total P concentrations and dissolved reactive P (DRP) concentrations in water extracts from six soils sampled from two regions. Three of the extracts from the six soil samples had different total P concentrations for all three membrane types. The other three soil extracts had significantly different total P results from at least one filter membrane type. Total P concentration differences were as great as 35%. The DRP concentrations in the extracts were dependent on filter type in five of the six soil types. Results from this research show that filter membrane type is an important parameter that affects concentrations of total P and DRP from soil extracts. Thus, membrane type should be specified in soil extraction protocols. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Environmental Indicator Principium with Case References to Agricultural Soil, Water, and Air Quality and Model-Derived Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T Q; Zheng, Z M; Lal, R; Lin, Z Q; Sharpley, A N; Shober, A L; Smith, D; Tan, C S; Van Cappellen, P

    2018-03-01

    Environmental indicators are powerful tools for tracking environmental changes, measuring environmental performance, and informing policymakers. Many diverse environmental indicators, including agricultural environmental indicators, are currently in use or being developed. This special collection of technical papers expands on the peer-reviewed literature on environmental indicators and their application to important current issues in the following areas: (i) model-derived indicators to indicate phosphorus losses from arable land to surface runoff and subsurface drainage, (ii) glutathione-ascorbate cycle-related antioxidants as early-warning bioindicators of polybrominated diphenyl ether toxicity in mangroves, and (iii) assessing the effectiveness of using organic matrix biobeds to limit herbicide dissipation from agricultural fields, thereby controlling on-farm point-source pollution. This introductory review also provides an overview of environmental indicators, mainly for agriculture, with examples related to the quality of the agricultural soil-water-air continuum and the application of model-derived indicators. Current knowledge gaps and future lines of investigation are also discussed. It appears that environmental indicators, particularly those for agriculture, work efficiently at the field, catchment, and local scales and serve as valuable metrics of system functioning and response; however, these indicators need to be refined or further developed to comprehensively meet community expectations in terms of providing a consistent picture of relevant issues and/or allowing comparisons to be made nationally or internationally. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Rate of water infiltration into soil on a selected location at Žabčice during the growing season 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vičanová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of currently running research, which is part of research program Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of controlled ecosystems and their adaptability to climate change at Faculty of Agronomy, is mapping of progress in water infiltration on selected areas at Žabčice locality and to specify possibilities of a water accumulation and retention influence in a landscape.During of the first year of measurement (2008, from April to November, has proceeded field measurement of soil infiltration ability at Žabčice locality. To get statistically conclusive results, measurement runs in three repetitions and data are subsequently averaged. Three sets of homocentric metal cylinders were used for the measurement. Measurement of infiltration has been preceded by an overflow. Empirical equations according to Kosťjak were used for evaluation of field measurement.At the same time there were ensured intact soil samples for laboratory determination of soil physical properties using Kopecky cylinders at depths of 10, 20 and 30 cm, and for the calculation of selected hydro-physical parameters of soil.­ reduced volume weight, actual monture, porosity, aeration and other.Graphical presentation presents process of speed infiltration and cumulative infiltration on selected area Niva IV. A. Non-homogeneity of measured values could be induced by several different factors.

  11. Microbial metabolism alters pore water chemistry and increases consolidation of oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkell, Nicholas; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Tailings produced during bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores (tar sands) comprise an aqueous suspension of clay particles that remain dispersed for decades in tailings ponds. Slow consolidation of the clays hinders water recovery for reuse and retards volume reduction, thereby increasing the environmental footprint of tailings ponds. We investigated mechanisms of tailings consolidation and revealed that indigenous anaerobic microorganisms altered porewater chemistry by producing CO and CH during metabolism of acetate added as a labile carbon amendment. Entrapped biogenic CO decreased tailings pH, thereby increasing calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) cations and bicarbonate (HCO) concentrations in the porewater through dissolution of carbonate minerals. Soluble ions increased the porewater ionic strength, which, with higher exchangeable Ca and Mg, decreased the diffuse double layer of clays and increased consolidation of tailings compared with unamended tailings in which little microbial activity was observed. These results are relevant to effective tailings pond management strategies. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. System and Field Devices (non Nuclear) in Agriculture Research in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2015-01-01

    Research to improve productivity on an ongoing basis in the agricultural sector is essential to ensure and guarantee the country's food security. Malaysian Nuclear Agency, agricultural research had begun in 1981 in which the focus of research is related to mutation breeding, irradiation and the use of isotopes in the study of plant nutrition. Although projects agricultural research carried out based on nuclear technology, other information relating to agricultural research such as agronomy, plant physiology, meteorology and ecology, soil characteristics and water is essential to obtain the understanding and research results that are relevant and significant. Data acquisition for other aspects also need a system and a modern and efficient equipment, in accordance with current technological developments. This paper describes the use, function and capabilities of the existing field equipment available in Agrotechnology and Biosciences Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency in acquiring data related to weather, measurement and control of ground water, soil nutrients assessment and monitoring of plant physiology. The latest technological developments in sensor technology, computer technology and communication is very helpful in getting data more easily, quickly and accurately. Equipment and the data obtained is also likely to be used by researchers in other fields in Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  13. Trace Elements in Dominant Species of the Fenghe River, China: Their Relations to Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Zhengchao; Bai, Yanying; Jiao, Wentao; Chen, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of trace elements (TEs) in water, sediment, riparian soil and dominant plants was investigated in the Fenghe River, Northwestern China. The Fenghe River ecosystem was polluted with Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb. There was a high pollution risk in the midstream and downstream regions and the risk level for Cd was much higher than that of the other elements. The average values of bioconcentration coefficient for Cd and Zn were 2.21 and 1.75, respectively, indicating a large accumulation of Cd and Zn in the studied species. With broad ecological amplitudes, L. Levl. et Vant. Trin., and L. had the greatest TE concentrations in aboveground and belowground biomass of the studied species and were potential biomonitors or phytoremediators for the study area. Multivariate techniques including cluster analysis, correlation analysis, principal component analysis, and canonical correspondence analysis were used to analyze the relations between TE concentrations in plants and various environmental factors. The soil element concentration is the main factor determining the accumulation of TEs in plants. The co-release behavior of common pollutants and TEs drove the accumulation of Hg, Cd, and As in the studied plants. Significant enrichment of some elements in the Fenghe River has led to a decline in the biodiversity of plants. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Real cases study through computer applications for futures Agricultural Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratiel, R.; Durán, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    One of the huge concerns on the higher engineer education is the lag of real cases study that the future professionals need in the work and corporation market. This concern was reflected in Bologna higher education system including recommendations in this respect. The knowhow as why this or other methodology is one of the keys to resolve this problem. In the last courses given in Department of Crop Production, at the Agronomy Engineer School of Madrid (Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, UPM) we have developed more than one hundred applications in Microsoft Excel®. Our aim was to show different real scenarios which the future Agronomic Engineers can be found in their professional life and with items related to crop production field. In order to achieve our target, each application in Excel presents a file text in which is explained the theoretical concepts and the objectives, as well as some resources used from Excel syntax. In this way, the student can understand and use of such application, even they can modify and customize it for a real case presented in their context and/or master project. This electronic monograph gives an answer to the need to manage data in several real scenarios showed in lectures, calculus resolution, information analysis and manage worksheets in a professional and student level.

  15. Development and testing of an in-stream phosphorus cycling model for the soil and water assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J; Storm, Daniel E; Mittelstet, Aaron; Busteed, Philip R; Haggard, Brian E; Rossi, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool is widely used to predict the fate and transport of phosphorus (P) from the landscape through streams and rivers. The current in-stream P submodel may not be suitable for many stream systems, particularly those dominated by attached algae and those affected by point sources. In this research, we developed an alternative submodel based on the equilibrium P concentration concept coupled with a particulate scour and deposition model. This submodel was integrated with the SWAT model and applied to the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma, a basin influenced by waste water treatment plant discharges and extensive poultry litter application. The model was calibrated and validated using measured data. Highly variable in-stream P concentrations and equilibrium P concentration values were predicted spatially and temporally. The model also predicted the gradual storage of P in streambed sediments and the resuspension of this P during periodic high-flow flushing events. Waste water treatment plants were predicted to have a profound effect on P dynamics in the Illinois River due to their constant discharge even under base flow conditions. A better understanding of P dynamics in stream systems using the revised submodel may lead to the development of more effective mitigation strategies to control the impact of P from point and nonpoint sources. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. African Leafy Vegetables: A Review of Status, Production and Utilization in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent Maseko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available African leafy vegetables (ALVs are mostly gathered from the wild, with few selected species being cultivated, usually as part of a mixed cropping system in home gardens or smallholder plots. They have important advantages over exotic vegetable species, because of their adaptability to marginal agricultural production areas and their ability to provide dietary diversity in poor rural communities. Despite their significance in food and nutrition security, there is limited availability or access to these crops leading to underutilisation. The objective of this review was to document the state of utilisation and production of ALVs in South Africa. A qualitative systematic approach review of online sources, peer reviewed papers published in journals, books and other publications was conducted. There is lack of suitable production systems, innovative processing, and value-adding techniques that promote utilisation of ALVs. Furthermore, there is a perception that ALVs are food for the poor among the youth and urban folks, while, among the affluent, they are highly regarded as being nutritious. To promote ALVs from household consumption and commercialisation, further research on agronomy, post-harvest handling, storage and processing is required in South Africa.

  17. Use of sewage from a treatment plant for recovery degraded area due to implantation of LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gases) pipeline in the Amazon; Uso de lodo de estacao de tratamento de efluente para recuperacao de area degradada pela implantacao de GLP (Gas Liquefeito de Petroleo) - duto na Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frade, Amadeu F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Liany do V. [OAS, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Pipelines construction possess characteristics that become them singulars in its conception and its implantation and therefore demanding that the services of support reach the same level of the challenge of these enterprises. Among these services the management of effluent is distinguished due to the high demand of technique-operational and Legal requirements. In this context destination of sewage from the STP (Sewage treatment plant) in remote areas with high requirement of environmental responsibility as the Amazonian forest demands additional cares. This work aim to evaluate an alternative to destination of this residue. For the execution of this work the removed sewage was prepared and incorporated to the soil that will receive plants for the restoration of degraded areas (RDA). The evaluation of the effect of this alternative was based on the analysis of agronomies aspects and quantitative analyses of cost X benefits between the conventional destination (CD) and the application in the RDA. In the conditions carried through until the moment we have: I-Parcel that had received the sewage had gotten better average development; II-Economically apply the sewage in RDA is more advantageous than the CD; III-Qualitatively the global impact in the environment of the alternative is minor who the CD. (author)

  18. Combining Nitrilotriacetic Acid and Permeable Barriers for Enhanced Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals from Municipal Solid Waste Compost by and Reduced Metal Leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shulan; Jia, Lina; Duo, Lian

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction has the potential to remove heavy metals from contaminated soil, and chelants can be used to improve the capabilities of phytoextraction. However, environmentally persistent chelants can cause metal leaching and groundwater pollution. A column experiment was conducted to evaluate the viability of biodegradable nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to increase the uptake of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn) by L. in municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and to evaluate the effect of two permeable barrier materials, bone meal and crab shell, on metal leaching. The application of NTA significantly increased the concentrations and uptake of heavy metals in . The enhancement was more pronounced at higher dosages of NTA. In the 15 mmol kg NTA treatment using a crab shell barrier, the Cr and Ni concentrations in the plant shoots increased by approximately 8- and 10-fold, respectively, relative to the control. However, the addition of NTA also caused significant heavy metal leaching from the MSW compost. Bone meal and crab shell barriers positioned between the compost and the subsoil were effective in preventing metal leaching down through the soil profile by the retention of metals in the barrier. The application of a biodegradable chelant and the use of permeable barriers is a viable form of enhanced phytoextraction to increase the removal of metals and to reduce possible leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Effects of Road Salt on Connecticut's Groundwater: A Statewide Centennial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, James P; Robbins, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which development and road salting has affected Connecticut's groundwater. We gathered water quality data from different time periods between 1894 and the present and analyzed the data using maps generated with ESRI ArcGIS. Historical reports illustrate a statewide baseline trend of decreasing chloride concentration northward across the State (average, 2 ppm). Since then, statewide chloride concentrations in ground water have increased by more than an order of magnitude on average. Analysis indicates spatial correlation between chloride impacts and major roadways. Furthermore, increases in statewide chloride concentration parallel increases in road salt application. Projected trends suggest that statewide baseline concentrations will increase by an amount equal to five times background levels between the present and the year 2030. The analytical process outlined herein can be readily applied to any region to investigate salt impacts on large spatial and temporal scales. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Microbial and chemical markers: runoff transfer in animal manure-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrezic, Anne; Jardé, Emilie; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Gourmelon, Michèle; Caprais, Marie-Paule; Heddadj, Djilali; Cottinet, Patrice; Bilal, Muhamad; Derrien, Morgane; Marti, Romain; Mieszkin, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Fecal contamination of water resources is evaluated by the enumeration of the fecal coliforms and Enterococci. However, the enumeration of these indicators does not allow us to differentiate between the sources of fecal contamination. Therefore, it is important to use alternative indicators of fecal contamination to identify livestock contamination in surface waters. The concentration of fecal indicators (, enteroccoci, and F-specific bacteriophages), microbiological markers (Rum-2-bac, Pig-2-bac, and ), and chemical fingerprints (sterols and stanols and other chemical compounds analyzed by 3D-fluorescence excitation-matrix spectroscopy) were determined in runoff waters generated by an artificial rainfall simulator. Three replicate plot experiments were conducted with swine slurry and cattle manure at agronomic nitrogen application rates. Low amounts of bacterial indicators (1.9-4.7%) are released in runoff water from swine-slurry-amended soils, whereas greater amounts (1.1-28.3%) of these indicators are released in runoff water from cattle-manure-amended soils. Microbial and chemical markers from animal manure were transferred to runoff water, allowing discrimination between swine and cattle fecal contamination in the environment via runoff after manure spreading. Host-specific bacterial and chemical markers were quantified for the first time in runoff waters samples after the experimental spreading of swine slurry or cattle manure. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  1. Chemical Fouling Reduction of a Submersible Steel Spectrophotometer in Estuarine Environments Using a Sacrificial Zinc Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Zachary S; Thompson, Megan; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-07-01

    The availability of in situ spectrophotometers, such as the S::CAN spectro::lyser, has expanded the possibilities for high-frequency water quality data collection. However, biological and chemical fouling can degrade the performance of in situ spectrophotometers, especially in saline environments with rapid flow rates. A complex freshwater washing system has been previously designed to reduce chemical fouling for the S::CAN spectro::lyser spectrophotometer. In the current study, we present a simpler, cheaper alternative: the attachment of a sacrificial zinc anode. Results are presented detailing the S::CAN spectro::lyser performance with and without the addition of the sacrificial anode. Attachment of the zinc anode provided efficient corrosion protection during 2-wk deployments in a highly dynamic (average tidal range, 2.5 m) saline tidal saltmarsh creek at Groves Creek, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Use of Annual Phosphorus Loss Estimator (APLE) Model to Evaluate a Phosphorus Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellino, Nicole M; McGrath, Joshua M; Vadas, Peter A; Bolster, Carl H; Coale, Frank J

    2017-11-01

    The Phosphorus (P) Index was developed to provide a relative ranking of agricultural fields according to their potential for P loss to surface water. Recent efforts have focused on updating and evaluating P Indices against measured or modeled P loss data to ensure agreement in magnitude and direction. Following a recently published method, we modified the Maryland P Site Index (MD-PSI) from a multiplicative to a component index structure and evaluated the MD-PSI outputs against P loss data estimated by the Annual P Loss Estimator (APLE) model, a validated, field-scale, annual P loss model. We created a theoretical dataset of fields to represent Maryland conditions and scenarios and created an empirical dataset of soil samples and management characteristics from across the state. Through the evaluation process, we modified a number of variables within the MD-PSI and calculated weighting coefficients for each P loss component. We have demonstrated that our methods can be used to modify a P Index and increase correlation between P Index output and modeled P loss data. The methods presented here can be easily applied in other states where there is motivation to update an existing P Index. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Comparing an Annual and a Daily Time-Step Model for Predicting Field-Scale Phosphorus Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Carl H; Forsberg, Adam; Mittelstet, Aaron; Radcliffe, David E; Storm, Daniel; Ramirez-Avila, John; Sharpley, Andrew N; Osmond, Deanna

    2017-11-01

    A wide range of mathematical models are available for predicting phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural fields, ranging from simple, empirically based annual time-step models to more complex, process-based daily time-step models. In this study, we compare field-scale P-loss predictions between the Annual P Loss Estimator (APLE), an empirically based annual time-step model, and the Texas Best Management Practice Evaluation Tool (TBET), a process-based daily time-step model based on the Soil and Water Assessment Tool. We first compared predictions of field-scale P loss from both models using field and land management data collected from 11 research sites throughout the southern United States. We then compared predictions of P loss from both models with measured P-loss data from these sites. We observed a strong and statistically significant ( loss between the two models; however, APLE predicted, on average, 44% greater dissolved P loss, whereas TBET predicted, on average, 105% greater particulate P loss for the conditions simulated in our study. When we compared model predictions with measured P-loss data, neither model consistently outperformed the other, indicating that more complex models do not necessarily produce better predictions of field-scale P loss. Our results also highlight limitations with both models and the need for continued efforts to improve their accuracy. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. The Promise, Practice, and State of Planning Tools to Assess Site Vulnerability to Runoff Phosphorus Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, P J A; Sharpley, A N; Buda, A R; Easton, Z M; Lory, J A; Osmond, D L; Radcliffe, D E; Nelson, N O; Veith, T L; Doody, D G

    2017-11-01

    Over the past 20 yr, there has been a proliferation of phosphorus (P) site assessment tools for nutrient management planning, particularly in the United States. The 19 papers that make up this special section on P site assessment include decision support tools ranging from the P Index to fate-and-transport models to weather-forecast-based risk calculators. All require objective evaluation to ensure that they are effective in achieving intended benefits to protecting water quality. In the United States, efforts have been underway to compare, evaluate, and advance an array of P site assessment tools. Efforts to corroborate their performance using water quality monitoring data confirms previously documented discrepancies between different P site assessment tools but also highlights a surprisingly strong performance of many versions of the P Index as a predictor of water quality. At the same time, fate-and-transport models, often considered to be superior in their prediction of hydrology and water quality due to their complexity, reveal limitations when applied to site assessment. Indeed, one consistent theme from recent experience is the need to calibrate highly parameterized models. As P site assessment evolves, so too do routines representing important aspects of P cycling and transport. New classes of P site assessment tools are an opportunity to move P site assessment from general, strategic goals to web-based tools supporting daily, operational decisions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. An approach for the condensed presentation of intuitive citation impact metrics which remain reliable with very few publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.; Tippett, Ch.; Côté, G.; Roberge, G.; Archambault, E.

    2016-07-01

    An approach for presenting citation data in a condensed and intuitive manner which will allow for their reliable interpretation by policy analysts even in cases where the number of peer-reviewed publications produced by a given entity remains small is presented. The approach is described using country level data in Agronomy & Agriculture (2004–2013), an area of specialisation for many developing countries with a small output size. Four citation impact metrics, and a synthesis graph that we call the distributional micro-charts of relative citation counts, are considered in building our “preferred” presentation layout. These metrics include two indicators that have long been used by Science-Metrix in its bibliometric reports, the Average of Relative Citations (ARC) and the percentage of publications in the 10% most cited publications in the database (HCP), as well as two newer metrics, the Median of Relative Citations (MRC) and the Relative Integration Score (RIS). The findings reveal that the proposed approach combining the MRC and HCP with the distributional micro-charts effectively allows to better qualify the citation impact of entities in terms of central location, density of the upper citation tail and overall distribution than Science-Metrix former approach based on the ARC and HCP. This is especially true of cases with small population sizes where a strong presence of outliers (denoted by strong HCP scores) can have a significant effect on the central location of the citation data when estimated with an average. (Author)

  6. Science, technique, technology: passages between matter and knowledge in imperial Chinese agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Francesca

    2008-09-01

    Many historians today prefer to speak of knowledge and practice rather than science and technology. Here I argue for the value of reinstating the terms science, techniques and technology as tools for a more precise analysis of governmentality and the workings of power. My tactic is to use these three categories and their articulations to highlight flows between matter and ideas in the production and reproduction of knowledge. In any society, agriculture offers a wonderfully rich case of how ideas, material goods and social relations interweave. In China agronomy was a science of state, the basis of legitimate rule. I compare different genres of agronomic treatise to highlight what officials, landowners and peasants respectively contributed to, and expected from, this charged natural knowledge. I ask how new forms of textual and graphic inscription for encoding agronomic knowledge facilitated its dissemination and ask how successful this knowledge proved when rematerialized and tested as concrete artefacts or techniques. I highlight forms of innovation in response to crisis, and outline the overlapping interpretative frameworks within which the material applications of Chinese agricultural science confirmed and extended its truth across space and time.

  7. Symptoms of nutritional deficiencies in neem plants cultivated in nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnky Chaell Braga da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The planting of forest species is an activity that, besides introducing new exotic types of plants, can lessen the environmental impacts resulting from extractivism. Nevertheless, such success depends, upon other factors, on the knowledge of the nutritional needs of the species to be used. This study intended to check the typical symptoms of nutritional deficiency of macronutrients in the culture of Neem, through the visual observation of the plants. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse at the College of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine (FAMEV of the Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT in Cuiabá/MT, and it was set up in randomized blocks, with seven treatments and three repetitions. Each experimental unit was represented by a plastic vase, two liters capacity. The treatments used were: complete nutritive solution and solution with the omission of the following nutrients: -N, -P, -K, -Ca, -Mg and -S. It was ascertained that the visual symptoms of nutrient deficiency were, as a general rule, of easy characterization except for the treatment with omission of sulphur. Therefore, the omission of macronutrients decreases the production of total dry matter of the Neem plants, except for the omission of the S nutrient.

  8. Response of Nerica Rice to Nitrogen Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shultana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted during T. Aman season, 2014 at the Agronomy Research Field, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur to determine the optimum rate of nitrogen fertilizer for higher yield in nerica rice. The experiment comprised of three rice varieties viz. NERICA1, NERICA10 and BRRI dhan57; and five nitrogen levels viz. 0, 23, 46, 69 and 92 kg ha-1. The rice var. BRRI dhan57 with 69 and 92 kg N ha-1 produced significantly identical with higher panicles m-2. But NERICA1 and NERICA10 produced higher number of panicles with 46 and 69 kg N ha-1, respectively. However, BRRI dhan57 with 46 kg N ha-1 produced highest grains panicle-1 but NERICA1 and NERICA10 produced higher number of grains panicle-1 with 23 kg N ha-1. The highest percentage of sterility was recorded in NERICA10 with 69 kg N ha-1. The regression analysis gave the optimum dose of nitrogen for NERICA1, NERICA10 and BRRI dhan57 which were 69.25, 74.25 and 85.75 kg N ha-1, respectively.

  9. Influence Mf Nitrogen and Phosphorus on Yield and Seed Quality of French Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Kakon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted at the research field of Agronomy Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI, Joydebpur, Gazipur during Rabi (winter season of 2010-11 to 2011-12 to determine the optimum rate of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer on yield and seed quality of French bean. A randomized complete block design was followed with ten treatment combinations such as N0P0, N0 P44, N50 P44, N100 P44, N150 P44, N200 P44, N150P0, N150P22, N150P33 and N150P55. Number of pods and yield of French bean were significantly increased with the increase in N (150 and P (44 kg ha--1. Averaged over the years, maximum number of pod (9.45 plant-1 and seed yield (1563.33 kg ha-1 were obtained when N and P were applied at the rate of 150 and 44 kg ha-1, respectively while lowest yield to N0P0 treatment in both the years. The treatment (N150P44 kg ha-1 gave the highest seed yield which was 51.4 and 54.30% higher than the control. Quality in terms of germination percentage and vigour index of harvested seed was also significantly influenced by higher doses of N and P while the lowest seed quality from plants that received no fertilizer in both the years.

  10. Diverse Applications of Electronic-Nose Technologies in Agriculture and Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) instruments, derived from numerous types of aroma-sensor technologies, have been developed for a diversity of applications in the broad fields of agriculture and forestry. Recent advances in e-nose technologies within the plant sciences, including improvements in gas-sensor designs, innovations in data analysis and pattern-recognition algorithms, and progress in material science and systems integration methods, have led to significant benefits to both industries. Electronic noses have been used in a variety of commercial agricultural-related industries, including the agricultural sectors of agronomy, biochemical processing, botany, cell culture, plant cultivar selections, environmental monitoring, horticulture, pesticide detection, plant physiology and pathology. Applications in forestry include uses in chemotaxonomy, log tracking, wood and paper processing, forest management, forest health protection, and waste management. These aroma-detection applications have improved plant-based product attributes, quality, uniformity, and consistency in ways that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of production and manufacturing processes. This paper provides a comprehensive review and summary of a broad range of electronic-nose technologies and applications, developed specifically for the agriculture and forestry industries over the past thirty years, which have offered solutions that have greatly improved worldwide agricultural and agroforestry production systems. PMID:23396191

  11. Phosphorus and Compost Management Influence Maize (Zea mays) Productivity Under Semiarid Condition with and without Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanullah

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) unavailability and lack of organic matter in the soils under semiarid climates are the two major constraints for low crop productivity. Field trial was conducted to study the effects of P levels, compost application times and seed inoculation with phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) on the yield and yield components of maize (Zea mays L., cv. Azam). The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm of The University of Agriculture Peshawar-Pakistan during summer 2014. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement using three replications. The two PSB levels [(1) inoculated seed with PSB (+) and (2) seed not inoculated with PSB (- or control)] and three compost application times (30, 15, and 0 days before sowing) combination (six treatments) were used as main plot factor, while four P levels (25, 50, 75, and 100 kg P ha-1) used as subplot factor. The results confirmed that compost applied at sowing time and P applied at the two higher rates (75 and 100 kg P ha-1) had significantly increased yield and yield components of maize under semiarid condition. Maize seed inoculated with PSB (+) had tremendously increased yield and yield components of maize over PSB-control plots (-) under semiarid condition. PMID:26697038

  12. Effects of land use on soil inorganic carbon stocks in the Russian Chernozem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Elena A; Post, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about changes in soil inorganic carbon (SIC) stocks with depth and with land use in grassland ecosystems. This study was conducted to determine SIC stocks under different management regimes in the Mollisol, one of the typical soils in grasslands. Four sites were sampled: a native grassland field (not cultivated for at least 300 yr), an adjacent 50-yr continuous fallow field, a yearly cut hay field in the V.V. Alekhin Central-Chernozem Biosphere State Reserve in the Kursk region of Russia, and a continuously cropped field in the Experimental Station of the Kursk Institute of Agronomy and Soil Erosion Control. All sampled soils were classified as fine-silty, mixed, frigid Pachic Hapludolls. Significant differences occurred in SIC stocks between cultivated and grassland soil. The inorganic carbon stocks in the top 2 m were 107 Mg ha(-1) for the native grassland, 91 Mg ha(-1) for the yearly cut hay field, 242 Mg ha(-1) for the continuously cropped field, and 196 Mg ha(-1) for the 50-yr continuous fallow. The SIC was in the form of calcium carbonate and was mostly stored below the 1-m depth. The largest difference between inorganic carbon stocks was observed between the continuously cropped field and native grassland. The increase in inorganic carbon in the continuously cropped field and continuous fallow was attributed to initial cultivation and fertilization. Soil inorganic carbon in Mollisols is not accounted for in the current global carbon estimates.

  13. Chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in surface water using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Clark, R.C.; Smith, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling methodologies were used to conduct a chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in the surface waters of three geographically distinct agricultural watersheds. A selection of current-use agrochemicals and persistent organic pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides, were targeted using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and the semipermeable membrane device passive samplers. In addition to the chemical analysis, the Microtox assay for acute toxicity and the yeast estrogen screen (YES) were conducted as potential assessment tools in combination with the passive samplers. During the spring of 2004, the passive samplers were deployed for 29 to 65 d at Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Morgan Creek, MD; and DR2 Drain, WA. Chemical analysis of the sampler extracts identified the agrochemicals predominantly used in those areas, including atrazine, simazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor. Other chemicals identified included deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, trifluralin, fluoranthene, pyrene, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and pentachloroanisole. Screening using Microtox resulted in no acutely toxic samples. POCIS samples screened by the YES assay failed to elicit a positive estrogenic response. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. A Field-Scale Sensor Network Data Set for Monitoring and Modeling the Spatial and Temporal Variation of Soil Water Content in a Dryland Agricultural Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, C. K.; Brown, D. J.; Campbell, C. S.; Cobos, D. R.; Brooks, E. S.; Chahal, M.; Poggio, M.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a soil water content monitoring data set and auxiliary data collected at a 37 ha experimental no-till farm in the Northwestern United States. Water content measurements have been compiled hourly since 2007 by ECH2O-TE and 5TE sensors installed at 42 locations and five depths (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 m, 210 sensors total) across the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm, a Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research Site stationed on complex terrain in a Mediterranean climate. In addition to soil water content readings, the data set includes hourly and daily soil temperature readings, annual crop histories, a digital elevation model, Bt horizon maps, seasonal apparent electrical conductivity, soil texture, and soil bulk density. Meteorological records are also available for this location. We discuss the unique challenges of maintaining the network on an operating farm and demonstrate the nature and complexity of the soil water content data. This data set is accessible online through the National Agriculture Library, has been assigned a DOI, and will be maintained for the long term.

  15. Selecting and utilizing Populus and Salix for landfill covers: implications for leachate irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesny, Ronald S; Bauer, Edmund O

    2007-01-01

    The success of using Populus and Salix for phytoremediation has prompted further use of leachate as a combination of irrigation and fertilization for the trees. A common protocol for such efforts has been to utilize a limited number of readily-available genotypes with decades of deployment in other applications, such as fiber or windbreaks. However, it may be possible to increase phytoremediation success with proper genotypic screening and selection, followed by the field establishment of clones that exhibited favorable potential for cleanup of specific contaminants. There is an overwhelming need for testing and subsequent deployment of diverse Populus and Salix genotypes, given current availability of clonal material and the inherent genetic variation among and within these genera. Therefore, we detail phyto-recurrent selection, a method that consists of revising and combining crop and tree improvement protocols to meet the objective of utilizing superior Populus and Salix clones for remediation applications. Although such information is lacking for environmental clean-up technologies, centuries of plant selection success in agronomy, horticulture, and forestry validate the need for similar approaches in phytoremediation. We bridge the gap between these disciplines by describing project development, clone selection, tree establishment, and evaluation of success metrics in the context of their importance to utilizing trees for phytoremediation.

  16. Impact of Sowing Date Induced Temperature and Management Practices on Development Events and Yield of Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSA Khan, MA Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted at the research field of the Agronomy Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI, Joydebpur, Gazipur, during rabi season of 2014-2015 to find out the relationship between different development events of mustard crop and sowing dates induced temperature as well as to minimize the yield reduction of the crop by adopting appropriate management practices. The mustard var. BARI Sarisha-15 was sown on 06, 25 November and 14 December 2014. Crop accumulated lower growing degree days (GDD i.e., 72.15, 521.10 and 1070 to 1154 °C were observed for the events of emergence, 50 % flowering and maturity on 14 December sowing. Late sown plants took minimum time from flowering to maturity (36 days due to increased temperature and high variability in both maximum and minimum temperature. The highest seed yield (1569 kg ha-1 was recorded from 06 November sowing with high management practices while the lowest seed yield (435 kg ha-1 from 14 December sowing with low management practices. At high management practices the crop yielded 1183 kg ha-1 at 14 December sowing. Yield reduction at late sowing condition was reduced to some extent with high management practices. The seed yield reductions at 14 December sowing as compared to high management practices at 06 November sowing were 72, 43 and 25% under low, medium and high management, respectively.

  17. Generating crop calendars with Web search data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Velde, Marijn; See, Linda; Fritz, Steffen; Khabarov, Nikolay; Obersteiner, Michael; Verheijen, Frank G A

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of using Web search volumes for generating crop specific planting and harvesting dates in the USA integrating climatic, social and technological factors affecting crop calendars. Using Google Insights for Search, clear peaks in volume occur at times of planting and harvest at the national level, which were used to derive corn specific planting and harvesting dates at a weekly resolution. Disaggregated to state level, search volumes for corn planting generally are in agreement with planting dates from a global crop calendar dataset. However, harvest dates were less discriminatory at the state level, indicating that peaks in search volume may be blurred by broader searches on harvest as a time of cultural events. The timing of other agricultural activities such as purchase of seed and response to weed and pest infestation was also investigated. These results highlight the future potential of using Web search data to derive planting dates in countries where the data are sparse or unreliable, once sufficient search volumes are realized, as well as the potential for monitoring in real time the response of farmers to climate change over the coming decades. Other potential applications of search volume data of relevance to agronomy are also discussed. (letter)

  18. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  19. Diverse applications of electronic-nose technologies in agriculture and forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alphus D

    2013-02-08

    Electronic-nose (e-nose) instruments, derived from numerous types of aroma-sensor technologies, have been developed for a diversity of applications in the broad fields of agriculture and forestry. Recent advances in e-nose technologies within the plant sciences, including improvements in gas-sensor designs, innovations in data analysis and pattern-recognition algorithms, and progress in material science and systems integration methods, have led to significant benefits to both industries. Electronic noses have been used in a variety of commercial agricultural-related industries, including the agricultural sectors of agronomy, biochemical processing, botany, cell culture, plant cultivar selections, environmental monitoring, horticulture, pesticide detection, plant physiology and pathology. Applications in forestry include uses in chemotaxonomy, log tracking, wood and paper processing, forest management, forest health protection, and waste management. These aroma-detection applications have improved plant-based product attributes, quality, uniformity, and consistency in ways that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of production and manufacturing processes. This paper provides a comprehensive review and summary of a broad range of electronic-nose technologies and applications, developed specifically for the agriculture and forestry industries over the past thirty years, which have offered solutions that have greatly improved worldwide agricultural and agroforestry production systems.

  20. Beyond conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  1. Percepção Entomológica de Graduandos da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, ES, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Hermogenes

    2016-12-01

    Abstract. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the level of students' perceptions of the various graduation courses at the Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (CCA/UFES in relation to insects. Data were collected by completing of a questionnaire by the students between the months of June and August 2013. The tried and tested hypothesis was that students of Agronomy, Bachelor in Biological Science, Biological Science Teacher Education, Forest Engineering and Zootechny have a higher hit rate and a higher level of awareness, since they have in their curriculum, disciplines they the group of insects is discussed. The students generally demonstrated ambiguous perceptions of the insects, as feelings of "fear", "disgust" and “curiosity” which was the main feeling that insects cause in the students interviewed. The main source of knowledge about insects cited by students was the “school”. In addition, are aware of the harms and benefits brought by the insects, and the ecological importance, the most cited benefit. Therefore, despite some mistakes in the classification of certain living being like insects, based on the Linnaean classification, the students interviewed, in general, were shown to be aware of the importance of these animals in the ecosystem.

  2. Significance, progress and prospects for research in simplified cultivation technologies for rice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M; Ibrahim, Md; Xia, B; Zou, Y

    2011-08-01

    Simplified cultivation technologies for rice have become increasingly attractive in recent years in China because of their social, economical and environmental benefits. To date, several simplified cultivation technologies, such as conventional tillage and seedling throwing (CTST), conventional tillage and direct seeding (CTDS), no-tillage and seedling throwing (NTST), no-tillage and direct seeding (NTDS) and no-tillage and transplanting (NTTP), have been developed in China. Most studies have shown that rice grown under each of these simplified cultivation technologies can produce a grain yield equal to or higher than traditional cultivation (conventional tillage and transplanting). Studies that have described the influences of agronomic practices on yield formation of rice under simplified cultivation have demonstrated that optimizing agronomy practices would increase the efficiencies of simplified cultivation systems. Further research is needed to optimize the management strategies for CTST, CTDS and NTST rice which have developed quickly in recent years, to strengthen basic research for those simplified cultivation technologies that are rarely used at present (such as NTTP and NTDS), to select and breed cultivars suitable for simplified cultivation and to compare the practicability and effectiveness of different simplified cultivation technologies in different rice production regions.

  3. Environmental challenges threatening the growth of urban agriculture in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, Sam E; Lovell, Sarah Taylor

    2013-09-01

    Urban agriculture, though often difficult to define, is an emerging sector of local food economies in the United States. Although urban and agricultural landscapes are often integrated in countries around the world, the establishment of mid- to large-scale food production in the U.S. urban ecosystem is a relatively new development. Many of the urban agricultural projects in the United States have emerged from social movements and nonprofit organizations focused on urban renewal, education, job training, community development, and sustainability initiatives. Although these social initiatives have traction, critical knowledge gaps exist regarding the science of food production in urban ecosystems. Developing a science-based approach to urban agriculture is essential to the economic and environmental sustainability of the movement. This paper reviews abiotic environmental factors influencing urban cropping systems, including soil contamination and remediation; atmospheric pollutants and altered climatic conditions; and water management, sources, and safety. This review paper seeks to characterize the limited state of the science on urban agricultural systems and identify future research questions most relevant to urban farmers, land-use planners, and environmental consultants. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Association between Aquilaria distribution, geographic characteristics, edaphic factors and water availability in natural tropical rainforest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab; Mohd Fajri Osman; Chong Saw Peng

    2006-01-01

    Oud or gaharu is a fragrant resin produced from Aquilaria trees as a response to injury, wounding and/or a fungal infection. Proliferation of Aquilaria under plantation system is essential to ensure continuous supply of gaharu. Even though the plantation of Aquilaria is aggressively conducted nowadays, there are still lack of details information and knowledge in terms of plant agronomy and oleoresin production. Understanding of plant, soil, water and environment relationship in natural habitat is important in order to provide guidelines and strategies for growers to adopt new agroforestry approaches that can lead to the best management practices for Aquilaria plantation. A study on soil physical and chemical characteristics, topographic condition, soil moisture and climate has been carried out to investigate the plant distribution pattern and resin production potential of 178 stand of Aquilaria in MINT Tech-Park tertiary forest and Gunung Tebu Forest Reserve. Result show that Aquilaria distributions concentrate at slope areas of gradient between 10 degrees to 15 degrees, the soil type is the stony low fertility sandy loam to sandy clay and this area receives a high density of rainfall which is more than 2500 mm/year. For the potential of resin production analysis, slope with high gradient show a significant potential of resin production probably due to the plant stress condition factors

  5. Biodegradation of organic compounds in vadose zone and aquifer sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, A.; Turco, R.

    1991-01-01

    The microbial processes that occur in the subsurface under a typical Midwest agricultural soil were studied. A 26-m bore was installed in November of 1988 at a site of the Purdue University Agronomy Research Center. Aseptic collections of soil materials were made at 17 different depths. Physical analysis indicated that the site contained up to 14 different strata. The site materials were primarily glacial tills with a high carbonate content. The N,P, and organic C contents of sediments tended to decrease with depth. Ambient water content was generally less than the water content, which corresponds to a -0.3-bar equivalent. No pesticides were detected in slurry incubations of up to 128 days. The sorption of atrazine and metolachlor was correlated with the clay content of the sediments. Microbial biomass (determined by direct microscopic count, viable count, and phospholipid assay) in the tills was lower than in either the surface materials or the aquifer located at 25 m. The biodegradation of glucose and phenol occurred rapidly and without a lag in samples from the aquifer capillary fringe, saturated zone, and surface soils. In contrast, lag periods and smaller biodegradation rates were found in the till samples. Subsurface sediments are rich in microbial numbers and activity. The most active strata appear to be transmissive layers in the saturated zone. This implies that the availability of water may limit activity in the profile

  6. Saline agriculture in Mediterranean environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Maggio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is increasingly affecting world's agricultural land causing serious yield loss and soil degradation. Understanding how we could improve crop productivity in salinized environments is therefore critical to meet the challenging goal of feeding 9.3 billion people by 2050. Our comprehension of fundamental physiological mechanisms in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly advanced over the last decades. However, many of these mechanisms have been linked to salt tolerance in simplified experimental systems whereas they have been rarely functionally proven in real agricultural contexts. In-depth analyses of specific crop-salinity interactions could reveal important aspects of plant salt stress adaptation as well as novel physiological/agronomic targets to improve salinity tolerance. These include the developmental role of root vs. shoot systems respect to water-ion homeostasis, morphological vs. metabolic contributions to stress adaptation, developmental processes vs. seasonal soil salinity evolution, residual effects of saline irrigation in non-irrigated crops, critical parameters of salt tolerance in soil-less systems and controlled environments, response to multiple stresses. Finally, beneficial effects of salinization on qualitative parameters such as stress-induced accumulation of high nutritional value secondary metabolites should be considered, also. In this short review we attempted to highlight the multifaceted nature of salinity in Mediterranean agricultural systems by summarizing most experimental activity carried out at the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy of University of Naples Federico II in the last few years.

  7. Impact of salt stress (NaCl on growth, chlorophyll content and fluorescence of Tunisian cultivars of chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaouther Zhani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is considered as the most important abiotic stress limiting crop production and plants are known to be able continuing survive under this stress by involving many mechanisms. In this content, the present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of NaCl on some physiological and biochemical parameters in five Tunisian chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens L. cultivars: Tebourba (Tb, Somaa (Sm, Korba (Kb, Awald Haffouzz (AW and Souk jedid (Sj. Thus, an experiment of five months was carried out under greenhouse at Higher Institute of Agronomy, Chott Meriem, Tunisia and stress is induced by NaCl at 7 concentrations (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12g/l. Results showed that increasing salinity stress, for all cultivars, had a negative impact on roots (length, fresh and dry weights and leaves (number and area. Also, chlorophyll (a and b amount in addition to quantium yield (Fv/Fm decreased significantly. However, biosynthesis of proline in leaves is activated. Awlad Haffouzz and Korba cultivars succefully tolerated highest salinity level by accumulating more proline in leaves and maintaining usually higher values in all parameters in opposition to Souk jedid cultivar. Taken together, our data partly explain the mechanism used to ovoid salt stress by pepper plants when excessive in the culture medium.

  8. Experience gained and future activities in radioactive waste management in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.

    1996-01-01

    The origin and the characteristics of the radioactive waste produced in the Nuclear Research Center are described, as well as those resulting from the application of radioisotopes in different external institutions. The methods utilized in the waste management, and the future actions that will be performed, in order to solve the specific problems of the management are also explained. The Nuclear Research Center is a university institution that has many research opportunities in different applications of radioisotopes: in medicine, biology, industry, agronomy and radiochemistry, and beside that, was here where the 10 km research reactor, that nowadays is being decommissioned, was in operation. Due to the infrastructure of this center, it has been usually responsible for the waste management produced in other institutions, but at present the capacity was exceeded, so that a program was carried out in order to confront this problem. The program for the radioactive waste management qualifies the personnel in formation courses and receives the support of specialists of the IAEA. It also records the sealed radiation sources using a data base by means of a computer to exhausted sources, developed by the same organization. The country regulating organization is carrying out a study to establish a national policy related to the treatment and disposal of wastes. (authors). 4 refs. 1 tab

  9. Stability of odorants from pig production in sampling bags for olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael J; Adamsen, Anders P S; Feilberg, Anders; Jonassen, Kristoffer E N

    2011-01-01

    Odor from pig production facilities is typically measured with olfactometry, whereby odor samples are collected in sampling bags and assessed by human panelists within 30 h. In the present study, the storage stability of odorants in two types of sampling bags that are often used for olfactometry was investigated. The bags were made of Tedlar or Nalophan. In a field experiment, humid and dried air samples were collected from a pig production facility with growing-finishing pigs and analyzed with a gas chromatograph with an amperometric sulfur detector at 4, 8, 12, 28, 52, and 76 h after sampling. In a laboratory experiment, the bags were filled with a humid gas mixture containing carboxylic acids, phenols, indoles, and sulfur compounds and analyzed with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry after 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. The results demonstrated that the concentrations of carboxylic acids, phenols, and indoles decreased by 50 to >99% during the 24 h of storage in Tedlar and Nalophan bags. The concentration of hydrogen sulfide decreased by approximately 30% during the 24 h of storage in Nalophan bags, whereas in Tedlar bags the concentration of sulfur compounds decreased by bags, and the composition changes toward a higher relative presence of sulfur compounds. This can result in underestimation of odor emissions from pig production facilities and of the effect of odor reduction technologies. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Strategies for enhancing the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated agricultural soils by Solanum nigrum L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Puhui; Sun Tieheng; Song Yufang; Ackland, M. Leigh; Liu Yang

    2011-01-01

    Field trials contribute practical information towards the development of phytoremediation strategies that cannot be provided by laboratory tests. We conducted field experiments utilizing the Cd hyperaccumulator plant Solanum nigrum L., on farmland contaminated with 1.91 mg kg -1 Cd in the soil. Our study showed that S. nigrum has a relatively high biomass. Planting density had a significant effect on the plant biomass and thus on overall Cd accumulation. For double harvesting, an optimal cutting position influenced the amount of Cd extracted from soils. Double cropping was found to significantly increase the amount of Cd extracted by S. nigrum. Fertilizing had no significant effect on plant biomass or on the Cd remediation of the soil over the short-term period. Our study indicates that S. nigrum can accumulate Cd from soils where the concentrations are relatively low, and thus has application for use in decontamination of slightly to moderately Cd-contaminated soil. - Research highlights: →S. nigrum L. is an effective phytoremediation plant for Cd-polluted soils. →Agronomy practices that increase harvested biomass improve bioremediation efficiency. →Double cropping of S. nigrum L. is an effective phytoremediation strategy. →Field experiments are necessary to effectively assess phytoremediation techniques. - Agronomic practice for the phytoremediation potential of Solanum nigrum L. for Cd uptake was demonstrated in field contaminated soils.

  11. The problem of sustainability within the complexity of agricultural production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotes Torres, Alejandro; Cotes Torres, Jose Miguel

    2005-01-01

    The problem of sustainability is a topic that since the end of the XX century has been worrying more the different sectors of society; becoming one of the topics of greatest interest for managers, consumers, academics and investigators that conform the different agricultural food chains of the world. This paper presents from the general systems theory point of view some elements of critical reflection, approaching the problem of sustainability from the complexity of agricultural production systems, beginning with the original philosophical conception of agricultural and ending by outlining some considerations that should be kept in mind for the development of scientific and technological advances concordant with the agricultural food chain needs of the XX century; which permit an orientation of not only work by profession is who lead the processes of animal and vegetable production, but also creates a sense of pertinence in all of the participants in the chain, highlighting the importance of studying by means of systemic thought, agronomy and animal science, as disciplines that approach to complexities of agriculture which is the angular stone of civilization, such as we know it at the moment

  12. ANCESTORS OF VEGETABLE BREEDING IN ROMANIA: GLICHERIA AND EMIL TĂLPĂLARU, RESEARCHERS AT EXPERIMENTAL STATION ŞTEFĂNEŞTI- ARGEŞ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Scurtu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glicheria and Emil Talpalaru are two of the first breeders in our country, which during 1963-1984 worked at Stefanesti - Arges Experiment Station and has achieved remarkable results in improving vegetables. Talpalaru Emil attended the Faculty of Agronomy in Iaşi, and Mrs. Glicheria Talpalaru graduated the Faculty of Agriculture in Bucharest (1952. In 1957 both became researchers at Vegetable Experiment Station Ţigăneşti, Ilfov. From 1963 until their retirement (1984 worked at the Research Station Ştefăneşti and obtained the most important achievements . There are authors and co-authors of a series of books, papers or brochures on studying the phenomenon heterosis, hybrid tomato and seed production, vegetable technology and other issues. They are created the first F1 tomato varieties and hybrids that were cultivated many years in our country: Arges 1 (F1, Arges 450 ( F1, Arges 400 ( F1 and Arges 428 variety . In the same time Mrs. Talpalaru and she is co-author of varieties and hybrids of tomatoes, but obtained, two varietes for lettuce and one for red cabbage.

  13. A priori Considerations When Conducting High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Sengupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amplicon-based sequencing strategies that include 16S rRNA and functional genes, alongside “meta-omics” analyses of communities of microorganisms, have allowed researchers to pose questions and find answers to “who” is present in the environment and “what” they are doing. Next-generation sequencing approaches that aid microbial ecology studies of agricultural systems are fast gaining popularity among agronomy, crop, soil, and environmental science researchers. Given the rapid development of these high-throughput sequencing techniques, researchers with no prior experience will desire information about the best practices that can be used before actually starting high-throughput amplicon-based sequence analyses. We have outlined items that need to be carefully considered in experimental design, sampling, basic bioinformatics, sequencing of mock communities and negative controls, acquisition of metadata, and in standardization of reaction conditions as per experimental requirements. Not all considerations mentioned here may pertain to a particular study. The overall goal is to inform researchers about considerations that must be taken into account when conducting high-throughput microbial DNA sequencing and sequences analysis.

  14. Advances and challenges for nutrient management in china in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J T; Ma, L; Oenema, O; Dou, Z; Zhang, F S

    2013-07-01

    Managing agricultural nutrients to provide a safe and secure food supply while protecting the environment remains one of the great challenges for the 21st century. The fourth International Nutrient Management Symposium (INMS), held in 2011 at the University of Delaware, addressed these issues via presentations, panel sessions, and field tours focused on latest technologies and policies available to increase nutrient use efficiency. Participants from the United States, Europe, Canada, and China discussed global trends and challenges, balancing food security and the environment in countries with struggling and emerging economics, nutrient management and transport at the catchment scale, new technologies for managing fertilizer and manure nutrients, and adaptive nutrient management practices for farm to watershed scales. A particular area of interest at the fourth INMS was nutrient management progress and challenges in China over the past 40 years. China's food security challenges and rapidly growing economy have led to major advances in agricultural production systems but also created severe nutrient pollution problems. This special collection of papers from the fourth INMS gives an overview of the remarkable progress China has made in nutrient management and highlights major challenges and changes in agri-environmental policies and practices needed today. Lessons learned in China are of value to both developing and developed countries facing the common task of providing adequate food for an expanding world population, while protecting air and water quality and restoring damaged ecosystems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Rainfall-induced runoff from exposed streambed sediments: an important source of water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S K; Gottschall, N; Wilkes, G; Grégoire, D S; Topp, E; Pintar, K D M; Sunohara, M; Marti, R; Lapen, D R

    2015-01-01

    When surface water levels decline, exposed streambed sediments can be mobilized and washed into the water course when subjected to erosive rainfall. In this study, rainfall simulations were conducted over exposed sediments along stream banks at four distinct locations in an agriculturally dominated river basin with the objective of quantifying the potential for contaminant loading from these often overlooked runoff source areas. At each location, simulations were performed at three different sites. Nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment, fecal indicator bacteria, pathogenic bacteria, and microbial source tracking (MST) markers were examined in both prerainfall sediments and rainfall-induced runoff water. Runoff generation and sediment mobilization occurred quickly (10-150 s) after rainfall initiation. Temporal trends in runoff concentrations were highly variable within and between locations. Total runoff event loads were considered large for many pollutants considered. For instance, the maximum observed total phosphorus runoff load was on the order of 1.5 kg ha. Results also demonstrate that runoff from exposed sediments can be a source of pathogenic bacteria. spp. and spp. were present in runoff from one and three locations, respectively. Ruminant MST markers were also present in runoff from two locations, one of which hosted pasturing cattle with stream access. Overall, this study demonstrated that rainfall-induced runoff from exposed streambed sediments can be an important source of surface water pollution. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Action plan against declining vineyards: An innovative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Declining vineyards are assessed by a multi-year decrease in vine productivity and/or its sudden premature or gradual death, based on multiple factors. Since 2015, the French wine sector has been working on an original study to identify new research avenues while launching an innovative action plan to combat vineyard decline. First, a statistical analysis enabled to estimate research efforts in the different countries. 70 factors susceptible to contribute to vineyard decline were then identified by analyzing more than 500 publications. These factors are biological, physical or linked to growing practices. While the role of pathogens is fairly well-known, the impact of the land plot or the soil on decline is less understood. Secondly, a prospective methodology was used to better identify viticulture system factors and levers affecting vines. It was thus demonstrated that yield and longevity are strongly linked to agronomy, economic variables and plant matter, plant physiology, disease, etc... These are the key issues and leverage actions to combat more strongly vineyard decline. The matrix analysis was then complemented by interviews and statistical data to imagine leverage actions. The strategic action plan is focused on four objectives: promoting training of good practices, improving plant production organization, developing vineyard observation networks, implementing an innovative research plan.

  17. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Solid Cattle Manure Less Prone to Phosphorus Loss in Tile Drainage Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y T; Zhang, T Q; Tan, C S; Qi, Z M; Welacky, T

    2018-03-01

    Forms (e.g., liquid and solid) of manure influence the risk of P loss after land application. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of P-based application of various forms of cattle manure (liquid, LCM; or solid, SCM) or inorganic P as triple superphosphate (IP) on soil P losses in tile drainage water. A 4-yr field experiment was conducted in a clay loam soil with a corn ( L.)-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] rotation in the Lake Erie basin. Over the 4 yr, the dissolved reactive P (DRP) flow-weighted mean concentration (FWMC) in tile drainage water was greater under SCM fertilization than under either IP or LCM fertilization. Despite its lower value on an annual basis, DRP FWMC rose dramatically immediately after LCM application. However, the differences in DRP FWMC did not result in detectable differences in DRP loads. Regarding particulate P and total P losses during the 4 yr, they were 68 and 47%, respectively, lower in the soils amended with SCM than in those with IP, whereas both values were similar between IP and LCM treatments. Overall, the P contained in solid cattle manure was less prone to P loss after land application. Accordingly, the present results can provide a basis for manure storage and application of best management practices designed to reduce P losses and improve crop growth. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Quaternary Geologic Map of the Regina 4 Degrees x 6 Degrees Quadrangle, United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, David S.; Christiansen, Earl A.; Schreiner, Bryan T.; Colton, Roger B.; Clayton, Lee; Bush, Charles A.; Fullerton, David S.

    2007-01-01

    For scientific purposes, the map differentiates Quaternary surficial deposits and materials on the basis of clast lithology or composition, matrix texture or particle size, structure, genesis, stratigraphic relations, engineering geologic properties, and relative age, as shown on the correlation diagram and indicated in the 'Description of Map Units'. Deposits of some constructional landforms, such as end moraines, are distinguished as map units. Deposits of erosional landforms, such as outwash terraces, are not distinguished, although glaciofluvial, ice-contact, fluvial, and lacustrine deposits that are mapped may be terraced. Differentiation of sequences of fluvial and glaciofluvial deposits at this scale is not possible. For practical purposes, the map is a surficial materials map. Materials are distinguished on the basis of lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized and classified in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils as recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. As a materials map, it serves as a base from which a variety of maps for use in planning engineering, land-use planning, or land-management projects can be derived and from which a variety of maps relating to earth surface processes and Quaternary geologic history can be derived.

  20. A review on plant importance, biotechnological aspects, and cultivation challenges of jojoba plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Halabi, Mohammed Farouq; AlKhalifah, Nasser S; Asanar, Shanavaskhan; Al-Soqeer, Abdulrahman A; Attia, M F

    2017-08-24

    Jojoba is considered a promising oil crop and is cultivated for diverse purposes in many countries. The jojoba seed produces unique high-quality oil with a wide range of applications such as medical and industrial-related products. The plant also has potential value in combatting desertification and land degradation in dry and semi-dry areas. Although the plant is known for its high-temperature and high-salinity tolerance growth ability, issues such as its male-biased ratio, relatively late flowering and seed production time hamper the cultivation of this plant. The development of efficient biotechnological platforms for better cultivation and an improved production cycle is a necessity for farmers cultivating the plant. In the last 20 years, many efforts have been made for in vitro cultivation of jojoba by applying different molecular biology techniques. However, there is a lot of work to be done in order to reach satisfactory results that help to overcome cultivation problems. This review presents a historical overview, the medical and industrial importance of the jojoba plant, agronomy aspects and nutrient requirements for the plant's cultivation, and the role of recent biotechnology and molecular biology findings in jojoba research.

  1. A review on plant importance, biotechnological aspects, and cultivation challenges of jojoba plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel R. Al-Obaidi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jojoba is considered a promising oil crop and is cultivated for diverse purposes in many countries. The jojoba seed produces unique high-quality oil with a wide range of applications such as medical and industrial-related products. The plant also has potential value in combatting desertification and land degradation in dry and semi-dry areas. Although the plant is known for its high-temperature and high-salinity tolerance growth ability, issues such as its male-biased ratio, relatively late flowering and seed production time hamper the cultivation of this plant. The development of efficient biotechnological platforms for better cultivation and an improved production cycle is a necessity for farmers cultivating the plant. In the last 20 years, many efforts have been made for in vitro cultivation of jojoba by applying different molecular biology techniques. However, there is a lot of work to be done in order to reach satisfactory results that help to overcome cultivation problems. This review presents a historical overview, the medical and industrial importance of the jojoba plant, agronomy aspects and nutrient requirements for the plant’s cultivation, and the role of recent biotechnology and molecular biology findings in jojoba research.

  2. Topsoil and subsoil properties influence phosphorus leaching from four agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Helena; Bergström, Lars; Djodjic, Faruk; Ulén, Barbro; Kirchmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Eutrophication, a major problem in many fresh and brackish waters, is largely caused by nonpoint-source pollution by P from agricultural soils. This lysimeter study examined the influence of P content, physical properties, and sorption characteristics in topsoil and subsoil on P leaching measured during 21 mo in 1-m-long, undisturbed soil columns of two clay and two sandy soils. Total P losses during the period varied between 0.65 and 7.40 kg ha. Dissolved reactive P was the dominant form in leachate from the sandy soils and one clay soil, varying from 48 to 76%. Particulate P dominated in leachate from the other clay soil, where low pH (5.2) in the subsoil decreased aggregate stability and thereby probably increased the dispersion of clay particles. Phosphorus leaching was small from soils with high P sorption index (PSI) and low P saturation (35% of PSI) in the profile. High sorption capacity in the subsoil was more important for P leaching in sandy soils than in clay soils with macropore flow, where the effect of high sorption capacity was reduced due to less interaction between percolating water and the soil matrix. The results suggest that P leaching is greatly affected by subsoil properties and that topsoil studies, which dominate current research, are insufficient for assessing P leaching in many soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. A brief history of the evolution of surveying and its role in today´s world | Uma breve história da evolução do levantamento e seu papel no mundo de hoje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Silva Anjos

    2016-06-01

    The land surveying appeared millennia ago as a measurement technique for large human constructions. Before all its historical process that science has gone through phases of improvement that has become quite popular nowadays. Since the first measurement instruments as the Egyptian Groma to the use of theodolites and total stations integrated with all kinds of instruments of spatial data acquisition (GNSS receivers, aerial photographs, multispectral satellites the surveying methods now form the basis for various types of research. Quite confused with other sciences, such as Geodesy, Topography makes a more limited planialtimetric survey. That is why their applications are given in areas such as civil engineering, architecture, agronomy to architecture. If we know the differentiation of these key concepts related to topography we can to understand the applicability of this science, helping researchers in various fields. It is in this context, that the present paper aims to address the main concepts related to topography and the main activities human using this technique, making a historical approach since the beginning of its use to the instruments most widely used in the survey.

  4. Considerations on the research and dissemination of agricultural knowledge by the Facultad de Agronomía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A Ligarreto M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to mark the 50-year-history of the Facultad de Agronomía of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, this article reviews the beginning of agronomy in Colombia, the creation of the Facultad de Agronomía, the development of the Escuela de Posgrados, and the launching of the journal Agronomia Colombiana; and analyzes the prioritization of research as a function of undergraduate thesis and theses from 1970 to 2012 and of the articles published in Agronomia Colombiana for 30 years. The fruits of its labor show that the Facultad strengthened the discipline of Crop protection in its first two decades with important advances in crops of flowers and cacao and went on to strengthen the fields of Crop physiology, Plant breeding, Soil and water, Economy and rural development, resulting in diversification to fruits, vegetables, the potato, flower species and perennial crops, showing how the Facultad's mission of teaching, research and continuing education has contributed to the development of the agricultural sector in Colombia

  5. Agricultura y botánica. La herencia de la Ilustración

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Maldonado Polo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture and botany were very closely linked from the last third of the eighteenth century, and even more so in the first third of the following century. The high standards attained by botany during the Enlightenment continued to some extent, associated with agriculture in the transition from the Old to the New Regime. This was specifically the case from the time when Casimiro Gómez Ortega travelled to Paris, enhancing the link with French science and its representatives like Duhamel de Monceau, whose directives he would try to introduce following his return to Spain. Subsequently, Claudio Boutelou and the reign of Joseph I would increase this influence. The article seeks to deal in general with the study of agronomy in the crisis of the ancien régime, when attempts were made to introduce enlightened theoretical assumptions as a means to improving agriculture and streamlining the depleted economy. I will also emphasise the culmination of enlightenment policy which, in the institutional framework, represented a full deployment of possibilities for extending the new agriculture through a teaching system, with the training of specialists using more modern and up-to-date education, in many of the potentially agricultural localities throughout the country.

  6. Electrocoagulation of palm oil mill effluent as wastewater treatment and hydrogen production using electrode aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M Ansori; Yaakob, Z; Ali, Ehsan; Tasirin, S M; Abdullah, S R S

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is highly polluting wastewater generated from the palm oil milling process. Palm oil mill effluent was used as an electrolyte without any additive or pretreatment to perform electrocoagulation (EC) using electricity (direct current) ranging from 2 to 4 volts in the presence of aluminum electrodes with a reactor volume of 20 L. The production of hydrogen gas, removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and turbidity as a result of electrocoagulation of POME were determined. The results show that EC can reduce the COD and turbidity of POME by 57 and 62%, respectively, in addition to the 42% hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was also helpful to remove the lighter suspended solids toward the surface. The production of Al(OH)XHO at the aluminum electrode (anode) was responsible for the flocculation-coagulation process of suspended solids followed by sedimentation under gravity. The production of hydrogen gas from POME during EC was also compared with hydrogen gas production by electrolysis of tap water at pH 4 and tap water without pH adjustment under the same conditions. The main advantage of this study is to produce hydrogen gas while treating POME with EC to reduce COD and turbidity effectively. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Combining satellite remote sensing and surveys to understand persistent yield variation--- a case study in North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Lobell, D. B.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large gap between maize yields on average farmers' fields and the highest yields achieved by either experiment or farmers is typical throughout the developing world, including in the North China Plain (NCP). This maize yield gap as identified by previous studies indicates large opportunities for raising yield by improving agronomy. Quzhou county is typical of the winter-wheat summer-maize system in NCP where the average plot size is as small as 0.25 hectares. To analyze this cropping system amidst the challenge of substantial heterogeneity, we identified fields that were either persistently higher or lower yielding according to the remote sensing yield estimates, and then conducted detailed field surveys. We found irrigation facility to be a major constraint to yield both in terms of irrigation water quality and farmers' access to wells. In total, improving the access to unsalty water would be associated with a 0.32t/ha (4.2%) increase in multi-year average yield. In addition, farmers' method of choosing cultivar, which likely relates to their overall knowledge level, significantly explained yield variation. In particular, those choosing cultivars according to technician advice, personal experiences and high yielding neighbors' advice had on average higher yield than farmers that either followed seed sellers' advice or collectively purchased seeds. Overall, the study presents a generalizable methodology of assessing yield gap as well as its persistent factors using a combination of satellite and survey data.

  8. The Potential Role of Neglected and Underutilised Crop Species as Future Crops under Water Scarce Conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivenge, Pauline; Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe; Modi, Albert T.; Mafongoya, Paramu

    2015-01-01

    Modern agricultural systems that promote cultivation of a very limited number of crop species have relegated indigenous crops to the status of neglected and underutilised crop species (NUCS). The complex interactions of water scarcity associated with climate change and variability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), and population pressure require innovative strategies to address food insecurity and undernourishment. Current research efforts have identified NUCS as having potential to reduce food and nutrition insecurity, particularly for resource poor households in SSA. This is because of their adaptability to low input agricultural systems and nutritional composition. However, what is required to promote NUCS is scientific research including agronomy, breeding, post-harvest handling and value addition, and linking farmers to markets. Among the essential knowledge base is reliable information about water utilisation by NUCS with potential for commercialisation. This commentary identifies and characterises NUCS with agronomic potential in SSA, especially in the semi-arid areas taking into consideration inter alia: (i) what can grow under water-scarce conditions, (ii) water requirements, and (iii) water productivity. Several representative leafy vegetables, tuber crops, cereal crops and grain legumes were identified as fitting the NUCS category. Agro-biodiversity remains essential for sustainable agriculture. PMID:26016431

  9. The minireactor Mirene for neutron-radiography: performances and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houelle, M.; Gerberon, J.M.

    1981-05-01

    The MIRENE neutron radiograhy mini-reactor is described. The core contains only one kilogram of enriched uranium in solution form. It works by pulsed operation. The neutron bursts produced are collimated into two beams which pass through the concrete protection around the reactor block. The performance of the reactor and the results achieved since it went into service in 1977 are described. These concern various fields. In the nuclear field: examination of fast neutron reactor fissile pins, monitoring of neutron absorbing screens employed to guarantee the safety-criticality of the transport and storage of the nuclear fuel cycle, observation of irradiated oxide fuel pellets in order to determine the fuel state equation of the fast neutron system, examination of UO 2 and water mixtures for criticality experiments. In the industrial field, Mirene has a vast field of application. Two examples are given: monitoring of electric insulation sealing, visualization of the bonding of two high density metal parts. Finally an original application in agronomy has given very good results: this concerns the on-site follow-up of the root growth of maize plants [fr

  10. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals to microporous activated carbon treated with potassium hydroxide, carbon dioxide, and steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Heyun; Yang, Liuyan; Wan, Yuqiu; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of sulfapyridine, tetracycline, and tylosin to a commercial microporous activated carbon (AC) and its potassium hydroxide (KOH)-, CO-, and steam-treated counterparts (prepared by heating at 850°C) was studied to explore efficient adsorbents for the removal of selected pharmaceuticals from water. Phenol and nitrobenzene were included as additional adsorbates, and nonporous graphite was included as a model adsorbent. The activation treatments markedly increased the specific surface area and enlarged the pore sizes of the mesopores of AC (with the strongest effects shown on the KOH-treated AC). Adsorption of large-size tetracycline and tylosin was greatly enhanced, especially for the KOH-treated AC (more than one order of magnitude), probably due to the alleviated size-exclusion effect. However, the treatments had little effect on adsorption of low-size phenol and nitrobenzene due to the predominance of micropore-filling effect in adsorption and the nearly unaffected content of small micropores causative to such effect. These hypothesized mechanisms on pore-size dependent adsorption were further tested by comparing surface area-normalized adsorption data and adsorbent pore size distributions with and without the presence of adsorbed antibiotics. The findings indicate that efficient adsorption of bulky pharmaceuticals to AC can be achieved by enlarging the adsorbent pore size through suitable activation treatments. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Quantifying the effects of green waste compost application, water content and nitrogen fertilization on nitrous oxide emissions in 10 agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xia; Silva, Lucas C R; Doane, Timothy A; Wu, Ning; Horwath, William R

    2013-01-01

    Common management practices, such as the application of green waste compost, soil moisture manipulation, and nitrogen fertilization, affect nitrous oxide (NO) emissions from agricultural soils. To expand our understanding of how soils interact with these controls, we studied their effects in 10 agricultural soils. Application of compost slightly increased NO emissions in soils with low initial levels of inorganic N and low background emission. For soils in which compost caused a decrease in emission, this decrease was larger than any of the observed increases in the other soils. The five most important factors driving emission across all soils, in order of increasing importance, were native dissolved organic carbon (DOC), treatment-induced change in DOC, native inorganic N, change in pH, and soil iron (Fe). Notable was the prominence of Fe as a regulator of NO emission. In general, compost is a viable amendment, considering the agronomic benefits it provides against the risk of producing a small increase in NO emissions. However, if soil properties and conditions are taken into account, management can recognize the potential effect of compost and thereby reduce NO emissions from susceptible soils, particularly by avoiding application of compost under wet conditions and together with ammonium fertilizer. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Using Ecophysiology to Improve Farm Efficiency: Application in Temperate Dairy Grazing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Chapman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Information on the physiological ecology of grass-dominant pastures has made a substantial contribution to the development of practices that optimise the amount of feed harvested by grazing animals in temperate livestock systems. However, the contribution of ecophysiology is often under-stated, and the need for further research in this field is sometimes questioned. The challenge for ecophysiolgists, therefore, is to demonstrate how ecophysiological knowledge can help solve significant problems looming for grassland farming in temperate regions while also removing constraints to improved productivity from grazed pastures. To do this, ecophysiological research needs to align more closely with related disciplines, particularly genetics/genomics, agronomy, and farming systems, including systems modelling. This review considers how ecophysiological information has contributed to the development of grazing management practices in the New Zealand dairy industry, an industry that is generally regarded as a world leader in the efficiency with which pasture is grown and utilised for animal production. Even so, there are clear opportunities for further gains in pasture utilisation through the refinement of grazing management practices and the harnessing of those practices to improved pasture plant cultivars with phenotypes that facilitate greater grazing efficiency. Meanwhile, sub-optimal persistence of new pastures continues to constrain productivity in some environments. The underlying plant and population processes associated with this have not been clearly defined. Ecophysiological information, placed in the context of trait identification, grounded in well-designed agronomic studies and linked to plant improvements programmes, is required to address this.

  13. BOOKLET TO INSTITUTO PEDAGOGICO NACIONAL TEACHERS ABOUT SYMBIOSIS AND PROCESSES ON BIOTECHNOLOGY: THE BIOFERTILIZER Rhizobium sp IN Phaseolus vulgaris WITH ALTERNATIVE TO SYMBIOSIS FOR Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Quevedo Rubiano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the thesis carried out in the research group of Biotechnology Teaching in Colombia, with the aim of providing teachers of Biology of Instituto Pedagogico Nacional a booklet that can strengthen the teaching of biotechnology processes using Rhizobium sp reduction of chemical fertilizers and symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris.   The booklet contains a proposal of practical activities that enable teachers of this institution to use spaces like the farm, enabling to teach biotechnology related to agronomy. Therefore, for this project was considered two Biological and Pedagogical approaches, the first is within the analytical empirical paradigm in the process of microbiological characterization of Rhizobium and their Biofertilizing ability in beans; and the teaching approach within the design of a booklet that includes the findings of this study as a contribution to the reduction of chemical fertilizers school farm. In order to have a complete analysis of the work it was subjected to quantitative and qualitative methods.   This biotech practice is included in the booklet showing in bioassays that bacteria has biofertilizer without inhibiting potential symbiosis, and that research and teaching biological concepts from scientific expertise can be promoted in Biology class for students to understand its context in a significant way, to be used in different levels of education; also it is a teaching strategy.

  14. From agricultural intensification to conservation: sediment transport in the Raccoon River, Iowa, 1916-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher S; Schilling, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial sediment is a ubiquitous pollutant that negatively affects surface water quality and municipal water supply treatment. As part of its routine water supply monitoring, the Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) has been measuring turbidity daily in the Raccoon River since 1916. For this study, we calibrated daily turbidity readings to modern total suspended solid (TSS) concentrations to develop an estimation of daily sediment concentrations in the river from 1916 to 2009. Our objectives were to evaluate long-term TSS patterns and trends, and relate these to changes in climate, land use, and agricultural practices that occurred during the 93-yr monitoring period. Results showed that while TSS concentrations and estimated sediment loads varied greatly from year to year, TSS concentrations were much greater in the early 20th century despite drier conditions and less discharge, and declined throughout the century. Against a backdrop of increasing discharge in the Raccoon River and widespread agricultural adaptations by farmers, sediment loads increased and peaked in the early 1970s, and then have slowly declined or remained steady throughout the 1980s to present. With annual sediment load concentrated during extreme events in the spring and early summer, continued sediment reductions in the Raccoon River watershed should be focused on conservation practices to reduce rainfall impacts and sediment mobilization. Overall, results from this study suggest that efforts to reduce sediment load from the watershed appear to be working. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. “SEABUCKTHORNOLOGY” A POSSIBLE NEW INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel PROOROCU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to present a critical overview on the main opinions and research results on "seabuckthornology" as a new interdisciplinary science, as mentioned on various international conferences and other events hold in different countries where the author took part and expressed his opinions as expert in the field. The current opinion of many experts is that the sea buckthorn is the result of a long hard work in the field of research, practice, landscape architecture, production, soil science, animal and human health. It is an important plant of the 3rd millennium. The only problem many experts are facing is the fact that it is very difficult to put in order all multidisciplinary information from Botany, Geology, Marketing, Medicine, Biochemistry, Agronomy, Management etc. The solution is the elaboration of a statute of the interdisciplinary new science "seabuckthornology" and the creation of a multilingual data base, which should be updated permanently as at any moment a manufacturer having sea buckthorn oil production to find many offers from the entire world, obtaining all parameters and prices in few minutes, the address, fax, e-mail, phone number etc. In the actual world crises, a scientifically aboard of seabuckthorn may be a solution to health and environmental problems.

  16. Systematic organization of medicinal plant information: a monograph template proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C.B. Carvalho

    Full Text Available The use of medicinal plants in Brazil is widespread and is supported by public policies; it has the objective of providing the population with safe and effective herbal medicines of adequate quality. An action in these policies is to develop medicinal plant monographs to gather published information and decide which medicinal plants should be financed by the Brazilian government and distributed by the public health system. Currently, the monographs published worldwide do not present unified information regarding medicinal plants, and generally, they do not cover enough requirements for herbal medicine registration. The aim of this study is to develop a monograph model with standardized information not only about botany, agronomy, quality control, safety, and efficacy but also about relating regulatory aspects that support herbal medicine regulation. The development of standardized monographs favors the fast authorization and distribution of herbal medicines in the public system. The model also points out the lacking studies that should be carried out to supplement the necessary regulatory information of medicinal plants.

  17. Calculation of neutron shielding using an unidimensional model of transportation in formulation of discrete ordinates with scattering linearly anisotropic and a speed; Cálculos de blindagem de nêutrons usando um modelo unidimensional de transporte na formulação de ordenadas discretas com espalhamento linearmente anisotrópico e uma velocidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libotte, Rafael Barbosa; Alves Filho, Hermes; Oliva, Amaury Muñoz, E-mail: rafaellibotte@hotmail.com, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: aoliva@iprj.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Modelagem Computacional

    2017-07-01

    The physical phenomenon of transport of neutral particles in a host environment is of interest in various scientific applications, e.g., nuclear reactors, shielding calculations, radiological protection, nuclear medicine, agronomy, materials science, oil prospecting, etc. In all these areas there is a need for an accurate description of the transport of the particles in the host medium. In this class of applications are the neutron shielding problems, also referred to as 'fixed-source' problems, where the interaction of the particles with the medium does not produce new neutrons, i.e., non-multiplicative medium. In this context, the development of tools that model these problems is relevant and of a beneficial return to society. In this work, we propose the development of deterministic mathematical and computational modeling of neutron transport using the linearized equation of Boltzmann applied to neutron shielding problems. Here we present also the development of a spectro-nodal method (coarse mesh) considering the scattering phenomenon as being linearly anisotropic. We show the results using a computational application, developed in Java language, version 1.8.0{sub 9}1.

  18. Simulation of Organic Matter and Pollutant Evolution during Composting: The COP-Compost Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashermes, G; Zhang, Y; Houot, S; Steyer, J P; Patureau, D; Barriuso, E; Garnier, P

    2013-01-01

    Organic pollutants (OPs) are potentially present in composts and the assessment of their content and bioaccessibility in these composts is of paramount importance. In this work, we proposed a model to simulate the behavior of OPs and the dynamic of organic C during composting. This model, named COP-Compost, includes two modules. An existing organic C module is based on the biochemical composition of the initial waste mixture and simulates the organic matter transformation during composting. An additional OP module simulates OP mineralization and the evolution of its bioaccessibility. Coupling hypotheses were proposed to describe the interactions between organic C and OP modules. The organic C module, evaluated using experimental data obtained from 4-L composting pilots, was independently tested. The COP-Compost model was evaluated during composting experiments containing four OPs representative of the major pollutants detected in compost and targeted by current and future regulations. These OPs included a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (fluoranthene), two surfactants (4--nonylphenol and a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate), and an herbicide (glyphosate). Residues of C-labeled OP with different bioaccessibility were characterized by sequential extraction and quantified as soluble, sorbed, and nonextractable fractions. The model was calibrated and coupling the organic C and OP modules improved the simulation of the OP behavior and bioaccessibility during composting. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. From the associative companies to the nuclei of rural entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Parrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the twentieth century, the impulse to the creation of Rural Associative Organizations (RAOs has become one of the main tools to implement rural development policies. However, most of these efforts have ended in failure, and have been marked by both the paternalism of the institutions and the lack of active participation from the rural communities. Faced with this situation, other methodologies and approaches have started to emerge. These new views have provided rural people with tools to participate in their own development processes and recognize that rural issues go beyond agricultural production. The Rural Management and Development Research Group in the Department of Agronomy at Colombia's Universidad Nacional has been working within this conceptual framework that tends to focus not only on participatory methodologies, but also on gender focus, the new rural setting and the territorial development. The research group has been involved in rural areas of Bogotá and Cundinamarca, building proposals with the active participation from the Nuclei of Rural Entrepreneurs as an alternative model to the conventional rural associative enterprise

  20. Beyond Conservation Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken E Giller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance, soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals and biotechnology. Over the past ten years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub- tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  1. How Could Agricultural Land Systems Contribute to Raise Food Production Under Global Change?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wen-bin; YU Qiang-yi; Verburg H Peter; YOU Liang-zhi; YANG Peng; TANG Hua-jun

    2014-01-01

    To feed the increasing world population, more food needs to be produced from agricultural land systems. Solutions to produce more food with fewer resources while minimizing adverse environmental and ecological consequences require sustainable agricultural land use practices as supplementary to advanced biotechnology and agronomy. This review paper, from a land system perspective, systematically proposed and analyzed three interactive strategies that could possibly raise future food production under global change. By reviewing the current literatures, we suggest that cropland expansion is less possible amid iferce land competition, and it is likely to do less in increasing food production. Moreover, properly allocating crops in space and time is a practical way to ensure food production. Climate change, dietary shifts, and other socio-economic drivers, which would shape the demand and supply side of food systems, should be taken into consideration during the decision-making on rational land management in respect of sustainable crop choice and allocation. And ifnally, crop-speciifc agricultural intensiifcation would play a bigger role in raising future food production either by increasing the yield per unit area of individual crops or by increasing the number of crops sown on a particular area of land. Yet, only when it is done sustainably is this a much more effective strategy to maximize food production by closing yield and harvest gaps.

  2. Quantification of chemical transport processes from the soil to surface runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kun; Huang, Chi-Hua; Wang, Guang-Qian; Fu, Xu-Dong; Parker, Gary

    2013-01-01

    There is a good conceptual understanding of the processes that govern chemical transport from the soil to surface runoff, but few studies have actually quantified these processes separately. Thus, we designed a laboratory flow cell and experimental procedures to quantify the chemical transport from soil to runoff water in the following individual processes: (i) convection with a vertical hydraulic gradient, (ii) convection via surface flow or the Bernoulli effect, (iii) diffusion, and (iv) soil loss. We applied different vertical hydraulic gradients by setting the flow cell to generate different seepage or drainage conditions. Our data confirmed the general form of the convection-diffusion equation. However, we now have additional quantitative data that describe the contribution of each individual chemical loading process in different surface runoff and soil hydrological conditions. The results of this study will be useful for enhancing our understanding of different geochemical processes in the surface soil mixing zone. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Vertical Stratification of Soil Phosphorus as a Concern for Dissolved Phosphorus Runoff in the Lake Erie Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David B; Johnson, Laura T; Confesor, Remegio B; Crumrine, John P

    2017-11-01

    During the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie, dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) loading and concentrations to the lake have nearly doubled, while particulate phosphorus (PP) has remained relatively constant. One potential cause of increased DRP concentrations is P stratification, or the buildup of soil-test P (STP) in the upper soil layer (soil samples (0-5 or 0-2.5 cm) alongside their normal agronomic samples (0-20 cm) ( = 1758 fields). The mean STP level in the upper 2.5 cm was 55% higher than the mean of agronomic samples used for fertilizer recommendations. The amounts of stratification were highly variable and did not correlate with agronomic STPs (Spearman's = 0.039, = 0.178). Agronomic STP in 70% of the fields was within the buildup or maintenance ranges for corn ( L.) and soybeans [ (L.) Merr.] (0-46 mg kg Mehlich-3 P). The cumulative risks for DRP runoff from the large number of fields in the buildup and maintenance ranges exceeded the risks from fields above those ranges. Reducing stratification by a one-time soil inversion has the potential for larger and quicker reductions in DRP runoff risk than practices related to drawing down agronomic STP levels. Periodic soil inversion and mixing, targeted by stratified STP data, should be considered a viable practice to reduce DRP loading to Lake Erie. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Adhesion of and to soil in runoff as influenced by polyacrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Tina B; Sbodio, Adrian; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Suslow, Trevor

    2014-11-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) is used in agriculture to reduce soil erosion and has been reported to reduce turbidity, nutrients, and pollutants in surface runoff water. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of PAM on the concentration of enteric bacteria in surface runoff by comparing four enteric bacteria representing phenotypically different motility and hydrophobicity from three soils. Results demonstrated that bacterial surface runoff was differentially influenced by the PAM treatment. Polyacrylamide treatment increased surface runoff for adhered and planktonic cells from a clay soil; significantly decreased surface runoff of adhered bacteria, while no difference was observed for planktonic bacteria from the sandy loam; and significantly decreased the surface runoff of planktonic cells, while no difference was observed for adhered bacteria from the clay loam. Comparing strains from a final water sample collected after 48 h showed a greater loss of while serovar Poona was almost not detected. Thus, (i) the PAM efficiency in reducing the concentration of enteric bacteria in surface runoff was influenced by soil type and (ii) variation in the loss of enteric bacteria highlights the importance of strain-specific properties that may not be captured with general fecal indicator bacteria. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Collection of rice mutants and application studies of their agronomic characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shuxiang; Jin Wei; Luo Qian; Sheng Ping; Huang Rongmin

    1993-01-01

    More than 1600 accessions of rice mutant germplasm have been collected since 1980, and 1142 accessions of mutants have been identified according to their agronomy and pattern characters. A part of mutants were compared with their original cultivars in eight main agronomic characters. The results showed that the agronomic characters of mutants induced by ionizing radiations changed to both positive and negative directions compared with their original cultivars. Only 6.3% mutants varied in single agronomic character, and 91.1% mutants varied in two to six agronomic characters. Tenetic analysis and Cellular observations were carried out for two kinds of early mutants. It showed that early mutants 'Yuan Feng Zao' are controlled by two independent and incomplete dominant genes. For the dwarf, the reduction of the number of longitudinal cell layers causes the stem shorter and the increase of the number of horizontal cell layers causes the stem wall thicker. More than 100 preserved accessions of mutants were supplied to breeding units as parents or for genetic studies. Sixteen cultivars (lines) were bred from the parents which played an important role in raising the output of rice production

  6. Research to commercialization: Technology transfer gaharu oil extraction to people of Orang Asli Kampung Kedaik, Rompin, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fajri Osman; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Chong, Saw Peng; Muhammad Lebai Juri; Mat Rasol Awang

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Malaysia has been involved in research related to gaharu since 2004 again. Studies conducted in the fields of agronomy, breeding, inoculation, grading, processing and development of quality agar wood products. Agar wood research involves application of nuclear technology and related technologies according to the expertise of researchers in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency in the developing industrial modernization and technology goals gaharu in Malaysia. In a study of the development process and product quality of agar wood, sandalwood oil processing technologies have been researched and developed at Nuclear Malaysia. Demand for sandalwood oil extraction technology development is very high because of sandalwood oil is very high-value products with the price can go up to RM 60,000.00 per kilogram. With the knowledge, technology innovation resulting from research and experience, the Malaysian Nuclear Agency was to transfer technology and knowledge of processing sandalwood oil to the community through a project of Development Projects in Agar wood Oil Extraction Plant Relocation Plan Aboriginal Kg Kedaik, Rompin, Pahang financial assistance from the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation under grant Community Innovation Fund (CIF). Technology transfer and travel through the various steps of the project which involves the preparation of papers, technology feasibility study to the community, the strength of community, sustainability research projects, effectiveness, success and benefits gained. (author)

  7. Prediction of thermal conductivity of rock through physico-mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, T.N. [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 400 076 (India); Sinha, S.; Singh, V.K. [Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2007-01-15

    The transfer of energy between two adjacent parts of rock mainly depends on its thermal conductivity. Present study supports the use of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) in the study of thermal conductivity along with other intrinsic properties of rock due to its increasing importance in many areas of rock engineering, agronomy and geo environmental engineering field. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to develop techniques to determine these properties. Comparative analysis is made to analyze the capabilities among six different models of ANN and ANFIS. ANN models are based on feedforward backpropagation network with training functions resilient backpropagation (RP), one step secant (OSS) and Powell-Beale restarts (CGB) and radial basis with training functions generalized regression neural network (GRNN) and more efficient design radial basis network (NEWRB). A data set of 136 has been used for training different models and 15 were used for testing purposes. A statistical analysis is made to show the consistency among them. ANFIS is proved to be the best among all the networks tried in this case with average absolute percentage error of 0.03% and regression coefficient of 1, whereas best performance shown by the FFBP (RP) with average absolute error of 2.26%. Thermal conductivity is predicted using P-wave velocity, porosity, bulk density, uniaxial compressive strength of rock as input parameters. (author)

  8. Bio-effectors from waste materials as growth promoters for tomato plants, an agronomic and metabolomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chehade, Lara; Chami, Ziad Al; De Pascali, Sandra; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In organic farming, where nutrient management is constrained and sustainability is claimed, bio-effectors pave their way. Considering selected bio-effectors, this study integrates metabolomics to agronomy in depicting induced relevant phenomena. Extracts of three agro-industrial wastes (Lemon processing residues, Fennel processing residues and Brewer's spent grain) are being investigated as sources of bio-effectors for the third trial consequently. Corresponding individual and mixture aqueous extracts are assessed for their synergistic and/or single agronomic and qualitative performances on soil-grown tomato, compared to both a control and humic acid treatments. A metabolomic profiling of tomato fruits via the Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as holistic indicator of fruit quality and extract-induced responses, complements crop productivity and organoleptic/nutritional qualitative analyses. Results are expected to show mainly an enhancement of the fruit qualitative traits, and to confirm partly the previous results of better crop productivity and metabolism enhancement. Waste-derived bio-effectors could be, accordingly, demonstrated as potential candidates of plant-enhancing substances. Keywords: bio-effectors, organic farming, agro-industrial wastes, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tomato.

  9. Phytoextraction of heavy metals by willows growing in biosolids under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, W S; Arndt, S K; Huynh, T T; Gregory, D; Baker, A J M

    2012-01-01

    Biosolids produced by sewage treatment facilities can exceed guideline thresholds for contaminant elements. Phytoextraction is one technique with the potential to reduce these elements allowing reuse of the biosolids as a soil amendment. In this field trial, cuttings of seven species/cultivars of Salix(willows) were planted directly into soil and into biosolids to identify their suitability for decontaminating biosolids. Trees were irrigated and harvested each year for three consecutive years. Harvested biomass was weighed and analyzed for the contaminant elements: As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. All Salix cultivars, except S. chilensis, growing in soils produced 10 to 20 t ha(-1) of biomass, whereas most Salix cultivars growing in biosolids produced significantly less biomass (metals from biosolids, driven by superior biomass increases and not high tissue concentrations. The willows were effectual in extracting the most soluble/exchangeable metals (Cd, 0.18; Ni, 0.40; and Zn, 11.66 kg ha(-1)), whereas Cr and Cu were extracted to a lesser degree (0.02 and 0.11 kg ha(-1)). Low bioavailable elements, As, Hg, and Pb, were not detectable in any of the aboveground biomass of the willows. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Microarray assessment of virulence, antibiotic, and heavy metal resistance in an agricultural watershed creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unc, Adrian; Zurek, Ludek; Peterson, Greg; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Springthorpe, Susan V; Sattar, Syed A

    2012-01-01

    Potential risks associated with impaired surface water quality have commonly been evaluated by indirect description of potential sources using various fecal microbial indicators and derived source-tracking methods. These approaches are valuable for assessing and monitoring the impacts of land-use changes and changes in management practices at the source of contamination. A more detailed evaluation of putative etiologically significant genetic determinants can add value to these assessments. We evaluated the utility of using a microarray that integrates virulence genes with antibiotic and heavy metal resistance genes to describe and discriminate among spatially and seasonally distinct water samples from an agricultural watershed creek in Eastern Ontario. Because microarray signals may be analyzed as binomial distributions, the significance of ambiguous signals can be easily evaluated by using available off-the-shelf software. The FAMD software was used to evaluate uncertainties in the signal data. Analysis of multilocus fingerprinting data sets containing missing data has shown that, for the tested system, any variability in microarray signals had a marginal effect on data interpretation. For the tested watershed, results suggest that in general the wet fall season increased the downstream detection of virulence and resistance genes. Thus, the tested microarray technique has the potential to rapidly describe the quality of surface waters and thus to provide a qualitative tool to augment quantitative microbial risk assessments. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Littérature scientifique et formation à l'information, la situation des bioingénieurs à Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (ULg (synthèse bibliographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochet, B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly publication and education in Information Literacy within the bioengineering curriculum, the Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (ULg case. A review. This article is based on a doctoral study on the role of scientific literature in the teaching of bioengineering at Gembloux. It is essentially a summary incorporating recent advances in Information Literacy. Data analysis indicates that the bioengineers working at Gembloux publish at least as much as research as other scientists in Belgium. These bioengineers choose to publish articles in journals with a high impact factor, preferring to read articles rather than books and using all the electronic resources available to them. Their fields of research, and reading, go beyond the bounds of agronomy in the strictest sense. The bioengineering courses provided at Gembloux are based on the concept of Information Literacy. This concept refers to a set of skills that allow individuals to recognize an information need and enable them to locate, evaluate and use the required information. The area of Information Literacy has evolved over the last two decades. The scope of education of this area goes well beyond the bounds of the library. In addition to intellectual skills, Information Literacy also involves social and cultural skills. These include an understanding of media and new information technologies, without being reduced to technical or technological skills. At Gembloux, education in Information Literacy is included in the student's timetable. It incorporates the production of scientific papers and is based on a methodological approach with its own didactic and specific content.

  12. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarte, Kirk A; Russell, James R; Kovar, John L; Morrical, Daniel G; Ensley, Steven M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Cornick, Nancy A; Cho, Yong Il

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A 2-yr grazing study was conducted to quantify the effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisected by a stream in central Iowa were divided into three treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with restricted stream access (CSR), and rotational stocking (RS). Rainfall simulations on stream banks resulted in greater ( CSR pastures. Bovine enterovirus was shed by an average of 24.3% of cows during the study period and was collected in the runoff of 8.3 and 16.7% of runoff simulations on bare sites in CSU pastures in June and October of 2008, respectively, and from 8.3% of runoff simulations on vegetated sites in CSU pastures in April 2009. Fecal pathogens (bovine coronavirus [BCV], bovine rotavirus group A, and O157:H7) shed or detected in runoff were almost nonexistent; only BCV was detected in feces of one cow in August of 2008. Erosion of cut-banks was the greatest contributor of sediment and P loading to the stream; contributions from surface runoff and grazing animals were considerably less and were minimized by grazing management practices that reduced congregation of cattle by pasture streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Sustainable development from A to Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euzen, Agathe; Gaill, Francoise; Eymard, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and the table of content of a book written by a large panel of researchers in economy, physics, agronomy, ecology, urban planning, demography, climate, geography, and so on, to describe, understand, and imagine the various tools aimed at the sustainable development of societies in the future. The contributions recall the origin of the concept of sustainable development, and discuss its political dimension, the evolution of the metropolitan space at the era of globalization, the issues of climate and energy, the relationship between environment and animal development, ethic aspects. They propose different perspectives on the environment (vulnerability, time scales, climate and ecosystems, water cycle issues, atmospheric chemistry, sea level rise, soils, wet lands, modelling of biodiversity, examples of sea biodiversity). They discuss the issue of new 'biomes' (city, urban forms, sustainable urban planning, urban ecology, urban mobility, urban growth, rural areas, and anthropogenic pressure on the coasts). They address societal aspects: demographic growth, access to basic services, sharing of resources, fishing and farming, GMOs and agriculture, food issues, energy transition, ways of life related to globalization, so on). They discuss the impacts of human activities on the environment: floods, dry and heat periods, air quality and health, ecological risks, marine sound pollution, consumption and wastes, pollutions, underground disposal, adaptation to climate change. A last part presents new research approaches

  14. Phosphorus and compost management influence maize (Zea mays productivity under semiarid condition with and without phosphate solubilizing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanullah eAmanullah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P unavailability and lack of organic matter in the soils under semiarid climates are the two major constraints for low crop productivity. Field trial was conducted to study the effects of P levels, compost application times and seed inoculation with phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB on the yield and yield components of maize (Zea mays L., cv. Azam. The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm of The University of Agriculture Peshawar-Pakistan during summer 2014. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement using three replications. The two PSB levels [(1 inoculated seed with PSB (+ and (2 seed not inoculated with PSB (- or control] and three compost application times [(30, 15 and 0 days before sowing (DBS] combination (six treatments were used as main plot factor, while four P levels (25, 50, 75 and 100 kg P ha-1 used as subplot factor. The results confirmed that compost applied at sowing time and P applied at the two higher rates (75 and 100 kg P ha-1 had significantly increased yield and yield components of maize under semiarid condition. Maize seed inoculated with PSB (+ had tremendously increased yield and yield components of maize over PSB-control plots (- under semiarid condition.

  15. An evaluation of the regional supply of biomass at three midwestern sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, B.C.; Dillivan, K.D.; Ojo, M.A.; Alexander, R.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Graham, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Research has been conducted on both the agronomy and the conversion of biomass. However, few studies have been initiated that combine the knowledge of growing biomass with site specific resource availability information. An economic appraisal of how much biomass might be grown in a specific area for a given price has only just been initiated. This paper examines the economics of introducing biomass production to three midwest representative areas centered on the following counties, Orange County, Indiana; Olmsted County, Minnesota; and Cass County, North Dakota. Using a regional linear programming model, estimates of economic feasibility as well as environmental impacts are made. At a price of $53 per metric ton the biomass supplied to the plant gate is equal to 183,251 metric tons. At $62 per metric ton the biomass supply has increased to almost 1 million metric tons. The model predicts a maximum price of $88 per metric ton and at this price, 2,748,476 metric tons of biomass are produced.

  16. Guidelines for the use of isotopes of sulfur in soil-plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element in plant, human and animal nutrition. This publication provides an overview of the sulfur cycle and how isotopic tracers can be used to obtain unique and precise information on the fluxes and movement of S between and within different compartments of the soil-plant system. It provides information on the theory and measurement of 35S and 34S, safety procedures using 35S, preparation of labelled S fertilizers and plant residues, estimation of the quantity of isotope required for different temporal and spatial scales, preparation digestion /extraction) and analysis of soil and plant samples and guidelines on comparative advantages with non-nuclear techniques and applications, including case studies and references. It is a timely publication in that greater attention is now being focused on S deficiencies in agriculture, which are becoming more common due to reduced atmospheric accretions from industrial sources and to the reduced use of fertilizer materials that contain sulfur as a secondary nutrient. The sub-programme in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition is committed to the dissemination of information to Member States on the practical applications of nuclear techniques through the IAEA Training Course Series. The present publication is preceded by IAEA-TCS-14 (2001), Use of Isotope and Radiation Methods in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition, and IAEA-TCS-16 (2002), Neutron and Gamma Probes: Their Use in Agronomy

  17. Thinking beyond the Bioreactor Box: Incorporating Stream Ecology into Edge-of-Field Nitrate Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeller, Brandon C; Febria, Catherine M; Harding, Jon S; McIntosh, Angus R

    2016-05-01

    Around the world, artificially drained agricultural lands are significant sources of reactive nitrogen to stream ecosystems, creating substantial stream health problems. One management strategy is the deployment of denitrification enhancement tools. Here, we evaluate the factors affecting the potential of denitrifying bioreactors to improve stream health and ecosystem services. The performance of bioreactors and the structure and functioning of stream biotic communities are linked by environmental parameters like dissolved oxygen and nitrate-nitrogen concentrations, dissolved organic carbon availability, flow and temperature regimes, and fine sediment accumulations. However, evidence of bioreactors' ability to improve waterway health and ecosystem services is lacking. To improve the potential of bioreactors to enhance desirable stream ecosystem functioning, future assessments of field-scale bioreactors should evaluate the influences of bioreactor performance on ecological indicators such as primary production, organic matter processing, stream metabolism, and invertebrate and fish assemblage structure and function. These stream health impact assessments should be conducted at ecologically relevant spatial and temporal scales. Bioreactors have great potential to make significant contributions to improving water quality, stream health, and ecosystem services if they are tailored to site-specific conditions and implemented strategically with land-based and stream-based mitigation tools within watersheds. This will involve combining economic, logistical, and ecological information in their implementation. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Reduction of Methane Emission during Slurry Storage by the Addition of Effective Microorganisms and Excessive Carbon Source from Brewing Sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Mohd Saufi B; Jones, Davey L; Chadwick, David R

    2016-11-01

    Storing livestock manure is the primary stage of manure management where microbial processes and chemical reactions result in the release of methane (CH), nitrous oxide (NO), ammonia (NH), and carbon dioxide (CO). This study examined the reduction of CH emissions from slurry storage under two temperatures (cool [10°C] and warm [30°C]) when a glucose-rich substrate (brewing sugar) and activated effective microorganisms were applied at 10% (w/w) and 5% (v/w), respectively. Brewing sugar addition influenced microbial anaerobic respiration, resulting in a reduction of slurry pH to <5.0, through "self-acidification" caused by lactic acid production. Subsequently, CH emissions were significantly reduced by 87 and 99% in the cool and warm environments, respectively. The effective microorganism treatment did not change the chemical characteristics of the slurry but reduced CH emissions by 17 and 27% ( < 0.05) in the cool and warm environments, respectively. These results suggest that self-acidification after addition of a carbon source may be a promising alternative to slurry acidification using concentrated acids. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of river subsurface solutes under agriculturally enhanced ground water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, R.A.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Hering, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The relative influences of hydrologic processes and biogeochemistry on the transport and retention of minor solutes were compared in the riverbed of the lower Merced River (California, USA). The subsurface of this reach receives ground water discharge and surface water infiltration due to an altered hydraulic setting resulting from agricultural irrigation. Filtered ground water samples were collected from 30 drive point locations in March, June, and October 2004. Hydrologic processes, described previously, were verified by observations of bromine concentrations; manganese was used to indicate redox conditions. The separate responses of the minor solutes strontium, barium, uranium, and phosphorus to these influences were examined. Correlation and principal component analyses indicate that hydrologic processes dominate the distribution of trace elements in the ground water. Redox conditions appear to be independent of hydrologic processes and account for most of the remaining data variability. With some variability, major processes are consistent in two sampling transects separated by 100 m. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  20. Impacts of climate change on peanut yield in China simulated by CMIP5 multi-model ensemble projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hanqing; Tian, Zhan; Zhong, Honglin; Fan, Dongli; Shi, Runhe; Niu, Yilong; He, Xiaogang; Chen, Maosi

    2017-09-01

    Peanut is one of the major edible vegetable oil crops in China, whose growth and yield are very sensitive to climate change. In addition, agriculture climate resources are expected to be redistributed under climate change, which will further influence the growth, development, cropping patterns, distribution and production of peanut. In this study, we used the DSSAT-Peanut model to examine the climate change impacts on peanut production, oil industry and oil food security in China. This model is first calibrated using site observations including 31 years' (1981-2011) climate, soil and agronomy data. This calibrated model is then employed to simulate the future peanut yield based on 20 climate scenarios from 5 Global Circulation Models (GCMs) developed by the InterSectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) driven by 4 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Results indicate that the irrigated peanut yield will decrease 2.6% under the RCP 2.6 scenario, 9.9% under the RCP 4.5 scenario and 29% under the RCP 8.5 scenario, respectively. Similarly, the rain-fed peanut yield will also decrease, with a 2.5% reduction under the RCP 2.6 scenario, 11.5% reduction under the RCP 4.5 scenario and 30% reduction under the RCP 8.5 scenario, respectively.

  1. UNIFORM FARM OPERATIONS (UFO ON HEMP BROOM RAPE SEED GERMINATION BY BIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANAGEMENT IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad SANI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are a constant problem in agronomy and they not only compete with crops for water, nutrients, sunlight, andspace but also harbor insect and disease pests; clog irrigation and drainage systems; undermine crop quality; anddeposit weed seeds into crop harvests. In order to the microbial herbicide (Orocide influence on seed germinationin Orobancheramosa L., this experiment was conducted in 2011 at Islamic Azad University Shahr-e-Qods Branch inTehran by a completely randomized design with four replications. The factor studied included use of Orocide(0(T1, 2(T2, 4(T3 and 6(T4 percentage. The results showed that the effect of microbial herbicide (Orocide wassignificant on germination percentage of Orobancheramosa. Mean comparison showed that the highest germinationpercentage (79% was achieved by non-application of Orocide and lowest germination percentage (8% wasachieved by application of 4% Orocide.The results of this experiment showed that the use of Orocide can decreasedthe germination in Orobancheramosa L. that is uniform farm operations (UFO very important for weed biologicalcontrol management at Iran.

  2. Assessment of the Environmental Fate of the Herbicides Flufenacet and Metazachlor with the SWAT Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohrer, Nicola; Dietrich, Antje; Kolychalow, Olga; Ulrich, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the environmental fate of the commonly used herbicides flufenacet and metazachlor in the Northern German Lowlands with the ecohydrological Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model) and to test the sensitivity of pesticide-related input parameters on the modeled transport dynamics. The river discharge of the Kielstau watershed was calibrated (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency [NSE], 0.83; = 0.84) and validated (NSE, 0.76; = 0.77) for a daily time step. The environmental fate of metazachlor (NSE, 0.68; = 0.62) and flufenacet (NSE, 0.13; = 0.51) was simulated adequately. In comparison to metazachlor, the simulated flufenacet concentration and loads show a lower model efficiency due to the weaker simulation of the stream flow. The in-stream herbicide loads were less than 0.01% of the applied amount in the observed time period and thus not in conflict with European Environmental Legislation. The sensitivity analysis showed that, besides the accurate simulation of stream flow, the parameterization of the temporal and spatial distribution of the herbicide application throughout the watershed is the key factor for appropriate modeling results, whereas the physicochemical properties of the pesticides play a minor role in the modeling process. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. SWAT Check: A Screening Tool to Assist Users in the Identification of Potential Model Application Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J; Harmel, R Daren; Arnold, Jeff G; Williams, Jimmy R

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a basin-scale hydrologic model developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. SWAT's broad applicability, user-friendly model interfaces, and automatic calibration software have led to a rapid increase in the number of new users. These advancements also allow less experienced users to conduct SWAT modeling applications. In particular, the use of automated calibration software may produce simulated values that appear appropriate because they adequately mimic measured data used in calibration and validation. Autocalibrated model applications (and often those of unexperienced modelers) may contain input data errors and inappropriate parameter adjustments not readily identified by users or the autocalibration software. The objective of this research was to develop a program to assist users in the identification of potential model application problems. The resulting "SWAT Check" is a stand-alone Microsoft Windows program that (i) reads selected SWAT output and alerts users of values outside the typical range; (ii) creates process-based figures for visualization of the appropriateness of output values, including important outputs that are commonly ignored; and (iii) detects and alerts users of common model application errors. By alerting users to potential model application problems, this software should assist the SWAT community in developing more reliable modeling applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Transferability of SWAT Models between SWAT2009 and SWAT2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mijin; Yen, Haw; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Jeong, Jaehak

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has experienced upgrades with enhanced functionalities and modeling capacities as it gets to the current version, SWAT2012. Changes in the SWAT code on a specific process may result in propagating influences in the output of other related processes. In this study, the characteristic significance of the enhancements in SWAT code was investigated using the two recent versions, SWAT2009 and SWAT2012. Using a global optimization technique, each model was calibrated for flow, sediment, and nutrient and then tested for transferability of parameters between the models. Results indicate that flow and water quality output were well calibrated with both models. However, the calibrated parameters determined by SWAT2009 and SWAT2012 were noticeably different, due mostly to the enhancements made in SWAT2012. Our results indicate that only the stream flow result was reliable when the models were upgraded or downgraded between the two versions after calibration. Sediment prediction was marginally reliable. SWAT parameters were nontransferrable if nutrient was the main output. The differences are due to various reasons, such as disparities in algorithms at the process level and propagation of the resulting uncertainty into higher-order processes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Modeling Phosphorus Losses through Surface Runoff and Subsurface Drainage Using ICECREAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongkai; Qi, Zhiming; Zhang, T Q; Tan, C S; Sadhukhan, Debasis

    2018-03-01

    Modeling soil phosphorus (P) losses by surface and subsurface flow pathways is essential in developing successful strategies for P pollution control. We used the ICECREAM model to simultaneously simulate P losses in surface and subsurface flow, as well as to assess effectiveness of field practices in reducing P losses. Monitoring data from a mineral-P-fertilized clay loam field in southwestern Ontario, Canada, were used for calibration and validation. After careful adjustment of model parameters, ICECREAM was shown to satisfactorily simulate all major processes of surface and subsurface P losses. When the calibrated model was used to assess tillage and fertilizer management scenarios, results point to a 10% reduction in total P losses by shifting autumn tillage to spring, and a 25.4% reduction in total P losses by injecting fertilizer rather than broadcasting. Although the ICECREAM model was effective in simulating surface and subsurface P losses when thoroughly calibrated, further testing is needed to confirm these results with manure P application. As illustrated here, successful use of simulation models requires careful verification of model routines and comprehensive calibration to ensure that site-specific processes are accurately represented. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Nutrient Losses during Winter and Summer Storage of Separated and Unseparated Digested Cattle Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzolo, Francesca; Mattachini, Gabriele; Riva, Elisabetta; Provolo, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Management factors affect nutrient loss during animal manure slurry storage in different ways. We conducted a pilot-scale study to evaluate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) losses from unseparated and digested dairy slurry during winter and summer storage. In addition to season, treatments included mechanical separation of digestate into liquid and solid fractions and bimonthly mixing. Chemical analyses were performed every 2 wk for the mixed materials and at the start and end of storage for unmixed materials. The parameters examined allowed us to estimate C and N losses and examine the factors that determine these losses as well as emission patterns. Gas measurements were done every 2 wk to determine the main forms in which gaseous losses occurred. To evaluate the effect of separation, measured losses and emissions of separated liquid and solid fractions were mathematically combined using the mass separation efficiency of the mechanical separator. Nutrient losses were mainly affected by climatic conditions. Losses of C (up to 23%) from unseparated, unmixed digestate and of N (38% from combined separated fractions and from unseparated digestate) were much greater in summer than in winter, when C and N losses were losses ( losses (up to 64 and 90% of total losses, respectively) in summer. Moreover, management practices should limit NH, the main form of N losses (up to 99.5%). Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Guidelines for the use of isotopes of sulfur in soil-plant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element in plant, human and animal nutrition. This publication provides an overview of the sulfur cycle and how isotopic tracers can be used to obtain unique and precise information on the fluxes and movement of S between and within different compartments of the soil-plant system. It provides information on the theory and measurement of 35S and 34S, safety procedures using 35S, preparation of labelled S fertilizers and plant residues, estimation of the quantity of isotope required for different temporal and spatial scales, preparation digestion /extraction and analysis of soil and plant samples and guidelines on comparative advantages with non-nuclear techniques and applications, including case studies and references. It is a timely publication in that greater attention is now being focused on S deficiencies in agriculture, which are becoming more common due to reduced atmospheric accretions from industrial sources and to the reduced use of fertilizer materials that contain sulfur as a secondary nutrient. The sub-programme in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition is committed to the dissemination of information to Member States on the practical applications of nuclear techniques through the IAEA Training Course Series. The present publication is preceded by IAEA-TCS-14 (2001), Use of Isotope and Radiation Methods in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition, and IAEA-TCS-16 (2002), Neutron and Gamma Probes: Their Use in Agronomy.

  8. Uncovering the Minor Contribution of Land-Cover Change in Upland Forests to the Net Carbon Footprint of a Boreal Hydroelectric Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessureault, Pierre-Luc; Boucher, Jean-François; Tremblay, Pascal; Bouchard, Sylvie; Villeneuve, Claude

    2015-07-01

    Hydropower in boreal conditions is generally considered the energy source emitting the least greenhouse gas per kilowatt-hour during its life cycle. The purpose of this study was to assess the relative contribution of the land-use change on the modification of the carbon sinks and sources following the flooding of upland forested territories to create the Eastmain-1 hydroelectric reservoir in Quebec's boreal forest using Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector. Results suggest a carbon sink loss after 100 yr of 300,000 ± 100,000 Mg CO equivalents (COe). A wildfire sensitivity analysis revealed that the ecosystem would have acted as a carbon sink as long as carbon flux estimate resulted in emissions of 4 ± 2 g COe kWh as a contribution to the carbon footprint calculation, one-eighth what was obtained in a recent study that used less precise and less sensitive estimates. Consequently, this study significantly reduces the reported net carbon footprint of this reservoir and reveals how negligible the relative contribution of the land-use change in upland forests to the total net carbon footprint of a hydroelectric reservoir in the boreal zone can be. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: an upcoming era of research on bio-meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Bardin, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Vogel, B.; Leyronas, C.; Ariya, P. A.; Psenner, R.

    2008-01-01

    For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  10. Resistant starch: promise for improving human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Diane F; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized.

  11. Evaluation of Salt Tolerance (NaCl in Tunisian Chili Pepper (Capsicum frutescens L. on Growth, Mineral Analysis and Solutes Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhani, Kaouther

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Every year, more and more land becomes non-productive due to salinity which adversely affects the productivity and quality of most crops that is why salinity becomes a concern to be studied more to understand the mechanisms included and select the tolerant genotypes. In this context, this investigation was carried out to study the impact of NaCl on growth, mineral analysis and solutes synthesis in five Tunisian chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens L. cultivars: Tebourba (Tb, Somaa (Sm, Korba (Kb, Awald Haffouzz (Aw and Souk jedid (Sj. Thus, an experiment took place under greenhouse at Higher Institute of Agronomy, Chott Meriem, Tunisia and stress was induced during two months in water by NaCl (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 g/l. Results showed that increasing salinity stress, for all cultivars, decreases the height and biomass (dry and fresh weight of plant in addition to the relative water content. Also, a decline in K+ and Ca2+ amounts in roots and K+/Na+ ratio was recorded. However, Na+ content in roots and the biosynthesis of soluble sugars and soluble proteins in leaves increased. Awlad Haffouzz and Korba cultivars succefully tolerated highest salinity level by accumulating more K+, Ca2+ in roots and containing the highest concentrations of soluble sugars and soluble protein in their leaves contrary to Souk jedid cultivar, considered as the sensitive cultivar.

  12. Toward a new “Fractals-General Science”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen Taher Dorrah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A recent study has shown that everywhere real systems follow common “fractals-general stacking behavior” during their change pathways (or evolutionary life cycles. This fact leads to the emergence of the new discipline “Fractals-General Science” as a mother-discipline (and acting as upper umbrella of existing natural and applied sciences to commonly handle their fractals-general change behavior. It is, therefore, the main targets of this short communication are to present the motives, objectives, relations with other existing sciences, and the development map of such new science. It is discussed that there are many foreseen illustrative applications in geology, archeology, astronomy, life sciences, ecology, environmental science, hydrology, agronomy, engineering, materials sciences, chemistry, nanotechnology, biology, medicine, psychiatry, sociology, humanities, education, and arts that could effectively lead the implementation and experimentation of such new science. It is highlighted that the new “Fractals-General Science” could provide through multi-stacking representations the necessary platforms for investigating interactions and mutual changes between real life systems belonging to several sciences and disciplines. Examples are handling problems of the processing of basic formation and changes of matter and substances, propagation of combined corrosion, creep, fatigue and sedimentation of engineering and industrial systems, and the progressing of humans’ evolutionary life cycles.

  13. [Pharmacy, one of the emerging sources of new science of technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlot, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Linking pharmacy and oenology seems to be paradox. The school of Medicine and Pharmacy owe their fame to the historical context of the Languedocian Universities. The role of their naturalist professors is less known. Dr Chaptal's thesis discusses the wine chemical constituents. In 1801 he published a book entitled "the Art of making, managing and perfecting wine", inventor of a distillation machine, his name become an eponym "the chaptalisation", which is specific process, for regions less exposed to sunlight, showing that sugar in the must is needed to obtain alcohol. Jules Emile Planchon, professor of botanic science at the Superior School of Pharmacy will discoverer the parasite disease of the phylloxera, a parasite that destroy vineyards. The cure will be the American grafting. The list of professors who worked on vineyards related frauds and diseases is long. Once Analytical chemistry has become part of the curriculum universities, pharmacists, started investigating wine analysis. It will be part of Bromatology, the science of food ingredients. Pharmacists were then able to carry out the first wine analyses sin their laboratory. It is at that time that Paul Jaulmes, professor of Analytical Chemistry who became Director of the international office of vineyards and Wine (OIV) proposed alongside Prof Nègre, director of the National School of Agronomy, the initiation in 1955 of a new diploma oenology. As a renowned toxicologist, Prof. Jaulmes will lead the committee in charge of the oenology Standards.

  14. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: research challenges concerning the impact of airborne micro-organisms on the atmosphere and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Bardin, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Vogel, B.; Leyronas, C.; Ariya, P. A.; Psenner, R.

    2011-01-01

    For the past 200 years, the field of aerobiology has explored the abundance, diversity, survival and transport of micro-organisms in the atmosphere. Micro-organisms have been explored as passive and severely stressed riders of atmospheric transport systems. Recently, an interest in the active roles of these micro-organisms has emerged along with proposals that the atmosphere is a global biome for microbial metabolic activity and perhaps even multiplication. As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and roles in atmospheric processes of biological particles in the atmosphere, here we describe the pertinence of questions relating to the potential roles that air-borne micro-organisms might play in meteorological phenomena. For the upcoming era of research on the role of air-borne micro-organisms in meteorological phenomena, one important challenge is to go beyond descriptions of abundance of micro-organisms in the atmosphere toward an understanding of their dynamics in terms of both biological and physico-chemical properties and of the relevant transport processes at different scales. Another challenge is to develop this understanding under contexts pertinent to their potential role in processes related to atmospheric chemistry, the formation of clouds, precipitation and radiative forcing. This will require truly interdisciplinary approaches involving collaborators from the biological and physical sciences, from disciplines as disparate as agronomy, microbial genetics and atmosphere physics, for example.

  15. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  16. Investment in plant research and development bears fruit in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kang; Xu, Zhihong

    2014-04-01

    Recent rapid progress in plant science and biotechnology in China demonstrates that China's stronger support for funding in plant research and development (R&D) has borne fruit. Chinese groups have contributed major advances in a range of fields, such as rice biology, plant hormone and developmental biology, genomics and evolution, plant genetics and epigenetics, as well as plant biotechnology. Strigolactone studies including those identifying its receptor and dissecting its complex structure and signaling are representative of the recent researches from China at the forefront of the field. These advances are attributable in large part to interdisciplinary studies among scientists from plant science, chemistry, bioinformatics, structural biology, and agronomy. The platforms provided by national facilities facilitate this collaboration. As well, efficient restructuring of the top-down organization of state programs and free exploration of scientists' interests have accelerated achievements by Chinese researchers. Here, we provide a general outline of China's progress in plant R&D to highlight fields in which Chinese research has made significant contributions.

  17. Total phenolic content, radical scavenging properties, and essential oil composition of Origanum species from different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambolena, José S; Zunino, María P; Lucini, Enrique I; Olmedo, Rubén; Banchio, Erika; Bima, Paula J; Zygadlo, Julio A

    2010-01-27

    The aim of this work was to compare the antiradical activity, total phenol content (TPC), and essential oil composition of Origanum vulgare spp. virens, Origanum x applii, Origanum x majoricum, and O. vulgare spp. vulgare cultivated in Argentina in different localities. The experiment was conducted in the research station of La Consulta (INTA-Mendoza), the research station of Santa Lucia (INTA-San Juan), and Agronomy Faculty of National University of La Pampa, from 2007 to 2008. The composition of the essential oils of oregano populations was independent of cultivation conditions. In total, 39 compounds were identified in essential oils of oregano from Argentina by means of GC-MS. Thymol and trans-sabinene hydrate were the most prominent compounds, followed by gamma-terpinene, terpinen-4-ol, and alpha-terpinene. O. vulgare vulgare is the only Origanum studied which is rich in gamma-terpinene. Among tested oregano, O. x majoricum showed the highest essential oil content, 3.9 mg g(-1) dry matter. The plant extract of O. x majoricum had greater total phenol content values, 19.36 mg/g dry weight, than the rest of oregano studied. To find relationships among TPC, free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), and climate variables, canonical correlations were calculated. The results obtained allow us to conclude that 70% of the TPC and FRSA variability can be explained by the climate variables (R(2) = 0.70; p = 8.3 x 10(-6)), the temperature being the most important climatic variable.

  18. Effect of Seed Distribution and Population on Maize (Zea mays L. Grain Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Khim Chim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize planting is normally accomplished by hand in the developing world where two or more seeds are placed per hill with a heterogeneous plant spacing and density. To understand the interaction between seed distribution and distance between hills, experiments were established in 2012 and 2013 at Lake Carl Blackwell (LCB and Efaw Agronomy Research Stations, near Stillwater, OK. A randomized complete block design was used with three replications and 9 treatments and a factorial treatment structure of 1, 2, and 3 seeds per hill using interrow spacing of 0.16, 0.32, and 0.48 m. Data for normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR, grain yield, and grain N uptake were collected. Results showed that, on average, NDVI and IPAR increased with number of seeds per hill and decreased with increasing plant spacing. In three of four site-years, planting 1 or 2 seeds per hill, 0.16 m apart, increased grain yield and N uptake. Over sites, planting 1 seed, every 0.16 m, increased yields by an average of 1.15 Mg ha−1 (range: 0.33 to 2.46 Mg ha−1 when compared to the farmer practice of placing 2 to 3 seeds per hill, every 0.48 m.

  19. Comprehensive nitrogen budgets for controlled tile drainage fields in eastern ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, M D; Craiovan, E; Topp, E; Gottschall, N; Drury, C F; Lapen, D R

    2014-03-01

    Excessive N loading from subsurface tile drainage has been linked to water quality degradation. Controlled tile drainage (CTD) has the potential to reduce N losses via tile drainage and boost crop yields. While CTD can reduce N loss from tile drainage, it may increase losses through other pathways. A multiple-year field-scale accounting of major N inputs and outputs during the cropping season was conducted on freely drained and controlled tile drained agricultural fields under corn ( L.)-soybean [ (L.) Merr.] production systems in eastern Ontario, Canada. Greater predicted gaseous N emissions for corn and soybean and greater observed lateral seepage N losses were observed for corn and soybean fields under CTD relative to free-draining fields. However, observed N losses from tile were significantly lower for CTD fields, in relation to freely drained fields. Changes in residual soil N were essentially equivalent between drainage treatments, while mass balance residual terms were systematically negative (slightly more so for CTD). Increases in plant N uptake associated with CTD were observed, probably resulting in higher grain yields for corn and soybean. This study illustrates the benefits of CTD in decreasing subsurface tile drainage N losses and boosting crop yields, while demonstrating the potential for CTD to increase N losses via other pathways related to gaseous emissions and groundwater seepage. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Potential Environmental Benefits from Blending Biosolids with Other Organic Amendments before Application to Land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Dickinson, Nicholas M; Clough, Timothy J; Horswell, Jacqui; Robinson, Brett H

    2017-05-01

    Biosolids disposal to landfill or through incineration is wasteful of a resource that is rich in organic matter and plant nutrients. Land application can improve soil fertility and enhance crop production but may result in excessive nitrate N (NO-N) leaching and residual contamination from pathogens, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. This paper evaluates evidence that these concerns can be reduced significantly by blending biosolids with organic materials to reduce the environmental impact of biosolids application to soils. It appears feasible to combine organic waste streams for use as a resource to build or amend degraded soils. Sawdust and partially pyrolyzed biochars provide an opportunity to reduce the environmental impact of biosolids application, with studies showing reductions of NO-N leaching of 40 to 80%. However, other organic amendments including lignite coal waste may result in excessive NO-N leaching. Field trials combining biosolids and biochars for rehabilitation of degraded forest and ecological restoration are recommended. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Phenological growth stages of saffron plant (Crocus sativus L. according to the BBCH Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Lopez-Corcoles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenological studies are important for understanding the influence of climate dynamics on vegetative growth, flowering and fruiting on plants and can be used in many scientific subjects, such as Agronomy, Botany and Plant Biology, but also Climatology as a result of the current global interest in climate change monitoring. The purpose of the detailed specific culture descriptions of the principal growth stages in plants is to provide an instrument for standardization of data recording. To date, there was no coding method to describe developmental stages on saffron plant (Crocus sativus L.. Because of the increasing world-wide interest on this crop, a novel growth development code based on the BBCH extended scale is proposed in this paper. Six principal growth stages were set up, starting from sprouting, cataphylls and flowers appearance, plant appearance and development, replacement corms development, plant senescence and corm dormancy. Each principal growth stage is subdivided into secondary growth stages. Descriptive keys with illustrations are included to make effective use of the system.

  2. Phenological growth stages of saffron plant (Crocus sativus L.) according to the BBCH Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Corcoles, H.; Brasa-Ramos, A.; Montero-Garcia, F.; Romero-Valverde, M.; Montero-Riquelme, F.

    2015-07-01

    Phenological studies are important for understanding the influence of climate dynamics on vegetative growth, flowering and fruiting on plants and can be used in many scientific subjects, such as Agronomy, Botany and Plant Biology, but also Climatology as a result of the current global interest in climate change monitoring. The purpose of the detailed specific culture descriptions of the principal growth stages in plants is to provide an instrument for standardization of data recording. To date, there was no coding method to describe developmental stages on saffron plant (Crocus sativus L.). Because of the increasing world-wide interest on this crop, a novel growth development code based on the BBCH extended scale is proposed in this paper. Six principal growth stages were set up, starting from sprouting, cataphylls and flowers appearance, plant appearance and development, replacement corms development, plant senescence and corm dormancy. Each principal growth stage is subdivided into secondary growth stages. Descriptive keys with illustrations are included to make effective use of the system. (Author)

  3. Formation of the research competence of future breeder-geneticists during the practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Павлівна Антіпова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article were analyzed content, structure and special features of the practical training of the future breeder-geneticists. There was specified that for bachelor breeder-geneticists of the 6.090101 “Agronomy” training direction are provided the following practices: botany, tractors and cars, soil science, agricultural machines, fruit growing, vegetable growing, agriculture, agrochemistry, plant growing, entomology, phytopathology, technology of retreatment and preservation of plant growing production, selection and seed growing of agricultural crops; work practice on agronomy.In the article was grounded the structural-logic scheme of organization of practices of the future breeder-geneticists for forming their professional research competences. There were analyzed functions and methods of scientific-cognitive activity, forms, means and methods of the practical education. According to the types of practices there were elucidated and grounded the structure of practical training of the future breeder-geneticists – natural-technical and special-professional – educational and work practices.The natural-technical, special-professional and production-technological practices form in bachelor agronomists breeder-geneticists professional scientific-research competences: theoretical-analytical ones – geosphere, bio-geo-physical-chemical, meteorological-climatological, informative, fundamental and applied ecological, fundamental-scientific agrosphere; professional competences of professionally oriented and special practical training – agricultural, branch, techno-service, technological, selective, special-genetic-engineering ones; managerial ones

  4. Epi-fingerprinting and epi-interventions for improved crop production and food quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS Marcelino Rodriguez Lopez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing crop production at a time of rapid climate change represents the greatest challenge facing contemporary agricultural research. Our understanding of the genetic control of yield derives from controlled field experiments designed to minimise environmental variance. In spite of these efforts there is substantial residual variability among plants attributable to Genotype x Environment (GxE interactions. Recent advances in the field of epigenetics have revealed a plethora of gene control mechanisms that could account for much of this unassigned variation. These systems act as a regulatory interface between the perception of the environment and associated alterations in gene expression. Direct intervention of epigenetic control systems hold the enticing promise of creating new sources of variability that could enhance crop performance. Equally, understanding the relationship between various epigenetic states and responses of the crop to specific aspects of the growing environment (epigenetic fingerprinting could allow for a more tailored approach to plant agronomy. In this review, we explore the many ways in which epigenetic interventions and epigenetic fingerprinting can be deployed for the improvement of crop production and quality.

  5. Options for support to agriculture and food security under climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeulen, S.J.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Ainslie, A.; Angelone, C.; Campbell, B.M.; Challinor, A.J.; Hansen, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture and food security are key sectors for intervention under climate change. Agricultural production is highly vulnerable even to 2C (low-end) predictions for global mean temperatures in 2100, with major implications for rural poverty and for both rural and urban food security. Agriculture also presents untapped opportunities for mitigation, given the large land area under crops and rangeland, and the additional mitigation potential of aquaculture. This paper presents a summary of current knowledge on options to support farmers, particularly smallholder farmers, in achieving food security through agriculture under climate change. Actions towards adaptation fall into two broad overlapping areas: (1) accelerated adaptation to progressive climate change over decadal time scales, for example integrated packages of technology, agronomy and policy options for farmers and food systems, and (2) better management of agricultural risks associated with increasing climate variability and extreme events, for example improved climate information services and safety nets. Maximization of agriculture's mitigation potential will require investments in technological innovation and agricultural intensification linked to increased efficiency of inputs, and creation of incentives and monitoring systems that are inclusive of smallholder farmers. Food systems faced with climate change need urgent, broad-based action in spite of uncertainties.

  6. Winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting system based on remote sensing and environmental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiyang, Yu; Yanmei, Liu; Guijun, Yang; Xiaodong, Yang; Chenwei, Nie; Dong, Ren

    2014-01-01

    To achieve dynamic winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting in larger scale regions, the objective of this study was to design and develop a winter wheat quality monitoring and forecasting system by using a remote sensing index and environmental factors. The winter wheat quality trend was forecasted before the harvest and quality was monitored after the harvest, respectively. The traditional quality-vegetation index from remote sensing monitoring and forecasting models were improved. Combining with latitude information, the vegetation index was used to estimate agronomy parameters which were related with winter wheat quality in the early stages for forecasting the quality trend. A combination of rainfall in May, temperature in May, illumination at later May, the soil available nitrogen content and other environmental factors established the quality monitoring model. Compared with a simple quality-vegetation index, the remote sensing monitoring and forecasting model used in this system get greatly improved accuracy. Winter wheat quality was monitored and forecasted based on the above models, and this system was completed based on WebGIS technology. Finally, in 2010 the operation process of winter wheat quality monitoring system was presented in Beijing, the monitoring and forecasting results was outputted as thematic maps

  7. 'I am an Intensive Guy': The Possibility and Conditions of Reconciliation Through the Ecological Intensification Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levain, Alix; Vertès, Françoise; Ruiz, Laurent; Delaby, Luc; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Barbier, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The need for better conciliation between food production and environmental protection calls for new conceptual approaches in agronomy. Ecological intensification (EI) is one of the most encouraging and successful conceptual frameworks for designing more sustainable agricultural systems, though relying upon semantic ambivalences and epistemic tensions. This article discusses abilities and limits of the EI framework in the context of strong social and environmental pressure for agricultural transition. The purpose is thus to put EI at stake in the light of the results of an interdisciplinary and participatory research project that explicitly adopted EI goals in livestock semi-industrialized farming systems. Is it possible to maintain livestock production systems that are simultaneously productive, sustainable, and viable and have low nitrate emissions in vulnerable coastal areas? If so, how do local stakeholders use these approaches? The main steps of the innovation process are described. The effects of political and social dynamics on the continuity of the transition process are analyzed, with a reflexive approach. This experiment invites one to consider that making EI operational in a context of socio-technical transition toward agroecology represents system innovation, requiring on-going dialogue, reflexivity, and long-term involvement by researchers.

  8. `I am an Intensive Guy': The Possibility and Conditions of Reconciliation Through the Ecological Intensification Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levain, Alix; Vertès, Françoise; Ruiz, Laurent; Delaby, Luc; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Barbier, Marc

    2015-11-01

    The need for better conciliation between food production and environmental protection calls for new conceptual approaches in agronomy. Ecological intensification (EI) is one of the most encouraging and successful conceptual frameworks for designing more sustainable agricultural systems, though relying upon semantic ambivalences and epistemic tensions. This article discusses abilities and limits of the EI framework in the context of strong social and environmental pressure for agricultural transition. The purpose is thus to put EI at stake in the light of the results of an interdisciplinary and participatory research project that explicitly adopted EI goals in livestock semi-industrialized farming systems. Is it possible to maintain livestock production systems that are simultaneously productive, sustainable, and viable and have low nitrate emissions in vulnerable coastal areas? If so, how do local stakeholders use these approaches? The main steps of the innovation process are described. The effects of political and social dynamics on the continuity of the transition process are analyzed, with a reflexive approach. This experiment invites one to consider that making EI operational in a context of socio-technical transition toward agroecology represents system innovation, requiring on-going dialogue, reflexivity, and long-term involvement by researchers.

  9. Organic No-Till Systems in Eastern Canada: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Halde

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than a decade, studies have aimed to adapt the agronomy of organic no-till systems for the environmental conditions of Eastern Canada. Most research on organic no-till practices in Eastern Canada has been conducted in the province of Québec, where 4% of farms are certified organic, and results from these trials have been published in technical reports available in French. The objective of this review was to revisit previous research work on organic farming in Eastern Canada—the majority of which has been published as technical reports in the French language—in order to highlight important findings and to identify information gaps. Cover crop-based rotational no-till systems for organic grain and horticultural cropping systems will be the main focus of this review. Overall, a few trials have demonstrated that organic rotational no-till can be successful and profitable in warmer and more productive regions of Eastern Canada, but its success can vary over years. The variability in the success of organic rotational no-till systems is the reason for the slow adoption of the system by organic farmers. On-going research focuses on breeding early-maturing fall rye, and terminating cover crops and weeds with the use of bioherbicides.

  10. Use of an exchange method to estimate the association and dissociation rate constants of cadmium complexes formed with low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, André; Nguyen, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Organic acids released from plant roots can form complexes with cadmium (Cd) in the soil solution and influence metal bioavailability not only due to the nature and concentration of the complexes but also due to their lability. The lability of a complex influences its ability to buffer changes in the concentration of free ions (Cd); it depends on the association (, m mol s) and dissociation (, s) rate constants. A resin exchange method was used to estimate and (m mol s), which is the conditional estimate of depending on the calcium (Ca) concentration in solution. The constants were estimated for oxalate, citrate, and malate, three low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots and expected to strongly influence Cd uptake by plants. For all three organic acids, the and estimates were around 2.5 10 m mol s and 1.3 × 10 s, respectively. Based on the literature, these values indicate that the Cd- low-molecular-weight organic acids complexes formed between Cd and low-molecular-weight organic acids may be less labile than complexes formed with soil soluble organic matter but more labile than those formed with aminopolycarboxylic chelates. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. The Potential Role of Neglected and Underutilised Crop Species as Future Crops under Water Scarce Conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Chivenge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern agricultural systems that promote cultivation of a very limited number of crop species have relegated indigenous crops to the status of neglected and underutilised crop species (NUCS. The complex interactions of water scarcity associated with climate change and variability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA, and population pressure require innovative strategies to address food insecurity and undernourishment. Current research efforts have identified NUCS as having potential to reduce food and nutrition insecurity, particularly for resource poor households in SSA. This is because of their adaptability to low input agricultural systems and nutritional composition. However, what is required to promote NUCS is scientific research including agronomy, breeding, post-harvest handling and value addition, and linking farmers to markets. Among the essential knowledge base is reliable information about water utilisation by NUCS with potential for commercialisation. This commentary identifies and characterises NUCS with agronomic potential in SSA, especially in the semi-arid areas taking into consideration inter alia: (i what can grow under water-scarce conditions, (ii water requirements, and (iii water productivity. Several representative leafy vegetables, tuber crops, cereal crops and grain legumes were identified as fitting the NUCS category. Agro-biodiversity remains essential for sustainable agriculture.

  12. Integrating the Fenton's Process with Biofiltration by to Reduce Chemical Oxygen Demand of Winery Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipolo, Marco; Martins, Rui C; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M; Costa, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    The discharge of poorly decontaminated winery wastewater remains a serious environmental problem in many regions, and the industry is welcoming improved treatment methods. Here, an innovative decontamination approach integrating Fenton's process with biofiltration by Asian clams is proposed. The potential of this approach was assessed at the pilot scale using real effluent and by taking an actual industrial treatment system as a benchmark. Fenton peroxidation was observed to remove 84% of the effluent's chemical oxygen demand (COD), reducing it to 205 mg L. Subsequent biofiltration decreased the effluent's COD to approximately zero, well below the legal discharge limit of 150 mg L, in just 3 d. The reduction of the effluent's organic load through Fenton's process did not decrease its toxicity toward , but the effluent was much less harmful after biofiltration. The performance of the treatment proposed exceeded that of the integrated Fenton's process-sequencing batch reactor design implemented in the winery practice, where a residence time of around 10 d in the biological step typically results in 80 to 90% of COD removal. The method proposed is effective and compatible with typical winery budgets and potentially contributes to the management of a nuisance species. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Large-scale hydrological simulations using the soil water assessment tool, protocol development, and application in the danube basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliero, Liliana; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Willems, Patrick; Diels, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The Water Framework Directive of the European Union requires member states to achieve good ecological status of all water bodies. A harmonized pan-European assessment of water resources availability and quality, as affected by various management options, is necessary for a successful implementation of European environmental legislation. In this context, we developed a methodology to predict surface water flow at the pan-European scale using available datasets. Among the hydrological models available, the Soil Water Assessment Tool was selected because its characteristics make it suitable for large-scale applications with limited data requirements. This paper presents the results for the Danube pilot basin. The Danube Basin is one of the largest European watersheds, covering approximately 803,000 km and portions of 14 countries. The modeling data used included land use and management information, a detailed soil parameters map, and high-resolution climate data. The Danube Basin was divided into 4663 subwatersheds of an average size of 179 km. A modeling protocol is proposed to cope with the problems of hydrological regionalization from gauged to ungauged watersheds and overparameterization and identifiability, which are usually present during calibration. The protocol involves a cluster analysis for the determination of hydrological regions and multiobjective calibration using a combination of manual and automated calibration. The proposed protocol was successfully implemented, with the modeled discharges capturing well the overall hydrological behavior of the basin. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. The global dispersion of pathogenic microorganisms by dust storms and its relevance to agriculture: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W.

    2014-01-01

    Dust storms move an estimated 500–5000 Tg of soil through Earth’s atmosphere every year. Dust-storm transport of topsoils may have positive effects such as fertilization of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and the evolution of soils in proximal and distal environments. Negative effects may include the stripping of nutrient-rich topsoils from source regions, sandblasting of plant life in downwind environments, the fertilization of harmful algal blooms, and the transport of toxins (e.g., metals, pesticides, herbicides, etc.) and pathogenic microorganisms. With respect to the long-range dispersion of microorganisms and more specifically pathogens, research is just beginning to demonstrate the quantity and diversity of organisms that can survive this type of transport. Most studies to date have utilized different assays to identify microorganisms and microbial communities using predominately culture-based, and more recently nonculture-based, methodologies. There is a clear need for international-scale research efforts that apply standardized methods to advance this field of science. Here we present a review of dust-borne microorganisms with a focus on their relevance to agronomy.

  15. Embracing Complexity of Crop Phytobiomes with a Multidisciplinary Roadmap for Phytobiomes Research and an Industry-Academic Research Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversole, K.

    2016-12-01

    To meet the demands of a global human population expected to exceed 9.6 billion by 2055, crop productivity in sustainable agricultural systems must improve considerably in the face of a steadily changing climate and increased biotic and abiotic stressors. Traditional agricultural sciences have relied mostly on research within individual disciplines and linear, reductionist approaches for crop improvement. While significant advancements have been made in developing and characterizing genetic and genomic resources for crops, we still have a very limited understanding of genotype by environment x management (GxExM) interactions that determine productivity, sustainability, quality, and the ability to withstand biotic and abiotic stressors. Embracing complexity and the non-linear organization and regulation of biological systems would enable a paradigm shift in breeding and crop production by allowing us to move towards a holistic, systems level approach that integrates a wide range of disciplines (e.g., geophysics, biology, agronomy, physiology, genomics, genetics, breeding, physics, pattern recognition, feedback loops, modeling, and engineering) and knowledge about crop phytobiomes (i.e., plants, their associated macro- and micro-organisms, and the geophysical environment of distinct geographical sites). By focusing on the phytobiome, we will be able to elucidate, quantify, model, predict, act, manipulate, and prevent and ultimately prescribe the cropping systems, methods, and management practices most suited for a particular farm, grassland, or forest. The recently released, multidisciplinary roadmap entitled Phytobiomes: A Roadmap for Research and Translation and the new International Alliance for Phytobiomes Research, an industry-academic consortium, will be presented.

  16. Assessment of potential soil degradation on agricultural land in the czech republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarapatka, Bořivoj; Bednář, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts have been made worldwide to develop methods to identify the areas most threatened by soil degradation. Some soils in afflicted areas may be irreversibly degraded and thus have very little resilience (the ability to restore themselves). For the purpose of assessing the current state of soil degradation in the Czech Republic (CZ) we have developed an overall indicator of land vulnerability to the threat of soil degradation on the basis of individual factors that contribute to soil degradation and are monitored on a long-term basis in various research worksites in the CZ. Individual degradation factors were divided into two groups: chemical and physical degradation. On the basis of principal component analysis, individual degradation factors were assigned a specific weight of influence. With the use of a GIS, the input factors of degradation were combined to create maps of chemical and physical soil degradation, and consequently a map of overall degradation-threatened soils for the CZ, along with a map of areas differentiated according to the prevailing type of degradation. Results showed that, at present, the most important degradation factor in the CZ is water erosion, followed by loss of organic matter. Statistical analysis showed that approximately 51% of agricultural land is moderately threatened in the CZ. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Yield and Water Quality Impacts of Field-Scale Integration of Willow into a Continuous Corn Rotation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumpf, Colleen; Ssegane, Herbert; Negri, Maria Cristina; Campbell, Patty; Cacho, Julian

    2017-07-01

    Agricultural landscape design has gained recognition by the international environmental and development community as a strategy to address multiple goals in land, water, and ecosystem service management; however, field research is needed to quantify impacts on specific local environments. The production of bioenergy crops in specific landscape positions within a grain-crop field can serve the dual purpose of producing cellulosic biomass (nutrient recovery) while also providing regulating ecosystem services to improve water quality (nutrient reduction). The effectiveness of such a landscape design was evaluated by the strategic placement of a 0.8-ha short-rotation shrub willow ( Seemen) bioenergy buffer along marginal soils in a 6.5-ha corn ( L.) field in a 6-yr field study in central Illinois. The impact of willow integration on water quality (soil water, shallow groundwater leaching, and crop nutrient uptake) and quantity (soil moisture and transpiration) was monitored in comparison with corn in the willow's first cycle of growth. Willows significantly reduced nitrate leachate in shallow subsurface water by 88% while maintaining adequate nutrient and water usage. Results suggest that willows offer an efficient nutrient-reduction strategy and may provide additional ecosystem services and benefits, including enhanced soil health. However, low values for calculated willow biomass will need to be readdressed in the future as harvest data become available to understand contributing factors that affected productivity beyond nutrient availability. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Genotype, environment, seeding rate, and top-dressed nitrogen effects on end-use quality of modern Nebraska winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Madhav; Regassa, Teshome; Rose, Devin J; Baenziger, P Stephen; Eskridge, Kent M; Santra, Dipak K; Poudel, Rachana

    2017-12-01

    Fine-tuning production inputs such as seeding rate, nitrogen (N), and genotype may improve end-use quality of hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivium L.) when growing conditions are unpredictable. Studies were conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm (ARF; Lincoln, NE, USA) and the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory (HPAL; Sidney, NE, USA) in 2014 and 2015 in Nebraska, USA, to determine the effects of genotype (6), environment (4), seeding rate (3), and flag leaf top-dressed N (0 and 34 kg N ha -1 ) on the end-use quality of winter wheat. End-use quality traits were influenced by environment, genotype, seeding rate, top-dressed N, and their interactions. Mixograph parameters had a strong correlation with grain volume weight and flour yield. Doubling the recommended seeding rate and N at the flag leaf stage increased grain protein content by 8.1% in 2014 and 1.5% in 2015 at ARF and 4.2% in 2014 and 8.4% in 2015 at HPAL. The key finding of this research is that increasing seeding rates up to double the current recommendations with N at the flag leaf stage improved most of the end-use quality traits. This will have a significant effect on the premium for protein a farmer could receive when marketing wheat. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Barium as a potential indicator of phosphorus in agricultural runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Djodjic, Faruk; Wallin, Mats

    2012-01-01

    In many catchments, anthropogenic input of contaminants, and in particular phosphorus (P), into surface water is a mixture of agricultural and sewage runoff. Knowledge about the relative contribution from each of these sources is vital for mitigation of major environmental problems such as eutrophication. In this study, we investigated whether the distribution of trace elements in surface waters can be used to trace the contamination source. Water from three groups of streams was investigated: streams influenced only by agricultural runoff, streams influenced mainly by sewage runoff, and reference streams. Samples were collected at different flow regimes and times of year and analyzed for 62 elements using ICP-MS. Our results show that there are significant differences between the anthropogenic sources affecting the streams in terms of total element composition and individual elements, indicating that the method has the potential to trace anthropogenic impact on surface waters. The elements that show significant differences between sources are strontium (p barium (p barium shows the greatest potential as a tracer for an individual source of anthropogenic input to surface waters. We observed a strong relationship between barium and total P in the investigated samples (R(2) = 0.78), which could potentially be used to apportion anthropogenic sources of P and thereby facilitate targeting of mitigation practices. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried

    2005-08-01

    Water in its different forms has always been a source of wonder, curiosity and practical concern for humans everywhere. Hydrology - An Introduction presents a coherent introduction to the fundamental principles of hydrology, based on the course that Wilfried Brutsaert has taught at Cornell University for the last thirty years. Hydrologic phenomena are dealt with at spatial and temporal scales at which they occur in nature. The physics and mathematics necessary to describe these phenomena are introduced and developed, and readers will require a working knowledge of calculus and basic fluid mechanics. The book will be invaluable as a textbook for entry-level courses in hydrology directed at advanced seniors and graduate students in physical science and engineering. In addition, the book will be more broadly of interest to professional scientists and engineers in hydrology, environmental science, meteorology, agronomy, geology, climatology, oceanology, glaciology and other earth sciences. Emphasis on fundamentals Clarification of the underlying physical processes Applications of fluid mechanics in the natural environment