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Sample records for agroecological zones

  1. Dynamic Agroecological Zones for the Inland Pacific Northwest, USA

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    Huggins, D. R.; Rupp, R.; Gessler, P.; Pan, W.; Brown, D. J.; Machado, S.; Walden, V. P.; Eigenbrode, S.; Abatzoglou, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Agroecological zones (AEZ's) have traditionally been defined by integrating multiple layers of biophysical (e.g. climate, soil, terrain) and occasionally socioeconomic data to create unique zones with specific ranges of land use constraints and potentials. Our approach to defining AEZ's assumes that current agricultural land uses have emerged as a consequence of biophysical and socioeconomic drivers. Therefore, we explore the concept that AEZ's can be derived from classifying the geographic distribution of current agricultural systems (e.g. the wheat-fallow cropping system zone) based on spatially geo-referenced annual cropland use data that is currently available through the National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS). By defining AEZ's in this way, we expect to: (1) provide baseline information that geographically delineates the boundaries of current AEZ's and subzones and therefore the capacity to evaluate shifts in AEZ boundaries over time; (2) assess the biophysical (e.g. climate, soils, terrain) and socioeconomic factors (e.g. commodity prices) that are most useful for predicting and correctly classifying current AEZ's, subzones or future shifts in AEZ boundaries; (3) identify and develop AEZ-relevant climate mitigation and adaptation strategies; and (4) integrate biophysical and socioeconomic data sources to pursue a transdisciplinary examination of climate-driven AEZ futures. Achieving these goals will aid in realizing major objectives for a USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, Cooperative Agricultural Project entitled "Regional Approaches to Climate Change (REACCH) for Pacific Northwest Agriculture". REACCH is a research, education and extension project under the leadership of the University of Idaho with significant collaboration from Washington State University, Oregon State University and the USDA Agricultural Research Service that is working towards increasing the capacity of Inland Pacific

  2. Genetic Diversity of Parkia biglobosa from Different Agroecological Zones of Nigeria Using RAPD Markers

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    Oluwafemi Amusa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkia biglobosa (Jacq. is an important leguminous tree crop in the African Savannahs useful to the natives where it is found, for domestic use. Previous diversity studies on this tree crop had been majorly on morphological and biochemical analysis. In order to capture the maximum diversity not obtained by previous research, the study aimed at evaluating the genetic diversity of accessions of this crop in the different agroecological zones in Nigeria using RAPD markers. A total of 81 scorable bands with an average of 8.1 bands per primer were amplified among the accessions studied. Intrazonal genetic diversity analysis showed a percentage polymorphism with a range of 11.11% to 65.43% among the agroecological zones studied. Although, gene diversity was highest within Humid forest agroecological zone, a low genetic distance and high genetic similarity between the agroecological zones were observed. Cluster analysis indicated six main groups of which four groups had single accessions while the two groups clustered the remaining accessions, indicating a narrowed genetic base from the 23 accessions studied.

  3. Ectoparasites of sheep in three agro-ecological zones in central Oromia, Ethiopia

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    Bersissa Kumsa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors for ectoparasites infestation in sheep in three agro-ecological zones in central Oromia, Ethiopia, from October 2009 to April 2010. The study revealed that 637 (48.1% of the 1325 sheep examined were infested with one or more ectoparasites. The ectoparasites identified were Bovicola ovis (27.2%, Melophagus ovinus (16.4%, Ctenocephalides sp. (2.3%, Linognathus africanus (1.2%, Linognathus ovillus (0.3%, Sarcoptes sp. (1.2%, Amblyomma variegatum (4.4%, Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (1.9%, Rhipicephalus pravus (1.9%, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus (1.1%, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (0.9%, Rhipicephalus praetextatus (1.1% and Hyalomma truncatum (1.6%. Statistically significant difference was observed in prevalence of B. ovis amongst study agroecological zones: highland 36.6%, midland 20.9% and lowland 14.0%. Significantly higher prevalence was recorded in highland agroecological zone. A significantly (OR = 0.041, p 0.05 was never recorded in the prevalence of all the identified species of ectoparasites between male and female sheep hosts. However, a significantly (p = 0.006 higher prevalence of B. ovis was recorded between young and adult sheep. The risk of B. ovis infestation was 1.45 times higher in young than the adult sheep. Furthermore, a significantly (p < 0.001 higher prevalence of M. ovinus, B. ovis and Sarcoptes sp. was found between sheep with poor and a good body condition. The ever increasing threat of ectoparasites on overall sheep productivity and tanning industry in Ethiopia warrants urgent control intervention. Further studies on the role of ectoparasites in transmission of diseases to sheep, zoonotic importance, comparative prevalence and load, and the importance of sheep as alternative hosts in different agroecological zones, breeds and management systems in Ethiopia are recommended so as to design applicable control programme in the country.

  4. Resource use and food self-sufficiency at farm scale within two agro-ecological zones of Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucagu, C.; Vanlauwe, B.; Wijk, van M.T.; Giller, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Resource use and management are major determinants of the food self-sufficiency of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was conducted in Rwanda in two contrasting agro-ecological zones (Central plateau and Buberuka) to characterise farms, quantify their resource flows, and evaluate the

  5. Simulated potential and water-limited yields of cocoa under different agro-ecological zones in Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zabawi, A.G.M.; Gerritsma, W.

    2009-01-01

    The yield of cocoa under potential and water-limited production levels in different agro-ecological zones was simulated using cocoa model CASE2. For both production levels, the yield was simulated using five years of elirnatic data (1991-1995) and plant data of three-year-old plant. The results show

  6. Relative Technical Efficiency of Cassava Farmers in the Three Agro-Ecological Zones of Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhabor, P. O.; Emokaro, C. O.

    This study employed the use of the Stochastic Frontier Production Function in the comparative economic analysis of the relative technical efficiency of cassava farmers in the three agro-ecological zones of Edo State. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select 156 cassava farmers from the three agro-ecological zones of the State and the differences in the results obtained were discussed. The empirical estimates showed individual technical efficiency values that ranged from 23 to 95%, 43 to 97% and 52 to 98% with a mean of 72, 83 and 91%, for Edo South, Edo North and Edo Central agro-ecological zones, respectively. This shows that systemic differences in relative technical efficiency levels exist between the three zones and these differences were shown to be related to particular farmer`s characteristics. Non-physical factors that served as determinants of technical inefficiency in the three zones were, farmers level of education, age, farming experience and variety of planting materials used. Gender and family size were however, not found to be significant determinants of the technical inefficiency of cassava farmers in the State. Apart from this estimates serving as a guide to potential investors in the cassava industry in the State, the relative variations in technical efficiency is also an indication of the gaps that exist in the current production technologies employed by cassava farmers in the three agro-ecological zones of the State. The gaps should serve as intervention points for government and non-governmental agencies as well as other stakeholders in the emerging cassava industry in Nigeria.

  7. Economics of milk production of major dairy buffalo breeds by agro-ecological zones in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to compare costs of rearing and returns received from major dairy buffalo breeds (Nili-Ravi and Kundhi) in various agro-ecological zones of Pakistan. For this purpose, 219 buffalo farmers were randomly selected from mixed and rice-wheat cropping zones of Punjab and Sindh provinces, mixed cropping zone of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, coastal zone of Sindh and mountainous-AJK. Of these, 155 and 64 were Nili-Ravi and Kundhi buffalo breed farmers, respectively. The study revealed that among the structure of cost components, feed cost occupied the major share in total cost of milk production. Milk production of buffaloes of Nili-Ravi and Kundhi breeds were 2889 and 2375 liter per annum, respectively. Total costs of milk production of Nili-Ravi and Kundhi buffalo breeds were Rs.96155 and Rs.90604 per annum, respectively. Net income per liter from milk of Nili-Ravi and Kundhi breeds was Rs.12 and Rs.11, and benefit-cost ratios were 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. Hence, Nili-Ravi buffalo breed is more productive and yields better returns over Kundhi breed. Moreover, buffalo milk production is a profitable business in the country except in coastal areas of Sindh, where investment in milk production just covers the cost of production due to comparatively higher feed prices and low milk prices. Econometric analysis of milk production in the country revealed that use of green fodder and concentrates contribute positively and significantly to milk production. (author)

  8. Characteristics of Rural Poultry Production in Different Agroecological Zones in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cross-sectional was conducted to establish the characteristics of rural poultry production in Nyandarua, Nakuru and Laikipia districts of Kenya. Sites of diverse agroecological zones (AEZ) in the 3 district were selected, thus Ol Kalou in Nyandarua, Njoro in Nakuru and Ng'arua in Laikipia. Each site was divided into 4 clusters according to AEZ and land size. Systematic sampling techniques were applied to select farmers. A checklist was then used to collect the baseline information for every household. The study revealed that the average flock size was 17.3 chicken with Ng'arua region demonstrating the largest flock size of 21 chickens. The purpose of rearing indigenous chicken were stated as home consumption and sale of eggs and meat, hatching eggs, and as gifts.Farmers in Ng'arua region reported the highest sale of eggs and chicken meat. the average number of broodings per year, number of eggs laid before a chicken becomes broody, eggs set for hatching and hatchability was 2.5, 16.5, 11.1 and 84.2%, respectively. The average chick mortality reported by farmers in te first eight weeks was 47.9%. Disease especially Newcastle, were cited as the main cause of mortality. Farmers did not commonly practice selection for genetic improvement, but occasionally they purchased a cock or hen to control inbreeding. In all the 3 regions, 78.4% of the respondents indicated that women took greater responsibility and decision making in the production of indigenous chicken; 54.8% of farmers used different herbs to treat and control diseases. Conventional vaccination,disinfection and deworming rarely practiced. On most farms, chickens were left to scavenge around the homestead, often they were supplemented with kitchen leftovers and a handful of grains. The survey results demonstrated that there was potential for improving rural poultry production through interventions using appropriate technologies that are currently on-shelf

  9. Survey of smallholder beef cattle production systems in different agro-ecological zones of Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkol, Pok; Sath, Keo; Patel, Mikaela; Windsor, Peter Andrew; Holtenius, Kjell

    2015-10-01

    A survey was conducted to better understand the contribution of farm productivity to rural household income and identify differences in production systems, feeding practices and development constraints to smallholder beef cattle producers in the four agro-ecological zones (AEZs) of Cambodia. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 360 households in the four AEZs: I, the Great Lake Floodplain; II, the Mekong Floodplain; III, the Coastal and IV, the Plateau/Mountainous. In addition, samples of common nutritional resources used for cattle feed were collected for nutrient composition analysis, plus cattle were scored for body condition. Rice farming and cattle production were the most common sources of income in all AEZs. The average cattle herd size was 3.7 (SD = 2.4), but the majority of households raised 1-3 animals. The most common cattle management system was grazing with supplementation, mainly with rice straw and 'cut-and-carry' natural grasses fed during the wet season in all AEZs. The body condition score of all cattle types was 3.2 (SD = 0.8), except for cows in lactation that were 1.8. Major constraints to cattle production in AEZs I, II and III were lack of quality feed resources, capital for cattle production and concerns on breed quality, whereas in AEZ IV, diseases were identified as the main constraint. This survey confirms the importance of cattle to smallholders in the four AEZs. Interventions including farmer education to improve husbandry skills, increase the utilisation of forages and crop residues and address disease issues are necessary to enhance cattle production and rural livelihoods in Cambodia. PMID:26055891

  10. Genetic Diversity of Cultivated Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and Its Relation to the World's Agro-ecological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Caron, Carolyn T; Fedoruk, Michael; Diapari, Marwan; Vandenberg, Albert; Coyne, Clarice J; McGee, Rebecca; Bett, Kirstin E

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of germplasm collections plays a critical role in supporting conservation and crop genetic enhancement strategies. We used a cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) collection consisting of 352 accessions originating from 54 diverse countries to estimate genetic diversity and genetic structure using 1194 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers which span the lentil genome. Using principal coordinate analysis, population structure analysis and UPGMA cluster analysis, the accessions were categorized into three major groups that prominently reflected geographical origin (world's agro-ecological zones). The three clusters complemented the origins, pedigrees, and breeding histories of the germplasm. The three groups were (a) South Asia (sub-tropical savannah), (b) Mediterranean, and (c) northern temperate. Based on the results from this study, it is also clear that breeding programs still have considerable genetic diversity to mine within the cultivated lentil, as surveyed South Asian and Canadian germplasm revealed narrow genetic diversity. PMID:27507980

  11. The influence of storage practices on aflatoxin contamination in maize in four agroecological zones of Benin, west Africa.

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    Hell; Cardwell; Setamou; Poehling

    2000-10-15

    Aflatoxin level in 300 farmers' stores in four agro-ecological zones in Benin, a west African coastal country, were determined over a period of 2 years. At sampling a questionnaire was used to evaluate maize storage practices. Farmers were asked what storage structure they used, their storage form, storage period, pest problems in storage and what was done against them. Beninese farmers often changed their storage structures during the storage period, transfering the maize from a drying or temporary store to a more durable one. Most of the farmers complained about insects damaging stored maize. Often, storage or cotton insecticides were utilized against these pests. Regression analysis identified those factors that were associated with increased or reduced aflatoxin.Maize samples in the southern Guinea and Sudan savannas were associated with higher aflatoxin levels and the forest/savanna mosaic was related to lower toxin levels. Factors associated with higher aflatoxin were: storage for 3-5 months, insect damage and use of Khaya senegalensis-bark or other local plants as storage protectants. Depending on the agroecological zone, storage structures that had a higher risk of aflatoxin development were the "Ago", the "Secco", the "Zingo" or storing under or on top of the roof of the house. Lower aflatoxin levels were related to the use of storage or cotton insecticides, mechanical means or smoke to protect against pests or cleaning of stores before loading them with the new harvest. Fewer aflatoxins were found when maize was stored in the "Ago" made from bamboo or when bags were used as secondary storage containers. PMID:10880814

  12. Spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies with reference to indigenous cattle populations among contrasting agro-ecological zones of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabi, Fredrick; Muwanika, Vincent; Masembe, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous cattle populations exhibit various degrees of agro-ecological fitness and provide desirable opportunities for investments to improve sustainable production for better rural small-scale farmers' incomes globally. However, they could be a source of infection to their attendants and other susceptible livestock if their brucellosis status remains unknown. This study investigated the spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda. Sera from a total of 925 indigenous cattle (410 Ankole Bos taurus indicus, 50 Nganda and 465 East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) - B. indicus) obtained randomly from 209 herds spread throughout Uganda were sequentially analysed for Brucella antibodies using the indirect (I) and competitive (C) enzyme linked Immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA). Recent incidences of abortion within the previous 12 months and routine hygienic practices during parturition were explored for public health risks. Brucella antibodies occurred in approximately 8.64% (80/925) and 28.70% (95% CI: 22.52, 34.89) of the sampled individual cattle and herds, respectively. Findings have shown that Ankole and EASZ cattle had similar seroprevalences. Indigenous cattle from the different study agro-ecological zones (AEZs) exhibited varying seroprevalences ranging from approximately 1.78% (95% CI: 0, 5.29) to 19.67% (95% CI: 8.99, 30.35) in the Lake Victoria Crescent (LVC) and North Eastern Drylands (NED) respectively. Significantly higher odds for Brucella antibodies occurred in the NED (OR: 3.40, 95% CI: 1.34, 8.57, p=0.01) inhabited by EASZ cattle compared to the KP (reference category) AEZ. Recent incidences of abortions within the previous 12 months were significantly (ppractices and mass vaccination. PMID:26100405

  13. Fungal and bacterial metabolites of stored maize (Zea mays, L.) from five agro-ecological zones of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, Modupeade; Atanda, Olusegun; Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Sulyok, Michael; Warth, Benedikt; Beltrán, Eduardo; Krska, Rudolf; Obadina, Olusegun; Bakare, Adegoke; Chilaka, Cynthia A

    2014-05-01

    Seventy composite samples of maize grains stored in five agro-ecological zones (AEZs) of Nigeria where maize is predominantly produced were evaluated for the presence of microbial metabolites with the LC-MS/MS technique. The possible relationships between the storage structures and levels of mycotoxin contamination were also evaluated. Sixty-two fungal and four bacterial metabolites were extracted from the grains, 54 of which have not been documented for maize in Nigeria. Aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B1 were quantified in 67.1 and 92.9% of the grains, while 64.1 and 57.1% exceeded the European Union Commission maximum acceptable limit (MAL) for aflatoxin B1 and fumonisins, respectively. The concentration of deoxynivalenol was, however, below the MAL with occurrence levels of 100 and 10% for its masked metabolite, deoxynivalenol glucoside. The bacterial metabolites had low concentrations and were not a source of concern. The storage structures significantly correlated positively or negatively (p diet, may therefore expose the population to mycotoxin contamination. There is need for an immediate action plan for mycotoxin mitigation in Nigeria, especially in the Derived Savannah zone, in view of the economic and public health importance of the toxins.

  14. The prevalence of serum antibodies to tick-borne infections in Mbale District, Uganda: The effect of agro-ecological zone, grazing management and age of cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Rubaire-Akiiki, C.; J.Okello-Onen; G.W. Nasinyama; Vaarst, M; Kabagambe, E. K.; W. Mwayi; Musunga, D.; Wandukwa, W.

    2004-01-01

    Between August and October 2000, a cross-sectional study was conducted in smallholder dairy farms in Mbale District, Uganda to assess the prevalence of ticks and tick-borne diseases under different grazing systems and agro-ecological zones and understand the circumstances under which farmers operated. A questionnaire was administered to obtain information on dairy farm circumstances and practices. A total of 102 farms were visited and sera and ticks were collected from 478 animals. Sero-preva...

  15. Serosurvey of peste des petits ruminants virus in small ruminants from different agro-ecological zones of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woma, Timothy Y; Ekong, Pius S; Bwala, Dauda G; Ibu, John O; Ta'ama, Louisa; Dyek, Dyek Y; Saleh, Ladi; Shamaki, David; Kalla, Demo J U; Bailey, Dalan; Kazeem, Haruna M; Quan, Melvyn

    2016-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants, caused by the peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), is a highly contagious and economically important transboundary viral disease of domestic and wild small ruminants and a major hindrance to small-ruminant production in Nigeria. The seroprevalence and distribution of PPRV antibodies in small ruminants in rural households, farms, live animal markets and slaughter slabs across the six different agro-ecological zones of Nigeria were determined. A total of 4548 serum samples from 3489 goats and 1059 sheep were collected in 12 states. A PPRV competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to test the samples and the data analysed with R statistical software version 3.0.1. The study animals included all ages and both sexes. The overall prevalence estimate of sera positive for PPRV antibodies was 23.16% (n = 1018 positive samples per 4548 total samples, 95% confidence interval: 21.79% - 24.57%). There were significant differences in the seroprevalence between the states (p = 0.001). Taraba State had the highest seroprevalence of 29.51%, whilst the lowest seroprevalence of 14.52% was observed in Cross River State. There were no significant differences in the PPRV seroprevalence between male and female animals (p = 0.571), age (p = 0.323) and between species (p = 0.639). These data indicate the current seroprevalence to PPRV in the small-ruminant population in Nigeria. PMID:26974177

  16. Toxigenic Potential of Aspergillus Species Occurring on Maize Kernels from Two Agro-Ecological Zones in Kenya

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    Vesa Joutsjoki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Two agro-ecological zones in Kenya were selected to compare the distribution in maize of Aspergillus spp. and their toxigenicity. These were Nandi County, which is the main maize growing region in the country but where no human aflatoxicoses have been reported, and Makueni County where most of the aflatoxicosis cases have occurred. Two hundred and fifty-five households were sampled in Nandi and 258 in Makueni, and Aspergillus was isolated from maize. Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus isolates were tested for the presence of aflD and aflQ genes. Positive strains were induced to produce aflatoxins on yeast extract sucrose and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS. Aspergillus flavus was the most common contaminant, and the incidence of occurrence in Nandi and Makueni was not significantly different (82.33% and 73.26%, respectively. Toxigenic strains were more prevalent than non-toxigenic strains. All the toxigenic strains from Makueni were of the S-type while those from Nandi belonged to the l-type. Quantitative differences in aflatoxin production in vitro between isolates and between strains were detected with S strains producing relatively larger amounts of total aflatoxins, B toxins and lower values for G toxins. This was in accord with the frequent aflatoxicosis outbreaks in Makueni. However some L strains produced considerable amounts of B toxins. Given the widespread distribution of toxigenic strains in both regions, the risk of aflatoxin poisoning is high when favorable conditions for toxin production occur.

  17. Toxigenic potential of Aspergillus species occurring on maize kernels from two agro-ecological zones in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoth, Sheila; Nyongesa, Beatrice; Ayugi, Vincent; Kang'ethe, Erastus; Korhonen, Hannu; Joutsjoki, Vesa

    2012-10-25

    Two agro-ecological zones in Kenya were selected to compare the distribution in maize of Aspergillus spp. and their toxigenicity. These were Nandi County, which is the main maize growing region in the country but where no human aflatoxicoses have been reported, and Makueni County where most of the aflatoxicosis cases have occurred. Two hundred and fifty-five households were sampled in Nandi and 258 in Makueni, and Aspergillus was isolated from maize. Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus isolates were tested for the presence of aflD and aflQ genes. Positive strains were induced to produce aflatoxins on yeast extract sucrose and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS). Aspergillus flavus was the most common contaminant, and the incidence of occurrence in Nandi and Makueni was not significantly different (82.33% and 73.26%, respectively). Toxigenic strains were more prevalent than non-toxigenic strains. All the toxigenic strains from Makueni were of the S-type while those from Nandi belonged to the l-type. Quantitative differences in aflatoxin production in vitro between isolates and between strains were detected with S strains producing relatively larger amounts of total aflatoxins, B toxins and lower values for G toxins. This was in accord with the frequent aflatoxicosis outbreaks in Makueni. However some L strains produced considerable amounts of B toxins. Given the widespread distribution of toxigenic strains in both regions, the risk of aflatoxin poisoning is high when favorable conditions for toxin production occur.

  18. Spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies with reference to indigenous cattle populations among contrasting agro-ecological zones of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabi, Fredrick; Muwanika, Vincent; Masembe, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous cattle populations exhibit various degrees of agro-ecological fitness and provide desirable opportunities for investments to improve sustainable production for better rural small-scale farmers' incomes globally. However, they could be a source of infection to their attendants and other susceptible livestock if their brucellosis status remains unknown. This study investigated the spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda. Sera from a total of 925 indigenous cattle (410 Ankole Bos taurus indicus, 50 Nganda and 465 East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) - B. indicus) obtained randomly from 209 herds spread throughout Uganda were sequentially analysed for Brucella antibodies using the indirect (I) and competitive (C) enzyme linked Immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA). Recent incidences of abortion within the previous 12 months and routine hygienic practices during parturition were explored for public health risks. Brucella antibodies occurred in approximately 8.64% (80/925) and 28.70% (95% CI: 22.52, 34.89) of the sampled individual cattle and herds, respectively. Findings have shown that Ankole and EASZ cattle had similar seroprevalences. Indigenous cattle from the different study agro-ecological zones (AEZs) exhibited varying seroprevalences ranging from approximately 1.78% (95% CI: 0, 5.29) to 19.67% (95% CI: 8.99, 30.35) in the Lake Victoria Crescent (LVC) and North Eastern Drylands (NED) respectively. Significantly higher odds for Brucella antibodies occurred in the NED (OR: 3.40, 95% CI: 1.34, 8.57, p=0.01) inhabited by EASZ cattle compared to the KP (reference category) AEZ. Recent incidences of abortions within the previous 12 months were significantly (p<0.001) associated with seropositive herds. These findings add critical evidence to existing information on the widespread occurrence of brucellosis among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda and could guide allocation of meagre resources for awareness creation

  19. Evaluations on the potential productivity of winter wheat based on agro-ecological zone in the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Li, Q.; Du, X.; Zhao, L.; Lu, Y.; Li, D.; Liu, J.

    2015-04-01

    Wheat is the most widely grown crop globally and an essential source of calories in human diets. Maintaining and increasing global wheat production is therefore strongly linked to food security. In this paper, the evaluation model of winter wheat potential productivity was proposed based on agro-ecological zone and the historical winter wheat yield data in recent 30 years (1983-2011) obtained from FAO. And the potential productions of winter wheat in the world were investigated. The results showed that the realistic potential productivity of winter wheat in Western Europe was highest and it was more than 7500 kg/hm2. The realistic potential productivity of winter wheat in North China Plain were also higher, which was about 6000 kg/hm2. However, the realistic potential productivity of winter wheat in the United States which is the main winter wheat producing country were not high, only about 3000 kg/hm2. In addition to these regions which were the main winter wheat producing areas, the realistic potential productivity in other regions of the world were very low and mainly less than 1500 kg/hm2, like in southwest region of Russia. The gaps between potential productivity and realistic productivity of winter wheat in Kazakhstan and India were biggest, and the percentages of the gap in realistic productivity of winter wheat in Kazakhstan and India were more than 40%. In Russia, the gap between potential productivity and realistic productivity of winter wheat was lowest and the percentage of the gap in realistic productivity of winter wheat in Russia was only 10%.

  20. Analysis of Awareness and Adaptation to Climate Change among Farmers in the Sahel Savannah Agro-ecological Zone of Borno State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Idrisa, Y.L.; Ogunbameru, B. O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Bawa, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the awareness and adaptation to climate change among farmers in the Sahel Savannah agro-ecological zone of Borno State, Nigeria. Data for the study were collected from 225 respondents selected through the Multi-stage sampling technique. A socio-economic profile of the respondents indicated that 48.89% were above 45 years of age and majority (78.23%) had educational qualifications below the secondary school level. The study also revealed that a majority (79.12%) of the resp...

  1. Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) to Different Rates of Palm Bunch Ash Application in the Semi-deciduous Forest Agro-ecological Zone of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Adjei-Nsiah, S.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of palm bunch ash (PBA) and mineral fertilizer application on grain yield and nutrient uptake in maize and soil chemical properties were studied in both the major and minor rainy seasons in the semi-deciduous forest agro-ecological zone of Ghana. In both the major and minor rainy seasons, the response of maize to four levels (0, 2, 4, and 6 tons per hectare) of palm bunch ash and 200 kg per hectare of NPK (15-15-15) application was evaluated using randomised complete block design....

  2. Ensuring Equitable Distribution Of Land In Ghana: Spirituality Or Policy? A Case Study From The Forest-Savanna Agroecological Zone Of Ghana

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    Paul Sarfo-Mensah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the pent-up question of equitable distribution of land in Ghana using the Forest-Savanna Agroecological Zone as a case study. It focuses on the dichotomy of policy versus indigenous spirituality in contemporary distribution of land in Ghana. After independence several attempts have been made to restructure land title holding in Ghana by way of land registration. The effectiveness of these attempts is also examined. The paper concludes that Ghana needs pragmatic steps (policies to confront the challenges of land distribution. And in taking these pragmatic policies, the religio-cultural underpinnings (the people`sworldview of land issues in Ghana should be factored into the policy that will result. Anything short of this will make the implementation of any land policy in Ghana ineffective.

  3. The Incidence, Severity and Occurrence of Four Viruses Infecting Pepper (Capsicum spp. in the Southern Guinea Savannah Agro-ecological Zone of Nigeria

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    Taiye Hussein Aliyu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence, severity and occurrence of four viruses infecting pepper were determined in Kwara State, Nigeria. A disease survey and antigen-coated plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA were the tools deployed to achieve these objectives. The survey indicated the highest virus incidence (97% in four locations, and the lowest incidence (16% in three locations, with variations in severity scores. Th e ELISA result indicated the occurrence of all four viruses with the highest percentage occurrence of virus in the samples as follows: Pepper veinal mottle virus (36.3%, Blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (16.2%, Cowpea aphid borne mosaic virus (7.4%, and Cucumber mosaic virus in the locations (4.8%. The results indicate the prevalence of these viruses on pepper in the Southern Guinea savannah agroecological zone and therefore the need for constant studies to detect other viruses that limit pepper production.

  4. The prevalence of serum antibodies to tick-borne infections in Mbale District, Uganda: the effect of agro-ecological zone, grazing management and age of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubaire-Akiiki, C; Okello-Onen, J; Nasinyama, G W; Vaarst, M; Kabagambe, E K; Mwayi, W; Musunga, D; Wandukwa, W

    2004-01-01

    Between August and October 2000, a cross-sectional study was conducted in smallholder dairy farms in Mbale District, Uganda to assess the prevalence of ticks and tick-borne diseases under different grazing systems and agro-ecological zones and understand the circumstances under which farmers operated. A questionnaire was administered to obtain information on dairy farm circumstances and practices. A total of 102 farms were visited and sera and ticks were collected from 478 animals. Sero-prevalence of tick-borne diseases was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Acaricides were used indiscriminately but the intensity of their use varied with the grazing system and zone. Cattle from different farms mixed for various reasons. During the dry seasons farmers have to get additional fodder from outside their farms that can result in importation of ticks. The prevalence of ticks and serum antibodies to tick-borne infections differed across the grazing systems and zones. The highest serum antibody prevalence (>60%) was recorded in the lowland zone under the free range and tethering grazing systems. The lowest tick challenge and serum antibody levels (<50%) were recorded in the midland and upland zones under a zero-grazing system. These findings suggest that endemic stability to East Coast Fever, babesiosis and anaplasmosis is most likely to have existed in the lowland zone, particularly, under the tethering and free-range grazing systems. Also, endemic stability for babesiosis existed in the upland zones. Endemic instability for East Coast Fever existed in the midland and upland zones. These structured observational studies are instrumental in planning of control strategies for ticks and tick borne diseases since production systems and the cattle population at high risk of the diseases in the district have been identified. PMID:15861224

  5. The prevalence of serum antibodies to tick-borne infections in Mbale District, Uganda: The effect of agro-ecological zone, grazing management and age of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rubaire-Akiiki

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Between August and October 2000, a cross-sectional study was conducted in smallholder dairy farms in Mbale District, Uganda to assess the prevalence of ticks and tick-borne diseases under different grazing systems and agro-ecological zones and understand the circumstances under which farmers operated. A questionnaire was administered to obtain information on dairy farm circumstances and practices. A total of 102 farms were visited and sera and ticks were collected from 478 animals. Sero-prevalence of tick-borne diseases was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Acaricides were used indiscriminately but the intensity of their use varied with the grazing system and zone. Cattle from different farms mixed for various reasons. During the dry seasons farmers have to get additional fodder from outside their farms that can result in importation of ticks. The prevalence of ticks and serum antibodies to tick-borne infections differed across the grazing systems and zones. The highest serum antibody prevalence (>60% was recorded in the lowland zone under the free range and tethering grazing systems. The lowest tick challenge and serum antibody levels (<50% were recorded in the midland and upland zones under a zero-grazing system. These findings suggest that endemic stability to East Coast Fever, babesiosis and anaplasmosis is most likely to have existed in the lowland zone, particularly, under the tethering and free-range grazing systems. Also, endemic stability for babesiosis existed in the upland zones. Endemic instability for East Coast Fever existed in the midland and upland zones. These structured observational studies are instrumental in planning of control strategies for ticks and tick borne diseases since production systems and the cattle population at high risk of the diseases in the district have been identified.

  6. Factors influencing the prevalence and infestation levels of Varroa destructor in honeybee colonies in two highland agro-ecological zones of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemurot, Moses; Akol, Anne M; Masembe, Charles; de Smet, Lina; Descamps, Tine; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2016-04-01

    Varroa mites are ecto-parasites of honeybees and are a threat to the beekeeping industry. We identified the haplotype of Varroa mites and evaluated potential factors that influence their prevalence and infestation levels in the eastern and western highland agro-ecological zones of Uganda. This was done by collecting samples of adult worker bees between December 2014 and September 2015 in two sampling moments. Samples of bees were screened for Varroa using the ethanol wash method and the mites were identified by molecular techniques. All DNA sequences obtained from sampled mite populations in the two zones were 100 % identical to the Korean Haplotype (AF106899). Mean mite prevalence in the apiaries was 40 and 53 % for the western and eastern zones, respectively, during the first sampling. Over the second sampling, mean mite prevalence increased considerably in the western (59 %) but not in the eastern (51 %) zone. Factors that were associated with Varroa mite infestation levels include altitude, nature of apiary slope and apiary management practices during the first sampling. Our results further showed that Varroa mites were spreading from lower to higher elevations. Feral colonies were also infested with Varroa mites at infestation levels not significantly different from those in managed colonies. Colony productivity and strength were not correlated to mite infestation levels. We recommend a long-term Varroa mite monitoring strategy in areas of varying landscape and land use factors for a clear understanding of possible changes in mite infestation levels among African honeybees for informed decision making. PMID:26801158

  7. Caregivers' nutrition knowledge and attitudes are associated with household food diversity and children's animal source food intake across different agro-ecological zones in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Aaron K; Marquis, Grace S; Colecraft, Esi K; Lartey, Anna; Sakyi-Dawson, Owuraku; Ahunu, Ben K; Butler, Lorna M

    2016-01-28

    Caregivers' nutrition knowledge and attitudes may influence the variety of foods available in the household and the quality of children's diets. To test the link, this study collected data on caregivers' (n 608) nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes as well as the diets of their household and of their 2-5-year-old children in twelve rural communities nested in the three main agro-ecological zones of Ghana. Household foods and children's animal source foods (ASF) consumed in the past 7 d were categorised into one of fourteen and ten groups, respectively. About 28 % of caregivers believed that their children needed to be fed only 2-3 times/d. Reasons for having adult supervision during child meal times, feeding diverse foods, prioritising a child to receive ASF and the perceived child benefits of ASF differed across zones (Pdiets compared with those of caregivers in the lowest tertile group (11·2 (sd 2·2) v. 10·0 (sd 2·4); Pzone, caregivers' nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes positively predicted household dietary diversity and the frequency and diversity of children's ASF intakes (P<0·001). The number of years of formal education of caregivers also positively predicted household dietary diversity and children's ASF diversity (P<0·001). A key component to improving child nutrition is to understand the context-specific nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes in order to identify relevant interventions.

  8. Caregivers' nutrition knowledge and attitudes are associated with household food diversity and children's animal source food intake across different agro-ecological zones in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Aaron K; Marquis, Grace S; Colecraft, Esi K; Lartey, Anna; Sakyi-Dawson, Owuraku; Ahunu, Ben K; Butler, Lorna M

    2016-01-28

    Caregivers' nutrition knowledge and attitudes may influence the variety of foods available in the household and the quality of children's diets. To test the link, this study collected data on caregivers' (n 608) nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes as well as the diets of their household and of their 2-5-year-old children in twelve rural communities nested in the three main agro-ecological zones of Ghana. Household foods and children's animal source foods (ASF) consumed in the past 7 d were categorised into one of fourteen and ten groups, respectively. About 28 % of caregivers believed that their children needed to be fed only 2-3 times/d. Reasons for having adult supervision during child meal times, feeding diverse foods, prioritising a child to receive ASF and the perceived child benefits of ASF differed across zones (Pcaregivers belonging to the highest tertile of nutrition knowledge and attitude scores consumed more diverse diets compared with those of caregivers in the lowest tertile group (11·2 (sd 2·2) v. 10·0 (sd 2·4); Pcaregivers' nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes positively predicted household dietary diversity and the frequency and diversity of children's ASF intakes (Pcaregivers also positively predicted household dietary diversity and children's ASF diversity (Pchild nutrition is to understand the context-specific nutrition knowledge and feeding attitudes in order to identify relevant interventions. PMID:26560016

  9. Zoneamento agroecológico do município de Lagoa Seca, PB Agroecological zoning of the municipal district of Lagoa Seca, Paraíba State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Íris do S. Barbosa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Visa-se, cinzelar, neste estudo um zoneamento em que se considerem os aspectos agrícolas, ecológicos e sociais inerentes ao município de Lagoa Seca, PB, elaborado através da análise dos vários cenários apresentados na área. O uso de um conjunto de recursos, como fotointerpretação, processamento de imagens georreferenciadas, posicionamento por satélites, associados à teoria sistêmica de Bertrand, possibilitou a identificação, delimitação e análise das áreas de uso antrópico, agrícola e das áreas com remanescentes vegetais significativos, que caracterizam o município. Foram elaborados para a área em estudo, arquivos digitais georreferenciados, relativos aos temas: limite municipal, áreas urbanizadas, infra-estrutura viária, rede de drenagem, altimetria, cobertura vegetal natural, uso agrícola do solo e zoneamento. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram que o município apresenta quatro regiões com aspectos distintos, as quais foram identificadas como regiões agroecológicas, de acordo com o fator que mais se destacou em cada área.This work sought to perfect zoning which concerns the agricultural, ecological and social aspects in the municipality of Lagoa Seca in the State of Paraíba through the study of several scenarios in that area. It consisted of a set of approaches such as photo interpretation, geo-referenced image processing, and satellite positioning associated with Bertrand's Systemic Theory that allowed the identification, delimitation and analysis of areas of anthropic and agricultural usage as well as of those with remaining significant vegetation, which characterize the municipality. Digital geo-referenced files were elaborated for the studied area comprising basic data about the municipal limit, urbanized areas, road systems, drainage system, altimetry, cover of natural vegetation, soil farming usage and zoning of agroecological regions. The study showed that the municipality of Lagoa Seca has four regions

  10. Response of Maize (Zea mays L. to Different Rates of Palm Bunch Ash Application in the Semi-deciduous Forest Agro-ecological Zone of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adjei-Nsiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of palm bunch ash (PBA and mineral fertilizer application on grain yield and nutrient uptake in maize and soil chemical properties were studied in both the major and minor rainy seasons in the semi-deciduous forest agro-ecological zone of Ghana. In both the major and minor rainy seasons, the response of maize to four levels (0, 2, 4, and 6 tons per hectare of palm bunch ash and 200 kg per hectare of NPK (15-15-15 application was evaluated using randomised complete block design. Results of the study showed that application of palm bunch ash significantly (P<0.05 increased soil pH, soil phosphorus, and exchangeable cations. Maize grain yield varied significantly (P<0.05 among the different treatments in both the major and minor rainy seasons. The highest maize grain yield of 4530 and 6120 kg ha-1 was obtained at PBA application rate of 2 tons ha-1 for the major and minor rainy seasons, respectively.

  11. Food Insecurity and Not Dietary Diversity Is a Predictor of Nutrition Status in Children within Semiarid Agro-Ecological Zones in Eastern Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zipporah N. Bukania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Machakos and Makueni counties in Kenya are associated with historical land degradation, climate change, and food insecurity. Both counties lie in lower midland (LM lower humidity to semiarid (LM4, and semiarid (LM5 agroecological zones (AEZ. We assessed food security, dietary diversity, and nutritional status of children and women. Materials and Methods. A total of 277 woman-child pairs aged 15–46 years and 6–36 months respectively, were recruited from farmer households. Food security and dietary diversity were assessed using standard tools. Weight and height, or length in children, were used for computation of nutritional status. Findings. No significant difference (P>0.05 was observed in food security and dietary diversity score (DDS between LM4 and LM5. Stunting, wasting, and underweight levels among children in LM4 and LM5 were comparable as were BMI scores among women. However, significant associations (P=0.023 were found between severe food insecurity and nutritional status of children but not of their caregivers. Stunting was significantly higher in older children (>2 years and among children whose caregivers were older. Conclusion. Differences in AEZ may not affect dietary diversity and nutritional status of farmer households. Consequently use of DDS may lead to underestimation of food insecurity in semiarid settings.

  12. Variabilities in Rainfall Onset, Cessation and Length of Rainy Season for the Various Agro-Ecological Zones of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard K. Amekudzi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the onset and cessation dates of the rainy season over Ghana using rain gauge data from the Ghana Meteorological Agency (GMet over the period of 1970–2012. The onset and cessation dates were determined from cumulative curves using the number of rainy days and rainfall amount. In addition, the inter-annual variability of the onset and cessation dates for each climatic zone was assessed using wavelet analysis. A clear distinction between the rainfall characteristics and the length of the rainy season in the various climatic zones is discussed. The forest and coastal zones in the south had their rainfall onset from the second and third dekads of March. The onset dates of the transition zone were from the second dekad of March to the third dekad of April. Late onset, which starts from the second dekad of April to the first dekad of May, was associated with the savannah zone. The rainfall cessation dates in the forest zone were in the third dekad of October to the first dekad of November, and the length of the rainy season was within 225–240 days. The cessation dates of the coastal zone were within the second and third dekad of October, and the length of rainy season was within 210–220 days. Furthermore, the transition zone had cessation dates in the second to third dekad of October, and the length of the rainy season was within 170–225 days. Lastly, the savannah zone had cessation dates within the third dekad of September to the first dekad of October, and the length of rainy season was within 140–180 days. The bias in the rainfall onset, cessation and length of the rainy season was less than 10 days across the entire country, and the root mean square error (RMSE was in the range of 5–25 days. These findings demonstrate that the onset derived from the cumulative rainfall amount and the rainy days are in consistent agreement. The wavelet power spectrum and its significant peaks showed evidence of variability in the

  13. Variabilities in Rainfall Onset, Cessation and Length of Rainy Season for the Various Agro-Ecological Zones of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard K. Amekudzi; Edmund I. Yamba; Kwasi Preko; Ernest O. Asare; Jeffrey Aryee; Michael Baidu; Samuel N. A. Codjoe

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the onset and cessation dates of the rainy season over Ghana using rain gauge data from the Ghana Meteorological Agency (GMet) over the period of 1970–2012. The onset and cessation dates were determined from cumulative curves using the number of rainy days and rainfall amount. In addition, the inter-annual variability of the onset and cessation dates for each climatic zone was assessed using wavelet analysis. A clear distinction between the rainfall characteristics and the...

  14. Effect of Phosphorus Fertilizer and Spacing on Growth, Nodulation Count and Yield of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L Walp in Southern Guinea Savanna Agroecological Zone, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ndor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiments were conducted during 2009 and 2010 rainy season at the research and teaching farm of the college of agriculture, Lafia, Nasarawa state, Nigeria. To determine the effect of phosphorus fertilizer and spacing on growth, nodulation count and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata in southern guinea savanna agroecological zone, Nigeria. The treatments consisted of three levels of phosphorus 0, 20 and 40 kg/ha and three levels of spacing: 15x40, 30x60 and 45x80 cm factorially combined to form nine treatments which were laid in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD and replicated three times to form twenty seven plots. The result showed that Phosphorus fertilizer had a significant (p<0.05 effect on the entire growth and yield parameter assessed in both years. 40 kg/ha of phosphorus gave a significantly higher number of nodulation count/plant (34.95 and 32.24, number of pod/plant (20.64 and 20.24, seed weight/plant (39.56 and 37.64, pods weight/plant (51.45 and 45.31 and seed weight/ha (1.56 and 1.52 t/ha in both years. The spacing also had a significant (p<0.05 response on almost the entire growth and yield parameter assessed except on the weight of 100 seeds. Spacing of 30×60 cm did not differ significantly with 45x80 cm which gave similar result in the no. of pod/plant, seed weight/plant, pods weight/plant and seed weight (t/ha in both years.

  15. Calibration of Daycent biogeochemical model for rice paddies in three agro-ecological zones in Peninsular India to optimize cropping practices and predict GHG emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S.; Kritee, K.; Keough, C.; Parton, W. J.; Ogle, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rice is a staple for nearly half of the world population with irrigated and rainfed lowland rice accounting for about 80% of the worldwide harvested rice area. Increased atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are expected to adversely affect rice yields by the end of the 21st century. In addition, different crop management practices affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice paddies antagonistically warranting a review of crop management practices such that farmers can adapt to the changing climate and also help mitigate climate change. The Daily DayCent is a biogeochemical model that operates on a daily time step, driven by four ecological drivers, i.e. climate, soil, vegetation, and management practices. The model is widely used to simulate daily fluxes of various gases, plant productivity, nutrient availability, and other ecosystem parameters in response to changes in land management and climate. We employed the DayCent model as a tool to optimize rice cropping practices in Peninsular India so as to develop a set of farming recommendations to ensure a triple win (i.e. higher yield, higher profit and lower GHG emissions). We applied the model to simulate both N2O and CH4 emissions, and crop yields from four rice paddies in three different agro-ecological zones under different management practices, and compared them with measured GHG and yield data from these plots. We found that, like all process based models, the biggest constraint in using the model was input data acquisition. Lack of accurate documentation of historic land use and management practices, missing historical daily weather data, and difficulty in obtaining digital records of soil and crop/vegetation parameters related to our experimental plots came in the way of our execution of this model. We will discuss utilization of estimates based on available literature, or knowledge-based values in lieu of missing measured parameters in our simulations with DayCent which could prove to be a

  16. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  17. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  18. Studies in evolutionary agroecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Wibke

    of Evolutionary Agroecology that the highest yielding individuals do not necessarily perform best as a population. The investment of resources into strategies and structures increasing individual competitive ability carries a cost. If a whole population consists of individuals investing resources to compete......Darwinian evolution by natural selection is driven primarily by differential survival and reproduction among individuals in a population. When the evolutionary interest of an individual is in conflict with the interests of the population, the genes increasing individual fitness at the cost...

  19. The California Biomass Crop Adoption Model estimates biofuel feedstock crop production across diverse agro-ecological zones within the state, under different future climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffka, S.; Jenner, M.; Bucaram, S.; George, N.

    2012-12-01

    Both regulators and businesses need realistic estimates for the potential production of biomass feedstocks for biofuels and bioproducts. This includes the need to understand how climate change will affect mid-tem and longer-term crop performance and relative advantage. The California Biomass Crop Adoption Model is a partial mathematical programming optimization model that estimates the profit level needed for new crop adoption, and the crop(s) displaced when a biomass feedstock crop is added to the state's diverse set of cropping systems, in diverse regions of the state. Both yield and crop price, as elements of profit, can be varied. Crop adoption is tested against current farmer preferences derived from analysis of 10 years crop production data for all crops produced in California, collected by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Analysis of this extensive data set resulted in 45 distinctive, representative farming systems distributed across the state's diverse agro-ecological regions. Estimated yields and water use are derived from field trials combined with crop simulation, reported elsewhere. Crop simulation is carried out under different weather and climate assumptions. Besides crop adoption and displacement, crop resource use is also accounted, derived from partial budgets used for each crop's cost of production. Systematically increasing biofuel crop price identified areas of the state where different types of crops were most likely to be adopted. Oilseed crops like canola that can be used for biodiesel production had the greatest potential to be grown in the Sacramento Valley and other northern regions, while sugar beets (for ethanol) had the greatest potential in the northern San Joaquin Valley region, and sweet sorghum in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Up to approximately 10% of existing annual cropland in California was available for new crop adoption. New crops are adopted if the entire cropping system becomes more profitable. In

  20. Agroecology and biodiversity of the catchment area of Swat River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agroecological studies of the of the Swat River catchment area showed that the terrestrial ecosystem of the area is divided into subtropical, humid temperate, cool temperate, cold temperate, subalpine, alpine and cold desert zones. Indicator species along with their altitudinal limits are specified for each zone. Unplanned population growth, agriculture extension, habitat losses, deforestation, environmental pollution and unwise use of natural resources are threats to the natural biodiversity of these zones. Its severity is very evident in the subtropical and humid temperate zones. The losses encountered to the biodiversity of the area under the influence of various anthropogenic stresses are highlighted. (author)

  1. Book review: Agroecology in action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agroecology extends the boundaries of modern agriculture relying primarily on reductionistic scientific investigations of how plants and animals respond to and interact with the environment to a more holistic understanding between humans and nature to produce more sustainable agricultural systems th...

  2. Salvadora persica agro-ecological suitability for oil production in Argentine dryland salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Silvia; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra; del Fresno, Carolina Miranda

    2015-12-15

    One of the major causes of crop stress is soil or water salinity. Thus, selection of the best species for cultivation in semiarid and arid climates is fundamental. Salvadora persica is an evergreen perennial halophyte that can grow under extreme conditions, from very dry environments to highly saline soils. Based on international bibliography, the authors outlined an agro-ecological zoning model to determine the potential cultivation zones for S. persica in Argentina. This model may be applied to any part of the world, using the agro-ecological limits presented in this work. All the maps were developed by the implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) that can be updated by the further incorporation of complementary information, with the consequent improvement of the original database. The overlap of the agroclimatic suitability map on the drylands' saline soils and the drylands' alkaline soils maps, determined the agro-ecological zoning. Since some areas in the agro-ecological zoning can overlap with land that is already assigned for other uses, protected areas, current land use/cover of the different zones, and urban areas maps were incorporated into the GIS and subtracted by a mask. This resulted in the delimitation of "potential cultivation zoning", thus avoiding possible conflicts surrounding the use of land and making the agro-ecological zonation more efficient. There is a broad agro-ecological zone for cultivation of S. persica that extends from Northern Argentina to approximately 41° South latitude, under dry-subhumid to semiarid climates. Lands classified with different degrees of suitability in the potential cultivation zoning could be used for production of this species for energy purposes on lands that are either unsuitable for food production or currently assigned for other purposes. This paper represents pioneering work since there are no previous studies concerning the introduction of S. persica in Argentina.

  3. Salvadora persica agro-ecological suitability for oil production in Argentine dryland salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, Silvia; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra; del Fresno, Carolina Miranda

    2015-12-15

    One of the major causes of crop stress is soil or water salinity. Thus, selection of the best species for cultivation in semiarid and arid climates is fundamental. Salvadora persica is an evergreen perennial halophyte that can grow under extreme conditions, from very dry environments to highly saline soils. Based on international bibliography, the authors outlined an agro-ecological zoning model to determine the potential cultivation zones for S. persica in Argentina. This model may be applied to any part of the world, using the agro-ecological limits presented in this work. All the maps were developed by the implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) that can be updated by the further incorporation of complementary information, with the consequent improvement of the original database. The overlap of the agroclimatic suitability map on the drylands' saline soils and the drylands' alkaline soils maps, determined the agro-ecological zoning. Since some areas in the agro-ecological zoning can overlap with land that is already assigned for other uses, protected areas, current land use/cover of the different zones, and urban areas maps were incorporated into the GIS and subtracted by a mask. This resulted in the delimitation of "potential cultivation zoning", thus avoiding possible conflicts surrounding the use of land and making the agro-ecological zonation more efficient. There is a broad agro-ecological zone for cultivation of S. persica that extends from Northern Argentina to approximately 41° South latitude, under dry-subhumid to semiarid climates. Lands classified with different degrees of suitability in the potential cultivation zoning could be used for production of this species for energy purposes on lands that are either unsuitable for food production or currently assigned for other purposes. This paper represents pioneering work since there are no previous studies concerning the introduction of S. persica in Argentina. PMID:26348151

  4. The relationships between organic farming and agroecology.

    OpenAIRE

    Bellon, Stephane; Lamine, Claire; Ollivier, Guillaume; Abreu, Lucimar

    2009-01-01

    While acknowledging an extension of agroecology in the organic sector and a growing influence of agroecology in the academic world, we explore their relationships. These relationships cannot be reduced to an opposition between a scientific field and a practical domain. A Brazilian case study based on the analysis of researchers and social actors trajectories exemplifies the diversity of existing relations, whether inclusive or exclusive. With a literature review, this allows characterising th...

  5. Actors and networks of agroecology in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    OpenAIRE

    Castella, Jean-Christophe; Kibler, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative analysis of agroecology network led to a classification based on their conditions of emergence, their structure and governance mechanisms. The study points the strengths and weaknesses of the existing networks at the different scales. It shows that the different agroecology schools are not necessarily well coordinated at each level (national, regional, global) nor across levels for each agroecology school. The activities of a regional agroecology learning alliance should be grou...

  6. Towards Responsible Action through Agroecological Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Lieblein

    Full Text Available In the Agroecology MSc Program in the Nordic Region, conventional training of routine skills and memorizing facts, principles and theories are only two components of the educational activities.We have established a dual learning ladder metaphor to explore the expanded learning process. To establish context and build relevance, student teams begin their studies in agroecology by working with farmers and other key clients in the food system. After exploring the current situation, students can step down the learning ladder to acquire additional needed information and skills. Next they explore the links between theory and application, and we provide a safe space to experiment with putting knowledge into directed action. To help clients plan for a desirable future in farming and food systems, students step up the learning ladder to practice their ability to think creatively about the future, and then to evaluate the expected impacts and potential implications of alternative scenarios. Underlying the learning of skills, principles, and methods for action are the internal values and attitudes that will motivate and drive students in their future work. These include individual learning as a process of practicing, assimilating, connecting, creating, and acting with responsibility. In this paper we describe the educational process used in agroecology, with the dual learning ladder as metaphor for both cognitive learning and personal growth.

  7. Towards Responsible Action through Agroecological Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Francis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Agroecology MSc Program in the Nordic Region, conventional training of routine skills and memorizing facts, principles and theories are only two components of the educational activities.We have established a dual learning ladder metaphor to explore the expanded learning process. To establish context and build relevance, student teams begin their studies in agroecology by working with farmers and other key clients in the food system. After exploring the current situation, students can step down the learning ladder to acquire additional needed information and skills. Next they explore the links between theory and application, and we provide a safe space to experiment with putting knowledge into directed action. To help clients plan for a desirable future in farming and food systems, students step up the learning ladder to practice their ability to think creatively about the future, and then to evaluate the expected impacts and potential implications of alternative scenarios. Underlying the learning of skills, principles, and methods for action are the internal values and attitudes that will motivate and drive students in their future work. These include individual learning as a process of practicing, assimilating, connecting, creating, and acting with responsibility. In this paper we describe the educational process used in agroecology, with the dual learning ladder as metaphor for both cognitive learning and personal growth.

  8. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  9. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  10. Zoneamento agroecológico para a região de Ribeirão Preto utilizando um sistema de informações geográficas Agroecologic zoning for the Ribeirão Preto Region using a geographic information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucieta G. Martorano

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando contribuir com a metodologia de identificação de potencialidades de uso das terras, este trabalho apresenta uma proposta de zoneamento agroecológico da quadrícula de Ribeirão Preto, SP, localizada entre as coordenadas de 21o00'S a 21o30'S e 47o30'W a 48o00'W, com base em características de solo, relevo e clima, utilizando-se de um Sistema de Informações Geográficas. Para caracterizar o regime térmico-hídrico da área utilizou-se os dados de temperatura do ar e de chuva, de 22 localidades, referentes ao período de 1967 a 1996. De acordo com os critérios adotados, quanto a capacidade de uso das terras, o zoneamento identificou seis unidades de utilização da área: agricultura (I; agricultura (II; agricultura (III; pecuária; agrossilvicultura e preservação. As principais conclusões referentes à área de estudo foram: o regime térmico-hídrico é praticamente homogêneo, a vocação dominante é para agricultura (I representando aproximadamente 191.118 hectares, correspondentes a 66,3% da área e cerca de 82,5% das terras possuem vocação para agropecuária e 10,4% devem ser preservadas ou utilizadas seguindo técnicas conservacionistas.In order to contribute with the methodology of identification of land use potentialities, this paper presents a proposal of agroecologic zoning of the quadrangle (21o00'S at 21o30'S and 47o30'W to 48o00'W, of the county of Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil, based on soil, relief and climate characteristics, in a GIS environment. Data of air temperature and rainfall of 22 locations from 1967 to 1996 were used to characterize the thermo-hydric regime of the area. Criteria were adopted according to the capacity of land use. The zoning identified six units of land use: agriculture (I; agriculture (II; agriculture (III; cattle; agroforest systems and preservation. It was concluded that the quadrangle has: a relative climatic uniformity; the dominant zone is the agriculture (I; about 82.5% of

  11. New Concepts in Agroecology: A Service-Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nicholas R.; Andow, David A.; Mercer, Kristin L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe our pedagogical approaches and experiences with a novel course in agroecology (one semester, three credit-hours, for graduate students and upper level undergraduates). Our course responds to recent proposals that agroecology expand its disciplinary focus to include human factors as well as ecological factors, thus taking a more…

  12. Students Learning Agroecology: Phenomenon-Based Education for Responsible Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Edvin; Lieblein, Geir; Breland, Tor Arvid; Francis, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Preparing students for a complex and dynamic future is a challenge for educators. This article explores three crucial issues related to agroecological education and learning: (1) the phenomenological foundation for learning agroecology in higher education; (2) the process of students' interactions with a wide range of various learners within and…

  13. Agroecology of Novel Annual and Perennial Crops for Biomass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    The agroecological potential of many crops under sustainable intensification has not been investigated. This study investigates such potential for novel annual and perennial crops grown for biomass production.......The agroecological potential of many crops under sustainable intensification has not been investigated. This study investigates such potential for novel annual and perennial crops grown for biomass production....

  14. ANALYSIS OF AGRO-ECOLOGICAL SITUATION FOR IDENTIFICATION OF PROBLEMS BY PRA TECHNIQUES IN ADAPTIVE VILLAGE OF KRISHI VIGYAN KENDRA UNDER NEW ALLUVIA ZONE OF MURSHIDABAD DISTRICT OF WEST BENGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishake Naskar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Agro Ecosystem analysis using the Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA techniques of an adaptive village (Jainpur of New Alluvial Zone of Murshidabad-Jiaganj block in Murshidabad district, West Bengal revealed that the village basically has rice and jute based farming system. The cropping intensity of the village is 233%. Out of 363 household 80% is engaged in Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and other allied activities. The land availability per household is 0.40 ha. The villagers are mostly scheduled caste. By snow ball technique major problems were identified .On the basis of bio-physical and socio-economic problems, thrust area were selected. Area specific On Farm Trials (OFT in farmers' were conducted on some researchable issues. Front Line Demonstration (FLD, training programme, health camp, awareness camp and other different extension activities were arranged to mitigate the problems.

  15. Agroecología y sustentabilidad

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Gastón Gutiérrez Cedillo; Luis Isaac Aguilera Gómez; Carlos Ernesto González Esquivel

    2008-01-01

    Este artículo enfatiza la importancia de la agroecología en la búsqueda de la sustentabilidad en el manejo de recursos naturales en zonas rurales. Se inicia discutiendo la relevancia de lograr el equilibrio en tre los sistemas natural y social para la sustentabilidad. Se propone la interpretación integral de los sistemas naturales y humanos a través del concepto de coevolución, así como la incorporación de elementos socioculturales y económicos en el análisis de ecosistemas, enfatizando el re...

  16. Diagnosis production agroecology of Municipality Areia - PB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique de Brito

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of agroecology is on the concept of sustainable development whose primary objective is combining economic development with environmental conservation, being able to meet the needs of the current generation without depleting resources for the future. The municipality of Areia - PB has always had its economic development in footwear production and its derivatives, is known as "Land of rum and Rapadura”, two icons of the agricultural economy of Areia. Presents favorable conditions of climate, soil and topography in order to enable the coexistence of diverse cultures and its variations, however, local farmers only cultivate crops as banana, cassava, maize, beans and sugar-cane. This work aimed to evaluate the profile of the producer and the production of the municipality of Areia - PB, via a questionnaire applied to five associations of farmers and producer's fair, where you can see that the majority of producers are illiterate or just read or write, characteristic of small areas have on average 1 to 3 ha; occurs traditional cultivation of maize, beans and cassava, banana, and grown on a smaller scale are found orange, sugar-cane, sweet potatoes and vegetables, production is characteristic of subsistence.Key-words: agroecology, sustainable development, food security.

  17. Stephen R. Gliessman: Alfred E. Heller Professor of Agroecology, UC Santa Cruz

    OpenAIRE

    Reti, Irene H.

    2010-01-01

    An internationally recognized leader in the field of agroecology, Stephen (Steve) Gliessman is the Alfred E. Heller Professor of Agroecology in UC Santa Cruz’s Environmental Studies Department, where he has taught since 1981. He earned his doctorate in plant ecology at UC Santa Barbara, and was the founding director of the UCSC Agroecology Program (now the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems). His teaching focuses on agroecology, sustainable agriculture, organic gardening, eth...

  18. Methodological difficulties of conducting agroecological studies from a statistical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianconi, A.; Dalgaard, Tommy; Manly, Bryan F J;

    2013-01-01

    Statistical methods for analysing agroecological data might not be able to help agroecologists to solve all of the current problems concerning crop and animal husbandry, but such methods could well help agroecologists to assess, tackle, and resolve several agroecological issues in a more reliable...... and accurate manner. Therefore, our goal in this paper is to discuss the importance of statistical tools for alternative agronomic approaches, because alternative approaches, such as organic farming, should not only be promoted by encouraging farmers to deploy agroecological techniques, but also by providing...

  19. Agroecology as a Science of Integration for Sustainability in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A knowledge contribution is provided in order to understand agroecology as both a scientific discipline and a philosophical paradigm for promoting sustainability in agriculture. The peculiar character of agroecology as an applied science based on the systems paradigm is explored in the fields of research and tuition. As an organisational capability of connecting different hierarchical levels in accordance with the goal of sustainability, integration is shown as an emergent property of the evolution of agriculture as a human activity system.

  20. The evolution of agroecology's concept as a science and a practice

    OpenAIRE

    Leao, Vitoria; Bonaudo, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Agroecology is a subject that has gained importance in the scientific domain since the last two decades. The use of the term agroecology in the scientific literature increased 60% in the last five years, comparing to its first citation in 1928 until 2007. In this bibliography our objective is to study the evolution of the concepts of agroecology taking into account these two dimensions: a science and a practice. As conclusion, we understand that the domain of agroecology concerns a lot more t...

  1. Agroecology as a science, a movement and a practice. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Wezel, A.; Bellon, Stephane; Doré, Thierry; Francis, C.; Vallod, D.; David, C.

    2009-01-01

    International audience Agroecology involves various approaches to solve actual challenges of agricultural production. Though agroecology initially dealt primarily with crop production and protection aspects, in recent decades new dimensions such as environmental, social, economic, ethical and development issues are becoming relevant. Today, the term 'agroecology' means either a scientific discipline, agricultural practice, or political or social movement. Here we study the different meanin...

  2. Agroecology Education: Action-Oriented Learning and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblein, Geir; Breland, Tor Arvid; Francis, Charles; Ostergaard, Edvin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines and evaluates the potential contributions from action learning and action research with stakeholders to higher education in agriculture and food systems. Design/Methodology/Approach: The research is based on our experiences over the past two decades of running PhD courses and an MSc degree programme in Agroecology in…

  3. Agro-ecological engineering in China: a way towards sustainableagriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable development, as a "hot topic", concerns not only economic development but also environmental protection. Agriculture, the base of other economic activities, has faced many difficulties that include over-growth population, land decrease, end land degradation and so on. Therefore, how to increase the food supply, to meet the over-growth population demands, is the main taskall over the world at present, especially in the developing countries, such as China, but we also must protect agricultural environment for medinm- and long-term development simultaneously. Hence, sustainable development in agriculture is the most important estate that we must concern. Its sustainable development determines the sustainability of other economic development to a great extent. Despite Chinese government has paid much attention to develop agricultural production and obtained great successions, there are also many shortcomings in Chinese agriculture. Therefore, China must seek new approaches for its development end environmental protection that suit local conditions and are based on local resources. Agro-ecological engineering, the application of ecological engineering in agriculture, is very thriving in China in recent decades. In this paper, the ecological, economic and social benefits of agro-ecological engineering are analyzed. The principles are discussed. The results indicated that agro-ecological engineering can meet the farmer's short-, medium- and long-term benefits. In the meanwhile, it also concerns not only economic benefits but ecological and social benefits. Therefore, agro-ecological engineering is a way that leads to sustainable agriculture in the future in China.

  4. 基于改进农业生态区划法的耕地综合量能指数模型构建%Comprehensive index model building of cultivated land yield and productivity based on improved agro-ecological zoning method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽; 郝晋珉; 艾东; 朱传民; 周宁; 洪舒蔓

    2014-01-01

    研究粮食产量与耕地产能间的关系以及区域差异,对于挖掘区域增产潜力,提高耕地资源利用效率,实现区域均衡增产,保障粮食安全战略具有重要意义。该文在农业生态区划法估算土地生产潜力基础上,提出基于耕地质量新内涵的耕地质量修正的耕地产能核算方法。通过探讨耕地综合产能的概念体系,构建了反映粮食产量与耕地产能关系的耕地综合量能指数模型,模型由耕地综合量能指数、耕地质量产能指数和耕地数量产能指数构成。并以曲周县为例,对该模型进行了实证研究,曲周县耕地综合量能指数为0.16,耕地质量产能指数为0.31,耕地数量产能指数为0.99,耕地总体产出效率不高,粮食增产的潜力较大,耕地粮食生产平均开发程度也不高,但数量增加潜力较小。%Study on the relationships between grain production and cultivated land productivity and its regional difference is of great significance for food security. Besides, it is also important for finding regional potential yields of grain, improving the utilization efficiency of cultivated land resources and achieving the regional increase of grain yield. In this paper, on the basis of agro-ecological zoning (AEZ) model, a new method was proposed to calculate the cultivated land productivity under cultivated land quality modification. Furthermore, the modification of cultivated land quality was based on a new concept that the quality of cultivated land was not only affected by natural factors but also by artificial factors such as irrigation canals, greenhouse, nursery factory, mechanical facilities and its supporting service station. By discussing the conceptual system of cultivated land integrated productivity which took the potential quantity of cultivated land and the quality index of cultivated land into the consideration, we proposed that comprehensive productivity of cultivated land

  5. Toward thick legitimacy: Creating a web of legitimacy for agroecology

    OpenAIRE

    Maywa Montenegro de Wit; Alastair Iles

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Legitimacy is at the heart of knowledge politics surrounding agriculture and food. When people accept industrial food practices as credible and authoritative, they are consenting to their use and existence. With their thick legitimacy, industrial food systems paralyze the growth of alternative agricultures, including agroecology. Questions of how alternative agricultures can attain their own thick legitimacy in order to compete with, and displace, that of industrial food have not yet...

  6. Crop pathogen emergence and evolution in agro-ecological landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Papaïx, Julien; Burdon, Jeremy J; Zhan, Jiasui; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Remnant areas hosting natural vegetation in agricultural landscapes can impact the disease epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of crop pathogens. However, the potential consequences for crop diseases of the composition, the spatial configuration and the persistence time of the agro-ecological interface – the area where crops and remnant vegetation are in contact – have been poorly studied. Here, we develop a demographic–genetic simulation model to study how the spatial and temporal distrib...

  7. Sustainable agriculture: An assessment of Brazil's family farm programmes in scaling up agroecological food production

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Ben; Nehring, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Agroecology in Brazil is quickly gaining momentum with the recent passing of Decree 7.794 of 20 August 2012 for a National Policy for Agroecology and Organic Production (PLANAPO) and strong support from civil society organisations. While PLANAPO was officially launched on 17 October 2013, the implementation of this policy in terms of outreach, coverage and effectiveness is yet to be determined. This study examines agroecological farm production in Brazil and the effectiveness of family farm p...

  8. Toward thick legitimacy: Creating a web of legitimacy for agroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maywa Montenegro de Wit

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Legitimacy is at the heart of knowledge politics surrounding agriculture and food. When people accept industrial food practices as credible and authoritative, they are consenting to their use and existence. With their thick legitimacy, industrial food systems paralyze the growth of alternative agricultures, including agroecology. Questions of how alternative agricultures can attain their own thick legitimacy in order to compete with, and displace, that of industrial food have not yet attracted much scrutiny. We show that both agroecological and scientific legitimacy grow out of a web of legitimation processes in the scientific, policy, political, legal, practice, and civic arenas. Crucially, legitimation often comes through meeting what we call ‘credibility tests’. Agroecologists can learn to navigate these co-constituted, multiple bases of legitimacy by paying attention to how credibility tests are currently being set in each arena, and beginning to recalibrate these tests to open more room for agroecology. Using a schematic of three non-exclusive pathways, we explore some possible practical interventions that agroecologists and other advocates of alternative agricultures could take. These pathways include: leveraging, while also reshaping, the existing standards and practices of science; extending influence into policy, legal, practical, and civic arenas; and centering attention on the ethical legitimacy of food systems. We conclude that agroecologists can benefit from considering how to build legitimacy for their work.

  9. “I made a pact with God, with nature, and with myself” : exploring deep agroecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veira Botelho, Maria Izabel; Cardoso, Irene; Otsuki, K.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the consequences of agroecology for smallholders’ personal and social world in a coffee-growing region of Zona da Mata in Brazil. Agroecology is usually considered a technically and politically rational approach for smallholders to counter large-scale agribusinesses. However,

  10. Co-creation in the practice, science and movement of agroecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milgroom, J.; Bruil, Janneke; Leeuwis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge building is central to agroecology rooted in family farming. But why? What type of knowledge, and whose knowledge is mobilised? This issue of Farming Matters explores what we really mean by co-creation of knowledge in agroecology, why it is so essential for today’s challenges, and how it t

  11. Discussions and Recommendations about Establishing Agro-ecological Compensation Mechanism in Jiangsu Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao; WU; Zichen; WANG

    2014-01-01

    Establishing agro-ecological compensation mechanism is the objective requirement for protecting agricultural ecological environment on the prerequisite of stabilizing and benefiting farmers,to realize protection in the process of development and promote development through protection.This study analyzed existing problems in the practice of establishing agro-ecological compensation mechanism in Jiangsu Province,including failure to form systematic compensation system due to limited technological reserve,failure to bring into play expected compensation effect due to scant attention,and failure to set up perfect input mechanism due to insufficient financing channel.In line with these problems,it came up with feasible policy recommendations,including strictly implementing top frame design for agro-ecological compensation and giving impetus to standardized and institutionalized work,building pilot demonstration area for agro-ecological compensation,setting up diversified agro-ecological compensation approaches,establishing long-term security mechanism for agro-ecological compensation,and strengthening propaganda and education of agro-ecological compensation.It is expected to provide reference for establishing agro-ecological compensation mechanism in Jiangsu Province,and also provide system guarantee for promoting ecological progress and agricultural modernization in Jiangsu Province.

  12. Agroecological Formación in Rural Social Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils McCune

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the many sectors currently engaged in struggle against the corporate food system, small farmers play a particularly important role—not only do they constitute a legitimate alternative to global agribusiness, but also they are the heirs to long traditions of local knowledge and practice. In defending peasant agriculture, rural social movements defend popular control over seeds and genetic resources, water, land and territory against the onslaught of globalized financial capital. A framework called food sovereignty has been developed by the international peasant movement La Via Campesina (LVC, to encompass the various elements of a food system alternative based on reclaiming popular resource control, defending small-scale agriculture and traditional knowledge, rebuilding local circuits of food and labor, and recovering the ecological processes that can make farming sustainable. Recognizing the need to develop “movement people” capable of integrating many ecological, social, cultural and political criteria into their organizational activities, LVC increasingly has articulated processes of popular education and consciousness-raising as part of the global social movement for agroecology and food sovereignty. Given the enormous diversity of organizations and actors in LVC, an underlying feature known in Spanish as diálogo de saberes (roughly the equivalent of “dialogue between ways of knowing” has characterized LVC processes of education, training, formation and exchange in agroecology. The diálogo de saberes takes place at the level of training centers and schools of the LVC organizations, as well as the larger scale of agricultural landscapes and peasant territories. The interactions between peasant, family or communal farmers, their organizations, their youth and their agroecology create social processes that assume the form and dynamic of a social movement in several countries of Latin America.

  13. Agroecology: foundations in agrarian social thought and sociological theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Guzmán, Eduardo; Woodgate, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo examina los orígenes y el impacto de la modernización agrícola para revelar las bases sociales de la agroecología como disciplina científica y como movimiento social agrario. El impacto del capitalismo en las sociedades rurales ha proporcionado un enfoque para el pensamiento y la movilización social desde el siglo XIX y, así, tomamos en consideración algunos de los discursos en conflicto que han acompañado al desarrollo de la agricultura industrial. También reflex...

  14. Agroecología, territorio, recampesinización y movimientos sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michael Rosset

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza el fenómeno de la agroecología en el contexto actual de disputa por los territorios rurales entre el agronegocio, y otros acaparadores de tierras, y el campesinado organizado y sus aliados. Usando los conceptos de soberanía alimentaria, territorios material e inmaterial en disputa y recampesinización, se explica el mayor énfasis que los movimientos sociales rurales dan a la agroecología en este contexto. Se muestran ejemplos de “Campesino a Campesino,” tanto un movimiento propio, como una meto- dología que otros movimientos sociales rurales han usado para llevar la agroecología a mayor escala y se analiza el proceso creciente de construcción de procesos de agroecología dentro del movimiento social transnacional, de movimientos rurales, organizaciones campesinas y agricultores familiares, La Vía Campesina ( LVC .

  15. Agroecological evaluation of soils suitable for viniculture on the southeastern macroslope of the Great Caucasus (Azerbaijan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, G. Sh.; Yusifova, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    Data on the agroecological evaluation of soils suitable for viniculture on the southeastern macroslope of the Great Caucasus in Azerbaijan are discussed. The quality of major soil types and subtypes has been assessed on the basis of special scales developed for the particular soil properties. The agroecological classes of soils have been specified, and the limiting and favorable ecological factors for winegrowing have been determined. On this basis, the areas with best ecological conditions for the development of viniculture have been outlined.

  16. Organic certification, agro-ecological practices and return on investment: Farm level evidence from Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Kleemann, Linda; Abdulai, Awudu

    2012-01-01

    The recent empirical literature on economic sustainability of certified export crops shows that certification standards that enhance yields are important for improving farm revenues and farmer welfare. However, limited evidence exists on the impact of organic certification on the adoption of agro-ecological practices. In this study, we use unique farm-level data from Ghana to examine the impact of organic certification on the use of agro-ecological practices to improve environmental condition...

  17. Discussions and Recommendations about Establishing Agro-ecological Compensation Mechanism in Jiangsu Province

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Zichen

    2014-01-01

    Establishing agro-ecological compensation mechanism is the objective requirement for protecting agricultural ecological environment on the prerequisite of stabilizing and benefiting farmers, to realize protection in the process of development and promote development through protection. This study analyzed existing problems in the practice of establishing agro-ecological compensation mechanism in Jiangsu Province, including failure to form systematic compensation system due to limited technolo...

  18. Forage mass and stocking rate of elephant grass pastures managed under agroecological and conventional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clair Jorge Olivo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. pastures, under the agroecological and conventional systems, as forage mass and stocking rate. In the agroecological system, the elephant grass was established in rows spaced by 3.0 m from each other. During the cool season ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. was established between these rows, which allowed the development of spontaneous growth species during the warm season. In the conventional system the elephant grass was established singularly in rows spaced 1.4 m from each other. Organic and chemical fertilizers were applied at 150 kg of N/ha/year with in the pastures under agroecological and conventional systems, respectively. Lactating Holstein cows which received 5.0 kg/day supplementary concentrate feed were used for evaluation. The experimental design was completely randomized, with two treatments (agroecological and conventional systems two replications (paddocks and independent evaluations (grazing cycles. The pastures were used during the whole year for the agroecological system and for 195 days in the conventional year. The average values of forage mass were 3.5 and 4.2 t/ha and the stocking rates were 2.08 and 3.23 AU/ha for the respective systems. The results suggest that the use of the elephant grass under the agroecological system allows for best distribution of forage and stocking rate to be more uniform throughout the year than the use of elephant grass in conventional system.

  19. Weed suppression by green manure in an agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Garicoix Recalde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manure promotes efficient suppression of weeds, but green manure species can exhibit distinct behaviors, depending on the environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of soil mulching and weed suppression by spring/summer green manure species grown in the spring/summer season, at different growth stages and after management (cut, for 90 days during the cassava crop cycle. The study was carried out in the 2010/2011 season, in a system managed under agroecological principles. The treatments consisted of different green manure species and arrangements: Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia brasiliensis, Canavalia ensiformis, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum intercropped; Mucuna aterrima, Sorghum bicolor, a mixture of all the green manures in study and a control plot under fallow. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. The evaluations of the soil cover either by the green manures or weeds were performed at 45, 90 and 105 days after the emergence of the green manures. The cassava crop was planted under reduced tillage system at 11 days after the cut of the green manures. The percentage of soil covered by weeds and the dry matter produced were evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days after planting. The results showed that the green manures had a suppressive effect on weeds during their life cycle, as well as during the first months after its management (cut, composing the mulch.

  20. Crop pathogen emergence and evolution in agro-ecological landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaïx, Julien; Burdon, Jeremy J; Zhan, Jiasui; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-04-01

    Remnant areas hosting natural vegetation in agricultural landscapes can impact the disease epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of crop pathogens. However, the potential consequences for crop diseases of the composition, the spatial configuration and the persistence time of the agro-ecological interface - the area where crops and remnant vegetation are in contact - have been poorly studied. Here, we develop a demographic-genetic simulation model to study how the spatial and temporal distribution of remnant wild vegetation patches embedded in an agricultural landscape can drive the emergence of a crop pathogen and its subsequent specialization on the crop host. We found that landscape structures that promoted larger pathogen populations on the wild host facilitated the emergence of a crop pathogen, but such landscape structures also reduced the potential for the pathogen population to adapt to the crop. In addition, the evolutionary trajectory of the pathogen population was determined by interactions between the factors describing the landscape structure and those describing the pathogen life histories. Our study contributes to a better understanding of how the shift of land-use patterns in agricultural landscapes might influence crop diseases to provide predictive tools to evaluate management practices. PMID:25926883

  1. How to measure the agroecological performance of farming in order to assist with the transition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Meriam; Mandart, Elisabeth; Le Grusse, Philippe; Bord, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant protection products enables farmers to maximize economic performance and yields, but in return, the environment and human health can be greatly affected because of their toxicity. There are currently strong calls for farmers to reduce the use of these toxic products for the preservation of the environment and the human health, and it has become urgent to invest in more sustainable models that help reduce these risks. One possible solution is the transition toward agroecological production systems. These new systems must be beneficial economically, socially, and environmentally in terms of human health. There are many tools available, based on a range of indicators, for assessing the sustainability of agricultural systems on conventional farm holdings. These methods are little suitable to agroecological farms and do not measure the performance of agroecological transition farms. In this article, we therefore develop a model for the strategic definition, guidance, and assistance for a transition to agroecological practices, capable of assessing performance of this transition and simulating the consequences of possible changes. This model was built by coupling (i) a decision-support tool and a technico-economic simulator with (ii) a conceptual model built from the dynamics of agroecological practices. This tool is currently being tested in the framework of a Compte d'Affectation Spéciale pour le Développement Agricole et Rural (CASDAR) project (CASDAR: project launched in 2013 by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, on the theme "collective mobilisation for agroecology," http://agriculture.gouv.fr/Appel-a-projets-CASDAR ) using data from farms, most of which are engaged in agroenvironmental process and reducing plant protection treatments since 2008.

  2. How to measure the agroecological performance of farming in order to assist with the transition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Meriam; Mandart, Elisabeth; Le Grusse, Philippe; Bord, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant protection products enables farmers to maximize economic performance and yields, but in return, the environment and human health can be greatly affected because of their toxicity. There are currently strong calls for farmers to reduce the use of these toxic products for the preservation of the environment and the human health, and it has become urgent to invest in more sustainable models that help reduce these risks. One possible solution is the transition toward agroecological production systems. These new systems must be beneficial economically, socially, and environmentally in terms of human health. There are many tools available, based on a range of indicators, for assessing the sustainability of agricultural systems on conventional farm holdings. These methods are little suitable to agroecological farms and do not measure the performance of agroecological transition farms. In this article, we therefore develop a model for the strategic definition, guidance, and assistance for a transition to agroecological practices, capable of assessing performance of this transition and simulating the consequences of possible changes. This model was built by coupling (i) a decision-support tool and a technico-economic simulator with (ii) a conceptual model built from the dynamics of agroecological practices. This tool is currently being tested in the framework of a Compte d'Affectation Spéciale pour le Développement Agricole et Rural (CASDAR) project (CASDAR: project launched in 2013 by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, on the theme "collective mobilisation for agroecology," http://agriculture.gouv.fr/Appel-a-projets-CASDAR ) using data from farms, most of which are engaged in agroenvironmental process and reducing plant protection treatments since 2008. PMID:26527345

  3. Agroecología: plantando las raíces de la resistencia

    OpenAIRE

    Gliessman, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    La agroecología actual se centra claramente en llevar la sostenibilidad a la producción de alimentos, concentrados y fibra. Pero también hay un mayor enfoque sobre los “conductores” sociales, económicos y políticos que mueven los sistemas alimentarios más allá de las condiciones que ha creado la insostenibilidad en la agricultura moderna industrial. Con su fundamento en el ecosistema, la ciencia de la agroecología se ha convertido en una herramienta poderosa para el cambio del ...

  4. Agroecología: promoviendo una transición hacia la sostenibilidad

    OpenAIRE

    S. R. Gliessman; F. J. Rosado-May; C. Guadarrama Zugasti; Jedlicka, J.; V. E. Mendez; Cohen, R.; L. Trujillo; Bacon, C; A. Cohn; Jaffe, R

    2007-01-01

    Agroecología: promoviendo una transición hacia la sostenibilidad. En este artículo se define agroecología como la aplicación de los conceptos y prinicipios ecológicos al diseño y manejo de los sistemas alimentarios sostenibles. Se presentan los argumentos principales que sostienen la validez, importancia y pertinencia del enfoque agroecológico, no solo para entender los procesos involucrados en la producción de alimentos, sino para proponer alternativas que conduzcan a esos procesos ...

  5. Agroecología, territorio, recampesinización y movimientos sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Michael Rosset; María Elena Martínez Torres

    2016-01-01

    El artículo analiza el fenómeno de la agroecología en el contexto actual de disputa por los territorios rurales entre el agronegocio, y otros acaparadores de tierras, y el campesinado organizado y sus aliados. Usando los conceptos de soberanía alimentaria, territorios material e inmaterial en disputa y recampesinización, se explica el mayor énfasis que los movimientos sociales rurales dan a la agroecología en este contexto. Se muestran ejemplos de “Campesino ...

  6. Effect of NPK fertiliser on growth, flowering and yield of fonio (Digitaria exilis) in a coastal agro-ecological environment of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonio (Digitaria spp) is neglected and underutilised crop traditionally grown in the Sahelian savannah agro-ecological zone of Ghana for its grain which is rich in crude protein, fibre and has medicinal properties. Decline in the production of the crop is attributed to poor agronomic and yield characteristics and changing agro-climatic conditions as a result of clobal warming which has rendered traditional growing areas too dry to surport cultivation of the crop. There is the need to explore the possibility of growing the crop in new agro-ecologies to sustain the production. The study was therefore conducted in Kwabenya-Atomic area which is located in the coastal savannah agro-ecological zone of Ghana, to evaluate the adaptability of three fonio landraces (Yadema, Nomber and Nvoni) to the coastal zone, their growth and response to NPK 15:15:15 fertiliser treatment, apparent fertiliser nitrogen recovery (AFNR) as well as presence basic elements in the grains. Field experiments were conducted in 2012 during the major cropping season, using three fonio landraces grown at a planting distance of 0.05m x 0.45m. The experiment design used was the split plot in three replicates. Plants were sampled every two weeks throughout the growing season. Grain yield (GY) and its associated apparent fertiliser nitrogen recovery were significantly different (P≤ 0.05) among the fonio landraces during the cropping season with the landrace Nvoni producing the highest grain yield of 96 kg ha-1 at NPK fertiliser rate of 60 kg ha-1 and with a AFNR of 33.1%. The study also establised a positive correlation between biomass accumulation and grain yield. The efficiency of grain production per unit of fertiliser nitrogen (FN) increased, but at a diminishing rate with each traditional unit of FN. Additionally, ten essentials mineral elements (Na,Mg, K, Ca, I, CI, Cu, AI, Mn, and V) were detected among the grain of the three fonio landrace using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA

  7. Farmers' Visions on Soils: A Case Study among Agroecological and Conventional Smallholders in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingen, Klarien Elisabeth; De Graaff, Jan; Botelho, Maria Izabel Vieira; Kessler, Aad

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Why do farmers not take better care of their soils? This article aims to give insight into how farmers look at soil quality management. Design/methodology/approach: It analyses diverse land management practices and visions on soils and soil quality of ten agroecological and 14 conventional smallholder farmers in Araponga, Minas Gerais,…

  8. Behavioral Changes Based on a Course in Agroecology: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristyn; King, James; Francis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated and described student perceptions of a course in agroecology to determine if participants experienced changed perceptions and behaviors resulting from the Agroecosystems Analysis course. A triangulation validating quantitative data mixed methods approach included a written survey comprised of both quantitative and open-ended…

  9. Agroecology and the Sustainable Production of Food and Fiber: Emergy Evaluation of Agriculture in the Montado

    Science.gov (United States)

    The silvopastoral, agricultural system of the montado in Southern Portugal is an example of the self-organization of an agroecological system adapted to the climate and soil conditions of the Mediterranean basin. This system with its consistent production of food, fiber, and ecos...

  10. Formalizing agro-ecological knowledge for future-oriented land use studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengsdijk, H.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords : agro-ecological engineering, land use system, modeling, uncertainty, temporal variability, Costa Rica, West Africa.Identification and ex-ante assessment of alternative land use systems is increasingly important to

  11. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality

  12. Assessing farmers' interest in agroforestry in two contrasting agro-ecological zones of Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Bucagu, C.; Vanlauwe, B.; Wijk, van, M.J.; Giller, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Uptake and management of agroforestry technologies differs among farms in Rwanda and needs to be documented as a basis for shaping future research and development programs. The objective of this study was to investigate current agroforestry practices, farmers’ preferences, tree management and perspectives for agroforestry technologies. The study consisted of a combination of a formal survey, a participatory tree testing, farmer evaluation and focus group discussions in the Central Plateau (mo...

  13. Assessing farmers' interest in agroforestry in two contrasting agro-ecological zones of Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucagu, C.; Vanlauwe, B.; Wijk, van M.T.; Giller, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Uptake and management of agroforestry technologies differs among farms in Rwanda and needs to be documented as a basis for shaping future research and development programs. The objective of this study was to investigate current agroforestry practices, farmers’ preferences, tree management and perspe

  14. Genomic prediction models for grain yield of spring bread wheat in diverse agro-ecological zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Pierre, C; Burgueño, J; Crossa, J; Fuentes Dávila, G; Figueroa López, P; Solís Moya, E; Ireta Moreno, J; Hernández Muela, V M; Zamora Villa, V M; Vikram, P; Mathews, K; Sansaloni, C; Sehgal, D; Jarquin, D; Wenzl, P; Singh, Sukhwinder

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and pedigree predictions for grain yield and agronomic traits were carried out using high density molecular data on a set of 803 spring wheat lines that were evaluated in 5 sites characterized by several environmental co-variables. Seven statistical models were tested using two random cross-validations schemes. Two other prediction problems were studied, namely predicting the lines' performance at one site with another (pairwise-site) and at untested sites (leave-one-site-out). Grain yield ranged from 3.7 to 9.0 t ha(-1) across sites. The best predictability was observed when genotypic and pedigree data were included in the models and their interaction with sites and the environmental co-variables. The leave-one-site-out increased average prediction accuracy over pairwise-site for all the traits, specifically from 0.27 to 0.36 for grain yield. Days to anthesis, maturity, and plant height predictions had high heritability and gave the highest accuracy for prediction models. Genomic and pedigree models coupled with environmental co-variables gave high prediction accuracy due to high genetic correlation between sites. This study provides an example of model prediction considering climate data along-with genomic and pedigree information. Such comprehensive models can be used to achieve rapid enhancement of wheat yield enhancement in current and future climate change scenario. PMID:27311707

  15. Agroecological monitoring of small-scale parcels in the zones of radioactive contamination of Chernihiv region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is found out that agricultural products grown at small parcels in Chernihiv region of Ukraine have high content of not only radionuclides but that of heavy metals and nitrates as well. That enhances the threat to human health. In order to ensure food production that meet requirements of their ecological purity and radiological safety the strict control of their quality is a must. The correspondent countermeasures directed at reduction of the toxicants level in plants are to be undertaken as well

  16. Agroecología: Desafíos de una ciencia ambiental en construcción

    OpenAIRE

    León Sicard, Tomás Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Este documento presenta algunas razones que sustentan la idea de que la agroecología es una ciencia ambiental, discute la definición de agroecosistema como objeto de estudio de la agroecología y las derivaciones discursivas de tipo político y social que inspira esta ciencia. Además, examina algunos campos de análisis autónomos de la agroecología y la conexión de esta ciencia con otras disciplinas y ramas del conocimiento. Finalmente, se exploran algunos significados de la ...

  17. Agroecología y movimientos agroalimentarios alternativos en los Estados Unidos: Hacia un sistema agroalimentario sostenible

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Margarita; Goodall, Katherine; Richards, Meryl; Mendez, V. Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    El concepto de agroecología en Estados Unidos nace de un proceso dialéctico de coproducción de conocimiento por el cual la ciencia de la agroecología ha formado, y se ha formado a sí misma, gracias a movimientos agroalimentarios, políticas y prácticas locales alternativas. Este artículo examina la relación entre la agroecología y los movimientos agroalimentarios alternativos e identifica oportunidades para un mayor compromiso. El artículo concluye con una discusión sobre los re...

  18. Biodiversity and agro-ecology in field margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cauwer, B; Reheul, D; Nijs, I; Milbau, A

    2005-01-01

    This multidisciplinary study investigates agro-ecological functions (nature conservation, agriculture, environment) and implications of newly created, mown sown and unsown field margin strips installed on ex-arable land to increase biodiversity. From conservational concern, the development of species rich field margin strips was not strongly affected by the installed type of margin strip since species diversity converged over time, whether strips were sown or not. Convergence between unsown and sown margin strips occurred also in terms of species composition: unsown and sown strips became similar over time. Mowing without removal of cuttings significantly reduced species richness, yielded more grassy margin strips and delayed similarity in species composition between sown and unsown margin strips. Species richness on the longer term was not significantly affected by light regime nor by disturbance despite significant temporary effects shortly after the disturbance event. On the contrary vegetation composition in terms of importance of functional groups changed after disturbance: the share of spontaneous species within functional groups increased resulting in higher similarity between the sown and unsown vegetation. Furthermore risk of invasion was highest in the disturbed unsown community on the unshaded side of a tree lane. A positive effect of botanical diversity on insect number and diversity was found. However the effects of botanical diversity on insect number was mediated by light regime. At high light availability differences between plant communities were more pronounced compared to low light availablilty. The abundance of some insect families was dependent on the vegetation composition. Furthermore light availability significantly influenced insect diversity as well as the spatial distribution of families. From agricultural concern, installing margin strips by sowing a species mixture and a mowing regime with removal of cuttings are good practices to

  19. Soil cover patterns influence on the land environmental functions, agroecological quality, land-use and monitoring efficiency in the Central Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Yashin, Ivan; Lukin, Sergey; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    current practice versions. Well-elaborated monitoring collaboration with the principal natural reserves in south-taiga and forest-steppe zones provides process-based interaction with long-term data on zonal climatic, landscape and soil features necessary to test the process, functional and evaluation models in the specific conditions of each bioclimatic zone. The dominated erosion and dehumification trends have been essentially activated for last 3-4 decades due to hu¬mus negative balance around 0.6-0.7 t ha-1year-1 and connected disaggregation with annual rate between 1 and 25 g/kg for aggregates 10-0.25 mm. "Standard" monitoring objects and regionally generalized data showed characteristic for Chernozems 2-2.5 % humus drop during this period and active processes of CO2 emission and humus eluvial-illuvial profile redistribution too. Forest-steppe Chernozems are usually characterized by higher stability than steppe ones. The ratio between erosive and biological losses in humus stock can be ten¬tatively estimated as fifty-fifty with essential variability within slope landscape. Both these processes have essential impacts on different sets of soil environmental and agroecological functions (including atmospheric air, surface and ground water quality, biodiversity and profitability) that we need to understand and predict. A drop of humus content below threshold values (for different soils between 1.5 and 6%) considerably reduces not only soil environmental regulation functions but also effectiveness of used fertilizers, crop yield quality and possibility of sustainable agricultural land-use. The carried out long-term researches of representative natural, rural and urban landscapes in Tver, Yaroslavl, Vladimir, Moscow, Kaluga, Kursk, Belgorod, Tambov, Voronezh and Saratov regions give us validation and ranging of the limiting factors of the elementary soil cover patterns current features and transformation processes, environmental functions and agroecological quality

  20. Agro-ecological sustainability and land degradation potential in Nang Rong, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, William F.

    This dissertation examines specific aspects of the land use history of Nang Rong (1972 to 1997), Buriram Province, northeast Thailand, emphasizing the relationship between patterns of land use/land cover (LULC) and soils. The potential for land degradation---a reduction in the capability of soil to support plant growth (including crops) due to human actions---was assessed by comparison of multi-temporal LULC data to soil surveys, using the situational indicator approach. Resulting patterns of land degradation potential were then used to infer agro-ecological sustainability (the ability to obtain and maintain socio-economically viable crop yields given the prevailing biophysical milieu of a place) on the basis of likely changes to soil attributes associated with land use practices. Digital and analogue geographical analysis techniques were used to manipulate and process the image, map, and field data collected and compiled to represent the phenomena of interest. Geographical information science, earth systems science, landscape ecology, and political ecology form the theoretical context influencing the research design and the interpretation of results. The research was conducted in three distinct phases. First, Landsat imagery, cartographic, and field data were processed to produce LULC change trajectories (1972--1985--1997) for agriculturally-relevant classes (rice paddy, field crop, forest, savanna). Second, a composite soil crop suitability variable was created and compared to the LULC change trajectories to derive a map based on a qualitative Land Degradation Potential Index. Third, spatial pattern metric analysis was performed using the LULC data, stratified by composite soil suitability classes over time. The LULC change trajectories indicate that cropland was extended between 1972 and 1997 (net increase in area of 17.9%), through conversion of forest and savanna (net decreases of 9.8% and 8.1%, respectively). Rice paddy was the dominant LULC type in all

  1. Social innovation in the commercialization of organic and agroecological products of family farming in Brazil’s Federal District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pierre Sabourin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Federal District and particularly the city of Brasilia constitute a booming market for organic and agro-ecological products. This paper develops a characterization of the modes of family farmer’s organization for marketing of organic and agro-ecological products in the Federal District of Brasilia. The methodology has associated an analysis of documents and statistics and interviews of the various actors of the two main chains of products in the Federal District: producers of the agro-ecological fairs, farmer’s organizations, supermarkets, extension agents and technicians of public agencies. Family farmers have progressively invested the short food chains with direct sales and agro-ecological fairs, through specific and innovative modalities of coordination and organization. The main results show a combination between formal and informal status and institutions and the mobilization of renewed forms of reciprocity, mutual help and collective learning.

  2. Agro-Ecology and Irrigation Technology : Comparative Research on Farmer-Management Irrigation Systems in the Mid- Hills of Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, U.N.

    1999-01-01

    Design and management of irrigation infrastructure in farmer managed irrigation systems (FMISs) are strongly influenced by social and agro-ecological conditions of an area. This thesis analyzes the elements of social and agro-ecological conditions in FMISs in the mid-hills of Nepal and examines their relationships with irrigation infrastructure, especially water division structures. Of the various types of water division structures, this thesis concentrates mainly on the proportioning weir, w...

  3. Agroecology in the tropics: Achieving a balance between land use and preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliessman, Stephen R.

    1992-11-01

    Agroecology is the application of ecological concepts and principles to the design and management of sustainable agricultural systems. An agroecological approach to agriculture has special importance in the humid tropics where agricultural development and the preservation of tropical forests are most often in direct conflict. It is proposed that a more sustainable approach to development is needed, where agroecosystems depend on low external inputs, function more on the use of locally available and renewable resources, have benign impacts on the environment, and are based on the knowledge and culture of the local inhabitants. Examples of traditional agroecosystem management in Mesoamerica that can provide this basis are presented. The preservation of both biological and cultural diversity are integral to the long-term sustainable management of natural resources in the tropics.

  4. Anotaciones para una historia de la agroecología en colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Cecilia Rivera; Tomás Enrique León Sicard

    2013-01-01

    En este texto se consignan los testimonios de algunos pioneros de la agroecología en Colombia que tienen como fin destacar momentos importantes de la consolidación de este proceso en nuestro país. Tales relatos están contextualizados a partir de una aproximación a la definición de agroecología y sus derivaciones de acuerdo con las tendencias y las discusiones de la época narrada, que se sitúa entre finales de 1980 y la primera década del año 2000. La información se recopiló mediante documento...

  5. Study on the morphology and agroecology of creat (Andrographis panculata ness.) in various habitat

    OpenAIRE

    BAMBANG PUJIASMANTO; JODY MOENANDIR; SYAMSULBAHRI; KUSWANTO

    2007-01-01

    Raw material supply which still depends on nature has caused genetic erotion of medicinal plants. The objectives of the research were to study creat (Andrographis paniculata Ness.) morphology; and agroecology in many habitat for cultivated be medical substance. The research were conducted at three different locations, ie. at lowland ( 700 m asl.). The result showed that creat growth on 180 m – 861 m above sea level wit...

  6. Anotaciones para una historia de la agroecología en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cecilia Rivera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En este texto se consignan los testimonios de algunos pioneros de la agroecología en Colombia que tienen como fin destacar momentos importantes de la consolidación de este proceso en nuestro país. Tales relatos están contextualizados a partir de una aproximación a la definición de agroecología y sus derivaciones de acuerdo con las tendencias y las discusiones de la época narrada, que se sitúa entre finales de 1980 y la primera década del año 2000. La información se recopiló mediante documentos escritos y relatos de académicos, directores de organizaciones no gubernamentales y profesionales de diferentes disciplinas, que han trabajado activamente en el tema (17 entrevistas semiestructuradas. El resultado es  una revisión histórica de la gestación y difusión  de la agroecología en Colombia, a partir de experiencias individuales e institucionales originadas inicialmente alrededor de la agricultura ecológica.

  7. 农业生态学的新视野%New dimensions in agroecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文雄; 陈婷; 周明明

    2012-01-01

    The authors reviewed the developmental history and characteristics of agroecology, and pointed out that the research areas of agroecology were broadening in both macroscopic and microscopic aspects, and the researches were going more deeply. On the macroscopic level, the investigation of agroecology was expanding from a pure macroscopic study of agricultural biology to a sociological study concerning the issues related to agriculture, fanner and rural areas. The research works shifted from the relationships between structure and function of agroecosystem to the food system. The major task was to study the impacts of the energy and material flow in agroecosystem on the social and economic development, and the regulation of food system by policy and laws from the eco-economic perspective. Modern agroecology emphasized the awakening of social ecological consciousness and the important role of ecological consciousness which played great roles in the protection of argoecosystem and the promotion of pollution-free production. Therefore, in western countries, community movements or actions were important ways that agroecologists relied on to make government, production units, sell units and administrations accept the agroecological concepts, act in compliance withagroecological laws and ensure the health and efficiency of the food system. These activities had become essential subjects in the education, research and practice of modem agroecology, which involved all processes in agroecology, including scientific research, demonstration and its extension of experiments, promotion by society or association actions, spontaneous participation of publics. All these efforts embodied the feature of the modern agroecology.On the microscopic level, modern agroecology was entering the age of molecular agroecology. Molecular agroecology employed the state-of-art techniques of modern biology and introduced the theories and assays from systems biology to unveil the underlying

  8. Combined agro-ecological strategies for adaptation of organic horticultural systems to climate change in Mediterranean environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Diacono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural biodiversity and related agro-ecological measures could play a crucial role in the agro-ecosystems adaptation to climate changes, thus sustaining crop production. The objective of this study was to assess the suitability (and the best combination of agro-ecological techniques as potential resilience strategies in organic horticultural systems in a Mediterranean environment. A long-term experimental device called MITIORG (Long-term climatic change adaptation in organic farming: synergistic combination of hydraulic arrangement, crop rotations, agro-ecological service crops and agronomic techniques is set-up at Metaponto (MT, testing the following agro-ecological measures as well as organic and conservation farming best practices: i hydraulic arrangement by a kind of ridge-furrow system; ii cash crop rotations; iii agro-ecological service crops (ASC introduction; iv ASC termination techniques (green manure vs roller crimper; and v organic fertilisation. The research here reported was carried out during the 2014-2015 season in the MITIORG device, on a rotation of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. crops. A detailed description of the scientific cognitive process that led to setup of the device, its components explanation, as well as preliminary yield results are reported. The outcomes suggest that organic vegetable cropping systems, designed following agro-ecological principles, are able to sustain yield of cash crops in rotation, in spite of changes in temperature and rainfall of the study site. Experimental data available in the next years will allow a deeper integrated analysis of the manifold effects of agro-ecological measures on horticultural systems.

  9. Towards sustainable food systems: the concept of agroecology and how it questions current research practices. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatt, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiple environmental and socio-economic indicators show that our current agriculture and the organization of the food system need to be revised. Agroecology has been proposed as a promising concept for achieving greater sustainability. This paper offers an overview and discussion of the concept based on existing literature and case studies, and explores the way it questions our current research approaches and education paradigms. Literature. In order to improve the sustainability of agriculture, the use of external and chemical inputs needs to be minimized. Agroecological farming practices seek to optimize ecological processes, thus minimizing the need for external inputs by providing an array of ecosystem services. Implementing such practices challenges the current structure of the food system, which has been criticized for its lack of social relevance and economic viability. An agroecological approach includes all stakeholders, from field to fork, in the discussion, design and development of future food systems. This inclusion of various disciplines and stakeholders raises issues about scientists and their research practices, as well as about the education of the next generation of scientists. Conclusions. Agroecology is based on the concept that agricultural practices and food systems cannot be dissociated because they belong to the same natural and socio-economic context. Clearly, agroecology is not a silver-bullet, but its principles can serve as avenues for rethinking the current approaches towards achieving greater sustainability. Adapting research approaches in line with indicators that promote inter- and transdisciplinary research is essential if progress is to be made.

  10. Zoning Rural Area For The Development Of Annual Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bariot Hafif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One strategy to protect land from degradation is to use the land according to their capability. Zoning of commodities is an effort in that direction and determination of commodities is based on the suitability of land with agronomic needs of crops and farming feasibility analysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the development zone of annual crops, based on the analysis of agro-ecological characteristics and agricultural viability. Analysis of land suitability for the cultivation of coffee, vanilla, pepper, cocoa, banana, durian, mango, and melinjo, found that land can be recommended for the development of the annual crops is about 29,230 ha from an area of 54,764 ha. The land was divided into six agro-ecological zones i.e. two zones at area with land slope of 3- 8%, each covering an area of 2,737 ha at an altitude of 15-50 m above sea level (asl, and 12,008 ha at an altitude of 50-300 m asl, the two zone at area with land slope of 8-15%, each covering 6119 ha at an altitude of 25-250 m asl and 1,221 ha at an altitude of 15-50 m asl, and two zones at area with land slope of 16-40% , each covering an area of 1,101 ha at an altitude of 400-700 m asl, and 6,134 ha at an altitude of 400-500 m asl. The soil types found are Typic /Vitrandic Eutrudepts, Typic Hapludands, and Vitrandic Hapludalfs. This study recommends that the banana is a perennial plant with the most potential to be developed and has good economic prospects in almost all agro-ecological zones. Other commodities are also preferred, coffee and vanilla.

  11. La agroecología postproductivista en Andalucía

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Márquez, Martín; Naranjo-Ramírez, J.

    1998-01-01

    El trabajo presenta, en el contexto de la PAC (Política Agraria Comunitaria), una mirada amplia para detectar la situación de la agricultura ecológica en Andalucía en los momentos finales del s. XX. Partiendo del contexto general de la agroecología en España, se analizan cuestiones como la distribución provincial de este tipo de actividad agraria en Andalucía, la estructura del sector según cultivos y la situación de la actividad industrial derivada de esta producción agroecológica.

  12. Agroecología : Bases teóricas para el diseño y manejo de agroecosistemas sustentables

    OpenAIRE

    Sarandón, Santiago Javier; Flores, Claudia Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    El libro Agroecología y Desarrollo Sustentable, editado por Santiago J. Sarandon y Claudia Cecilia Flores de La Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales de la UNLP, viene a llenar un gran vacío en nuestra literatura agroecológica al entregarnos un libro adaptado a las necesidades del currículo agronómico que se desarrolla en la mayoría de las Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Agropecuaria en América Latina. El libro se suma a la escuela de pensamiento que define a la Agroecología c...

  13. La agroecología como un enfoque transdisciplinar, participativo y orientado a la acción

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Méndez, V.; Bacon, Christopher M; Cohen, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo examina las múltiples direcciones en la evolución de la agroecología, desde su temprano énfasis en los procesos ecológicos de los sistemas agrícolas, hasta su desarrollo como planteamiento multidimensional amplio, y orientado hacia los sistemas agroalimentarios. La publicación de esta edición especial es muy oportuna, pues la agroecología se está aplicando cada vez más en diversas iniciativas científicas, políticas y prácticas. En este artículo contrastamos distin...

  14. The Cook Agronomy Farm LTAR: Knowledge Intensive Precision Agro-ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drowning in data and starving for knowledge, agricultural decision makers require evidence-based information to enlighten sustainable intensification. The agro-ecological footprint of the Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) site is embedded within 9.4 million ha of diverse land uses primarily cropland (2.9 million ha) and rangeland (5.3 million ha) that span a wide annual precipitation gradient (150 mm through 1400 mm) with diverse social and natural capital (see Figure). Sustainable intensification hinges on the development and adoption of precision agro-ecological practices that rely on meaningful spatio-temporal data relevant to land use decisions at within-field to regional scales. Specifically, the CAF LTAR will provide the scientific foundation (socio-economical and bio-physical) for enhancing decision support for precision and conservation agriculture and synergistic cropping system intensification and diversification. Long- and short-term perspectives that recognize and assess trade-offs in ecosystem services inherent in any land use decision will be considered so as to promote the development of more sustainable agricultural systems. Presented will be current and future CAF LTAR research efforts required for the development of sustainable agricultural systems including cropping system cycles and flows of nutrients, water, carbon, greenhouse gases and other biotic and abiotic factors. Evaluation criteria and metrics associated with long-term agro-ecosystem provisioning, supporting, and regulating services will be emphasized.

  15. Agro-food Quality and Safety Based on Agro-ecological Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Reflection of the rise of agro-food production costs is analyzed based on the introduction of the quality safety situation of agricultural products in China.Firstly,rise of production costs caused by the demarcation of prohibited areas;secondly,rise of production costs caused by using environment-friendly agricultural inputs;thirdly,rise of production costs caused by quality control;fourthly,rise of production costs caused by product identification.The ecological compensation mechanism which is beneficial to agro-food quality safety is set up according to the principle "the one who is benefited compensates".Firstly,laws and regulations of agricultural production compensation are to be actively perfected.Secondly,experience of developed countries can be borrowed to establish a fiscal transfer payment system of production compensation.Thirdly,ecological agriculture is to be developed to produce products with safety and excellent quality.Since agro-ecological compensation can make up for the costs paid for protecting agro-ecological environment and producing safe agro-products by agro-food producers and is beneficial to motivating producers’ initiative,compensation is made for agricultural producers from compensation objects,compensation scope and compensation mechanism to improve the quality safety level of agricultural products.

  16. Interinstitutional relations on agro-ecological fairs in the region of Campina Grande-PB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramonildes Alves Gomes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the State’s strategies to promote family farming, the practice of agroecology opens up possibilities for increased production and economic dynamism, combining ecological processes to social structures and giving importance to peculiar attributes of local territories. In this article, it highlights the practice of ecologic based agriculture that has increased visibility in the region of Campina Grande-Paraíba State (Brazil, where there are seven Agro-ecological Fairs. It is discussed how farmers, Labor Unions, NGOs and Government Agencies interact for carrying out the mentioned fairs, using as analytical perspective the Actor-Network Theory (ANT, by Bruno Latour. For that, it was used as investigative techniques the non-interventional observation, documental research and semi-structured interviews with the farmers and the different representatives that support the fairs. It’s concluded that the heterogenety on the networks shows differences about the affective support to family agriculture in this research field. JEL-Code | O13; Q18; Q58.

  17. Open-Ended Cases in Agroecology: Farming and Food Systems in the Nordic Region and the US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Charles; King, James; Lieblein, Geir; Breland, Tor Arvid; Salomonsson, Lennart; Sriskandarajah, Nadarajah; Porter, Paul; Wiedenhoeft, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Our aim is to describe open-ended case studies for learning real-life problem solving skills, and relate this approach to conventional, closed-ended decision case studies. Teaching methods are open-ended cases in agroecology, an alternative to traditional strategies that lead students through prepared materials and structured discussions to…

  18. The long-term agroecological research (LTAR) experiment supports organic yields, soil quality, and economic performance in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Long-Term Agroecological Research (LTAR) experiment, at the Iowa State University Neely-Kinyon Farm in Greenfield, Iowa, was established in 1998 to compare the agronomic, ecological and economic performance of conventional and organic cropping systems. The main goals of the project are to evalua...

  19. Agroecology and sustainable food systems: Participatory research to improve food security among HIV-affected households in northern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyantakyi-Frimpong, Hanson; Mambulu, Faith Nankasa; Bezner Kerr, Rachel; Luginaah, Isaac; Lupafya, Esther

    2016-09-01

    This article shares results from a long-term participatory agroecological research project in northern Malawi. Drawing upon a political ecology of health conceptual framework, the paper explores whether and how participatory agroecological farming can improve food security and nutrition among HIV-affected households. In-depth interviews were conducted with 27 farmers in HIV-affected households in the area near Ekwendeni Trading Centre in northern Malawi. The results show that participatory agroecological farming has a strong potential to meet the food, dietary, labour and income needs of HIV-affected households, whilst helping them to manage natural resources sustainably. As well, the findings reveal that place-based politics, especially gendered power imbalances, are imperative for understanding the human impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Overall, the study adds valuable insights into the literature on the human-environment dimensions of health. It demonstrates that the onset of disease can radically transform the social relations governing access to and control over resources (e.g., land, labour, and capital), and that these altered social relations in turn affect sustainable disease management. The conclusion highlights how the promotion of sustainable agroecology could help to partly address the socio-ecological challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. PMID:27475055

  20. Agroecology and sustainable food systems: Participatory research to improve food security among HIV-affected households in northern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyantakyi-Frimpong, Hanson; Mambulu, Faith Nankasa; Bezner Kerr, Rachel; Luginaah, Isaac; Lupafya, Esther

    2016-09-01

    This article shares results from a long-term participatory agroecological research project in northern Malawi. Drawing upon a political ecology of health conceptual framework, the paper explores whether and how participatory agroecological farming can improve food security and nutrition among HIV-affected households. In-depth interviews were conducted with 27 farmers in HIV-affected households in the area near Ekwendeni Trading Centre in northern Malawi. The results show that participatory agroecological farming has a strong potential to meet the food, dietary, labour and income needs of HIV-affected households, whilst helping them to manage natural resources sustainably. As well, the findings reveal that place-based politics, especially gendered power imbalances, are imperative for understanding the human impacts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Overall, the study adds valuable insights into the literature on the human-environment dimensions of health. It demonstrates that the onset of disease can radically transform the social relations governing access to and control over resources (e.g., land, labour, and capital), and that these altered social relations in turn affect sustainable disease management. The conclusion highlights how the promotion of sustainable agroecology could help to partly address the socio-ecological challenges associated with HIV/AIDS.

  1. Prospects from agroecology and industrial ecology for animal production in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, B; Fortun-Lamothe, L; Jouven, M; Thomas, M; Tichit, M

    2013-06-01

    Agroecology and industrial ecology can be viewed as complementary means for reducing the environmental footprint of animal farming systems: agroecology mainly by stimulating natural processes to reduce inputs, and industrial ecology by closing system loops, thereby reducing demand for raw materials, lowering pollution and saving on waste treatment. Surprisingly, animal farming systems have so far been ignored in most agroecological thinking. On the basis of a study by Altieri, who identified the key ecological processes to be optimized, we propose five principles for the design of sustainable animal production systems: (i) adopting management practices aiming to improve animal health, (ii) decreasing the inputs needed for production, (iii) decreasing pollution by optimizing the metabolic functioning of farming systems, (iv) enhancing diversity within animal production systems to strengthen their resilience and (v) preserving biological diversity in agroecosystems by adapting management practices. We then discuss how these different principles combine to generate environmental, social and economic performance in six animal production systems (ruminants, pigs, rabbits and aquaculture) covering a long gradient of intensification. The two principles concerning economy of inputs and reduction of pollution emerged in nearly all the case studies, a finding that can be explained by the economic and regulatory constraints affecting animal production. Integrated management of animal health was seldom mobilized, as alternatives to chemical drugs have only recently been investigated, and the results are not yet transferable to farming practices. A number of ecological functions and ecosystem services (recycling of nutrients, forage yield, pollination, resistance to weed invasion, etc.) are closely linked to biodiversity, and their persistence depends largely on maintaining biological diversity in agroecosystems. We conclude that the development of such ecology

  2. Agroecological evaluation of the principal microelements content in Chernozems at the Central Chernozemic Region of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Sergey; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The ecological evaluation of the principal microelements content in soil cover of the agroecosystems is the important issue of the regional agroecological monitoring which results are actively used for landscape-adaptive land-use design with rational, environmental friendly fertilizing systems. The virgin forest-steppe plots without anthropogenous impacts are usually used as background data of microelements content in dominated zonal Chernozems. The average background content of zinc, copper, cobalt and manganese mobile forms (extracted with рН 4,8 buffer) in 10-20 cm layer of virgin Leached Chernozem at the federal reserve «Belogorye» (monitoring site «Jamskaya Steppe») are accordingly 0.75, 0.19, 0.14 and 12.8 mg/kg. According to RF actual evaluation scale for arable soils the background microelements content in the investigated virgin Chernozems have been corresponded to low level for mobile forms of zinc, copper and cobalt, and to middle level - for manganese ones that essentially limits their natural fertility. The results of carried out in the Belgorod Region in 2010-2014 agroecological monitoring have shown, that most of the arable soils are characterized by low content of the mobile forms of manganese (60 %) zinc (99,2 % of total area), cobalt (94,1 %) and copper (100 %) too that became a serious problem for intensive farming active development in the region. During active agroecological monitoring period since 1990-1994 to 2010-2014 the average regional contents of the principal microelements mobile forms have been essentially decreased: from 1,44 to 0,53 mg/kg in case of zinc, from 17,5 to 9,2 mg/kg in case of manganese - due to low level of micronutrient fertilizers and manure application. It determined the current priority in the agrochemical service development in the region with new DSS-supported agrotechnologies design and essentially increased level of profitable application of traditional and non-traditional organic and mineral

  3. Meat production in sheep hybrids in agro-ecological feeding and growing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sauer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Research points out the effect of feeding young hybrid sheep (Black-faced German x Ţurcană in the conditions of permanent hill grasslands with two technological systems of improving grasslands: the conventional chemical (NPK fertilisation system and the agro-ecological organic fertilisation (sheep folding and over-sowing system. Studies show that the changes in the floristic structure of the grasslands have influenced both fodder yield and quality and meat production and quality. Meat production depending on experimental factors ranged between 189 and 393 kg/ha in the grasslands improved conventionally and between 191 and 461 kg/ha in the grasslands fertilised organically.

  4. The role of trees in agroecology and sustainable agriculture in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leakey, Roger R B

    2014-01-01

    Shifting agriculture in the tropics has been replaced by sedentary smallholder farming on a few hectares of degraded land. To address low yields and low income both, the soil fertility, the agroecosystem functions, and the source of income can be restored by diversification with nitrogen-fixing trees and the cultivation of indigenous tree species that produce nutritious and marketable products. Biodiversity conservation studies indicate that mature cash crop systems, such as cacao and coffee with shade trees, provide wildlife habitat that supports natural predators, which, in turn, reduce the numbers of herbivores and pathogens. This review offers suggestions on how to examine these agroecological processes in more detail for the most effective rehabilitation of degraded land. Evidence from agroforestry indicates that in this way, productive and environmentally friendly farming systems that provide food and nutritional security, as well as poverty alleviation, can be achieved in harmony with wildlife.

  5. Clade-level Spatial Modelling of HPAI H5N1 Dynamics in the Mekong Region Reveals New Patterns and Associations with Agro-Ecological Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artois, Jean; Newman, Scott H; Dhingra, Madhur S; Chaiban, Celia; Linard, Catherine; Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella; Fusaro, Alice; Xenarios, Ioannis; Engler, Robin; Liechti, Robin; Kuznetsov, Dmitri; Pham, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tung; Pham, Van Dong; Castellan, David; Von Dobschuetz, Sophie; Claes, Filip; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Inui, Ken; Gilbert, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has been circulating in Asia since 2003 and diversified into several genetic lineages, or clades. Although the spatial distribution of its outbreaks was extensively studied, differences in clades were never previously taken into account. We developed models to quantify associations over time and space between different HPAI H5N1 viruses from clade 1, 2.3.4 and 2.3.2 and agro-ecological factors. We found that the distribution of clades in the Mekong region from 2004 to 2013 was strongly regionalised, defining specific epidemiological zones, or epizones. Clade 1 became entrenched in the Mekong Delta and was not supplanted by newer clades, in association with a relatively higher presence of domestic ducks. In contrast, two new clades were introduced (2.3.4 and 2.3.2) in northern Viet Nam and were associated with higher chicken density and more intensive chicken production systems. We suggest that differences in poultry production systems in these different epizones may explain these associations, along with differences in introduction pressure from neighbouring countries. The different distribution patterns found at the clade level would not be otherwise apparent through analysis treating all outbreaks equally, which requires improved linking of disease outbreak records and genetic sequence data. PMID:27453195

  6. Beyond yields: Climate change effects on specialty crop quality and agroecological management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Climate change is impacting the sustainability of food systems through shifts in natural and human dimensions of agroecosystems that influence farmer livelihoods, consumer choices, and food security. This paper highlights the need for climate studies on specialty crops to focus not only on yields, but also on quality, as well as the ability of agroecological management to buffer climate effects on quality parameters. Crop quality refers to phytonutrient and secondary metabolite profiles and associated health and sensory properties that influence consumer buying decisions. Through two literature reviews, we provide examples of specialty crops that are vulnerable to climate effects on quality and examples of climate-resilient agroecological strategies. A range of specialty crops including fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, stimulants, and herbs were identified to respond to climate variables with changes in quality. The review on climate-resilient strategies to mitigate effects on crop quality highlighted a major gap in the literature. However, agricultural diversification emerged as a promising strategy for climate resilience more broadly and highlights the need for future research to assess the potential of diversified agroecosystems to buffer climate effects on crop quality. We integrate the concepts from our literature review within a socio-ecological systems framework that takes into account feedbacks between crop quality, consumer responses, and agroecosystem management. The presented framework is especially useful for two themes in agricultural development and marketing, nutrition-sensitive agriculture and terroir, for informing the design of climate-change resilient specialty crop systems focused on management of quality and other ecosystem services towards promoting environmental and human wellbeing.

  7. Impacts of the Climate Change on Agricultural Food Security, Traditional Knowledge and Agroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Türkeş

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses mainly on both impacts of the climate change on agriculture and food security, and multidisciplinary scientific assessment and recommendations for sustainable agro ecological solutions including traditional knowledge responding to these impacts. The climate change will very likely affect four key dimensions of the food security including availability, accessibility, utilization and sustainability of the food, due to close linkage between food and water security and climate change. In one of the most comprehensive model studies simulating impacts of global climate change on agriculture to date, it was estimated that by 2080, in a business-as-usual scenario, climate change will reduce the potential output of global agriculture by more than 3.2 per cent. Furthermore, developing countries will suffer the most with a potential 9.1 per cent decline in agricultural output, for example with a considerable decrease of 16.6 per cent in Africa. Some comprehensive studies pointed out also that all regions may experience significant decreases in crop yields as well as significant increases, depending on emission scenarios and the assumptions on effectiveness of carbon dioxide (CO2 fertilization. One of the tools that would ensure the food security by making use of local sources and traditional knowledge is agroecology. Agroecology would contribute to mitigation of the anthropogenic climate change and cooling down the Earth’s increasing surface and lower atmospheric air temperatures, because it is mainly labour-intensive and requires little uses of fossil fuels, energy and artificial fertilisers. It is also necessary to understand the ecological mechanisms underlying sustainability of traditional farming systems, and to translate them into ecological principles that make locally available and appropriate approaches and techniques applicable to a large number of farmers.

  8. Agroecological urban agriculture - strategy for health promotion and food and nutrition security - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p381

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Ribeiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To raise considerations about the agroecological urban agriculture, in articulation with movements for promotion of health and food and nutrition security, with participation of local communities. Data synthesis: Documental research carried out through the reading and analysis of report, field activities’ records, participants’ testimonies and interview performed with the project coordinator. The contribution of agroecological urban agriculture was perceivable in regard to the community protagonism, popular participation, and the rising of feeding and environmental awareness among social actors. Conclusion: Relevant aspects in consonance with the principles and fields of action of Health Promotion were identified, especially the strengthening of intersetorial actions, the local community empowerment, individual and collective protagonism, creation of health-friendly environments and community mobilization.

  9. Utilization of farm animal genetic resources in a changing agro-ecological environment in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantanen, Juha; Løvendahl, Peter; Strandberg, Erling;

    2015-01-01

    Livestock production is the most important component of northern European agriculture and contributes to and will be affected by climate change. Nevertheless, the role of farm animal genetic resources in the adaptation to new agro-ecological conditions and mitigation of animal production’s effects...... to a future with altered production systems. Some animals with useful phenotypes and genotypes may be more useful than others in the changing environment. Robust animal breeds with the potential to adapt to new agro-ecological conditions and tolerate new diseases will be needed. The key issue in mitigation....... Characterization of breeds and individuals with modern genomic tools should be applied to identify breeds that have genetically adapted to marginal conditions and to get critical information for breeding and conservation programs for farm animal genetic resources. We conclude that phenotyping and genomic...

  10. A method combining simulation models and on farm surveys for ex ante assessment of agro-ecological innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Blazy, Jean-Marc; Ozier Lafontaine, Harry; Thomas, Alban; Meynard, Jean Marc,; Wery, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Agro-ecological innovations are needed to reduce the impacts of current intensive agricultural practices on biodiversity and ecosystems. Whereas many published studies focus on the biophysical impacts of such innovations at field level, few attention has been given to the analysis of the potential of adoption of these innovations at farm and regional levels. In order to reduce the gap between on station and in silico innovation and farmer’s adoption process, we developped an interdisciplinary...

  11. Assessment of soil fertility change and sustainability of agroecological management in different land use systems of the southern Ecuadorian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The thesis was conducted to investigate soil fertility changes and assess the sustainability of agroecological management in different land-use systems of the southern Ecuadorian Andes using quantitative and qualitative methods. Ecuador still holds the highest deforestation rate of all Latin American countries which also has a large impact in the research area by forest conversion into agricultural land. Agricultural land-use systems in the research area are multifaceted due to heterogeneous ...

  12. Effects of climatic conditions and agro-ecological settings on the productive efficiencies of small-holder farmers in Ethopia

    OpenAIRE

    Temesgen Tadesse Deressa

    2011-01-01

    This study argues that the adaptation measures farmers take to reduce the negative impacts of climate change do affect farmers’ efficiency of production. To support this argument, two steps were followed to understand how climatic factors especially long term average seasonal rainfall and temperature; and agro-ecological settings affect production efficiency in Ethiopian agriculture. In the first step, the stochastic frontier approach was employed to analyze the farm level technical efficie...

  13. Memorias del V Congreso Latinoamericano de Agroecología - SOCLA : Trabajos científicos y relatos de experiencias: la agroecología, un nuevo paradigma para redefinir la investigación, la educación y la extensión para una agricultura sustentable

    OpenAIRE

    Sarandón, Santiago J.; Abbona, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Este libro reúne los resúmenes de trabajos científicos y relatos de experiencias presentados en el V Congreso Latinoamericano de Agroecología, organizado por la Sociedad Científica Latinoamericana de Agroecología, que tuvo lugar en la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina, del 7 al 9 de Octubre del 2015. Los trabajos y experiencias abordan diferentes líneas temáticas del amplio campo de la Agroecología y tienen como objetivos: a) contribuir a la difusión de los avances en investigación agroecológica ...

  14. Community vulnerability assessment index for flood prone savannah agro-ecological zone: A case study of Wa West District, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effah Kwabena Antwi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The savannah regions of Northern Ghana are characterized by smallholder farming systems and high levels of poverty. Over the past two decades, communities in the regions have become more prone to climate and human-induced disasters in the form of annual floods and droughts. This study evaluates the degree and magnitude of vulnerability in four communities subjected to similar climate change induced flood events and propose intervention options. The study employs rural participatory research approaches in developing four vulnerability categories namely socio-economic, ecological, engineering and political; which were used to develop indicators that aided the calculation of total community vulnerability index for each community. The findings indicate that the state of a community's vulnerability to flood is a composite effect of the four vulnerability index categories which may act independently or concurrently to produce the net effect. Based on a synthesis of total vulnerability obtained in each community, Baleufili was found to be the least vulnerable to flood due to its high scores in engineering, socio-economic and political vulnerability indicators. Baleufili and Bankpama were the most ecologically vulnerable communities. The selection of vulnerability index categories and associated indicators were grounded in specific local peculiarities that evolved out of engagement with community stakeholders and expert knowledge of the socioecological landscape. Thus, the Total Community Vulnerability Assessment Framework (TCVAF provides an effective decision support for identifying communities’ vulnerability status and help to design both short and long term interventions options that are community specific as a way of enhancing their coping and adaptive capacity to disasters.

  15. Effect of Oily Effluent on Leaf Characteristics of Insitu Park Plants in Guinea Savanna Agroecological Zone of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Alamu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spent engine oil is the hydrocarbon product of crude oil and it is unsatisfactory for plant growth due to insufficient reaction of the soil and the microbes because of the displacement of air from spaces between soil particles This research looked at two major trees used as park plants (Azerdirachta indica and Gliricidia sepium in Ogbomoso North environment of Oyo State. Leaf samples were collected from three different mechanic workshops and three different farmlands in the study area. The leaf samples collected were analyzed using the following parameters, Weight of leaf, Stomata quantity, Leaf area, Leaf acidity and Leaf color difference. The result of the analysis for Azerdirachta indica indicated that leaf weight of polluted trees had a higher average weight of 1.84mm2 compared to that of the unpolluted tree 1.75mm2. The leaf stomata (upper surface of polluted trees had a higher average value 38mm-2. Results for leaf acidity indicated that unpolluted trees had a greater value of 0.142ug/g compared to the average acidity value of 1.423ug/g for polluted trees. Measuring the colour difference; Azerdirachta indica (A. Juss on unpolluted site had the highest colour difference of 0.1566ug/gThe result of the analysis for Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. indicated that leaf weight of polluted trees had a higher average weight of 2.81mm2 compared to that of unpolluted trees 1.42mm2. The leaf stomata (upper surface of polluted trees had a higher average value of 58mm-2. Result s for leaf acidity indicated that unpolluted trees had a greater value of 0.142ug/g compared to the average acidity value of 1.423ug/g for polluted trees. Measuring the colour difference; Gliricidia sepium on unpolluted site had the highest colour difference of 0.1566ug/g. The generic composition of these trees may change over time due to the level of pollution recorded it is therefore recommended that the mechanics should build their workshops far away from trees and the general public should be educated on the danger of using the park plants medicinal purposes.

  16. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  17. Study on the morphology and agroecology of creat (Andrographis panculata ness. in various habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG PUJIASMANTO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Raw material supply which still depends on nature has caused genetic erotion of medicinal plants. The objectives of the research were to study creat (Andrographis paniculata Ness. morphology; and agroecology in many habitat for cultivated be medical substance. The research were conducted at three different locations, ie. at lowland ( 700 m asl.. The result showed that creat growth on 180 m – 861 m above sea level with environmental conditions : temperature 20.320C – 26.930C, relative humidity 78% - 87%, perticipation 2053.2 mm/ year – 3555.6 mm/ year. The creat can growth on soil mineral that contains N medium, P low, K medium, Mg low, Ca verylow until low ,C organic low until medium, and pH less acid until acid. The heihgt plant of creat in middleland is the highest of in lowland and upland, that also leaf of creat. The flower, fruit, and root of creat as good as in the habitat various. The highest andrographolid contain in middleland (2.27%, whereas in lowland (1.37% and upland (0.89%.

  18. Implementing plant biostimulants and biocontrol strategies in the agroecological management of cultivated ecosystems. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Mire, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the context of sustainable agricultural production, agroecology aims at optimizing the economic and environmental performances of beneficial ecosystem services in order to (i increase the productivity and resilience of cultivated ecosystems and (ii preserve their natural resources. The maintenance of such performances is supported by research via the development of new tools that enhance plant tolerance to numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Literature. Biostimulants can be used as a tool to complement the use of chemical inputs, by involving non-living-based products, or living-based products containing beneficial rhizosphere microbiome, such as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. Pest management research has also made major advances in the development of efficient biocontrol methods. Elicitors and semiochemicals are considered to be some of the most promising tools for inducing plant resistance to various diseases and enhancing natural predation, respectively. Several products are already on the market. This review discusses current methods for exploiting and applying biostimulant and biocontrol products in contemporary agricultural systems. Future applications of these tools for sustainable management of cultivated ecosystems are also discussed. Conclusions. These tools are still difficult to use because of their lack of reliability in the field and their uneasy integration in the cropping systems. Further studies are needed to better understand the parameters influencing the efficiency of PGPR, elicitors and semiochemicals. Special attention needs to be given to the formulation and the interactions of these products with plant physiology and the environment.

  19. Gully Morphology and Rehabilitation Measures in Different Agroecological Environments of Northwestern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Kendie Addis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gully erosion is a serious threat to the society and environment of the study, primarily caused by surface runoff and dramatically accelerated due to rugged topography and human induced factors. Intensive measurements of gully characteristics were undertaken to investigate the morphologies of gully, while aiming for sustainable gully rehabilitation; therefore, a total of 63 gully samples from three different agroecologies were randomly observed. The morphological variability of measured gullies was evaluated and the resulting CVs had been between 0.27 and 0.39 except for gully length, which had highest variability (CV = 1.10. The highest gully length (2,400 m and highest lower width (6 m were observed on Dembia district, which might be due to the loose and pulverized condition of the soil. The correlation matrices for many parameters of gully morphology in different districts of Semien Gondar showed several sets of significant relationships. Some of the assessed gullies showed that appropriate physical gully control structures integrated with vegetative measures have resulted in a significant reduction of soil loss and stabilized the gully from further enlargement. There could be various justifications for the success of these structures; however, the most important measures were vegetative management and exclusion of cattle.

  20. Modeling the Agroecological Land Suitability for Coffea arabica L. in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Leonel; Rasche, Livia; Schneider, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Coffee production is an important income source for small farms in Central America, but climate change threatens the production. In order to develop efficient adaptation strategies, an assessment of local conditions and opportunities is essential. Lack or uncertainty of information are common challenges for such assessments. A tool to resolve these challenges is Bayesian network analysis. In this study, we developed ALECA, the first Bayesian network model to evaluate the agroecological land suitability for Coffea arabica L. A new set of suitability functions was created and subsequently used to populate the conditional probability tables of the variables. The variables include temperature, precipitation and dry season length for the climate, slope and aspect for the landform, and soil pH, cation exchange capacity and texture for the soil component. We validated ALECA by comparing a map of current coffee areas, and specific coffee areas with known suitability for coffee production in Central America to the suitability evaluations of the model; and proceeded to explore 1) the capabilities of the model to manage data uncertainty, and 2) the changes to suitability scores under climate change. The results showed that the area suitable for coffee production will decline in Central America under climate change, underlining the need for models like ALECA, which can be used to produce reliable land evaluations at local, national and regional scales under uncertainty.

  1. Colored and agroecological cotton may be a sustainable solution for future textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solimar Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The agribusiness topics ofcolored cottonand fashion do not have any practical scientific literature published on the subject,only when the theme is treated primarily as the aim of sustainability. Colored and agroecological cotton, despite the limitation in color,could become an industrial production with less environmental, impact using less water. The aim of this study was to present the colored fiber and organic cotton, produced by small farmers in the Northeast region of Brazil, as an alternative product to promote sustainability in cotton agribusiness and the textile industry, and to identify the lack of scientific studies related to the theme. Surveys were carried out on available national literature and international database publications on the topic, and the results of research on toxic products used for the production of white cotton and textile industry were presented. Governmental incentives through funding agencies to farmers engaged in this production are suggested, in order to improve production and distribution. It is also necessary to provide the infrastructure necessary for this product to reach the global market, including in cooperation with poorer countries in order to promote changes in environmental impact worldwide in the fashion industry

  2. Perception of Infestation Problems on Cassava Farms and Preference for Weed Management Practices in Humid Agro- Ecological Zone of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Agumagu; Olufemi Martins Adesope; Edna Chioma Matthews-Njoku

    2008-01-01

    The problem of weed infestation on cassava farms is a major factor for low crop yield. This problem has caused untold hardship on the small-scale cassava farms where production at the subsistence level and where farmers still manage to produce some quantity for sale. The study examines cassava farmers’ perception of problems of infestation and preference for weed management practices in the humid agro-ecological zone of Nigeria. Data was collected with the aid of questionnaire and interviews....

  3. Detection and spatial distribution of multiple-contaminants in agro-ecological Mediterranean wetlands (Marjal de Pego-Oliva, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Picó, Yolanda; Masia, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Socio economic activities are more and more producing amounts (in quantity and quality) of non desirable chemical substances (contaminants) that can be found in open air environments. As many of these products persist and may also circulate among environmental compartments, the cumulative incidence of such multiple contaminants combination may be a cause of treat that should not exists taking only in consideration concentrations of each contaminant individually because the number and the type of compounds are not known, as well as their cumulative and interaction effects. Thus prior to any further work analyzing the environmental risk of multiple contaminants their identification and level of concentration is required. In this work the potential presence of multiple contaminants of anthropogenic origin in a protected agro-ecological Mediterranean wetland is studied: the Pego-Oliva Marsh Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain), which is characterized by a long history of human pressures, such as marsh transformation for agricultural uses. Two major groups of relevant pollutants have been targeted according o two distinct environmental matrices: seven heavy metals in soils (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and fourteen emerging contaminants /drugs of abuse in surface waters of the natural lagoon, rivers and artificial irrigation networks (6-ACMOR, AMP, BECG, COC, ECGME, HER, KET, MAMP, MDA, MDMA, MET, MOR, THC, THC-COOH). The wetland was divided in nine representative zones with different types of land cover and land use. For soils, 24 samples were collected and for waters 33 taking in consideration the spatial representativeness of the above mention nine environments. Spatial analysis applying Geographical Information Systems to determine areas with greater incidence of both types of contaminants were also performed. With regard to heavy metals, Zn showed values under the detection limits in all samples, the remainder metals appeared in concentrations surpassing the

  4. The Campesino-to-Campesino agroecology movement of ANAP in Cuba: social process methodology in the construction of sustainable peasant agriculture and food sovereignty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Peter Michael; Sosa, Braulio Machín; Jaime, Adilén María Roque; Lozano, Dana Rocío Ávila

    2011-01-01

    Agroecology has played a key role in helping Cuba survive the crisis caused by the collapse of the socialist bloc in Europe and the tightening of the US trade embargo. Cuban peasants have been able to boost food production without scarce and expensive imported agricultural chemicals by first substituting more ecological inputs for the no longer available imports, and then by making a transition to more agroecologically integrated and diverse farming systems. This was possible not so much because appropriate alternatives were made available, but rather because of the Campesino-a-Campesino (CAC) social process methodology that the National Association of Small Farmers (ANAP) used to build a grassroots agroecology movement. This paper was produced in a 'self-study' process spearheaded by ANAP and La Via Campesina, the international agrarian movement of which ANAP is a member. In it we document and analyze the history of the Campesino-to-Campesino Agroecology Movement (MACAC), and the significantly increased contribution of peasants to national food production in Cuba that was brought about, at least in part, due to this movement. Our key findings are (i) the spread of agroecology was rapid and successful largely due to the social process methodology and social movement dynamics, (ii) farming practices evolved over time and contributed to significantly increased relative and absolute production by the peasant sector, and (iii) those practices resulted in additional benefits including resilience to climate change. PMID:21284238

  5. Local post-harvest practices associated with aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination of maize in three agro ecological zones of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, Analice; Kimanya, Martin; Haesaert, Geert; Tiisekwa, Bendantuguka; Madege, Richard; Degraeve, Szanne; Cyprian, Cypriana; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A survey was undertaken of a total of 120 farmers, 40 from each of the three studied agro-ecological zones of Tanzania, to determine local post-harvest management practices associated with aflatoxin (AF) and fumonisin (FB) contamination of maize. Data on practices (collected using a structured questionnaire) and maize samples were obtained from each of the 120 farmers. FB and AF contamination in the samples were analysed by HPLC. A total of 45% and 85% of maize samples were positive for AF and FB respectively, with levels ranging from 0.1 to 269 μg kg(-1) for AF and from 49 to 18 273 μg kg(-1) for FBs. Significant differences in contamination level were observed among the three agro-ecological zones. Farmers in the three agro-ecological zones practised similar practices in varying degrees. Drying, sorting and protecting maize against insect infestation are practices that showed significant association with AF or FB contamination of maize. Drying maize on mat/raised platform, sorting (damaged, discoloured and moulded grains) and application of synthetic insecticides during storage are practices that were associated with less contamination of maize with AF and FB. The results can be used to advise on effective post-harvest strategies for prevention of AF and FB contamination of maize in rural Tanzania. PMID:26795400

  6. Local post-harvest practices associated with aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination of maize in three agro ecological zones of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, Analice; Kimanya, Martin; Haesaert, Geert; Tiisekwa, Bendantuguka; Madege, Richard; Degraeve, Szanne; Cyprian, Cypriana; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    A survey was undertaken of a total of 120 farmers, 40 from each of the three studied agro-ecological zones of Tanzania, to determine local post-harvest management practices associated with aflatoxin (AF) and fumonisin (FB) contamination of maize. Data on practices (collected using a structured questionnaire) and maize samples were obtained from each of the 120 farmers. FB and AF contamination in the samples were analysed by HPLC. A total of 45% and 85% of maize samples were positive for AF and FB respectively, with levels ranging from 0.1 to 269 μg kg(-1) for AF and from 49 to 18 273 μg kg(-1) for FBs. Significant differences in contamination level were observed among the three agro-ecological zones. Farmers in the three agro-ecological zones practised similar practices in varying degrees. Drying, sorting and protecting maize against insect infestation are practices that showed significant association with AF or FB contamination of maize. Drying maize on mat/raised platform, sorting (damaged, discoloured and moulded grains) and application of synthetic insecticides during storage are practices that were associated with less contamination of maize with AF and FB. The results can be used to advise on effective post-harvest strategies for prevention of AF and FB contamination of maize in rural Tanzania.

  7. Manipulating Crop Density to Optimize Nitrogen and Water Use: An Application of Precision Agroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.; Smith, J. L.; Keller, C. K.; Kruger, C.

    2011-12-01

    Rising levels of reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the environment coupled with increasing population positions agriculture as a major contributor for supplying food and ecosystem services to the world. The concept of Precision Agroecology (PA) explicitly recognizes the importance of time and place by combining the principles of precision farming with ecology creating a framework that can lead to improvements in Nr use efficiency. In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest, USA, relationships between productivity, N dynamics and cycling, water availability, and environmental impacts result from intricate spatial and temporal variations in soil, ecosystem processes, and socioeconomic factors. Our research goal is to investigate N use efficiency (NUE) in the context of factors that regulate site-specific environmental and economic conditions and to develop the concept of PA for use in sustainable agroecosystems and science-based Nr policy. Nitrogen and plant density field trials with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were conducted at the Washington State University Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA under long-term no-tillage management in 2010 and 2011. Treatments were imposed across environmentally heterogeneous field conditions to assess soil, crop and environmental interactions. Microplots with a split N application using 15N-labeled fertilizer were established in 2011 to examine the impact of N timing on uptake of fertilizer and soil N throughout the growing season for two plant density treatments. Preliminary data show that plant density manipulation combined with precision N applications regulated water and N use and resulted in greater wheat yield with less seed and N inputs. These findings indicate that improvements to NUE and agroecosystem sustainability should consider landscape-scale patterns driving productivity (e.g., spatial and temporal dynamics of water availability and N transformations) and would benefit from policy incentives that promote a PA

  8. Pathogen evolution across the agro-ecological interface: implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, Jeremy J; Thrall, Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Infectious disease is a major causal factor in the demography of human, plant and animal populations. While it is generally accepted in medical, veterinary and agricultural contexts that variation in host resistance and pathogen virulence and aggressiveness is of central importance to understanding patterns of infection, there has been remarkably little effort to directly investigate causal links between population genetic structure and disease dynamics, and even less work on factors influencing host-pathogen coevolution. The lack of empirical evidence is particularly surprising, given the potential for such variation to not only affect disease dynamics and prevalence, but also when or where new diseases or pathotypes emerge. Increasingly, this lack of knowledge has led to calls for an integrated approach to disease management, incorporating both ecological and evolutionary processes. Here, we argue that plant pathogens occurring in agro-ecosystems represent one clear example where the application of evolutionary principles to disease management would be of great benefit, as well as providing model systems for advancing our ability to generalize about the long-term coevolutionary dynamics of host-pathogen systems. We suggest that this is particularly the case given that agro-ecological host-pathogen interactions represent a diversity of situations ranging from those that only involve agricultural crops through to those that also include weedy crop relatives or even unrelated native plant communities. We begin by examining some of the criteria that are important in determining involvement in agricultural pathogen evolution by noncrop plants. Throughout we use empirical examples to illustrate the fact that different processes may dominate in different systems, and suggest that consideration of life history and spatial structure are central to understanding dynamics and direction of the interaction. We then discuss the implications that such interactions have for

  9. Persistence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus defined by agro-ecological niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerwerf, Lenny; Wallace, Rob G; Ottaviani, Daniela; Slingenbergh, Jan; Prosser, Diann; Bergmann, Luc; Gilbert, Marius

    2010-06-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has spread across Eurasia and into Africa. Its persistence in a number of countries continues to disrupt poultry production, impairs smallholder livelihoods, and raises the risk a genotype adapted to human-to-human transmission may emerge. While previous studies identified domestic duck reservoirs as a primary risk factor associated with HPAI H5N1 persistence in poultry in Southeast Asia, little is known of such factors in countries with different agro-ecological conditions, and no study has investigated the impact of such conditions on HPAI H5N1 epidemiology at the global scale. This study explores the patterns of HPAI H5N1 persistence worldwide, and for China, Indonesia, and India includes individual provinces that have reported HPAI H5N1 presence during the 2004-2008 period. Multivariate analysis of a set of 14 agricultural, environmental, climatic, and socio-economic factors demonstrates in quantitative terms that a combination of six variables discriminates the areas with human cases and persistence: agricultural population density, duck density, duck by chicken density, chicken density, the product of agricultural population density and chicken output/input ratio, and purchasing power per capita. The analysis identifies five agro-ecological clusters, or niches, representing varying degrees of disease persistence. The agro-ecological distances of all study areas to the medoid of the niche with the greatest number of human cases are used to map HPAI H5N1 risk globally. The results indicate that few countries remain where HPAI H5N1 would likely persist should it be introduced. PMID:20585972

  10. Persistence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus defined by agro-ecological niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerwerf, Lenny; Wallace, Rob G.; Ottaviani, Daniela; Slingenbergh, Jan; Prosser, Diann; Bergmann, Luc; Gilbert, Marius

    2010-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has spread across Eurasia and into Africa. Its persistence in a number of countries continues to disrupt poultry production, impairs smallholder livelihoods, and raises the risk a genotype adapted to human-to-human transmission may emerge. While previous studies identified domestic duck reservoirs as a primary risk factor associated with HPAI H5N1 persistence in poultry in Southeast Asia, little is known of such factors in countries with different agro-ecological conditions, and no study has investigated the impact of such conditions on HPAI H5N1 epidemiology at the global scale. This study explores the patterns of HPAI H5N1 persistence worldwide, and for China, Indonesia, and India includes individual provinces that have reported HPAI H5N1 presence during the 2004–2008 period. Multivariate analysis of a set of 14 agricultural, environmental, climatic, and socio-economic factors demonstrates in quantitative terms that a combination of six variables discriminates the areas with human cases and persistence: agricultural population density, duck density, duck by chicken density, chicken density, the product of agricultural population density and chicken output/input ratio, and purchasing power per capita. The analysis identifies five agro-ecological clusters, or niches, representing varying degrees of disease persistence. The agro-ecological distances of all study areas to the medoid of the niche with the greatest number of human cases are used to map HPAI H5N1 risk globally. The results indicate that few countries remain where HPAI H5N1 would likely persist should it be introduced.

  11. La investigación participativa en agroecología: una herramienta para el desarrollo sustentable

    OpenAIRE

    G. I. Guzmán Casado; A. M. Alonso Mielgo

    2007-01-01

    La investigación participativa en agroecología: una herramienta para el desarrollo sustentable. La agricultura, tanto a escala mundial como de la Unión Europea, está sumida en una grave crisis, que tiene su origen en una compleja trama de problemas sociales (desempleo, envejecimiento de la población rural…), económicos (incremento de los costes de producción, pérdida de renta agraria…) y ecológicos (contaminación de agua, polución del aire, erosión del suelo…). En este contexto, la A...

  12. Agroecología, soberanía alimentaria y la nueva revolución verde

    OpenAIRE

    Holt-Giménez, Eric; Miguel A Altieri

    2013-01-01

    Frente a la crisis alimentaria global recurrente, las instituciones del régimen corporativo alimentario proponen una nueva Revolución Verde acompañada por la continuación de las políticas económicas neoliberales. En tanto que, para empezar, éstas son causas de las crisis, este enfoque puede empeorar el problema del hambre, en lugar de resolverlo. Construir un contramovimiento depende en parte de la formación de fuertes alianzas estratégicas entre la agroecología y la soberanía ...

  13. Una herencia en Manaos (anotaciones sobre historia ambiental, ecología política y agroecología en una perspectiva latinoamericana)

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Alimonda

    2006-01-01

    Este artículo pretende explorar algunas vinculaciones de la agroecología con la historia ambiental, en sus escalas macro y micro, y con la ecología política. Una clave de interpretación es un interrogante sobre la identidad latinoamericana, que es percibida como articulación y sedimentación de varias herencias diferentes, en la cultura, la tecnología, los paisajes y la naturaleza.This article intends to explore some links between agroecology, environmental history (in macro and micro scales) ...

  14. Agroecología escolar en comunidades urbanas mediterráneas. El caso de Sant Cugat del Vallès (Barcelona)

    OpenAIRE

    Llerena del Castillo, Germán; Espinet Blanch, Mariona

    2013-01-01

    Se presenta la agroecología escolar como práctica educativa, que tiene su referente social en la agroecología, a través del trabajo realizado durante seis años en el municipio de Sant Cugat del Vallès (Barcelona). Se trata de una experiencia escolar en red que involucra centros escolares, administración, universidad y el sector de educadores/as agroambientales del municipio. Se presenta la práctica educativa a partir del huerto escolar ecológico y sus raíces agroecológicas. Finalmente, se en...

  15. Effects of Land Use Practices on the Organic Carbon Content, Cation Exchange Capacity and Aggregate Stability of Soils in the Catchment Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Mosayeb Heshmati; Arifin Abdu; Shamshuddin Jusop; Nik M. Majid

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Land use practice leads to changes in the physico-chemical properties of soils, such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC), Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) and Soil Aggregate Stability (SAS) that cause soil erosion. Approach: Merek catchment, Iran suffers from land degradation due to poor land use practice. A study was carried out with the objectives: (i) to determine soil nutrient status in different agro-ecological zones in Merek catchment; and (ii) to evaluate the influence of lan...

  16. Ecological estimation of the soils good for grape in Ganja-Gazakh zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contemporary agricultural science improved the known adaptive approaches in the past, for it accounting natural peccularities of the concrete region is offered with the assistance of agroecological estimation of soil. Using of collecting materials of the soil ecological parameters of soil cover of the studing territory and applying the system of the private scales of the soil estimation on degree of display of their separate signs, the ecological estimation of the soils good for grape in Ganja-Gazakh zone where the highest ecological markshave been got mountain-grey-brown dark (97 marks) and grey-brown dark (96 marks) soils has been carried out

  17. Utilization of farm animal genetic resources in a changing agro-ecological environment in the Nordic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha eKantanen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Livestock production is the most important component of northern European agriculture and contributes to and will be affected by climate change. Nevertheless, the role of farm animal genetic resources in the adaptation to new agro-ecological conditions and mitigation of animal production’s effects on climate change has been inadequately discussed despite there being several important associations between animal genetic resources and climate change issues. The sustainability of animal production systems and future food security require access to a wide diversity of animal genetic resources.There are several genetic questions that should be considered in strategies promoting adaptation to climate change and mitigation of environmental effects of livestock production. For example, it may become important to choose among breeds and even among farm animal species according to their suitability to a future with altered production systems. Some animals with useful phenotypes and genotypes may be more useful than others in the changing environment.Robust animal breeds with the potential to adapt to new agro-ecological conditions and tolerate new diseases will be needed. The key issue in mitigation of harmful greenhouse gas effects induced by livestock production is the reduction of methane (CH4 emissions from ruminants. There are differences in CH4 emissions among breeds and among individual animals within breeds that suggest a potential for improvement in the trait through genetic selection.Characterization of breeds and individuals with modern genomic tools should be applied to identify breeds that have genetically adapted to marginal conditions and to get critical information for breeding and conservation programmes for farm animal genetic resources. We conclude that phenotyping and genomic technologies and adoption of new breeding approaches, such as genomic selection introgression, will promote breeding for useful characters in livestock species.

  18. Una herencia en Manaos (anotaciones sobre historia ambiental, ecología política y agroecología en una perspectiva latinoamericana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alimonda

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende explorar algunas vinculaciones de la agroecología con la historia ambiental, en sus escalas macro y micro, y con la ecología política. Una clave de interpretación es un interrogante sobre la identidad latinoamericana, que es percibida como articulación y sedimentación de varias herencias diferentes, en la cultura, la tecnología, los paisajes y la naturaleza.This article intends to explore some links between agroecology, environmental history (in macro and micro scales and political ecology. A question on latin american identity is a key of lecture. Its is seen as articulation and sedimentation of differents heritages, in culture, in tecnology, in landscapes and in Nature.

  19. Agroecologia, consumo sustentável e aprendizado coletivo no Brasil Agroecology, sustainable consumption and collective learning in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Passos dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O que acontece quando consumidores e produtores agroecológicos adotam uma prática econômica alternativa ao consumo convencional? O presente artigo analisa e qualifica as comunidades aprendentes existentes no âmbito desse tipo de prática econômica. O estudo de caso do grupo de consumo coletivo de produtos agroecológicos Trocas Verdes, situado em Campinas (SP, no contexto da agricultura familiar no Brasil, mostrou que as trocas econômicas são também trocas de saberes. Além disso, tais trocas constituem uma práxis em educação ambiental. As três dimensões da sustentabilidade - econômica, social e ambiental - são as categorias de análise utilizadas para determinar o potencial pedagógico existente na articulação de uma prática de consumo coletivo. A partir da metodologia da pesquisa participante, observou-se que, na venda direta de produtos agroecológicos a grupos de consumidores organizados de forma autônoma ou que funcionam em regime de autogestão, essa prática econômica também caracteriza um processo de educação ambiental crítica, pois possibilita que se apreenda coletivamente a realidade socioeconômica dos atores envolvidos. As dinâmicas socioeconômicas são objeto de aprendizado dos consumidores e pesquisadores atuantes nas compras e, assim, conclui-se que esse tipo de prática promove um aprendizado coletivo. O presente estudo confirma que um importante fator para a existência de comunidades aprendentes é a autogestão da organização social.What happens when consumers and agro-ecological producers adopt an economic practice alternative to conventional consumption? This article characterizes and analyzes the learning communities which exist within this type of economic practice. The case study of Trocas Verdes (Green Exchange, - a group of collective consumption of agro-ecological products, located in Campinas (SP - in the context of family farming in Brazil, has shown that economic exchanges are also

  20. Agro-ecological aspects when applying the remaining products from agricultural biogas processes as fertilizer in crop production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermejo Dominguez, Gabriela

    2012-06-11

    With the increase of biogas production in recent years, the amount of digestates or the remaining residues increased accordingly. Every year in Germany more than 50 million tons of digestates are produced, which are used as fertilizer. Thus nutrients return into the circulation of agricultural ecosystems. However, the agro-ecological effects have not been deeply researched until now. For this reason, the following parameters were quantified: the influence of dry and liquid fermentation products on the yield of three selected crops in comparison to or in combination with mineral-N-fertilizers in on-farm experiments; the growth, development and yield of two selected crops in comparison to mineral-N-fertilizer, liquid manure and farmyard manure in a randomized complete block design; selected soil organisms as compared to mineral-N-fertilizer, liquid manure and farmyard manure in a randomized complete block design. In addition, the mineralization of dry and wet digestates in comparison with liquid manure and farmyard manure was investigated in order to evaluate the effects of different fertilizers on the humus formation under controlled conditions. The 2-year results of on-farm experiments showed that for a sandy soil, the combination of digestates in autumn and mineral-N-fertilizer in spring for winter crops (wheat, rye and rape) brought the highest yields. The wet digestate achieved the highest dry-matter yield as the only fertilizer for maize in spring. In a clayey soil, the use of 150 kg ha{sup -1} N mineral-N-fertilizer brought the highest grain yield. These results were similar to the ones obtained by the application of dry digestates, if they were applied in two doses. Maize showed no signif-icant differences between the dry-matter yields of the different treatments. The results in the field experiments from 2009 to 2011 showed that the effect of digestates on the yield of winter wheat and Sorghum sudanense was up to 15 % lower than the effect of the mineral

  1. La agroecología como base de la formación profesional del administrador de empresas agropecuarias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Manuel Sáenz Torres

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available El sector agrario del país se encuentra frente a la encrucijada de la apertura de mercados y la preservación de los casi deteriorados recursos naturales. Es preciso que desde la universidad, se generen alternativas de gestión sostenible de los recursos agropecuarios, que también involucren calidad y competitividad. Para ello, se necesitan instituciones que buscando en la moderna ciencia de la Agroecología, encuentren cómo afrontar el reto de la globalización en la que ya estamos inmersos. La Facultad de Administración de Empresas Agropecuarias de la Universidad de La Salle, hace eco de la nueva realidad mundial y en sus espacios académicos viene gestando una formación empresarial sustentada en los modernos conceptos agroecológicos para ser irradiados a los líderes agropecuarios del país y sobre todo a los sectores rurales menos favorecidos.

  2. Seed-borne fungi of soybeans (Glycine max [L.] Merr in the guinea savannah agroecology of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Oladimeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed health testing of fifteen soybean cultivars obtained from five locations in the Guinea Savannah agro-ecology of Nigeria was carried out using two main seed health testing methods described by the International Seed Testing Association (ISTA; the standard blotter and two variants of agar plate incubation method (Potato Dextrose Agar and Czapeck Dox Agar plate methods to determine the seed infection by fungi. Seed component plating was also carried out to determine the most active site of infection of the seeds by the fungi. Five fungal species were isolated from the cultivars tested. The percentage of seeds infected with Fusarium sp. and Penicillium sp. was significantly different (p<0.05 among the cultivars, with the highest value standing at 15.20 percent of Fusarium sp. and 8.54 percent of Penicillium sp. in cultivars MSJ and FSSBu, respectively. The difference in the methods of isolation was also significant (p<0.05 and the agar (PDA plate method was the most efficient in the isolation of Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp. and Phomopsis sp. The efficiency of the other methods of isolation however varied for the different organisms. The cotyledon was observed to be the most active site of infection with thirteen of the fifteen tested cultivars showing 40-100% of infection of the cotyledons. The need for soybean seed health testing before their distribution to farmers is made manifest in this study.

  3. Analysis of Constraints to Agricultural Production in the Sudano Savanna Zone of Cameroon and Implication for Research Priority Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M'biandoum, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A participatory rural appraisal (PRA survey approach was used to identify the major constraints to agricultural production and to describe the major production systems in the sudano savanna and sudano sahelian zone of northern Cameroon. Relative emphasis was placed on the household level characterization to have a better understanding of the land use system, farmers' constraints to production and opportunities, so as to better target agricultural technologies and interventions in this vast agro-ecological zone. It was noted that, large variations exist in agriculture management practices between agro-ecological zones, among villages and households in terms of access to resources, such as labour, fertilizers, livestock, farm equipment, and land. Intensive and extensive farming practices might co-exist within the same village and households. The mains sources of vulnerability were identified. Results are used to set research priorities which will be directed towards the need of the majority of area's population; the improvement of sustainable food and feed crop production.

  4. Land husbandry: an agro-ecological approach to land use and management Part 1: Considerations of landscape conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Shaxson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this, the first of two papers, the roles of key features of any landscape in determining potentials for erosional losses of soil and water are considered from an agro-ecological viewpoint. In this light, the effectiveness of past commonly-accepted approaches to soil and water conservation are often found to have been inadequate. In many cases they have tackled symptoms of land degradation without appreciating fully the background causes, which often relate to inadequate matching of land-use/land-management with features of the landscape. A number of reasons for this mismatch are suggested. Understanding the ecological background to land husbandry (as defined below will improve the effectiveness of attempts to tackle land degradation. In particular, an ecologically based approach to better land husbandry helps to foresee potential problems in some detail, so that appropriate forward planning can be undertaken to avoid them. This paper describes some practical ways of undertaking an appropriate survey of significant landscape features, enabling the definition and mapping of discrete areas of different land-use incapability classes. This is accompanied by an example of how the outcome was interpreted and used to guide the selection of appropriate areas which were apparently suitable for growing flue-cured tobacco within an area of ca. 140 km2 in Malawi. This process relied on knowledge and experience in various disciplines (interpretation of air-photos, topographic survey, soil survey, vegetation analysis, hydrology, soil & water conservation, geology, agronomy so as to ensure that the mapping process was based on the principles of better land husbandry.

  5. Effect of two agroecological management strategies on ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) diversity on coffee plantations in southwestern Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Escobar, M X; Armbrecht, I

    2013-04-01

    Simplification of agroecosystems because of industrialization of agriculture may cause the loss of associated animal biodiversity of both vertebrates and invertebrates. To measure how the agricultural intensification on coffee plantations affects ant biodiversity, we intensively sampled ants in Caldono (Cauca, Colombia). We surveyed 15 sites classified into three management types: sun coffee plantations, shaded coffee plantations, and forest patches. Fifteen 50-m linear transects, each one consisting of 5 pitfall traps and 5 tuna baits, were set at each sampling location between December of 2009 and February of 2010. We collected 18,186 ants that represent 82 ant species, 34 genera, and 9 subfamilies of Formicidae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The management intensification index showed an increasing intensification gradient along the 15 sampling locations from forest patches to shaded coffee to sun coffee plantations. Shaded coffee plantations harbored the highest number of species (60), followed by forest (56) and sun coffee (33). Ant species composition and plant structure on shaded coffee plantations resembled the forest patches more than the sun coffee plantations. Forest and shaded coffee plantations had a more equitable distribution of ant species, whereas in sun coffee plantations, Linepithema neotropicum (Emery) and Ectatomma ruidum (Roger) typically outnumbered all other ant species. Evidence from functional groups indicated that specific habitat and feeding requirements exist among the species that are found together. Our results confirmed that intensification of agriculture negatively affects ant diversity, despite the fact that farms were located in a heterogeneous landscape, suggesting that agroecological management is a strong determinant in the conservation of wild fauna. PMID:23575008

  6. Effect of two agroecological management strategies on ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) diversity on coffee plantations in southwestern Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Escobar, M X; Armbrecht, I

    2013-04-01

    Simplification of agroecosystems because of industrialization of agriculture may cause the loss of associated animal biodiversity of both vertebrates and invertebrates. To measure how the agricultural intensification on coffee plantations affects ant biodiversity, we intensively sampled ants in Caldono (Cauca, Colombia). We surveyed 15 sites classified into three management types: sun coffee plantations, shaded coffee plantations, and forest patches. Fifteen 50-m linear transects, each one consisting of 5 pitfall traps and 5 tuna baits, were set at each sampling location between December of 2009 and February of 2010. We collected 18,186 ants that represent 82 ant species, 34 genera, and 9 subfamilies of Formicidae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The management intensification index showed an increasing intensification gradient along the 15 sampling locations from forest patches to shaded coffee to sun coffee plantations. Shaded coffee plantations harbored the highest number of species (60), followed by forest (56) and sun coffee (33). Ant species composition and plant structure on shaded coffee plantations resembled the forest patches more than the sun coffee plantations. Forest and shaded coffee plantations had a more equitable distribution of ant species, whereas in sun coffee plantations, Linepithema neotropicum (Emery) and Ectatomma ruidum (Roger) typically outnumbered all other ant species. Evidence from functional groups indicated that specific habitat and feeding requirements exist among the species that are found together. Our results confirmed that intensification of agriculture negatively affects ant diversity, despite the fact that farms were located in a heterogeneous landscape, suggesting that agroecological management is a strong determinant in the conservation of wild fauna.

  7. Innovative approaches to linking sustainable and agro-ecological production with markets in developing countries: a researcher-practitioner workshop. Final report.

    OpenAIRE

    Vicovaro, Marcello; Loconto, Allison Marie; Santacoloma, Pilar; Vandecandelaere, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    As an output of the international workshop held in Bogota from 23 to 25 June, the Plant Production and Protection and Division and the Rural Infrastructure and Agro-Industries Division of FAO have launched a report on innovative approaches for linking sustainable and agro-ecological production to markets in developing countries (Enfoques innovadores que vinculan la producción sostenible y agroecológica con los mercados en los países en desarrollo). The report focuses on the role of markets...

  8. Ecología política y agroecología: marcos cognitivos y diseño institucional

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Peña, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    La ideología política y el modelo institucional producen “marcos cognitivos” y “marcos institucionales” que favorecen uno u otro tipo de elecciones y conductas. La Ecología Política como generadora de marcos cognitivos (ideología) y marcos institucionales (normas y programas de gobierno). En este trabajo tratamos de identificar las virtualidades que para el desarrollo de la agroecología tiene el contar con marco cognitivos e institucionales afines como los que proponen la Ecolo...

  9. Soil macrofauna functional groups and their effects on soil structure, as related to agricultural management practices across agroecological zones of Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayuke, F.O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding the effects of crop management practices on soil macrofauna and the links with soil aggregation and soil organic matter dynamics, which is key to the improvement of infertile or degrading soils in Sub-Sahara Africa. Soil macrofauna, especially earthworms and termite

  10. Effect of organic fertilizers on soil chemical properties and performance of blackberry (Rubus adenotrichus) in two agroecology zones of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of two organic fertilizers on soil chemical properties and plant performance blackberry (Rubus adenotrichus cv.Vino) in two areas of Costa Rica were evaluated. For this purpose, two experiments were established, one in Buena Vista of Perez Zeledon (BVPZ) and another in San Martin of Leon Cortes (SMLC), both in the province of San Jose, Costa Rica. The research was conducted between August 2005 and July 2008. Three treatments were evaluated in each experiment: Compost (C) and Vermicompost (L), at the rate of 4 kg/plant and 3 kg/plant respectively, and a control without fertilizer (T). The frequency of application of fertilizer at planting was given at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months for a total of 6,6 t/ha for C and 4,9 t/ha for L. Soil samples were taken at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 35 months, after planting for analysis. The results have shown that in both agro-ecosystems, the application of C and L has increased soil pH, reduced acidity, has increased the availability of Ca, Mg, K, N, and P, and has favored the effective cation exchange capacity (ICC) and the percentage of organic matter. The accumulation of Mn, Cu and Zn was not observed. Performance-wise, in BVPZ only significant have found differences (P = 0,00188) between C (1,8 t/ha) and T (0,9 t/ha), while in SMLC, found no differences statistical significant (P <0,05) between treatments. (author)

  11. Crop Farmers' Willingness to Pay for Agricultural Extension Services in Bangladesh: Cases of Selected Villages in Two Important Agro-Ecological Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Ektear MD.; Gao, Qijie; Mamun-Ur-Rashid, MD.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Globally, many extension professionals and policy-makers are advocating fee based services, in addressing the fund shortage and sustainable provision of agricultural advisory services. Hence, the article attempts to expose the farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) as agricultural extension in Bangladesh is experiencing chronic fund crisis.…

  12. Prevalence of the gastro-intestinal parasites of domestic chicken Gallus domesticus Linnaeus, 1758 in Tunisia according to the agro-ecological zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slimane, Badreddine

    2016-09-01

    Helminthosis is a very important disease affecting the poultry industry, especially the traditionally reared free ranging chickens. In Tunisia, the poultry production is considered as the most important source of protein in as much as chickens provide 53 % of animal protein production. The traditionally reared poultry farming system exposes chickens to many types of parasites, however, very little work has been done to establish the extend of helminth infection in Tunisia. The aim of this work is to investigate various aspects of helminth infections. A significant difference (p nematodes included Heterakis spp. (100 %), Ascaridia galli (53.33 %) and Acuaria hamulosa (37 %). The principal cestode species encountered were Hymenolepis spp. (73.33 %) and Raillietina spp. (33.33 %). PMID:27605783

  13. Species Composition, Distribution, and Seasonal Abundance of Liriomyza Leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae) Under Different Vegetable Production Systems and Agroecological Zones in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foba, C N; Salifu, D; Lagat, Z O; Gitonga, L M; Akutse, K S; Fiaboe, K K M

    2015-04-01

    A longitudinal study to identify the species of Liriomyza leafminer, their distribution, relative abundance, and seasonal variation, including their host range, was conducted in vegetable fields at three altitudes in Kenya from November 2011 to November 2012. Three main species were identified: Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard), Liriomyza sativae Blanchard, and Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), of which L. huidobrensis was the most abundant across all altitudes irrespective of the cropping season and accounting for over 90% of the total Liriomyza specimens collected. Liriomyza species were collected from all infested incubated leaves of 20 crops surveyed belonging to seven families: Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Malvaceae, Brassicaceae, Amaranthaceae, and Amaryllidaceae. However, more than 87.5% of the Liriomyza species were obtained from only four of these crops: Pisum sativum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., Solanum lycopersicum L., and Solanum tuberosum, thereby demonstrating that Fabaceae and Solonaceae crops are the most important hosts with regard to Liriomyza species richness and relative abundance. L. huidobrensis had the widest host range (20 crops), followed by L. sativae (18 crops) and L. trifolii (12 crops). Although L. trifolii has been considered the dominant Liriomyza leafminer in Kenya, this study suggests that this may not be the case anymore, as L. huidobrensis dominates at all altitudes. PMID:26313175

  14. Suitability Analysis and Projected Climate Change Impact on Banana and Coffee Production Zones in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujakhu, Nani M.; Merz, Juerg; Kindt, Roeland; Xu, Jianchu; Matin, Mir A.; Ali, Mostafa; Zomer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The Government of Nepal has identified opportunities in agricultural commercialization, responding to a growing internal demand and expansion of export markets to reduce the immense trade deficit. Several cash crops, including coffee and bananas, have been identified in the recently approved Agriculture Development Strategy. Both of these crops have encouraged smallholder farmers to convert their subsistence farming practices to more commercial cultivation. Identification of suitable agro-ecological zones and understanding climate-related issues are important for improved production and livelihoods of smallholder farmers. Here, the suitability of coffee and banana crops is analyzed for different agro-ecological zones represented by Global Environmental Stratification (GEnS). Future shifts in these suitability zones are also predicted. Plantation sites in Nepal were geo-referenced and used as input in species distribution modelling. The multi-model ensemble model suggests that climate change will reduce the suitable growing area for coffee by about 72% across the selected emission scenarios from now to 2050. Impacts are low for banana growing, with a reduction in suitability by about 16% by 2050. Bananas show a lot of potential for playing an important role in Nepal as a sustainable crop in the context of climate change, as this study indicates that the amount of area suited to banana growing will grow by 40% by 2050. Based on our analysis we recommend possible new locations for coffee plantations and one method for mitigating climate change-related problems on existing plantations. These findings are expected to support planning and policy dialogue for mitigation and support better informed and scientifically based decision-making relating to these two crops. PMID:27689354

  15. The Dynamic Analysis of Agro-ecological Economic System on the Basis of Emergy: A Case Study of Wu’an City in Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongya; ZHANG; Meichen; FU; Yan; MENG; Weibin; GUO

    2013-01-01

    Using the method of emergy analysis, we analyze the input and output of agroecological economic system, and select five indicators (net emergy yield ratio, emergy investment ratio, environmental loading ratio, emergy sustainability index, and dominance of emergy yield system) for assessment. The results show that the emergy input-output in Wu’an City is in general on the rise; the emergy investment ratio rises constantly, but the net emergy yield ratio decreases, and the comparative advantage in the prices of agricultural products is gradually lost. At the same time, with increase in the non-renewable industrial support emergy, the environmental pressures are also mounting. In the future agricultural development, it is necessary to pay more attention to the coordination between agricultural development and ecological environment, achieving sustainable development of agriculture.

  16. Zoning Districts, Zoning, Published in 2002, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described as 'Zoning'. Data by this publisher are often...

  17. Towards an agro-ecological village at the Flora Community : reducing greenhouse gas emissions through organic based farming and energy self reliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.; Mulkins, L. [Resource Efficient Agricultural Production-Canada, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ (Canada); Amongo, L.; Yap, E. [MASIPAG, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Mendoza, T. [Univ. of the Philippines Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines). Dept of Agronomy

    2000-07-01

    A former haciendero owned sugarcane plantation in Negros Occidental, Philippines was transformed into a diversified, self-reliant, agro-ecological village, and its transition is documented in this paper. In 1995, through the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program, the Philippine Government awarded 87 hectares of land to 76 hacienda workers. Community organizing, farm planning, training in organic farming, and loan support from a number of social welfare agencies were all areas where the community received assistance. The sugarcane production has been reduced at Flora since the land transition, and the community diversified into the growing of organic rice, corn and vegetables. Through its transition into an agro-ecological village, the Flora community has become more self-reliant in the areas of food and energy. Most individual farms and communally farmed areas have adopted organic based farming practices. The main products sold off the farm are sugarcane and high value vegetables. The MASIPAG rice farming system is being adhered to in the production of rice, the community's staple food. Nitrogen fixed during straw decomposition and the use of azolla, a nitrogen-fixing plant, represent some of the sources of nitrogen for the rice production. Other nutrient sources used are the mudpress from sugarcane processing and rice hull ash. To encourage nitrogen fixation and soil carbon accumulation from cane litter, a system of continuous trash farming was implemented for the production of sugarcane. In excess of 140 water buffaloes (carabaos) are employed for tillage and on-farm hauling, which minimizes the requirements for fossil fuels. Liquid propane gas (LPG), kerosene and wood fuel use in home cooking are being minimized by the efficient rice hull cookers. The local environmental impacts and greenhouse gas emissions are minimized, and the Flora community largely meets its requirements in terms of food security, on-farm energy and income. refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  18. Based on CVM Agro-ecological Compensation in Upstream of Erhai Lake Basin%基于 CVM 意愿调查的洱海流域上游农业生态补偿研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施翠仙; 郭先华; 祖艳群; 陈建军; 李元

    2014-01-01

    Farmers are the core stakeholders of agro-ecological compensation. Their cognition and participation willingness in agro-ecologi-cal compensation greatly influence the efficiency and sustainability of agro -ecological compensation. In this study, contingent valuation method(CVM)was used to collect information including farmersˊ cognition level of eco-environment and agro-ecological compensation and willingness to accept(WTA)agro-ecological compensation in Eryuan County in the upstream of Erhai lake basin. Agro-ecological compen-sation criteria for adjusting agricultural industry structure were also estimated. Total 350 questionnaires were sent out and valid 305 re-ceived. About 70% of farmers showed correct understanding of ecological environment and high cognition level of agro-ecological compen-sation. More than half of farmers who participated in projects of agro-ecological compensation were satisfied with agro-ecological compensa-tion in 2007-2009, while 42.77% farmers were dissatisfied due to low compensation standards and inequities in agro-ecological compen-sation. Farmers preferred policy compensation and technology compensation. Total amount of the compensation for the whole county should be 3.248 0×108 Yuan(RMB)per year. Of four agricultural structure adjustment modes in Eryuan County, 71.15% farmers chose non-zero WTA. Farmersˊ education level, cognition and participating willingness of agro-ecological compensation showed positive effects on the pref-erence of agro-ecological compensation modes, while family income had a negative effect. This study suggests that raising farmersˊ cognition of agro-ecological compensation and performing pilot scale trials of agro-ecological compensation are essential for sustainability of agro-e-cological compensation.%农民是农业生态补偿的主要利益相关者,其对生态补偿的认知态度和参与意愿直接影响生态补偿项目的实施效果和可持续性。以洱海流域上游水源地洱源

  19. Effects of Seasons on Embryo Transfer of Cattle in Different Climatic Zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Feng; Wang; Shenyuan; Zhang; Dong; Han; Lidong; Li; Lu; Huang; Chunhua; Zhong; Gang; Han; Jinlong; Wang; Bingping; Liu; Yiyi; Liu; Caiyun; Pan; Jing; Zhao; Zhichao; Zhou; Huanmin; Zhang; Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper was to evaluate the efficient seasons for embryo transfer of cattle in different climatic zones in China. Three climatic zones(mid-temperate zone,warm temperate zone,subtropical zone) were designed,and embryo transfers had been carried out in spring,summer,autumn and winter from 2009 to 2011,respectively. The total number of transplant recipient cattle was 22 208. The results showed that the best seasons for embryo transfers varied with different climatic zones. In mid-temperate zone,summer and autumn were better while summer was the best,and the rate of pregnant was 50. 67%(the number of pregnant cattle was 8 005). In warm temperate zone,spring and autumn were better while autumn was the best,and the rate of pregnant was 54. 99 %(the number of pregnant cattle was 551). In subtropical zone,spring and winter were better while winter was the best,and the rate of pregnant was 56. 94 %(the number of pregnant cattle was 328). The seasonal average temperatures and relative humidity of the best seasons in different climatic zones were concentrated on the same region. In mid-temperate zone,the mean temperature ranged between 22. 4 ℃ and 24. 2 ℃,and the mean relative humidity ranged from 44% to 55. 3%. In warm zone,the mean temperature ranges were between 14. 2 ℃ and 16. 2 ℃,and the mean relative humidity ranges were from 59. 3% to 71. 6%. In sub-tropical zone,the mean temperature ranges were between 3. 26 ℃ and 7. 73 ℃,and the mean relative humidity ranges were from 72% to 80. 6%. Therefore,the optimized conditions of temperature and humidity of season in different zones could be simulated. It is possible that we apply the program to bovine production in the similar agroecological zones,which is of great significance for improving the embryo transfer efficiency of livestock in production.

  20. Impactos ambientais do manejo agroecológico da caatinga no Rio Grande do Norte Environmental impacts of caatinga agroecological handling in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton Felipe Marinho Barreto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os impactos ambientais do manejo agroecológico da caatinga, em unidades de produção familiar no Rio Grande do Norte, pelo método Ambitec de produção animal - dimensão ambiental, desenvolvido pela Embrapa Meio Ambiente. Foram avaliadas sete unidades de produção familiar, em quatro projetos de assentamentos de reforma agrária do Município de Apodi, RN. Os dados para o levantamento foram obtidos por meio de questionários aplicados aos representantes das unidades produtivas familiares, que atribuíram, a cada variável estudada, um valor que representou a alteração proporcionada pela implementação da tecnologia. Após a inserção dos coeficientes de alteração de cada variável dos indicadores por unidade de produção, o coeficiente de impacto foi automaticamente calculado por meio da planilha Ambitec. O manejo agroecológico da caatinga resultou num impacto ambiental positivo, e suas maiores contribuições foram relacionadas aos efeitos positivos dos seguintes indicadores: capacidade produtiva do solo, uso de insumos materiais, qualidade do produto e diminuição da emissão de poluentes à atmosfera. Dois indicadores geraram efeitos negativos: o uso de energia e o uso de recursos naturais. Pela superioridade dos benefícios gerados, o manejo agroecológico da caatinga é uma inovação tecnológica geradora de impactos ambientais positivos.The objective of this work was to evaluate the environmental impacts of caatinga agroecological handling, in production unities of family farms, in Rio Grande do Norte, using the method Ambitec of animal production - environmental dimension, developed by Embrapa Meio Ambiente. Seven family farm production units were evaluated within four projects of agrarian reform in the county of Apodi, RN, Brazil. The data for surveying were obtained through applying queries to the responsibles for the production units, who attributed - to each studied variable - a

  1. Weed seedbank biodiversity in emmer wheat (triticum dicoccum (schrank schübler in a mountainous agro-ecological oasis (garfagnana, tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macchia Mario

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytocoenoses of conventional agroecosystems are subjected, already from several decades, to the reduction of the weed species present in the various crops. Such floristic decreasing is directly proportional to intensity of the agronomic impact. The present work is born from the hypothesis that the agro-ecological oases, managed with the ancient agrotechniques, are linked by an high degree of plant biodiversity. In this perspective it was carried out not only an analysis of the field emerged weeds, but even an evaluation of the seedbank since this one synthesizes the weed flora of a wider period. In the experimental agroecosystems, selected due to the typical Emmer wheat presence, an high degree of weed species diversity was observed, above all of terophytes, in the emerged flora as well in the seedbank. In both cases relative densities of each species were found low and without any weed dominance. Probably it occurs as a function of the high degree of competitive and allelopathic interactions. Almost scarce was the presence of exhumed seeds of graminaceae virtually due to their inability to store in the soil a persistent seedbank. Of particular importance it was the discovery of two rare species such as Agrostemma githago and Centaurea cyanus disappeared from many years by the landscape of “conventional” agricultural systems. The seedbank was found uniformly distributed in both sampled soil layers (0-15 and 15-30 cm confirming that plowing induced an uniform burial of the annually produced seeds. The total examined soil profile (0-30 cm showed a quantitative seedbank similar to those already found in “biological” agricultural systems (from 12.000 to 47.000 seeds m-2. However it was qualitatively formed even from several weed species of negligible agronomic impact as a function of their scarce competitivity like in the case of some caryophyllaceae (Silene noctiflora and S.alba, boraginaceae (Myosotis arvensis and Echium vulgaris and

  2. Economie agro-alimentaire : Analyse des modèles de consommation des zones rurales au Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedonkeng Pamo, E.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Food Economy : Analysis of Food Consumption Pattern of the Rural Area of Cameroon. An outlook of the major steps of the Cameroon food consumption history reflecting the history of the food consumption in general is presented within the framework of food industry economy. On the basis of the agro-ecological zones of Cameroon, major staple food products and respective consumption pattern are analyzed. From this study it appears that nation wide there are areas where acute food deficiency occurs in spite of the presence or absence of the relative diversity in food production. Research on ways and means to improve these food consumption patterns, is matter of necessity and should have as basis food consumption characteristics and the culture of the different local populations.

  3. Root Apex Transition Zone as Oscillatory Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek eBaluska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command centre. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwins, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.

  4. Changes in physical and biological soil quality indicators in a tropical crop system (Havana, Cuba) in response to different agroecological management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, I; Caravaca, F; Alguacil, M M; Roldán, A

    2003-11-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the response of physical (aggregate stability and bulk density) and biological (enzyme activities and microbial biomass) soil quality indicators to the adoption of agroecological management practices, such as the planting of forage species (forage area) and the rotation of local crops (polycrop area), carried out in a representative tropical pasture on an integrated livestock-crop farm. The pasture system was used as control (pasture area). In all three areas, the values of water-soluble C were higher in the rainy season compared to the dry season. Pasture and forage areas had the highest percentage of stable aggregates in the rainy season, while polycrops developed soils with less stable aggregates. Soil bulk density was lower in the pasture and forage areas than in the polycrop area. In the pasture area, the microbial biomass C values, dehydrogenase, urease, protease-BAA, acid phosphatase, and beta-glucosidase activities were higher than in the forage and polycrop areas, particularly in the dry season. The highest increase in the microbial biomass C in the rainy season, with respect to the dry season, was recorded in the pasture area (about 1.2-fold). In conclusion, the planting of forage species can be considered an effective practice for carrying out sustainable, integrated livestock-crop systems, due to its general maintenance of soil quality, while the adoption of polycrop rotations appears to be less favorable because it decreases soil quality.

  5. Fenologia e produção de cultivares de amoreira-preta em sistema agroecológico Phenology and production of blackberry cultivars in agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Corrêa Antunes

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A amoreira-preta é uma espécie de exploração recente no Brasil. Nos últimos ano, s tem sido dada especial atenção ao cultivo orgânico ou agroecológico dessa espécie. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o comportamento fenológico e produtivo das cultivares de amora-preta 'Tupy', 'Guarani', 'Caingangue', 'Cherokee' e 'Brazos', e das seleções denominadas 'seleção 97' e 'seleção 787' na região de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul(RS, em sistema agroecológico. O trabalho foi realizado na Estação Experimental de Cascata (EEC, Embrapa Clima Temperado. As plantas foram dispostas no pomar, em blocos varietais aleatórios, com 10 plantas por genótipo, perfazendo quatro linhas com duas cultivares por linha. Foram observadas as datas de início da floração e fim da floração, início e final de colheita, massa (gramas e número de frutos por planta, teor de sólidos solúveis totais (°Brix, produção média por planta (g pl-1 e produtividade estimada por hectare (kg ha-1. Para análise das características dos frutos, a média de cada ano de avaliação (três foi considerada como uma repetição. Na região de Pelotas-RS, é viável o cultivo agroecológico de amoreira-preta. Não há diferenças de produção, produtividade, número de frutos e teores de sólidos solúveis totais entre os genótipos estudados.The aim of this research was to evaluate yield and quality of blackberry cultivars Tupy, Guarani, Caingangue, Cherokee and Brazos, and the 'selection 97' and 'selection 787' at Pelotas, in the Southern of Rio Grande do Sul State, under agroecological system. The plants were available in blocks varietal randomized in the orchard, with 10 plants per row, four lines with two cultivars per line. For statistic analysis of the fruit characteristics each year of evaluation (three was considered as one repetition. The characteristics evaluate were the beginning and end of flowering and harvest, mass (g, number of fruit per plant

  6. Using a Remote Sensing-Supported Hydro-Agroecological Model for Field-Scale Simulation of Heterogeneous Crop Growth and Yield: Application for Wheat in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias B. Hank

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of converting global agricultural food, fiber and energy crop cultivation into an ecologically and economically sustainable production process requires the most efficient agricultural management strategies. Development, control and maintenance of these strategies are highly dependent on temporally and spatially continuous information on crop status at the field scale. This paper introduces the application of a process-based, coupled hydro-agroecological model (PROMET for the simulation of temporally and spatially dynamic crop growth on agriculturally managed fields. By assimilating optical remote sensing data into the model, the simulation of spatial crop dynamics is improved to a point where site-specific farming measures can be supported. Radiative transfer modeling (SLC is used to provide maps of leaf area index from Earth Observation (EO. These maps are used in an assimilation scheme that selects closest matches between EO and PROMET ensemble runs. Validation is provided for winter wheat (years 2004, 2010 and 2011. Field samples validate the temporal dynamics of the simulations (avg. R² = 0.93 and > 700 ha of calibrated combine harvester data are used for accuracy assessment of the spatial yield simulations (avg. RMSE = 1.15 t∙ha−1. The study shows that precise simulation of field-scale crop growth and yield is possible, if spatial remotely sensed information is combined with temporal dynamics provided by land surface process models. The presented methodology represents a technical solution to make the best possible use of the growing stream of EO data in the context of sustainable land surface management.

  7. Transformações da terra: para uma perspectiva agroecológica na história Transformation of the land: towards an agroecological perspective in history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Worster

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo discute a constituição do campo da história ambiental, que se deu nos anos 70 em meio aos debates sobre a crise ecológica e a eclosão do movimento ambientalista. Esta história não aceita a noção de que as sociedades humanas não produzem alterações ambientais significativas, e interpela as condições específicas dessa interação recorrente. O sistema agroecológico representa um dos casos mais típicos de rearranjo da atividade humana sobre os ecossistemas naturais, em uma relação complexa de interação entre plantas nativas, vegetação forasteira, fertilidade dos solos e diversas práticas agrícolas. O itinerário dessas mudanças é essencial para se compreender a história do ponto de vista ambientalThis article discusses the formation of the field of environmental history which originated in the 1970s in the middle of the debates on the ecologic crisis and the emergence of the environmental movement. This history rejects the notion that human societies do not cause significant environmental alterations and analyzes the specific conditions of that recurring interaction. The agroecologic system is one of the most typical cases of the intervention of human activity on natural ecosystems in a complex interaction between indigenous plants, exotic vegetation, fertility of the soil and diverse agricultural practices. The roadmap of these changes is essential to understand history from the view point of the environment.

  8. Generalized Fibonacci zone plates

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Jie; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  9. Shanghai's Development Zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Since the early 1980s,development zones began appearing in China.Their Success largely stems from the preferential policies they offer and the safe investment environment they work hard to create.As zones have personalities themselves,it is essential to look beyond the pamphlets and published information and get down to the nittygritty.Shanghai has more State designated Economic and Technology Development Zones than any other city in China.In the following article,we have chosen development zones located around Shanghai and conducted a comparison.

  10. Educación, resistencia y contra-hegemonía: la Escuela de Agroecología del Movimiento Campesino de Santiago del Estero/Vía Campesina

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    El escrito presenta los resultados de una investigación en curso que estudia la construcción de proyectos educativos en el marco de las luchas de los nuevos movimientos sociales. Se centra en una propuesta educativa contra-hegemónica nacida en el marco de un movimiento de resistencia a las transformaciones neoliberales, para jóvenes del Movimiento Campesino de Santiago del Estero/Vía Campesina: la Escuela de Agroecología. Se trata de un movimiento social que surge en el año 1990 en lucha por ...

  11. Serological survey of African horse sickness in selected districts of Jimma zone, Southwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitew, Molalegne; Andargie, Ashenafi; Bekele, Mihreteab; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Ayelet, Gelagay; Gelaye, Esayas

    2011-12-01

    A cross-sectional serological survey was undertaken in selected districts of different agro-ecology of Jimma zone (Dedo, Yebu, Seka, Serbo, and Jimma town) from November 2009 to February 2010 to determine the seroprevalence of African horse sickness virus and associated risk factors of the disease. Two hundred seventy-four equids (189 horses, 43 mules, and 47 donkeys) with a history of non-vaccination for at least 2 years were selected randomly from the above areas. Sera samples were collected and assayed for the presence of specific antibody against African horse sickness virus using blocking ELISA. An overall seroprevalence of 89 (32.5%) was found and it was 24 (51.1%) for donkeys, 13 (30.2%) for mules, and 52(28.3%) for horses. Seroprevalence was significantly (X(2) = 11.05, P 0.05 and X(2) = 3.38, P > 0.05, respectively) associated with seroprevalence of AHSV. The present study showed that African horse sickness (AHS) is highly prevalent disease for the horses followed by mules and then donkeys in Jimma zone explained by lower seroconversion rate. Therefore, control strategy against AHS should target at high risk species of all age and sex in their locality in the initial stage for better containment of the disease.

  12. ZoneLib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jan Jacob; Schiøler, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a dynamic model for climate in a livestock building divided into a number of zones, and a corresponding modular Simulink library (ZoneLib). While most literature in this area consider air flow as a control parameter we show how to model climate dynamics using actual control signals for...

  13. Agro-ecological compensation standard based on emergy analysis in Yongding River basin%基于能值分析的永定河流域农业生态补偿标准

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付意成; 高婷; 闫丽娟; 张爱静; 阮本清

    2013-01-01

      实施农业生态补偿是消除当前农业生产中的负面影响,保证环境友好型农业生产顺利进行的前提.针对当前的农业生态补偿标准计算中,价值受时空动态变化影响较大、投入成本难以准确计量的弊端,借助能值与价值之间的可转化性,给出基于农业可持续发展的生态补偿标准计算体系.选择永定河官厅水库以上流域为研究区,从可更新资源(R)、不可更新资源(N)、物质投入(M)、服务成本(S)的能值计算出发,计算得出永定河流域的农业生产的总能值为3.80×1016 Sej/hm2,其中可更新的能值为1.59×1016 Sej/hm2,不可更新能值2.21×1016 Sej/hm2.研究区农业生产的环境可持续指数(ESI)为0.1056,流域农业处于严重不可持续状态,应实施农业生态补偿进行调整.借鉴能值与生态服务价值之间的可转化性,为实现流域农业生产的可持续,下游区域政府或受益部门应对上游农业水土流失防护补偿约4亿元.该文研究结果的应用表明,基于能值的农业生态补偿标准计算方法具有一定的适用性.%The aim of agro-ecological compensation is to eliminate the negative effects during agricultural production, and promote the strategy implementation of environment-friendly agriculture. At present, agro-ecological compensation standard is greatly affected by the temporal and spatial variation of value, and the inaccuracy of input cost calculation result. Emergy is an important advanced technology in calculation of material inputs and efficiency of agricultural ecological protection quality. The paper gave the study method of agro-ecological compensation standard based on the conversion between emergy and value, as well as the process to calculate agro-ecological protection cost and benefit. On the basis of defining the components within the system, and allowing the identification of inputs and output of agricultural production, the annual emergy flows

  14. Analyzing anthropogenic pressures in soils of agro-ecological protected coastal wetlands in L'Albufera de Valencia Natural Park, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Gimeno, Eugenia; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-04-01

    Coastal wetlands, despite the importance of their environmental and ecological functions, are areas that suffer of great pressures. Most of them are produced by the rapid development of the surrounding artificial landscapes. Socio-economic factors such as population growth and urban-industrial surfaces expansion introduce pressures on the nearby environment affecting the quality of natural and agricultural landscapes. The present research analyses interconnections among landscapes (urban, agricultural and natural) under the hypothesis that urban-artificial impacts could be detected on soils of an agro-ecological protected area, L'Albufera de Valencia, Natural Park, located in the vicinity or the urban area of the City of Valencia, Spain. It has been developed based on Environmental Forensics criteria witch attend two types of anthropogenic pressures: (1) direct, due to artificialization of soil covers that produce anthropogenic soil sealing, and (2) indirect, which are related to water flows coming from urban populations throw artificial water networks (sewage and irrigation systems) and that ultimately will be identified by the presence of o emerging-pharmaceuticals contaminants in soils of the protected area. For the first case, soil sealing a methodology based on temporal comparison of two digital layers for the years 1991 and 2011 applying Geographical Information Systems and Landscapes Metrics were undertaken. To determine presence of emerging contaminants 15 soil samples within the Natural Park were analyzed applying liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of 17 pharmaceutical compounds. Results show that both processes are present in the Natural Park with a clear geographical pattern. Either soil sealing or detection of pharmaceuticals are more intensive in the northern part of the study area. This is related to population density (detection of pharmaceuticals) and land cover conversion from agricultural and natural surfaces to

  15. BLM Solar Energy Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Priority development areas for utility-scale solar energy facilities as identified in the Solar PEIS Record of Decision. An additional Solar Energy Zone identified...

  16. Phase zone photon sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Jia; Xie Chang-Qing

    2009-01-01

    A novel diffractive optical element, named phase zone photon sieve (PZPS), is presented. There are three kinds of phase plates in PZPSs: PZPS1, PZPS2, and PZPS3. Each of the PZPSs has its own structure and is made on quartz substrate by etching. The three PZPSs have stronger diffraction peak intensity than a photon sieve (PS) when the margin pinhole and zone line width are kept the same. The PZPS3 can produce a smaller central diffractive spot than the ordinary PS with the same number of zones on the Fresnel zone plate. We have given the design method for and the simulation of PZPS and PS. PZPS has potential applications in optical maskless lithography.

  17. : Seizure onset zone imaging

    OpenAIRE

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique,; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we re...

  18. AGROECOLOGICAL FACTORS OF FOOD SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moldavan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An experience of development of forms of economy in developed countries is analysed. Ways of development of domestic agriculture are proposed. The paper proved that Ukraine needs a new model of agriculture that was based not on the dynamic growth market of export production, and the balanced development of multipurpose field, which meets the needs of the country in food and foreign exchange earnings, warned to the depletion of natural resources. The extent of devastating effects of industrial model of agriculture development, which is oriented on economic growth without social and environmental price of its growth is revealed. Retrospective analysis of entry in international practice like formal institutional status of an alternative model in which an economic function of a branch (production and income is balanced with ecological (conservation potential land and social (food security is realized. Basic principles of ecologically oriented agriculture as a factor in long-term food security are formulated.

  19. LEGISLATIVE ASPECTS OF AGROECOLOGICAL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg BUDEANU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Moldova has an enormous potential of exploiting the ecologicalagricultural and genetic modified food products. Consumers, especially of EU market, havedemanded both the conformity of products in regard to harmless effects and additionalrequirements for the quality.In this view, in the RM the Law on ecological agri-food products, 6 GovernmentalDecisions, 5 Presidential Decrees, 1 Ministerial Order and several standards were passed. Thebasic principles of ecological agrifood production have been proposed for adoption.Consumers, especially those on European Union markets, don’t ask only the guarantees ofconfirmation of products and of harmlessness in consumption, but solicit additionalconfirmations concerning their quality, including ensurance that the products which theyconsume are pure ecological and genetic unmodified.For that reason, The Parliament of the Republic of Moldova adopted the law “Concerningecological agrifood products” which anticipates settlement of social reports that are under toobtain ecological agrifood products without using the unending chemical substances,inclusively commercialization of ecological food products of vegetal and animal origin. Somegeneral principles of ecological agrifood products were proposed.

  20. Zones of emotional labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2011-01-01

    The paper suggests that due to the difficult nature of their work public family law caseworkers are to be included in the definition of emotional labour even though they are omitted by Hochschild. Based upon a review of the structures involved in emotional labour an explorative qualitative study is...... put forth among 25 Danish public family law caseworkers. The study points to personal, professional, and social zones of emotional labour through which the caseworkers carry out their work. Emotional labour zones mark emotion structures that may be challenging due to complex emotional intersections...

  1. Grid zone drone

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Clive; Cooper, Graham; Field, James; Thayne, Martyn; Vickers, Richard

    2014-01-01

    From 16th – 19th October 2014, co_LAB presented its newest creation, Grid Zone Drone, at Kinetica – an international exhibition providing a global platform for galleries, curatorial groups, design studios and artists working with new media art. 2014 marked the third consecutive year that the University of Lincoln has been represented at the global art fair. Grid Zone Drone represents a continuation of the group’s research into ‘drone culture’, and explores the detachment of the drone withi...

  2. Investigating Root Zone Soil Moisture Using Electrical Resistivity and Crop Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diker, K.; Van Dam, R. L.; Hyndman, D. W.; Kendall, A. D.; Bhardwaj, A. K.; Hamilton, S. K.; Basso, B.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate understanding of soil moisture variability is critical for agroecological modeling and for understanding the implications of climate change for agriculture. In recent years, electrical resistivity (ER) methods have successfully been used to characterize soil moisture in a range of environments, but there remains a need to better link these data to climate variability, soil textural properties, and vegetation and root dynamics. We present results for a novel ER measurement system at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) in southwest Michigan. Permanent multi-electrode arrays were installed beneath a range of annual and perennial biofuel crop types including corn, soybean, various grasses, and poplars. The ER arrays provide both high spatial resolution 2D and high temporal resolution 1D apparent resistivity data (4 week and 2 hour intervals, respectively). These data, along with a forward simulation of electrical resistivity in the soil column, are used to calibrate and refine root growth dynamics modules within the crop growth and soil hydrologic model SALUS (System Approach to Land Use Sustainability). Simulations are compared to 1D TDR-inferred soil moisture data. Variability in root zone dynamics among different biofuel cropping systems is explored. Total water use and efficiency, along with profile root water extraction, vary considerably among the crops.

  3. DNS zones revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanrooij, van Ward; Pras, Aiko; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Recent research [Pap04b] suggests DNS reliability and performance is not up to the levels it should be due to misconfigurations. This paper checks the configuration of nameserver zones against additional requirements, recommendations and best-practices. It shows that almost one in four domains fails

  4. Determinants of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] production system in Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Carmelle Zoundji; Pascal Houngnandan; Houinsou Dedehouanou; Fatiou Toukourou

    2015-01-01

    Present study was conducted to analyze the soybean production system in Benin. Data were collected from 324 soybean producers selected from the three major soybean-producing agro-ecological areas i.e. agro-ecological zone 3 (southern Borgou), agro-ecological zone 4 (West Atacora) and agro-ecological zone 5 (Cotton zone of the Centre of Benin). A participatory research approach with group discussions followed by individual interviews was carried out for extracting the information f...

  5. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - MDC_EnterpriseZone

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Polygon feature class of Miami Dade County Enterprise Zones. Enterprise Zones are special areas in the county where certain incentives from the State are available...

  6. ZONE OF COOPERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The China-ASEAN Economic Zone is attracting more and more investors from both Southeast Asia and China Compared with other countries that have established free trade areas with ASEAN, China owns millions of unique advantages. Millions, after all, is the quantity of Chinese living in ASEAN countries. "With ties of blood, geography and commerce, business people of Chinese descent can be the best candidates to pro-

  7. Cape Verde Frontal Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Zenk, Walter; Klein, Birgit; Schröder, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The term Cape Verde Frontal Zone is introduced to characterize the southeastern corner of the subtropical gyre circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean far west of the upwelling area off the Mauretanean shelf. Two water mass fronts, one overlying the other, are identified with a quasi-synoptic set of CTD-OZ and nutrient data from November 1986. In the warm water sphere we encounter North and South Atlantic Central Water (NACWISACW) superimposed on extensions of Mediterranean outflow and Antarc...

  8. The uncomfortable comfort zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Whenever we achieve the satisfaction of our expectations and anxiety dissolves, we feel as if we were in a comfort zone – safe, complete, free from risks and in peace with ourselves. We might even have a little taste of heaven when we feel that we have fulfilled our duty. And as a fact, scientists are entitled to this kind of reward… but not for too long! In science, to enter a comfort zone can be as pleasant as dangerous. On one hand we may have a safe ground available to develop new modes of reasoning, protocols and theories. And on the other, we may stay stuck in a conventional but fragile ground, missing opportunities to reveal novel secrets or to address edge issues. ... The community of HD researchers seems to have entered a new comfort zone when nanostructures were found in HD. Nanostructures have been raised to the level of ultimate evidence doing away with Avogadro’s limit and leading homeopathy and HD research into mainstream science. We really should enjoy this moment and collect more information about the HD phenomenon. However, we must be wary to not fall into a trap.

  9. Blasting of broken marble zones

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Stojceski, Igor; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    On receipt of marble blocks appear deformed zones with presence of cracks and other deformities and very small cracks with different azimuth in the rocky massif. The fastest and economical way to bring this zone are removed by applying the methods of blasting. Before blasting, these tables - zones are limited by the block, making the cuts with diamond wire because explosive action may cause of surrounding quality marble blocks. Keywords: blasting, crashed zones, cracks, marble ...

  10. Smartphones and Time Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  11. Parapapillary atrophy: histological gamma zone and delta zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine histomorphometrically the parapapillary region in human eyes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The histomorphometric study included 65 human globes (axial length:21-37 mm. On anterior-posterior histological sections, we measured the distance Bruch's membrane end (BME-optic nerve margin ("Gamma zone", BME-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE ("Beta zone", BME-beginning of non-occluded choriocapillaris, and BME-beginning of photoreceptor layer. "Delta zone" was defined as part of gamma zone in which blood vessels of at least 50 µm diameter were not present over a length of >300 µm. Beta zone (mean length:0.35±0.52 mm was significantly (P = 0.01 larger in the glaucoma group than in the non-glaucomatous group. It was not significantly (P = 0.28 associated with axial length. Beta zone was significantly (P = 0.004 larger than the region with occluded choriocapillaris. Gamma zone (mean length:0.63±1.25 mm was associated with axial length (P50 µm diameter within gamma zone was present only in highly axially elongated globes and was not related with glaucoma. Beta zone (Bruch's membrane without RPE was correlated with glaucoma but not with globe elongation. Since the region with occluded choriocapillaris was smaller than beta zone, complete loss of RPE may have occurred before complete choriocapillaris closure.

  12. The Near Zone to Far Zone Transformation (N2F)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackfield, Donald T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, Brian R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-11

    N2F is a C/C++ code used to calculate the far zone electromagnetic (EM) field, given E and H near zone field data. The method used by N2F can be found in Ref. 1 and 2. N2F determines the far field EΦ and Eθ in spherical coordinates for near zone data calculated in either Cartesian or Cylindrical geometry.

  13. Effects of Land Use Practices on the Organic Carbon Content, Cation Exchange Capacity and Aggregate Stability of Soils in the Catchment Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Heshmati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Land use practice leads to changes in the physico-chemical properties of soils, such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC and Soil Aggregate Stability (SAS that cause soil erosion. Approach: Merek catchment, Iran suffers from land degradation due to poor land use practice. A study was carried out with the objectives: (i to determine soil nutrient status in different agro-ecological zones in Merek catchment; and (ii to evaluate the influence of land use practices on SOC, CEC and SAS. Results: It was found that soil texture was silty and clay, while soil reaction was alkaline (pH was 7.75. The respective amount of carbonates was 32 and 36% in the top-soil and sub-soil respectively, indicating high level of alkalinity in the soils of the study area. The mean SAS of the surface soil layer for agriculture, rangeland and forest was 53, 61 and 64%, respectively with its mean in the topsoil of agriculture is significantly lower (P≤0.05 than the other zones. SOC level in the agriculture, rangeland and forest were 1.35, 1.56, 2.14 % in the topsoil and 1.03, 1.33 and 1.45%, in the subsoil of the respective areas. The results of t-test and ANOVA analyses showed that SOC means are significantly different from each other within soil depth and among agro-ecological zones. The CEC in the agriculture, rangeland and forest areas were 25.8, 24.6 and 35.1 cmolckg-1 for the top-soil and 31.1, 26.8 and 26.9 cmolckg-1 in the sub-soil, respectively. All the above changes are due to the negative effects of agricultural activities. Conclusion: Improper tillage practice (up-down the slope, conversion of the rangeland and forest to rain-fed areas, crop residue burning, over grazing and forest clearance contribute to reduction in SOC and SAS in the Merek catchment, Iran.

  14. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - Volusia County Enterprise Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Florida's Enterprise Zone Program encourages economic growth and investment in distressed areas by offering tax advantages and incentives to businesses that are...

  15. Nairu en zone heureuse

    OpenAIRE

    Reynès, Frédéric; Lemoine, Matthieu; Veroni, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Cette étude spéciale propose des estimations du niveau non inflationniste du taux de chômage (Nairu) pour la zone euro agrégée, pour la France, l’Italie et l’Allemagne. Une équation d’inflation, qui dépend de l’écart du taux de chômage au Nairu, est estimée par le filtre de Kalman. Le modèle le plus simple, qui considère le Nairu comme une marche aléatoire, a des capacités prédictives limitées. Il diagnostique un taux de chômage inférieur au Nairu à l’horizon de notre prévision. Il est con...

  16. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  17. The zone of alienation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years after the nuclear disaster, people still live and die in Chernobyl. Thousands of people continue to live and work there. Roughly 500 have moved back into their old homes inside the alienation zone. Fewer than half still alive. Medical researchers in the area insist that immune systems are weakened by doses of radiation far lower than previously thought. However, an European Union sponsored study concluded that Chernobyl's toll has been exaggerated. Thus, while 760 children in the contaminated area have developed thyroid cancer, only three have died as a result. Yet in and around Chernobyl, people carry on their lives and the Ukrainian Government says it can't afford to close the plant without billions of dollars in Western aid. ills

  18. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Miracle, Ann L.

    2012-11-01

    Contaminants in vadose zone environments pose a long-term source and threat to groundwater resources, human health, and the environment. Several technical, regulatory, and policy challenges and opportunities are associated with contamination in vadose zone environments, particularly in remediation. In this special issue, ten papers present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments.

  19. Street Prostitution Zones and Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Bisschop, Paul; Kastoryano, Stephen; Van der Klaauw, Bas

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of introducing legal street prostitution zones on both registered and perceived crime. We exploit a unique setting in the Netherlands where legal street prostitution zones were opened in nine cities under different regulation systems. We provide evidence that the opening of these zones was not in response to changes in crime. Our difference-in-difference analysis using data on the largest 25 Dutch cities between 1994 and 2011 shows that opening a legal street pr...

  20. Learning About Intervention Target Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Michael W; Karen K. Lewis

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for evaluating how market participants' beliefs about foreign exchange target zones change as they learn about central bank intervention policy. In order to examine this behavior, we first generalize the standard target zone model to allow for intra-marginal intervention. Intra-marginal intervention implies that the position of market participants' beliefs about the target zone can be determined from their beliefs about the likelihood of intervention. As an app...

  1. Race, Ethnicity, and Discriminatory Zoning

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Shertzer; Tate Twinam; Randall P. Walsh

    2014-01-01

    Zoning has been cited as a discriminatory policy tool by critics, who argue that ordinances are used to deter the entry of minority residents into majority neighborhoods through density restrictions (exclusionary zoning) and locate manufacturing activity in minority neighborhoods (environmental racism). However, identifying discrimination in these regulations is complicated by the fact that land use and zoning have been co-evolving for nearly a century in most American cities, rendering resid...

  2. Problems of Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone, aimed at the development of technologies, equipment and devices for radioactive waste management and ChNPP accident clean-up, at studying the composition and structure of the Exclusion zone soil activity solid bearers, form transformation of the fission products of fuel fallout radionuclide composition in the ChNPP near zone, the spatial distribution of radionuclides and other radioecological issues.. Much attention is paid to medical and biological aspects of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health, labour conditions and incidence of the workers of the Exclusion zone

  3. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, δ-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal

  4. Instrumentation for coastal zone management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_91.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_91.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  5. Management of coastal zone vegetation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.

    stream_size 14 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_22.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_22.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  6. Excavation damaged zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, T.; Salzer, K.; Minkley, W. [Institut fur Gebirgsmechanik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Gibert, D.; Nicollin, F.; Kergosien, B. [Rennes-1 Univ., GdR FORPRO (CNRS/ANDRA GdR 788) and Geosciences Rennes (CNRS/UR1 UMR 6118) (France); Bossart, P. [Federal Office for Topography, Wabern (Switzerland); Nussbaum, C. [Institut Geotechnique SA, St-Ursanne (Switzerland); Robinet, J.C.; Nguyen, M.T. [EGC Euro-Geomat-Consulting, 45 - Orleans (France); Barnichon, J.D.; Plas, F. [ANDRA - Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Ghorbani, A.; Cosenza, P.; Florsch, N. [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., UMR 7619 Sisyphe, 75 - Paris (France); Revil, A.; Jougnot, D. [Aix-Marseille-2, UMR 6635, CNRS-CEREGE, 13 (France); Schmutz, M. [EGID, M. de Montaigne Univ., 33 - Pessac (France); Contrucci, I.; Klein, E. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Ecole des Mines de Nancy, 54 - Nancy (France); Cabrera, J.; Ben-Slimane, K.; Rejeb, A.; Matray, J.M.; Savoye, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maiolino, S. [Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Mecanique des Solides, UMR 7649, LMS, 91 - Palaiseau (France); CETE de Lyon/LRPC de Lyon/Meca Roches/ ERA, 69 - Bron (France); Yong, S.; Loew, S.; Fidelibus, C.; Lemy, F. [Engineering Geology, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Frank, E. [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK), Villigen (Switzerland); Chun-Liang, Zhang; Tilmann, Rothfuchs [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 10 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of bedding planes to EDZ evolution and the coupled HM properties of Opalinus Clay; the electrical tomography monitoring of the EDZ during the excavation of the gallery 04 in the Mont Terri rock laboratory; the seismic endoscopy and tomography of the EDZ of the gallery 04 in the Mont Terri rock laboratory; a elastoplastic damage model for saturated and unsaturated stiffness clays: description and application to the modelling of EDZ around drifts in Callovo-Oxfordian argillites; the non-invasive monitoring of water content and microcracks in argillites using spectral induced polarization; EDZ investigations by ultrasonic borehole logging in drifts of different ages excavated in argillaceous formations of the Tournemire experimental station (Aveyron, France); the excavation damaged zones in the argillaceous Tournemire site: characterisation and failure mechanisms; the hardening-based degradation factor: influence of mean stress and stiffness; the disturbance in the EDZ in the Opalinus clay at Mont Terri; and the experimental study on self-sealing capacity of clay rocks.

  7. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  8. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  9. Mechanical properties of fracture zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available data on mechanical characteristics of fracture zones are compiled and discussed. The aim is to improve the basis for adequate representation of fracture zones in geomechanical models. The sources of data researched are primarily borehole investigations and case studies in rock engineering, involving observations of fracture zones subjected to artificial load change. Boreholes only yield local information about the components of fracture zones, i.e. intact rock, fractures and various low-strength materials. Difficulties are therefore encountered in evaluating morphological and mechanical properties of fracture zones from borehole data. Although often thought of as macroscopically planar features, available field data consistently show that fracture zones are characterized by geometrical irregularities such as thickness variations, surface undulation and jogs. These irregularities prevail on all scales. As a result, fracture zones are on all scales characterized by large, in-plane variation of strength- and deformational properties. This has important mechanical consequences in terms of non-uniform stress transfer and complex mechanisms of shear deformation. Field evidence for these findings, in particular results from the underground research laboratory in Canada and from studies of induced fault slip in deep mines, is summarized and discussed. 79 refs

  10. Formalized morphostructural zoning of the mountain zone of the Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielov, A.M.; Gvishiani, A.D.; Zhidkov, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A plan is presented for morphostructural zoning of the Andes compiled according to formalized signs for purposes of seismic forecasting. Characteristics are presented for the basic morphostructural subdivisions of the Andes.

  11. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone with the aim to develop technology, equipment and instruments for RAW management and accident clean-up, studying of the composition and structure of the activity solid bearers in the soil of the exclusion zone and transformation of the radionuclides in the nearest zone of ChNPP. Much attention is paid to medical and biological problems of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health labour conditions and incidence of the people involved

  12. Problems of Chornobyl Exclusion Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone with the aim to develop technology, equipment and instruments for RAW management and accident clean-up, studying of the composition and structure of the activity solid bearers in the soil of the exclusion zone and transformation of the radionuclides in the nearest zone of ChNPP. Much attention is paid to medical and biological problems of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health, labour conditions and incidence of the people involved.

  13. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  14. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  15. Development Zones Flourish in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Based on the Beijing Municipal Government's plans for developing the city and neighboring suburbs,and after more than 10 years in development,the Beijing Development Zones have taken shape,each with their own characteristics.

  16. ShoreZone Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a point file showing GPS trackline data collected during a ShoreZone aerial imaging survey. This flight trackline is recorded at 1-second intervals...

  17. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  18. Tamanho de amostra para avaliação de caracteres de cenoura em sistemas de cultivo agroecológico Sample size for evaluation of carrot traits in agroecologic cultivation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Olegário da Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O correto dimensionamento de experimentos deve ser utilizado para que se possa reduzir o erro experimental e com isso, maximizar a precisão das informações obtidas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar o número mínimo de famílias e de plantas por parcela para avaliação de caracteres de raiz em uma população de cenoura cultivada em sistema agroecológico. Os ensaios foram conduzidos no verão de 2006/2007 em duas propriedades com cultivo agroecológico em Brasília: Associação Mokiti Okada, que segue modelo de Agricultura Natural em Brazlândia-DF e Núcleo Rural Taguatinga, seguindo modelo de Agricultura Orgânica em Taguatinga-DF. Foram avaliadas 100 famílias de meio-irmãos de cenoura dispostas em delineamento de blocos casualizados com duas repetições e parcelas de 1 m². Foram colhidas 20 plantas competitivas por parcela e avaliadas individualmente para os caracteres comprimento de raiz, diâmetro da raiz, massa da raiz, diâmetro do xilema da raiz, relação diâmetro do xilema/diâmetro da raiz, tipo de ponta da raiz, tipo de ombro da raiz, parâmetro a* para os tecidos xilema e floema. Foi realizada análise de variância conjunta e para cada sistema, com informação entre e dentro de parcelas. Foram realizadas ainda análises de representatividade do número mínimo de famílias e de plantas para representar uma população de cenoura. Foi verificado que uma amostra de 18 plantas competitivas/parcela coletadas em ensaios com 2 repetições, bem como de 74 famílias, são suficientes para garantir uma adequada avaliação de famílias meio-irmãos de cenoura para os caracteres estudados.The correct experiment design should be used to reduce the experimental error and, with that, maximize the precision of the information obtained. The objective of this work was to estimate the minimum number of families and of plants per plot for evaluation of root traits in a carrot population cultivated in agroecologic systems. The

  19. Stepped conical zone plate antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltse, James C.

    2001-07-01

    The Fresnel zone plate lens was invented and developed for optical frequencies. However, fabrication difficulties at the short optical wavelengths have prevented obtain good efficiencies. At longer microwave or millimeter-wavelengths fabrication is easier and phase correcting zone plate antennas have been used to obtain good efficiencies. This paper describes a new type of phase correcting zone plate having even better efficiency, namely a diffraction efficiency of 99 percent compared to a true lens, and an overall efficiency much better than a true lens. For the usual zone plate antenna employed at microwave or millimeter wavelengths, path length adjustment is accomplished by cutting different depths in a dielectric plate or by using two or more dielectrics having different dielectric constants. The new design uses a tilted cut in a dielectric plate, which more accurately matches the shape of a true lens and produces much lower phase error. The construction is still near and can be made for example, by a milling machine with a tilted bit. For a circular zone plate, the lens is a stepped conical or tapered shape. Because the phase steps are small, the far-field antenna pattern is excellent and sidelobe-levels are very low. Analysis of typical configurations will be given, showing that phase errors are small, lower than those for an eighth-wave corrected phase zone plate.

  20. The global aftershock zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Margaret Segou,; Warner Marzocchi,

    2014-01-01

    The aftershock zone of each large (M ≥ 7) earthquake extends throughout the shallows of planet Earth. Most aftershocks cluster near the mainshock rupture, but earthquakes send out shivers in the form of seismic waves, and these temporary distortions are large enough to trigger other earthquakes at global range. The aftershocks that happen at great distance from their mainshock are often superposed onto already seismically active regions, making them difficult to detect and understand. From a hazard perspective we are concerned that this dynamic process might encourage other high magnitude earthquakes, and wonder if a global alarm state is warranted after every large mainshock. From an earthquake process perspective we are curious about the physics of earthquake triggering across the magnitude spectrum. In this review we build upon past studies that examined the combined global response to mainshocks. Such compilations demonstrate significant rate increases during, and immediately after (~ 45 min) M > 7.0 mainshocks in all tectonic settings and ranges. However, it is difficult to find strong evidence for M > 5 rate increases during the passage of surface waves in combined global catalogs. On the other hand, recently published studies of individual large mainshocks associate M > 5 triggering at global range that is delayed by hours to days after surface wave arrivals. The longer the delay between mainshock and global aftershock, the more difficult it is to establish causation. To address these questions, we review the response to 260 M ≥ 7.0 shallow (Z ≤ 50 km) mainshocks in 21 global regions with local seismograph networks. In this way we can examine the detailed temporal and spatial response, or lack thereof, during passing seismic waves, and over the 24 h period after their passing. We see an array of responses that can involve immediate and widespread seismicity outbreaks, delayed and localized earthquake clusters, to no response at all. About 50% of the

  1. Potencial agroecológico de Ateleia cubensis (DC Dietr. var. cubensis (Griseb. Mohlenber en condiciones naturales del núcleo ultramáfico de Camagüey/Agroecological potential of Ateleia cubensis (DC Dietr. var. cubensis (Griseb. Mohlenber in natural conditions of Camagüey ultramafic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delmy Triana González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Con el objetivo de evaluar el potencial agroecológico de Ateleia cubensis (DC Dietr. var. cubensis (Griseb. Mohlenber en condiciones naturales del núcleo ultramáfico de Camagüey, se desarrolló un estudio en el municipio Minas, durante los meses comprendidos entre enero del 2014 y enero del año 2015, sobre un suelo Fersialítico rojo pardusco ferromagnesial (Inceptisol - Cambisol. Se estimó la densidad natural de la especie en el área a través de 20 parcelas de muestreo permanentes (36 m2 distribuidas aleatoriamente, se determinó la densidad de la madera para ser utilizada en el cálculo del carbono retenido, el volumen de madera, raíces, follaje y hojarasca. Los resultados muestran una densidad de 8 055 plantas /ha de A. cubensis con beneficios desde el punto de vista agroecológico reconocido por las bondades que ofrece al ecosistema. ABSTRACT Agroecological potential of Ateleia cubensis (DC Dietr. var. cubensis (Griseb. Mohlenber in natural conditions of Camagüey ultramafic core In order to evaluate the agroecological potential of o Ateleia cubensis (DC Dietr. var. cubensis (Griseb. Mohlenber in natural conditions of Camagüey ultramafic core, a study was conducted in the municipality Minas, during the months between January 2014 and January 2015, on a brownish red soil Fersialitic ferromagnesian (Inceptisol - Cambisol. The natural density of the species in the area through 20 permanent sample plots (36 m2 randomly distributed, estimated density of the wood to be used in the calculation of carbon retained, the volume of wood, roots, foliage was determined and stubble. The results show a density of 8 055 plants / ha of A. cubensis with benefits from the agroecological point of view recognized the advantages offered to ecosystem.

  2. Zone and double zone diagrams in abstract spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Reem, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A zone diagram of order $n$ is a relatively new concept which was first defined and studied by T. Asano, J. Matousek and T. Tokuyama. It can be interpreted as a state of equilibrium between $n$ mutually hostile kingdoms. Formally, it is a fixed point of a certain mapping. These authors considered the Euclidean plane and proved the existence and uniqueness of zone diagrams there. In the present paper we generalize this concept in various ways. We consider $m$-spaces (a simple generalization of metric spaces) and prove some existence and (non)uniqueness results there. In contrast to previous works, our proofs are based on purely order theoretic arguments. Many explicit examples are given, and some of them illustrate new phenomena which occur in the general case. We also re-interpret zone diagrams as a stable configuration in a certain combinatorial game, and provide an algorithm for finding this configuration in a particular case.

  3. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone with the aim to develop technology, equipment and instruments for RAW management and accident clean-up, studying of the composition and structure of the activity solid bearers in the soil of the exclusion zone and transformation of the radionuclides in the nearest zone of ChNPP. Much attention is paid to medical and biological problems of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health, labour conditions and incidence of the people involved. The collection comprises the information for scientists, experts, postgraduates and students in gaged in ecology, radioecology, nuclear engineering, radiology, radiochemistry and radiobiology

  4. Earthquake Zoning Maps of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earthquake Zoning Maps (1945, 1947, 1963, 1972 and 1996) and Specifications for Construction in Disaster Areas (1947, 1953, 1962, 1968, 1975, 1996, 1997 and 2006) have been changed many times following the developments in engineering seismology, tectonic and seismo-tectonic invention and improved earthquake data collection. The aim of this study is to give information about this maps, which come into force at different dates since the introduction of the firs official Earthquake Zoning Map published in 1945 and is to assist for better understanding of the development phases of these maps

  5. AGROECOLOGY: BASIS OF SUSTAINABILITY AGROECOSYSTEMSDiante da insustentabilidade ambiental dos sistemas de produção agrícolas na atualidade, o enfoque agroecológico surge como uma alternativa sustentável aos agroecossistemas. A ciência agroecológica trabal Agroecologia: base da sustentabilidade dos agroecossistemas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Loreto Vargas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the environmental unsustainability of agricultural production systems today, the agroecological approach is an alternative to sustainable agroecosystems. The agroecological science works with the idea of biodiversity, the interaction of various plants and animals, which should keep a crop diversification, as well as organic matter and microorganisms in the soil acting, without the use of chemical intervention. Questions which will contribute to increased productivity, for reestablishment and maintenance of balance and hence Agroecosystems, for processing and social environment in a way that it holds over time.Diante da insustentabilidade ambiental dos sistemas de produção agrícolas na atualidade, o enfoque agroecológico surge como uma alternativa sustentável aos agroecossistemas. A ciência agroecológica trabalha com a idéia de biodiversidade, da interação de diversas plantas e animais, onde deve-se manter uma diversificação de culturas, assim como a matéria orgânica e os microorganismos atuando no solo, sem fazer uso da intervenção de produtos químicos. Questões que vão contribuir para o aumento da produtividade, para o reestabelecimento e manutenção do equilíbrio dos agroecossistemas e consequentemente, para a transformação ambiental e social de uma forma que se sustente ao longo do tempo.

  6. Caracterización de sistemas agroecológicos para el establecimiento comercial de cacao orgánico (Theobroma cacao en Talamanca Description of agro-ecological systems to the shop of organic cocoa (Theobroma cacao in Talamanca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Salazar Díaz

    2012-11-01

    for the five selected farms and a socioeconomic characterization of the beneficiary families; based on the results it was proposed a production design and an agronomic management, for establishing the agroecological systems.

  7. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; Gonzalez, Frank; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  8. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, Ivan I., E-mail: iis@gao.spb.ru [Pulkovo Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pulkovskoje ave. 65, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  9. ShoreZone Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a polyline file of mapped ShoreZone units which correspond with data records found in the Unit, Xshr, BioUnit, and BioBand tables of this...

  10. ISOLDE target zone control room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  11. Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion

  12. Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Conca

    2000-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

  13. Perception of Infestation Problems on Cassava Farms and Preference for Weed Management Practices in Humid Agro- Ecological Zone of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Agumagu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of weed infestation on cassava farms is a major factor for low crop yield. This problem has caused untold hardship on the small-scale cassava farms where production at the subsistence level and where farmers still manage to produce some quantity for sale. The study examines cassava farmers’ perception of problems of infestation and preference for weed management practices in the humid agro-ecological zone of Nigeria. Data was collected with the aid of questionnaire and interviews. Random sampling technique was used to select 117 small-scale cassava farmers in the study area. Data analysis was done by simple descriptive statistics such as frequency, percentage and mean. Findings of the study revealed that majority of the respondents (73.5% grow cassava for both household use and for sale. The major source of labour identified by respondents was family labour (51.3%. About 55% of the respondents obtained cassava planting materials from the open market. Findings showed that the commonest weed control measures used by cassava farmers were hand pulling (100%, and hoes/cutlass (100%. However, the most preferred weed control measures identified include hoes/cutlass (100%, use of machines (100%, and a combination of methods (100%. Major problems affecting cassava farms as identified by respondents include grasses (88%, broadleaf weeds (66.6%, rodents (64.1%, other animals (63.3%, cassava rot (53.9% and insect pests (48.7%. Extension education should focus on the preferred weed control measures identified by respondents so as to work out modalities for their adequate use. This can be possible if regular extension farmer forum is ensured.

  14. Topography of Human Erogenous Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Suvilehto, Juulia T; Glerean, Enrico; Santtila, Pekka; Hietanen, Jari K

    2016-07-01

    Touching is a powerful means for eliciting sexual arousal. Here, we establish the topographical organization of bodily regions triggering sexual arousal in humans. A total of 704 participants were shown images of same and opposite sex bodies and asked to color the bodily regions whose touching they or members of the opposite sex would experience as sexually arousing while masturbating or having sex with a partner. Resulting erogenous zone maps (EZMs) revealed that the whole body was sensitive to sexual touching, with erogenous hotspots consisting of genitals, breasts, and anus. The EZM area was larger while having sex with a partner versus while masturbating, and was also dependent on sexual desire and heterosexual and homosexual interest levels. We conclude that tactile stimulation of practically all bodily regions may trigger sexual arousal. Extension of the erogenous zones while having sex with a partner may reflect the role of touching in maintenance of reproductive pair bonds. PMID:27091187

  15. Satellite-Derived Management Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoutre, Damien; Layrol, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The term "satellite-derived management zones" (SAMZ) denotes agricultural management zones that are subdivisions of large fields and that are derived from images of the fields acquired by instruments aboard Earth-orbiting satellites during approximately the past 15 years. "SAMZ" also denotes the methodology and the software that implements the methodology for creating such zones. The SAMZ approach is one of several products of continuing efforts to realize a concept of precision agriculture, which involves optimal variations in seeding, in application of chemicals, and in irrigation, plus decisions to farm or not to farm certain portions of fields, all in an effort to maximize profitability in view of spatial and temporal variations in the growth and health of crops, and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. As used here, "management zone" signifies, more precisely, a subdivision of a field within which the crop-production behavior is regarded as homogeneous. From the perspective of precision agriculture, management zones are the smallest subdivisions between which the seeding, application of chemicals, and other management parameters are to be varied. In the SAMZ approach, the main sources of data are the archives of satellite imagery that have been collected over the years for diverse purposes. One of the main advantages afforded by the SAMZ approach is that the data in these archives can be reused for purposes of precision agriculture at low cost. De facto, these archives contain information on all sources of variability within a field, including weather, crop types, crop management, soil types, and water drainage patterns. The SAMZ methodology involves the establishment of a Web-based interface based on an algorithm that generates management zones automatically and quickly from archival satellite image data in response to requests from farmers. A farmer can make a request by either uploading data describing a field boundary to the Web site or else

  16. 75 FR 40726 - Safety Zones: Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... the Port Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY... Buffalo Zone from July 2, 2010 through July 31, 2010. This action is necessary to protect the safety of... vessel may enter the safety zones without the permission of the Captain of the Port Buffalo. DATES:...

  17. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  18. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  19. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1983) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1983 North American Datum within United States.

  20. GIS modeling of introduction zones in Sochi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annenkova Irina Vladimirovna

    2014-11-01

    Defined the mean monthly temperature and precipitation for each zone. The diagram shows the dependence of the probability distribution of the three groups resistance from the mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation. Describes the climatic conditions of the zones.

  1. Zone Denmark - gasell Taanist / Reet Krause

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krause, Reet, 1967-

    2006-01-01

    Taanis Viborgis asuva firma Zone Company Denmark, kaubamärgi Zone Denmark ja firma disainerite tutvustus. Ettevõte valmistab disainitooteid roostevabast terasest, klaasist, puidust, kummist jm. Disainer Naja Utzon Popov endast, oma loomingust

  2. United States Stateplane Zones - NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — U.S. State Plane Zones (NAD 1927) represents the State Plane Coordinate System (SPCS) Zones for the 1927 North American Datum within United States.

  3. Initiatives and experiences in agroecology as a strategy for local development in a land reform settlement As iniciativas e experiências em agroecologia como estratégia de desenvolvimento local em um assentamento de reforma agrária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Botton Barcellos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper searches to understand which disputes and conflicts are around the consolidation of agroecology as one of the alternatives and initiatives of local development in a land reform settlement. Thus, this paper, which consists of one of the results presented in the authorïs dissertation, aims to identify the disputes and conflicts that occur among local initiatives related to agroecology. Santa Rosa settlement is located in one of the densest areas in relation to rural settlements in Rio Grande do Sul (RS State. The research sources used to collect data and references to this paper were obtained in: researched bibliography in the writing of the author's dissertation; academic articles; and perceptions from the author's experiences in some land reform settlements. In this research it was considered that initiatives and actions in agroecology in the studied settlement can be strategic to make the social relations potential to the occurrence of experiences in local development different from those that occur alongside agribusiness.Por meio desse trabalho será buscado compreender quais são as disputas e os conflitos acerca da consolidação da agroecologia como uma das alternativas e iniciativas de desenvolvimento local em um assentamento de reforma agrária. Dessa forma, o objetivo desse trabalho, que é um dos resultados apresentados como trabalho de dissertação do autor, é identificar as disputas e os conflitos que ocorrem em meio a iniciativas locais relacionadas à agroecologia. O assentamento Santa Rosa está localizado em uma das regiões de maior densidade de assentamentos e assentados no Rio Grande do Sul (RS. As fontes de pesquisa utilizadas para coletar os dados e as referências nesse trabalho foram obtidas em: bibliografias temáticas pesquisadas; artigos acadêmicos; e percepções de vivências do autor em alguns assentamentos de reforma agrária. Por meio da pesquisa considerou-se que as iniciativas e ações em

  4. Bats initiate vital agroecological interactions in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Josiah J; Boyles, Justin G

    2015-10-01

    In agroecosystems worldwide, bats are voracious predators of crop pests and may provide services to farmers worth billions of U.S. dollars. However, such valuations make untested assumptions about the ecological effect of bats in agroecosystems. Specifically, estimates of the value of pest suppression services assume bats consume sufficient numbers of crop pests to affect impact pest reproduction and subsequent damage to crops. Corn is an essential crop for farmers, and is grown on more than 150 million hectares worldwide. Using large exclosures in corn fields, we show that bats exert sufficient pressure on crop pests to suppress larval densities and damage in this cosmopolitan crop. In addition, we show that bats suppress pest-associated fungal growth and mycotoxin in corn. We estimate the suppression of herbivory by insectivorous bats is worth more than 1 billion USD globally on this crop alone, and bats may further benefit farmers by indirectly suppressing pest-associated fungal growth and toxic compounds on corn. Bats face a variety of threats globally, but their relevance as predators of insects in ubiquitous corn-dominated landscapes underlines the economic and ecological importance of conserving biodiversity. PMID:26371304

  5. Bats initiate vital agroecological interactions in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Josiah J; Boyles, Justin G

    2015-10-01

    In agroecosystems worldwide, bats are voracious predators of crop pests and may provide services to farmers worth billions of U.S. dollars. However, such valuations make untested assumptions about the ecological effect of bats in agroecosystems. Specifically, estimates of the value of pest suppression services assume bats consume sufficient numbers of crop pests to affect impact pest reproduction and subsequent damage to crops. Corn is an essential crop for farmers, and is grown on more than 150 million hectares worldwide. Using large exclosures in corn fields, we show that bats exert sufficient pressure on crop pests to suppress larval densities and damage in this cosmopolitan crop. In addition, we show that bats suppress pest-associated fungal growth and mycotoxin in corn. We estimate the suppression of herbivory by insectivorous bats is worth more than 1 billion USD globally on this crop alone, and bats may further benefit farmers by indirectly suppressing pest-associated fungal growth and toxic compounds on corn. Bats face a variety of threats globally, but their relevance as predators of insects in ubiquitous corn-dominated landscapes underlines the economic and ecological importance of conserving biodiversity.

  6. 76 FR 22033 - Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AAOO Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN AGENCY... Safety Unit Duluth, MN is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Red River, MN. This safety zone is... entering all navigable waters of the Red River in the State of Minnesota north of a line drawn...

  7. 40 CFR 265.278 - Unsaturated zone (zone of aeration) monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unsaturated zone (zone of aeration) monitoring. 265.278 Section 265.278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 265.278 Unsaturated zone (zone of aeration)...

  8. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine... Port Buffalo. (2) Persons or vessels desiring to transit the area of the Nine Mile Point...

  9. Use of quality indicators for long-term evaluation of heavy metals content in soils of an agro-ecological protected wetland: L'Albufera de Valencia Natural Park, Valencia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Palop, Carla

    2015-04-01

    Due to the social, economical and environmental importance of agro-ecological wetlands, strategies for periodical evaluation of their environmental quality should be developed, particularly in those areas were a mixture of land uses are supporting the survival of wildlife and migrant species as is the case of most Mediterranean coastal wetlands. The aim of this work is to develop a strategy for a long-term assessment of the environmental quality of soils in a rice-wetland: L'Albufera Natural Park, Spain, in the surroundings of the metropolitan area of Valencia. The area was officially declared as Natural Park in 1986, integrating both the traditional irrigation system and the ecological importance derived from being a Mediterranean Wetland that is now transformed to a large extent in a rice-wetland allowing the presence of a large variety of migrant spices. The methodology consisted in the monitoring of 20 sites distributed in 5 sectors in and around the natural park of potentially contrasting anthropogenic pressure and land use. Soil samples collection were instrumented in two campaigns. The first one was in 1989 (three years after the official declaration as Natural Park of the wetland), and the second 19 years later in 2008. Seven heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were analyzed to determine its total and extractable fractions by treatment with EDTA. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, using graphite furnace when necessary, was used for the determination of metals. To evaluate the quality of soils at each sampling date four indicators were obtained, namely, Contamination Factor (CF), Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo), Pollution Load Index (PLI) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). Results obtained with quality indicators were further compared to obtain temporal and spatial trends using Geographical Information systems procedures. In general, there is a reduction of metal contents in the study area in both dates. The trend of metals according to average

  10. The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ľ Ambriško; L Pešek

    2014-04-01

    The paper deals with an experimental determination of the stretch zone dimensions in the notch tip in thin steel sheets. The stretch zone dimensions depend on steel grade, on the rolling direction as well as on the loading rate. Stretch zones were observed and measured on three steel grades. Fracture area and stretch zones were analysed by SEM. Stable crack growth was monitored by videoextensometry techniques on CT (Compact Tension) specimens. Specimens were loaded under two loading rates by eccentric tension, whereby the deformation in the notch surrounding area was recorded using a non-contact measurement–videoextensometry technique. Linear relation between the stretch zone dimensions was determined.

  11. Serpentine in active subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Serpentinization is a key phenomenon for understanding the geodynamics of subduction zones in the 10-200 km depth range. Serpentines are a major water carrier, and their rheological properties have a strong influence on deformation partitioning and seismicity at depths. I review experimental investigations that have been conducted on serpentines, with emphasis on the large body of data acquired over the past decade. Determinations of physical properties at the pressure and temperature conditions of subductions allow interpreting geophysical data in active subduction in terms of mineralogy and petrology, and to link the presence of serpentinites with deformation and fluid circulation. The fluid budget can be partially constrained from geophysical data. Elasticity data provide a quantitative basis for mapping serpentinization in the mantle wedge and slab from seismic tomography. Anisotropy suggests the existence of thin serpentinite channels above the plate interface, that account for mechanical decoupling inferred from down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone and heat flow. Strain-rate dependent rheology of antigorite serpentine is consistent with stable deformation of this thin layer or channel over timescales ranging from those of the seismic cycle to those of thermal equilibration and exhumation of high-pressure rocks, and with the geological record of subduction-related deformation. Circulation of serpentinizing fluids depends on the permeability structure, and is imaged by electrical conductivity tomography. It could be controlled by fracturing in the undeformed cold nose of the mantle wedge, and by plastic deformation along the plate interface. Fluid migration mechanisms are similar to those inferred from petrological and geochemical data on exhumed serpentinites. Estimation of the fluid budget associated with serpentine formation will rely on numerical simulations for which coupling of kinetics of hydration and dehydration at scales ranging from grain size up

  12. Holdridge life zone physical inconsistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A., Sr.; Ochoa, A.

    2015-12-01

    Life zones is a very used classification system, developed by L.R. Holdridge in 1967, used to discern why plants have different adaptation mechanism to their surrounding environment. In this paper, the relation between potential evapotranspiration rate (ETr ), anual precipitation (P ) and biotemperature (Tb ) in the Holdridge triangle, is parametrized (P = (500/9)*ETr) to evaluate if the rain process is conserved in Colombia. Further, an adiabatic ascent of air with diurnal and interannual variability, and cluster analysis is view as a classification example of the advantage of using physical process to evaluate the plants adaptation mechanisms . The most inconsistency life zones are situated in the rainiest places of Colombian pacific costs in tropical latitudinal region, are non-exist places in holdridge triangle with annual biotemperature higher than 26◦ C, annual precipitation about 10.000mm and annual potential evapotranspiration rate about 0.1. The difference between Holdridge predicted precipitation and the precipitation measured with TRMM are about 5.000mm in these places. Classification systems based on an annual average, do not stablish adaptation as a function of diurnal variability, for example, the difference between valley sides vegetation could not being determined. This kind of limitations, added to a validation procces and the auscence of a physic procces in the variable interaction, make the Holdridge Life Zones a very useful tool, but physically inconsistent for caracterice vegetation as a function of precipitation. The rain process is very complex, depend of mass and energy exchanges and is still a controversial topic in atmospheric modeling, as a biotic pump.

  13. Demarcation of secondary hyperalgesia zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Thomas K; Enghuus, Casper; Petersen, Morten A;

    2015-01-01

    of analgesic drug effects in humans. However, since the methods applied in demarcating the secondary hyperalgesia zone seem inconsistent across studies, we examined the effect of a standardized approach upon the measurement of SHA following a first degree burn injury (BI). NEW METHOD: The study was a two......, demarcated by polyamide monofilaments (bending force: 0.2, 69 and 2569mN) and a "weighted-pin" stimulator (512mN), were assessed 45 to 75min after each BI. RESULTS: A random effect, linear mixed model demonstrated a logarithmic correlation between elicited skin pressures (mN/mm(2)) and the SHAs (P

  14. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  15. Wood zone plate fishnet metalens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazbayev Bakhtiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresnel-zone plate lenses provide focusing performance while having low profile. Unfortunately, they usually display higher reflection losses than conventional dielectric lenses. Here, we demonstrate a low-profile Wood zone plate metalens based on the fishnet metamaterial working in a near-zero regime with an equivalent refractive index less than unity (nf = 0.51. The metalens is made of alternating dielectric and fishnet metamaterial concentric rings. The use of fishnet metamaterial allows reducing the reflections from the lens, while maintaining low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. The lens is designed to work at the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a focal length FL = 22.8 mm (7.5 λ0 aiming at antenna or radar system applications. The focusing performance of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2.5 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret metalens.

  16. Euphotic Zone Study moves forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Kenneth

    The Global Ocean Euphotic Zone Study (GOEZS), a potential core program of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) being planned jointly with the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), was recently given the go-ahead by IGBP's Scientific Committee to move on to the next level of developing its scientific program.The GOEZS program will focus on the coupled physical, biological, and chemical processes operating in the euphotic zone, which is the ocean surface layer where sufficient light penetrates for photosynthesis by phytoplankton to exceed their metabolic energy losses. The upper ocean is extremely important to understanding the atmosphereocean system because it mediates exchanges of heat, momentum, carbon dioxide, sulphur, and nitrogen between the atmosphere and the ocean interior. For the major greenhouse gas carbon dioxide for example, there is more carbon in the upper ocean than in the whole atmosphere. Essentially all carbon dioxide from the atmosphere that passes from the upper ocean to the ocean interior has been transformed chemically or biologically in the upper ocean. Moreover, the upper ocean is the site of all marine shipping and most recreation and industrial activity and contains the planktonic food chain and most fish stocks.

  17. Generalized provisional seed zones for native plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Andrew D; St Clair, J Bradley; Erickson, Vicky

    2014-07-01

    Deploying well-adapted and ecologically appropriate plant materials is a core component of successful restoration projects. We have developed generalized provisional seed zones that can be applied to any plant species in the United States to help guide seed movement. These seed zones are based on the intersection of high-resolution climatic data for winter minimum temperature and aridity (as measured by annual heat : moisture index), each classified into discrete bands. This results in the delineation of 64 provisional seed zones for the continental United States. These zones represent areas of relative climatic similarity, and movement of seed within these zones should help to minimize maladaptation. Superimposing Omernik's level III ecoregions over these seed zones distinguishes areas that are similar climatically yet different ecologically. A quantitative comparison of provisional seed zones with level III ecoregions and provisional seed zones within ecoregions for three species showed that provisional seed zone within ecoregion often explained the greatest proportion of variation in a suite of traits potentially related to plant fitness. These provisional seed zones can be considered a starting point for guidelines for seed transfer, and should be utilized in conjunction with appropriate species-specific information as well as local knowledge of microsite differences. PMID:25154085

  18. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  19. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection reflects the results of researches and test-design activities in the exclusion area of the Chernobyl NPP directed to elaborate the equipment and devices for scientific researches and elimination of the accident after effects at the Chernobyl NPP and to study composition and structure of solid-phase bearers of the activity in the soil of the exclusion area, form transformation of decay products, radionuclide composition of the fuel precipitation in the nearest zone of the Chernobyl NPP. Special attention is paid to medical-biological problems of the accident after effects influence on flora, fauna and human health, labour conditions and sick rate of people working in the exclusion area

  20. Yellow light dilemma zone researches: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The yellow light dilemma zone is widely known as an area on the high-speed intersection approach, where vehicles neither safely stop before the stop line nor proceed through the intersection during amber interval. Within such an area, a vehicle might be involved in a right-angle crash or rear-end collision. This issue has been extensively discussed over five decades in traffic engineering field, covering from theory to practice. However, few comprehensive review literatures on the amber signal dilemma zone problems can be found. The objective of this paper is to summarize the evolution of yellow light dilemma zone researches. Basic definition and boundary of dilemma zone followed by driver behavior and dilemma zone hazard measurement are depicted. At last, the future directions of yellow light dilemma zone research are discussed.

  1. Saltwater upconing zone of influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovovic, Danica; Werner, Adrian D.; de Louw, Perry G. B.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Morgan, Leanne K.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we define and characterize the saltwater upconing zone of influence (SUZI). The SUZI is the region around a pumping well within which significant rise in the saltwater-freshwater interface occurs. While the zone of influence of a pumping well can be clearly defined in terms of hydraulics (e.g., drawdown), the SUZI has not been recognised and characterised, despite its importance for groundwater decision-making in coastal regions. We explore the SUZI under various conditions and compare common methods of investigation using both axisymmetric (1D and 2D vertical cross-section) and 3D simulations of saltwater upconing at the field scale, based on a combination of numerical and analytical approaches. The SUZI was found to be dependent on the relative magnitudes of pumping, regional flow, distance of the well from the coast, and position of the well above the interface, as expected. The three-dimensional coastal setting simulations revealed an asymmetric shape of the lateral extent of the SUZI, which is largest in the direction parallel to the coast. This occurs because the ocean and the inland extent of the seawater wedge limit the propagation of the SUZI perpendicular to the coast. Predictions of the SUZI using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation, including cases where sloping interfaces occur (i.e., in contrast to the artificiality of horizontal interfaces used in axisymmetric approaches), provide reasonable first approximations of the SUZI. Numerical modelling of dispersive upconing in the 3D inclined interface case is influenced by practical limits to the model domain size and grid resolution. For example, the no-flow boundary condition at 1500 m from the pumping well elongates the SUZI in the direction parallel to the coast. This study extends previous concepts of well interference, which have previously been based on hydraulics only, by introducing the SUZI and characterising its extent, with consideration given to differences in commonly adopted

  2. Modeling Alternative Zoning Strategies in Forest Management

    OpenAIRE

    Emina Krcmar; Ilan Vertinsky; G. Cornelis van Kooten

    2004-01-01

    To satisfy public demands for environmental values, forest companies face the prospect of reduced wood supply and increased costs. Some Canadian provincial governments have proposed intensifying silviculture in special zones dedicated to timber production as the means for pushing out the forest possibilities frontier. In this paper, we compare the traditional two-zone land allocation framework, which includes ecological reserves and integrated forest management zones, with the triad (three-zo...

  3. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Munirathnam; D S Prasad; Ch Sudheer; J V Rao; T L Prakash

    2005-06-01

    We present the zone refining results of cadmium using horizontal resistive zone refiner under constant flow of moisture free hydrogen gas. The boron impurity in cadmium can be avoided using quartz (GE 214 grade) boat in lieu of high pure graphite boat. The analytical results using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) show that majority of the impurities are less than the detection limits. Comparatively, zinc is the most difficult impurity element to remove in cadmium matrix by zone refining.

  4. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  5. Agricultural disease and insect-pest control via agro-ecological landscape construction%以病虫害控制为中心的农业生态景观建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段美春; 刘云慧; 张鑫; 曾为刚; 宇振荣

    2012-01-01

    other agro-management practices. At the farm management level, reasonable intercropping patterns at the landscape level were needed for effective disease and insect-pests control. Tree-crop intercrops, rice-fish/duck farms, fallows, deep ploughs, conservation tillages, organic fertilizations, etc., constituted other important control measures of agricultural diseases and insect-pests. The combination of the above in constructing integrated agro-ecological landscapes for comprehensive control of plant diseases and insect-pests was demonstrated in the Hani terraced fields.%化学农药控制农田病虫害面临诸如农药残留、环境污染等问题,而生物农药及生物防治存在着药效缓慢、成本高、防治对象单一等不足,目前缺乏综合、效果明显、环境友好的农田病虫害控制手段.景观生态学研究显示,致病菌、害虫及其天敌种群受到大尺度上景观格局的影响,从而为病虫害控制提供了一条新的途径:通过合理规划农业生态景观格局,在景观尺度上合理安排种植结构和农事活动,从而控制农田病虫害.本文从景观、田块、耕种管理措施3个层次上论述通过农业生态景观建设控制农业病虫害.景观上:应提高半自然生境的面积比例;丰富半自然生境类型和农田生境作物类型;同时注意景观结构异质性的营建;关注景观连接度,使其保持在既有利于天敌昆虫的迁移、又能较好地阻止病虫害传播的水平上;同时还应提升半自然生境斑块的质量.田块上:通过保留原有的农田边界和新建农田植被缓冲带来控制相邻农田中的病虫害;农田缓冲带的建设要与原有的半自然生境及农田边界构成一个整体,建设过程中主要关注植被的搭配,后期要特别注意杂草、割草、施肥、喷药等管理措施.耕种管理措施上:通过景观层次上合理安排间套混作控制农田中的病虫害,同时注重与农林间作,稻田

  6. Agricultural disease and insect-pest control via agro-ecological landscape construction%以病虫害控制为中心的农业生态景观建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段美春; 刘云慧; 张鑫; 曾为刚; 宇振荣

    2012-01-01

    other agro-management practices. At the farm management level, reasonable intercropping patterns at the landscape level were needed for effective disease and insect-pests control. Tree-crop intercrops, rice-fish/duck farms, fallows, deep ploughs, conservation tillages, organic fertilizations, etc., constituted other important control measures of agricultural diseases and insect-pests. The combination of the above in constructing integrated agro-ecological landscapes for comprehensive control of plant diseases and insect-pests was demonstrated in the Hani terraced fields.%化学农药控制农田病虫害面临诸如农药残留、环境污染等问题,而生物农药及生物防治存在着药效缓慢、成本高、防治对象单一等不足,目前缺乏综合、效果明显、环境友好的农田病虫害控制手段.景观生态学研究显示,致病菌、害虫及其天敌种群受到大尺度上景观格局的影响,从而为病虫害控制提供了一条新的途径:通过合理规划农业生态景观格局,在景观尺度上合理安排种植结构和农事活动,从而控制农田病虫害.本文从景观、田块、耕种管理措施3个层次上论述通过农业生态景观建设控制农业病虫害.景观上:应提高半自然生境的面积比例;丰富半自然生境类型和农田生境作物类型;同时注意景观结构异质性的营建;关注景观连接度,使其保持在既有利于天敌昆虫的迁移、又能较好地阻止病虫害传播的水平上;同时还应提升半自然生境斑块的质量.田块上:通过保留原有的农田边界和新建农田植被缓冲带来控制相邻农田中的病虫害;农田缓冲带的建设要与原有的半自然生境及农田边界构成一个整体,建设过程中主要关注植被的搭配,后期要特别注意杂草、割草、施肥、喷药等管理措施.耕种管理措施上:通过景观层次上合理安排间套混作控制农田中的病虫害,同时注重与农林间作,稻田

  7. 75 FR 61099 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone... Buffalo has previously established a security zone in the vicinity of Moses-Saunders Power Dam and the... the Supervisor, Marine Safety Detachment Massena. Discussion of Rule The Captain of the Port...

  8. 76 FR 7107 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    .... 4th Quarter 2009 Listing Docket No. Location Type Effective date CGD13-01-004 Lake Washington, WA... County, MD.. Safety Zones (Part 165)...... 1/17/2009 ] USCG-2009-0013 Lake Washington, WA...... Safety... Safety Zones (Part 165)...... 4/6/2009 USCG-2009-0253 Lake Washington, WA...... Safety Zones (Part...

  9. Land use zones and land use patterns in the Atlantic Zone of Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huising, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes an approach to land use inventory at the sub-regional scale in the Guacimo-Rio Jiménez-Siquirres (GRS) area in the Atlantic Zone of Costa Rica. Therefore, the concept of "land use zones" is introduced. The land use zone (LUZ) plays a central role in the definition of an observa

  10. Remote sensing applications for coastal zone management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, L.V.G.

    stream_size 4 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_5.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coast_Zone_Manage_1993_5.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  11. A Novel Offset Fresnel Zone Plate Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel offset Fresnel Zone Plate reflector Antenna (FZPA) is proposed, the phase correcting zone of this FZPA is elliptic. Based on Physical Optics Method, the focusing characteristics of the reflector are analyzed. The comparison of this new FZPA with the circular FZPA and Mawzones FZPA is made.

  12. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. Perception coherence zones in flight simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente Pais, A.R.; Paassen, M.M. van; Mulder, M.; Wentink, M.

    2010-01-01

    The development and tuning of flight simulator motion filters relies on understanding human motion perception and its limitations. Of particular interest to flight simulation is the study of visual-inertial coherence zones. Coherence zones refer to combinations of visual and inertial cues that, alth

  14. Special Economic Zones Blaze New Trails

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐现祥; 陈小飞

    2008-01-01

    Special economic zones(SEZ) are starting points of incremental reform and opening-up in China. On the 30th anniversay of reform and opening-up,this article attempts to present a systematic review of the evolution,mechanism and performance of special economic zones as well as a pespective on SEZs’ furture development.

  15. Earthcasting the future Critical Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Goddéris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As humans continue to impact the Critical Zone, we need to project how our environment will evolve into the future. To model such change requires the ability to simulate interactions among the lithosphere, pedosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere — including the activities of humans. Such projections, which some have called earthcasts, must be made with mechanistic models that capture the important phenomena, as well as scenarios of human behavior. As an example, we present earthcasts of future weathering in the mid-continent of the USA into the next century of projected warming. Rates of sequestration of CO2 from the atmosphere due to weathering will change in the future as carbonate and silicate minerals are dissolved or precipitated in soil. The downward or upward advance of the carbonate reaction front in the soil is an analogue of the oceanic lysocline. Like the movement of the oceanic lysocline in response to oceanic acidification, this terrestrial lysocline will likely move due to fluxes of CO2 driven by human activity. Understanding this and other responses to perturbations will best be achieved using multiple models for earthcasting.

  16. Trading Zones in Early Modern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pamela O

    2015-12-01

    This essay adopts the concept of trading zones first developed for the history of science by Peter Galison and redefines it for the early modern period. The term "trading zones" is used to mean arenas in which substantive and reciprocal communication occurred between individuals who were artisanally trained and learned (university-trained) individuals. Such trading zones proliferated in the sixteenth century. They tended to arise in certain kinds of places and not in others, but their existence must be determined empirically. The author's work on trading zones differs from the ideas of Edgar Zilsel, who emphasized the influence of artisans on the scientific revolution. In contrast, in this essay, the mutual influence of artisans and the learned on each other is stressed, and translation is used as a modality that was important to communication within trading zones. PMID:27024940

  17. Managing speed at school and playground zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Lina; Tay, Richard; Acharjee, Shanti

    2011-09-01

    Since speeding is one of the major causes of frequent and severe traffic accidents around school and playground areas, many jurisdictions have reduced the speed limits in these areas to protect children who may be at risk. This paper investigated the speed compliance, mean speed and 85th percentile speed at selected school and playground zones in the City of Calgary in Alberta. Our results showed that the mean speed was lower and the rate of compliance was higher in the school zone compared to the playground zone, 2 lane roads relative to 4 lane roads, roads with fencing, traffic control devices and the presence of speed display device or children, and zones that were longer (> 200 m). Accordingly, this study provided recommendations to improve the effectiveness of school and playground zone speed limits. PMID:21658518

  18. Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision Special Economic Zones, UTM Zone 15N NAD83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_special_economic_zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates special economic zones included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. Special economic zones include existing national,...

  19. Simulation of Fault Zone Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P.; Abe, S.; Place, D.

    2002-12-01

    Particle models such as the discrete element model for granular assemblies and the lattice solid model provide a means to study the dynamics of fault zones. The lattice solid model was developed with the aim of progressively building up the capacity to simulate all relevent physical processes in fault zones. The present implementation of the model is able to simulate the dynamics of a granular lattice consisting of bonded or unbonded circular (2D) or spherical (3D) particles. Thermal effects (frictional hear generation, thermal expansion, heat flow) and pore fluid effects (heat induced pore pressure gradients and the consequent Darcian flow and impact on effective friction) can be modelled. Past work involving both circular particles and non-circular grains constructed as groups of bonded particles have demonstrated that grain shape has a fundamental impact on zero-th order behaviour. When circular particles are used, rolling is the most efficient means to accomodate slip of a simulated fault gouge layer leading to unrealistically low friction, typically around 0.2. This is consistent with laboratory results by Mair and Marone which have demonstrated that gouge consisting entirely of spherical beads shows a lower coefficient of friction than gouge containing irregular shaped particles. Recent work comparing quasi-2D laboratory results using pasta (Marone) with 2D numerical results (Morgan) have confirmed that numerical and laboratory results with circular ``particles'' are in agreement. When irregular grains are modelled at the lowest scale, the friction of simulated gouge layers matches with laboratory observations of rock friction (μ ~ 0.6) and is insentitive to the value used for interparticle friction (Mora et al, 2000). This indicates a self-regulation mechanism is occurring in which the group behaviour of the gouge layer remains constant at around 0.6 by balancing the amount of slip and rolling of grains within the gouge layer. A limitation of these studies

  20. Radiation danger of exclusion zone objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholosha, V.I.; Proskura, N.I.; Ivanov, Yu.A.; Kazakov, S.V.; Arkhipov, A.N. [Ministry of Ukraine of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chornobyl Catastrophe (Ukraine)

    2001-03-01

    The analysis of radiation danger of the Exclusion Zone objects was made. Here, the Zone is defined as the territory from which the population has been evacuated in 1986 owing to the Chernobyl accident and possible outflow of the contaminated substances out of the borders is potentially dangerous to the Ukraine. In the present work were analyzed such problems as sources of radiation danger in the Zone, ways of radionuclide migration out of the borders of the Zone in normal and emergency situations, the non-radiation (ecological) danger factors of the Zone objects, doses (individual and collective) from various sources and on separate ways of their formation, and the characteristics of radiation danger of the Zone objects. The conclusions are: (1) Radionuclide flows both from technologic and natural sources exceed those from Shelter objects, (2) Under emergency conditions, radionuclide flows and doze loading remain comparable with those from emergency sources, (3) To solve some management tasks in radiation situation, the basic works on the Shelter objects should be oriented to decrease probability of emergency occurrence and to reduce radiation influence (prevention wash-outs during high waters, fire-prevention measures in forests and strengthening of the control behind non-authorized use of objects in the Zone). (S. Ohno)

  1. New national seismic zoning map of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高孟潭

    2003-01-01

    A new set of seismic zoning maps were published in August 1,200l. It includes two maps, one is the seismic zon-ing map of peak acceleration, and the other is the zoning map of the characteristic period of the response spectrum.The exceeding probability of the map is 10% within 50 years. The scale of the map is 1:4 000 000. These mapsserve as the national standard. The background of this project, technical approach and key scientific measures, thebasic feature and the application of the maps are introduced in this paper.

  2. Groundwater: Saturated and Unsaturated Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of isotope hydrological data is not straightforward. Many field studies lead to a conclusion that the origin of groundwater and the chemical and isotopic processes in groundwater systems can only be studied successfully, if a composition of isotopic, chemical, geological and hydrogeological data is available for interpretation. Following the previous volumes on isotopic principles, precipitation and surface waters, this volume is dealing with the application of isotope hydrological methods in groundwater studies. It conveys basic knowledge in geohydraulics and hydrogeology required for a consistent interpretation of isotope hydrological data. This volume starts with a brief discussion of the characteristics and behaviour of groundwater as a medium of mass transport for gases, dissolved constituents and colloids. The geohydraulic aspects of groundwater flow under steady-state conditions are described in combination with an explanation of the most important terms related to isotope hydrology (e.g. transit time, turn-over time, mean residence time, water age). Non-steady state flow conditions caused by palaeoclimatic variations and anthropogenic activities such as overexploitation or groundwater mining seriously affect the interpretation of isotope hydrological data. Also water-rock interactions may modify the isotope composition of a carbonate rock environment, especially in high-temperature systems. Environmental isotope techniques are pre-eminently suitable for studying the unsaturated and saturated zone, the latter particularly concerning the stable and radioactive natural isotopes. Stable isotope data preferentially yield information on the origin of groundwater. Radioactive isotopes allow groundwater to be 'dated' in support of geohydraulic investigations. In undisturbed high-temperature systems isotopic geothermometry, i.e. the study of the temperature effect of stable isotopic abundances, is applied for gaining information on water mixing as

  3. White Light Photorefractive Phase Zone Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yuan-Mei; LIU Si-Min

    2008-01-01

    Incoherent white light from an incandescent source is employed to Fabricate volume phase zone plates in LiNbO3:Fe,for the first time to our knowledge,which can guide and modulate the input white light or laser light.The diffractive efficiency of the white light volume phase zone plates fabricated can reach as high as 12%.In addition,we test the volume phase zone plates by a probe beam and find that the volume phase zone plate is present in the direction perpendicular to the c-axis and absent in the direction parallel to the c-axis.This directly proves the existence of photovoltalc photorefractive anisotropy of white light.

  4. A New Viewpoint for Seismotectonic Zoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Derakhshani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Seismotectonic zoning has always been used to get access to intracontinental seismic deformation whereas zoning is not enough reliable in regard with small-scale studies. Approach: This research presents a theoretical model on the basis of plate tectonic theory to introduce a new approach to conduct zoning in terms of seismic deformation. Results: The result of this research not only has reliability but also is applicable to variety of research scales. Conclusion: The numerical techniques were used in the proposed model. Thus, this novelty model contains remarkable innovations: (1 Objectivity, accuracy and therefore reliability of zoning have been increased. (2 Numerical explanation of seismic deformation has been presented.

  5. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  6. Fault Zones in the Gulf Coast [gcfltzoneg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent major fault zones as indicated on Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico Basin (compiled by T.E. Ewing and R.F. Lopez) in...

  7. EPA Region 1 No Discharge Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset details No Discharge Zones (NDZ) for New England. Boaters may not discharge waste into these areas. Boundaries were determined mostly by Federal...

  8. Schools K-12 - School Board Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset contains polygons and attributes which represent the School District Board Zones for the Public School Districts in the State of Arkansas. It includes...

  9. Global challenges in integrated coastal zone management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Growing pressure from increasingly diverse human activities coupled with climate change impacts threaten the functional integrity of coastal ecosystems around the globe. A multi-disciplinary approach towards understanding drivers, pressures and impacts in the coastal zone requires effective...... integration of data and information in policy and management, combining expertise from nature and social science, to reach a balanced and sustainable development of the coastal zone. This important book comprises the proceedings of The International Symposium on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, which took...... place in Arendal, Norway between 3-7 July 2011. The main objective of the Symposium was to present current knowledge and to address issues on advice and management related to the coastal zone. The major themes of papers included in this book are: Coastal habitats and ecosystem services Adaptation...

  10. 19 CFR 146.7 - Zone changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operator or a zone user. If a list was previously furnished, the port director may make a written demand... director may make a written demand upon the operator to submit, within 30 days after the date of the...

  11. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  12. WVSAMB Color Digital Orthophotos North Zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital color orthophotography of the State of West Virginia (West Virginia State Plane Coordinate System North Zone). The W.V. state plane system has two...

  13. Clinical crown lengthening in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Paulo M; Melnick, Philip R; Camargo, Luciano M

    2007-07-01

    Periodontal surgical procedures consisting of gingival flaps and osseous recontouring are indicated for crown lengthening of several contiguous teeth in the esthetic zone; both in cases where restorations are required and in cases where no restorations are planned, such as in patients with excessive gingival display due to altered passive eruption. Forced tooth eruption via orthodontic extrusion is the technique of choice when clinical crown lengthening is necessary on isolated teeth in the esthetic zone.

  14. Lucas Heights buffer zone: plan of management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan is being used by the Commission as a guide for its management of the Lucas Heights buffer zone, which is essentially a circular area having a 1-6 km radius around the HIFAR reactor. Aspects covered by this plan include past uses, current use, objectives for buffer zone land management, emergency evacuation, resource conservation, archaeology, fire, access, rehabilitation of disturbed areas, resource management and plan implementation

  15. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  16. Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2010-03-30

    An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

  17. MANIFESTATION OF FAULT ZONES IN GEOPHYSICAL FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Spivak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical fields influenced by tectonics faults were observed, and instrumental observation results are analysed in the article. It is shown that fault zones are characterized by geophysical fields that are more variable than those in midmost segments of crustal blocks, more intense responses to weak external impacts such as lunar and solar tides and atmospheric pressure variations, and intensive relaxation. Transformation of energy between geophysical fields varying in origin takes place mainly in the fault zones.

  18. Standardized precipitation index zones for Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, L.; Soto, M. [Instituto de Ecologia, A.C., Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Rutherford, B.M.; Maarouf, A. [Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation zone systems exists for Mexico based on seasonality, quantity of precipitation, climates and geographical divisions, but none are convenient for the study of the relation of precipitation with phenomena such as El nino. An empirical set of seven exclusively Mexican and six shared zones was derived from three series of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) images, from 1940 through 1989: a whole year series (SPI-12) of 582 monthly images, a six month series (SPI-6) of 50 images for winter months (November through April), and a six month series (SPI-6) of 50 images for summer months (May through October). By examination of principal component and unsupervised classification images, it was found that all three series had similar zones. A set of basic training fields chosen from the principal component images was used to classify all three series. The resulting thirteen zones, presented in this article, were found to be approximately similar, varying principally at zones edges. A set of simple zones defined by just a few vertices can be used for practical operations. In general the SPI zones are homogeneous, with almost no mixture of zones and few outliers of one zone in the area of others. They are compared with a previously published map of climatic regions. Potential applications for SPI zones are discussed. [Spanish] Existen varios sistemas de zonificacion de Mexico basados en la estacionalidad, cantidad de precipitacion, climas y divisiones geograficas, pero ninguno es conveniente para el estudio de la relacion de la precipitacion con fenomenos tales como El Nino. En este trabajo se presenta un conjunto de siete zonas empiricas exclusivamente mexicanas y seis compartidas, derivadas de tres series de imagenes de SPI (Indice Estandarizado de la Precipitacion), desde 1940 a 1989: una serie de 582 imagenes mensuales (SPI-12), una series de 50 imagenes (SPI-6) de meses de invierno (noviembre a abril), y otra de 50 imagenes (SPI-6) de meses de verano

  19. Agroecologia e relazione con “l’altra”. Appunti di un’etnografia collaborativa con il movimento di donne contadine in Santa Catarina (Brasile - Agroecology and the relation with “the other”: notes on a collaborative ethnography with the movement of peasant women in Santa Catarina - (Br

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa Muraca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a collaborative ethnography about political and pedagogical practices of the Movement of Peasant Women in Santa Catarina (Brazil. In particular, it investigates the educational potential of the agroecological practices and reflections developed by the movement, in order to rethink the “negated relation” between the peasants of European origin and the native population, into the social-political-cultural context of the State of Santa Catarina. After a brief reference to the background of the study about the educational practices of the social movements, the author presents her research and focuses on the political, ethical and methodological implications of an investigation with a social movement. How can the identification with the struggles of the social movement contribute to the research? In which way, is it possible to promote the reciprocity in all stages of the survey? Can the discussion about the researcher’s interpretations with her interlocutors promote any non-individualistic modalities of ethnographic writing?

  20. 农业生态环境监测中无线传感节点信号有效传输距离的确定%Determination of effective transmission distances of wireless sensor network nodes for agro-ecological environment monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐兴元; 章玥; 季民河※; 宋洋

    2013-01-01

      农业生态环境的物理形态和结构复杂多样,对WSN(wireless sensor networks)的无线信号传输造成不同衰减影响。为确保无线传感器网络在农业环境中经济、合理、高效部署,有必要明确典型农业环境中无线传感节点间的有效传输距离。该文基于Shadowing信号衰减模型,利用当前通用的CC2530和CC2591无线通信模块,分别选定4种不同农业环境(湖泊、草地、农田、树林)开展单跳组网试验,通过设定不同距离测试传感器节点的接收信号强度指标(received signal strength indication,RSSI),分析不同环境中RSSI与传输距离间的变化特征。试验结果表明,所有测试环境获得的RSSI值与有效距离遵从Shadowing模型,其拟合度在0.9232~0.9846之间。通过对实测数据建立拟合模型,以接收节点的灵敏度为临界值,计算出湖泊、草地、农田、树林4种环境的理论传输距离分别为663.3,419.3,208.0和79.5 m,而实测有效传输距离与理论值之间的相对误差在22%~34%之间。从误差分布看,复杂环境的实测值更接近理论值,而特殊结构的复杂环境似对实际信号传输有增强作用。该文的研究方法和模型估算获得的信号衰减系数可为实际环境监测组网提供有益参考。%  Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been widely adopted for monitoring of agro-ecological environment, as they offer a number of advantages over traditional field observation methods. Signal transmission distances and qualities achieved by wireless sensors are highly related to the types of external environments. Attenuation of radio signals varies drastically for wireless sensor networks in different agro-ecological environments with diverse physical forms and structures. To achieve the economic, rational, and efficient goal for WSN deployment, it is essential to identify the effective transmission distance between wireless

  1. Incorporating conservation zone effectiveness for protecting biodiversity in marine planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Makino

    Full Text Available Establishing different types of conservation zones is becoming commonplace. However, spatial prioritization methods that can accommodate multiple zones are poorly understood in theory and application. It is typically assumed that management regulations across zones have differential levels of effectiveness ("zone effectiveness" for biodiversity protection, but the influence of zone effectiveness on achieving conservation targets has not yet been explored. Here, we consider the zone effectiveness of three zones: permanent closure, partial protection, and open, for planning for the protection of five different marine habitats in the Vatu-i-Ra Seascape, Fiji. We explore the impact of differential zone effectiveness on the location and costs of conservation priorities. We assume that permanent closure zones are fully effective at protecting all habitats, open zones do not contribute towards the conservation targets and partial protection zones lie between these two extremes. We use four different estimates for zone effectiveness and three different estimates for zone cost of the partial protection zone. To enhance the practical utility of the approach, we also explore how much of each traditional fishing ground can remain open for fishing while still achieving conservation targets. Our results show that all of the high priority areas for permanent closure zones would not be a high priority when the zone effectiveness of the partial protection zone is equal to that of permanent closure zones. When differential zone effectiveness and costs are considered, the resulting marine protected area network consequently increases in size, with more area allocated to permanent closure zones to meet conservation targets. By distributing the loss of fishing opportunity equitably among local communities, we find that 84-88% of each traditional fishing ground can be left open while still meeting conservation targets. Finally, we summarize the steps for developing

  2. Risk-based zoning for urbanizing floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Urban floodplain development brings economic benefits and enhanced flood risks. Rapidly growing cities must often balance the economic benefits and increased risks of floodplain settlement. Planning can provide multiple flood mitigation and environmental benefits by combining traditional structural measures such as levees, increasingly popular landscape and design features (green infrastructure), and non-structural measures such as zoning. Flexibility in both structural and non-structural options, including zoning procedures, can reduce flood risks. This paper presents a linear programming formulation to assess cost-effective urban floodplain development decisions that consider benefits and costs of development along with expected flood damages. It uses a probabilistic approach to identify combinations of land-use allocations (residential and commercial development, flood channels, distributed runoff management) and zoning regulations (development zones in channel) to maximize benefits. The model is applied to a floodplain planning analysis for an urbanizing region in the Baja Sur peninsula of Mexico. The analysis demonstrates how (1) economic benefits drive floodplain development, (2) flexible zoning can improve economic returns, and (3) cities can use landscapes, enhanced by technology and design, to manage floods. The framework can incorporate additional green infrastructure benefits, and bridges typical disciplinary gaps for planning and engineering. PMID:25500464

  3. Pollution concentration estimates in ecologically important zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, Y.N. [Mexico City Univ. (Mexico). Center for Atmospheric Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Method based on using the pollutant transport equation and the adjoint technique is described here for estimating the pollutant concentration level in ecologically important zones. The method directly relates the pollution level in such zones with the power of the pollution sources and the initial pollution field. Assuming that the wind or current velocities are known (from climatic data or dynamic model), the main and adjoint pollutant transport equations can be considered in a limited area to solve such theoretically and practically important problems as: (1) optimal location of new industries in a given region with the aim to minimize the pollution concentration in certain ecologically important zones, (2) optimization of emissions from operating industries, (3) detection of the plants violating sanitary regulations, (4) analysis of the emissions coming from the vehicle traffic (such emissions can be included in the model by means of the linear pollution sources located along the main roadways), (5) estimation of the oil pollution in various ecologically important oceanic (sea) zones in case of accident with the oil tanker, (6) evaluation of the sea water desalination level in estuary regions, and others. These equations considered in a spherical shell domain can also be applied to the problems of transporting the pollutants from a huge industrial complex, or from the zone of an ecological catastrophe similar to the Chernobyl one

  4. 76 FR 18674 - Security Zones; Sector Southeastern New England Captain of the Port Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Captain of the Port Zone, 75 FR 63714, October 18, 2010. In a rule published March 31, 2011 (FR Doc. 2011..., 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The...

  5. 78 FR 24679 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Acronyms COTP Captain of the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register LIS Long Island... published at 78 FR 20277 and Docket Number USCG-2013-1036 titled, ``Safety Zones & Special Local Regulations... Long Island Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast...

  6. 75 FR 16370 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports in Boston Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulated navigation areas (RNAs) and safety and security zones for deepwater liquefied natural gas (LNG... handling oil or natural gas, RNAs and safety or security zones established by the District Commander may... deepwater port operations, and protect liquefied natural gas carriers (LNGCs) and deepwater...

  7. 78 FR 23850 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... jurisdiction of the Captain of the Port Buffalo (73 FR 28704). Specifically, twenty-six permanent safety zones... the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone in the Federal Register (78 FR 11798). We received 0 comments on...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of...

  8. 78 FR 41846 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: At various... fireworks events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. This action is necessary and intended for the... Buffalo. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR 165.939 will be enforced on the dates and times listed in...

  9. 77 FR 41914 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: At various... zone without the permission of the Captain of the Port Buffalo. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR 165... email Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard Sector Buffalo, 1 Fuhrmann Blvd., Buffalo, NY...

  10. 78 FR 45059 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: At various... zone without the permission of the Captain of the Port Buffalo. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR 165... Buffalo, 1 Fuhrmann Blvd., Buffalo, NY 14203; Coast Guard telephone 716-843-9343, email...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1304 - Ice fall hazard zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ice fall hazard zones. 13.1304 Section 13.1304 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Provisions § 13.1304 Ice fall hazard zones. Entering an ice fall hazard zone is prohibited. These zones...

  12. 33 CFR 334.5 - Disestablishment of a danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disestablishment of a danger zone..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.5 Disestablishment of a danger zone. (a) Upon receipt of a request from any agency for the disestablishment of a danger zone, the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1396-1 - Qualified zone employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Empowerment Zone Employment Credit § 1.1396-1 Qualified zone employees. (a) In... calendar year during which the employee is employed by the employer) are performed within the empowerment... periods (if any) in which B is a qualified zone employee. Y may claim the empowerment zone...

  14. 33 CFR 165.755 - Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico (a) The following area is established as a safety zone during the... the Eco-Electrica waterfront facility in Guayanilla Bay, Puerto Rico. The safety zone remains in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Guayanilla,...

  15. 33 CFR 2.30 - Exclusive Economic Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exclusive Economic Zone. 2.30... JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.30 Exclusive Economic Zone. (a) With respect to the United States... States exercises sovereignty, exclusive economic zone means the zone seaward of and adjacent to...

  16. 49 CFR 1105.9 - Coastal Zone Management Act requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coastal Zone Management Act requirements. 1105.9... ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS § 1105.9 Coastal Zone Management Act requirements. (a) If the proposed action affects land or water uses within a State coastal zone designated pursuant to the Coastal Zone Management Act (16...

  17. Zone-Doubled Fresnel Zone Plates for Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; Färm, E.; Kewish, C. M.; Diaz, A.; Guzenko, V. A.; Barrett, R.; Raabe, J.; Menzel, A.; Bunk, O.; Ritala, M.; David, C.

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the highest spatial resolution reported in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy to date. For the first time in x-ray microscopy, features below 10 nm in width were resolved in the soft x-ray regime (1.2 keV) and 20-nm lines and spaces were visible at multi-keV photon energies (6.2 keV). These achievements were accomplished using zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates. These lenses were fabricated by combining electron-beam lithography and atomic layer deposition of iridium. Diffraction efficiencies up to 8% were measured for zone-doubled Fresnel zone plates with an outermost zone width of 25 nm at 6.2-keV photon energy.

  18. Urban planning as a trading zone

    CERN Document Server

    Mäntysalo, Raine

    2013-01-01

    'Trading zone' is a concept introduced by Peter Galison in his social scientific research on how scientists representing different sub-cultures and paradigms have been able to coordinate their interaction locally. In this book, Italian and Finnish planning researchers extend the use of the concept to different contexts of urban planning and management, where there is a need for new ideas and tools in managing the interaction of different stakeholders. The trading zone concept is approached as a tool in organizing local platforms and support systems for planning participation, knowledge production, decision making and local conflict management. In relation to the former theses of communicative planning theory that stress the ideals of consensus, mutual understanding and universal reason, the 'trading zone approach', outlined in this book, offers a different perspective. It focuses on the potentiality to coordinate locally the interaction of different stakeholders without requiring the deeper sharing of underst...

  19. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuhong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the dynamic evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are reviewed with focus on emerging flux tubes responsible for the formation of solar active regions. The current prevailing picture is that active regions on the solar surface originate from strong toroidal magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo mechanism at the thin tachocline layer at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. This review discusses results with regard to the following major topics: 1. the equilibrium properties of the toroidal magnetic fields stored in the stable overshoot region at the base of the convection zone, 2. the buoyancy instability associated with the toroidal magnetic fields and the formation of buoyant magnetic flux tubes, 3. the rise of emerging flux loops through the solar convective envelope as modeled by the thin flux tube calculations which infer that the field strength of the toroidal magnetic fields at the base of the solar convection zone is significantly higher than the value in equipartition with convection, 4. the minimum twist needed for maintaining cohesion of the rising flux tubes, 5. the rise of highly twisted kink unstable flux tubes as a possible origin of d -sunspots, 6. the evolution of buoyant magnetic flux tubes in 3D stratified convection, 7. turbulent pumping of magnetic flux by penetrative compressible convection, 8. an alternative mechanism for intensifying toroidal magnetic fields to significantly super-equipartition field strengths by conversion of the potential energy associated with the superadiabatic stratification of the solar convection zone, and finally 9. a brief overview of our current understanding of flux emergence at the surface and post-emergence evolution of the subsurface magnetic fields.

  20. Pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Qing Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL is a distinct low grade B-cell lymphoma with an immunophenotype similar to that of splenic marginal zone B-cells. Like the normal splenic marginal zone B-cells, SMZLs also show variable features in somatic mutations of their rearranged immunoglobulin genes, with ∼90% of cases harbouring somatic mutations but at remarkably variable degrees, suggesting that SMZL may have multiple cell of origins, deriving from the heterogeneous B-cells of the splenic marginal zone. Notably, ∼30% of SMZLs show biased usage of IGHV1-2*04, with the expressed BCR being potentially polyreactive to autoantigens. Recent exome and targeted sequencing studies have identified a wide spectrum of somatic mutations in SMZL with the recurrent mutations targeting multiple signalling pathways that govern the development of splenic marginal zone B-cells. These recurrent mutations occur in KLF2 (20–42%, NOTCH2 (6.5–25%, NF-κB (CARD11 ∼7%, IKBKB ∼7%, TNFAIP3 7–13%, TRAF3 5%, BIRC3 6.3% and TLR (MYD88 5–13% signalling pathways. Interestingly, the majority of SMZL with KLF2 mutation have both 7q32 deletion and IGHV1-2 rearrangement, and these cases also have additional mutations in NOTCH2, or TNFAIP3, or TRAF3. There is a potential oncogenic cooperation among concurrent genetic changes, for example between the IGHV1-2 expressing BCR and KLF2 mutation in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, and between KLF2 and TRAF3 mutations in activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. These novel genetic findings have provided considerable insights into the pathogenesis of SMZL and will stimulate the research in both normal and malignant marginal zone B-cells.

  1. Recent Study of the Changjiang Fault Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Kangming; Zong Kaihong; Guo Jiangning; Xiong Zhen; Li Limei; Zhou Caixia; Jiang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The Changjiang fault zone, also known as the Mufushan-Jiaoshan fault, is a famous fault located at the southern bank of the Changjiang River, near the Nanjing downtown area. Based on multidisciplinary data from shallow artificial seismic explorations in the target detecting area (Nanjing city and the nearby areas), trenching and drilling explorations, classification of Quaternary strata and chronology dating data, this paper provides the most up-to-date results regarding activities of the Changjiang fault zone, including the most recent active time, activity nature, related active parameters, and their relation to seismic activity.

  2. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 8 August 1986 the Protocols to the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty were adopted by the South Pacific Forum at its 17th session, in Suva. The attached texts of the Protocols were formally communicated to the Director General by the Director of the South Pacific Bureau for Economic Co-operation (SPEC) and are herewith being circulated to all Member States for their information pursuant to a request made by the Director of SPEC. Following the deposit of the eighth instrument of ratification, the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty entered into force on 11 December 1986

  3. SAR observations of coastal zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, G. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to the observation of coastal zones phenomena are detailed. The conditions observed include gravity wave detection, surf zone location, surface currents, and long-period 'surf beats'. Algorithms have been developed and successfully tested that determine significant wave and current parameters from the sea surface backscatter of microwave energy. Doppler information from the SAR optical correlator allows a rough estimation of near shore surface flow velocities that has been found in agreement with both theory and in situ observations as well. Seasat SAR data of the Scotland and North Carolina coasts are considered, as well as the results of bathymetric updating of coastal area charts.

  4. Monitoring man's impact in the coastal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper examines the monitoring of man's impact in the coastal zone. Color infrared photography shows destroyed or degraded wetlands or beaches, and makes possible relevant linear or aerial measurements with aerial photography. It can also categorize the environmental impacts which have accrued as the result of completion of water development projects. Aerial photography of the Texas coastal zone illustrates the nature and degree of damage likely to occur as a result of construction or maintenance projects. It is concluded that the method of assigning realistic values to unit areas of wetlands and beaches will make it feasible to incorporate the cost of estuarine damages into the cost estimates of water development schemes

  5. Building fire zone model with symbolic mathematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武红梅; 郜冶; 周允基

    2009-01-01

    To apply the fire modelling for the fire engineer with symbolic mathematics,the key equations of a zone model were demonstrated. There were thirteen variables with nine constraints,so only four ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were required to solve. A typical fire modelling with two-room structure was studied. Accordingly,the source terms included in the ODEs were simplified and modelled,and the fourth Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with symbolic mathematics. Then a zone model could be used with symbolic mathematics. It is proposed that symbolic mathematics is possible for use by fire engineer.

  6. La zone nouvelle de Pudong (Shangai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Weissberg

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Depuis 1990 et au prix de lourds investissements en infrastructures, le gouvernement et les autorités locales espèrent faire de la Zone Nouvelle de Pudong un élément clé de l’expansion de Shanghai. Neuf zones d’activités accueillent habitat, services et industries. Le développement de la ZNP reste cependant marqué par certaines faiblesses qui posent la question de son rôle dans le renouveau attendu de Shanghai.

  7. 77 FR 21439 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone in the Federal Register (77 FR 11426). We received 0 letters... under Executive Order 13211. Technical Standards The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act... Thursday of November; 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (66) New Years Eve Fireworks; Chicago, IL. (i) Location. All...

  8. 77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... Causeway (60); Sand Key Bridge (699); Belleair Causeway Bridge; Walsingham Rd Bridge (688); Park Blvd. (co... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory Information... surrounding waters to stop or impede maritime traffic during the event. The security zones and...

  9. 75 FR 26650 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Agriculture Regulatory Enforcement Ombudsman and the Regional Small Business Regulatory Fairness Boards. The... Captain of the Port Lake Michigan zone, in the Federal Register (75 FR 13707). We received 0 letters... on a substantial number of small entities. The term ``small entities'' comprises small...

  10. 33 CFR 3.25-10 - Sector Hampton Roads Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sector Hampton Roads Marine... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fifth Coast Guard District § 3.25-10 Sector Hampton Roads Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Hampton Roads' office is located in Portsmouth, VA....

  11. 33 CFR 165.775 - Safety Zone; Captain of the Port Zone Jacksonville; Offshore Cape Canaveral, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Captain of the Port Zone Jacksonville; Offshore Cape Canaveral, Florida. 165.775 Section 165.775 Navigation and Navigable... Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.775 Safety Zone; Captain of the Port Zone Jacksonville; Offshore...

  12. Traffic Analysis Zones - TRAFFIC_ZONES_TIGER00_IN: Indiana Traffic Analysis Zones (U.S. Census Bureau, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — TRAFFIC_ZONES_TIGER00_IN contains traffic analysis zones in Indiana identified by the US Bureau of the Census. Vigo, Madison, and Monroe counties were not available...

  13. Sustainable commercialization of new crops for the agricultural bioeconomy

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, N.R; Dorn, K.; B. Runck; P. Ewing; Williams, A; Anderson, K A; L. Felice; K. Haralson; J. Goplen; Altendorf, K; Fernandez, A.; W. Phippen; Sedbrook, J.; Marks, M.; Wolf, K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diversification of agroecological systems to enhance agrobiodiversity is likely to be critical to advancing environmental, economic, and social sustainability of agriculture. Temperate-zone agroecological systems that are currently organized for production of summer-annual crops can be diversified by integration of fallow-season and perennial crops. Integration of such crops can improve sustainability of these agroecological systems, with minimal interference with current agricultura...

  14. 33 CFR 165.929 - Safety Zones; Annual events requiring safety zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zones; Annual events... Areas Ninth Coast Guard District § 165.929 Safety Zones; Annual events requiring safety zones in the... of June; 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. each day. (8) International Bayfest; Green Bay, WI—(i) Location....

  15. Modeling alternative zoning strategies in forest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krcmar, E.; Vertinsky, I.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2003-01-01

    To satisfy public demands for environmental values, forest companies are facing the prospect of a reduction in wood supply and increases in costs. Some Canadian provincial governments have proposed intensifying silviculture in special zones dedicated to timber production as the means for pushing out

  16. Analysis Links Zoning Policies and Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Location, location, location. This mantra of real estate agents and their clients alike is now the target of a new report from the Brookings Institution linking housing prices and zoning practices to effectively depriving low-income students of high-quality schools. Using test scores from schools in the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the…

  17. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...

  18. Water chemistry evolution through the critical zone

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyojin

    2014-01-01

    Water as it passes through the critical zone - from top of the trees to the bottom of the groundwater table - plays a critical role in chemical weathering of rocks and in the global carbon cycle. Although the chemistry of surface water (i.e. rivers and lakes) has been intensively monitored at high-frequency (

  19. Fluorescent retroreflective signing of work zones : abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Kooi, F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescent retroreflective materials increase the brightness of traffic signs. In construction work zones a benefit is expected from the increased conspicuity of fluorescent retroreflective signs. Fluorescent material can be used instead of non-fluorescent materials both for the advance warning sig

  20. A zone theory of colour vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, P.L.

    1966-01-01

    Arguments are put forward to explain the basic facts about color vision in the frame work of a zone theory, a combination of the Young-Helmholtz and the Hering theory. Data on wavelength discrimination in particular as a function of luminance, necessitate to assume separate mechanisms for red-green

  1. 76 FR 23485 - Safety Zone; Red River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Red River AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... Red River in the State of North Dakota, including those portions of the river bordered by Richland... protect persons and vessels from safety hazards associated with flooding occurring on the Red River....

  2. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty with its Annexes endorsed on 6 August 1985 by the South Pacific Forum (a body comprising the independent and self-governing countries of the South Pacific, namely Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Nive, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Western Samoa) is presented

  3. Ethnographies of Grey Zones in Eastern Europe:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ’ and internationally minded ‘new citizens’ has left some in poverty, unemployment and social insecurity, leading them to rely on normative coping and semi-autonomous strategies for security and social guarantees. This anthology explores how grey zones of governance, borders, relations and invisibilities affect...

  4. English Higher Education and Its Vocational Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Distinctions between academic, vocational and professional education inform but do not define the divisions of English higher education. Nevertheless, there are zones where courses, qualifications and institutions are specifically oriented to the world of work. These include most short-cycle higher education, large parts of undergraduate and…

  5. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 6 August 1985 the South Pacific Forum, a body comprising the independent and self-governing countries of the South Pacific (Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Western Samoa), endorsed the text of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty and opened it for signature

  6. ISOLDE target zone control room HD

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Wolfsberg; P. Reimus

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the Saturated Zone Colloid-Facilitated Transport Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR), as outlined in its Work Direction and Planning Document (CRWMS M&O 1999a), is to provide retardation factors for colloids with irreversibly-attached radionuclides, such as plutonium, in the saturated zone (SZ) between their point of entrance from the unsaturated zone (UZ) and downgradient compliance points. Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this AMR especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and perhaps other radionuclides may be irreversibly attached to colloids. This report establishes the requirements and elements of the design of a methodology for calculating colloid transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In previous Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses, radionuclide-bearing colloids were assumed to be unretarded in their migration. Field experiments in fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain and in porous media at other sites indicate that colloids may, in fact, experience retardation relative to the mean pore-water velocity, suggesting that contaminants associated with colloids should also experience some retardation. Therefore, this analysis incorporates field data where available and a theoretical framework when site-specific data are not available for estimating plausible ranges of retardation factors in both saturated fractured tuff and saturated alluvium. The distribution of retardation factors for tuff and alluvium are developed in a form consistent with the Performance Assessment (PA) analysis framework for simulating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone. To improve on the work performed so far for the saturated-zone flow and transport modeling, concerted effort has been made in quantifying colloid retardation factors in both fractured tuff and alluvium. The fractured tuff analysis used recent data

  8. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  9. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  10. The concept of the Economic Exclusive Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Patuzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The important and the new concept that brought the third UN Conference of the Law of the Sea was the Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ, requested by countries whose coasts are bordering on the oceans, seas, but also in harmony with the interests of countries which have extensive coastline or those with specific geographical features, which have a very narrow coastal zone. On December 10, 1982, nearly 120 countries signed the new United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, as one of the most significant international conferences. Part V of that Convention (more precisely Articles 55 to 75 provides for an “Exclusive Economic Zone” extending 200 nautical miles seaward from the coast. If all coastal states thus exercised their jurisdiction over their own EEZ, some 38 million square nautical miles would become their “economic patrimony”. It should be mentioned that the ocean represents 71% of the total surface of the earth and that 32% of that falls under the jurisdiction of coastal states. Consequently inside these economic zones would lie 90% of global fishing, 87% of oil deposits and 10 % of polymetallic nodules. The EEZ provisions have received widespread support and have become an integral part of international practice especially when the Convention of 1982 entered into force, also articles 55 and 86 of the Convention make it clear that the EEZ is not a part of the territorial sea, but it is a zone sui generis, with a statute of its own. Some countries had claimed 200-mile EEZ and other have established a 200- mile Exclusive Fishing Zone (EFZ. The countries benefiting the most from the EEZ concept are in order of the size of their zones: USA, Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Canada and Russia. If this concept was to be applied by all coastal Mediterranean States, the entire sea would be covered by EEZs of the littoral countries. The countries of the Mediterranean that would most benefit from the EEZ are Greece, Cyprus, Italy and Malta

  11. Improved Zone Plate Coded Imaging Technique by Using Four Special Designed Gabor Zone Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lei-Feng; SHEN Yu-Ji; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; DING Yong-Kun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Direct-current component, high-order artifacts, and side lobe distortion provide serious drawbacks in the application of Fresnel zone plate coded imaging (ZPCI).The presentation provided here proposes a novel way to resolve all the above-mentioned problems.Four different Gabor zone plates are suggested to substitute the one Fresnel zone plate used in the conventional ZPCI.Perfect reconstruction will be obtained when integrally analysing the four coded images.Primary numerical simulation provided here shows good result.

  12. Mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, M.

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence for mid mantle seismic anisotropy around subduction zones whose interpretation remains elusive. In this study I estimate the strain-induced mid mantle fabric and associated seismic anisotropy developing in 3D petrological-thermo-mechanical subduction models where the slab is either stagnating over the 660 km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle. The modelling of synthetic lattice-preferred-orientation (LPO) development of wadsleyite and perovskite has been calibrated with results from deformational experiments and ab-initio atomic scale models, and the single crystal elastic tensor of the different mineral phases is scaled by local P-T conditions. The lower transition zone (ringwoodite + garnet) is assumed to be isotropic. Mid mantle fabric develops in proximity of the subducting slab where deformation and stresses are high, except at depths where upwelling or downwelling material undergoes phase transformations, yielding to LPO reset. The upper transition zone (wadsleyite + garnet) is characterized by weak transverse isotropy (2-3%) with symmetry axes oriented and fast S wave polarized dip-normal. A slightly stronger transverse isotropy develops in the lower mantle (perovskite + periclase), where the symmetry axes, the polarization of the fast S wave and the maximum Vp and dVs are parallel to the slab dip and subduction direction. For stagnating slab models this translates into negative and positive radial anisotropy in the upper transition zone and lower mantle back-arc, respectively, minimum delay times for vertically travelling shear waves and large shear wave splitting for waves propagating horizontally in the lower mantle. These results may help in reconciling the seismic anisotropy patterns observed in some subduction zones with subduction-induced deformation, such as those measured in the mid mantle between the Australian plate and the New Hebrides-Tonga-Kermadec trenches that I interpret as related to stagnating

  13. Main principles of the Chernobyl' NPP zone development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested to divide the Chernobyl' NPP zone into two parts, which are the alienation and evacuation (buffer) zones. The alienation zone includes the areas with greatest contamination around the Chernobyl' NPP. The population residence in this zone is forbidden. The watching method of working with short-time personnel residence is suggested to be used in this zone. The buffer zone is the territory out of the alienation zone boundaries including all settlements, from which the population is evacuated. Constant residence is permitted in the buffer zone for persons 50 and more years old with introduction of restrictions for diet and residence organization. The production activity in this zone includes operation of three units of the Chernobyl' NPP, works with the Ukrytie object and researches. Operations connected with radioactive waste processing and redisposal from places of storage is not recommended to be done. It is suggested to develop methods for local radioactive waste processing

  14. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, Hemin; Schmeling, Harro; Burchardt, Steffi;

    2013-01-01

    a partially molten magma body (stoping). From the fluid dynamics perspective these shear zones can be regarded as low Reynolds number deformation zones within the wake of a body moving through a viscous medium. While compact moving bodies (aspect ratio 1:1:1) generate axial symmetric (cone like) shear zones......Shear zones are normally viewed as relatively narrow deformation zones that accommodate relative displacement between two "blocks" that have moved past each other in opposite directions. This study reports localized zones of shear between adjacent blocks that have not moved past each other...... or wakes, elongated bodies (vertical plates or horizontal rod-like bodies) produce tabular shear zones or wakes. Unlike conventional shear zones across which shear indicators usually display consistent symmetries, shear indicators on either side of the shear zone or wake reported here show reverse...

  15. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Schmeling, H.; Burchardt, S.;

    2012-01-01

    magma body (stoping). From the fluid dynamics point of view these shear zones can be regarded as the low Reynolds number deformation zones within the wake of a body moving through a viscous medium. While compact (aspect ratio 1:1:1) moving bodies generate axial symmetric (cone like) shear zones......Shear zones are normally viewed as relatively narrow deformation zones that accommodate relative displacement between two "blocks" that have moved past each other in opposite directions. This study reports localized zones of shear between adjacent blocks that have not moved past each other......, elongated bodies (vertical plates or horizontal rod-like bodies) produce tabular shear zones. Unlike conventional shear zones across which shear indicators ideally display consistent symmetries, shear indicators on either sides of the shear zone reported here show reverse kinematics. Thus profiles exhibit...

  16. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  17. FIGHT ZONE WITH POINTS OF THE SHOTOKAN KARATE FEMALE COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Kautzner Marques Junior

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the fight zone with point during the female kumite of competition. This study used a quantitative research for identify the fight zone with point (ippon or waza-ari or not during the female kumite of competition. Were selected on the Internet several championship of kumite of the JKA and of the ITKF. The study detected a high probability of point in the zone 7 and in the zone 2. The study determined that the most points at the corner occurred when the karateka practiced the attack in fight zone. Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA verified significant difference between the fight zone with points, H (10 = 29,49, p = 0,001. The Mann Whitney U test detected significant difference between the zone 5 with waza-ari versus all the zone. The greatest number of points in the fight zone was in agreement with the size of the fight zone. The central zone or zone 5 has 6x6 m, during the female kumite occurred more points, total of 68 waza-aris and 5 ippons. The study on the fight zone with points of the female kumite permits that the karateka has knowledge about the combat zones and guides the karateka before, during and after the female kumite. However, more studies should be done to confirm these findings.

  18. Louisiana Coastal Zone Boundary, Geographic NAD83, LDNR (1998)[coastal_zone_boundary_LDNR_1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset representing the extent of the LDNR regulatory area defined as the Louisiana Coastal Zone. This area comprises a band across the southern...

  19. Energy transport in the marginal ice zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Tony W.; Squire, Vernon A.

    2001-09-01

    A novel approach to modeling ocean wave scattering in the marginal ice zone that uses the coherent potential approximation to compute the energy transport velocity is reported. The necessary theory is developed by considering sea ice floes to be thin elastic beams governed by the Euler-Bernoulli equation, with the open water surrounding each floe subject to the same equation with its material coefficients set to be very small quantities. This mathematical stratagem facilitates the solution of the problem and yields interesting results about the speed at which wave energy propagates through a marginal ice zone, the dispersion relation for a random mixture of ice floes and water, and the mean free path or attenuation coefficient. Results from the model are compared with data reported by Wadhams et al. [1988].

  20. Flow and transport in Riparian Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jannick Kolbjørn

    scenarios with changing conditions for flow (steady state with no flooding or transient with flooding), hydrogeology, denitrification rate, and extent of flooding it is demonstrated how flow paths, residence times, and nitrate removal are affected. With this previous conceptual models on the hydrology...... of riparian zones are extended by accounting for the effect of flooding and a key result is that flooding enhances nitrate removal given the right hydrogeological characteristics. Moreover the re-established riparian zones were characterized to understand the effects of flooding on subsurface hydrological...... flow paths by combining a number of field investigation methods and 2D modeling for the Brynemade site. Field investigations included: (1) hydrogeological characterization using wells, slug and infiltration tests, (2) geophysical imaging of the subsurface using Multi-Electrode-Profiling, (3...

  1. Torsional oscillations in the solar convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Covas, E; Moss, D; Tworkowski, A; Covas, Eurico; Tavakol, Reza; Moss, David; Tworkowski, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Recent analysis of the helioseismic observations indicate that the previously observed surface torsional oscillations extend significantly downwards into the solar convection zone. In an attempt to understand these oscillations, we study the nonlinear coupling between the magnetic field and the solar differential rotation in the context of a mean field dynamo model, in which the nonlinearity is due to the action of the azimuthal component of the Lorentz force of the dynamo generated magnetic field on the solar angular velocity. The underlying zero order angular velocity is chosen to be consistent with the most recent helioseismic data. The model produces butterfly diagrams which are in qualitative agreement with the observations. It displays torsional oscillations that penetrate into the convection zone, and which with time migrate towards the equator. The period of these oscillations is found to be half that of the period of the global magnetic fields. This is compatible with the observed period of the surfa...

  2. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (∼ 1024 Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  3. Diamagnetic pumping in a rotating convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L

    2016-01-01

    Solar dynamo models require some mechanism for magnetic field concentration near the base of the convection zone in order to generate super-kilogauss toroidal fields with sufficiently large (~10^{24} Mx) magnetic flux. We consider the downward diamagnetic pumping near the base of the convection zone as a possible concentration mechanism and derive the pumping velocities with allowance for the effect of rotation. Transport velocities for poloidal and toroidal fields differ in rotating fluid. The toroidal field is transported downward along the radius only but the pumping velocity for the poloidal field has an equatorward meridional component also. Previous results for cases of slow and rapid rotation are reproduced and the diamagnetic pumping expressions adapted for use in dynamo models are presented.

  4. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  5. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  6. A systems approach framework for coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Tom Sawyer; Bailly, Denis; Støttrup, Josianne

    2011-01-01

    application to coastal zone systems (CZSs) was developed. The SAF is about information for management through a focus on how to generate a higher, dynamic level of information about complex CZSs and how to render this information more useful to end users through a participatory suite of communication methods...... simulations appropriate to a selected policy issue and to the social-environmental conditions of each Study Site Application. Their findings are not the result of funded research projects; instead, they are by-products of pilot applications conducted to develop and improve the SAF methodology. The final...... article of this Volume synthesizes these results in the context of the SAF as a higher level instrument for integrated coastal zone management...

  7. SAMZ: Satellite-Derived Management Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The term "satellite-derived management zones" (SAMZ) denotes agricultural management zones that are subdivisions of large fields and that are derived from images of the fields acquired by instruments aboard Earth orbiting satellites during approximately the past 15 years. "SAMZ" also denotes the methodology and the software that implements the methodology for creating such zones. The SAMZ approach is one of several products of continuing efforts to realize a concept of precision agriculture, which involves optimal variations in seeding, in application of chemicals, and in irrigation, plus decisions to farm or not to farm certain portions of fields, all in an effort to maximize profitability in view of spatial and temporal variations in the growth and health of crops and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. As used here, "management zone" signifies, more precisely, a subdivision of a field within which the crop production behavior is regarded as homogeneous. From the perspective of precision agriculture, management zones are the smallest subdivisions between which the seeding, application of chemicals, and other management parameters are to be varied. In the SAMZ approach, the main sources of data are the archives of satellite imagery that have been collected over the years for diverse purposes. One of the main advantages afforded by the SAMZ approach is that the data in these archives can be reused for purposes of precision agriculture at low cost. De facto, these archives contain information on all sources of variability within a field, including weather, crop types, crop management, soil types, and water drainage patterns. The SAMZ methodology involves the establishment of a Web-based interface based on an algorithm that generates management zones automatically and quickly from archival satellite image data in response to requests from farmers. A farmer can make a request by either uploading data describing a field boundary to the Web site or else

  8. Extrasolar Trojan Planets close to Habitable Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, R; Schwarz, R; Freistetter, F

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the stability regions of hypothetical terrestrial planets around the Lagrangian equilibrium points L4 and L5 in some specific extrasolar planetary systems. The problem of their stability can be treated in the framework of the restricted three body problem where the host star and a massive Jupiter-like planet are the primary bodies and the terrestrial planet is regarded as being massless. From these theoretical investigations one cannot determine the extension of the stable zones around the equilibrium points. Using numerical experiments we determined their largeness for three test systems chosen from the table of the know extrasolar planets, where a giant planet is moving close to the so-called habitable zone around the host star in low eccentric orbits. The results show the dependence of the size and structure of this region, which shrinks significantly with the eccentricity of the known gas giant.

  9. Wood-framed houses for earthquake zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg

    Wood-framed houses with a sheathing are suitable for use in earthquake zones. The Direction describes a method of determining the earthquake forces in a house and shows how these forces can be resisted by diaphragm action in the walls, floors, and roof, of the house. An appendix explains how to d...... to design the wall, roof, and floor panels. The Direction is intended for design engineers and architects.......Wood-framed houses with a sheathing are suitable for use in earthquake zones. The Direction describes a method of determining the earthquake forces in a house and shows how these forces can be resisted by diaphragm action in the walls, floors, and roof, of the house. An appendix explains how...

  10. Two-Temperature-Zone Silicon Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo, A.; Nanis, L.; Kapur, V. K.; Weaver, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    When high purity silicon is synthesized by reduction of silicon tetrafluoride by sodium, very-fast highly exothermic reaction takes place. Controlled reaction is proposed in which SiF4-pressurized vertical reactor operates with two temperature zones. Liquid sodium feeds from nozzle at top of rector without reacting with SiF4. When sodium reaches higher temperature region at bottom, reaction takes place immediately.

  11. A strategic zone for Total's future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, the Total company investments in the Middle East reached 1.2 billions of French Francs. This region is considered as a major growth zone by the French group. This paper summarizes the Total's participations in oil and gas activities and partnerships of Middle East countries (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Qatar, Yemen): exploration, production, development, contracts, permits, technical assistance etc.. (J.S.)

  12. Rural Productivity Zones (RPZs) for microenterprises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the concept of rural productivity zones (RPZs) which are defined as a business incubator to foster income-producing opportunities for the rural poor. The essential ingredients of such a program include: electric power; business development assistance; office services; and quality work space. The electric power source must be a good quality system, consisting of a diesel/wind/photovoltaic hybrid type system, providing reliable service, with a local maintenance program and a functional load management program.

  13. Yellow light dilemma zone researches: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Yaping Zhang; Chuanyun Fu; Liwei Hu

    2014-01-01

    The yellow light dilemma zone is widely known as an area on the high-speed intersection approach, where vehicles neither safely stop before the stop line nor proceed through the intersection during amber interval. Within such an area, a vehicle might be involved in a right-angle crash or rear-end collision. This issue has been extensively discussed over five decades in traffic engineering field, covering from theory to practice. However, few comprehensive review literatures on the amber signa...

  14. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications. PMID:27678305

  15. Flood Insurance Coverage in the Coastal Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, Craig E.; Jahan-Parvar, Mohammad R.

    2008-01-01

    We explore behavior and test theory regarding the determinants of flood insurance coverage in the coastal zone using household-level data for nine southeastern counties. We use Tobit regression models to assess the importance and magnitude of insurance cost, risk factors, community characteristics, and household attributes on flood insurance purchase for residential building structures. Overall estimates indicate price inelastic demand, though subsidized policyholders are more sensitive to ...

  16. Moral Hazard in the Euro-Zone?

    OpenAIRE

    Briceño Avalos, Hernán Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is provide us with empirical evidences and theoretical knowledge about how the compelling current Sovereign Debt Crisis in the periphery Euro-zone countries was triggered according with moral hazard theory, because the implicit and explicit externalization of risk cost for commercial financial institutions and/or banks. Different from traditional working papers that concentrated only on weak macroeconomic fundamentals and contagion effects as the main origins of the prev...

  17. Integrated modelling of the Belgian coastal zone

    OpenAIRE

    Delhez, E. J. M.; Carabin, G.

    2001-01-01

    The management of the water resources in coastal or delta plains asks for an integrated modelling of the water system at a regional scale. In the SALMON project, detailed descriptions of the groundwater, river and marine domains are provided by coupling appropriate numerical models of these different sub-systems.The application of this three-fold model to the Scheldt and Belgian Coastal Zone reveals a marked river plume extending along the Belgian Coast with strong offshore gradients. This pl...

  18. Macrofungi in the Rural Zone of Villavicencio

    OpenAIRE

    Martha L. Ortiz-Moreno

    2010-01-01

    Organic material degrading macrofungi, are a group of particular microorganisms with a high diversity of forms and habits. Thirty specimens were collected through punctual sampling in rural zone of Villavicencio,this city has a foothills landscape. During the sampling predominated the Basidiomycetes. The Polyporal order and the Polyporaceae family were the best represented and the most frequent gender were Trametes and Auricularia. It is hoped that this study will contribute to the knowledge ...

  19. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  20. Tax and spending incentives and enterprise zones

    OpenAIRE

    Peter S. Fisher

    1997-01-01

    Firm-specific incentives and enterprise zones are the two most rapidly growing weapons in states' and localities' competitive arsenal. What incentives have states and localities adopted, which of these incentives are spreading, and what are the prominent successes and failures? What has been the experience with "clawback" provisions, assurances from recipients that they will actually create the jobs and other economic benefits they promise?

  1. Overlapping Zone Partitioning Localisation Technique for RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavi K. Khedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Basically used for contactless identification, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology was originallythought as a complement for the drawbacks of the Barcode. Due to its capabilities and on-going drop in cost,researchers have started to look into other areas where RFID can be employed. One such area of research isReal-Time Location Tracking (RTLT, especially for indoor environments. While technologies such as Ultra-Sound, Infrared, WiFi, Bluetooth and GSM have been considered for indoor localisation, their requirements forline of sight and/or prohibitive cost have hindered their successful adoption. We are therefore presenting a lowcostsolution using RFID technology which we refer to as the ‘Overlapping Zone Partitioning’ (OZP techniquethat can be implemented using basic off-the-shelf RFID Readers and which has been derived from the zonebasedlocalisation technique. We have successfully implemented OZP and evaluated its performance. It hasbeen found that its accuracy is enhanced by nearly 40% in comparison to a normal zone-based localisationsystem. Its performance in terms of correct zone classification is within the range of 80-90%.

  2. Blending zone determination for aerial orthimage mosaicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Chen, Bo-Heng; Lin, Bo-Yi; Chou, Han-Szu

    2016-09-01

    Creating a composed image from a set of aerial images is a fundamental step in orthomosaic generation. One of the processes involved in this technique is determining an optimal seamline in an overlapping region to stitch image patches seamlessly. Most previous studies have solved this optimization problem by searching for a one-pixel-wide seamline with an objective function. This strategy significantly reduced pixel mismatches on the seamline caused by geometric distortions of images but did not fully consider color discontinuity and mismatch problems that occur around the seamline, which sometimes cause mosaicking artifacts. This study proposes a blending zone determination scheme with a novel path finding algorithm to reduce the occurrence of unwanted artifacts. Instead of searching for a one-pixel-wide seamline, a blending zone, which is a k-pixel-wide seamline that passes through high-similarity pixels in the overlapping region, is determined using a hierarchical structure. This strategy allows for not only seamless stitching but also smooth color blending of neighboring image patches. Moreover, the proposed method searches for a blending zone without the pre-process of highly mismatched pixel removal and additional geographic data of road vectors and digital surface/elevation models, which increases the usability of the approach. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of aerial images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method to related methods in terms of avoidance of passing highly mismatched pixels.

  3. Torsional oscillations in the solar convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covas, E.; Tavakol, R.; Moss, D.; Tworkowski, A.

    2000-08-01

    Recent analysis of the helioseismic observations indicate that the previously observed surface torsional oscillations extend significantly downwards into the solar convection zone. In an attempt to understand these oscillations, we study the nonlinear coupling between the magnetic field and the solar differential rotation in the context of a mean field dynamo model, in which the nonlinearity is due to the action of the azimuthal component of the Lorentz force of the dynamo generated magnetic field on the solar angular velocity. The underlying zero order angular velocity is chosen to be consistent with the most recent helioseismic data. The model produces butterfly diagrams which are in qualitative agreement with the observations. It displays torsional oscillations that penetrate into the convection zone, and which with time migrate towards the equator. The period of these oscillations is found to be half that of the period of the global magnetic fields. This is compatible with the observed period of the surface torsional oscillations. Inside the convection zone, this is a testable prediction that is not ruled out by the observations so far available.

  4. Transport of through a Thick Vadose Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Best, Anna; Parker, Beth L; Aravena, Ramon; Dunfield, Kari

    2015-09-01

    Livestock manure applications on fields can be a source of contamination in water resources, including groundwater. Although fecal indicators like have often been detected in tile drainage systems, few studies have monitored groundwater at depth after manure treatments, especially at sites with a deep, heterogeneous vadose zone. Our hypothesis was that microbial transport through a thick vadose zone would be limited or nonexistent due to attenuation processes, subsurface thickness, and heterogeneity. This study tested this hypothesis by monitoring concentrations beneath a 12-m-thick vadose zone of coarse, heterogeneous glacial sediments after surface application of liquid swine manure. was detected on all 23 sample dates over the 5-mo period (4 Apr. 2012-13 Aug. 2012), with particularly elevated concentrations 1 wk after application and lasting for 5 wk. Variable low-level concentrations before and after the elevated period suggest remobilization and delayed transport of microorganisms to the water table without additional loadings within the flow field. These findings suggest preferential flow pathways allowing deep infiltration of manure bacteria as well as a continued source of bacteria, with variable retention and travel times, over several months. Preferential flow pathways at this site include soil macropores, depression focused infiltration, and pathways related to subsurface heterogeneity and/or fracture flow through finer-grained diamict beds. Further research is needed to confirm the relative contribution of sources, constrain travel times, and define specific transport pathways. PMID:26436260

  5. Multispectral observations of the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonmaker, Jon S.; Dirbas, Joseph; Gilbert, Gary

    2003-09-01

    Airborne multispectral imagery was collected over various targets on the beach and in the water in an attempt to characterize the surf zone environment with respect to electro-optical system capabilities and to assess the utility of very low cost, small multispectral systems in mine counter measures (MCM) and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications. The data was collected by PAR Government Systems Corporation (PGSC) at the Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility at Duck North Carolina and on the beaches of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in Southern California. PGSC flew the first two of its MANTIS (Mission Adaptable Narrowband Tunable Imaging Sensor) systems. Both MANTIS systems were flown in an IR - red - green - blue (700, 600, 550, 480 nm) configuration from altitudes ranging from 200 to 700 meters. Data collected has been lightly analyzed and a surf zone index (SZI) defined and calculated. This index allows mine hunting system performance measurements in the surf zone to be normalized by environmental conditions. The SZI takes into account water clarity, wave energy, and foam persistence.

  6. Coastal zone: Shelf-EEZ and land sea interface

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, B.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Among the few vibrant ecotopes is the coastal zone, where multifaceted interactions among air, sea and land are dynamically balanced. An area of intense clash of interest of user community, the coastal zone harbouring vast potential of renewable...

  7. Shipping Fairways, Lanes, and Zones for US waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various shipping zones delineate activities and regulations for marine vessel traffic. Traffic lanes define specific traffic flow, while traffic separation zones...

  8. Ecotype Zones for Minnesota and Iowa Prairie Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a map of local ecotype seed harvest zones for Iowa and Minnesota. A local ecotype zone is defined as a geographic area with generally similar...

  9. The Study on Provincial-level Land Consolidation Zoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping; CHEN; Xiaowei; WU

    2013-01-01

    The principles and methods of regional land consolidation in Yunnan Province are expounded. On the basis of differences in topography, climate, soil, hydrology and other natural conditions and the characteristics of spatial layout of land use, agricultural zoning, cropping system and land consolidation measures, the land consolidation zoning indicator system composed of five indicators covering ecological environment, socio-economy, land use, land consolidation and land quality is established by using the GIS spatial analysis and mathematical analysis. Against this backdrop, the Yunnan Province is divided into five first-level land consolidation zones, including the middle-mountain lake basin plateau consolidation zone in central Yunnan, the middle and low mountain wide valley basin consolidation zone in southwest Yunnan, the karst middle and low mountains consolidation zone in southeast Yunnan, the high-mountain and highlands consolidation zone in northeast Yunnan, the middle -mountain and mountain plateau consolidation zone in northeast Yunnan.

  10. Study on rupture zone of the M=8.1 Kunlun Mountain earthquake using fault-zone trapped waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松林; 张先康; 樊计昌

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the fault-zone trapped waves was conducted using a seismic line with dense receivers across surface rupture zone of the M=8.1 Kunlun Mountain earthquake. The fault zone trapped waves were separated from seismograms by numerical filtering and spectral analyzing. The results show that: a) Both explosion and earthquake sources can excite fault-zone trapped waves, as long as they locate in or near the fault zone; b) Most energy of the fault-zone trapped waves concentrates in the fault zone and the amplitudes strongly decay with the distance from observation point to the fault zone; c) Dominant frequencies of the fault-zone trapped waves are related to the width of the fault zone and the velocity of the media in it. The wider the fault zone or the lower the velocity is, the lower the dominant frequencies are; d) For fault zone trapped waves, there exist dispersions; e) Based on the fault zone trapped waves observed in Kunlun Mountain Pass region, the width of the rupture plane is deduced to be about 300 m and is greater than that on the surface.

  11. Marginal zone lymphoma: old, new, targeted, and epigenetic therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Monika; Sheikh, Hassan; Abbi, Kamal; Long, Sarah; Sharma, Kamal; Tulchinsky, Mark; Epner, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) is an indolent B-cell lymphoma arising from marginal zone B-cells present in lymph nodes and extranodal tissues. MZL comprises 5–17% of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in adults. The World Health Organization categorizes MZL into three distinct types based on their site of impact: (1) splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL); (2) nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL); (3) extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, which can be subdivided into gastric and...

  12. Characterization of fracture zone 2, Finnsjoen study-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1. Overview of the fracture zone project at Finnsjoen, Sweden. Part 2 Geological setting and deformation history of a low angle fracture zone at Finnsjoen, Sweden. Part 3 Hydraulic testing and modelling of a lowangle fracture zone at Finnsjoen, Sweden. Part 4 Groundwater flow conditions in a low angle fracture zone at Finnsjoen, Sweden. Part 5 Hydrochemical investigations at Finnsjoen, Sweden. Effects of gas-lift pumping on hydraulic borehole conditions at Finnsjoen, Sweden

  13. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass

  14. Fluid migration in ductile shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migration in metamorphic environments depends on a dynamically evolving permeable pore space, which was rarely characterised in detail. The data-base behind our understanding of the 4-dimensional transport properties of metamorphic rocks is therefore fragmentary at best, which leaves conceptual models poorly supported. Generally, it seems established that deformation is a major driver of permeability generation during regional metamorphism, and evidence for metamorphic fluids being channelled in large scale shear zones has been found in all depth segments of the continental crust. When strain localizes in ductile shear zones, the microfabric is modified until a steady state mylonite is formed that supports large deformations. A dynamic porosity that evolves during mylonitisation controls the distinct transport pathways along which fluid interacts with the rock. This dynamic porosity is controlled by a limited number of mechanisms, which are intrinsically linked to the metamorphic evolution of the rock during its deformational overprint. Many mid- and lower-crustal mylonites comprise polyphase mixtures of micron-sized grains that show evidence for deformation by dissolution/precipitation-assisted viscous grain boundary sliding. The establishment of these mineral mixtures is a critical process, where monomineralic layers are dispersed and grain growth is inhibited by the heterogeneous nucleation of secondary mineral phases at triple junctions. Here we show evidence from three different mid- and lower-crustal shear zones indicating that heterogeneous nucleation occurs in creep cavities. Micro- and nanotomographic observations show that creep cavities provide the dominant form of porosity in these ultramylonites. They control a "granular fluid pump" that directs fluid migration and hence mass transport. The granular fluid pump operates on the grain scale driven by viscous grain boundary sliding, and requires only small amounts of fluid. The spatial arrangement of

  15. 76 FR 51887 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ...) entitled ``Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 36447). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11,'' which consists of aerial...

  16. 32 CFR 256.7 - Accident potential zone guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accident potential zone guidelines. 256.7 Section 256.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS AIR INSTALLATIONS COMPATIBLE USE ZONES § 256.7 Accident potential zone...

  17. 33 CFR 147.825 - Chevron Genesis Spar safety zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chevron Genesis Spar safety zone... (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.825 Chevron Genesis Spar safety zone. (a) Description. The Chevron Genesis Spar, Green Canyon 205A (GC205A), is located at position 27°46′46.365″ N,...

  18. Research on Seismic Interpretation Method of Karst-Fractured Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Ruo-fei; ZHANG Cong-ling

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the fundamentals of predicting karst-fractured zones using both seismic attribute technique and pattern recognition method are introduced. Ordovician limestone karst-fractured zones in the First Mining Area of Wutongzhuang Coal Mine were forecast by using practical seismic data. The result shows that both seismic attribute technique and pattern recognition method are effective in predicting karst-fractured zones.

  19. 76 FR 58401 - Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 38586). We received no... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC... temporary moving safety zone during the Swim Around Charleston, a swimming race occurring on waters of...

  20. 77 FR 35846 - Safety Zone; Sheboygan Harbor Fest, Sheboygan, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sheboygan Harbor Fest, Sheboygan, WI AGENCY... safety zone on Lake Michigan and the Sheboygan River, Sheboygan, WI. This safety zone is intended...

  1. 75 FR 34361 - Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS..., call ] or e-mail BM1 Adam Kraft, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI... enforce the safety zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for...

  2. 75 FR 49848 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY..., WI at 414-747-7154, e-mail Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for...

  3. 75 FR 22234 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY... BM1 Adam Kraft, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at 414-747-7154... zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zones, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the following...

  4. Distribution of some vascular plants and anthropopressure zones in Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sudnik-Wójcikowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The cartogramms of the species distribution within Warsaw were compared to the anthropopressure zones distinguished conventionally. Floras of individual zones differboth quantitatively and qualitatively. Some species are more confined to specific zones some have even an indicator value. The most interesting taxa are those found in sites where anthropopressure is the greatest.

  5. Recipe for Hypoxia: Playing the Dead Zone Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastler, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Dead zones--areas experiencing low levels of dissolved oxygen--are growing in shallow ocean waters around the world. Research has shown that dead zones form as a result of a specific type of pollution, called nutrient enrichment or eutrophication, and are found in almost every coastal zone where humans have large populations. Concepts related to…

  6. 78 FR 57570 - Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago, IL (78 FR 20241, August 20, 2013). This updated schedule... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Motion Picture Production; Chicago... will enforce the temporary safety zone for motion picture filming in Calumet Harbor, Chicago, IL from...

  7. 78 FR 34395 - Announcement of Foreign-Trade Zones Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Announcement of Foreign-Trade Zones Test AGENCY: U.S. Customs... announces U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (``CBP's'') plan to conduct a voluntary general test regarding certain foreign-trade zone (``FTZ'' or ``zone'') activities. Pursuant to the FTZ test,...

  8. Zoning Districts, Zoning Districts, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Zoning...

  9. Zoning Districts, zoning map series grid, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'zoning...

  10. Zoning Districts, zoning, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'zoning'....

  11. 76 FR 69613 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone in the Federal Register (76 FR 125). We..., Code for Fireworks Displays (30-yard distance per inch of diameter of the fireworks mortars), and...

  12. Zoning Districts, zone 01, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'zone 01'....

  13. Zoning Districts, k-zones, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'k-zones'....

  14. Zoning Districts, zoning lines, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'zoning...

  15. Zoning Districts, zoning trouble, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'zoning...

  16. Zoning Districts, zoning leader, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'zoning...

  17. The down-faulted basin zone and high disaster risk zone in Shanxi Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惠敏; 苏桂武; 邓砚; 高庆华

    2004-01-01

    Shanxi Province is a region with frequent occurrence of earthquakes, floods and waterlogging, meteorological and geologic hazards, and agrobiohazards in China. The study shows that the formation and development of the down-faulted basin zone in Shanxi Province provides an available condition for preparation and occurrence of these hazards, so that the basin zone becomes an area with frequent occurrence of the hazards, such as earthquakes, floods and waterlogging, meteorological and geologic hazards and agrobiohazards in Shanxi and with their most serious interaction and mutual intensification. Moreover, the basin zone is an area with dense population and most concentrated industrial and agricultural productions and social-economic property in Shanxi. The comprehensive effect of the two factors caused the zone to be a high natural disaster risk area in Shanxi. For reduction of natural disasters and ensuring the sustainable social-economic development in Shanxi, it is necessary to regard the basin zone as an important area for disaster reduction in Shanxi and to carry out integrated disaster reduction.

  18. The Lake Gordan mylonite zone: A link between the Nutbush Creek and Hylas zones of Eastern Piedmont fault system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.W. Jr.; Sacks, P.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)); Berquist, C.R. Jr.; Marr, J.D. Jr. (Virginia Div. of Mineral Resources, Charlottesville, VA (United States)); Druhan, R.M. (Robert M. Carolina Friends School, Durham, NC (United States)); Butler, J.R. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary results of geologic mapping indicate that the Nutbush Creek and Hylas mylonite zone of the lake Paleozoic Eastern Piedmont fault system are not coextensive, as has been proposed. In south-central Virginia and northern North Carolina, a separate NNE-trending, orogen-parallel mylonite zone, the Lake Gordon mylonite zone, lies between the Nutbush Creek and Hylas zone and may link them. The Lake Gordon mylonite zone, named for exposures near Lake Gordon Mecklenburg Co., Va., lies mainly along the eastern flank of the Buggs Island granite pluton and has been mapped for a distance of about 80 km. Reconnaissance between Blackstone and Kenbridge, Va., suggests that the Lake Gordon mylonite zone is linked to the Hylas zone by either a releasing bend or an en echelon right step. The Lake Gordon and Nutbush Creek mylonite zone converge southward and are separated by only 3 km of granitic gneiss at the southern limit of mapping near Henderson, N.C. Mylonitic foliation in the Lake Gordon mylonite zone strikes 10--25[degree] E., dips subvertically to steeply northwest, and is parallel to the mapped boundaries of the zone. Intensity of mylonitization varies across the 1.5--3.6-km width of the zone. Subhorizontal mineral-elongation lineation is common in the plane of mylonitic foliation. Asymmetric porphyroclasts and shear bands indicate dextral simple shear. Coincidence of the Lake Gordon and Nutbush Creek mylonite zones, respectively, with the eastern and western margins of the highly elongate Buggs Island granite pluton suggests that the mylonite zones influenced emplacement of the pluton. These map relations, combined with very localized mylonitic fabric in the granite, suggest that mylonite in the Lake Gordon zone, like that in the Nutbush Creek zones is partly coeval with the Pennsylvanian-age Buggs Island granite. Postmylonitic brittle faulting is found locally in both the Lake Gordon and the Nutbush Creek zones.

  19. Changes in soil biological quality under legume- and maize-based farming systems in a humid savanna zone of Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tano Y.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying the impact of farming systems on soil status is essential in determining the most relevant for a given agroecological zone. A trial was conducted in a West Africa humid savanna, aiming at assessing the short-term effects of farming systems on soil (0-10 cm organic carbon (SOC content and some soil microbiological properties. A randomized complete block experimental design with three replications, and the following treatments were used: Mucuna pruriens (Mucuna, Pueraria phaseoloides (Pueraria, Lablab purpureus (Lablab, a combination of these three legumes (Mixed-legumes, maize + urea (Maize-U, maize + triple super phosphate (Maize-Sp, maize + urea + triple super phosphate (Maize-USp, fertilizer-free maize continuous cropping (Maize-Tradi. Results indicated that SOC content was improved over time under legume-based systems. The relative increase was the highest with the legume association and Lablab, where SOC varied from 7.5 to 8.6 g.kg-1 (i.e. 14.7% and from 7.2 to 8.3 g.kg-1 (i.e. 15.3% respectively, between the start and the end of the trial. Besides, applying grass and maize residues as mulch on the ground, in association with inorganic fertilizers may be a way of improving SOC content in the short-term. Although legume-based systems exhibited highest values, microbial biomass carbon (MBC did not show any statistical significant differences between treatments. However, soil C mineralization and soil specific respiration were influenced by the farming systems, with higher mean values under legume-based systems (42 ± 7.6 mg C-CO2.g-1 Corg and 0.4 mg C-CO2.g-1 biomass C, respectively, compared to maize continuous cropping systems (33.1 ± 1.6 mg C-CO2.g-1 Corg and 0.3 mg C-CO2.g-1 biomass C, respectively. Thus, these parameters can be used as sensitive indicators of the early changes in soil organic matter quality. The integration of legumes cover crops in farming systems may contribute to improve soil quality that would lead to

  20. 32 CFR 256.9 - Real estate interests to be considered for clear zones and accident potential zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real estate interests to be considered for clear zones and accident potential zone. 256.9 Section 256.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS AIR INSTALLATIONS COMPATIBLE USE ZONES § 256.9 Real estate interests to...

  1. 33 CFR 3.45-10 - Sector Buffalo Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sector Buffalo Marine Inspection... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Ninth Coast Guard District § 3.45-10 Sector Buffalo Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Buffalo's office is located in Buffalo, NY. The boundaries of...

  2. 77 FR 22525 - Safety Zone; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New... temporary safety zones ] for swim events within the Captain of the Port (COTP) New York Zone. These...

  3. Biological, chemical and physical characteristics of downwelling and upwelling zones in the hyporheic zone of a north-temperate stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, R.J.M.; Storey, R.G.; Williams, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Along a single stream riffle, there is a typical flow pattern in which surface water enters the hyporheic zone in a downwelling zone at the head of the riffle and hyporheic water returns to the stream surface in an upwelling zone at the tail of the riffle. Distinct patterns of physical and chemical

  4. 33 CFR 3.35-10 - Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sector Miami Marine Inspection... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Seventh Coast Guard District § 3.35-10 Sector Miami Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Miami's office is located in Miami, FL. The boundaries of Sector...

  5. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in

  6. Understanding Fluid and Contaminant Movement in the Unsaturated Zone Using the INEEL Vadose Zone Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbell, J. M.; Mattson, E. D.; Sisson, J. B.; Magnuson, S. O.

    2002-02-26

    DOE has hundreds of contaminated facilities and waste sites requiring cleanup and/or long-term monitoring. These contaminated sites reside in unsaturated soils (i.e. the vadose zone) above the water table. Some of these sites will require active remediation activities or removal while other sites will be placed under institutional controls. In either case, evaluating the effectiveness of the remediation strategy or institutional controls will require monitoring. Classical monitoring strategies implemented at RCRA/CERCLA sites require ground water sampling for 30 years following closure. The overall effectiveness of ground water sampling is diminished due to the fact that by the time you detect chemical transport from a waste site, a major contamination plume likely exists in the vadose zone and the aquifer. This paper suggests a more effective monitoring strategy through monitoring near the contaminant sites within the vadose zone. Vadose zone monitoring allows for quicker detection of potential contaminant transport. The INEEL Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) is becoming an accepted, cost effective monitoring technology for assessing contaminant transport at DOE facilities. This paper describes the technologies employed in the VZMS and describes how it was used at several DOE facilities. The INEEL VZMS has provided the information in developing and validating both conceptual and risk assessment models of contaminant transport at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Hanford site. These DOE sites exhibit a broad range of meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic conditions representative of various common geologic environments. The VZMS is comprised of advanced tensiometers, water content sensors, temperature sensors and soil and gas samplers. These instruments are placed at multiple depths in boreholes and allows for the detection of water movement in the

  7. Heat flux in the coastal zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Edson, J.;

    1998-01-01

    correlation data taken at a mast two kilometres off the Danish coast in RASEX. For these coastal zone data, the thermal roughness length shows no well-defined relation to the momentum roughness length or roughness Reynolds number, in contrast to previous theories. The variation of the momentum roughness......-dimensional temperature function. The resulting stability function is simpler than previous ones and satisfies free convection similarity theory without introduction of the gustiness factor. The internal boundary layer also influences the moisture transfer coefficient....

  8. Nonaxisymmetric Variations Deep in the Convection Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using a deep-focusing time-distance technique and the MDI medium-1 data, a preliminary study of nonaxisymmetric variability deep in the convection zone has been performed. The purpose of the present study is to see what signals might be present in raw travel times indicating variation. To this end, noise levels will be examined. Correlations with point separations in the range 40-50 deg. have been measured for the entire medium-1 dataset over a significant fraction of the solar disk. Both flows and mean-time variations have been examined. Separation of near-surface signals from deep signals will also be examined.

  9. Swash Zone Response under Various Wave Regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Baldock, Tom; Contestabile, Pasquale;

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of swash zone (SZ) sediment transport and the resulting morphodynamics have been areas of active research over the last decade. However, many details are still to be understood, whose knowledge will be greatly advanced by the collection of high-quality data under the controlled large...... waves plus free long waves, bi-chromatic waves and random waves. Both erosive and accretive conditions were considered. Results discussed here were derived from the analysis of only a part of the whole data set....

  10. PLANETARY CHAOTIC ZONE CLEARING: DESTINATIONS AND TIMESCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Sarah; Malhotra, Renu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We investigate the orbital evolution of particles in a planet's chaotic zone to determine their final destinations and their timescales of clearing. There are four possible final states of chaotic particles: collision with the planet, collision with the star, escape, or bounded but non-collision orbits. In our investigations, within the framework of the planar circular restricted three body problem for planet-star mass ratio μ in the range 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –1.5}, we find no particles hitting the star. The relative frequencies of escape and collision with the planet are not scale-free, as they depend upon the size of the planet. For planet radius R{sub p} ≥ 0.001 R{sub H} where R{sub H} is the planet's Hill radius, we find that most chaotic zone particles collide with the planet for μ ≲ 10{sup –5}; particle scattering to large distances is significant only for higher mass planets. For fixed ratio R{sub p} /R{sub H} , the particle clearing timescale, T {sub cl}, has a broken power-law dependence on μ. A shallower power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –1/3}, prevails at small μ where particles are cleared primarily by collisions with the planet; a steeper power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –3/2}, prevails at larger μ where scattering dominates the particle loss. In the limit of vanishing planet radius, we find T {sub cl} ≈ 0.024 μ{sup –3/2}. The interior and exterior boundaries of the annular zone in which chaotic particles are cleared are increasingly asymmetric about the planet's orbit for larger planet masses; the inner boundary coincides well with the classical first order resonance overlap zone, Δa {sub cl,} {sub int} ≅ 1.2 μ{sup 0.28} a{sub p} ; the outer boundary is better described by Δa {sub cl,} {sub ext} ≅ 1.7 μ{sup 0.31} a{sub p} , where a{sub p} is the planet-star separation.

  11. Lanzhou New Zone looks to new opportunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The Lanzhou New Area, China's fifth State-level development zone, was established in August to "explore the market of the Commonwealth of the Independent States". Sitting in the geometric center of the country and the traditional transportation hub toward Europe, Lanzhou City, with its advantage of oil refining and equipment manufacturing, is well prepared to develop energy industries by importing more raw materials from Central Asia and Mongolia. The Lanzhou New Area targets the markets of Central Asian countries and the CIS countries.

  12. Special Economic Zones, 20 Years After

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla; Winiarczyk, Marcin

    In this paper we evaluate in an ex-post perspective whether the special economic zones (SEZs) introduced in Poland in 1994 have been successful in meeting regional development objectives or what we in this paper identify as a particular policy that has changed from being supply- to demand...... a higher income level and locking firms into the sustainability agenda through adoption of green technologies and reduced air pollution we find only a small positively moderating effect of the policy on what are traditional economically disadvantaged areas in Poland that were overtly dependent...

  13. Special Economic Zones, 20 years after

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla; Winiarczyk, Marcin

    technologies and reduced air pollution, the authors find only a small positively moderating effect of the policy on what are traditionally economically disadvantaged areas in Poland that used to be dependent on the socialist production model. Hence, despite high levels of FDI, the zones policy has not managed....... The positive effect of the policy however mainly comes through foreign direct investment (FDI), whereas the effects on e.g. investment and employment are small or insignificant. In other areas, such as securing higher income levels and locking firms into the sustainability agenda through the adoption of green...

  14. Integrated seismic interpretation of the Carlsberg Fault zone, Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Thybo, Hans; Jørgensen, Mette Iwanouw

    2005-01-01

    recorded seismic signals in a fan geometry from shots detonated both inside the low-velocity fault zone and up to ~500 m away from the fault zone. The seismic energy was recorded on three receiver arrays (1.5- to 2.4-km-long arcs) across the expected location of the ~400- to 700-m-wide fault zone at...... distances of up to ~7 km from the shots. Shots detonated inside the fault zone result in (1) weak and delayed first arrivals on the receivers located inside the fault zone compared to earlier and stronger first arrivals outside the fault zone; (2) strong guided P and S waves as well as surface waves inside...... the fault zone. The fault zone is a shadow zone to shots detonated outside the fault zone. Finite-difference wavefield modelling supports the interpretations of the fan recordings. Our fan recording approach facilitates cost-efficient mapping of fault zones in densely urbanized areas where seismic...

  15. Land Use and Land Cover Change, and Woody Vegetation Diversity in Human Driven Landscape of Gilgel Tekeze Catchment, Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuale Tesfaye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Land use and land cover (LULC change through inappropriate agricultural practices and high human and livestock population pressure have led to severe land degradation in the Ethiopian highlands. This has led to further degradation such as biodiversity loss, deforestation, and soil erosion. The study examined woody vegetation diversity status and the impact of drivers of change across different LULC types and agroecological zones in Gilgel Tekeze catchment, northern Ethiopian highlands. LULC dynamics were assessed using GIS techniques on 1976, 1986, and 2008 satellite images. Vegetation data were collected from 135 sample plots (20 m × 20 m from five LULC types, namely, forest, shrub-bush, grazing, settlement, and cultivated land, in the three agroecological zones; Kolla, Weyna-Dega, and Dega. Differences in vegetation structure and composition and their relationship to agroecological zones were tested using two-way ANOVA and PCA technique. The results show that vegetation structure and composition significantly differed across all LULC types in different agroecological zones particularly in sapling density, tree height, and shrub height and in each agroecological zone between forest land, shrub-bush land, and settlement area. Overall, Weyna-Dega agroecological zone and the shrub-bush land had more structural and compositional diversity than the other agroecological zones and LULC types.

  16. Avaliação do incremento em volume de madeira de Quassia amara L.- Simaroubaceae, em cultivo agroecológico no trópico úmido da Costa Rica Evaluation of wood volume increment in Quassia amara L. - Simaroubaceae, under agroecological cultivation in the humid tropic of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Próspero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quassia amara é arbusto de 3 a 6 metros de altura, tendo sido retirado indiscriminadamente das florestas para extrair do caule as quassinas usadas na indústria farmacêutica e como inseticida em agricultura orgânica. Não se tem muita informação técnica acerca do crescimento desta espécie para subsidiar estratégias de manejo sustentado. Este trabalho tem como objetivo avaliar o crescimento de Q. amara L. em cultivo agroecológico na Costa Rica. O trabalho consistiu em realizar avaliações do desenvolvimento de indivíduos de Q. amara em parcelas permanentes de medições, instaladas em meio às plantações desta espécie em consórcio com essências arbóreas. Foram efetuadas medições de diâmetro do caule a 10 cm do solo e altura total. Foi observado que em função das taxas de crescimento vegetal e incrementos médio e corrente anuais (IMA e ICA, mesmo após cinco anos de plantio, a madeira de Quassia amara para extração de quassinas não está pronta para colheita.Quassia amara is a 3-6m tall bush which has been indiscriminately removed from forests for extraction of quassins from its stem. These substances have been used in pharmaceutical industry and as insecticide in organic agriculture. There is not much technical information about the growth of this species to subsidize sustainable management strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of Quassia amara under agroecological cultivation in Costa Rica. The study consisted in evaluating the development of Q. amara individuals in permanent plots intercropped with other tree species. Stem diameter at 10 cm from the ground and total height were measured. According to the results concerning growth rates, Mean Annual Increment (MAI and Current Annual Increment (CAI, even at five years after planting, Q. amara wood is not ready to be harvested.

  17. AUGO II: A Comprehensive Subauroral Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, I. S.; Connors, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Athabasca University Geophysical Observatory II (AUGO II) is a comprehensive subauroral zone observatory designed for routine automated optical and magnetic observation of the aurora. Becoming operational in February 2012, AUGO II has six temperature/humidity controlled observation rooms, each equipped with a 1.5 meter diameter acrylic dome custom fabricated for wide spectral transparency. AUGO II is located approximately 25 km southwest of the town of Athabasca, in Alberta, Canada, on the southern edge of the auroral zone (Geodetic coordinates: latitude 54 36' 10", longitude 113 38' 40" west. CGM coordinates: latitude 61.7, longitude 306.8, L-value 4.5). AUGO II is sufficiently isolated from urban development that skies are dark enough during winter months to allow optical studies of faint phenomena, such as H-beta studies of proton precipitation aurora, currently underway. The observatory's modest residence can accommodate six persons, allowing groups to live and work with their instruments for the duration of their research campaign without leaving the site. AUGO II's inaugural guest research campaign was reported successful, and resulted in a permanent VLF/LF radio experiment being deployed at the observatory's expansive site. We are hopeful more research groups will take advantage of this unique facility and help realize its full potential.

  18. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

  19. Natural Analogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model

  20. EURO ZONE AND ITS MONETARY POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Dumitru CHIRIŢESCU

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I have tried to make a short presentation of the Euro Zone and it’s monetary policy. At the present moment the Euro Zone has 16 countries that have adopted the Euro as a national currency and also 4 small countries that have monetary agreements with their neighbours. The monetary policy represents all the regulations of the money supply and interest rates adopted by the European Central Bank in order to control the inflation rate and to stabilize a specific currency, in this case, the Euro. Stabilizing the inflation rate to certain levels is the main goal of the monetary policy. The monetary policy is the second policy, next to the fiscal one which in which a government, in this case the European Union’s official bodies, can impact the economic situation of the Eurozone. The fiscal policy represents the way a government spends, borrows or applies different types of taxes. The Monetary policy can be either expansionary, when unemployement and recessions needs to be combated, or contractionary, when inflation is conbated byt raising the interest rates.

  1. Preliminary Saturated-Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-10

    This milestone consists of an updated fully 3D model of ground-water flow within the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. All electronic files pertaining to this deliverable have been transferred via ftp transmission to Steve Bodnar (M and O) and the technical data base. The model was developed using a flow and transport simulator, FEHMN, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and represents a collaborative effort between staff from the US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model contained in this deliverable is minimally calibrated and represents work in progress. The flow model developed for this milestone is designed to feed subsequent transport modeling studies at Los Alamos which also use the FEHMN software. In addition, a general-application parameter estimation routine, PEST, was used in conjunction with FEHMN to reduce the difference between observed and simulated values of hydraulic head through the adjustment of model variables. This deliverable in large part consists of the electronic files for Yucca Mountain Site saturated-zone flow model as it existed as of 6/6/97, including the executable version of FEHMN (accession no. MOL.19970610.0204) used to run the code on a Sun Ultrasparc I workstation. It is expected that users of the contents of this deliverable be knowledgeable about the oration of FEHMN.

  2. Molybdenum isotope systematics in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Stephan; Wille, Martin; Voegelin, Andrea; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2016-08-01

    This study presents Mo isotope data for arc lavas from different subduction zones that range between δ 98 / 95 Mo = - 0.72 and + 0.07 ‰. Heaviest isotope values are observed for the most slab fluid dominated samples. Isotopically lighter signatures are related to increasing relevance of terrigenous sediment subduction and sediment melt components. Our observation complements previous conclusions that an isotopically heavy Mo fluid flux likely mirrors selective incorporation of isotopically light Mo in secondary minerals within the subducting slab. Analogue to this interpretation, low δ 98 / 95 Mo flux that coincides with terrigenous sediment subduction and sediment melting cannot be simply related to a recycled input signature. Instead, breakdown of the controlling secondary minerals during sediment melting may release the light component and lead to decreasing δ 98 / 95 Mo influx into subarc mantle sources. The natural range between slab dehydration and hydrous sediment melting may thus cause a large spread of δ 98 / 95 Mo in global subduction zone magmas.

  3. Eccentricity in Zone Routing Protocol for MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs Komal Nair

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Ad-Hoc Network (MANET is a decentralized network of autonomous mobile nodes, able to communicate with each other over wireless links. Due to the mobility of the nodes, the topology ofthe network changes spontaneously, therefore use of conventional routing tables maintained at fixed points (routers is not suggested. Such a network may operate in a standalone fashion. There are variousrouting protocols available for MANETs. The most popular ones are DSR, DSDV and ZRP .The zone routing protocol (ZRP is a hybrid routing protocol that proactively maintains routes within a localregion of the network. ZRP can be configured for a particular network through adjustment of a single parameter, the routing zone radius. In this paper, we address the issue of configuring the ZRP to providethe best performance for a particular network at any time with the concept of eccentricity. The results illustrate the important characteristics of different protocols based on their performance and thus suggest some improvements in the respective protocol. The tools used for the simulation are NS2 which is the main simulator, NAM (Network Animator and Tracegraph which is used for preparing the graphs from the trace files.

  4. 78 FR 57485 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Puget Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast... cargo in the navigable waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters. Entry into this zone is prohibited... or email LTJG Johnny Zeng, Sector Puget Sound Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard;...

  5. 78 FR 44014 - Safety Zones; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The... Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2013 and the War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration. These safety zones will... Great Lakes. DATES: This rule will be enforced with actual notice from 12:01 a.m. on July 3, 2013,...

  6. 77 FR 36396 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register LIS Long Island Sound A. Regulatory History... Long Island Sound Zone, in the Federal Register (77 FR 20324). The NPRM proposed these events and... Niantic Bay Fireworks submitted marine event applications with 135 day notice and on April 4, 2012...

  7. 77 FR 4900 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels in Captain of the Port Ohio Valley Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ...: The public meeting will be held at The Brown Hotel, 335 West Broadway, Louisville, KY 40202, telephone... Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION..., 2011, (76 FR 44880), entitled ``Security Zone; Escorted Vessels in Captain of the Port Ohio Valley...

  8. 33 CFR 165.503 - Security Zone; Captain of the Port Hampton Roads Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Passenger vessel means a vessel defined as a passenger vessel in 46 CFR part 70. (b) Location. All navigable waters of the Captain of the Port Hampton Roads zone (defined in 33 CFR 3.25-10) within 500 yards around... section— Certain dangerous cargo or CDC means a material defined as CDC in 33 CFR 160.204....

  9. 77 FR 41688 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ..., FL in the Federal Register (77 FR 64). We received one comment on the proposed rule. Public meetings... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention... vicinity of Tampa, Florida during the 2012 Republican National Convention. The 2012 Republican...

  10. 77 FR 19970 - Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not anticipate convening public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; 2012 Republican National Convention... Turning Basin in the vicinity of Tampa, Florida during the 2012 Republican National Convention. The...

  11. 78 FR 12595 - Safety Zone for Ice Conditions; Baltimore Captain of the Port Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone for Ice Conditions; Baltimore Captain of the...-steel hulled vessels would be exposed to a greater risk of hull breach. When ice conditions develop to a... hazards due to ice conditions that become a threat to navigation. The COTP Baltimore will notify...

  12. 75 FR 50700 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, and Drawbridge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... Washington, WA...... Special Local Regulation (Part 8/31/2008 100). USCG-2008-0734 Lake Washington, WA... Building ground floor, room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590 between 9 a.m. and 5.../2007 165). COTP San Francisco Bay 07-043 South Lake Tahoe, CA..... Safety Zones (Parts 147 and...

  13. Fault weakening across the frictional-viscous transition zone, Karakoram Fault Zone, NW Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Phillips, Richard J.; Lloyd, Geoffrey E.

    2013-09-01

    fault rocks formed in the frictional-viscous transition zone (FVTZ) provide test material that can be used to assess the strength of natural fault zones. In the Karakoram Fault Zone (KFZ), such rocks contain evidence of several long-term weakening mechanisms associated with reduced coefficients of friction (strands of the KFZ are focused along metavolcano-sedimentary formations indicating weakness relative to the bounding granitoids. Synkinematic retrogression suggests that reaction softening has weakened the margins of granitoids along the Nubra and Tangtse strands and the Nubra Formation within the Nubra strand. The resultant phyllosilicates have formed well-developed interconnected weak layers within phyllonites and granitic mylonites. Micaceous foliae with increased proportions of opaque minerals in granitic mylonites suggest that fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer aided deformation within the Nubra and Tangtse strands. Microstructures within Nubra strand phyllonites suggest that frictional-viscous flow accommodated deformation at low shear stresses in the FVTZ. Multiple generations of veining within each strand indicate overpressured pore fluids within the fault zone across a range of depths. Active springs and travertines along the fault indicate ongoing suprahydrostatic fluid flow within the KFZ. Despite such evidence for weakening mechanisms, the KFZ is currently locked and most likely generates moment magnitude 7.5+ earthquakes. Evidence for multiple fault weakening mechanisms reduces potential for shear heating within the KFZ and suggests that the long-term strength of the lithosphere must reside below the depth of penetration of the fault.

  14. 75 FR 5511 - Safety Zone; AICW Closure Safety Zone for Ben Sawyer Bridge Replacement Project, Sullivan's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... person is allowed in this zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port or a designated... equipment and machinery in the waterway, could lead to severe injury, fatalities and/or destruction of... debris and the use of heavy equipment and machinery. To provide for the safety of the public, the...

  15. 78 FR 75899 - Safety Zone; 2013 Holiday Boat Parades, Captain of the Port Miami Zone; FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... Port Miami Zone; FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... occur on the navigable waterways in the vicinity of Palm Beach and Miami, Florida. The safety...

  16. Denuded Zones, Diffusional Creep, and Grain Boundary Sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J; Ruano, O A; Sherby, O D

    2001-06-27

    The appearance of denuded zones following low stress creep in particle-containing crystalline materials is both a microstructural prediction and observation often cited as irrefutable evidence for the Nabarro-Herring mechanism of diffusional creep. The denuded zones are predicted to be at grain boundaries that are orthogonal to the direction of the applied stress. Furthermore, their dimensions should account for the accumulated plastic flow. In the present paper, the evidence for such denuded zones is critically examined. These zones have been observed during creep of magnesium, aluminum, and nickel-base alloys. The investigation casts serious doubts on the apparently compelling evidence for the link between denuded zones and diffusional creep. Specifically, denuded zones are clearly observed under conditions that are explicitly not diffusional creep. Additionally, the denuded zones are often found in directions that are not orthogonal to the applied stress. Other mechanisms that can account for the observations of denuded zones are discussed. It is proposed that grain boundary sliding accommodated by slip is the rate-controlling process in the stress range where denuded zones have been observed. It is likely that the denuded zones are created by dissolution of precipitates at grain boundaries that are simultaneously sliding and migrating during creep.

  17. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  18. Critical Zone Science: a new scientific paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardet, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Nord, G.; André, F.

    2014-12-01

    The main merit of the Critical Zone (CZ) Science is to foster multidisciplinary approaches on one of the most important envelopes of our Planet, the zone on which humanity lives and on which humans develop their societies. Policy makers and stakeholders also require a more unified scientific vision on the behavior of the CZ. The CZ science is not new and many communities have been doing CZ science for many decades. CZ-type observatories have been developed in most of the countries for different aims but generally lack of an integrated approach. When hydrologic measurements are made, they are generally not associated to geochemical measurements and the situation is worst for biological parameters. Instrumental geophysics of the CZ has done impressive progresses over the last decades but the misfit between the scientific questions and instrumental development is still a challenging issue. We will take the example of the French initiatives to build up a wide community of CZ scientists ("critical zonists") at the national scale taking into account decades of instrumentation and observation. More than creating new CZOs the French national research agencies helped foster collaboration between existing infrastructures by funding networking activities and developing significant investment programs for new equipment. We will review the main challenges of creating CZ networks based on existing funded research infrastructures and highlight the main instrumental challenges that need to be addressed to explore and understand the CZ in a modern way. The French initiatives mirror the European initiatives and the need for developing the links between the geo-centered initiative CZ concept and the ecology-centered concepts of LTER (and more recently LTSER) at the European scale. This willingness of linking historically separated communities is a stimulating opportunity for the advance of integrated Earth and Life sciences. As quoted by Bruno Latour (2014) the new environmental

  19. Effet du labour et du mode de bouturage sur les rendements en racines et en feuilles de manioc dans les zones de savane et de jachères forestières de la République Démocratique du Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahungu, NM.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Tillage and the Position of Cuttings on Cassava Root and Leaf Yields in the Savanna and Forest Fallow Zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, cassava covers more than half of the area under cultivation and is permanently consumed by more than 70% of the population for its roots and about 80% for its leaves, which are one of the main vegetables in the country. National cassava production suffered a setback in the early 1990s and an annual arithmetic reduction of the cassava production, from this period to the start of a program on the rehabilitation of the crop. The main objective of the program was to develop varieties with high dry yield and resistant to cassava diseases and pests mainly the cassava mosaic disease (CMD because the latter was identified as the major cause for the low production recorded. As and when the program gained momentum, many other factors appeared to have important role for the effective recovery of cassava production. Soil fertility management and cultural practices are amongst them. This study was conducted in this context in two different agro-ecological zones (Litoy in Kisangani hinterlands in forest zone and Plateau de Batéké at the East of Kinshasa in savannah zone. The soil of Litoy is heavier than the one of Plateau des Batéké whose sand content is higher than 90%. The method of land preparation influenced the production of cassava roots and leaves in the grassy fallows of the forested areas of the Kisangani region. A 45% increase of the root yield was obtained in this area when the soil was plowed. An stabe yield of 14 t/ha was obtained in the Batéké plateau savannah regardless of the land preparation method. The position/orientation of cuttings at planting did not indicate significant statistical differences. However, higher gross profit margins were obtained on plowed land with US$ 2500/ha compared to US$1500/ha on no tilled land.

  20. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. KELLER

    2004-11-03

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical

  1. A population-based Habitable Zone perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, Andras

    2015-01-01

    What can we tell about exoplanet habitability if currently only the stellar properties, planet radius, and the incoming stellar flux are known? A planet is in the Habitable Zone (HZ) if it harbors liquid water on its surface. The HZ is traditionally conceived as a sharp region around stars because it is calculated for one planet with specific properties. Such an approach is limiting because the planets' atmospheric and geophysical properties, which influence the presence of liquid water on the surface, are currently unknown but expected to be diverse. A statistical HZ description is outlined which does not favor one planet type. Instead the stellar and planet properties are treated as random variables and a continuous range of planet scenarios are considered. Various probability density functions are assigned to each random variable, and a combination of Monte Carlo sampling and climate modeling is used to generate synthetic exoplanet populations with known surface climates. Then, the properties of the liquid...

  2. The Habitable Zone of Inhabited Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zuluaga, Jorge I; Cuartas-Restrepo, Pablo; Poveda, German

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and illustrate the hypothesis that life substantially alters the state of a planetary environment and therefore, modifies the limits of the HZ as estimated for an uninhabited planet. This hypothesis lead to the introduction of the Habitable Zone for Inhabited planets (hereafter InHZ), defined here as the region where the complex interaction between life and its abiotic environment is able to produce plausible equilibrium states with the necessary physical conditions for the existence and persistence of life itself. We support our hypothesis of an InHZ with three theoretical arguments, multiple evidences coming from observations of the Earth system, several conceptual experiments and illustrative numerical simulations. Conceptually the diference between the InHZ and the Abiotic HZ (AHZ) depends on unique and robust properties of life as an emergent physical phenomenon and not necesarily on the particular life forms bearing in the planet. Our aim here is to provide conceptual basis for ...

  3. Carte du Ciel, San Fernando zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, C.

    2014-06-01

    An updated summary of a future large astrometric catalogue is presented, based on the two most important astrometric projects carried out by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada de San Fernando (ROA). The goal is to make a catalogue of positions and proper motions based on ROA's Cart du Ciel (CdC) and the Astrographic Catalogue (AC) San Fernando zone plates, and the HAMC2 meridian circle catalogue. The CdC and AC plates are being reduced together to provide first-epoch positions while HAMC2 will provide second-epoch ones. New techniques have been applied, that range from using a commercial flatbed scanner to the proper reduction schemes to avoid systematics from it. Only thirty plates (out of 540) remain to be processed, due to scanning problems that are being solved.

  4. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical analysis (FEHM) computer code, (FEHM V2.20, STN: 10086

  5. Definition of Exclusion Zones Using Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Y.; Villagran, M.; Ben Horin, Y.; Leonard, G.; Joswig, M.

    - In verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), there is a motivation to be effective, efficient and economical and to prevent abuse of the right to conduct an On-site Inspection (OSI) in the territory of a challenged State Party. In particular, it is in the interest of a State Party to avoid irrelevant search in specific areas. In this study we propose several techniques to determine `exclusion zones', which are defined as areas where an event could not have possibly occurred. All techniques are based on simple ideas of arrival time differences between seismic stations and thus are less prone to modeling errors compared to standard event location methods. The techniques proposed are: angular sector exclusion based on a tripartite micro array, half-space exclusion based on a station pair, and closed area exclusion based on circumferential networks.

  6. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  7. JGR and marginal ice zone processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a follow-up to the special sessions on marginal ice zone (MIZ) processes at the AGU 1981 Fall Meeting in San Francisco and to sessions scheduled for the upcoming AGU/ASLO Meeting in San Antonio, a collection of papers on MIZ research is planned for the Journal of Geophysical Research.Tentative titles for manuscripts should be sent as soon as possible to Robin D. Muench, Coordinator JGR/MIZ Issue, SAI/Northwest, 13400B Northrup Way #36, Bellevue, WA 98005. Finished manuscripts, due April 1, 1982, should be sent directly to A.D. Kirwan, Jr., coeditor of JGR, Oceans and Atmospheres, Department of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Ave. South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701. Authors are requested to specify that manuscripts are for the special MIZ issue.

  8. Null radiation zone at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    The null radiation zone theorem states that, when special kinematical conditions are satisfied, all the helicity amplitudes of a parton-level subprocess where a vector current is emitted vanish due to destructive interference among different diagrams. We study the manifestation of the theorem in $pp$ collisions at the $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV LHC. The theorem predicts that the cross section for $p p \\rightarrow j j \\gamma$ events is suppressed when the transverse momenta of the two jets are similar and when the rapidity difference between the photon and the cluster of the jets is nearly zero, because the $u u \\rightarrow u u \\gamma$ subprocess, which dominates in events with large $j j \\gamma$ invaraint mass, has strong destructive interference in this region. We confirm this prediction by the calculation with MadGraph 5, and show that the suppression on the $p p \\rightarrow j j \\gamma$ cross section is observable at the LHC.

  9. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each o...

  10. Neopaleozoic flora in stratigraphic zones of Gondwana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archangelsky, S.

    1984-01-01

    Carboniferous and Permian floristic sequences in Gondwana and adjacent areas are analyzed. These data are distributed on palaeogeographic maps that correspond to four chronologic segments: lower Carboniferous-early middle Carboniferous, early middle Carboniferous-middle late Carboniferous, lower Permian and upper Permian. A correlation of zones and floral assemblages during the late Palaeozoic is proposed on the base of recent data. The distribution of possible periglacial sediments (diamictites) is also included in the sequences. It is concluded that palaeogeography conditioned the floristic development in Gondwana. An independent evolution of different gondwanic areas is suggested by the continuous change in their palaeolatitudinal disposition. South Africa and South America had a similar development during the Permian and belong to the Northafroamerican Palaeofloristic Province. During the same period, on the other hand, Australia, India and Antartica had a more temperate climatic regime, being located nearer the pole; they may belong to the Indoaustralian Palaefloristic Province. 44 refs.

  11. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower

  12. Interaction between pregnancy zone protein and plasmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, O M; Hau, J

    1988-01-01

    Pregnancy zone protein (PZP, alpha 2-PAG, SP3) was found to bind to plasmin in crossed affino-immunoelectrophoresis using sodium caseinate in the first dimension gel. The plasmin presence in the PZP-plasmin complex was confirmed by addition of antiserum against plasminogen to the gel. In crossed affino-immunoelectrophoresis using plasmin in the first dimension gel a non migrative PZP immunoreactive peak appeared, similar to the peak obtained with casein in the first dimension gel. Incubation of mixtures of PZP and plasmin also demonstrated complex formation between PZP and plasmin. The complex between PZP and plasmin could be precipitated not only by anti-PZP antibodies, but also by anti-plasminogen antibodies, confirming the interaction between the two molecules. The significance of the binding between plasmin and PZP remains to be elucidated, but it is tempting to speculate that PZP, present on the trophoblastic surface, immobilizes plasmin, rendering this molecule able to perform a local fibrinolytic activity.

  13. Application Of Zone Plates In Interferometric Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Moreno, Vincente; Bara Vinas, Salvador

    1990-04-01

    The usefullness of the zone plates (ZP) to the optical alignment and displacements measurement is discussed basing on examples of parabolic (PZP) and equilateral hyperbolic ZP (EHZP). Any displacement of the ZP from the position occupied during its recording creates the interference patterns between diffracted beam and its undiffracted counterpart. The shape of this pattern is explicitly determined by the kind and range of the misalignment. The PZP enables the accurate measurement of the linear motion in the direction parallel to the foci line with the control of undesired deviations in perpendicular directions. EHZP offers a possibility of strict point positioning for all possible degrees of movement freedom (including in-plane rotations), in contrary to the commonly used spherical ZP. Simple experiments supporting the analysis are presented.

  14. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  15. Habitable Zone Dependence on Stellar Parameter Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    An important property of exoplanetary systems is the extent of the Habitable Zone (HZ), defined as that region where water can exist in a liquid state on the surface of a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure. Both ground and space-based observations have revealed a plethora of confirmed exoplanets and exoplanetary candidates, most notably from the Kepler mission using the transit detection technique. Many of these detected planets lie within the predicted HZ of their host star. However, as is the case with the derived properties of the planets themselves, the HZ boundaries depend on how well we understand the host star. Here we quantify the uncertainties of HZ boundaries on the parameter uncertainties of the host star. We examine the distribution of stellar parameter uncertainties from confirmed exoplanet hosts and Kepler candidate hosts and translate these into HZ boundary uncertainties. We apply this to several known systems with a HZ planet to determine the uncertainty in their HZ status.

  16. Impacts of Cash Crop Production on Land Management and Land Degradation: The Case of Coffee and Cotton in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Pender, John L.; Nkonya, Ephraim M.; Kato, Edward; Kaizzi, Crammer; Ssali, Henry

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impacts of coffee and cotton production on land management and land degradation in Uganda, based on a survey of 851 households and soil measurements in six major agro-ecological zones, using matching and multivariate regression methods. The impacts of cash crop production vary by agro-ecological zones and cropping system. In coffee producing zones, use of organic inputs is most common on plots growing coffee with other crops (mainly bananas), and least common on mono-croppe...

  17. The disturbed rock zone at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2003-12-01

    The Disturbed Rock Zone constitutes an important geomechanical element of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The science and engineering underpinning the disturbed rock zone provide the basis for evaluating ongoing operational issues and their impact on performance assessment. Contemporary treatment of the disturbed rock zone applied to the evaluation of the panel closure system and to a new mining horizon improves the level of detail and quantitative elements associated with a damaged zone surrounding the repository openings. Technical advancement has been realized by virtue of ongoing experimental investigations and international collaboration. The initial portion of this document discusses the disturbed rock zone relative to operational issues pertaining to re-certification of the repository. The remaining sections summarize and document theoretical and experimental advances that quantify characteristics of the disturbed rock zone as applied to nuclear waste repositories in salt.

  18. Light-zone(s) : as concept and tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Merete

    2006-01-01

    Daylight is essential to the experience of an architectural space. Nevertheless, amongst the handful of predominantly scientific methods available to assess daylight in architecture, there are only a few considering the spatial and form-giving characteristics of daylight. This paper investigates...... light-zone(s) as concept and tool, which can be taken as a point of departure for a new method to perceive, consider and analyse daylight in architecture. As concept, light-zone(s) are areas, fields or zones of light. It is a way of considering a space’s daylight as (forms of) bubbles or spheres...... of light, which as light-zones can be compressed, expanded, combined, exploded, etc., all according to the character of 'the meeting' between the light-zone(s) and the space itself (inclusive of the space’s content). Thus, the daylight in a space can be regarded as a composition of light-zones. As tool...

  19. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ishak, Sherif

    2016-03-01

    There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]). A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone. PMID:26937456

  20. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Shakouri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]. A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone.