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Sample records for agraphia

  1. Music and language: musical alexia and agraphia.

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    Brust, J C

    1980-06-01

    Two aphasic right-handed professional musicians with left hemispheric lesions had disturbed musical function, especially musical alexia and agraphia. In Case 1 aphasia was of transcortical sensory type, with severe agraphia and decreased comprehension of written words, although she could match them with pictures. Except for reading and writing, musical ability was normal; she could sing in five languages. Musical alexia and agraphia affected pitch symbols more than rhythm. Case 2 had conduction aphasia and severe expressive amusia, especially for rhythm. Although his language alexia and agraphia were milder than Case 1's, his musical alexia and agraphia were more severe, affecting rhythm as much as pitch. In neither patient were those aspects of musical notation either closest to verbal language or most dependent upon temporal (sequential) processing maximally impaired. These cases are consistent with the literature in suggesting that the presence or absence of aphasia or of right or left hemispheric damage fails to predict the presence, type, or severity of amusia, including musical alexia and agraphia. The popular notion that receptive amusia follows lesions of the language-dominant temporal lobe, whereas expressive amusia follows non-dominant frontal lobe damage, is an over-simplification, as is the view that increasing musical sophistication causes a shift of musical processing from the right hemisphere to the left.

  2. Alexia and agraphia in Wernicke's aphasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirshner, H S; Webb, W G

    1982-01-01

    Three patients with otherwise typical Wernicke's aphasia showed consistently greater impairment of reading than auditory comprehension. While this syndrome resembles alexia with agraphia, the paraphasia of speech, repetition, and naming underline the aphasic nature of the disorder. Together with previous reports of isolated word deafness in Wernicke's aphasia, these cases suggest a relative independence of auditory and visual language processing.

  3. Alexia without agraphia: Clinical-computed tomographic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisberg, L.A.; Wall, M.; Charity Hospital, New Orleans, LA; Veterans Administration Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1987-01-01

    Four patients with alexia without agraphia had CT lesions which correlated with the clinical findings. All lesions were vascular; two were spontaneous intracerebral hematomas and two were ischemic infarctions in the posterior cerebral artery distribution. The lesions were located in the posterior portion of the dominant hemisphere. The location of the lesion correlated with the presence or absence of visual field abnormalities. (orig.)

  4. A Case of Anoxic Brain Injury Presenting with Agraphia of kanji in the Foreground

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    Yasutaka Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old woman was hospitalized for rehabilitation from the aftereffects of an anoxic brain injury. In addition to a general cognitive decline, agraphia of kana and kanji was noted at the time of admission, which had advanced to agraphia which is dominant in kanji at the time of hospital discharge. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed no stroke lesions, and brain perfusion scintigraphy found a decreased blood flow in the bilateral parietal lobes. We hereby report on this case because case reports on agraphia caused by anoxic brain injury are extremely rare.

  5. [Aphasia without amusia in a blind organist. Verbal alexia-agraphia without musical alexia-agraphia in braille].

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    Signoret, J L; van Eeckhout, P; Poncet, M; Castaigne, P

    1987-01-01

    A 77 year old right handed male was blind since the age of 2. He presented with an infarction involving the territory of the left middle cerebral artery involving the temporal and the inferior parietal lobes. He had learned to read and write language as well as read and write music in braille, ultimately becoming a famous organist and composer. There were no motor or sensory deficits. Wernicke's aphasia with jargonaphasia, major difficulty in repetition, anomia and a significant comprehension deficit without word deafness was present; verbal alexia and agraphia in braille were also present. There was no evidence of amusia. He could execute in an exemplary fashion pieces of music for the organ in his repertory as well as improvise. All his musical capabilities: transposition, modulation, harmony, rythm, were preserved. The musical notation in braille remained intact: he could read by touch and play unfamiliar scores, he could also read and sing the musical notes, he could copy and write a score. Nine months after the stroke his aphasia remained unchanged. Nevertheless he composed pieces for the organ which were published. Such data highly suggest the independence of linguistic and musical competences, defined as the analysis and organization of sounds according to the rules of music. This independence in an extremely talented musician leads to a discussion of the role of the right hemisphere in the anatomical-functional processes at the origin of musical competence. The use of braille in which the same constellations of dots correspond either to letters of the alphabet or musical notes supports the independence between language and music.

  6. [Agraphia and preservation of music writing in a bilingual piano teacher].

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    Assal, G; Buttet, J

    1983-01-01

    A bilingual virtuoso piano teacher developed aphasia and amusia, probably due to cerebral embolism. The perfectly demarcated and unique lesion was located in the left posterior temporoparietal region. Language examinations in French and Italian demonstrated entirely comparable difficulties in both languages. The linguistic course was favorable after a period of auditory agnosia and global aphasia. Language became fluent again 3 months after the onset, with a marked vocabulary loss and phonemic paraphasias with attempts at self-correction. Repetition was altered markedly with a deficit in auditory comprehension but no remaining elements of auditory agnosia. Reading was possible, but with some difficulty and total agraphia and acalculia persisted. Musical ability was better conserved, particularly with respect to repetition and above all to writing, the sparing of the latter constituting a fairly uncommon dissociation in relation to agraphia. Findings are discussed in relation to data in the literature concerning hemispheric participation in various musical tasks.

  7. Revival of Historical Kana Orthography in a Patient with Allographic Agraphia.

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    Maeda, Kengo; Shiraishi, Tomoyuki

    2018-01-01

    Japanese people born before World War II learned Japanese kana (Japanese syllabograms) writing in a style that is not currently used. These individuals had to learn the current style of kana orthography after the war. An 85-year-old man was taken to our hospital by his family who were surprised by his diary. It was written with kanji (Japanese ideograms) and katakana using the prewar style. A neuropsychological examination revealed impaired recall of hiragana. Neuroimaging studies revealed atrophy of the left fronto-parietal lobe and hypoperfusion of the left frontal lobe. His allographic agraphia might have resulted from the disturbance of the current style of kana orthography.

  8. Treatment for Alexia with Agraphia Following Left Ventral Occipito-Temporal Damage: Strengthening Orthographic Representations Common to Reading and Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Esther S.; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Beeson, Pélagie M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Damage to left ventral occipito-temporal cortex can give rise to written language impairment characterized by pure alexia/letter-by-letter (LBL) reading, as well as surface alexia and agraphia. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of a combined treatment approach to address concurrent LBL reading with surface…

  9. Frontal Phonological Agraphia and Acalculia with Impaired Verbal Short-Term Memory due to Left Inferior Precentral Gyrus Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Furukawa, Emi; Kurihara, Masanori; Sugimoto, Izumi

    2018-01-01

    We report a patient with phonological agraphia (selective impairment of kana [Japanese phonetic writing] nonwords) and acalculia (mental arithmetic difficulties) with impaired verbal short-term memory after a cerebral hemorrhage in the opercular part of the left precentral gyrus (Brodmann area 6) and the adjacent postcentral gyrus. The patient showed phonemic paragraphia in five-character kana nonword writing, minimal acalculia, and reduced digit and letter span. Mental arithmetic normalized after 8 months and agraphia recovered to the normal range at 1 year after onset, in parallel with an improvement of the auditory letter span score from 4 to 6 over a period of 14 months and in the digit span score from 6 to 7 over 24 months. These results suggest a close relationship between the recovery of agraphia and acalculia and the improvement of verbal short-term memory. The present case also suggests that the opercular part of the precentral gyrus constitutes the phonological route in writing that conveys phonological information of syllable sequences, and its damage causes phonological agraphia and acalculia with reduced verbal short-term memory.

  10. Transient Beneficial Effects of Excitatory Theta Burst Stimulation in a Patient with Phonological Agraphia after Left Supramarginal Gyrus Infarction

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    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient showing isolated phonological agraphia after an ischemic stroke involving the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). In this patient, we investigated the effects of focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) over the left SMG, corresponding to the Brodmann area (BA) 40. The patient…

  11. Frontal Phonological Agraphia and Acalculia with Impaired Verbal Short-Term Memory due to Left Inferior Precentral Gyrus Lesion

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    Yasuhisa Sakurai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with phonological agraphia (selective impairment of kana [Japanese phonetic writing] nonwords and acalculia (mental arithmetic difficulties with impaired verbal short-term memory after a cerebral hemorrhage in the opercular part of the left precentral gyrus (Brodmann area 6 and the adjacent postcentral gyrus. The patient showed phonemic paragraphia in five-character kana nonword writing, minimal acalculia, and reduced digit and letter span. Mental arithmetic normalized after 8 months and agraphia recovered to the normal range at 1 year after onset, in parallel with an improvement of the auditory letter span score from 4 to 6 over a period of 14 months and in the digit span score from 6 to 7 over 24 months. These results suggest a close relationship between the recovery of agraphia and acalculia and the improvement of verbal short-term memory. The present case also suggests that the opercular part of the precentral gyrus constitutes the phonological route in writing that conveys phonological information of syllable sequences, and its damage causes phonological agraphia and acalculia with reduced verbal short-term memory.

  12. Alexia and agraphia with lesions of the angular and supramarginal gyri: evidence for the disruption of sequential processing.

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    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Asami, Masahiko; Mannen, Toru

    2010-01-15

    To determine the features of alexia or agraphia with a left angular or supramarginal gyrus lesion. We assessed the reading and writing abilities of three patients using kanji (Japanese morphograms) and kana (Japanese syllabograms). Patient 1 showed kana alexia and kanji agraphia following a hemorrhage in the left angular gyrus and the adjacent lateral occipital gyri. Patient 2 presented with minimal pure agraphia for both kanji and kana after an infarction in the left angular gyrus involving part of the supramarginal gyrus. Patient 3 also showed moderate pure agraphia for both kanji and kana after an infarction in the left supramarginal and postcentral gyri. All three patients made transposition errors (changing of sequential order of kana characters) in reading. Patient 1 showed letter-by-letter reading and a word-length effect and made substitution errors (changing hiragana [one form of kana] characters in a word to katakana [another form of kana] characters and vice versa) in writing. Alexia occurs as "angular" alexia only when the lesion involves the adjacent lateral occipital gyri. Transposition errors suggest disrupted sequential phonological processing from the angular and lateral occipital gyri to the supramarginal gyrus. Substitution errors suggest impaired allographic conversion between hiragana and katakana attributable to a dysfunction in the angular/lateral occipital gyri.

  13. Pure agraphia after infarction in the superior and middle portions of the left precentral gyrus: Dissociation between Kanji and Kana.

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    Kurosaki, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Ryusaku; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Hadano, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    The present study describes a Japanese patient with pure agraphia displaying differential disturbances in processing Kanji (morphogram) and Kana (syllabogram) letters after an infarction in the middle and superior portions of the left precentral gyrus. Kana errors reflected the patient's difficulty with retrieving both motor and visual letter images, whereas Kanji errors included partial letter stroke omissions or additions. This present case suggests that differences in writing disturbances between Kana and Kanji letters are caused by a differential dependency on letter motor images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Do dual-route models accurately predict reading and spelling performance in individuals with acquired alexia and agraphia?

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    Rapcsak, Steven Z; Henry, Maya L; Teague, Sommer L; Carnahan, Susan D; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2007-06-18

    Coltheart and co-workers [Castles, A., Bates, T. C., & Coltheart, M. (2006). John Marshall and the developmental dyslexias. Aphasiology, 20, 871-892; Coltheart, M., Rastle, K., Perry, C., Langdon, R., & Ziegler, J. (2001). DRC: A dual route cascaded model of visual word recognition and reading aloud. Psychological Review, 108, 204-256] have demonstrated that an equation derived from dual-route theory accurately predicts reading performance in young normal readers and in children with reading impairment due to developmental dyslexia or stroke. In this paper, we present evidence that the dual-route equation and a related multiple regression model also accurately predict both reading and spelling performance in adult neurological patients with acquired alexia and agraphia. These findings provide empirical support for dual-route theories of written language processing.

  15. Agraphia of Kanji (Chinese characters): an early symptom of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a Japanese patient: a case report.

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    Nakamura, Keiko; Sakai, Kenji; Samuraki, Miharu; Nozaki, Ichiro; Notoya, Masako; Yamada, Masahito

    2014-08-06

    Slowly progressive cognitive decline is the most frequent initial manifestation in MM2-cortical-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Agraphia has never been noted in patients with this type of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, however, we report the case of a Japanese patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in whom agraphia of Kanji was an initial cardinal symptom. A 59-year-old right-handed Japanese woman complained of agraphia of Kanji (Chinese characters) as an initial symptom. A neurological examination revealed mild word-finding difficulty, constructive disturbance, hyperreflexia in her jaw and lower limbs, and bilateral extensor plantar reflexes. An examination of her cerebrospinal fluid revealed increased levels of 14-3-3 and total tau proteins, and abnormal conformation of the proteinase K-resistant prion protein. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse hyperintensity in bilateral cerebral cortices. Single-photon emission computed tomography scans revealed hypoperfusion in the left temporal lobe, bilateral parietal and occipital lobes. An analysis of the prion protein gene demonstrated no mutation with homozygous for methionine at the codon 129. We diagnosed our patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Although a histological examination was not performed, it was assumed that our patient could be the MM2-cortical type according to the clinical findings and the elevated levels of 14-3-3 protein in her cerebrospinal fluid. The left posterior inferior temporal area, which was affected in our patient as a hypoperfusion area, is associated with selecting and recalling Kanji characters. Focal signs as an early symptom and hypoperfusion areas in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are critical to recognize initial brain lesions damaged by the proteinase K-resistant prion protein accumulation.

  16. Kanji and Kana agraphia in mild cognitive impairment and dementia: A trans-cultural comparison of elderly Japanese subjects living in Japan and Brazil

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    Kyoko Akanuma

    Full Text Available Abstract This study verifies the environmental effects on agraphia in mild cognitive impairment and dementia. We compared elderly Japanese subjects living in Japan and Brazil. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the database of the Prevalence Study 1998 in Tajiri (n=497, Miyagi, Japan and the Prevalence Study 1997 of elderly Japanese immigrants living in Brazil (n=166, migrated from Japan and living in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area. In three Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR groups, i.e., CDR 0 (healthy, CDR 0.5 (questionable dementia, and CDR 1+ (dementia , the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE item of spontaneous writing and the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI domain of dictation were analyzed with regard to the number of Kanji and Kana characters. Formal errors in characters and pragmatic errors were also analyzed. Results: The immigrants in Brazil wrote similar numbers of Kanji or Kana characters compared to the residents of Japan. In spontaneous writing, the formal Kanji errors were greater in the CDR 1+ group of immigrants. In writing from dictation, all the immigrant CDR groups made more formal errors in Kana than the Japan residents. No significant differences in pragmatic errors were detected between the two groups. Conclusions: Subjects living in Japan use Kanji frequently, and thus the form of written characters was simplified, which might be assessed as mild formal errors. In immigrants, the deterioration in Kanji and Kana writing was partly due to decreased daily usage of the characters. Lower levels of education of immigrants might also be related to the number of Kanji errors.

  17. Whole-word response scoring underestimates functional spelling ability for some individuals with global agraphia

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    Andrew Tesla Demarco

    2015-05-01

    These data suggest that conventional whole-word scoring may significantly underestimate functional spelling performance. Because by-letter scoring boosted pre-treatment scores to the same extent as post-treatment scores, the magnitude of treatment gains was no greater than estimates from conventional whole-word scoring. Nonetheless, the surprisingly large disparity between conventional whole-word scoring and by-letter scoring suggests that by-letter scoring methods may warrant further investigation. Because by-letter analyses may hold interest to others, we plan to make the software tool used in this study available on-line for use to researchers and clinicians at large.

  18. Do Dual-Route Models Accurately Predict Reading and Spelling Performance in Individuals with Acquired Alexia and Agraphia?

    OpenAIRE

    Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Henry, Maya L.; Teague, Sommer L.; Carnahan, Susan D.; Beeson, Pélagie M.

    2007-01-01

    Coltheart and colleagues (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; Castles, Bates, & Coltheart, 2006) have demonstrated that an equation derived from dual-route theory accurately predicts reading performance in young normal readers and in children with reading impairment due to developmental dyslexia or stroke. In this paper we present evidence that the dual-route equation and a related multiple regression model also accurately predict both reading and spelling performance in adult...

  19. [Brodmann Areas 39 and 40: Human Parietal Association Area and Higher Cortical Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa

    2017-04-01

    The anatomy and function of the angular gyrus (Brodmann Area 39) and supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann Area 40) are described here. Both gyri constitute the inferior part of the parietal lobe. Association fibers from the angular gyrus project to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex via the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II/arcuate fasciculus (AF), whereas those from the supramarginal gyrus project to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex via SLF III/AF. Damage to the left angular gyrus causes kanji agraphia (lexical agraphia) and mild anomia, whereas damage to the left supramarginal gyrus causes kana alexia (phonological dyslexia) and kana agraphia (phonological agraphia). Damage to either gyrus causes Gerstmann's syndrome (finger agnosia, left-right disorientation, agraphia and acalculia) and verbal short-term memory impairment. "Angular alexia with agraphia" results from damage to the middle occipital gyrus posterior to the angular gyrus. Alexia and agraphia, with lesions in the angular or supramarginal gyrus, are characterized by kana transposition errors in reading words, which suggests the impairment of sequential phonological processing.

  20. Post-stroke writing and reading disorders

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    Sinanović Osman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias, agraphias and acalculias are more frequent than verified in routine exam, not only in the less developed but also in large neurological departments. Alexia is an acquired type of sensory aphasia where damage to the brain causes a patient to lose the ability to read. It is also called word blindness, text blindness or visual aphasia. Alexia refers to an acquired inability to read caused by brain damage and must be distinguished from dyslexia, a developmental abnormality in which the individual is unable to learn to read, and from illiteracy, which reflects a poor educational back-ground. Most aphasics are also alexic, but alexia may occur in the absence of aphasia and may occasionally be the sole disability resulting from specific brain lesions. There are different classifications of alexias. Traditionally, the alexias are divided into three categories: pure alexia with agraphia, pure alexia without agraphia, and alexia associated with aphasia ("aphasic alexia". Agraphia is defined as the disruption of previously intact writing skills by brain damage. Writing involves several elements - language processing, spelling, visual perception, visual-spatial orientation for graphic symbols, motor planning, and motor control of writing. A disturbance of any of these processes can impair writing. Agraphia may occur by itself or as association with aphasias, alexia, agnosia and apraxia. Agraphia can also result from "peripheral" involvement of the motor act of writing. Like alexia, agraphia must be distinguished from illiteracy, where writing skills were never developed. Acalculia is a clinical syndrome of acquired deficits in mathematical calculation, either mentally or with paper and pencil. This language disturbances can be classified differently, but there are three principal types of acalculia: acalculia associated with language disturbances, including number paraphasia, number agraphia, or

  1. POST-STROKE WRITING AND READING DISORDERS

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    Sinanović Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias, agraphias and acalculias are more frequent than verified in routine exam, not only in the less developed but also in large neurological departments. Alexia is an acquired type of sensory aphasia where damage to the brain causes a patient to lose the ability to read. It is also called word blindness, text blindness orvisual aphasia. Alexia refers to an acquired inability to read caused by brain damage and must be distinguished from dyslexia, a developmental abnormality in which the individual is unable to learn to read, and from illiteracy, which reflects a poor educational back-ground. Most aphasics are also alexic, but alexia may occur in the absence of aphasia and may occasionally be the soledisability resulting from specific brain lesions. There are different classifications of alexias. Traditionally, the alexias are divided into three categories: pure alexia with agraphia, pure alexia without agraphia, and alexia associated with aphasia (“aphasic alexia”. Agraphia is defined as the disruption of previously intact writing skills by brain damage. Writing involves several elements—language processing, spelling, visual perception, visual-spatial orientation for graphic symbols, motor planning, and motor control of writing. A disturbance of any of these processes can impair writing. Agraphia may occur by itself or as association with aphasias, alexia, agnosia and apraxia. Agraphia can also result from “peripheral” involvement of the motor act of writing. Like alexia, agraphia must be distinguished from illiteracy, where writing skills were never developed. Acalculia is a clinical syndrome of acquired deficits in mathematical calculation, either mentally or with paper and pencil. This language disturbances can be classified differently, but there are three principal types of acalculia: acalculia associated with language disturbances, including number paraphasia, number

  2. Clinico-anatomical correlations of left posterior cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Osamu; Shiota, Junichi; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Hirayama, Keizou; Maki, Toshiyuki.

    1988-01-01

    The relation between neurological signs and symptoms and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was examined in 11 cases of occlusion of the left posterior cerebral artery. All the patients were righthanded. Right homonimous hemianopia was noted in 8 cases, right upper quadrantanopia in 2 cases, and right lower quadrantanopia in 1 case. Of the 11 cases, alexia without agraphia was noted in 9 cases, all 9 of which showed lesions of inferior occipital cortex (lingual and fusiform gyri) and subjacent white matter. Lesions of splenium were found in only 5 of the cases of alexia without agraphia. In 2 cases with neither alexia nor agraphia, lesions were seen in the medial occipital cortex and the subjacent white matter but not in the inferior occipital lobe. Three patients had color anomia which was accompanied by memory disturbances and alexia without agraphia. In 2 of these 3, lesions were widespread in the region of the left posterior cerebral artery. Memory disturbances were observed in 6 cases, all of which also showed alexia without agraphia. The lesions extended not only of the inferior surface of the occipital lobe and along the interhemispheric fissure, but also of hippocampal and parahippocampal gyri. In 3 cases of alexia without agraphia in which no memory distrubance was found, the symptoms of alexia were slight and disappeared at an early stage. (J.P.N.)

  3. Pure alexia after right temporo-occipital hemorrhage in a right-handed female

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    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alexia without agraphia is a rare clinical disorder which is characterized by impairment of reading in spite of protection of writing ability. It usually results from infarction within the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery. The lesions of left occipital lobe or splenium of corpus callosum can cause alexia without agraphia by the deterioration of connection between the right occipital lobe and left parietal lobe. We describe the case of a 70-year-old right-handed woman who was presented with moderate headache and blurred vision and affected by alexia without agraphia and aphasia. Our case indicates that pure alexia may arise as a consequence of damage to the right hemisphere in right-handed patients and may lead to a severe reading disorder, as in individuals with left-hemisphere dominance for language.

  4. The neuropsychological and neuroradiological correlates of slowly progressive visual agnosia.

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    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Aresi, Anna; Reati, Fabiola; Riva, Alice; Gobbo, Clara; Bizzi, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 64-year-old woman affected by slowly progressive visual agnosia is reported aiming to describe specific cognitive-brain relationships. Longitudinal clinical and neuropsychological assessment, combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography (PET) were used. Sequential neuropsychological evaluations performed during a period of 9 years since disease onset showed the appearance of apperceptive and associative visual agnosia, alexia without agraphia, agraphia, finger agnosia, and prosopoagnosia, but excluded dementia. MRI showed moderate diffuse cortical atrophy, with predominant atrophy in the left posterior cortical areas (temporal, parietal, and lateral occipital cortical gyri). 18FDG-PET showed marked bilateral posterior cortical hypometabolism; proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging disclosed severe focal N-acetyl-aspartate depletion in the left temporoparietal and lateral occipital cortical areas. In conclusion, selective metabolic alterations and neuronal loss in the left temporoparietooccipital cortex may determine progressive visual agnosia in the absence of dementia.

  5. Gerstmann's syndrome and unilateral optic ataxia in the emergency department

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    Barbosa, Breno José Alencar Pires; de Brito, Marcelo Houat; Rodrigues, Júlia Chartouni; Kubota, Gabriel Taricani; Parmera, Jacy Bezerra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT. A 75-year-old right-handed woman presented to the emergency department with simultanagnosia and right unilateral optic ataxia. Moreover, the patient had agraphia, acalculia, digital agnosia and right-left disorientation, consistent with complete Gerstmann's syndrome. This case highlights the concurrence of Gerstmann's syndrome and unilateral optic ataxia in the acute phase of a left middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:29354229

  6. Toe agnosia in Gerstmann syndrome

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    Tucha, O.; Steup, A.; Smely, C.; Lange, K.

    1997-01-01

    The following case report presents a patient exhibiting Gerstmann syndrome accompanied by toe agnosia. A 72 year old right handed woman had a focal lesion in the angular gyrus of the left hemisphere which was caused by a glioblastoma multiforme. The first symptom she had complained of was severe headache. Standardised neuropsychological tests of intelligence, memory, attention, fluency, apraxia, and language functions as well as tests for the assessment of agraphia, acalculia, right-...

  7. Gerstmann's syndrome and unilateral optic ataxia in the emergency department

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    Breno José Alencar Pires Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. A 75-year-old right-handed woman presented to the emergency department with simultanagnosia and right unilateral optic ataxia. Moreover, the patient had agraphia, acalculia, digital agnosia and right-left disorientation, consistent with complete Gerstmann's syndrome. This case highlights the concurrence of Gerstmann's syndrome and unilateral optic ataxia in the acute phase of a left middle cerebral artery stroke.

  8. Central and peripheral components of writing critically depend on a defined area of the dominant superior parietal gyrus.

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    Magrassi, Lorenzo; Bongetta, Daniele; Bianchini, Simonetta; Berardesca, Marta; Arienta, Cesare

    2010-07-30

    Classical neuropsychological models of writing separate central (linguistic) processes common to oral spelling, writing and typing from peripheral (motor) processes that are modality specific. Damage to the left superior parietal gyrus, an area of the cortex involved in peripheral processes specific to handwriting, should generate distorted graphemes but not misspelled words, while damage to other areas of the cortex like the frontal lobe should produce alterations in written and oral spelling without distorted graphemes. We describe the clinical and neuropsychological features of a patient with combined agraphia for handwriting and typewriting bearing a small glioblastoma in the left parietal lobe. His agraphia resolved after antiedema therapy and we tested by bipolar cortical stimulation his handwriting abilities during an awake neurosurgical procedure. We found that we could reversibly re-induce the same defects of writing by stimulating during surgery a limited area of the superior parietal gyrus in the same patient and in an independent patient that was never agraphic before the operation. In those patients stimulation caused spelling errors, poorly formed letters and in some cases a complete cessation of writing with minimal or no effects on oral spelling. Our results suggest that stimulating a specific area in the superior parietal gyrus we can generate different patterns of agraphia. Moreover, our findings also suggest that some of the central processes specific for typing and handwriting converge with motor processes at least in the limited portion of the superior parietal gyrus we mapped in our patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis following influenza vaccination: report of a case with callosal disconnection syndrome].

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    Arai, Motomi; Takagi, Daisuke; Nagao, Ryosuke

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of callosal disconnection syndrome as a rare manifestation of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). A dextral 48-year-old Japanese woman received trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in mid-November 2011. Twenty days later, she was found to be in a daze. Subsequently, she developed abnormal behavior and gait disturbance, and she was disoriented regarding time and place. Nystagmus and abnormal ocular movements were absent. Upper limb power was normal, whereas her lower limbs were mildly weak. Tendon reflexes were normally evoked without pathological reflexes. There was no sensory impairment. Serum CRP levels were slightly elevated; other routine laboratory tests, thyroid functions, and vitamin B1 levels were within the normal range. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed that it was acellular with a protein level of 54 mg/dl and high myelin basic protein level. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR images revealed a large hyperintense lesion in the corpus callosum, but the lower part of the splenium was spared. Flow voids were observed in the pericallosal arteries. She was diagnosed with post-vaccination ADEM and vigorously treated with an intravenous infusion of methylprednisolone (1 g/day for 6 days) and immunoglobulin (1.2 g/kg). Gait disturbance and disorientation rapidly improved; however, tactile anomia, ideomotor apraxia, ideational apraxia, and agraphia of the left hand were present one month after onset. She had no aphasia or alexia.Interestingly, the patient's left unilateral agraphia was more prominent in kana than kanji (an article in Japanese text) for polysyllabic words, whereas she could write kana characters to dictation. Changes in the sequential order of kana characters within a word were observed. These findings were similar to those observed in pure agraphia associated with lesions in the posterior part of the left middle frontal gyrus. Thus, an interhemispheric mechanism is probably involved in the selection and

  10. [A case of carbon monoxide poisoning by explosion of coal mine presenting as visual agnosia: re-evaluation after 40 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, Akiko; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Nomura, Takuo; Shida, Kenshiro; Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2005-11-01

    We re-evaluated a case of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting as visual agnosia who had been injured by explosion of Miike-Mikawa coal mine 40 years ago. In an early stage, his main neuropsychological symptoms were visual agnosia, severe anterograde amnesia, alexia, agraphia, constructional apraxia, left hemispatial neglect and psychic paralysis of gaze, in addition to pyramidal and extra pyramidal signs. At the time of re-evaluation after 40 years, he still showed visual agnosia associated with agraphia and constructional apraxia. Concerning visual agnosia, recognition of the real object was preserved, while recognition of object photographs and picture was impaired. Thus, this case was considered to have picture agnosia as he could not recognize the object by pictorial cues on the second dimensional space. MRI examination revealed low signal intensity lesions and cortical atrophy in the bilateral parieto-occipital lobes on T1-weighted images. Therefore, the bilateral parieto-occipital lesions are likely to be responsible for his picture agnosia.

  11. A case of carbon monoxide poisoning by explosion of coal mine presenting as visual agnosia: re-evaluation after 40 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaiwa, A.; Yamashita, K.; Nomura, T.; Shida, K.; Taniwaki, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medical Science

    2005-11-15

    We re-evaluated a case of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting as visual agnosia who had been injured by explosion of Miike-Mikawa coal mine 40 years ago. In an early stage, his main neuropsychological symptoms were visual agnosia, severe anterograde amnesia, alexia, agraphia, constructional apraxia, left hemispatial neglect and psychic paralysis of gaze, in addition to pyramidal and extra pyramidal signs. At the time of re-evaluation after 40 years, he still showed visual agnosia associated with agraphia and constructional apraxia. Concerning visual agnosia, recognition of the real object was preserved, while recognition of object photographs and picture was impaired. Thus, this case was considered to have picture agnosia as he could not recognize the object by pictorial cues on the second dimensional space. MRI examination revealed low signal intensity lesions and cortical atrophy in the bilateral parieto-occipital lobes on T1-weighted images. Therefore, the bilateral parieto-occipital lesions are likely to be responsible for his picture agnosia.

  12. Variability of writing disorders in Wernicke's aphasia underperforming different writing tasks: A single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozintseva, Elena; Skvortsov, Anatoliy

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study was to evolve views on writing disorders in Wernicke's agraphia by comparing group data and analysis of a single patient. We showed how a single-case study can be useful in obtaining essential results that can be hidden by averaging group data. Analysis of a single patient proved to be important for resolving contradictions of the "holistic" and "elementaristic" paradigms of psychology and for the development of theoretical knowledge with the example of a writing disorder. The implementation of a holistic approach was undertaken by presenting the tasks differing in functions in which writing had been performed since its appearance in human culture (communicative, mnestic, and regulatory). In spite of the identical composition of involved psychological components, these differences were identified when certain types of errors were analyzed in the single subject. The results are discussed in terms of used writing strategy, resulting in a way of operation of involved components that lead to qualitative and quantitative changes of writing errors within the syndrome of Wernicke's agraphia. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. A second case of the thrid alexia in pure form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Gade, Anders; Gerlach, Christian

    2000-01-01

    We present a patient (J.M.) with severe alexia and agraphia in the absence of aphasia, and with intact reading and writing of numbers. J.M., a right- handed 18-year-old man, presented with alexia and agraphia after concus- sion. CT and MR were normal. J.M. is impaired in identifying, writing......, and copying letters. His reading and writing of numbers are normal, as is his written arithmetic. Object naming is within normal range, and his copy- ing and drawing of figures and objects are good. In a single letter identi- fication task, J.M. was able to identify only 13/29 uppercase letters and 18...... is good, as is his oral spelling of dictated words. In writing, letters are partly superimposed on each other, making the words virtually unreadable. There are no obvious spelling errors, but some letters are poorly formed. By contrast to his reading, J.M. was able to identify written numbers (1–7 digits...

  14. Dystypia: isolated typing impairment without aphasia, apraxia or visuospatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Mika; Soma, Yoshiaki; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old right-handed Japanese man who showed an isolated persistent typing impairment without aphasia, agraphia, apraxia or any other neuropsychological deficit. We coined the term 'dystypia' for this peculiar neuropsychological manifestation. The symptom was caused by an infarction in the left frontal lobe involving the foot of the second frontal convolution and the frontal operculum. The patient's typing impairment was not attributable to a disturbance of the linguistic process, since he had no aphasia or agraphia. The impairment was not attributable to the impairment of the motor execution process either, since he had no apraxia. Thus, his typing impairment was deduced to be based on a disturbance of the intermediate process where the linguistic phonological information is converted into the corresponding performance. We hypothesized that there is a specific process for typing which branches from the motor programming process presented in neurolinguistic models. The foot of the left second frontal convolution and the operculum may play an important role in the manifestation of 'dystypia'. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Neuroradiologic correlation with aphasias. Cortico-subcortical map of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez de la Peña, M M; Gómez Vicente, L; García Cobos, R; Martínez de Vega, V

    Aphasia is an acquired language disorder due to a cerebral lesion; it is characterized by errors in production, denomination, or comprehension of language. Although most aphasias are mixed, from a practical point of view they are classified into different types according to their main clinical features: Broca's aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, conduction aphasia, transcortical aphasia, and alexia with or without agraphia. We present the clinical findings for the main subtypes of aphasia, illustrating them with imaging cases, and we provide an up-to-date review of the language network with images from functional magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluent Aphasia From Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Yadegari

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present case report introduces a patient with fluent aphasia, anterograde amnesia and anosmia due to herpes simplex encephalitis after her first delivery. The left medial temporal lobe was one of the main areas involved. On aphasia testing she showed severe anomia on both confrontation and free recall, agraphia, alexia, repetition disorder and some auditory comprehension impairments. Therapy was focused on the following issues: phonological output lexicon , using graphemes as a source of reestablishing phonological representation; describing pictures to reinforce free recall and self-cuing word retrieval strategies; sequencing the events for language memory reinforcement, etc. Results showed improvement in confrontational naming, free recall, correct responses without priming, writing on dictation, spontaneous writing and reading comprehension.

  17. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  18. Transient Gerstmann syndrome as manifestation of stroke: Case report and brief literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Batista João

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Gerstmann Syndrome (GS is a rare neurological condition described as a group of cognitive changes corresponding to a tetrad of symptoms comprising agraphia, acalculia, right-left disorientation and finger agnosia. It is known that some specific brain lesions may lead to such findings, particularly when there is impairment of the angular gyrus and adjacent structures. In addition, the possibility of disconnection syndrome should be considered in some cases. The purpose of this article is to report a case of a young, cardiac patient, non-adherent to treatment, who presented with a stroke in which transient clinical symptoms were compatible with the tetrad of GS. The case report is followed by a discussion and brief review of the relevant literature.

  19. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  20. Historical Perspectives on Ancient Greek Derived "a" Prefixed Nomenclature for Acquired Neurocognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard

    2017-06-01

    Distinct forms of acquired neurocognitive impairment are often described by "a" prefixed terms that derive from ancient Greek (and in one case Latin). Two modern English language neurological and neuropsychological reference books were searched to identify 17 such terms in contemporary usage: amnesia, akinesia, ataxia, aphasia, agraphia, anosmia, apraxia, athetosis, ageusia, achromatopsia, agnosia, alexia, amusia, anomia, anarthria, anosognosia, and acalculia. These were traced to their initial association with acquired neurocognitive impairment in German, English, and French language medical publications from the late 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries (1770 through 1920). Some of these terms (e.g., agnosia) were used in ancient Greek, although not associated with neurocognitive impairment. The remainder constitute novel semantically plausible (e.g., anosmia) and unclear (e.g., alexia) formulations. In the localizationist thinking of the time, neurocognition was conceived as being organized within specialized "centers" in specific locations connected by pathways within the brain.

  1. Ventral simultanagnosia and prosopagnosia for unfamiliar faces due to a right posterior superior temporal sulcus and angular gyrus lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Hamada, Kensuke; Tsugawa, Naoya; Sugimoto, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with ventral simultanagnosia, prosopagnosia for "unfamiliar faces" (dorsal prosopagnosia), spatial agraphia, and constructional disorder, particularly on the left spatial side, due to a lesion in the right posterior superior and middle temporal gyri and angular gyrus. The patient showed impairment of fundamental visual and visuospatial recognition, such as in object size, configuration, and horizontal point location, which probably underlay the mechanism of simultanagnosia and prosopagnosia. This case also suggests that the coexistence of simultanagnosia and prosopagnosia results from a right hemispheric insult, and damage to the temporoparietal area interrupts the incorporation of spatial information into object recognition. This disconnection of information flow, together with impaired object recognition per se, may impair the parallel processing of multiple objects, leading to object-by-object or part-by-part recognition.

  2. Sclerosis: Implications for Interhemispheric Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunardelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with 35-year history of multiple sclerosis, who showed alien hand signs, a rare behavioural disorder that involves unilateral goal-directed movements that are contrary to the individual's intention. Alien hand syndrome has been described in multiple sclerosis (MS only occasionally and is generally suggestive of callosal disconnection. The patient presented also with bilateral limb apraxia and left hand agraphia, raising the possibility of cortical dysfunction or disconnection, in addition to corpus callosum and white matter involvement. Her specific pattern of symptoms supports the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric communication for complex as well as fine motor activities and may indicate that it can serve as both an inhibitory and excitatory function depending on task demands.

  3. The neural basis for writing from dictation in the temporoparietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Franck-Emmanuel; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Réhault, Emilie; Planton, Samuel; Draper, Louisa; Démonet, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Cortical electrical stimulation mapping was used to study neural substrates of the function of writing in the temporoparietal cortex. We identified the sites involved in oral language (sentence reading and naming) and writing from dictation, in order to spare these areas during removal of brain tumours in 30 patients (23 in the left, and 7 in the right hemisphere). Electrostimulation of the cortex impaired writing ability in 62 restricted cortical areas (.25 cm2). These were found in left temporoparietal lobes and were mostly located along the superior temporal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 22 and 42). Stimulation of right temporoparietal lobes in right-handed patients produced no writing impairments. However there was a high variability of location between individuals. Stimulation resulted in combined symptoms (affecting oral language and writing) in fourteen patients, whereas in eight other patients, stimulation-induced pure agraphia symptoms with no oral language disturbance in twelve of the identified areas. Each detected area affected writing in a different way. We detected the various different stages of the auditory-to-motor pathway of writing from dictation: either through comprehension of the dictated sentences (word deafness areas), lexico-semantic retrieval, or phonologic processing. In group analysis, barycentres of all different types of writing interferences reveal a hierarchical functional organization along the superior temporal gyrus from initial word recognition to lexico-semantic and phonologic processes along the ventral and the dorsal comprehension pathways, supporting the previously described auditory-to-motor process. The left posterior Sylvian region supports different aspects of writing function that are extremely specialized and localized, sometimes being segregated in a way that could account for the occurrence of pure agraphia that has long-been described in cases of damage to this region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissociative Disturbance in Hangul-Hanja Reading after a Left Posterior Occipital Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Key-Chung Park

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the Korean language has two distinct writing systems, phonogram (Hangul and ideogram (Hanja: Chinese characters, alexia can present with dissociative disturbances in reading between the two systems. A 74-year-old right-handed man presented with a prominent reading impairment in Hangul with agraphia of both Hangul and Hanja after a left posterior occipital- parietal lesion. He could not recognize single syllable words and nonwords in Hangul, and visual errors were predominant in both Hanja reading and the Korean Boston Naming Test. In addition, he had difficulties in visuoperceptual tests including Judgment of Line Orientation, Hierarchical Navon figures, and complex picture scanning. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that Hangul reading impairment results from a general visual perceptual deficit. However, this assumption cannot explain why performance on visually complex Hanja was better than performance on visually simple Hanja in our patient. In addition, the patient did not demonstrate higher accuracy on Hanja characters with fewer strokes than on words with more strokes. Thus, we speculate that the left posterior occipital area may be specialized for Hangul letter identification in this patient. This case demonstrates that Hangul-Hanja reading dissociation impairment can occur after occipital-parietal lesions.

  5. Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease, a suspicious case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão, Pedro; Pereira, Patrícia; Nunes, Andreia; Antunes, Pedro

    2017-03-02

    A 70-year-old man with known cardiovascular risk factors, presented with acute onset expression aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, right-left disorientation and finger agnosia, without fever or meningeal signs. Stroke was thought to be the cause, but cerebrovascular disease investigation was negative. Interviewing the family revealed he had undergone yellow fever vaccination 18 days before. Lumbar puncture revealed mild protein elevation. Cultural examinations, Coxiella burnetti, and neurotropic virus serologies were negative. Regarding the yellow fever virus, IgG was identified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with negative IgM and virus PCR in CSF. EEG showed an encephalopathic pattern. The patient improved gradually and a week after discharge was his usual self. Only criteria for suspect neurotropic disease were met, but it's possible the time spent between symptom onset and lumbar puncture prevented a definite diagnosis of yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease. This gap would have been smaller if the vaccination history had been collected earlier. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. The knowledge and attitudes of occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech-language therapy students, regarding the speech-language therapist's role in the hospital stroke rehabilitation team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsher, L; Ross, E

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to survey and compare the knowledge and attitudes of final year occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech-language therapy students, concerning the role of the speech-language therapist as a member of the stroke rehabilitation team in the hospital setting. In order to achieve this aim, a questionnaire was administered to final year students in these three disciplines, and included questions on most areas of stroke rehabilitation with which the speech-language therapist might be involved, as well as the concepts of rehabilitation and teamwork in relation to stroke rehabilitation. Results suggested a fairly good understanding of the concepts of rehabilitation and teamwork. Students appeared to have a greater understanding of those disorders following a stroke, with which the speech-language therapist is commonly involved, such as Aphasia, Dysarthria, Verbal Apraxia and Dysphagia. However, students appeared to show less understanding of those disorders post-stroke, for which the speech-language therapist's role is less well defined, such as Agraphia, Alexia and Amnesia. In addition, a high percentage of role duplication/overlapping in several aspects of stroke rehabilitation, such as family and social support, was found. Several implications for facilitating communication, collaboration and understanding between paramedical professions, as well as for further research are also provided.

  7. Neural substrates of reading and writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa

    2008-01-01

    Functional MRI has made a great advance in the neurological field because of its low invasion, easiness to collect data to be analyzed by such a globally standardizable software as SPM (statistical parametric mapping), and appearance of academic journals specified for neuroimaging. This chapter of the review describes the activating regions and functions in reading and writing, the essential ability of language belonging to the cerebral highest function, as evidenced by the fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) images including those under disease states (alexia and agraphia), in the following order; Correspondence of Japanese kanji/kana-words to English ones for studies on activation, Cognitive psychological model of reading, Studies on the activation of reading words, and Studies on the activation of writing words. In this paper, regions are mainly documented in accordance with the coordinate of Montreal Neurological Institute. The third section above mentions the concerned regions in the fusiform gyrus and posterior inferior temporal cortex; lateral occipital gyrus subcortex; temporal plane, superior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus; posterior middle temporal, angular and supramarginal gyri; and inferior frontal gyrus, insular gyri, and supplementary motor area. The fourth section for writing words says the regions in the fusiform gyrus, posterior inferior temporal gyrus and posterior inferior temporal cortex; intraparietal sulcus pericortex, superior parietal lobule and lateral occipital gyrus; and sensorimotor area, posterior middle temporal gyrus and posterior inferior frontal gyrus. (R.T.)

  8. Letter-By-Letter Reading: Natural Recovery and Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pélagie M. Beeson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation provides a longitudinal study of an individual (RB with acquired alexia following left posterior cerebral artery stroke. At initial testing, RB exhibited acquired alexia characterized by letter-by-letter (LBL reading, mild anomic aphasia, and acquired agraphia. Repeated measures of reading accuracy and rate were collected for single words and text over the course of one year, along with probes of naming and spelling abilities. Improvements associated with natural recovery (i.e., without treatment were documented up to the fourth month post onset, when text reading appeared to be relatively stable. Multiple oral reading (MOR treatment was initiated at 22 weeks post-stroke, and additional improvements in reading rate and accuracy for text were documented that were greater than those expected on the basis of spontaneous recovery alone. Over the course of one year, reading reaction times for single words improved, and the word-length effect that is the hallmark of LBL reading diminished. RB's response to treatment supports the therapeutic value of MOR treatment to in LBL readers. His residual impairment of reading and spelling one-year post stroke raised the question as to whether further progress was impeded by degraded orthographic knowledge.

  9. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Positron emission tomography scans on kanji and kana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa

    2002-01-01

    We reanalyzed our positron emission tomography (PET) study on reading of Japanese kanji (morphogram) words, kana (phonogram) words and kana nonwords, using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). The basal occipital and occipito-temporal areas were activated in common, among which activity was most pronounced in the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri with kanji and in the inferior occipital gyrus with kana. The results were consistent with the clinical observations that damage to the posterior inferior temporal cortex including the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri causes alexia with agraphia for kanji, whereas damage to the posterior occipital area including the inferior occipital gyrus causes pure alexia for kana. Bases on the present results and the lesion studies, a dual-route hypothesis that modifies Iwata's model of reading about the Japanese language was proposed. That is, the middle occipital gyrus, deep perisylvian temporoparietal cortex and posterior temporal gyrus constitute a dorsal route for reading and process phonology for words, whereas the inferior occipital, fusiform and posterior inferior temporal gyri constitute a ventral route for reading and process orthography and lexico-semantics for words. The ventral route may gain dominance in reading, according as a word is repeatedly presented. (author)

  11. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  12. Musical functioning, speech lateralization and the amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, I W

    1981-01-17

    Amusia is a condition in which musical capacity is impaired by organic brain disease. Music is in a sense a language and closely resembles speech, both executively and receptively. For musical functioning, rhythmic sense and sense of sounds are essential. Musical ability resides largely in the right (non-dominant) hemisphere. Tests have been devised for the assessment of musical capabilities by Dorgeuille, Grison and Wertheim. Classification of amusia includes vocal amusia, instrumental amnesia, musical agraphia, musical amnesia, disorders of rhythm, and receptive amusia. Amusia like aphasia has clinical significance, and the two show remarkable similarities and often co-exist. Usually executive amusia occurs with executive aphasia and receptive amusia with receptive aphasia, but amusias can exist without aphasia. Severely executive aphasics can sometimes sing with text (words), and this ability is used in the treatment of aphasia. As with aphasia, there is correlation between type of amusia and site of lesion. Thus in executive amusia, the lesion generally occurs in the frontal lobe. In receptive amusia, the lesion is mainly in the temporal lobe. If aphasia is also present the lesion will be in the left (dominant) hemisphere.

  13. Jean-Martin Charcot's role in the 19th century study of music aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julene K; Lorch, Marjorie; Nicolas, Serge; Graziano, Amy

    2013-05-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot's ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his 'Friday Lessons' on aphasia, which took place at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris in 1883-84. In his most comprehensive discussion about music, Charcot described a professional trombone player who developed difficulty copying music notation and playing his instrument, thereby identifying a new isolated syndrome of music agraphia without aphasia. Because the description of this case was published only in Italian by one of his students, Domenico Miliotti, there has been considerable confusion and under-acknowledgement of Charcot's ideas about music and the brain. In this paper, we describe Charcot's ideas regarding music and place them within the historical context of the growing interest in the neurological underpinnings of music abilities that took place in the 1880s.

  14. 123I-IMP-SPECT in vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Toshihiko; Shio, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Kimura, Jun

    1990-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by N-isopropyl-p- 123 I-iodoamphetamine (IMP)-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with vascular dementia. Patients were divided by CT/MRI findings into multiple or localized type and cortical or subcortical type. Of patients with multiple lesions in the cortex, the reduction of CBF was noted in several cortex corresponding to CT/MRI findings. Patients in this group had a high incidence of aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, and amnesia. Patients with multiple lesions in the white matter and basal ganglia were subdivided into 3 groups by clinical manifestations. CBF in those with dementia showed generalized reduction in all cerebral cortex and especially in bilateral frontal regions. CBF in those with slightly impaired mentality was almost normal. In another group with pseudobulbar palsy and/or extrapyramidal sings, CBF was reduced intermediately only in bilateral frontal regions. Typical symptoms in demented patients were apathy, emotional lability, and forgetfulness. In those with the localized type, CBF was reduced in cerebral cortical areas correlating with the impaired mental functions. (author)

  15. sup 123 I-IMP-SPECT in vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namura, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Toshihiko; Shio, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Kimura, Jun (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital)

    1990-12-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied by N-isopropyl-p-{sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine (IMP)-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with vascular dementia. Patients were divided by CT/MRI findings into multiple or localized type and cortical or subcortical type. Of patients with multiple lesions in the cortex, the reduction of CBF was noted in several cortex corresponding to CT/MRI findings. Patients in this group had a high incidence of aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, and amnesia. Patients with multiple lesions in the white matter and basal ganglia were subdivided into 3 groups by clinical manifestations. CBF in those with dementia showed generalized reduction in all cerebral cortex and especially in bilateral frontal regions. CBF in those with slightly impaired mentality was almost normal. In another group with pseudobulbar palsy and/or extrapyramidal sings, CBF was reduced intermediately only in bilateral frontal regions. Typical symptoms in demented patients were apathy, emotional lability, and forgetfulness. In those with the localized type, CBF was reduced in cerebral cortical areas correlating with the impaired mental functions. (author).

  16. Words don't come easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi

    of reading, and with the use of functional imaging techniques. Extant evidence for (and against) cerebral specialization for visual word recognition is briefly reviewed and found inconclusive.                       Study I is a case study of a patient with a very selective alexia and agraphia affecting...... and object processing, may explain the pattern of activations found in our and other functional imaging studies of the visual word form area.                       Study III reports a patient (NN) with pure alexia. NN is not impaired in object recognition, but his deficit(s) affects processing speed...... reading and writing of letters and words but not numbers. This study raised questions of "where" in the cognitive system such a deficit may arise, and whether it can be attributed to a deficit in a system specialized for reading or letter knowledge. The following studies investigated these questions...

  17. Síndrome de gerstmann de desenvolvimento associada a neoplasia cerebelar: relato de um caso e revisão da literatura Developmental Gerstmann syndrome associated with cerebellar neoplasm: a case report with review of litterature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu César Werneck

    1975-03-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de síndrome de Gerstmann de Desenvolvimento, que apresentava acalculia, agrafía, confusão direita-esquerda, agnosia de dedos e apraxia construcional, em um menino de 7 anos. O tratamento inicial com metilfenidato determinou bons resultados no que concerne à hiperatividade, à atenção e à apraxia construcional. Durante o curso clínico, o paciente apresentou sintomatologia cerebelar, hipertensão intracraniana, tendo sido feita intervenção cirúrgica na fossa posterior, sendo excisado um meduloblastoma de cerebelo. O autor acredita que é esta a primeira descrição na literatura da concomitância da síndrome de Gerstmann de Desenvolvimento e neoplasia de fossa posterior. São feitos comentários focalizando cada um dos aspectos clínicos, fatores etiológicos e topográficos.A Developmental Gerstmann syndrome in a 7 years-old-boy with hyperactivity, short attention span, acalculia, agraphia, right-left confusion, finger agnosia and constructional apraxia is reported. An initial trial with methylphenidate was done with good improvement regarding hyperactivity, attention span and constructional apraxia. In the clinical course developed a cerebellar syndrome and intracranial hypertension. Surgical exploration of the cerebellum discovered a medulloblastoma. The author believes that this is the first described association of Developmental Gerstmann syndrome and cerebellar neoplasia. The clinical findings, the etiology and the topography of the Gerstmann syndrome are discussed.

  18. The "handwriting brain": a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of motor versus orthographic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planton, Samuel; Jucla, Mélanie; Roux, Franck-Emmanuel; Démonet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Handwriting is a modality of language production whose cerebral substrates remain poorly known although the existence of specific regions is postulated. The description of brain damaged patients with agraphia and, more recently, several neuroimaging studies suggest the involvement of different brain regions. However, results vary with the methodological choices made and may not always discriminate between "writing-specific" and motor or linguistic processes shared with other abilities. We used the "Activation Likelihood Estimate" (ALE) meta-analytical method to identify the cerebral network of areas commonly activated during handwriting in 18 neuroimaging studies published in the literature. Included contrasts were also classified according to the control tasks used, whether non-specific motor/output-control or linguistic/input-control. These data were included in two secondary meta-analyses in order to reveal the functional role of the different areas of this network. An extensive, mainly left-hemisphere network of 12 cortical and sub-cortical areas was obtained; three of which were considered as primarily writing-specific (left superior frontal sulcus/middle frontal gyrus area, left intraparietal sulcus/superior parietal area, right cerebellum) while others related rather to non-specific motor (primary motor and sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, thalamus and putamen) or linguistic processes (ventral premotor cortex, posterior/inferior temporal cortex). This meta-analysis provides a description of the cerebral network of handwriting as revealed by various types of neuroimaging experiments and confirms the crucial involvement of the left frontal and superior parietal regions. These findings provide new insights into cognitive processes involved in handwriting and their cerebral substrates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge and attitudes of allied health professional students regarding the stroke rehabilitation team and the role of the Speech and Language Therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aine; Pettigrew, Catharine M

    2010-01-01

    One of the major barriers to effective team working among healthcare professionals is a lack of knowledge of each other's roles. The importance of understanding Irish healthcare students' attitudes towards team working and each other's roles led to the development of this study. The aims were to investigate allied health professional students' perceptions and experiences of the stroke rehabilitation team and the role of the Speech and Language Therapist (SLT). A survey first developed by Felsher and Ross (1994) and further developed by Insalaco et al. (2007) was adapted to the Irish healthcare setting. The survey was administered to final-year Occupational Therapy (n = 23), Speech and Language Therapy (21) students and Physiotherapy (20) students (64 in total) (a 98.5% response rate). Results indicate that students had a good understanding of teamwork in the healthcare setting and the possible benefits and challenges it presents. Students had a strong appreciation for interprofessional collaboration, with the majority (79%) choosing shared leadership as their preferred option for the stroke rehabilitation team. Further to this, the team approaches that students felt were most appropriate for the stroke rehabilitation setting were the more collaborative approaches of interdisciplinary (43.5%) and transdisciplinary (37.1%). The students had clear perceptions of the SLT's role in aphasia, dysphagia, dysarthria, apraxia and auditory agnosia, but were less knowledgeable of the SLT's role in the acquired disorders of alexia and agraphia (p < 0.05). More than half of all students perceived that the SLT is involved in the treatment of hemispatial neglect (55.5%), depression (71.5%) and visual agnosia (59.4%). The results provide valuable information for further developments in interprofessional education at an undergraduate level. Further opportunities should be provided to students to collaborate with each other, particularly in their final year of training as, by then

  20. [Associative visual agnosia. The less visible consequences of a cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2011-02-01

    After a cerebral infarction, some patients acutely demonstrate contralateral hemiplegia, or aphasia. Those are the obvious symptoms of a cerebral infarction. However, less visible but burdensome consequences may go unnoticed without closer investigation. The importance of a thorough clinical examination is exemplified by a single case study of a 72-year-old, right-handed male. Two years before he had suffered from an ischemic stroke in the territory of the left posterior cerebral artery, with right homonymous hemianopia and global alexia (i.e., impairment in letter recognition and profound impairment of reading) without agraphia. Naming was impaired on visual presentation (20%-39% correct), but improved significantly after tactile presentation (87% correct) or verbal definition (89%). Pre-semantic visual processing was normal (correct matching of different views of the same object), as was his access to structural knowledge from vision (he reliably distinguished real objects from non-objects). On a colour decision task he reliably indicated which of two items was coloured correctly. Though he was unable to mime how visually presented objects were used, he more reliably matched pictures of objects with pictures of a mime artist gesturing the use of the object. He obtained normal scores on word definition (WAIS-III), synonym judgment and word-picture matching tasks with perceptual and semantic distractors. He however failed when he had to match physically dissimilar specimens of the same object or when he had to decide which two of five objects were related associatively (Pyramids and Palm Trees Test). The patient thus showed a striking contrast in his intact ability to access knowledge of object shape or colour from vision and impaired functional and associative knowledge. As a result, he could not access a complete semantic representation, required for activating phonological representations to name visually presented objects. The pattern of impairments and

  1. [Amusia and aphasia of Bolero's creator--influence of the right hemisphere on music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Lorraine; Sikirić, Predrag; Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Cambi-Sapunar, Liana; Radonić, Vedran; Tudor, Mario; Buca, Ante; Carija, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The experience with cortical localization (BA 44, 45, 22) of language (Broca, Wernicke and others) in the left hemisphere has been repeatedly tested over the last 150 years and is now generally accepted. A single case report with autopsy findings (Leborgne, Tan tan), has enabled to localize the seat of spoken language in the left third frontal convolution. As music and language have a lot in common and even share the same hearing system, it is logical to try to localize the cognitive centers for music too. The disabling neurological disease illness of Maurice Ravel (1875-1937), a French impressionist composer, is not the right example to localize music center as that of Broca's language center, but it demonstrates the role of the right hemisphere in music production. In the last five years of his life, Ravel suffered from an unknown disease that affected the left hemisphere causing aphasia, apraxia, alexia, agraphia and amusia. It was the reason why Ravel could not compose during the last years of his life. In contrast to Ravel, Shebalin and Britten continued writing music works of their own although aphasic after having sustained two strokes to the left hemisphere. While lacking clinical cases with selective ablative brain lesions, research into the music localization can be done using modern imaging technologies such as fMRI and PET. Exercising music (professionally) develops analytical process in the left hemisphere whereas other individuals process music in their right hemisphere. There is right ear (left hemisphere) predominance in musicians and vice versa in musical amateurs. Music lateralization towards the right hemisphere is seen in women and in inattentive listeners. It can be subject to cultural influence, so the Japanese process their traditional popular music in the left hemisphere, whereas Westerners process the same music in the right hemisphere. Music and language are processed separately; they are localized in homologous regions of the opposite

  2. A 58-year-old female with blurred vision and apraxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hong SHI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old right handed woman, with 12 years of formal education, had a five-year history of slowly progressive blurred vision and apraxia. Five years before the examination she gradually became blurred vision and had difficulties identifying static objects within the visual field. Then she went to an ophthalmologist and received cataract surgery. However, the symptoms were not improved after surgery. Two years later, she had difficulty doing household chores and was unable to dress herself. She developed an anxiety disorder in the absence of prominent language or memory deficits. Five years after onset, she showed global cognitive decline and abilities of daily life decline. On neurological examination she was alert. Neuropsychological testing revealed a mini-mental state examination (MMSE score of 20/30 with anomia, agraphia, alexia and partial impairment on time orientation. Biochemical investigations for disorders involving thyroid function, vitamin B12, and folate were unremarkable. A brain MRI showed diffuse cortical atrophy and hippocampus atrophy. An 18F-FDG PET scan showed bilateral hypometabolism at the frontal lobes, tempoparietooccipital adjunction, posterior cingulate cortices and precuneus, insular lobes, caudate nuclei and right thalamus. An 11C-PIB PET scan showed bilateral amyloid deposits at bilateral frontal lobes and occipital lobes, left temporal lobe and insular, basal ganglia, bilateral cingulate cortices and precuneus. No PSEN1, PSEN2 or APP mutations were identified. This early-onset patient had an unusual cognitive complaint, including visual agnosia and apraxia. The clinical features, structural and functional imaging findings of this case were compatible with the diagnosis of Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA. PCA is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by a progressive, often dramatic and relatively selective decline in visual processing skills and other functions subserved by parietal, occipital and

  3. Preserved processing of musical syntax in a person with agrammatic aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhvi Saxena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of work suggests that processing hierarchical structure in language and in music rely on shared systems (review: Slevc, 2012, however this conclusion is tempered by neuropsychological dissociations between linguistic and musical processing (i.e., aphasia and amusia; review: Peretz, 2006. An influential reconciliation comes from Patel’s (2003 shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis (SSIRH, which suggests that evidence for shared processes reflect reliance on shared syntactic integration processes whereas dissociations result from damage to domain-specific syntactic representations. The SSIRH thus predicts that patients with deficits in the processing of linguistic syntax–such as agrammatic aphasics–should show parallel deficits in musical structural (harmonic processing. This prediction is countered by findings of impaired harmonic processing in patients with (apparently spared linguistic syntactic processing (e.g., Sammler et al., 2011, however evidence for the opposite dissociation–preserved harmonic processing in agrammatic aphasia–is lacking. While there are reports of preserved musical abilities despite global aphasia (Basso & Capitani, 1985 or severe Wernicke’s aphasia (Luria, Tsvetkova, & Futer, 1965, of preserved reading and writing of music in the face of alexia and agraphia (Signoret et al., 1987, and of preserved musical sound naming in the face of severe anomia (Tzortzis et al., 2000, no study (to our knowledge has demonstrated preserved musical structural processing in an agrammatic patient. In addition, at least one group of agrammatic aphasics did not show normal effects of harmonic priming, and showed a relationship between accuracy on acceptability judgments in language and in music (Patel et al., 2008. Here, we report a detailed analysis of structural processing in language and in music in HV, a 63 year-old native English-speaking female musician who sustained a left peri-Sylvian stroke. She