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Sample records for agonist-activated human platelets

  1. Comparative study of human and mouse pregnane X receptor agonistic activity in 200 pesticides using in vitro reporter gene assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PXR activation may affect energy metabolism as well as the endocrine and immune systems. In this study, we characterized and compared the agonistic activities of a variety of pesticides against human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR). We tested the hPXR and mPXR agonistic activity of 200 pesticides (29 organochlorines, 11 diphenyl ethers, 56 organophosphorus pesticides, 12 pyrethroids, 22 carbamates, 12 acid amides, 7 triazines, 7 ureas, and 44 others) by reporter gene assays using COS-7 simian kidney cells. Of the 200 pesticides tested, 106 and 93 activated hPXR and mPXR, respectively, and a total of 111 had hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity with greater or lesser inter-species differences. Although all of the pyrethroids and most of the organochlorines and acid amides acted as PXR agonists, a wide range of pesticides with diverse structures also showed hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity. Among the 200 pesticides, pyributicarb, pretilachlor, piperophos and butamifos for hPXR, and phosalone, prochloraz, pendimethalin, and butamifos for mPXR, acted as particularly potent activators at low concentrations in the order of 10-8-10-7 M. In addition, we found that several organophosphorus oxon- and pyributicarb oxon-metabolites decreased PXR activation potency compared to their parent compounds. These results suggest that a large number of structurally diverse pesticides and their metabolites possess PXR-mediated transcriptional activity, and their ability to do so varies in a species-dependent manner in humans and mice.

  2. Effect of sulphation on the oestrogen agonist activity of the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugazhendhi, D; Watson, K A; Mills, S; Botting, N; Pope, G S; Darbre, P D

    2008-06-01

    The phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein and the daidzein metabolite equol have been shown previously to possess oestrogen agonist activity. However, following consumption of soya diets, they are found in the body not only as aglycones but also as metabolites conjugated at their 4'- and 7-hydroxyl groups with sulphate. This paper describes the effects of monosulphation on the oestrogen agonist properties of these three phytoestrogens in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in terms of their relative ability to compete with [(3)H]oestradiol for binding to oestrogen receptor (ER), to induce a stably transfected oestrogen-responsive reporter gene (ERE-CAT) and to stimulate cell growth. In no case did sulphation abolish activity. The 4'-sulphation of genistein reduced oestrogen agonist activity to a small extent in whole-cell assays but increased the relative binding affinity to ER. The 7-sulphation of genistein, and also of equol, reduced oestrogen agonist activity substantially in all assays. By contrast, the position of monosulphation of daidzein acted in an opposing manner on oestrogen agonist activity. Sulphation at the 4'-position of daidzein resulted in a modest reduction in oestrogen agonist activity but sulphation of daidzein at the 7-position resulted in an increase in oestrogen agonist activity. Molecular modelling and docking studies suggested that the inverse effects of sulphation could be explained by the binding of daidzein into the ligand-binding domain of the ER in the opposite orientation compared with genistein and equol. This is the first report of sulphation enhancing activity of an isoflavone and inverse effects of sulphation between individual phytoestrogens. PMID:18492816

  3. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [125I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [125I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 109 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  4. Glycoprotein biosynthesis by human normal platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of radioactive Man, Gal, Fuc, Glc-N, and NANA into washed human normal platelets and endogenous glycoproteins has been found. Both parameters were time dependent. Analysis of hydrolyzed labeled glycoproteins by paper chromatography revealed that the radioactive monosaccharide incubated with the platelets had not been converted into other sugars. Acid hydrolysis demonstrates the presence of a glycosidic linkage. All the effort directed to the demonstration of the existence of a lipid-sugar intermediate in intact human platelets yielded negative results for Man and Glc-N used as precursors. The incorporation of these sugars into glycoproteins is insensitive to bacitracin, suggesting no involvement of lipid-linked saccharides in the synthesis of glycoproteins in human blood platelets. The absence of inhibition of the glycosylation process in the presence of cycloheximide suggests that the sugars are added to proteins present in the intact platelets. These results support the contention that glycoprotein biosynthesis in human blood platelets observed under our experimental conditions is effected through direct sugar nucleotide glycosylation

  5. Direct assessment of cumulative aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist activity in sera from experimentally exposed mice and environmentally exposed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Bernard, Pamela L; Haas, Amelia;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands adversely affect many biological processes. However, assessment of the significance of human exposures is hampered by an incomplete understanding of how complex mixtures affect AhR activation/inactivation. OBJECTIVES: These studies used biologic...

  6. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  7. Clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis aggregate human platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Magnus; Johansson, Daniel; Karlsson Söbirk, Sara; Mörgelin, Matthias; Shannon, Oonagh

    2010-01-01

    Many endocarditis pathogens activate human platelets and this has been proposed to contribute to virulence. Here we report for the first time that many clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, a common pathogen in infective endocarditis, aggregate human platelets. 84 isolates from human blood and urine were screened for their ability to aggregate platelets from four different donors. Platelet aggregation occurred for between 11 and 65 % of isolates depending on the donor. In one donor, a s...

  8. Ultraviolet irradiation effect on human platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of human blood platelets with ultraviolet light (uv) results in changes of several physiological functions. When uv-treated platelets are stirred in the presence of fibrinogen and calcium ions aggregation occurs. The amount of aggregation is dependent upon the uv dosage and wavelength, the fibrinogen concentration and the calcium concentration. Maximum aggregation occurs with a 250 joule/m2 dosage at 245 nm wavelength in the presence of 0.5 mg/ml fibrinogen and 2 mM calcium ion. Aggregation induced by uv is partially inhibited by apyrase or by metabolic inhibitors. Hirudin, a potent inhibitor of thrombin action, did not inhibit uv-induced aggregation. Pretreatment with uv decreases the ability of platelets to support clot retraction. An action spectrum for the effect has maxima at 210 nm and at 280 nm indicating the chromophore is a protein containing aromatic amino acids. Dosages greater than 120 seconds of exposure to a Hanovia High-Pressure Quartz Mercury-Vapor Lamp render the platelets incapable of supporting retraction of fibrin clots induced by thrombin. Irradiation with 250 nm uv has the ability to stimulate retraction of fibrin clots induced by reptilase. Thrombin-mediated platelet functions, including binding, release and aggregation are also inhibited by uv irradiation. The number of binding sites per platelet is reduced by 43 percent with a 90 second dose of uv. For the same dose, the total amount of serotonin released is decreased from 81 percent to 41 percent while the thrombin-induced aggregation is completely inhibited. An action spectra contains two maxima, at 245 nm and 280 nm. The effect of uv is compared with the effect of dithiothreitol (DTT) as a test of the hypothesis that uv-induced aggregation is mediated by disulfide bond disruption

  9. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  10. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES EXPOSURE OF FIBRINOGEN RECEPTORS ON HUMAN PLATELETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于希春; 吴其夏

    1995-01-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors was investigated.The results showed that:1)LPS increased the binding of fibrinogen-gold complexes to platelets and the labels were primarily limited to shape-changed platelets;2)LPS caused a dose-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in platelets;3)LPS induced the activation of platelet protein kinase C(PKC) and the phosphorylation of glycoprotein llla (GP llla) which was inhibited by H-7.All these results suggest that stimulation of platelets with LPS causes a conformational change in glycoprotein llb/Illa (GPllb/llla) through platelet shape change and/or phosphorylation of GPllla via PKC,which serves to expose the fibrinogen binding sites of GPllb/llla on human platelets.

  11. (N)-methanocarba-2MeSADP (MRS2365) is a subtype-specific agonist that induces rapid desensitization of the P2Y1 receptor of human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdon, D. M.; Mahanty, S. K.; Jacobson, K A; Boyer, J. L.; Harden, T. K.

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) initiates and maintains sustained aggregation of platelets through simultaneous activation of both the Gq-coupled P2Y1 receptor and the Gi-coupled P2Y12 receptor. We recently described the synthesis and P2Y1 receptor-specific agonist activity of (N)-methano-carba-2MeSADP (MRS2365). Consequences of selective activation of the P2Y1 receptor by MRS2365 have been further examined in human platelets. Whereas MRS2365 alone only induced shape change, addition of MRS2365 f...

  12. Human Platelet Lipidomics: Variance, Visualization, Flux, and Fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2016-05-10

    The cardioprotection afforded by low-dose aspirin reflects the biological importance of the platelet lipid thromboxane A2. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Slatter et al. (2016) illuminate the breadth, complexity, and variability of the human platelet lipidome under conditions of thrombin activation and aspirin suppression, potentially facilitating the pursuit of precision medicine. PMID:27166936

  13. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus, Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Ming Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.. Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH● formation, and phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Adhesion of human platelets to serum amyloid A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urieli-Shoval, Simcha; Shubinsky, George; Linke, Reinhold P; Fridkin, Mati; Tabi, Israel; Matzner, Yaacov

    2002-02-15

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant, and its level in the blood is elevated to 1000-fold in response of the body to trauma, infection, inflammation, and neoplasia. SAA was reported to inhibit platelet aggregation and to induce adhesion of leukocytes. This study looked at adhesion of human platelets to SAA. Immobilized SAA supported the adhesion of human washed platelets; level of adhesion to SAA was comparable to fibronectin and lower than to fibrinogen. Adhesion to SAA was further enhanced by Mn(2+) and the physiological agonist, thrombin. Platelet adhesion to SAA was completely abolished by anti-SAA antibody. SAA-induced adhesion was inhibited by antibodies against the integrin receptor alphaIIbbeta3, by the peptide GRGDSP and by SAA-derived peptide containing YIGSR-like and RGD-like adhesion motifs (amino acids 29 to 42). Adhesion was not inhibited by control immunoglobulin G, by antibody against the integrin receptor alphaVbeta3, by the peptide GRGESP, and by SAA-derived peptide that includes incomplete RGD motif. SAA-derived peptide 29 to 42 also inhibited platelet adhesion to fibronectin. Transfected human melanoma cells expressing alphaIIbbeta3 adhered to SAA, whereas transfected cells expressing alphaVbeta3 did not. By using flow cytometry, the alphaIIbbeta3 cells displayed significantly higher levels of binding of soluble SAA than the alphaVbeta3 cells. These data indicate that human platelets specifically adhere to SAA in an RGD- and alphaIIbbeta3-dependent manner. Thus, SAA may play a role in modulating platelet adhesion at vascular injury sites by sharing platelet receptors with other platelet-adhesive proteins. PMID:11830469

  15. Labeling of human platelets with [111In] 8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated the factors influencing the labeling of human platelets in the presence of autologous plasma. The labeling efficiency was found to be dependent on a) the time and temperature of incubation, b) the platelet concentration, c) the concentration of citrate ions (in ACD anticoagulant), and d) the concentration of 8-hydroxyquinoline in the suspending medium. Contrary to what was expected, unsaturated transferrin was found not to interfere with the transfer of In-111 from the [111In] 8-hydroxyquinoline complex to the platelets. Based on the findings of this study, a protocol was established by which human platelets can be labeled with In-111 in plasma with a labeling efficiency of 55.5 +- 9.3 (mean +- 1 s.d.) percent

  16. Lonomia obliqua venomous secretion induces human platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Reck, José; Terra, Renata M S; Beys da Silva, Walter O; Santi, Lucélia; Pinto, Antônio F M; Vainstein, Marilene H; Termignoni, Carlos; Guimarães, Jorge A

    2010-10-01

    The caterpillar Lonomia obliqua is a venomous animal that causes numerous accidents, especially in southern Brazil, where it is considered a public health problem. The clinical manifestations include several haemostatic disturbances that lead to a hemorrhagic syndrome. Considering that platelets play a central role in hemostasis, in this work we investigate the effects of L. obliqua venomous secretion upon blood platelets responses in vitro. Results obtained shows that L. obliqua venom directly induces aggregation and ATP secretion in human washed platelets in a dose-dependent manner. Electron microscopy studies clearly showed that the venomous bristle extract was also able to produce direct platelets shape change and adhesion as well as activation and formation of platelet aggregates. Differently from other enzyme inhibitors, the venom-induced platelet aggregation was significatively inhibited by p-bromophenacyl bromide, a specific inhibitor of phospholipases A2. Additional experiments with different pharmacological antagonists indicate that the aggregation response triggered by the venom active components occurs through a calcium-dependent mechanism involving arachidonic acid metabolite(s) of the cyclooxygenase pathway and activation of phosphodiesterase 3A, an enzyme that leads to the consumption of intracellular cAMP content. It was additionally found that L. obliqua-induced platelet aggregation was independent of ADP release. Altogether, these findings are in line with the need for a better understanding of the complex hemorrhagic syndrome resulting from the envenomation caused by L. obliqua caterpillars, and can also give new insights into the management of its clinical profile. PMID:20157842

  17. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva T.J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  18. Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the left. They are shaped like a plate, therefore their name. When platelets are stimulated by ... can occur, related to a restaurant or a contaminated food or water source. Shiga toxin can cause ...

  19. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Torreggiani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP and platelet lysate (PL in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies.

  20. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies. PMID:25241964

  1. Human platelet 5HT receptors: characterisation and functional association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal human blood platelets in plasma were incubated at 20C with tritiated 5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5HT), and the specific receptor binding was displaced by the addition of unlabelled 5HT. The kinetic parameters of this binding were established and a two-site model for the platelet 5HT receptor demonstrated. Site A has a Ksub(D) of 0.5-1 nM and capacity of 6-10 fmol/108 platelets, and site B a Ksub(D) of 15-36 nM and a capacity of 100-150 fmol/108 platelets. Non-specific or non-receptor binding of [3H]5HT to platelets at 20C was resolved into a passive linear component and an active saturable component sensitive to metabolic inhibition. Binding to the lower affinity 5HT receptor site was inhibited by drugs of the tricylic antidepressant type with IC50 values similar to those against the active uptake component of non-specific binding as described. Isomers of the neuroleptic drug flupenthixol showed a differential and competitive antagonism of high affinity [3H]5HT binding. The 5HT antagonist methysergide, and pizotifen and mianserin also were competitive inhibitors at this site. The rank order of potency of these drugs correlated with their action as inhibitors of 5HT induced platelet aggregation. It is concluded that binding of [3H]5HT to intact human platelets satisfies all the criteria for specific binding and that the two sites demonstrated, of high and lower affinity, are concerned with the functions of 5HT induced aggregation and 5HT uptake respectively. (Auth.)

  2. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM)-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM. Ten distinct proteins with molecular weights of 245, 225K, 175K, 150K, 90K, 82K(2), 60K and 41K(2) bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by both trifluoperazine and nonradiolabeled CaM. The 225K and 90K proteins were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase (MLCK); the 60K and one of the 82K proteins were identified as the CaM-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon. The remaining proteins have not yet been identified. Most of the CaM-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin or N-ethyl-maleimide which suggests that it was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, ADP, collagen and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores A23187 and ionomycin under conditions which promote platelet aggregation (i.e. stirring with extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/) also resulted in limited proteolysis of CaM-binding proteins including those labeled with anti-MLCK and the phosphatase. Many Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes have been shown to be irreversibly activated in vitro by limited proteolysis. Their data indicates that limited proteolysis also occurs in vivo; under certain conditions proteolysis may be an important physiological mechanism for irreversibly activating Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes.

  3. The effects of osmotic stress on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, W J; Parmar, N; Hunt, C J

    1985-05-01

    The effect of osmotic stress on human platelets was investigated at 0, 25, and 37 degrees C. The osmolality of the suspending plasma was decreased by adding water or increased by adding sodium chloride or sucrose. After 5 min, isotonicity was restored by dilution with an excess of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. After centrifugation, the platelets were resuspended in autologous plasma and then incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C before assaying the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the hypotonic stress response. Anisosmotic conditions had a greater effect on the extent of volume reversal in the hypotonic stress test than on 5-HT uptake. At 25 degrees C, only moderate degrees of hypotonicity (0.25 osmol/kg) or hypertonicity (0.59 osmol/kg) were sufficient to depress the hypotonic stress response. In general, platelets tolerated departures from isotonic conditions better at 0 degree C than at the higher temperatures. Furthermore, at 0 and 25 degrees C approximately equiosmolal concentrations of sucrose and sodium chloride depressed the hypotonic stress response to similar extents, but at 37 degrees C high osmolalities (greater than 2 osmol/kg) were tolerated better when the additive was sucrose than when it was sodium chloride. Platelets shrank when subjected to hyperosmotic conditions, but their discoid shape and the peripheral band of microtubules were maintained. PMID:3980588

  4. Human platelet antigen gene frequencies in the Austrian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holensteiner, A; Walchshofer, S; Adler, A; Kittl, E M; Mayr, W R; Panzer, S

    1995-01-01

    Gene frequencies for the human platelet antigen systems HPA-1, -2, -3, and -5 were determined directly from DNA isolated from cord blood of more than 900 randomly selected Caucasoid newborns in Vienna, Austria. Genotyping was performed by specific amplification of the respective regions coding for platelet glycoproteins GP Ib, IIb, IIIa, and Ia by PCR. These PCR products were analyzed after restriction enzyme digestion and electrophoresis. The observed gene frequencies were: HPA-1a: 0.852, HPA-1b: 0.148; HPA-2a: 0.918, HPA-2b: 0.082; HPA-3a: 0.612, HPA-3b: 0.388; HPA-5a: 0.892, HPA-5b: 0.108. There was a good fit with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Results from serological determinations and genotyping showed no discrepancies. PMID:7607581

  5. Mechanisms of andrographolide-induced platelet apoptosis in human platelets: regulatory roles of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Li-Ming; Su, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chung, Chi-Li; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2013-11-01

    Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, is isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our recent studies revealed that andrographolide possesses potent antiplatelet activity by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/(●) HO-NF-κB-ERK2 cascade. Although platelets are anucleated cells, apoptotic machinery apparatus recently has been found to regulate platelet activation and limit platelet lifespan. Therefore, we further investigated the regulatory effects of andrographolide on platelet apoptotic events. In this study, apoptotic signaling events for caspase-3, -8, and Bid were time (10-60 min)- and dose (25-100 μΜ)-dependently activated by andrographolide in human platelets. Andrographolide could also disrupt mitrochondrial membrane potential. In addition, caspase-8 inhibitor (z-IETD-fmk, 50 μΜ) was found to reverse andrographolide-induced caspase-8 activation, whereas the antagonistic anti-Fas receptor (ZB4, 500 ng/mL) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-R1 (H398, 10 µg/mL) monoclonal antibodies did not. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that andrographolide might limit platelet lifespan by initiating the caspase-8-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway, in spite of no direct evidence that death receptors are involved in this process proved. Overall, the various medicinal properties of andrographolide suggest its potential value in treating patients with thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23292890

  6. Is cold labelling of human platelets with rubidium feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 111In labeling of human platelets is the methodology of choice for monitoring kinetics and abnormal deposition. permit easy visualisation by the gamma camera. Avoiding use of radionuclides may allow application in children and pregnant at the expense of imaging possibility. We therefore were studying the use of stable rubidium (Rb) for labeling having the advantage that the in vitro methodology can be controlled by the addition of 86Rb. Human platelets derived from healthy volunteers as well as patients suffering from clinically manifested atherosclerosis and / or hyperlipidaemia were examined after anticoagulation with acid citrate dextrose. Platelets (>1.109) were isolated using a protocol defined by us earlier using Monovette vials for easy and safe handling under closed conditions. After isolation platelets were incubated in a volume of 1 ml freshly prepared Tyrode buffer (pH 6,2) with 5 mg rubidium at various temperatures (40C, 220C, 370C) using a variety of different incubation times (10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes, respectively) and differing cellular density (1.106 - 1.109 /ml. Labeling efficiency was assessed by means of radioactive counting as well as by coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICPSFMS). Labeling efficiencies ranged at about 10 % and in contrast to 111In-oxine was not temperature-dependent. Considering the detection limit of ICP-SFMS and labeling efficiency 0,5 - 1 mg Rb are finally injected into the patient allowing in-vivo monitoring of kinetics. These findings indicate that ICP-SFMS monitoring Rb labeled blood cells is feasible and may even replace radiolabeling in those patients where subsequent gamma-camera imaging is not required. (author)

  7. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 signaling inhibits the activation of human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cicmil, Milenko; Stevens, Jo; Leduc, Mireille; Bon, Cassian; Gibbins, Jonathan M.

    2002-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is a 130-kd transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the growing family of receptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). PECAM-1 is expressed on platelets, certain T cells, monocytes, neutrophils, and vascular endothelial cells and is involved in a range of cellular processes, though the role of PECAM-1 in platelets is unclear. Cross-linking of PECAM-1 results in phosphorylation of the ITIM allowing the r...

  8. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults. PMID:26743063

  9. Niacin and biosynthesis of PGD₂ by platelet COX-1 in mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Wen-Liang; Stubbe, Jane; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Alamuddin, Naji; Ibrahim, Salam; Crichton, Irene; Prempeh, Maxwell; Lawson, John A; Wilensky, Robert L; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A

    2012-01-01

    thromboxane (Tx) formation. However, in platelet-rich plasma, where formation of both Tx and PGD₂ was increased, spreading was not as pronounced and was inhibited by DP1 activation. Thus, PGD₂, like PGI₂, may function as a homeostatic response to thrombogenic and hypertensive stimuli and may have particular...... during platelet activation in humans and, although vascular expression of DP1 is conserved between humans and mice, platelet DP1 is not present in mice. Despite this, DP1 deletion in mice augmented aneurysm formation and the hypertensive response to Ang II and accelerated atherogenesis and thrombogenesis....... Furthermore, COX inhibitors in humans, as well as platelet depletion, COX-1 knockdown, and COX-2 deletion in mice, revealed that niacin evoked platelet COX-1-derived PGD₂ biosynthesis. Finally, ADP-induced spreading on fibrinogen was augmented by niacin in washed human platelets, coincident with increased...

  10. Inhibitory Effects of Yuzu and Its Components on Human Platelet Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hye-Min; Park, Se Won; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that yuzu has an anti-platelet effect in rat blood. In the present study, we examined whether the anti-platelet effect of yuzu can be extended to human blood by investigating its ability to inhibit aggregations induced by various agonists in human platelet rich plasma (PRP). This study also investigated the underlying mechanism of yuzu focusing on ADP granule secretion, TXB2 formations, and PLCγ/Akt signaling. The results from this study showed that ethanolic y...

  11. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity

    OpenAIRE

    E Torreggiani; F Perut; Roncuzzi, L; N Zini; SR Baglìo; N Baldini

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one...

  12. Human platelet as an independent unit for sulfate conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human platelets possess a full complement of enzymes capable of synthesizing N-acetyldopamine (NADA) 35sulfate from ATP, Mg++ and sodium 35sulfate. The pH optimum for this three-step overall sulfate conjugation (comprising of the ATP sulfurylase, APS kinase and phenolsulfotransferase reactions) is 8.6 and the reactions proceeded progressively for several hours. Both ATP and Mg++ ions, above their respective optimal concentrations of 5 and 7 mM, inhibited the sulfate conjugation of NADA. The apparent Km values for NADA as determined by the phenolsulfotransferase (PST) and overall reactions were similar in magnitude being 2.6 and 4.8 μM, respectively, while that for sodium 35sulfate was 202 μM. A comparison of these two activities in 62 platelet preparations of normal subjects showed that the rate of the PST reaction was generally higher than the overall reaction even though the PST assay was carried out at suboptimal concentration of PAPS. There was a positive correlation (r=0.82) between the two sets of data, suggesting that the PST reaction probably has some control over the rate of overall sulfate conjugation

  13. Amorphous silica nanoparticles aggregate human platelets: potential implications for vascular homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbalan JJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available J Jose Corbalan1,2, Carlos Medina1, Adam Jacoby2, Tadeusz Malinski2, Marek W Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USABackground: Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNP can be used in medical technologies and other industries leading to human exposure. However, an increased number of studies indicate that this exposure may result in cardiovascular inflammation and damage. A high ratio of nitric oxide to peroxynitrite concentrations ([NO]/[ONOO-] is crucial for cardiovascular homeostasis and platelet hemostasis. Therefore, we studied the influence of SiNP on the platelet [NO]/[ONOO-] balance and platelet aggregation.Methods: Nanoparticle–platelet interaction was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical nanosensors were used to measure the levels of NO and ONOO- released by platelets upon nanoparticle stimulation. Platelet aggregation was studied using light aggregometry, flow cytometry, and phase contrast microscopy.Results: Amorphous SiNP induced NO release from platelets followed by a massive stimulation of ONOO- leading to an unfavorably low [NO]/[ONOO-] ratio. In addition, SiNP induced an upregulation of selectin P expression and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa activation on the platelet surface membrane, and led to platelet aggregation via adenosine diphosphate and matrix metalloproteinase 2-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, all the effects on platelet aggregation were inversely proportional to nanoparticle size.Conclusions: The exposure of platelets to amorphous SiNP induces a critically low [NO]/[ONOO-] ratio leading to platelet aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the pharmacological profile of SiNP in platelets.Keywords: amorphous silica nanoparticles, nanotoxicology, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, platelet aggregation

  14. The effect of ticlopidine administration to humans on the binding of adenosine diphosphate to blood platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Lips, J.P.M.; Sixma, J.J.; Schiphorst, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Administration of Ticlopidine to human volunteers resulted in a prolonged bleeding time and decreased or absent aggregation of platelets with collagen and epinephrine. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregation was initiated by a normal shape change, but the rate of the first wave of aggregation had decreased. The second wave of aggregation was absent. ADP-binding to platelets of volunteers, consisted of two classes of binding sites:one with high affinity and one with low affini...

  15. Indium-111-labeled platelets: Applications in human platelet imaging and survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical indications for the use of platelets labeled with indium-111 are not well established at this time, and the procedure should be considered an investigational tool. The procedure is used to study platelet kinetics, platelet distribution, and organ uptake. Although the /sup 51/Cr technique is still the reference procedure, the indium label has advantages that make it a more useful tool for clinical studies. Like the /sup 51/Cr method, /sup 111/In-oxine is a random label, that is, a mixed population (with respect to age) of circulating platelets is labeled in vitro and reinjected. Other random labels such as /sup 14/C-serotonin and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) labeled with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H have been used in research applications but are not well suited as clinical test procedures. Efforts to use cohort labeling with /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S, and /sup 75/Se-methionine have not resulted in a generally accepted procedure

  16. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: identification and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1987-05-19

    Calmodulin-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets by using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-calmodulin. Ten distinct proteins of 245, 225, 175, 150, 90, 82 (2), 60, and 41 (2) kilodaltons (kDa) bound /sup 125/I-calmodulin in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by ethylene glycol bis(..beta..-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), trifluoperazine, and nonradiolabeled calmodulin. Proteins of 225 and 90 kDa were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase; 60- and 82-kDa proteins were labeled by antisera against the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon, respectively. The remaining calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified. Calmodulin-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin, or N-ethylmaleimide which suggests that the degradation was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and collagen under conditions which promote platelet aggregation also resulted in limited proteolysis of calmodulin-binding proteins including those labeled with antisera against myosin light chain kinase and the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Activation by the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophores A23187 and ionomycin also promoted degradation of the calmodulin-binding proteins in the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The data indicate that limited proteolysis of Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes also occurs in the intact platelet and suggest that the proteolysis is triggered by an influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ associated with platelet aggregation.

  17. Comparative study of eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism by human platelets in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During long-term dietary n-3 fatty acid supplementation, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is not incorporated into phosphatidylinositol or -serine of human platelets in vivo and is not detectable in phosphatidic acid upon stimulation with thrombin. However, EPA is released from platelet phospholipids and metabolized to thromboxane B3 (TXB3). In contrast, in vitro, platelets incorporate [14C]EPA into phosphatidylinositol, whether they contain endogenous EPA in their cellular lipids or not. Following platelet stimulation, [14C]EPA appears in phosphatidic acid, as free fatty acid, and is transformed to TXB3. The authors conclude that the fatty acid compositions of platelet phospholipid subclasses are regulated with a high degree of specificity in vivo. Qualitative differences exist between in vivo and in vitro uptake of EPA into platelet phospholipid subclasses. After in vivo incorporation, EPA is released by action of a phospholipase A2

  18. Prolactin does not affect human platelet aggregation or secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Reuwer, A.Q.; Nieuwland, R.; Fernandez, I; Goffin, V.; Tiel, van, F.H.; Schaap, M.C.L.; Berckmans, R.J.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Twickler, M.T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets play an important role in the development of plaque formation and in the events after rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque, leading to atherothrombosis. Multiple hormones, either in excess or when deficient, are involved in the development of atherothrombotic disease, but, to which extent such hormones affect platelet function, is still controversial. It was the objective of this study to assess the ability of the pituitary hormone prolactin to affect platelet functions. Venous blo...

  19. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the α2-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl2, or the α2-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding

  20. Purification of human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF;1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is synthesized by a variety of cells. It induces hypotension, and activates platelets, neutrophils, and macrophages at nanomolar concentrations. Removal of the acetate abolishes biological activity, and is catalyzed by a specific PAF acetylhydrolase present in plasma and tissues. The authors developed a rapid assay, based on separation of [3H]acetate from [3H-acetyl]PAF by reversed-phase chromatography. In human plasma the enzyme exhibits an apparent Km of 5.7μM, with a Vmax of 0.027μmol/h/mg. Ultracentrifugation in density gradients showed that 30% of the activity is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) and 70% with low density lipoproteins (LDL). The enzyme was purified from LDL by precipitation with Na phosphotungstate and MgCl2, solubilization with Tween 20, column chromatography and electrophoresis. This procedure resulted in a preparation that was 21,000-fold purified from plasma (spec. act. 575μmol/h/mg) with a recovery of 10%. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of about 43,000, a broad pH optimum (peak 7.5-8.0), and a pl of 4.6. It has greater activity when PAF is in a micellar, as compared to monomeric, and exhibits surface dilution kinetics, which may be important in vivo. The purification and characterization of this enzyme will allow detailed studies of its role in PAF metabolism

  1. Human platelets express CAR with localization at the sites of intercellular interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Maha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenovirus has a wide tissue tropism. The virus attaches to the surface of cells via the fiber protein knob binding to the Coxsackie and Adenovirus receptor known as CAR. Virus entry inside cells is facilitated by integrins αVβ3 and αVβ5. Mice platelets are shown to be the predominant Ad binding blood cell type and the virus is documented inside platelets. CAR was identified on human platelets in one study yet contradicted in another. The presence of CAR appears to be the most reasonable initial step for virus entry into platelets and is a key to the understanding of platelet adenovirus interaction. This study aimed to re investigate the presence of CAR on human platelets. Platelets were tested by indirect immune-fluorescence using rabbit H-300 polyclonal anti-CAR antibody and goat anti-rabbit IgG F(ab'2 Texas Red antibodies, alongside with CAR positive and negative controls. Platelets were found to express CAR on their surface and in contrast to the previous study only 3.5 ± 1.9% of the tested platelets did express CAR. In addition, CAR was seen within intracellular aggregates localized at the sites of cell-cell contacts indicating that CAR expression might be upregulated in response to platelet stimulation. We confirm the presence of CAR on human platelets, we provide explanation to some of the discrepancies in this regards and we add that this receptor is localized at the sites of intercellular interaction.

  2. Platelet extracts induce growth, migration and invasion in human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombocytopenia has been reported to be associated with small size HCCs, and thrombocytosis to be associated with large size HCCs. The aim was to examine the effects of platelets in relation to HCC cell growth. The effects of time-expired pooled normal human platelets were examined on human HCC cell line growth and invasion. Blood platelet numbers increased with increasing HCC tumor size and portal vein invasion. Platelet extracts enhanced cell growth in 4 human HCC cell lines, as well as cell migration, medium AFP levels and decreased apoptosis. Cell invasion was significantly enhanced, using a Matrigel-coated trans-well membrane and3D (Real-Time Imaging) invasion assay. Western blots showed that platelets caused enhanced phospho-ERK and phospho–JNK signaling and anti-apoptotic effect with increase of Bcl-xL (anti-apoptotic marker) and decrease of Bid (pro-apoptotic marker) levels. Their growth effects were blocked by a JNK inhibitor. Platelets stimulated growth and invasion of several HCC cell lines in vitro, suggesting that platelets or platelet growth factors could be a potential pharmacological target

  3. Comparison of common platelet receptors between the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) and human for use in pre-clinical human-targeted anti-platelet studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, Walter J

    2016-06-01

    Anti-platelet agents play a central part in the treatment and prevention of acute thrombotic events. Discriminating animal models are needed for the development of novel agents. The chacma baboon has been extensively used as a model to evaluate anti-platelet agents. However, limited data exist to prove the translatability of this species to humans. We aimed to determine the suitability of the chacma baboon in preclinical human targeted GPIIb/IIIa, GPIbα and P2Y12 studies. Light-transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA), whole blood impedance aggregometry, receptor number quantification and genomic DNA sequencing were performed. Baboon ADP and arachidonic acid-induced LTA aggregation results differed significantly from human values, even at increased concentrations. LTA ristocetin-induced agglutination was comparable between species, but baboon platelets needed twice the concentration of ristocetin to elicit a similar response. Citrated baboon blood had significantly less aggregation than humans when evaluated with impedance aggregometry. However, hirudinised baboon whole blood gave similar aggregation as humans at the same agonist concentrations. GPIIb, GPIIIa and GPIbα numbers were significantly more on the baboon platelets. None of the amino acids deemed vital for receptor function, ligand binding or receptor inhibition, were radically different between the species. However, a conservative change in a calcium-binding region of GPIIb may render the baboon platelets more sensitive to calcium-binding agents. The chacma baboon may be used for the evaluation of human-targeted GPIIb/IIIa-, GPIbα- and P2Y12-inhibiting agents. However, the best anticoagulant, optimal agonist concentrations, increase in receptor number and sequence differences must be considered for any future studies. PMID:26559117

  4. Analysis of angiotensin II binding to human platelets: Differences in young and old subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the binding of radiolabeled angiotensin II (AII) to human platelets to characterize the apparent increase in AII receptors observed in older subjects. At 22 degrees C, the amount of radioactivity associated with platelets from older subjects increased continuously for more than 2 hours. The same amount of radioactivity was displaced by addition of unlabeled AII at 30 min and 60 min. In the presence of phenylarsine oxide, in the cold, or when labeled antagonist was the ligand, binding came to equilibrium by 30 min. High pressure liquid chromatography demonstrated that 125I-AII was the major radioactive compound in the supernatant and platelets after incubation, but the platelets also contained radiolabeled AII fragments. Thus, some degradation accompanied interaction of AII and platelets. Phenylarsine oxide did not prevent degradation of bound AII, suggesting that degradation precedes internalization. On average, maximum binding was greater in older subjects whether platelets were incubated with 125I-AII alone, with 125I-AII and phenylarsine oxide to prevent internalization, or when the competitive inhibitor 125I-sar1,ile8-AII was the radioligand. Variability of binding among subjects also increased with age. Thus, platelets bind, degrade, and internalize AII, and the three processes occur to a greater extent in platelets from some, but not all older subjects

  5. Secretory products from thrombin-stimulated human platelets exert an inhibitory effect on NK-cytotoxic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Madsen, P; Hokland, P; Hokland, M

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between human platelets and the NK-system, with special emphasis on the action of secretory products from platelets in an NK assay with 51Cr-labelled K562 as target cells. Supernatants from thrombin-stimulated platelets added to the NK assay consistently decre...

  6. Minoxidil sulphation in human liver and platelets. A study of interindividual variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, G M; Bigotti, R; Marchi, G; Giuliani, L

    1993-01-01

    Minoxidil requires to be sulphated to exert its hypotensive effect. We report on interindividual variability in the rate of minoxidil sulphation in 118 specimens of human liver and in platelets obtained from 100 healthy subjects and 100 newborns. The frequency distribution histogram of the hepatic activity of minoxidil sulphotransferase was positively skewed; the mean was 631 pmol.min-1 x mg-1. After logarithmic transformation of the enzyme activity, the frequency distribution histogram became symmetrical and did not significantly deviate from normality. The rate of minoxidil sulphation was not different in platelets from adults (0.74 pmol.min-1 x mg-1) and newborns (1.16 pmol.min-1 x mg-1). The frequency distribution histograms were positively skewed and the results of normal equivalent deviation analysis was compatible with the presence of at least two subgroups of sulphotransferase in liver and platelets. Thus, two phenotypes of sulphotransferase exist in human liver and platelets, and the "extensive sulphator" phenotype contributes to skewing the frequency distribution. In platelets, the percentage of subjects that fall in the two subgroups is different at birth and in adulthood. This can explain the different shape of the frequency distribution in newborn and adult platelets and suggests that platelet minoxidil sulphotransferase undergoes modification after birth. PMID:8299666

  7. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM, potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1 platelet function and (2 platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01. These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM. The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the

  8. Continuous monitoring of human kidney transplants by autologous labelled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-oxine labelled autologous platelets were prepared and injected in 75 renal transplant patients, who were collected in 3 groups of 25 persons each. Group 1 consisted of cases examined during the first 4 weeks after transplantation, group 2 of patients suffering from histologically proven chronic rejection and group 3 of cases with good and stable grafts a long time after transplantation. The grafts were monitored by gamma camera imaging and the calculation of a platelet-uptake index (PUI), as well as by estimation of platelet t/2. For diagnosis of acute rejection the platelet scan was of great help, when PUI rose from 1.13+-0.11 to 1.74+-0.17. The further outcome of graft rejection, reversible or irreversible, documented itself in a decrease or a sustaining high level of PUI respectively. The PUI of patients with chronic rejection differed significantly from those of cases with long-term stable grafts. The platelet t/2 correlated well with PUI. The possible pitfalls of this method giving a false positive result are haematomas and theoretically the recurrence of haemolytic-uraemic syndrome after transplantation. All in all the authors regard this method as an important and conclusive item in the rather complex mosaic of rejection diagnosis. (Auth.)

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of the ion channelome of human platelets and megakaryocytic cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Joy R.; Amisten, Stefan; Alison H Goodall; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels have crucial roles in all cell types and represent important therapeutic targets. Approximately 20 ion channels have been reported in human platelets; however, no systematic study has been undertaken to define the platelet channelome. These membrane proteins need only be expressed at low copy number to influence function and may not be detected using proteomic or transcriptomic microar-ray approaches. In our recent work, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) provided key evidence tha...

  10. Isolation of a 5-kilodalton actin-sequestering peptide from human blood platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Safer, D; Golla, R; Nachmias, V T

    1990-01-01

    Resting human platelets contain approximately 0.3 mM unpolymerized actin. When freshly drawn and washed platelets are treated with saponin, 85-90% of the unpolymerized actin diffuses out. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions shows that the bulk of this unpolymerized actin migrates with a higher mobility than does pure G-actin, profilactin, or actin-gelsolin complex. When muscle G-actin is added to fresh or boiled saponin extract, the added muscle actin...

  11. Phorbol ester stimulates calcium sequestration in saponized human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When platelets are activated by agonists, calcium (Ca2+) is released from an intracellular storage site. Recent studies using fura-2 show that, after thrombin stimulation, the rise in free calcium is transient and returns to base-line levels in 2-3 min, while the transient following ADP stimulation lasts only 15-20 s. We reported previously that the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), added at nanomolar levels after thrombin, immediately accelerated the rate of return of calcium to the base line severalfold. In the present study, we used both intact and saponized platelets to determine whether this is due to stimulation of calcium sequestration. Using fura-2 and intact platelets, we found 1) that PMA stimulated the restoration of free Ca2+ levels after ADP as well as after thrombin, and 2) that H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme), slowed the return of Ca2+ to baseline levels. Using saponized platelets, we also found 3) that pretreatment of platelets with PMA before saponin treatment increased the ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, with a half-maximal effect at 5 nm; 4) that most of the Ca2+ released by ionomycin or by myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; and 5) that a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), decreased basal or PMA-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake in saponin-treated platelets. Our data suggest that activation of protein kinase C stimulates the sequestration of Ca2+ independently of cAMP or myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

  12. Phorbol ester stimulates calcium sequestration in saponized human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K.; Nachmias, V.T.

    1987-11-25

    When platelets are activated by agonists, calcium (Ca2+) is released from an intracellular storage site. Recent studies using fura-2 show that, after thrombin stimulation, the rise in free calcium is transient and returns to base-line levels in 2-3 min, while the transient following ADP stimulation lasts only 15-20 s. We reported previously that the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), added at nanomolar levels after thrombin, immediately accelerated the rate of return of calcium to the base line severalfold. In the present study, we used both intact and saponized platelets to determine whether this is due to stimulation of calcium sequestration. Using fura-2 and intact platelets, we found 1) that PMA stimulated the restoration of free Ca2+ levels after ADP as well as after thrombin, and 2) that H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme), slowed the return of Ca2+ to baseline levels. Using saponized platelets, we also found 3) that pretreatment of platelets with PMA before saponin treatment increased the ATP-dependent /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, with a half-maximal effect at 5 nm; 4) that most of the Ca2+ released by ionomycin or by myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; and 5) that a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), decreased basal or PMA-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake in saponin-treated platelets. Our data suggest that activation of protein kinase C stimulates the sequestration of Ca2+ independently of cAMP or myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

  13. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and [3H]PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of [3H]PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation)

  14. Receptor-mediated effects of a PGH2 analogue (U 46619) on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific effects of U 46619 (9,11-dideoxy,9α-11α-methanoepoxy-prostaglandin F2α), thromboxane A2-prostaglandin H2 (TxA2/PGH2) analogue, on human platelet shape change, myosin light-chain phosphorylation, serotonin release, fibrinogen receptor exposure, and platelet aggregation were measured and compared with binding of [3H]U 46619 to platelets. Shape change and myosin light-chain phosphorylation were found to be saturable and dose dependent. These two effects were competitively inhibited by specific antagonists of TxA2/PGH2 receptors indicating that they are receptor mediated. Binding of [3H]U 46619 showed two components. The authors proposed that a second component represents a second, low-affinity site. Mean EC50 values for U 46619-induced serotonin release platelet aggregation, and fibrinogen receptor exposure were 0.54 ± 0.13, 1.31 ± 0.34, and 0.53 ± 0.21 μM, respectively. Therefore, the platelet release reaction was not directly correlated with occupancy of high-affinity receptors but could be related to the second binding component of U 46619. Fibrinogen receptor exposure and platelet aggregation caused by U 46619 appeared to be events mediated by the release of adenosine diphosphate from platelet-dense granules

  15. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea M Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli--two bacterial infections and a Western diet--on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants.Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR.At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS.Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity.

  16. Studies on energy metabolism in human platelets. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of 14C-adenine into the metabolic pool of platelet adenine nucleotides is linear over a range of hours and at a rate of 5 nmol/min . 1011 cells. The radioactive equilibrium is reached after 60 minutes incubation. The adenine nucleotides and their catabolites products were separated by a one-dimensional TLC technique. (author)

  17. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C

  18. Identification of D1-like dopamine receptors on human blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine is able to inhibit the epinephrine-induced aggregation of human blood platelets, but the mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study the authors report that membranes from human blood platelets possess high affinity, saturable and stereoselective binding sites for the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist (3H)SCH 23390. (3H)SCH 23390 appeared to label a single class of binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 18.6 +- 1.6 fmolmg protein and a K/sub D/ of 0.8 nM. The potencies of different dopaminergic antagonists and agonists in displacing (3H)SCH 23390 from blood platelet membranes were similar to those obtained for striatal membranes. Unlike the classically defined D1 receptors, e.g. those in striatum, the D1 receptor sites on platelets appeared no to be coupled to the adenylate cyclase system, hence the term D1-like. The D1 agonist SKF 38393 was more potent than dopamine in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, and the effects of dopamine and SKF 38393 were prevented by SCH 23390. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of dopamine on the epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through these D1-like receptors

  19. Quantifying Agonist Activity at G Protein-coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors.

  20. Brazilin isolated from Caesalpinia sappan L. acts as a novel collagen receptor agonist in human platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brazilin, isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to possess multiple pharmacological properties. Methods In this study, platelet aggregation, flow cytometry, immunoblotting analysis, and electron spin resonance (ESR spectrometry were used to investigate the effects of brazilin on platelet activation ex vivo. Moreover, fluorescein sodium-induced platelet thrombi of mesenteric microvessels was also used in in vivo study. Results We demonstrated that relatively low concentrations of brazilin (1 to 10 μM potentiated platelet aggregation induced by collagen (0.1 μg/ml in washed human platelets. Higher concentrations of brazilin (20 to 50 μM directly triggered platelet aggregation. Brazilin-mediated platelet aggregation was slightly inhibited by ATP (an antagonist of ADP. It was not inhibited by yohimbine (an antagonist of epinephrine, by SCH79797 (an antagonist of thrombin protease-activated receptor [PAR] 1, or by tcY-NH2 (an antagonist of PAR 4. Brazilin did not significantly affect FITC-triflavin binding to the integrin αIIbβ3 in platelet suspensions. Pretreatment of the platelets with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (an antagonist of collagen receptors or JAQ1 and Sam.G4 monoclonal antibodies raised against collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and integrin α2β1, respectively, abolished platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen or brazilin. The immunoblotting analysis showed that brazilin stimulated the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLCγ2 and Lyn, which were significantly attenuated in the presence of JAQ1 and Sam.G4. In addition, brazilin did not significantly trigger hydroxyl radical formation in ESR analysis. An in vivo mouse study showed that brazilin treatment (2 and 4 mg/kg significantly shortened the occlusion time for platelet plug formation in mesenteric venules. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that brazilin acts a novel collagen

  1. Prostaglandin I2 during radiolabelling improves recovery, but does not change platelet half-life and platelet uptake over active human lesion sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzinger, H.; Fitscha, P.; Kaliman, J.

    1987-06-01

    The fact that prostacyclin is able to preserve platelets in-vitro stimulated the question whether platelets being treated in presence of prostacyclin might behave different after reinjection in human. We therefore studied the effect of synthetic PG12 in-vitro, being added immediately after blood sampling. It is demonstrated that the presence of prostacyclin does not change the labelling efficiency and in-vitro viability beside the alterations induced by this compound itself, however, it results in a significantly improved recovery. Furthermore, the platelet half-life in the patients as well as the deposition of the radiolabelled platelets on active human atherosclerotic lesions does not seem to be affected. Thus, the addition of PGI2-improves cellular viability during the preparation without negatively interfering with the in-vitro and in-vivo results later on. Thus, the use of PGI2 can be strongly recommended.

  2. Culture of human cell lines by a pathogen-inactivated human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Mariotti, A; Fioravanti, D; Procoli, A; Cicchetti, E; Scambia, G; Bonanno, G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-01

    Alternatives to the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) have been investigated to ensure xeno-free growth condition. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of human platelet lysate (PL) as a substitute of FBS for the in vitro culture of some human cell lines. PL was obtained by pools of pathogen inactivated human donor platelet (PLT) concentrates. Human leukemia cell lines (KG-1, K562, JURKAT, HL-60) and epithelial tumor cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7) were cultured with either FBS or PL. Changes in cell proliferation, viability, morphology, surface markers and cell cycle were evaluated for each cell line. Functional characteristics were analysed by drug sensitivity test and cytotoxicity assay. Our results demonstrated that PL can support growth and expansion of all cell lines, although the cells cultured in presence of PL experienced a less massive proliferation compared to those grown with FBS. We found a comparable percentage of viable specific marker-expressing cells in both conditions, confirming lineage fidelity in all cultures. Functionality assays showed that cells in both FBS- and PL-supported cultures maintained their normal responsiveness to adriamycin and NK cell-mediated lysis. Our findings indicate that PL is a feasible serum substitute for supporting growth and propagation of haematopoietic and epithelial cell lines with many advantages from a perspective of process standardization, ethicality and product safety. PMID:25944665

  3. Estimation of anti-platelet drugs on human platelet aggregation with a novel whole blood aggregometer by a screen filtration pressure method

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, Toshiki; Ito, Hideki; Ozeki, Yasushi; Kimura, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    The effects of anti-platelet drugs on human whole blood aggregation were evaluated using a novel whole blood aggregometer by a screen filtration pressure (SFP) method.The SFP whole blood aggregometer was found to successfully detect whole blood aggregation induced by ADP, collagen and TRAP by measuring the SFP of blood samples. The platelet aggregation threshold index (PATI), the concentration of agonist required with an inducing pressure rate of 50%, varied time-dependently after collection ...

  4. Unstimulated platelets evoke calcium responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van IJzendoorn, S C; van Gool, R G; Reutelingsperger, C P; Heemskerk, J W

    1996-01-01

    Interactions between human platelets and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were studied by monitoring changes in cytosolic [Ca2+]i in both cell types. Confluent monolayers of Fura-2-loaded HUVEC, grown on gelatin-coated coverslips, responded to repeated addition of a suspension of unsti

  5. Measurement of kinetic parameters of human platelet DNA polymerase gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taanman, Jan-Willem; Heiske, Margit; Letellier, Thierry

    2010-08-01

    Synthesis of mitochondrial DNA is performed by DNA polymerase gamma. Mutations in POLG, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase gamma, are a major cause of neurological disease. A large proportion of patients carry rare nucleotide substitutions leading to single amino acid changes. Confirming that these replacements are pathogenic can be problematic without biochemical evidence. Here, we provide a hands-on protocol for an in vitro kinetic assay of DNA polymerase gamma which allows assessment of the K(m) and V(max) for the incoming nucleotide of the polymerization reaction. To avoid measurement of contaminating nuclear DNA polymerases, platelet extracts are used since platelets do not contain a nucleus. Moreover, platelets have the advantage of being obtainable relatively non-invasively. Polymerization activity is determined by measurement of the incorporation of radioactive thymidine 5'-triphosphate (dTTP) on the homopolymeric RNA substrate poly(rA).oligo(dT)(12-18). To further minimize nuclear DNA polymerase activity, aphidicolin, an inhibitor of most nuclear DNA polymerases, is included in the reaction. In addition, reactions are carried out in the absence and presence of the competitive inhibitor of DNA polymerase gamma, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (ddTTP), to allow calculation of the ddTTP-sensitive incorporation. With this method, platelets from healthy control subjects extracted with 3% Triton X-100 showed a K(m) for dTTP of 1.42 microM and a V(max) of 0.83 pmol min(-1)mg(-1). PMID:20227504

  6. Radiolabeling of human platelets using four radiopharmaceuticals with Tc-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation work has been done in an evaluation of four different radiopharmaceuticals with Tin II (Glucoheptonate, Pyrophosphate, Citrate and DTPA), with the purpose of determining which one of the four would be obtained a higher rate of radiolabeling of platelets with Tc-99m. In order to evaluate the four radiopharmaceuticals it was procede to the separation and labeling of the human platelets. It was worked with samples of blood from five pacients, and the platelets from each one of them were labeled with the radiopharmaceuticals-Tc-99m. Then was observed a significant difference among the four radiopharmaceuticals studied, with a reliable level of 0.05 being the Glucoheptonate-Tc-99m the best to label platelets, obtaining with the same 50.23% of labeling efficiency, while for DTPA, Pyrophosphate and Citrate, It was obtained 33.42%, 29.82% and |2.62% respectively. Also, it was studied the biodistribution of the labeled platelets, using Glucoheptonate-Tc-99m as a radiopharamceutical. The biodistribution was studied in white mice at different times and it was founded that the place of biodistribution of the labeled platelets is given in greater percentage in the liver, spleen, lungs and kydneis. (Author)

  7. Drug/drug interaction of common NSAIDs with antiplatelet effect of aspirin in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Aaruni; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Saxena, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin at the level of the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme. In order to examine the interference of common NSAIDs with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin the human platelet rich plasma from voluntary donors was used for arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and determination of thromboxane synthesis. Further, docking studies were used to explain the molecular basis of the NSAID/aspirin interaction. The experimental results showed that celecoxib, dipyrone (active metabolite), ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, naproxen, nimesulide, oxaprozin, and piroxicam significantly interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin, while diclofenac, ketorolac and acetaminophen do not. Docking studies suggested that NSAIDs forming hydrogen bonds with Ser530, Arg120, Tyr385 and other amino acids of the COX-1 hydrophobic channel interfere with antiplatelet activity of aspirin while non interfering NSAIDs do not form relevant hydrogen bond interactions within the aspirin binding site. In conclusion, docking analysis of NSAID interactions at the COX-1 active site appears useful to predict their interference with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin. The results, demonstrate that some NSAIDs do not interfere with the antiplatelet action of aspirin while many others do and provide a basis for understanding the observed differences among individual non-aspirin NSAIDs. PMID:24075938

  8. Effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of oral take L-arginine on [Ca2+]i of human platelet, ten male volunteers were selected to take L-arginine for 4 days (20g/three times/a day, the 4th day took about 7g). They are neither smokers nor drinkers and no drugs were taken by them during 2 weeks before study. Tests were performed before and after taking L-arginine. Before and after taking L-arginine, platelet intracellular cGMP were 1.91 ± 0.20 vs 2.14 ± 0.34pmol/109 platelets, P 2+]i (A/B value: 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.32 ± 0.09) were inhibited. The results has showed that oral take L-arginine could inhibit platelet activation. This inhibition should be ascribed to such two points: (1) The amount of NO released by endothelial cells has increased. A basal release of NO has been found to regulate the blood vessel intensity and inhibit platelet adhesion. After taking L-arginine, the endothelial cells released more NO and the plasma NO3- level also increased. (2) The platelet has synthesized more NO. There is an L-arginine/NO pathway in platelet and platelet could synthesize NO from L-arginine to inhibit its activation. Taking L-arginine has enhanced the negative effect of this pathway by producing more NO. The study will be helpful to further study on the possibility of oral take L-arginine to avoid thrombotic and hemorrhagic diseases

  9. Temporal and pharmacological characterization of angiostatin release and generation by human platelets: implications for endothelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Radziwon-Balicka

    Full Text Available Platelets play an important role in thrombosis and in neo-vascularisation as they release and produce factors that both promote and suppress angiogenesis. Amongst these factors is the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin, which is released during thrombus formation. The impact of anti-thrombotic agents and the kinetics of platelet angiostatin release are unknown. Hence, our objectives were to characterize platelet angiostatin release temporally and pharmacologically and to determine how angiostatin release influences endothelial cell migration, an early stage of angiogenesis. We hypothesized anti-platelet agents would suppress angiostatin release but not generation by platelets. Human platelets were aggregated and temporal angiostatin release was compared to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Immuno-gold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy identified α-granules as storage organelles of platelet angiostatin. Acetylsalicylic acid, MRS2395, GPIIb/IIIa blocking peptide, and aprotinin were used to characterize platelet angiostatin release and generation. An endothelial cell migration assay was performed under hypoxic conditions to determine the effects of pharmacological platelet and angiostatin inhibition. Compared to VEGF, angiostatin generation and release from α-granules occurred later temporally during platelet aggregation. Consequently, collagen-activated platelet releasates stimulated endothelial cell migration more potently than maximally-aggregated platelets. Platelet inhibitors prostacyclin, S-nitroso-glutathione, acetylsalicylic acid, and GPIIb/IIIa blocking peptide, but not a P2Y12 inhibitor, suppressed angiostatin release but not generation. Suppression of angiostatin generation in the presence of acetylsalicylic acid enhanced platelet-stimulated endothelial migration. Hence, the temporal and pharmacological modulation of platelet angiostatin release may have significant consequences for neo

  10. Interindividual variability in the N-sulphation of desipramine in human liver and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiti, P; Giuliani, L; Pacifici, G M

    1992-01-01

    1. The activity of N-sulphotransferase (N-ST) with desipramine (DMI) as substrate was measured in 118 human liver specimens, in platelets obtained from 105 subjects, in 12 specimens of human ileum and colon mucosa and in five specimens of human kidney and lung. 2. N-ST activity ranged between 5.71 and 157 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein in human liver and between 0.27 and 17.3 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein in human platelets. 3. Probit analysis was compatible with a unimodal distribution of the data from both liver and platelets. 4. The frequency distribution histograms of N-ST were asymmetric, with a positive skew in data from both liver and platelets. The mode, median and mean of N-ST were 16.4, 30.2 and 40.4 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein in liver, and 2.12, 3.61 and 3.82 pmol min-1 mg-1 protein in platelets, respectively. After logarithmic transformation of N-ST activity, the frequency distribution histogram was symmetric for data from both liver and platelets. 5. In extrahepatic tissues, the average (+/- s.d.) N-ST activity (pmol min-1 mg-1 protein) was 22.2 +/- 22.8 (ileum), 20.9 +/- 26.9 (colon), 12.4 +/- 5.5 (renal cortex), 9.3 +/- 2.8 (renal medulla) and 4.2 +/- 1.1 (lung). N-ST is widely distributed in the body and the intestine is the extrahepatic tissue with the highest N-ST activity. PMID:1540485

  11. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Romero Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS. RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation.

  12. Fish Oil Supplementation in Humans: Effects on Platelet Responses, Phospholipid Composition and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeaff, Clark Murray

    Platelets are believed to play a significant role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Epidemiological reports have correlated the high intake of marine foods, rich in omega3 fatty acids, with diminished platelet responses and a low incidence of arterial thrombosis and myocardial infarction. The activation of platelet responses is mediated by the accelerated metabolism of membrane phospholipid; therefore, it was of interest to examine, in human volunteers, the effect of a dietary fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA), enriched in omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, on platelet aggregation and phospholipid composition/metabolism. For the complete separation of cellular phospholipids, a one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography system using silica-gel pre-coated glass plates was developed. The solvent system consisted of CHCl_3/CH_3OH/CH _3COOH/H_2O (50/37.5/3.5/2.0, by vol), required approximately 90-120 minutes for full phospholipid separation, and was highly reproducible even under conditions of variable humidity and temperature. The consumption of a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) for 6 weeks (3.6 g of 20:5omega 3 and 2.4 g of 22:6omega3 per day) diminished both the collagen- and platelet activating factor-induced maximum aggregation responses in washed human platelet suspensions by 50.1% and 27.2%, respectively, as compared to initial unsupplemented baseline responses. Thrombin -induced aggregation remained unchanged. Thrombin stimulation of intact human platelets produced a significant decrease in the mass of phosphatidylinositol in plasma membrane. In platelets pre-labelled with (2-^3H) glycerol and stimulated with either thrombin or low-dose collagen, the loss of (^3H) phosphatidylinositol did not differ between those subjects consuming olive oil or fish oil. Likewise, the thrombin-stimulated accumulation of diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, was unaffected by fish oil consumption. The ratio of collagen -induced increase in radioactivity

  13. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 ± 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% ± 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 ± 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  14. Regulation of cAMP Intracellular Levels in Human Platelets Stimulated by 2-Arachidonoylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorello, Maria Grazia; Leoncini, Giuliana

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated that in human platelets the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) decreased dose- and time-dependently cAMP intracellular levels. No effect on cAMP decrease induced by 2-AG was observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 as well in platelets pretreated with the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548 or with aspirin, inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway. An almost complete recovering of cAMP level was measured in platelets pretreated with the specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A, milrinone. In platelets pretreated with LY294002 or MK2206, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT pathway, and with U73122, inhibitor of phospholipase C pathway, only a partial prevention was shown. cAMP intracellular level depends on synthesis by adenylate cyclase and hydrolysis by PDEs. In 2-AG-stimulated platelets adenylate cyclase activity seems to be unchanged. In contrast PDEs appear to be involved. In particular PDE3A was specifically activated, as milrinone reversed cAMP reduction by 2-AG. 2-AG enhanced PDE3A activity through its phosphorylation. The PI3K/AKT pathway and PKC participate to this PDE3A phosphorylation/activation mechanism as it was greatly inhibited by platelet pretreatment with LY294002, MK2206, U73122, or the PKC specific inhibitor GF109203X. Taken together these data suggest that 2-AG potentiates its power of platelet agonist reducing cAMP intracellular level. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1240-1249, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26460717

  15. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmis, Lars [Institute for Clinical Hematology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Sudano, Isabella [Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Luescher, Thomas F. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Camici, Giovanni G., E-mail: giovannic@access.uzh.ch [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  16. Inhibitory effects of kiwifruit extract on human platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdarevic, Lili L; Biswas, Dipankar; Uddin, M D Main; Jørgenesen, Aud; Falch, Eva; Bastani, Nasser E; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2014-01-01

    Previous human studies suggest that supplementation with kiwifruits lowers several cardiovascular risk factors such as platelet hyperactivity, blood pressure and plasma lipids. The cardiovascular health benefit of fruit and vegetables is usually attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals therein; however, kiwifruit's cardioprotective factors are not well studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of kiwifruit extract on human blood platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. A sugar-free, heat-stable aqueous extract with molecular mass less than 1000 Da was prepared from kiwifruits. Typically, 100 g kiwifruits produced 66.3 ± 5.8 mg (1.2 ± 0.1 mg CE) of sugar-free kiwifruit extract (KFE). KFE inhibited both human platelet aggregation and plasma ACE activity in a dose-dependent manner. KFE inhibited platelet aggregation in response to ADP, collagen and arachidonic acid, and inhibitory action was mediated in part by reducing TxA2 synthesis. The IC50 for ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 1.6 ± 0.2 mg/ml (29.0 ± 3.0 μg CE/ml), whereas IC50 for serum ACE was 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/ml (11.0 ± 1.2 μg CE/ml). Consuming 500 mg of KFE (9.0 mg CE) in 10 g margarine inhibited ex vivo platelet aggregation by 12.7%, 2 h after consumption by healthy volunteers (n = 9). All these data indicate that kiwifruit contains very potent antiplatelet and anti-ACE components. Consuming kiwifruits might be beneficial as both preventive and therapeutic regime in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24219176

  17. A new method for high yield purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets. This method is a three-step procedure including gel filtration, weak cation exchange HPLC and reverse phase HPLC. All steps are carried out at low pH using exclusively volatile acidic buffer

  18. The interaction of dDAVP analogues with human platelet vasopressin receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barth, Tomislav; Pencheva, N.; Barthová, J.; Penev, M.; Hauzerová, Linda; Mladenova, A.

    Napoli : Edizioni Ziino, 2002 - (Benedetti, E.; Pedone, C.), s. 434-435 ISBN 88-900948-1-8. [Peptides 2002. European Peptide Symposium /27./. Sorrento (IT), 31.08.2002-06.09.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : dDAVP * AVP receptors * human platelets Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  19. Mitochondrial respiration in human viable platelets-Methodology and influence of gender, age and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Ehinger, Johannes K H; Marelsson, Sigurður E;

    2013-01-01

    human viable mitochondria when studying mitochondrial physiology and pathogenic mechanisms, as well as for the diagnostics of mitochondrial diseases. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed evaluation of platelet mitochondrial respiration using high-resolution respirometry. Further...

  20. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  1. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PMID:25994029

  2. Mechanisms of Ascorbyl Radical Formation in Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Kou-Gi Shyu; Chao-Chien Chang; Yu-Chieh Yeh; Joen-Rong Sheu; Duen-Suey Chou

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many clinical reports have suggested that the ascorbyl free radical (Asc∙) can be treated as a noninvasive, reliable, real-time marker of oxidative stress, but its generation mechanisms in human blood have rarely been discussed. In this study, we used upstream substances, enzyme inhibitors, and free radical scavengers to delineate the mechanisms of Asc∙ formation in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our results show that the doublet signal was detected in PRP samples by using electr...

  3. Human platelets produce 14,15-oxido-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid from phosphatidylinositol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human platelets contain a soluble enzyme or enzyme system which catalyzes the formation of a compound more polar than arachidonate from 2-arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). The C-value and mass spectrum of the compound appears similar to the reported values of 14,15-oxido-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (EET). 2-Arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine, 2-arachidonyl-sn-phosphatidylethanolamine and arachidonic acid were not substrates for EET production. The reaction was Ca2+-dependent and insensitive to aspirin, mepacrin and indomethacin. EET formation was greatly reduced under nitrogen or carbon monoxide, however, exposure to atmospheric air rapidly restored EET production to a rate comparable to that under air. Further, neither NADPH nor cyanide affected EET formation, suggesting that a cytochrome P-450 system was not involved. Intact platelets prelabeled with [14C]arachidonic acid generated at least 0.5 nmole of EET/109 platelets in response to thrombin; other agonists such as collagen, epinephrine, ADP or ionophore A23187 were not effective. Collectively, these data suggest that human platelets possess an enzyme system which appears to catalyze epoxidation of the arachidonyl moiety of PtdIns and its subsequent hydrolysis to yield EET

  4. Interaction of berberine with human platelet. alpha. sub 2 adrenoceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Ka Kit; Yu, Jun Liang; Chan, Wai Fong A.; Tse, E. (UCLA School of Medicine, (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Berberine was found to inhibit competitively the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine. The displacement curve was parallel to those of clonidine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, with the rank order of potency (IC{sub 50}) being clonidine {gt} epinephrine {gt} norepinephrine (14.5 {mu}M) = berberine. Increasing concentrations of berberine from 0.1 {mu}M to 10 {mu}M inhibited ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine binding, shifting the saturation binding curve to the right without decreasing the maximum binding capacity. In platelet cyclic AMP accumulation experiments, berberine at concentrations of 0.1 {mu}M to 0.1 mM inhibited the cAMP accumulation induced by 10 {mu}M prostaglandin E{sub 1} in a dose dependent manner, acting as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor agonist. In the presence of L-epinephrine, berberine blocked the inhibitory effect of L-epinephrine behaving as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor antagonist.

  5. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated platelets compared to control platelets on storage day 5, but not storage day 1. Transfusion of control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated platelets (day 5 of storage, 109 platelets per mouse) into NOD/SCID mice did not result in lung injury, however transfusion of storage day 5 platelets treated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide increased both extravascular lung water and lung vascular permeability. Transfusion of day 1 platelets did not produce lung injury in any group, and LPS priming 24 hours before transfusion had no effect on lung injury. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury, NOD/SCID mice were susceptible to acute lung injury when challenged with H-2Kd monoclonal antibody vs. isotype control antibody. Using lung intravital microscopy, we did not detect a difference in the dynamic retention of platelets in the lung circulation in control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated groups. In conclusion, Mirasol PRT produced an increase in P-selectin expression that is storage-dependent, but transfusion of human platelets treated with Mirasol PRT into immunodeficient mice did not result in greater platelet retention in the lungs or the development of acute lung injury. PMID:26176623

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated conversion of human platelet alloantigen allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhi, Huiying; Curtis, Brian R; Rao, Sridhar; Jobaliya, Chintan; Poncz, Mortimer; French, Deborah L; Newman, Peter J

    2016-02-11

    Human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) reside on functionally important platelet membrane glycoproteins and are caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes that encode them. Antibodies that form against HPAs are responsible for several clinically important alloimmune bleeding disorders, including fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura. The HPA-1a/HPA-1b alloantigen system, also known as the Pl(A1)/Pl(A2) polymorphism, is the most frequently implicated HPA among whites, and a single Leu33Pro amino acid polymorphism within the integrin β3 subunit is responsible for generating the HPA-1a/HPA-1b alloantigenic epitopes. HPA-1b/b platelets, like those bearing other low-frequency platelet-specific alloantigens, are relatively rare in the population and difficult to obtain for purposes of transfusion therapy and diagnostic testing. We used CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR associated protein 9) gene-editing technology to transform Leu33 (+) megakaryocytelike DAMI cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to the Pro33 allotype. CD41(+) megakaryocyte progenitors derived from these cells expressed the HPA-1b (Pl(A2)) alloantigenic epitope, as reported by diagnostic NciI restriction enzyme digestion, DNA sequencing, and western blot analysis using HPA-1b-specific human maternal alloantisera. Application of CRISPR/Cas9 technology to genetically edit this and other clinically-important HPAs holds great potential for production of designer platelets for diagnostic, investigative, and, ultimately, therapeutic use. PMID:26634302

  7. Inhibition of human platelet function in vitro and ex vivo by acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, B; Weiss, H J

    1989-03-15

    The effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in vitro, or ex vivo following APAP ingestion, on human platelet aggregation, 14C-5HT secretion, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) formation were assessed. APAP added in vitro to citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) inhibited aggregation, secretion, and TxB2 formation induced by collagen, epinephrine, arachidonate, and the ionophore A23187, but had no effect on the responses induced by the endoperoxide analog U44069. Arachidonate-induced responses were inhibited by lower concentrations of APAP than were the responses to the other agonists. In PRP obtained 1 hour after ingestion of 650 mg or 1000 mg APAP, arachidonate-induced TxB2 formation was inhibited by 40-99% in five subjects tested, whereas inhibition of collagen- or epinephrine-induced TxB2 formation was less consistent. Aggregation and secretion responses were not altered by APAP ingestion in 4 of the 5 subjects, but were inhibited in the remaining subject, who had the highest plasma APAP levels. In contrast to aspirin and indomethacin, APAP-induced inhibition of collagen-stimulated TxB2 formation could be partially overcome with increasing collagen concentrations. No such partial correction occurred with epinephrine, however. In washed platelet suspensions labeled with 3H-arachidonate, both APAP and aspirin inhibited the formation of labeled PGD2 and PGE2, as well as TxB2. These results suggest that APAP acts in human platelets as a reversible inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase, as found previously in other tissues, and that recent APAP ingestion can, on occasion, produce inhibition of platelet functional responses measured in vitro. PMID:2499947

  8. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  9. Inhibition of human platelet phospholipase A/sub 2/ by mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labow, R.S.; Meek, E.; Adams, G.A.; Rock, G.

    1988-06-01

    There is evidence that the carcinogenic and teratogenic effects attributed to the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) are due to its major metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP). MEHP is also formed ex vivo by a plasma enzyme in blood products stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) DEHP plastic containers. People who receive large amounts of blood products, such as hemophiliacs or patients undergoing hemodialysis, cardiopulmonary bypass, or massive transfusion, are exposed to significant levels of plasticizer. In this study, the platelet was used to show that MEHP inhibits phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/), one of the enzymes important in the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. PLA/sub 2/ was measured by the liberation of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid from 1-stearoyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonyl-L-3-phosphatidylcholine. MEHP inhibits PLA/sub 2/ activity noncompetitively in intact human platelets and lysates with a K/sub i/ of 3.7 x 10/sup -4/ M. DEHP does not inhibit PLA/sub 2/ in whole platelets. Inhibition of PLA/sub 2/ by MEHP occurs at only three times the circulating level of MEHP measured in neonates undergoing exchange transfusion and 20-fold the levels experienced by patients during cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore, infants and adult patients with multisystem failure who accumulate MEHP in their blood may be at risk for decreased platelet function.

  10. Inhibition of human platelet phospholipase A2 by mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence that the carcinogenic and teratogenic effects attributed to the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) are due to its major metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP). MEHP is also formed ex vivo by a plasma enzyme in blood products stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) DEHP plastic containers. People who receive large amounts of blood products, such as hemophiliacs or patients undergoing hemodialysis, cardiopulmonary bypass, or massive transfusion, are exposed to significant levels of plasticizer. In this study, the platelet was used to show that MEHP inhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2), one of the enzymes important in the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. PLA2 was measured by the liberation of 14C-arachidonic acid from 1-stearoyl-2-[1-14C]arachidonyl-L-3-phosphatidylcholine. MEHP inhibits PLA2 activity noncompetitively in intact human platelets and lysates with a K/sub i/ of 3.7 x 10-4 M. DEHP does not inhibit PLA2 in whole platelets. Inhibition of PLA2 by MEHP occurs at only three times the circulating level of MEHP measured in neonates undergoing exchange transfusion and 20-fold the levels experienced by patients during cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore, infants and adult patients with multisystem failure who accumulate MEHP in their blood may be at risk for decreased platelet function

  11. Serotonin binding in vitro by releasable proteins from human blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the substances released from human blood platelets are serotonin and various proteins. It was hypothesized that one of these proteins binds serotonin and that serotonin might be important to the protein's function or that the protein might be important to serotonin's function. Two platelet-specific proteins, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and β-thromboglobulin (βTG) were found to bind serotonin in vitro. Endogenous PF4 was isolated by serotonin-affinity chromatography and was identified by radioimmunoassay. Purified [125I] -PF4 and native PF4 bound to and eluted from a serotonin-affinity column similarly. Ultrafiltration of the homologous protein, βTG, with [14C]-serotonin demonstrated binding of about 8 moles serotonin per mole tetrameric βTG with a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(sup-8) M. Equilibrium dialysis of PF4 with radiolabelled serotonin was attempted, but no binding constant values were obtained because serotonin apparently bound to the dialysis membrane. Since EDTA was one of the two agents that eluted PF4 from the serotonin-affinity gel, calcium binding by PF4 was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Evidence was obtained for positively cooperative binding of calcium ions by PF4. It is concluded that PF4 and βTG bind serotonin in vitro, that they may also bind in vivo when platelets undergo release, and that the functions of serotonin, PF4 and βTG may be mediated in part by serotonin-protein associations

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression in human peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Seeger, Harald; Braun, Niko; Latus, Joerg; Alscher, M. Dominik; Fritz, Peter; Edenhofer, Ilka; Biegger, Dagmar; Lindenmeier, Maja; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Segerer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Simple peritoneal fibrosis and encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) are important lesions in the peritoneum of patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). We have previously described a population of podoplanin-positive myofibroblasts in peritoneal biopsies from patients with EPS. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ) is a marker of pericytes, and PDGFs might be involved in the fibrotic response of the peritoneum. This study aimed to describe PDGFRβ in the human perit...

  13. Mechanical fibrinogen-depletion supports heparin-free mesenchymal stem cell propagation in human platelet lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Lener, Thomas; Schmid, Doris; Streif, Doris A.; Salzer, Tina; Öller, Michaela; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Fischer, Thorsten; Jacobs, Volker R.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Gimona, Mario; Rohde, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) is an efficient alternative to xenogenic supplements for ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in clinical studies. Currently, porcine heparin is used in pHPL-supplemented medium to prevent clotting due to plasmatic coagulation factors. We therefore searched for an efficient and reproducible medium preparation method that avoids clot formation while omitting animal-derived heparin. Methods We established a protocol to deplete fibrino...

  14. Platelet-activating factor causes ventilation-perfusion mismatch in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R.; Félez, M A; Chung, K F; Barberà, J.A.; Wagner, P D; Cobos, A; Barnes, P. J.; Roca, J

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesized that platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, could induce gas exchange abnormalities in normal humans. To this end, the effect of aerosolized PAF (2 mg/ml solution; 24 micrograms) on ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) relationships, hemodynamics, and resistance of the respiratory system was studied in 14 healthy, nonatopic, and nonsmoking individuals (23 +/- 1 [SEM]yr) before and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 15, and 45 min after inhalation, and compared to that of inhale...

  15. Mitochondrial Localization of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Platelets and Differentiated Megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Silvagno, Francesca; De Vivo, Enrico; Attanasio, Angelo; Gallo, Valentina; Mazzucco, Gianna; Pescarmona, Gianpiero

    2010-01-01

    Background Like other steroid hormones, vitamin D elicits both transcriptional events and rapid non genomic effects. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) localization and mechanisms of VDR-triggered non genomic responses are still controversial. Although anticoagulant effects of vitamin D have been reported and VDR signalling has been characterized in monocytes and vascular cells, nothing is known about VDR expression and functions in human platelets, anucleated fragments of megakaryocytes which are know...

  16. Transcellular metabolism of neutrophil-derived leukotriene A4 by human platelets. A potential cellular source of leukotriene C4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transformation of leukotriene (LT) A4 into leukotriene C4 has been found to be carried out by human platelets in a rather efficient manner. LTC4 was characterized by a combination of high performance liquid chromatography, UV spectrophotometry, use of labeled precursor, guinea pig ileum bioassay, and enzyme immunoassay. LTA4 metabolism was found to be substrate-dependent, time-dependent, and proportional to platelet concentration even at sub- or supraphysiological levels (0.0019-1 X 10(9) platelets/ml). Neither plasma alone nor the supernatant of resting or activated platelets was found to catalyze the production of LTC4 in the presence or in the absence of reduced glutathione. These data suggest that platelets contain a glutathione S-transferase specific for LTC4 biosynthesis. The formation of LTC4 was greatly enhanced when LTA4 was incubated with platelets in the presence of albumin. Low concentrations of albumin (2-4 g/liter) stabilized LTA4 to an extent that conversion into LTC4 by the platelets could be detected after 1 h of incubation. The possible intercellular transfer of LTA4 between neutrophils and platelets was tested. The production of LTC4 by neutrophils was greatly enhanced in the presence of platelets. Furthermore, the supernatant of neutrophils stimulated with the calcium ionophore contained a short-lived acid-labile substance which was converted by the platelets into LTC4. When platelets were prelabeled with [35S]cysteine to allow intracellular synthesis of [35S]glutathione, the coincubation of both cell types challenged with the calcium ionophore resulted in the production of [35S] LTC4

  17. Identification and characterization of a putative human platelet thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analog, 9,11-dimethylmethano-11,12-methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13,14-dihydro-13-aza-15αβ-omega-tetranor TXA2 (I-PTA-OH) was characterized as a competitive antagonist of TXA2 mimetic-induced platelet aggregation, with a K/sub d/ of 190 nM in platelet rich plasma. This antagonism was specific for the putative thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptor, since I-PTA-OH had no inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation stimulated by agonists which act independently of TXA2/PGH2, and did not inhibit platelet TXA2 synthesis. [125I]-PTA-OH binding to a particulate fraction from human platelets was saturable, displaceable, and linear with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding revealed a single class of high affinity binding sites, with a K/sub d/ of 30 +/- 4 nM and a B/sub max/ of 1.8 +/- 0.3 pmol/mg protein. Kinetic analysis yielded a k1 of 1.35 x 106 M-1 x min-1 and a k√1 of 0.032 min-1, K/sub d/ = k√1/k1 = 24 nM. The subcellular localization of the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor was determined using [125I]-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. [125I]-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. [125I]-PTA-OH binding, was coenriched with markers for plasma membranes and dense tubular system; but not with markers for cytoplasmic constituents, mitochondria, or granules

  18. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  19. Integrative Multi-omic Analysis of Human Platelet eQTLs Reveals Alternative Start Site in Mitofusin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lukas M; Chen, Edward S; Edelstein, Leonard C; Kong, Xianguo; Bhatlekar, Seema; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Bray, Paul F; Shaw, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    Platelets play a central role in ischemic cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci associated with CVD risk. However, our understanding of how these variants contribute to disease is limited. Using data from the platelet RNA and expression 1 (PRAX1) study, we analyzed cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in platelets from 154 normal human subjects. We confirmed these results in silico by performing allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis, which demonstrated that the allelic directionality of eQTLs and ASE patterns correlate significantly. Comparison of platelet eQTLs with data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project revealed that a number of platelet eQTLs are platelet specific and that platelet eQTL peaks localize to the gene body at a higher rate than eQTLs from other tissues. Upon integration with data from previously published GWASs, we found that the trait-associated variant rs1474868 coincides with the eQTL peak for mitofusin 2 (MFN2). Additional experimental and computational analyses revealed that this eQTL is linked to an unannotated alternate MFN2 start site preferentially expressed in platelets. Integration of phenotype data from the PRAX1 study showed that MFN2 expression levels were significantly associated with platelet count. This study links the variant rs1474868 to a platelet-specific regulatory role for MFN2 and demonstrates the utility of integrating multi-omic data with eQTL analysis in disease-relevant tissues for interpreting GWAS results. PMID:27132591

  20. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  1. Study of the insulin-like peptide 3 in human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like 3 peptide is autocrine/paracrine insulin-related hormone with a size of approximately 6kDa [1]. It mediates through a leucine richG-coupled receptor named LGR8. INSL3 is mainly expressed in human Leydig cells and is directly responsible for migration of the testis during the pre-natal period in maledevelopment. [2] INSL3 mRNA has recently been verified in human platelets whereas no mRNA has been detected for LGR8 (by Sanofi-Aventis GmbH in Frankfurt,Germany), indicating that ...

  2. Methods for defining distinct bioenergetic profiles in platelets, lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils, and the oxidative burst from human blood

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, Balu K; Kramer, Philip A.; Ravi, Saranya; Johnson, Michelle S.; Hardy, Robert W.; Ballinger, Scott W.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and platelets have long been recognized as having the potential to act as sensitive markers for mitochondrial dysfunction in a broad range of pathological conditions. However, the bioenergetic function of these cells has not been examined from the same donors, yet this is important for the selection of cell types for translational studies. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of cellular bioenergetics in isolated human monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, ...

  3. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated ...

  4. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 4 counter-regulate endostatin and VEGF release from human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Li; Perini, Rafael; McKnight, Webb; Dicay, Michael; Klein, Andre; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Wallace, John L

    2004-01-01

    The roles of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in platelet functions other than aggregation are not well understood. Among these is the release of factors that regulate the process of angiogenesis, such as endostatin and VEGF, which, respectively, inhibit and promote angiogenesis. PAR1 and PAR4 are expressed on the surface of human platelets and can be activated by thrombin. In the present study, we have attempted to determine the roles of PAR1 and PAR4 in regulating release of endostatin...

  5. Investigation of interaction of human platelet membrane components with anticoagulant drugs Abciximab and Eptifibatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gorodkiewicz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abciximab (Abci and eptifibatide (Epti are antiaggregate drugs which may reduce thrombotic complications inacute coronary syndromes. The aim of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and Abci or Epti, and the influence of these drugs on the phospholipid ratio in the plateletmembrane. The interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and antiaggregate drugs were investigatedusing the Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging technique (SPRI. Phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine(PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM were first immobilizedonto the gold chip surface. The phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane was determined by the HPLC. Only PI,PS, PE and PC were determined. Human platelets treated 'in vitro' with Abci or Epti exhibit changes in the phospholipidratio in the platelet membrane. The ratio of PS decreases and PC rises. The SPRI distinctly shows interactions between phospholipidsand glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa, and between the phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci or Epti.The interaction between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa is growing in the sequence: PI<

  6. Theory of partial agonist activity of steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson C. Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The different amounts of residual partial agonist activity (PAA of antisteroids under assorted conditions have long been useful in clinical applications but remain largely unexplained. Not only does a given antagonist often afford unequal induction for multiple genes in the same cell but also the activity of the same antisteroid with the same gene changes with variations in concentration of numerous cofactors. Using glucocorticoid receptors as a model system, we have recently succeeded in constructing from first principles a theory that accurately describes how cofactors can modulate the ability of agonist steroids to regulate both gene induction and gene repression. We now extend this framework to the actions of antisteroids in gene induction. The theory shows why changes in PAA cannot be explained simply by differences in ligand affinity for receptor and requires action at a second step or site in the overall sequence of reactions. The theory also provides a method for locating the position of this second site, relative to a concentration limited step (CLS, which is a previously identified step in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation that always occurs at the same position in the overall sequence of events of gene induction. Finally, the theory predicts that classes of antagonist ligands may be grouped on the basis of their maximal PAA with excess added cofactor and that the members of each class differ by how they act at the same step in the overall gene induction process. Thus, this theory now makes it possible to predict how different cofactors modulate antisteroid PAA, which should be invaluable in developing more selective antagonists.

  7. Metabolic energy is required in human platelets at any stage during optical aggregation and secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Verhoeven, A J M; Mommersteeg, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between metabolic energy and platelet aggregation and secretion was investigated by sudden exhaustion of the cell energy content after these platelet responses had been initiated. In normal platelets, optical aggregation was at any stage susceptible to energy exhaustion, whereas single platelet disappearance and secretion were hardly affected. Prelowering the platelet energy content, while preserving the adenylate energy charge, made both optical aggregation and the secretion...

  8. Characterization of the effects of isoprostanes on platelet aggregation in human whole blood

    OpenAIRE

    Cranshaw, Julius H; Evans, Timothy W.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the effects of 11 commercially-available isoprostanes on platelet aggregation directly or when triggered by the thromboxane receptor agonist U46619 or collagen in healthy human citrated blood using a whole blood aggregometer.None of the isoprostanes tested triggered aggregation alone, nor facilitated aggregation by a sub-threshold dose of U46619 or collagen. Five isoprostanes inhibited aggregation (rank order of potency 8-iso PGE1>8-iso PGE2>8-iso PGF2α>8-iso PGF3α>8-iso-13,14-dihyd...

  9. On the association of glycoprotein Ib and actin-binding protein in human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein (GP) Ib was purified from lysates of human platelets prepared in the presence or absence of inhibitors of the endogenous calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP) by immunoaffinity chromatography, employing the GPIb-specific murine monoclonal antibody, AP1, coupled to Sepharose CL4B. When derived from lysates prepared in the presence of EDTA or leupeptin, the eluate from the AP1-affinity column contained a 240,000-260,000-mol-wt protein in addition to GPIb. In SDS PAGE, this prot...

  10. Effects of mibefradil on intracellular Ca2+ release in cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts and human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, M; Miyagawa, K; Hermsmeyer, K; Erne, P

    1995-12-01

    The Ca2+ antagonist mibefradil at supratherapeutic concentrations induced a sustained increase of cytosolic Ca2+ in cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts and human platelets which lack sensitivity to K+ depolarization and Ca2+ channel block by verapamil or other Ca2+ antagonists. At concentrations above 10 microM, mibefradil elevated substantially cytosolic [Ca2+] without affecting the peak level of agonist-induced Ca2+ transients. These Ca2+-mobilizing actions of 10 or 100 microM mibefradil stand in contrast to the Ca2+ antagonism and relaxation of vascular muscle at 1 microM concentrations. Since a substantial part of mibefradil-induced increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was independent of extracellular Ca2+, and in order to define better the mechanism of Ca2+ increase, we exposed permeabilized cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts and human platelets to mibefradil at concentrations sufficiently high to identify covert effects. In permeabilized fibroblasts or platelets mibefradil at concentrations above 10 microM activated dose-dependent Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. Verapamil had no effect at concentrations of up to 100 microM. Mibefradil-induced Ca2+ release was not affected by ryanodine, thapsigargin, removal of ATP or dithioerythreitol, indicating that neither Ca2+ - nor disulfide reagent-induced Ca2+ release were involved and that mibefradil did not release Ca2+ by inhibition of the Ca2+-ATPase pump of endoplasmic reticulum. The rate, but not the amplitude, of mibefradil-induced Ca2+ release is increased up to fourfold in the presence of pentosan polysulphate or heparin, two potent inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release. Depletion of Ca2+ stores of permeabilized cells inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the presence of thapsigargin completely blocked mibefradil-induced Ca2+ release, and depletion of Ca2+ stores by mibefradil prevented further Ca2+ release by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Mibefradil at supratherapeutic concentrations (> or

  11. Resolution of radiolabeled molecular species of phospholipid in human platelets: effect of thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resolution of individual molecular species of human platelet 1,2-diradyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines and 1,2-diradyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines by reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) allowed a thorough analysis of those phospholipids labeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. Approximately 54% and 16% of the total incorporated radiolabel was found in choline glycerophospholipids and ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, respectively, with ca. 90% of this being found in the 1,2-diacyl molecular species. Eighty percent of [3H]-arachidonic acid incorporated into 1-acyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in resting platelets was equally distributed between 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl and 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, while 70% of the radiolabel in 1-acyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine was found in 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. Thrombin stimulation (5 U/ml for 5 min) resulted in deacylation of all 1-acyl-2-[3H]arachidonoyl molecular species of 1-acyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-acyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethanolamine. There was also a slight increase in 1-O-alkyl-2-[3H]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and a significant increase in 1-O-alk-1'-enyl-2-[3H]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine molecular species of over 300%. Thus, HPLC methodology indicates that arachidonoyl-containing molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are the major source of arachidonic acid in thrombin-stimulated human platelets, while certain ether phospholipid molecular species become enriched in arachidonate

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors in the human central nervous system : autoradiographic distribution and receptor densities in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Wilczak, N

    1997-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were studied in postmortem adult human brain and cervical spinal cord using autoradiography with human recombinant I-125-PDGF-BB. PDGF-BB binds to the three different dimers of PDGF receptors (alpha alpha, alpha beta and beta beta) PDGF receptors were

  13. Platelet receptor interplay regulates collagen-induced thrombus formation in flowing human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Munnix, Imke C A; Smethurst, Peter A; Deckmyn, Hans; Lindhout, Theo; Ouwehand, Willem H; Farndale, Richard W; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-02-15

    The platelet glycoproteins (GPs) Ib, integrin alpha(2)beta(1), and GPVI are considered central to thrombus formation. Recently, their relative importance has been re-evaluated based on data from murine knockout models. To examine their relationship during human thrombus formation on collagen type I fibers at high shear (1000 s(-1)), we tested a novel antibody against GPVI, an immunoglobulin single-chain variable fragment, 10B12, together with specific antagonists for GPIb alpha (12G1 Fab(2)) and alpha(2)beta(1) (6F1 mAb or GFOGER-GPP peptide). GPVI was found to be crucial for aggregate formation, Ca(2+) signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, but not for primary adhesion, even with more than 97% receptor blockade. Inhibiting alpha(2)beta(1) revealed its involvement in regulating Ca(2+) signaling, PS exposure, and aggregate size. Both GPIb alpha and alpha(2)beta(1) contributed to primary adhesion, showing overlapping function. The coinhibition of receptors revealed synergism in thrombus formation: the coinhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors with collagen receptors further decreased adhesion and aggregation, and, crucially, the complete eradication of thrombus formation required the coinhibition of GPVI with either GPIb alpha or alpha(2)beta(1). In summary, human platelet deposition on collagen depends on the concerted interplay of several receptors: GPIb in synergy with alpha(2)beta(1) mediating primary adhesion, reinforced by activation through GPVI, which further regulates the thrombus formation. PMID:14563646

  14. Plant extracts inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation in humans: their potential therapeutic role as ADP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagroop, Indera Anita

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) plays a pivotal role in platelet activation. Platelet hyperactivity is associated with vascular disease and also has a key role in haemostasis and thrombosis. ADP activates platelets through three purinoceptor subtypes, the G(q)-coupled P2Y(1) receptor, G(i)-coupled P2Y(12) receptor and P2X(1) ligand-gated cation channel. Platelet ADP purinergic receptors are therefore suitable targets for antiplatelet drugs. Thienopyridines such as clopidogrel and ticlopidine, as well as other ADP receptor antagonists like prasugrel, ticagrelor, cangrelor and elinogrel have demonstrated clinical benefits via the inhibition of the selective purinergic ADP receptor, P2Y(12). However, they still have limitations in their mode of action and efficacy, like increased risk of bleeding. Thus, the ongoing pursuit to develop newer and more effective antiplatelet agents continues. There is a growing interest in the purinergic antiplatelet properties exhibited by plant extracts. This article considers the following: pomolic acid isolated from Licania pittieri, brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L, phylligenin isolated from the twigs of Muraltia vulpina, bark oil of Gonystylus velutinus, seed and bark extracts from Aesculus hippocastanum L. and red wine phenolics and catechins isolated from green tea. Moreover, the method used to investigate platelet purinergic receptors should be considered, since using a more sensitive, high-resolution platelet sizer can sometimes detect platelet variations when the light transmission method was not able to do so. The exact mechanisms by which these plant extracts work need further investigation. They all however inhibit ADP-induced activation in human platelets. This could explain, at least in part, the protective effect of plant extracts as antiplatelet agents. PMID:24190032

  15. Human platelet releasates combined with polyglycolic acid scaffold promote chondrocyte differentiation and phenotypic maintenance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giulia Bernardini; Federico Chellini; Bruno Frediani; Adriano Spreafico; Annalisa Santucci

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the differentiating properties of platelet-rich plasma releasates (PRPr) on human chondrocytes seeded on a polygtlycolic acid (PGA) 3D scaffold. Gene expression and biochemical analysis were carried out to assess the improved quality of our PGA-based cartilage constructs supplemented with PRPr. We observed that the use of PRPr as cell cultures supplementation to PGA-chondrocyte constructs may promote chondrocyte differentiation, and thus may contribute to maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype longer than conventional supplementation by increasing high levels of important chondrogenic markers (e.g. sox9, aggrecan and type II collagen), without induction of type I collagen. Moreover, our constructs were analysed for the secretion and deposition of important ECM molecules (sGAG, type II collagen, etc.). Our results indicate that PRPr supplementation may synergize with PGA-based scaffolds to stimulate human articular chondrocyte differentiation, maturation and phenotypic maintenance.

  16. New analogues of 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid block human blood platelet aggregation and cyclooxygenase-1 activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirz Taghreed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thromboxane A2 is derived from arachidonic acid through the action of cyclooxygenases and thromboxane synthase. It is mainly formed in blood platelets upon activation and plays an important role in aggregation. Aspirin is effective in reducing the incidence of complications following acute coronary syndrome and stroke. The anti-thrombotic effect of aspirin is obtained through the irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid were shown previously to modulate platelet activation and to block thromboxane receptors. Results and discussion We synthesized 10 compounds based on the structures of analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and evaluated their effect on platelet aggregation triggered by arachidonic acid. The structure activity relationship was evaluated. Five compounds showed a significant inhibition of platelet aggregation and highlighted the importance of the lipidic hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain and the phenol group. Their IC50 ranged from 7.5 ± 0.8 to 14.2 ± 5.7 μM (Mean ± S.E.M.. All five compounds decreased platelet aggregation and thromboxane synthesis in response to collagen whereas no modification of platelet aggregation in response to thromboxane receptor agonist, U46619, was observed. Using COS-7 cells overexpressing human cyclooxygenase-1, we showed that these compounds are specific inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 with IC50 ranging from 1.3 to 12 μM. Docking observation of human recombinant cyclooxygenase-1 supported a role of the phenol group in the fitting of cyclooxygenase-1, most likely related to hydrogen bonding with the Tyr 355 of cyclooxygenase-1. Conclusions In conclusion, the compounds we synthesized at first based on the structures of analogues of 12 lipoxygenase metabolites showed a role of the phenol group in the anti-platelet and anti-cyclooxygenase-1 activities

  17. Regulation of hormone-induced Ca2+ mobilization in the human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α-Thrombin, γ-thrombin, and platelet-activating factor each stimulated the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores in aspirin-treated human platelets. This was followed by desensitization of the receptors, as shown by the return of the Ca2+ level to basal values and by the fact that a subsequent addition of a second different agonist, but not the same agonist, could again elicit a response. Epinephrine, acting on α2-adrenergic receptors, was by itself ineffective at mobilizing Ca2+ stores. However, when added after the thrombin-induced response, epinephrine could evoke a considerable release of Ca2+ from cellular stores. This appeared to be due to epinephrine recoupling thrombin receptors to phospholipase C. In support of this, epinephrine was able to induce the formation of inositol triphosphate when added after the response to thrombin had also become desensitized. Alone, epinephrine was without effect. Pre-activation of protein kinase C with the phorbol ester abolished these effects of epinephrine, suggesting that epinephrine was working by activating a protein which could be inactivated by phosphorylation. The current work is to characterize this protein that may be a member of the Gi, GTP-binding protein family

  18. Carbonic anhydrases are producers of S-nitrosothiols from inorganic nitrite and modulators of soluble guanylyl cyclase in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanff, Erik; Böhmer, Anke; Zinke, Maximilian; Gambaryan, Stepan; Schwarz, Alexandra; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitrosocysteine are highly potent signaling molecules, acting both by cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent mechanisms. The NO metabolite nitrite (NO2 (-)) is a major NO reservoir. Hemoglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) have been reported to reduce/convert nitrite to NO. We evaluated the role and the physiological importance of CA for an extra-platelet CA/nitrite/NO/cGMP pathway in human platelets. Authentic NO was analyzed by an NO-sensitive electrode. GSNO and GS(15)NO were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). cGMP was determined by LC-MS/MS or RIA. In reduced glutathione (GSH) containing aqueous buffer (pH 7.4), human and bovine erythrocytic CAII-mediated formation of GSNO from nitrite and GS(15)NO from (15)N-nitrite. In the presence of L-cysteine and GSH, this reaction was accompanied by NO release. Incubation of nitrite with bovine erythrocytic CAII and recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase resulted in cGMP formation. Upon incubation of nitrite with bovine erythrocytic CAII and washed human platelets, cGMP and P-VASP(S239) were formed in the platelets. This study provides the first evidence that extra-platelet nitrite and erythrocytic CAII may modulate platelet function in a cGMP-dependent manner. The new nitrite-dependent CA activity may be a general principle and explain the cardioprotective effects of inorganic nitrite in the vasculature. We propose that nitrous acid (ONOH) is the primary CA-catalyzed reaction product of nitrite. PMID:27129464

  19. Partial Purification of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine-Reuptake System from Human Blood Platelets Using a Citalopram-Derived Affinity Resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessen, E.A.L.; Horn, A.S.; Robillard, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for the synthesis and application of a citalopram-derived affinity resin in purifying the 5HT-reuptake system from human blood platelets. A two-step scheme has been developed for partial purification, based on wheat germ agglutinin-lectin (WGA) affinity and citalopra

  20. Physiological Roles of Platelet-activating Factor in Mammalian and Human Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-ming ZHU; Joe B. MASSEY; William E. ROUDEBUSH

    2005-01-01

    This review described origination, biosynthesis and functions of platelet-activat-ing factor (PAF) in the reproductive system of mammals and human beings. The articlemainly focused on biological roles of the phospholipid mediator in sperm fertilizationand embryonic implantation. As an autocrine product of sperm and embryos, PAFmarkedly stimulates sperm motility and fertilization and serves as a capacitationfactor in a ligand-receptor manner. After fertilization, embryo-derived PAF improvesits own development, especially from fertilized ova to blastocyst stage and is thoughtto act as an embryo growth factor in the same manner as on sperm. Its mechanism ofaction was also clarified. At the end, it was presented some advances in its clinicalapplication, followed by discussion of some issues possibly concerning in its currentapplication.

  1. Effect of antidepressants and neuroleptics on phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously reported that tricyclic antidepressants and iprindole inhibit thrombin-stimulated formation of inositol-1, 4 bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) but do not cause any change in inositol-1 phosphate (IP1). In order to examine if this decrease in IP2 and IP3 formation by antidepressants is related to the inhibition of the enzyme phospholipase C (PLC), the authors determined the effects of antidepressants and neuroleptics on the levels of 3[H] phosphotidylinositol (PI), 3[H] PI-4 phosphate (PIP), 3[H] PI-4, 5 bisphosphate (PIP2) in human platelets. The implications of the findings and their relevance to the mode of action of antidepressants are discussed

  2. Unusual subcellular confinement of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in circulating human platelets: complete polyribosome dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzière, Véronique; Lessard, Mandy; Meunier, Alexandre J; McCoy, Marie; Bergeron, Lucien Junior; Corbin, Francois

    2012-04-01

    FMRP, a RNA-binding protein, was shown in association with polyribosomes in every cell types studied so far, suggesting a ubiquitous role as a translational regulator. Platelets are known for their limited protein synthesis potential. However, current investigations put forward that RNA metabolism is more developed than previously thought. Unexpectedly, our results provide evidence that FMRP, in platelets, is not constitutively associated with heavy particles, such as polyribosomes, and possesses a sedimentation coefficient of less than 10S contrasting with values of 150 to 500S as reported in other cell types. In summary, this report brings to light platelets as a simple human biological system to delineate novel FMRP functions as well as strengthening our comprehension of the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome which results from the absence of FMRP. PMID:22210492

  3. /sup 3/H-PAF-acether displacement and inhibition of binding in intact human platelets by BN 52021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, R.; Le Couedic, J.P.; Benveniste, J.

    1986-03-05

    Intact washed human platelets incubated at 20/sup 0/C in Tyrode's buffer containing 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin bound /sup 3/H paf-acether in a concentration (0-6.5 nM) and time (0-60 min) dependent manner (n=3). BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) a chemically defined extract from Ginkgo biloba inhibited the binding of increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H paf-acether. Calculated differences between /sup 3/H paf-acether binding in the presence or absence of BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) reached nearly a plateau in concentrations higher than 0.65 nM /sup 3/H paf-acether. Increasing concentrations of BN 52021 (0-60 ..mu..M) as well as of unlabelled paf-acether (0-50 nM) prevented within 15 min /sup 3/H paf-acether binding (0.65 nM) to platelets in a concentration-dependent way. Increasing BN 52021 concentrations (0-60 ..mu..M) also displaced platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether (0.65 nM) in a concentration-dependent way. Displacement increased with the time length of platelet incubation with BN 52021 and reached a plateau at 15 min. Platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether displacement of 28.3 +/- 6.3%, 31.1 +/- 4.0% and 26.7 +/- 5.6% was observed using 50 nM unlabelled paf-acether, 60 ..mu..M BN 52021 or both substances together (vs 4.3 +/- 7.2% for vehicle alone). No degradation of /sup 3/H paf-acether occurred as assessed by high pressure liquid chromatography. These results demonstrate that BN 52021 competes directly with paf-acether binding sites on human platelets.

  4. 3H-PAF-acether displacement and inhibition of binding in intact human platelets by BN 52021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact washed human platelets incubated at 200C in Tyrode's buffer containing 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin bound 3H paf-acether in a concentration (0-6.5 nM) and time (0-60 min) dependent manner (n=3). BN 52021 (60 μM) a chemically defined extract from Ginkgo biloba inhibited the binding of increasing concentrations of 3H paf-acether. Calculated differences between 3H paf-acether binding in the presence or absence of BN 52021 (60 μM) reached nearly a plateau in concentrations higher than 0.65 nM 3H paf-acether. Increasing concentrations of BN 52021 (0-60 μM) as well as of unlabelled paf-acether (0-50 nM) prevented within 15 min 3H paf-acether binding (0.65 nM) to platelets in a concentration-dependent way. Increasing BN 52021 concentrations (0-60 μM) also displaced platelet-bound 3H paf-acether (0.65 nM) in a concentration-dependent way. Displacement increased with the time length of platelet incubation with BN 52021 and reached a plateau at 15 min. Platelet-bound 3H paf-acether displacement of 28.3 +/- 6.3%, 31.1 +/- 4.0% and 26.7 +/- 5.6% was observed using 50 nM unlabelled paf-acether, 60 μM BN 52021 or both substances together (vs 4.3 +/- 7.2% for vehicle alone). No degradation of 3H paf-acether occurred as assessed by high pressure liquid chromatography. These results demonstrate that BN 52021 competes directly with paf-acether binding sites on human platelets

  5. High-throughput proteomics detection of novel splice isoforms in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Karen A

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of all metazoans. Recent findings suggest that 100% of multiexonic human genes give rise to splice isoforms. AS can be specific to tissue type, environment or developmentally regulated. Splice variants have also been implicated in various diseases including cancer. Detection of these variants will enhance our understanding of the complexity of the human genome and provide disease-specific and prognostic biomarkers. We adopted a proteomics approach to identify exon skip events - the most common form of AS. We constructed a database harboring the peptide sequences derived from all hypothetical exon skip junctions in the human genome. Searching tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) data against the database allows the detection of exon skip events, directly at the protein level. Here we describe the application of this approach to human platelets, including the mRNA-based verification of novel splice isoforms of ITGA2, NPEPPS and FH. This methodology is applicable to all new or existing MS\\/MS datasets.

  6. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line

  7. Platelet Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. ... This can cause excessive bleeding. Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  8. sup 86 Rb(K) influx and ( sup 3 H)ouabain binding by human platelets: Evidence for beta-adrenergic stimulation of Na-K ATPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turaihi, K.; Khokher, M.A.; Barradas, M.A.; Mikhailidis, D.P.; Dandona, P. (Royal Free Hospital and School of Medicine, London (England))

    1989-08-01

    Although active transport of potassium into human platelets has been demonstrated previously, there is hitherto no evidence that human platelets have an ouabain-inhibitable Na-K ATPase in their membrane. The present study demonstrates active rubidium (used as an index of potassium influx), {sup 86}Rb(K), influx into platelets, inhibitable by ouabain, and also demonstrates the presence of specific ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding by the human platelet. This {sup 86}Rb(K) influx was stimulated by adrenaline, isoprenaline, and salbutamol, but noradrenaline caused a mild inhibition. Active {sup 86}Rb(K) influx by platelets was inhibited markedly by timolol, mildly by atenolol, but not by phentolamine. Therefore, active {sup 86}Rb(K) influx in human platelets is enhanced by stimulation of beta adrenoceptors of the beta 2 subtype. The platelet may therefore replace the leukocyte in future studies of Na-K ATPase activity. This would be a considerable advantage in view of the ease and rapidity of preparation of platelets.

  9. Effect of carbon black nanomaterial on biological membranes revealed by shape of human erythrocytes, platelets and phospholipid vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Drašler, Barbara; Pajnič, Manca; Šuštar, Vid; Štukelj, Roman; Kononenko, Veno; Šimundić, Metka; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Makovec, Darko; Drobne, Damjana; Krek, Judita Lea

    2016-01-01

    Background We studied the effect of carbon black (CB) agglomerated nanomaterial on biological membranes as revealed by shapes of human erythrocytes, platelets and giant phospholipid vesicles. Diluted human blood was incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by different microscopic techniques. Giant unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (GUVs) created by electroformation were incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by optical microscopy. Populations of erythrocytes and GUVs were analyzed: t...

  10. Human Podoplanin-positive Monocytes and Platelets Enhance Lymphangiogenesis Through the Activation of the Podoplanin/CLEC-2 Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Jin; Jang, Jae Hee; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Joonoh; Choi, Young-Eun; Ko, Seung-Bum; Kang, Jin-A; Kang, Jeehoon; Lee, Sang Eun; LEE, Hwan; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Emerging studies suggested that murine podoplanin-positive monocytes (PPMs) are involved in lymphangiogenesis. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic lymphangiogenesis of human PPMs by the interaction with platelets. Aggregation culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) resulted in cellular aggregates termed hematospheres. During 5-day culture, PPMs expanded exponentially and expressed several lymphatic endothelial cell–specific markers including vascular ...

  11. Synthesis and secretion of platelet-derived growth factor by human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report that human breast cancer cells secrete a growth factor that is biologically and immunologically similar to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Serum-free medium conditioned by estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 or estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells contains a mitogenic or competence activity that is capable of inducing incorporation of [3H] thymidine into quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells in the presence of platelet-poor plasma. Like authentic PDGF, the PDGF-like activity produced by breast cancer cells is stable after acid and heat treatment (950C) and inhibited by reducing agents. The mitogenic activity comigrates with a material of ≅30 kDa on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with PDGF antiserum of proteins from metabolically labeled cell lysates and conditioned medium followed by analysis on nonreducing NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels identified proteins of 30 and 34 kDa. Upon reduction, the 30- and 34-kDa bands were converted to 15- and 16-kDa bands suggesting that the immunoprecipitated proteins were made up of two disulfide-linked polypeptides similar to PDGF. Hybridization studies with cDNA probes for the A chain PDGF and the B chain of PDGF/SIS identified transcripts for both PDGF chains in the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The data summarized above provide conclusive evidence for the synthesis and hormonally regulated secretion of a PDGF-like mitogen by breast carcinoma cells. Production of a PDGF-like growth factor by breast cancer cell lines may be important in mediating paracrine stimulation of tumor growth

  12. Gene frequencies of human platelet alloantigens 1–5 in two Arab populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdel Halim A.; Abdel Hamed, Alaa Eldin S.; Abdalla, Essam M.; Almawi, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of the human platelet alloantigens (HPA) arise from single base pair substitutions in alleles and lead to changes in amino acids of glycoproteins expressed on platelets. The aim of this study was to determine the gene frequencies of the five common HPA (HPA-1 to −5) in Egyptians and Jordanians and to compare these data with those established for other populations. Materials and methods HPA genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. Results The gene frequencies obtained in Egyptians were: HPA-1a/b, 0.767/0.233; HPA-2a/b, 0.759/0.241; HPA-3a/b, 0.704/0.296; HPA-4a/b, 1/0; HPA-5a/b, 0.728/0.272, while the frequencies in Jordanians were: HPA-1a/b, 0.821/0.179; HPA-2a/b, 0.877/0.123; HPA-3a/b, 0.660/0.340; HPA-4a/b, 1/0; HPA-5a/b, 0.795/0.205. The observed gene frequencies in both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The gene frequencies for HPA-2b and HPA-5b among Egyptians were the highest reported among Arabs. Except for HPA-2, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPA-1 to −5 between the two populations. Conclusion The distributions of HPA alleles among Egyptians and Jordanians are similar to those reported for other Arabs. This study reports the first data on gene frequencies of HPA in Egyptians and Jordanians. PMID:23736919

  13. Mechanisms of ascorbyl radical formation in human platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Chang, Chao-Chien; Yeh, Yu-Chieh; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chou, Duen-Suey

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many clinical reports have suggested that the ascorbyl free radical (Asc(∙)) can be treated as a noninvasive, reliable, real-time marker of oxidative stress, but its generation mechanisms in human blood have rarely been discussed. In this study, we used upstream substances, enzyme inhibitors, and free radical scavengers to delineate the mechanisms of Asc(∙) formation in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our results show that the doublet signal was detected in PRP samples by using electron spin resonance, and the hyperfine splitting of the doublet signal was a(H) = 1.88 gauss and g-factor = 2.00627, which was determined to be the Asc(∙). We observed that the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (NOX), cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), mitochondria complex III, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), but not xanthine oxidase, diminished the intensity of the Asc(∙) signal dose dependently. All enzyme inhibitors showed no obvious antioxidant activity during a Fenton reaction assay. In summary, the obtained data suggest that Asc(∙) formation is associated with NOX, COX, LOX, CYP450, eNOS, and mitochondria in human PRP. PMID:24696859

  14. Mechanisms of Ascorbyl Radical Formation in Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou-Gi Shyu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many clinical reports have suggested that the ascorbyl free radical (Asc∙ can be treated as a noninvasive, reliable, real-time marker of oxidative stress, but its generation mechanisms in human blood have rarely been discussed. In this study, we used upstream substances, enzyme inhibitors, and free radical scavengers to delineate the mechanisms of Asc∙ formation in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Our results show that the doublet signal was detected in PRP samples by using electron spin resonance, and the hyperfine splitting of the doublet signal was aH=1.88 gauss and g-factor = 2.00627, which was determined to be the Asc∙. We observed that the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (NOX, cyclooxygenase (COX, lipoxygenase (LOX, cytochrome P450 (CYP450, mitochondria complex III, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS, but not xanthine oxidase, diminished the intensity of the Asc∙ signal dose dependently. All enzyme inhibitors showed no obvious antioxidant activity during a Fenton reaction assay. In summary, the obtained data suggest that Asc∙ formation is associated with NOX, COX, LOX, CYP450, eNOS, and mitochondria in human PRP.

  15. A review of the mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in human platelets and leukocytes: Implications for their use as bioenergetic biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Kramer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of metabolic function in cells isolated from human blood for treatment and diagnosis of disease is a new and important area of translational research. It is now becoming clear that a broad range of pathologies which present clinically with symptoms predominantly in one organ, such as the brain or kidney, also modulate mitochondrial energetics in platelets and leukocytes allowing these cells to serve as “the canary in the coal mine” for bioenergetic dysfunction. This opens up the possibility that circulating platelets and leukocytes can sense metabolic stress in patients and serve as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathologies such as diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. In this overview we will describe how the utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation differs in platelets and leukocytes and discuss how they can be used in patient populations. Since it is clear that the metabolic programs between leukocytes and platelets are fundamentally distinct the measurement of mitochondrial function in distinct cell populations is necessary for translational research.

  16. Metabolism of 1-alkyl-2-acyl-GPC in human platelets in response to stimulation by thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washed human platelets were incubated with radioactive 1-[3H]alkyl-2-hydroxyglycero-3-phosphocholine (lyso-PAF) at 37 degrees C. [3H]lyso-PAF was converted by platelets into [3H]alkylacyl-GPC which was incorporated. Incorporation of radioactivity was time dependent and reached a maximum of 57 percent in one h. This formation and incorporation of [3H]alkylacyl-GPC was inhibited (50%) by extracellular calcium (1.3 mM). Labeled platelets were treated for 5 min with either thrombin (2.5 U/ml) or saline solution. While there was no change in the saline control, thrombin induced a reduction in the content of [3H]alkylacyl-GPC, accompanied by an increase in [3H]lyso-PAF presumably by stimulation of phospholipase A2. There was no apparent increase in radioactivity comigrating with PAF. This was probably due to the overwhelming dilution of the radioactive alkylacyl-GPC by the endogenous nonradioactive compound (ratio-1/3200). These studies suggest that human platelets can take up lyso-PAF and acylate it to alkylacyl-GPC which is susceptible to phospholipase A2 activity

  17. Radiolabeled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial interest in developing techniques to radiolabel platelets was spurred by the lack of an accurate method for measuring platelet life span in both normals and in thrombocytopenic patients. Early investigators could obtain only rough estimates of platelet life spans by monitoring the platelet counts of thrombocytopenic patients undergoing platelet transfusions. Labels were also sought that would allow imaging of platelets in vivo in order to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases. Two types of platelet labels were investigated: cohort (pulse) labels and random labels. Cohort labels are taken up by megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and incorporated in the DNA and other components of the forming platelet. In theory, only freshly released platelets of a uniform age are labeled. Random labels, on the other hand, tag platelets in the peripheral blood, labeling platelets of all ages

  18. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in human platelets via C-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicun Wu

    Full Text Available Arsenic trioxide (ATO, one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm, up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO.

  19. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in human platelets via C-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicun; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Weilin; Yan, Rong; Zhang, Yiwen; Ruan, Changgeng; Dai, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO), one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS) exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO. PMID:24466103

  20. Studies on the Biological Effects of Ozone: 10. Release of Factors from Ozonated Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valacchi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3, promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 and interleukin-8(IL-8 are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limbischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT.

  1. Induction of circular membrane ruffling on human fibroblasts by platelet-derived growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellstroem, K.; Westermark, B. (University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Heldin, C.H. (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1988-08-01

    One of the earliest effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on human fibroblasts in culture is an induction of membrane ruffling. The morphology of the ruffles induced by PDGF is unique in that they form circular arrangements on the dorsal side of the cells. Here we report that the induction of circular ruffle arrangements is an effect specific for PDGF, dose-dependent and inhibitable by anti-PDGF antibodies. The authors have attempted to utilize this effect to design a rapid and sensitive bioassay for PDGF. The membrane ruffling assay is compared with other methods to measure PDGF and its specificity with regard to the different dimeric forms of PDGF is discussed. Introduction of Ca{sup 2+} into the cells via the Ca{sup 2+} ionophore A23187 or the addition of the tumor-promor 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), which is a stimulator of protein kinase C, does not induce circular ruffle formations on human fibroblasts, neither does the addition of the combination of these two agents. However, addition of TPA almost completely inhibits PDGF-induced circular ruffle formations. Further, they find a shift in the time-course of the PDGF-induced circular ruffle formations by sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. This may indicate the involvement of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of PDGF-induced membrane ruffling.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of TLR4 Agonist Activity: Formulation Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Misquith, Ayesha; Millie Fung, H. W.; Dowling, Quinton M.; Guderian, Jeffrey A.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Fox, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Effective in vitro evaluation of vaccine adjuvants would allow higher throughput screening compared to in vivo studies. However, vaccine adjuvants comprise a wide range of structures and formulations ranging from soluble TLR agonists to complex lipid-based formulations. The effects of formulation parameters on in vitro bioactivity assays and the correlations with in vivo adjuvant activity is not well understood. In the present work, we employ the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and a human mac...

  3. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  4. Can Platelet-rich Plasma Be Used for Skin Rejuvenation? Evaluation of Effects of Platelet-rich Plasma on Human Dermal Fibroblast

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae Hun; Je, Young Jin; Kim, Chang Deok; Lee, Young Ho; Seo, Young Joon; Lee, Jeung Hoon; Lee, Young

    2011-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet-rich plasma has attracted attention in various medical fields recently, including orthopedic, plastic, and dental surgeries and dermatology for its wound healing ability. Further, it has been used clinically in mesotherapy for skin rejuvenation. Objective In this study, the effects of activated platelet-rich plasma (aPRP) and activated platelet-poor plasma (aPPP) have been investigated on the remodelling of the extracellular matrix, a process that requires activ...

  5. Next generation sequencing analysis of human platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-depleted total RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antheia Kissopoulou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. RESULTS: Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. CONCLUSION: The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components

  6. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and 1-oleyl-2-acetyldiacylglycerol stimulate inositol trisphosphate dephosphorylation in human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina y Vedia, L.M.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1986-08-15

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP3) is formed in response to specific agonists that cause activation of phospholipase C and degradation of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. IP3 is a second messenger that releases Ca/sup 2 +/ from the dense tubular system to the cytosol in stimulated platelets. Our present information indicates that (/sup 3/H)IP3 is dephosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)inositol bisphosphate (IP2) and (/sup 3/H)inositol monophosphate (IP) by human platelets treated with 0.05-0.10% Triton X-100. This dephosphorylation of (/sup 3/H)IP3 to (/sup 3/H)IP2 and (/sup 3/H)IP is also observed when platelets are permeabilized by electrical stimulation or by 20 micrograms/ml saponin. These detergents or electropermeabilization allow IP3 to access cytosolic IP3 phosphatase. Pretreatment of intact platelets with phorbol dibutyrate and 1-oleyl-2-acetyldiacylglycerol for 30 s, at concentrations that maximally activate protein kinase C, stimulates the conversion of IP3 to IP2 and IP. This suggests a role for protein kinase C in the regulation of IP3 degradation.

  7. Imaging platelet deposition on Dacron bifurcation grafts in man: Quantification by a dual-tracer method using 111In-labeled platelets and sup(99m)Tc-labeled human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual tracer technique using 111In-labeled platelets and sup(99m)Tc-labeled human serum albumin was applied to evaluate the thrombogenicity of Dacron, bifurcation arterial grafts. The level of platelet accumulation over the whole of the graft was estimated from the ratio of 111In-platelet radioactivity deposited on the vascular wall to these radioactivity circulating in the blood pool, i.e., the platelet-accumulation index (PAI). Furthermore, the PAI value was calculated for each pixel in digitized images and the PAI distribution image (PAI image) was reconstructed. Eighteen patients with DeBakey knitted Dacron bifurcation grafts and 11 normal volunteers were studied. Of the 18 patients, 11 had no graft occlusion (group I) and the remaining 7 (group II) had occlusion. The mean PAI value (+-SD) over the whole of the graft in group I was 32.6%+-33.7% as compared to -8.8%+-4.5% in the control group (P2=10.55; P<0.005). The method used for platelet imaging in the present study may be useful in the study of platelet reactions on Dacron arterial prostheses. (orig.)

  8. Effects of condensation products of biogenic amines on human platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation products (CP) are formed by the reaction of biogenic amines with aldehydes and alpha-keto acids. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of CP on platelet function in vitro. The effect of CP on platelet aggregation was examined. Epinephrine-induced aggregation was inhibited, suggesting CP antagonistic activity on the platelet alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP), collagen and arachidonic acid induced aggregation was inhibited only at high concentrations. Inhibition of epinephrine and ADP aggregation was reversible, suggesting CP are competitive inhibitors of these agonists. Binding affinities for the platelet alpha2-adrenergic receptor were determined using [3H]-yohimbine, a specific alpha2-receptor antagonist. The order of potency for CP inhibition of [3H]-yohimbine binding paralleled that determined for inhibition of epinephrine-induced aggregation. Platelet uptake of serotonin (5-HT) was competitively inhibited by CP, with the exception of salsolinol, which appears to be stimulatory. Release of 5-HT from platelets was induced by CP, with betacarbolines being more potent than tetrahydroisoquinolines. Evidence suggests that CP cause release by displacement of 5-HT from intraplatelet storage sites since this effect can be inhibited by imipramine, thus preventing accumulation of CP by platelets

  9. Physical and chemical effects of red cells in the shear-induced aggregation of human platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, H L; Bell, D N; Braovac, S; Steinberg, A.; McIntosh, F

    1995-01-01

    Both chemical and physical effects of red cells have been implicated in the spontaneous aggregation of platelets in sheared whole blood (WB). To determine whether the chemical effect is due to ADP leaking from the red cells, a previously described technique for measuring the concentration and size of single platelets and aggregates was used to study the shear-induced aggregation of platelets in WB flowing through 1.19-mm-diameter polyethylene tubing in the presence and absence of the ADP scav...

  10. A review of the mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in human platelets and leukocytes: Implications for their use as bioenergetic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Philip A.; Saranya Ravi; Balu Chacko; Johnson, Michelle S.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of metabolic function in cells isolated from human blood for treatment and diagnosis of disease is a new and important area of translational research. It is now becoming clear that a broad range of pathologies which present clinically with symptoms predominantly in one organ, such as the brain or kidney, also modulate mitochondrial energetics in platelets and leukocytes allowing these cells to serve as “the canary in the coal mine” for bioenergetic dysfunction. This opens up th...

  11. Molecular basis of human von Willebrand disease: Analysis of platelet von Willebrand factor mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Willebrand disease (vWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder in humans, can result from either a quantitative or a qualitative defect in the adhesive glycoprotein, von Willebrand factor (vWF). Molecular studies of vWD have been limited by the large size of the vWF gene and difficulty in obtaining the vWF mRNA from patients. By use of an adaptation of the polymerase chain reaction, vWF mRNA was amplified and sequenced from peripheral blood platelets. A silent vWF allele was identified, resulting from a cis defect in vWF mRNA transcription or processing. In two type IIA vWD patients, two different but adjacent missense mutations were identified, the locations of which may identify an important vWF functional domain. Expression in heterologous cells of recombinant vWF containing one of these latter mutations reproduced the characteristic structural abnormality seen in type IIA vWD plasma

  12. Gene frequencies of human platelet antigens 1-5 in indigenous Australians in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J A; Palmer, L J; Musk, A W; Erber, W N

    2002-06-01

    The frequencies of human platelet antigen (HPA) systems vary between different racial groups; however, HPA frequency data for some racial groups are still incomplete. We report the distribution of HPA 1-5 systems in Australian Aborigines from a remote community in the north-west of Australia and compare our findings with HPA observed in a Western Australian blood donor population. Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with sequence-specific primers, 185 indigenous Australians and 1000 Western Australian blood donors were genotyped for each of the HPA 1-5 systems. Comparison of gene frequencies of alleles from HPA-1, -2, -3 and -5 systems showed significant differences between Aboriginal people and Western Australian blood donors (P Australian Aboriginals, from this study, was one of the lowest reported, whilst the frequency of HPA-5b (0.246) was one of the highest for this allele. Gene frequencies were similar to those reported for central Australian Aborigines but with no other ethnic group. In conclusion, this study confirms significant differences in HPA distributions between indigenous Australians, Australian blood donors and other racial groups. These results indicate a higher potential risk of alloimmunization to HPA-1, -2 and -3 in Australian Aborigines receiving transfusion therapy from a Caucasian blood donor population, thereby having practical implications for transfusion and pregnancy risks in people of Aboriginal origin. PMID:12071877

  13. Stimulated human neutrophils synthesize an ethanolamine plasmalogen analog of platelet-activating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to platelet-activating factor (PAF), human neutrophils stimulated by ionophore A23187 incorporate [3H] acetate into an additional product that migrates near phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and accounts for approximately 25% of the labeled lipids. We have identified this product as 1-O-alk-1'-enyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine based upon the following data. Acid lability of both the intact phospholipid and the diacetylglycerol derivates prepared by treatment of the intact product with phospholipase C followed by acetylation indicated approximately 80% of the unknown lipid is alk-1'-enyl-linked. Hydrogenation of the diacetyl derivative resulted in a product which no longer chromatographed by TLC with alk-1'-enyldiacetylglycerol, but rather with alkyldiacetylglycerol. The hydrogenated product was no longer sensitive to acid. Treatment with phospholipase A2 resulted in the release of 88% of the radiolabel into the acidified aqueous phase, indicating that the label remained as acetate. The head group was determined to be a primary amine based upon its complete conversion to the trinitrophenyl derivative by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. Investigations using a cell-free system indicate that neutrophils contain an acetyltransferase which, when stimulated, uses acetyl CoA and lysoPE plasmalogen to produce the ethanolamine plasmalogen analog of PAF

  14. Purification and reconstitution of the human platelet α2-adrenergic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human platelet α2-adrenergic receptors have been purified ∼80,000 fold to apparent homogeneity by a five step chromatographic procedure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of radioiodinated protein from purified receptor preparations shows a single major band of M/sub r/ 64,000. The competitive binding of ligands to the purified receptor protein shows the proper α2-adrenergic specificity. The α2-adrenergic receptor contains an essential sulfhydryl residues. Thus, exposure of the purified receptor to the sulfhydryl specific reagent, phenylmercuric chloride (PMC), resulted in a 80% loss of binding activity. This loss of binding activity was prevented when exposure to PMC was done in the presence of α2-adrenergic ligands and it was reversed by subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol. Partial proteolysis of purified α2-adrenergic receptors was obtained with S. aureus V-8 protease, α-chymotrypsin and papain. In a comparison with purified β2-adrenergic receptors no common partial proteolytic products were found. Partially purified preparations of the α2-adrenergic receptor were successfully reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, N/sub i/. In these reconstituted preparations, epinephrine could stimulate, and phentolamine could block, the GTPase activity of N/sub i/

  15. Purification and characterization of a novel GTP-binding protein from human platelet cytosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human platelet cytosol contains a GTP-binding protein which exhibits a Mr of 37,000 daltons in SDS-PAGE. This protein was purified to apparent homogeneity using conventional and fast protein liquid chromatography. The protein does not exhibit detectable GTPase activity. Analysis of amino acid composition indicates striking analogy to α subunits of previously described membrane bound G-proteins. The purified protein binds GTP or GTPγS specifically with a Kd of 118 nM or 70 nM respectively as determined by using [35S]GTPγS as labeled ligand. GDP or ATP is competitive only at more than 100 fold higher concentrations. Other nucleotides are not competitive at all. The protein at the native state is a dimer of Mr of 74,000 daltons. Binding of GTP is stimulated by various metal ions, dithiothreitol, phospholipids and arachidonic acid, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl inhibitors. Lysophosphatidylcholine appears to be the most potent stimulator. The sensitivity of the GTP binding toward thiol reagents suggests that the cysteinyl residues may be crucial for GTP binding. The functional role of this novel GTP-binding protein remains unknown

  16. Human platelet glycoprotein IX: An adhesive prototype of leucine-rich glycoproteins with flank-center-flank structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex on the surface of human platelets functions as the von Willebrand factor receptor and mediates von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet adhesion to blood vessels. GPIX is a relatively small (Mr, 17,000) protein that may provide for membrane insertion and orientation of the larger component of the complex. GPIb (Mr, 165,000). Using antibody screening, the authors cloned a cDNA encoding GPIX from a human erythroleukemia cell cDNA library constructed in phage λgt11. Lacking a 5' untranslated region and start codon, the cDNA sequence includes 604 nucleotides, beginning with 495 bases at the 5' end coding for 165 amino acids, followed by a stop codon and 106 noncoding bases at the 3' end. By Northern blot analysis, the GPIX cDNA hybridizes with a single 1.0-kilobase species of platelet poly(A)+ RNA. Translation of the cDNA sequence gives a predicted protein sequence beginning with a truncated putative signal sequence of 5 amino acids followed by a sequence of 17 amino acids matching that determined directly by Edman degradation of intact GPIX. GPIX contains a leucine-rich glycoprotein (LRG) sequence of 24 amino acids similar to conserved LRG sequences in GPIb and other proteins from humans, Drosophila, and yeast. The role of the flank-LRG center-flank structure in the evolution and function of the LRG proteins remains to be defined

  17. Investigation of cyclooxygenase and signaling pathways involved in human platelet aggregation mediated by synergistic interaction of various agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadia; Farooq, Ahsana Dar; Sadek, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanism(s) of synergistic interaction of various platelet mediators such as arachidonic acid (AA) when combined with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) on human platelet aggregation were examined. The results demonstrated that 5-HT had no or negligible effect on aggregation but it did potentiate the aggregation response of AA. Similarly, the combination of subeffective concentrations of ADP and AA exhibited noticeable rise in platelet aggregation. Moreover, the observed synergistic effect of AA with 5-HT on platelets was inhibited by different cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, namely ibuprofen and celecoxib, with half maximal inhibitory effect (IC50) values of 18.0 ± 1.8 and 15.6 ± 3.4 μmol/L, respectively. Interestingly, the synergistic effect observed for AA with 5-HT was, also, blocked by the 5-HT receptor blockers cyproheptadine (IC50=22.0 ± 7 μmol/L), ketanserin (IC50=152 ± 23 μmol/L), phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor (U73122; IC50=6.1 ± 0.8 μmol/L), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=3.8 ± 0.5 μmol/L). Likewise, the synergism of AA and ADP was, also, attenuated by COX inhibitors (ibuprofen; IC50=20 ± 4 μmol/L and celecoxib; IC50=24 ± 7 μmol/L), PLC inhibitor (U73122; IC50=3.7 ± 0.3 μmol/L), and MAPK inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=2.8 ± 1.1 μmol/L). Our observed data demonstrate that the combination of subthreshold concentrations of agonists amplifies platelet aggregation and that these synergistic effects largely depend on activation of COX/thromboxane A2, receptor-operated Ca(2+) channels, Gq/PLC, and MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, our data revealed that inhibition of COX pathways by using both selective and/or non-selective COX inhibitors blocks not only AA metabolism and thromboxane A2 formation, but also its binding to Gq receptors and activation of receptor-operated Ca(2+) channels in platelets. Overall, our results show that PLC and MAPK inhibitors proved

  18. Synthesis of Prostacyclin from Platelet-derived Endoperoxides by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Aaron J.; Weksler, Babette B.; Jaffe, Eric A.; Broekman, M Johan

    1980-01-01

    We have previously shown that aspirin-treated endothelial cells synthesize prostacyclin (PGI2) from the purified prostaglandin endoperoxide PGH2 (1978. J. Biol. Chem.253: 7138). To ascertain whether aspirin-treated endothelial cells produce PGI2 from endoperoxides released by stimulated platelets, [3H]arachidonic acid-prelabeled platelets were reacted in aggregometer cuvettes with the calcium ionophore A 23187, thrombin, or collagen in the presence of aspirin-treated endothelial cell suspensi...

  19. Biosynthesis and processing of platelet GPIIb-IIIa in human megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa forms a calcium-dependent heterodimer and constitutes the fibrinogen receptor on stimulated platelets. GPIIb is a two-chain protein containing disulfide-linked alpha and beta subunits. GPIIIa is a single chain protein. These proteins are synthesized in the bone marrow by megakaryocytes, but the study of their synthesis has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining enriched population of megakaryocytes in large numbers. To examine the biosynthesis and...

  20. Selective inhibition of PAF-induced human platelet aggregation by garlic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlic exudate (0.2-2.5 mg) prepared by squeezing fresh garlic cloves inhibited platelet aggregation induced by platelet activating factor (PAF) in a dose-dependent manner. No inhibition of aggregation was observed when adenosine-5-diphosphate (ADP) or arachidonic acid (AA) were used as aggregating agents. This selective effect of garlic against PAF-induced aggregation was also seen with aqueous or alcoholic garlic extracts. These results suggest that PAF antagonists are present in garlic. (author)

  1. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When [3H] AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of [3H]AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of [3H]AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate)

  2. Covalent complexes of albumin with serotonin, ketanserin and lysergic acid antagonize the activity of serotonin in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covalent conjugates of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 5-HT, ketanserin or d-lysergic acid were synthesized and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, whole blood clearance experiments in mice and aggregation studies with human platelets. Using the standard synthesis procedure, each mol of BSA bound 13.4 mol of [3H]5-HT. Derivatization did not cause significant protein aggregation as determined by electrophoresis. All three conjugates antagonized the ability of 5-HT to amplify aggregation caused by low concentrations of ADP. The antagonist activity of each conjugate was concentration dependent; 2.6 μM 5-HT-BSA completely inhibited the aggregation caused by 13 μM 5-HT. None of the BSA drug conjugates, including 5-HT-BSA, amplified platelet aggregation caused by ADP in the absence of 5-HT. Aggregation by ristocetin, collagen, epinephrine or ADP alone was not significantly affected by the conjugates. Whole blood elimination experiments in mice demonstrated that the three conjugates and underivatized BSA are equally stable in the circulation. These prototypic 5-HT drug-protein conjugates may be useful for probing 5-HT2 receptor-ligand interactions in human platelets

  3. Effects of some beta lactam antibiotics on (/sup 3/H)-methyl-yohimbine binding to intact human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borst, S.E.; Hui, K.K.; Conolly, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    Several antibiotics have been reported to cause a bleeding diathesis in man, characterized by reduced platelet aggregation. The authors investigated the effects of several of the penicillins and of moxalactam on the binding of (/sup 3/H)-methyl-yohimbine to intact human platelets. The (/sup 3/H)-methyl-yohimbine binding met the criteria for interaction at an alpha2 adrenergic binding site and showed low interindividual variability. Penicillin G, ticarcillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin and moxalactam all inhibited (/sup 3/H)-methyl-yohimbine binding, but at concentrations far in excess of clinically achievable plasma levels. They conclude that these compounds exert their antiplatelet effects by a mechanism other than competitive inhibition of catecholamine binding.

  4. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: A histological and biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H Cummings

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Repairing tendon injuries with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB has potential for improving surgical outcomes. Augmentation of sutures, a critical component of surgical tendon repair, by coating with growth factors may provide a clinically useful therapeutic device for improving tendon repair. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (a coat Vicryl sutures with a defined dose of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB without additional coating excipients (e.g. gelatin, (b quantify the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB released from the suture, and (c use the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures to enhance tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon transection model. Methods: Vicryl sutures were coated with 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/mL concentrations of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB using a dip-coating process. In vitro release was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acutely transected rat Achilles tendons were repaired using one of the four suture groups (n = 12 per group. Four weeks following repair, the tensile biomechanical and histological (i.e. collagen organization and angiogenesis properties were determined. Results: A dose-dependent bolus release of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB occurred within the first hour in vitro, followed by a gradual release over 48 h. There was a significant increase in ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.01 in the two highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose groups (1.9 ± 0.5 and 2.1 ± 0.5 MPa relative to controls (1.0 ± 0.2 MPa. The modulus significantly increased (p = 0.031 with the highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose group (7.2 ± 3.8 MPa relative to all other groups (control: 3.5 ± 0.9 MPa. No significant differences were identified for the maximum load or stiffness. The histological collagen and angiogenesis

  5. Platelet kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the in vivo processes of platelet function and the reaction and interaction of platelets with components of the blood vessel wall and artificial surfaces have received increasing attention. In this article the focus is placed on two aspects of platelet function and kinetics as revealed by 111In-labelled platelets. First the interaction of platelets with foreign prosthetic surfaces is discussed and some interesting facets of platelet functions that have come to light, are pointed out. Secondly, experiences with the development and refinement of an improved technique, namely the dual-isotope subtraction method, which increases the sensitivity of platelet imaging and allows the detection of relatively small areas of platelet deposition with accuracy, are described

  6. Effects of U46619 on human platelets: dissociation of shape change from fibrinogen receptor exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the authors measured the specific effects of U46619 (15(s)-hydroxy-9α,11α-methano-epoxy-prostadienoic acid), a TxA2/PGH2 analog on platelet (plt) activation. Plt shape change (SC) myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC-P) and fg receptor exposure (using I125fg), were measured. SC, and MLC-P were saturable and dose dependent. EC50 values are as follows: SC;61.3nM +/- 32nM(n=10), MLC-P;0.15μM. Interaction of U46619 with a specific membrane receptor was inferred from studies using BM13177, (2-benzene-sulphonamido)-ethyl)-phenoxyacetic acid) a specific TxA2/PGH2 antagonist. The IC50 of BM13177 for MLC-P, was 6.5μM and for SC was 4.3μM. Concentrations of U46619 (50-200nM) that gave MLC-P and SC similar to ADP (5-10μM) caused minimal exposure of fg receptors (302 sites/plt) and no plt aggregation when 400μg/mL fg was added to the system. In contrast, ADP caused SC, fg receptor exposure (8000 sites/plt) and aggregation. Higher concentrations of U46619 (0.2-1μM) caused SC, exposure of fg receptors (19,000 sites/plt) and when fg was added, aggregation. But the receptor exposure and aggregation responses by U46619 were blocked by addition of the ADP scavenger, apyrase. In conclusion, U46619 causes the following direct effects in human plts: MLC-P, and SC; and through released ADP, exposure of fg receptors

  7. Preclinical Toxicology Studies of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Either Alone or in Combination with Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate and Type I Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Conan S.; Gino Bradica; Hart, Charlie E.; Anuradha Karunanidhi; Reva M. Street; Lyndsey Schutte; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2011-01-01

    Human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (hPDGF-BB) is a basic polypeptide growth factor released from platelets at the injury site. It is a multifunctional molecule that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division and induces biological effects that are implicated in tissue repair, atherosclerosis, inflammatory responses, and neoplastic diseases. This paper is an overview of the toxicology data generated from a broad testing platform to determine bone, soft tissue, and systemic responses follow...

  8. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  9. Multiple signaling pathways mediated by dopamine and calcium ionophore A23187 in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of platelet aggregation induced by the synergistic action of dopamine (DA) and a Ca/sup +2/-ionophore, A23187. DA showed non significant effect on platelet aggregation over a wide range of concentrations (up to 500 micro M), but did potentiate the aggregation response of A23187. Aggregation induced by A23187 was inhibited by calcium channel blockers (diltiazem and verpamil), receptor blockers (chlorpromazine and haloperidol) and a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin). However, the inhibitory effect of these blockers was more pronounced (with a selectivity ratio of 1.5-28) in the aggregation induced by synergistic effect of A23187 and DA. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P1 3-Kinase) inhibitor, wortmanin (1C/sub 50/. 25-30 nM), inhibited aggregation induced by either A23187 or DA and act synergistically. This synergistic effect on platelet aggregation is mediated through multiple signaling pathways. (author)

  10. CdTe quantum dots induce activation of human platelets: implications for nanoparticle hemocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel SP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stephen P Samuel,1 Maria J Santos-Martinez,2–4 Carlos Medina,2,3 Namrata Jain,1 Marek W Radomski,2,3 Adriele Prina-Mello,1,5 Yuri Volkov1,5 1Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 3Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 4School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 5AMBER and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: New nanomaterials intended for systemic administration have raised concerns regarding their biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Quantum dots (QD nanoparticles have been used for diagnostics, and recent work suggests their use for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging. However, the hemocompatibility of QDs and their constituent components has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, comprehensive investigation of QD–platelet interactions is presented. These interactions were shown using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of QDs on platelet function were investigated using light aggregometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, flow cytometry, and gelatin zymography. Platelet morphology was also analyzed by phase-contrast, immunofluorescence, atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy. We show that the QDs bind to platelet plasma membrane with the resultant upregulation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin receptors, and release of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These findings unravel for the first time the mechanism of functional response of platelets to ultrasmall QDs in vitro. Keywords: platelets, quantum dots, aggregometry, flow cytometry, zymography, quartz crystal microbalance, transmission electron microscopy

  11. Biocompatibility, biodegradation, and neovascularization of human single-unit platelet-rich fibrin glue: an in vivo analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiuwen; Ren Jianan; Yao Genhong; Zhou Bo; Wang Gefei; Gu Guosheng; Luan Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical applications of fibrin glue span over several surgical modalities.The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility and biodegradation of different formulations of platelet-rich fibrin glue in vivo and examine its effects on the neovascularization of wound sites.Methods Human-derived single-unit fibrin glue was prepared.Incisions were made on the backs of rats,and these were coated with homemade glues containing different concentrations of aminomethylbenzoic acid (Groups A-F) or commercial adhesives (Group G).A sham control group was included (Group H).The wounds were examined by histological analysis and immunohistochemistry at several time points.Results Successful wound closure was achieved in all groups by day 12.Acute inflammation occurred during the first six days,but gradually disappeared.The longest sealant duration was achieved using the lowest concentration of antifibrinolytic agent in a 1:10 volume ratio with cryoprecipitate.Expression levels of the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 were significantly higher in Groups A and C compared to the control groups (Groups G and H) on day 3 (P <0.05).Conclusions Single-unit platelet-rich fibrin glue has excellent biocompatibility and is associated with the upregulation of neovascularization.The addition of aminomethylbenzoic acid could prevent the degradation of fibrin glue.

  12. Platelet reactivity in human aortic grafts: a prospective, randomized midterm study of platelet adherence and release products in Dacron and polytetrafluoroethylene conduits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet-related phenomena at the blood-surface interface of randomly placed knitted Dacron (n = 6) and polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (n = 6) interposition aortic grafts were studied in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy. Luminal accumulation of platelets was assessed by infusing indium-111-oxine (400 microCi) labeled autologous platelets and imaging grafts at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Image analysis included an indium ratio technique (comparing aortic graft radioactivity to that of an iliac artery) and a red blood cell technetium subtraction technique (excluding blood pool radioactivity from graft radioactivity, with the heart or iliac artery serving as reference regions). Plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 were correlated with platelet accumulations on the aortic prostheses. Differences in graft radioactivity or platelet-release products were not evident 1 week after surgery. Three months after implantation, Dacron and ePTFE conduits exhibited 87% and 47% (p less than 0.05) more radioactivity with the indium ratio technique than the iliac artery. Similarly, increased Dacron compared with ePTFE graft radioactivity was noted using technetium subtraction techniques: 71% vs 30% with a heart reference and 26% vs 11% with an iliac artery reference, respectively. Increases in graft radioactivity correlated with increases in both plasma beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 at 3 months (r = 0.6 to 0.9; p less than 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the imaging technique used). At 6 months, differences did not persist. In fact, technetium subtraction techniques suggested less Dacron conduit reactivity. It is speculated that differences in platelet accumulation and activation associated with different graft substrates may prove clinically important

  13. Scintigraphic assessment of focal platelet accumulations following infrainguinal bypass surgery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; Hesse, B; Eiberg, J; Rabøl, A; Folke, M; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    28 patients undergoing in situ vein (n = 24), composite vein-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (n = 1) or PTFE (n = 3) bypass surgery, assumed vascular injuries were recorded intraoperatively. Autologous indium-111-labelled platelets were injected into the inflow artery immediately after restoration of...... antiplatelet therapy or vein graft diameter. Only 2 of the 20 intragraft platelet depositions occurred in areas where intra-operative vascular injury was suspected. In the composite graft and the PTFE grafts, diffuse activity was observed throughout the entire bypass. In conclusion, focal activity...

  14. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation. PMID:19286657

  15. Mechanisms of Nifedipine-Downregulated CD40L/sCD40L Signaling in Collagen Stimulated Human Platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Hsiao Chen

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived soluble CD40L (sCD40L release plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, a dihydropyridine-based L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect beyond its blood pressure-lowering effect, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether nifedipine affects sCD40L release from collagen-stimulated human platelets and to determine the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-γ (PPAR-β/-γ. We found that treatment with nifedipine significantly inhibited the platelet surface CD40L expression and sCD40L release in response to collagen, while the inhibition was markedly reversed by blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity with specific antagonist such as GSK0660 and GW9662. Meanwhile, nifedipine also enhanced nitric oxide (NO and cyclic GMP formation in a PPAR-β/-γ-dependent manner. When the NO/cyclic GMP pathway was suppressed, nifedipine-mediated inhibition of sCD40L release was abolished significantly. Collagen-induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and HSP27, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression/activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were significantly inhibited by nifedipine, whereas these alterations were all attenuated by co-treatment with PPAR-β/-γ antagonists. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PPAR-β/-γ-dependent pathways contribute to nifedipine-mediated downregulation of CD40L/sCD40L signaling in activated platelets through regulation of NO/ p38MAPK/ERK1/2/HSP27/MMP-2 signalings and provide a novel mechanism regarding the anti-atherosclerotic effect of nifedipine.

  16. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 μM/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na+ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with 14C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 μM, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet

  17. Investigation of cyclooxygenase and signaling pathways involved in human platelet aggregation mediated by synergistic interaction of various agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nadia Khan,1,2 Ahsana Dar Farooq,1 Bassem Sadek21Dr Panjwani Center for Molecular Medicine and Drug Research, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan; 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab EmiratesAbstract: In the present study, the mechanism(s of synergistic interaction of various platelet mediators such as arachidonic acid (AA when combined with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT or adenosine diphosphate (ADP on human platelet aggregation were examined. The results demonstrated that 5-HT had no or negligible effect on aggregation but it did potentiate the aggregation response of AA. Similarly, the combination of subeffective concentrations of ADP and AA exhibited noticeable rise in platelet aggregation. Moreover, the observed synergistic effect of AA with 5-HT on platelets was inhibited by different cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors, namely ibuprofen and celecoxib, with half maximal inhibitory effect (IC50 values of 18.0±1.8 and 15.6±3.4 µmol/L, respectively. Interestingly, the synergistic effect observed for AA with 5-HT was, also, blocked by the 5-HT receptor blockers cyproheptadine (IC50=22.0±7 µmol/L, ketanserin (IC50=152±23 µmol/L, phospholipase C (PLC inhibitor (U73122; IC50=6.1±0.8 µmol/L, and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=3.8±0.5 µmol/L. Likewise, the synergism of AA and ADP was, also, attenuated by COX inhibitors (ibuprofen; IC50=20±4 µmol/L and celecoxib; IC50=24±7 µmol/L, PLC inhibitor (U73122; IC50=3.7±0.3 µmol/L, and MAPK inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=2.8±1.1 µmol/L. Our observed data demonstrate that the combination of subthreshold concentrations of agonists amplifies platelet aggregation and that these synergistic effects largely depend on activation of COX/thromboxane A2, receptor-operated Ca2+ channels, Gq/PLC, and MAPK signaling

  18. Variability of the human aggregation response of normal platelets to AVP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pencheva, N.; Barth, Tomislav; Barthová, J.; Penev, M.; Mladenova, A.

    Praha : ÚOCHB AV ČR, 2003 - (Slaninová, J.), s. 73-76 ISBN 80-86241-20-3. [Biologically Active Peptides /8./. Praha (CZ), 23.04.2003-25.04.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : vasopressin * platelet aggregation * heparin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  19. Effects of activated and nonactivated platelet-rich plasma on proliferation of human osteoblasts in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slapnička, J.; Fassmann, A.; Strašák, Luděk; Augustin, P.; Vaněk, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2008), s. 297-301. ISSN 0278-2391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : platelet - rich plasma * osteoblast * proliferation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2008

  20. Human platelet-derived growth factor stimulates prostaglandin synthesis by activation and by rapid de novo synthesis of cyclooxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Habenicht, A J; Goerig, M; Grulich, J; Rothe, D; Gronwald, R; Loth, U; Schettler, G; Kommerell, B; Ross, R.

    1985-01-01

    Human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulated prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis in the cell cycle of Swiss 3T3 cells at two distinct time intervals, with a first plateau within 10 min and a second plateau within 2-4 h after addition of PDGF. At 4 h, the concentration of PGE2 in PDGF-stimulated cultures exceeded the quiescent control cells by a factor of 10-15. Quiescent cells incubated with up to 16 microM exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) synthesized only small amounts of PGE2. In contr...

  1. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinju; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Stegeman, Samantha; Pfaff-Amesse, Teresa; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenfeng; Amesse, Lawrence; Chen, Yanfang

    2012-01-01

    Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs). The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs) has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs). In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29) and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34) expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1) MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation) accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2) expression; 2) The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm) and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation); 3) Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4) Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system) as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production. PMID:22952951

  2. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Wang

    Full Text Available Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs. The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs. In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29 and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34 expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1 MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2 expression; 2 The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation; 3 Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4 Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  3. Effect of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Xiang-ying; QIAO Jing

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a kind of natural source of autologous growth factors, and has been used successfully in medical community. However, the effect of PRP in periodontal regeneration is not clear yet.This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP as an adjunct to bovine porous bone mineral (BPBM) graft in the treatment of human intrabony defects.Methods Seventeen intrabony defects in 10 periodontitis patients were randomly treated either with PRP and BPBM (test group, n=9) or with BPBM alone (control group, n=8). Clinical parameters were evaluated including changes in probing depth, relative attachment level (measured by Florida Probe and a stent), and bone probing level between baseline and 1 year postoperatively. Standardized periapical radiographs of each defect were taken at baseline, 2 weeks, and 1 year postoperatively, and analyzed by digital subtraction radiography (DSR).Results Both treatment modalities resulted in significant attachment gain, reduction of probing depth, and bone probing level at 1-year post-surgery compared to baseline. The test group exhibited statistically significant improvement compared to the control sites in probing depth reduction: (4.78 ± 0.95) mm versus (3.48±0.41) mm (P<0.01); clinical attachment gain: (4.52± 1.14) mm versus (2.85 ±0.80) mm (P<0.01);bone probing reduction:(4.56±1.04) mm versus (2.88±0.79) mm (P<0.01); and defect bone fill: (73.41±14.78)% versus (47.32±11.47)% (P<0.01). DSR analysis of baseline and 1 year postoperatively also showed greater radiographic gains in alveolar bone mass in the test group than in the control group: gray increase (580 ±50) grays versus (220 ± 32)grays (P=0.0001);area with increased gray were (5.21±1.25) mm2 versus (3.02±1.22) mm2 (P=0.0001).Conclusions The treatment with a combination of PRP and BPBM led to a significantly favorable clinical improvement in periodontal intrabony defects compared to using BPBM alone. Further studies are

  4. Post-transfusion purpura in an African-American man due to human platelet antigen-5b alloantibody: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynce Filipa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-transfusion purpura is a rare immunohematological disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia following transfusion of blood components and induced by an alloantibody against a donor platelet antigen. It occurs primarily in women sensitized by pregnancy and is most commonly caused by anti-human platelet antigen-1a antibodies. Here, we describe what we believe to be the first documented case of an African-American man who developed post-transfusion purpura due to an anti-human platelet antigen-5b alloantibody after receiving multiple blood products. Case presentation A 68-year-old African-American man initially admitted with atrial flutter was started on anticoagulation treatment, which was complicated by severe hematemesis. On days 4 and 5 of hospitalization, he received six units of packed red blood cells, and on days 4, 13 and 14 he received plasma. His platelet count began to drop on day 25 and on day 32 reached a nadir of 7 × 109/L. His platelet count increased after receiving intravenous immune globulin. An antibody with reactivity to human platelet antigen-5b was detected by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassay. Our patient was homozygous for human platelet antigen-5a. Conclusion This case emphasizes the importance of including post-transfusion purpura in the differential diagnosis for both men and women with acute onset of thrombocytopenia following transfusion of blood products. The prompt recognition of this entity is crucial for initiation of the appropriate management.

  5. Effect of membrane protein concentration on binding of 3H-imipramine in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of 3H-imipramine to platelet membranes has been implicated as a marker for depression. Comparing 3H-IMI binding between depressed patients and normal subjects we observed an increase in the dissociation constant Kd with increasing membrane protein. This phenomenon was studied more rigorously in five normal subjects. Platelet membranes were prepared and adjusted to four concentrations of protein ranging from 100 to 800 micrograms/ml. The 3H-IMI binding parameters of maximum binding sites number (Bmax) and Kd were obtained by Scatchard analysis at each membrane concentration. A positive linear relationship was found between K/sub d/ values and the concentration of membrane protein in the assay, but no change was observed in Bmax. The variability in Kd values reported in the literature may be accounted for in part by the different concentrations of membrane protein used in various studies

  6. Recombinant human interleukin-6 protects mice from lethal irradiation and has effects on platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of rhIL-6 on platelets and its possible utilization in irradiation-induced myelosuppression. Methods: The rhIL-6 (5μg/day x 7 days) was injected into lethally irradiated C57BL/6 mice before or after irradiation. Results: The survival was significantly prolonged by rhIL-6 administration either before or after irradiation when compared with HBSS group (P<0.01). The mean survival period prolonged from 9.3 days to 12.7 days (rhIL-6 administration after irradiation) or to 11.5 days (rhIL-6 administration before irradiation). rhIL-6 enhanced the contents of RBC, HGB, HCT and PLT. Conclusion: The research indicates that rhIL-6 may improve platelets and be a possibly potential candidate for the treatment of irradiation-induced myelosuppression in clinic

  7. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    OpenAIRE

    Asmis, L; Tanner, F C; Sudano, I; Lüscher, T F; Camici, G G

    2010-01-01

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and resul...

  8. Release of (14C)5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red wine, at a final dilution of 1/50, caused released of (14C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from preloaded platelets, an effect which was not observed with any white wines or beers tested. Since 5-HT, is probably released from body stores during migraine attacks and red wine is known to provoke migraine episodes in susceptible individuals, release of 5-HT, possibly from central stores, could represent a plausible mechanism for its mode of action

  9. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  10. Trypsin pretreatment dissociates the effect of GTP and Na+ on ligand binding to human platelet α2-adrenoreceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recently showed that maximal concentration of trypsin (TR) inactivated only 70-80% of specific [3H]yohimbine (3H-Y) binding to human platelet α2-adrenoreceptors (α2-AR). The effect of TR on the interaction between the agonist, epinephrine, and GTP or Na+ on 3H-Y binding to α2-AR of human platelets was investigated in the present study. Partially purified α2-AR protein was pretreated with 500 μg TR for 3 min at 350C, the proteolytic action was terminated by specific TR-inhibitor, and the membranes were washed twice prior to specific ligand binding studies. Under these conditions, TR produced a 40-50% reduction of specific 3H-Y binding. Further characterization of the specific ligand binding by Scatchard plots showed that TR did not modify the affinity of the α2-AR to the agonist or the antagonist or the antagonists. However, in the TR-pretreated membranes, the ability of GTP to reduce the receptor affinity for epinephrine was lost. The effect of Na+, on the other hand, remained intact under these conditions. Thus, TR can selectively destroy the GTP-α2-AR but not Na+-α2-AR interaction suggesting that the GTP- and Na+-binding proteins are distinct

  11. Aggregation of human platelets by endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595 is prevented by synthetic peptide analogs of cell adhesion sites of fibrinogen and fibronectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombocytopenia often accompanies sepsis due to endotoxin producing gram-negative bacteria. The authors have observed that mutant Re595 of S. minnesota induced aggregation of human platelets separated from plasma fibrinogen (Theta) and other proteins. This aggregation is dependent on ADP secreted from storage granules in response to mutant Re595. Platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 was prevented by simultaneously added EDTA and EGTA (5mM), whereas secretion of 14C-serotonin was maintained. Preincubation of platelets with chelators (1 hr, 370C), known to dissociate irreversibly the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb x IIIa complex, abolished aggregation while serotonin secretion was decreased by only one fourth. Since the GPIIb x IIIa complex constitutes the receptor for Theta, its role was examined using synthetic peptide analogs of sites on gamma and alpha chains of Theta. Gamma 400-411 (225 μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 while serotonin secretion was unaffected. Alpha 572-575 (RGDS; 100 μM), analogous to cell adhesion site of fibronectin, also prevented aggregation induced by mutant Re595. Thus, mutant Re595 causes platelet aggregation which is divalent cation-dependent and proceeds via receptor pathway for secreted adhesive macromolecules

  12. Effect of some saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on prostaglandin biosynthesis in washed human blood platelets from (1-/sup 14/ C)arachidonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, K.C.; Awasthi, K.K.; Lindegard, P.; Tiwari, K.P.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of some saturated (lauric, palmitic and stearic) an unsaturated (linoleic, gamma-linolenic, alpha-linolenic and oleic) fatty acids at 0.1. 0.25 and 0.5 mM concentrations on the in vitro metabolization of (1-14 C) arachidonic acid by washed human blood platelets have been studied. Effects of these fatty acids were studied with intact as well as lysed platelet preparations. With intact platelet preparations it was found that (i) all unsaturated fatty acids enhanced the biosynthesis of TxB2, PGE2, PGD2 and PGF2 alpha, (ii) unsaturated fatty acids reduced the formation of HHT and HETE with the exception of oleic acid which showed very little effect, (iii) unsaturated fatty acids reduced the formation of MDA, whereas palmitic and stearic acids increased its formation and (iv) all unsaturated fatty acids reduced the synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxides. These results support our previous observations where effects of fatty acids were examined at higher concentrations (10). At 0.1 mM FA concentration, inconsistent results were obtained. With lysed platelet preparations all cyclooxygenase products were reduced in presence of unsaturated fatty acids, whereas HETE formation was reduced only in presence of linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids. Electron micrographs of washed platelet suspensions were obtained with untreated platelet preparations and platelet preparations treated with 0.25 and 0.5 mM linoleic acid concentrations. The results are discussed in the light of a possible soap-like effect of FA salt on platelets.

  13. Cultivation and irradiation of human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with platelet lysate for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over 30 years, the use of culture medium, enriched with bovine serum, and murines fibroblasts, with the rate of proliferation controlled by irradiation or by share anticarcinogenic drugs, has been playing successfully its role in assisting in the development of keratinocytes in culture, for clinical purposes. However, currently there is a growing concern about the possibility of transmitting prions and animals viruses to transplanted patients. Taking into account this concern, the present work aims to cultivate human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with human platelets lysate and determine the irradiation dose of these cells, for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture. For carrying out the proposed objective, platelets lysis has standardized, this lysate was used for human fibroblasts cultivation and the irradiation dose enough to inhibit its duplication was evaluated. Human keratinocytes were cultivated in these feeder layers, in culture medium enriched with the lysate. With these results we conclude that the 10% platelets lysate promoted a better adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts and in all dose levels tested (60 to 300 Gy), these had their mitotic activity inactivated by ionizing irradiation, being that the feeder layers obtained with doses from 70 to 150 Gy were those that provided the best development of keratinocytes in medium containing 2.5% of human platelet lysate. Therefore, it was possible to standardize both the cultivation of human fibroblasts as its inactivation for use as feeder layer in culture of keratinocytes, so as to eliminate xenobiotics components. (author)

  14. Use of Aspirin in normalization of recombinant human erythropoietin-mediated hyper-reactivity of platelets in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh M Soni

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that rHuEPO increases platelet reactivity and aspirin normalizes the hyper-reactive platelet and may reduce the cardiovascular events associated with rHuEPO in CKD patients.

  15. Influence of hirudin and cobra venom factor on the release of 14C-serotonin and 51chromium from human platelets induced by thrombin, collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin and HLA antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work investigates the influence of hirudin and cobra venom factor on thrombin, collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin and HLA-antibody-induced release of 14C-serotonin and 51chromium from human platelets. Besides the platelet-specific release reaction (14C-serotonin) the extent of platelet lysis was determined by measurement of the loss of 51chromium from the platelets. The results showed the thrombin, collagen and aggregate-gammaglobulin-induced platelet alteration to be a non-complement-dependent reaction of the platelets with release of 14C-serotonin. Following long-term incubation small quantities of 51chromium are also released. As this release of 51chromium cannot be inhibited using cobra venom factor and does not occur in washed platelets either, it is most probably a non-complement-dependent reaction. The HLA-antibody-induced, specific platelet alteration is both complement-dependent and complement-independent. Differentiation is possible by inhibition of the complement-dependent lysis. On the other hand thrombin is of no relevance to the collagen, aggregate gammaglobulin, and HLA-antibody-induced platelet alteration as the interactions of these substances with platelets are not inhibited by hirudin. The above results are confirmed by investigation of the 51chromium uptake capacity of washed platelets treated previously with thrombin, collagen and HLA antibody. (orig./MG)

  16. E17110 promotes reverse cholesterol transport with liver X receptor β agonist activity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Liver X receptor (LXR plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT, and activation of LXR could reduce atherosclerosis. In the present study we used a cell-based screening method to identify new potential LXRβ agonists. A novel benzofuran-2-carboxylate derivative was identified with LXRβ agonist activity: E17110 showed a significant activation effect on LXRβ with an EC50 value of 0.72 μmol/L. E17110 also increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 and G1 (ABCG1 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, E17110 significantly reduced cellular lipid accumulation and promoted cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, we found that the key amino acids in the LXRβ ligand-binding domain had distinct interactions with E17110 as compared to TO901317. These results suggest that E17110 was identified as a novel compound with LXRβ agonist activity in vitro via screening, and could be developed as a potential anti-atherosclerotic lead compound.

  17. Formation and metabolism of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Myo-inositol (1,4,5)trisphosphate ((1,4,5)IP3), when added to lysed platelets, was rapidly converted to [3H]inositol (1,3,4,5)tetrakisphosphate which was in turn converted to [3H]inositol (1,3,4)trisphosphate. This result demonstrates that platelets have the same metabolic pathways for interconversion of inositol polyphosphates that are found in other cells. Labelling of platelets with [32P]orthophosphate, followed by h.1.p.c. was used to measure thrombin-induced changes in the three inositol polyphosphates. Interfering compounds were removed by a combination of enzymatic and nonenzymatic techniques. [32P]-(1,4,5)IP3 was formed rapidly and reached its maximal level at about 4 sec. It was also rapidly degraded and was no longer detectable after 30-60 sec. Formation of (1,3,4,5)IP4 was almost as rapid as that of (1,4,5)IP3 and remained at detectable levels for a longer time. (1,3,4)IP3 was formed after an initial lag and this isomer reached its maximal level that was ten-fold higher than that of (1,4,5)IP3 at 30 sec. Comparison of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration as measured with fura-2 indicates that agents other than (1,4,5)IP3 are responsible for the sustained maintenance of a high level of intracellular Ca2+. It is proposed that either (1,3,4)IP3 or (1,3,4,5)IP4 may also be Ca2+-mobilizing agents

  18. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental thrombi in dogs using Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antibody fragments [MAPab-F(ab')/sub 2/] reactive with human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunoimaging of thrombi could have great clinical value in the management of coronary artery and thromboembolic disease. In-111-oxine-labeled platelets currently used require platelet isolation, delayed imaging, background subtraction and there is also potential for damaging or contaminating platelets during labeling. Murine monoclonal antibody (IgG/sub 2/a) fragments directed against human platelet membrane components (cross-reactive with dog platelets) were labeled with Tc-99m and repurified from ''kits''. After radiolabeling, 91.5-93.3% of the Tc-99m was antibody-associated. The preparations retained immunoreactivity, as determined by the ratio of cell to plasma-associated radioactivity (ratios 54.7-63.8). Tc-99m-MAPAb-F(ab')/sub 2/ were injected i.v. into dogs with thrombi produced in peripheral and pulmonary veins and arteries. About 50% of the radioactivity was cleared from the blood in 3-6 min. and 18-24% was excreted in the urine within 3 hrs. The thrombi were consistently and easily visible within 1-3 hrs. with no need for blood pool subtraction. In some cases, intimal damage along the path of catheters was seen. No adverse side effects were observed. The advantages of this method are: short and simple preparation, no need for blood pool subtraction and early visualization of thrombi. Human studies are warranted to determine its clinical efficacy

  19. Early production of human neutrophils and platelets posttransplant is severely compromised by growth factor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul H; Knapp, David J H F; Beer, Philip A; MacAldaz, Margarita; Rabu, Gabrielle; Cheung, Alice M S; Wei, Lisa; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-07-01

    The critical human cells that produce neutrophils and platelets within 3 weeks in recipients of hematopoietic transplants are thought to produce these mature blood cells with the same kinetics in sublethally irradiated immunodeficient mice. Quantification of their numbers indicates their relative underrepresentation in cord blood (CB), likely explaining the clinical inadequacy of single CB units in rescuing hematopoiesis in myelosuppressed adult patients. We here describe that exposure of CD34(+) CB cells ex vivo to growth factors that markedly expand their numbers and colony-forming cell content also rapidly (within 24 hours) produce a significant and sustained net loss of their original short-term repopulating activity. This loss of short-term in vivo repopulating activity affects early platelet production faster than early neutrophil output, consistent with their origin from distinct input populations. Moreover, this growth factor-mediated loss is not abrogated by published strategies to increase progenitor homing despite evidence that the effect on rapid neutrophil production is paralleled in time and amount by a loss of the homing of their committed clonogenic precursors to the bone marrow. These results highlight the inability of in vitro or phenotype assessments to reliably predict clinical engraftment kinetics of cultured CB cells. PMID:27090409

  20. Effect of albumin-bound DHA on phosphoinositide phosphorylation in collagen stimulated human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of exogenous albumin-bound docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) (DHA), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) (AA), and eicosapendaenoic acid (20:5n-3) (EPA) on phosphoinositide metabolism following collagen stimulation was studied using [3H]inositol prelabelled platelets. Collagen stimulation (3 min, 1.8 micrograms/ml) increased the labelling of both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). Of the fatty acids tested, only pre-incubation (2 min) with DHA (20 microM) significantly attenuated the collagen-induced increased PIP and PIP2 labelling; EPA was without effect, while AA enhanced PIP labelling. Forty microM DHA was less effective at attenuating the increased PIP and PIP2 labelling even though this concentration of DHA resulted in greater inhibition of platelet aggregation. Neither concentration of DHA attenuated the increased polyphosphoinositide labelling resulting from stimulation by the endoperoxide analogue U46619, or the phorbol ester, PMA. These data suggest that the effect of DHA on attenuating the increased PIP and PIP2 labelling following collagen stimulation likely occurs before thromboxane receptor occupancy, may not occur at the level of protein kinase C activation, and could be mediated in part via a lessened synthesis of thromboxane A2

  1. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  2. Differential fMet-Leu-Phe- and Platelet-activating Factor-induced Signaling Toward Ral Activation in Primary Human Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M'Rabet, Laura; Coffer, P.J.; Wolthuis, R.M.F.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Koenderman, L.; Bos, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the activation of the small GTPase Ral in human neutrophils after stimulation with fMet- Leu-Phe (fMLP), platelet activating factor (PAF), and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and compared it with the activation of two other small GTPases, Ras and Rap1. We found that

  3. High glucose enhances transient receptor potential channel canonical type 6-dependent calcium influx in human platelets via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Maier, Alexandra; Scholze, Alexandra; Rauch, Ursula; Boltzen, Ulrike; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channels mediating 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG)-induced calcium entry have been identified on human platelets. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia increases the expression of TRPC6 channels....

  4. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyffarth Gunter

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour.

  5. Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felixsson, Emma; Persson, Ingrid A-L; Eriksson, Andreas C; Persson, Karin

    2010-09-01

    Extract from seeds and bark of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) is used as an herbal medicine against chronic venous insufficiency. The effect and mechanism of action on veins, arteries, and platelets are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of horse chestnut on the contraction of bovine mesenteric veins and arteries, and human platelet aggregation. Contraction studies showed that horse chestnut extract dose-dependently contracted both veins and arteries, with the veins being the most sensitive. Contraction of both veins and arteries were significantly inhibited by the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. No effect on contraction was seen with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, the alpha(1) receptor antagonist prazosin or the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonist saralasin neither in veins nor arteries. ADP-induced human platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by horse chestnut. A further reduction was seen with the extract in the presence of ketanserin. In conclusion, horse chestnut contraction of both veins and arteries is, at least partly, mediated through 5-HT(2A) receptors. Human platelet aggregation is reduced by horse chestnut. The clinical importance of these findings concerning clinical use, possible adverse effects, and drug interactions remains to be investigated. PMID:20148408

  6. Platelet Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or exertion Recovery from excess alcohol consumption and vitamin B12 and folate deficiency Rarely, thrombocytosis is caused by ... have bleeding problems, as the platelets may not function normally. This disorder is often associated with a ...

  7. Platelet-rich plasma in orthopedic therapy: a comparative systematic review of clinical and experimental data in equine and human musculoskeletal lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Brossi, Patrícia M.; Moreira, Juliana J; Machado, Thaís SL; Baccarin, Raquel YA

    2015-01-01

    Background This systematic review aimed to present and critically appraise the available information on the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) in equine and human orthopedic therapeutics and to verify the influence of study design and methodology on the assumption of PRP’s efficacy. We searched Medline, PubMed, Embase, Bireme and Google Scholar without restrictions until July 2013. Randomized trials, human cohort clinical studies or case series with a control group on the use of PRP in te...

  8. Activation of haem-oxidized soluble guanylyl cyclase with BAY 60-2770 in human platelets lead to overstimulation of the cyclic GMP signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B Mendes-Silverio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC activators reactivate the haem-oxidized enzyme in vascular diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-platelet mechanisms of the haem-independent sGC activator BAY 60-2770 in human washed platelets. The hypothesis that sGC oxidation potentiates the anti-platelet activities of BAY 60-2770 has been tested. METHODS: Human washed platelet aggregation and adhesion assays, as well as flow cytometry for α(IIbβ(3 integrin activation and Western blot for α1 and β1 sGC subunits were performed. Intracellular calcium levels were monitored in platelets loaded with a fluorogenic calcium-binding dye (FluoForte. RESULTS: BAY 60-2770 (0.001-10 µM produced significant inhibition of collagen (2 µg/ml- and thrombin (0.1 U/ml-induced platelet aggregation that was markedly potentiated by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (10 µM. In fibrinogen-coated plates, BAY 60-2770 significantly inhibited platelet adhesion, an effect potentiated by ODQ. BAY 60-2770 increased the cGMP levels and reduced the intracellular Ca(2+ levels, both of which were potentiated by ODQ. The cell-permeable cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (100 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and Ca(2+ levels in an ODQ-insensitive manner. The cAMP levels remained unchanged by BAY 60-2770. Collagen- and thrombin-induced α(IIbβ(3 activation was markedly inhibited by BAY 60-2770 that was further inhibited by ODQ. The effects of sodium nitroprusside (3 µM were all prevented by ODQ. Incubation with ODQ (10 µM significantly reduced the protein levels of α1 and β1 sGC subunits, which were prevented by BAY 60-2770. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory effects of BAY 60-2770 on aggregation, adhesion, intracellular Ca(2+ levels and α(IIbβ(3 activation are all potentiated in haem-oxidizing conditions. BAY 60-2770 prevents ODQ-induced decrease in sGC protein levels. BAY 60-2770 could be of therapeutic interest in cardiovascular diseases

  9. Measurement of arachidonic acid release from human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and platelets: comparison between gas chromatographic and radiometric assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a simple gas chromatographic method for the assay of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) has been described in which arachidonic acid released from endogenous phospholipid pools is measured following its extraction and derivatization to pentafluorobenzyl esters. Using this assay, PLA2 activities in control and calcium ionophore-stimulated human neutrophils, as well as in control, thrombin, and calcium ionophore stimulated human platelets, have been measured. These values are compared with those obtained by monitoring the release of radioactivity from 3H- or 14Carachidonic acid prelabeled cells. While the radiometric assay measures only the release of exogenously incorporated radioactive arachidonic acid, the gas chromatographic assay measures arachidonic acid released from all the endogenous pools. Thus, the apparent increase in PLA2 activity in stimulated cells measured by the gas chromatographic assay is four- to fivefold higher than that by the radiometric assay. Inclusion of fatty acid free bovine serum albumin in the reaction buffer significantly increases the amount of arachidonic acid that is measured by gas chromatography. The gas chromatographic method has also been successfully utilized for measuring PLA2 activity in cell-free preparations derived from physically disrupted human neutrophils

  10. The 46/50 kDa phosphoprotein VASP purified from human platelets is a novel protein associated with actin filaments and focal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, M; Halbrügge, M; Scheer, U; Wiegand, C; Jockusch, B M; Walter, U

    1992-01-01

    Vasoactive agents which elevate either cGMP or cAMP inhibit platelet activation by pathways sharing at least one component, the 46/50 kDa vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). VASP is stoichiometrically phosphorylated by both cGMP-dependent and cAMP-dependent protein kinases in intact human platelets, and its phosphorylation correlates very well with platelet inhibition caused by cGMP- and cAMP-elevating agents. Here we report that in human platelets spread on glass, VASP is associated predominantly with the distal parts of radial microfilament bundles and with microfilaments outlining the periphery, whereas less VASP is associated with a central microfilamentous ring. VASP is also detectable in a variety of different cell types including fibroblasts and epithelial cells. In fibroblasts, VASP is concentrated at focal contact areas, along microfilament bundles (stress fibres) in a punctate pattern, in the periphery of protruding lamellae, and is phosphorylated by cGMP- and cAMP-dependent protein kinases in response to appropriate stimuli. Evidence for the direct binding of VASP to F-actin is also presented. The data demonstrate that VASP is a novel phosphoprotein associated with actin filaments and focal contact areas, i.e. transmembrane junctions between microfilaments and the extracellular matrix. Images PMID:1318192

  11. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP3 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca++ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P3 (IP3) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P3 (cIP3). A specific phosphatase, IP3 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP3 or cIP3 to form IP2 or cIP2 and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca++. Thus, the IP3 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP3 or cIP3. The authors find that IP3 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP3 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP3 5'-p'tase using γ 32P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP3 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca++ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP3 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP3 and decreased Ca++ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition

  12. Platelet aggregation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  13. Prophylactic platelets in dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G;

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a...... result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of...... platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of...

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation, gene expression and protein production in human platelet-rich plasma-supplemented media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Romina Amable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is increasingly used as a cell culture supplement, in order to reduce the contact of human cells with animal-derived products during in vitro expansion. The effect of supplementation changes on cell growth and protein production is not fully characterized. METHODS: Human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue and Wharton's Jelly were isolated and cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Proliferation, in vitro differentiation, expression of cell surface markers, mRNA expression of key genes and protein secretion were quantified. RESULTS: 10% PRP sustained five to tenfold increased cell proliferation as compared to 10% fetal bovine serum. Regarding cell differentiation, PRP reduced adipogenic differentiation and increased calcium deposits in bone marrow and adipose tissue-mesenchymal stromal cells. Wharton's Jelly derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of chemokines and growth factors than other mesenchymal stromal cells when cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic proteins. Mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue secreted higher amounts of extracellular matrix components. CONCLUSIONS: Mesenchymal stromal cells purified from different tissues have distinct properties regarding differentiation, angiogenic, inflammatory and matrix remodeling potential when cultured in PRP supplemented media. These abilities should be further characterized in order to choose the best protocols for their therapeutic use.

  15. von Willebrand factor fibers promote cancer-associated platelet aggregation in malignant melanoma of mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexander T; Suckau, Jan; Frank, Kathrin; Desch, Anna; Goertz, Lukas; Wagner, Andreas H; Hecker, Markus; Goerge, Tobias; Umansky, Ludmila; Beckhove, Philipp; Utikal, Jochen; Gorzelanny, Christian; Diaz-Valdes, Nancy; Umansky, Viktor; Schneider, Stefan W

    2015-05-14

    Tumor-mediated procoagulatory activity leads to venous thromboembolism and supports metastasis in cancer patients. A prerequisite for metastasis formation is the interaction of cancer cells with endothelial cells (ECs) followed by their extravasation. Although it is known that activation of ECs and the release of the procoagulatory protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) is essential for malignancy, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that VWF fibers in tumor vessels promote tumor-associated thromboembolism and metastasis. Using in vitro settings, mouse models, and human tumor samples, we showed that melanoma cells activate ECs followed by the luminal release of VWF fibers and platelet aggregation in tumor microvessels. Analysis of human blood samples and tumor tissue revealed that a promoted VWF release combined with a local inhibition of proteolytic activity and protein expression of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I repeats 13) accounts for this procoagulatory milieu. Blocking endothelial cell activation by the low-molecular-weight heparin tinzaparin was accompanied by a lack of VWF networks and inhibited tumor progression in a transgenic mouse model. Our findings implicate a mechanism wherein tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) promotes tumor progression and angiogenesis. Thus, targeting EC activation envisions new therapeutic strategies attenuating tumor-related angiogenesis and coagulation. PMID:25977583

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  17. Partial purification of the 5-hydroxytryptophan-reuptake system from human blood platelets using a citalopram-derived affinity resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biessen, E.A.L; Horn, A.S.; Robillard, G.T. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-04-03

    This paper describes a procedure for the synthesis and application of a citalopram-derived affinity resin in purifying the 5HT-reuptake system from human blood platelets. A two-step scheme has been developed for partial purification, based on wheat germ agglutinin-lectin (WGA) affinity and citalopram affinity chromatographies. Upon solubilization of the carrier with 1% digitonin, a 50-70-fold increase in specific ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity with a 70% recovery could be accomplished through WGA-lectin chromatography. The WGA pool was then subjected to affinity chromatography on citalopram-agarose. At least 90% of the binding capacity adsorbed to the column. Specific elution using 10 {mu}M citalopram resulted in a 22% recovery of binding activity. A 10,000-fold overall purification was obtained by using this two-step procedure. Analysis of the fractions on SDS-PAGE after {sup 125}I labeling revealed specific elution of 78- and 55-kDa proteins concomitant with the appearance of ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity. The pharmacological profile of the partially purified reuptake system correlated well with that derived from the crude membrane-bound reuptake system, suggesting a copurification of the 5HT binding activity and ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding activity.

  18. Does Freeze-Thawing Influence the Effects of Platelet Concentrates? An In Vitro Study on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Caterina; Niada, Stefania; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Lolato, Alessandra; Taschieri, Silvio; Giannasi, Chiara; Brini, Anna Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have been proposed as a possible therapy for tissue regeneration in aesthetic, plastic, and reconstructive surgery. Today, platelet concentrates are used in a wide range of disciplines, but their storage has become a controversial aspect. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF), after a freeze-thawing cycle, on the proliferation and biological activity of progenitor cells involved in soft tissue healing. Different formulations of activated PRGF were added to hASCs cultured in serum-free medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT test and cell count up to 7 and 12-day incubation. Osteo-differentiation ability of hASCs was also tested after 7 and 14-day incubation by alkaline phosphatase assay. The effects of 4 PRGF preparations (fresh/frozen and with/without platelets) were compared with corresponding formulations of plasma poor in growth factors and with standard medium. hASCs cultured in the presence of platelet concentrates increased proliferation rate with respect to cells grown in standard medium without significant differences among all the tested plasma formulations on cell viability up to 12 days of culture. PRGF activity is preserved after cryopreservation and platelet-rich preparations promoted osteo-differentiation of hASCs at day 7. In conclusion, PRGF supports the proliferation and the differentiation of progenitor cells in vitro also when applied after cryopreservation. Platelet concentrates, either alone or in combination with mesenchymal stem cells, might be a valuable tool in the field of tissue regeneration. PMID:26872279

  19. Activated platelet supernatant can augment the angiogenic potential of human peripheral blood stem cells mobilized from bone marrow by G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeehoon; Hur, Jin; Kang, Jin-A; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Il; Ko, Seung Bum; Lee, Choon-Soo; Lee, Jaewon; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Platelets not only play a role in hemostasis, but they also promote angiogenesis and tissue recovery by releasing various cytokines and making an angiogenic milieu. Here, we examined autologous 'activated platelet supernatant (APS)' as a priming agent for stem cells; thereby enhance their pro-angiogenic potential and efficacy of stem cell-based therapy for ischemic diseases. The mobilized peripheral blood stem cells ((mob)PBSCs) were isolated from healthy volunteers after subcutaneous injection of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. APS was collected separately from the platelet rich plasma after activation by thrombin. (mob)PBSCs were primed for 6h before analysis. Compared to naive platelet supernatants, APS had a higher level of various cytokines, such as IL8, IL17, PDGF and VEGF. APS-priming for 6h induced (mob)PBSCs to express key angiogenic factors, surface markers (i.e. CD34, CD31, and CXCR4) and integrins (integrins α5, β1 and β2). Also (mob)PBSCs were polarized toward CD14(++)/CD16(+) pro-angiogenic monocytes. The priming effect was reproduced by an in vitro reconstruction of APS. Through this phenotype, APS-priming increased cell-cell adhesion and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. The culture supernatant of APS-primed (mob)PBSCs contained high levels of IL8, IL10, IL17 and TNFα, and augmented proliferation and capillary network formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo transplantation of APS-primed (mob)PBSCs into athymic mice ischemic hindlimbs and Matrigel plugs elicited vessel differentiation and tissue repair. In safety analysis, platelet activity increased after mixing with (mob)PBSCs regardless of priming, which was normalized by aspirin treatment. Collectively, our data identify that APS-priming can enhance the angiogenic potential of (mob)PBSCs, which can be used as an adjunctive strategy to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for ischemic diseases. PMID:25016235

  20. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    32P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ from internal stores (Ca2+ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca2+ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor

  1. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  2. Identification and Functional Characterization of Glycosylation of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Dai

    Full Text Available Yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used system for heterologous protein expression. However, post-translational modifications, especially glycosylation, usually impede pharmaceutical application of recombinant proteins because of unexpected alterations in protein structure and function. The aim of this study was to identify glycosylation sites on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB secreted by P. pastoris, and investigate possible effects of O-linked glycans on PDGF-BB functional activity. PDGF-BB secreted by P. pastoris is very heterogeneous and contains multiple isoforms. We demonstrated that PDGF-BB was O-glycosylated during the secretion process and detected putative O-glycosylation sites using glycosylation staining and immunoblotting. By site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution LC/MS analysis, we, for the first time, identified two threonine residues at the C-terminus as the major O-glycosylation sites on rhPDGF-BB produced in P. pastoris. Although O-glycosylation resulted in heterogeneous protein expression, the removal of glycosylation sites did not affect rhPDGF-BB mitogenic activity. In addition, the unglycosylated PDGF-BBΔGly mutant exhibited the immunogenicity comparable to that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, antiserum against PDGF-BBΔGly also recognized glycosylated PDGF-BB, indicating that protein immunogenicity was unaltered by glycosylation. These findings elucidate the effect of glycosylation on PDGF-BB structure and biological activity, and can potentially contribute to the design and production of homogeneously expressed unglycosylated or human-type glycosylated PDGF-BB in P. pastoris for pharmaceutical applications.

  3. Pharmacological properties of novel cyclic pentapeptides with µ-opioid receptor agonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlikowska, Renata; Piekielna, Justyna; Fichna, Jakub; do-Rego, Jean Claude; Toth, Geza; Janecki, Tomasz; Janecka, Anna

    2014-03-01

    In our previous paper we have reported the synthesis and biological activity of a cyclic analog, Tyr-c(D-Lys- Phe-Phe-Asp)-NH2, based on endomorphin-2 (EM-2) structure. This analog displayed high affinity for the µ-opioid receptor, was much more stable than EM-2 in rat brain homogenate and showed remarkable antinociceptive activity after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Even more importantly, the cyclic analog elicited weak analgesia also after peripheral administration, giving evidence that it was able to cross, at least to some extent, the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we describe further modifications of this analog aimed at enhancing brain delivery by increasing lipophilicity. Two new cyclic pentapeptides, Tyr-c(D-Lys-D-1-Nal-Phe-Asp)-NH2 and Tyr-c(D-Lys-D-2-Nal-Phe-Asp)-NH2 (where 1-Nal=1- naphthyl-3-alanine, 2-Nal=2-naphthyl-3-alanine) were synthesized and evaluated in biological assays. Both analogs showed high µ-opioid receptor affinity and agonist activity and were stable in the rat brain homogenates. Unfortunately, the increase of lipophilicity was achieved at the expense of water solubility. The analog with D-2-Nal residue showed strong analgesic effect when given i.c.v. but could not be tested after intravenous (i.v.) administration where higher concentrations of the compound are required. However, this analog showed inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in vivo, providing an interesting approach to the development of peripherally restricted agents that could be useful for studying gastrointestinal disorders in animal models. PMID:23628088

  4. Calcium-mediated agonists activate an inwardly rectified K+ channel in colonic secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, D C; Frizzell, R A

    1993-11-01

    Single-channel recording techniques were used to identify and characterize the K+ channel activated by Ca(2+)-mediated secretory agonists in T84 cells. Carbachol (CCh; 100 microM) and taurodeoxycholate (TDC; 0.75 mM) stimulated oscillatory outward K+ currents. With K gluconate in bath and pipette, cell-attached single-channel K+ currents stimulated by CCh and ionomycin (2 microM) were inwardly rectified and reversed at 0 mV. The single-channel chord conductance was 32 pS at -90 mV and 14 pS at +90 mV. Similar properties were observed in excised inside-out patches in symmetric K+, permitting further characterization of channel properties. Partial substitution of bath or pipette K+ with Na+ gave a K(+)-to-Na+ selectivity ratio of 5.5:1. Channel activity increased with increasing bath Ca2+ concentration in the physiological range of 50-800 nM. Maximal channel activity occurred at intracellular pH 7.2 and decreased at more acidic or alkaline pH values. Extracellular charybdotoxin (CTX; 50 nM) blocked inward but not outward currents. Extracellular tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 mM) reduced single-channel amplitude at all voltages. No apparent block of the channel was observed with extracellular Ba2+ (1 mM), apamin (1 microM), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 4 mM), quinine (500 microM), or glyburide (10 microM). Cytosolic quinine and 4-AP blocked both inward and outward currents, whereas Ba2+ blocked only outward currents. Apamin, CTX, TEA, and glyburide did not affect channel activity. The agonist activation and pharmacological profile of this inwardly rectified K+ channel indicate that it is responsible for the increase in basolateral K+ conductance stimulated by Ca(2+)-mediated agonists in T84 cells. PMID:7694492

  5. Swietenia mahagony extract shows agonistic activity to PPARγ and gives ameliorative effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-dan LI; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG; Jun-hua CHEN; Qing CHEN; Guo-wei LI; Jing CHEN; Jian-min YUE; Min-li CHEN; Xiao-ping WANG; Jian-hua SHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To search the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists from Swietenia mahagony extract (SmE) and observe the possible ameliorative effects of SmE on diabetic db/db mice. Methods: The PPARγ agonistic activity of SmE was screened by yeast-two hybrid system. The blood glucose levels of diabetic db/db mice were measured using a blood glucose level monitor and the data were statistically analyzed by NDST8.8W software. Results: By using the clinical drug rosiglitazone as a positive control, it was found that the PPARγ agonistic activity of SmE at a concentration of 50 μg/L was approximately half that of 35.7 μg/L (0.1 μmol/L) of rosiglitazone. At the dose of 1000 mg/kg, SmE remark ably decreased the blood glucose concentration of db/db mice from (15.26±2.98) to (7.58±2.20) mmol/L, and reduced the blood glucose levels by 55.49% compared with the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: SmE shows agonistic activity to PPARγ and can ameliorate the blood glucose levels of diabetic db/db mice. SmE may be thus used as a potential agent for diabetes therapy.

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J. (Delaware)

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  7. Properdin-Mediated C5a Production Enhances Stable Binding of Platelets to Granulocytes in Human Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Adam Z; Saggu, Gurpanna; Kulkarni, Koustubh V; Cortes, Claudio; Thurman, Joshua M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Ferreira, Viviana P

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced levels of platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs) are found in patients suffering from many different inflammatory vascular diseases, and their formation in animal models of vascular disease is associated with increased thromboinflammation and worsened outcomes. The complement system, a part of the innate immune system, influences PGA formation, but the mechanisms for its effects are unknown. In this study, we have defined complement-mediated mechanisms that enhance PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP) using ex vivo flow cytometry assays. We demonstrate that physiological properdin, a positive regulator of complement alternative pathway activity, increases PGA formation when added to TRAP-stimulated blood. All physiological properdin forms increase PGA formation, but properdin tetramers are the most efficient at increasing complement activity and PGA formation. Inhibition of endogenous properdin, either circulating in the blood or produced locally by leukocytes, impairs TRAP-mediated PGA formation to the same level as specific inhibition of either the alternative or classical pathway. Additionally, blocking the interaction of C5a with its cellular receptor prevents properdin-mediated increases in PGA formation. Adding either properdin tetramers or C5a to whole blood increases CD11b expression on granulocytes, and this increase is prevented by blockade of the C5a-C5a receptor axis. Finally, we demonstrate that the effects of properdin on PGA formation are tightly regulated by Factor H. Cumulatively, our data indicate that properdin enhances PGA formation via increased production of C5a, and that inhibition of properdin function has therapeutic potential to limit thromboinflammation in diseases characterized by increased PGA formation. PMID:27183616

  8. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  9. Preliminary separation of the growth factors in platelet-rich plasma: effects on the proliferation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qian; WANG Yun-dan; WU Tao; JIANG Shan; HU Yan-ling; PEI Guo-xian

    2009-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a storage vehicle of growth factors has been successfully used in clinical applications, but in most cases the platelets were autologous. However, the large volume of blood withdrawn has detrimental effects on patients with anemia or poor general health. To overcome these limitations, this study was designed to separate the growth factors in homologous platelet-rich plasma. Methods The gel chromatography with Superdex-75 column was applied to separate PRP supernatants into 4 major fractions. Then the four fractions were vacuumed freeze-dried and re-dissolved in phosphate buffered saline. Proteins concentrations in PRP and in four fractions were detected by bicinchoninic acid protein assay; platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) and transforming growth factor 131 (TGF-β1) levels were determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The effects of fractions on the proliferation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were determined by 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results PRP supernatants were separated into four major fractions by gel chromatography. The proteins recovery was 96.72%. Of the four fractions, fraction B contained the highest TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB levels, and the highest proteins concentrations. Cell proliferation curves of MSC demonstrated that fraction B and C induced a remarkable increase of MTT values compared to the untreated culture (P 0.05). Fraction A and D showed no significant difference to the negative control group (P >0.05). Conclusions The growth factors in PRP supernatants could be preliminarily separated into four fractions by gel chromatography, and the freeze-drying fractions retained the biological activity of growth factors. The growth factors were mostly presented in fraction B and C, and they promoted cell proliferation effectively.

  10. Oral streptococci utilize a Siglec-like domain of serine-rich repeat adhesins to preferentially target platelet sialoglycans in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingquan Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Damaged cardiac valves attract blood-borne bacteria, and infective endocarditis is often caused by viridans group streptococci. While such bacteria use multiple adhesins to maintain their normal oral commensal state, recognition of platelet sialoglycans provides an intermediary for binding to damaged valvular endocardium. We use a customized sialoglycan microarray to explore the varied binding properties of phylogenetically related serine-rich repeat adhesins, the GspB, Hsa, and SrpA homologs from Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis species, which belong to a highly conserved family of glycoproteins that contribute to virulence for a broad range of Gram-positive pathogens. Binding profiles of recombinant soluble homologs containing novel sialic acid-recognizing Siglec-like domains correlate well with binding of corresponding whole bacteria to arrays. These bacteria show multiple modes of glycan, protein, or divalent cation-dependent binding to synthetic glycoconjugates and isolated glycoproteins in vitro. However, endogenous asialoglycan-recognizing clearance receptors are known to ensure that only fully sialylated glycans dominate in the endovascular system, wherein we find these particular streptococci become primarily dependent on their Siglec-like adhesins for glycan-mediated recognition events. Remarkably, despite an excess of alternate sialoglycan ligands in cellular and soluble blood components, these adhesins selectively target intact bacteria to sialylated ligands on platelets, within human whole blood. These preferred interactions are inhibited by corresponding recombinant soluble adhesins, which also preferentially recognize platelets. Our data indicate that circulating platelets may act as inadvertent Trojan horse carriers of oral streptococci to the site of damaged endocardium, and provide an explanation why it is that among innumerable microbes that gain occasional access to the bloodstream, certain viridans group

  11. The Effect of Butanolides from Cinnamomum tenuifolium on Platelet Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yi Chen; Sheue-Jiun Chen; Hui-Ming Wu; Huei-Ping Dong

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of isotenuifolide and tenuifolide B from the stems of Cinnamomum tenuifolium on adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced human platelet aggregation. Treatment of human platelet-rich plasma with isotenuifolide (1 and 2 μg/μL) and tenuifolide B (1, 2 and 4 μg/μL) did not have any significant effect on human platelet aggregation in vitro, however, treatment of human platelet-rich plasma with isotenuifolide (4 μg/μL) resulted in an inhibitory effect on platelet aggr...

  12. Evaluation of in vivo partial beta 1/beta 2-agonist activity: a dose-ranging study with carteolol.

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeldon, N M; McDevitt, D G; Lipworth, B J

    1992-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were to investigate the partial agonist profile of carteolol and evaluate methodology for differentiating relative beta 1 and beta 2 partial agonist activity (PAA) in vivo. 2. Eight normal subjects received single oral doses of carteolol 10 mg, 30 mg and 60 mg; nadolol 40 mg; pindolol 30 mg and placebo, given in a single-blind, randomised crossover design. 3. beta 1-PAA was demonstrated with carteolol by dose-related increases in resting heart rate and systolic blood...

  13. Effect of Follicular Fluid and Platelet-Activating Factor on Lactate Dehydrogenase C Expression in Human Asthenozoospermic Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Esmaeilpour; Mohmmad-Reza Zarei; Soghra Bahmanpour; Elham Aliabadi; Ahmad Hosseini; Mansooreh Jaberipour

    2014-01-01

    Background: Application of follicular fluid (FF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in artificial insemination improves sperm motility. Lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C) is a key enzyme for sperm motility. In this study, the effects of FF and PAF on the sperm motility index and LDH-C expression were investigated. Moreover, LDH-C expression was compared between asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Methods: The expression of LDH-C was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase ...

  14. Platelets and galectins

    OpenAIRE

    Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling...

  15. The Potential of GMP-Compliant Platelet Lysate to Induce a Permissive State for Cardiovascular Transdifferentiation in Human Mediastinal Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Siciliano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs are considered eligible candidates for cardiovascular stem cell therapy applications due to their cardiac transdifferentiation potential and immunotolerance. Over the years, the in vitro culture of ADMSCs by platelet lysate (PL, a hemoderivate containing numerous growth factors and cytokines derived from platelet pools, has allowed achieving a safe and reproducible methodology to obtain high cell yield prior to clinical administration. Nevertheless, the biological properties of PL are still to be fully elucidated. In this brief report we show the potential ability of PL to induce a permissive state of cardiac-like transdifferentiation and to cause epigenetic modifications. RTPCR results indicate an upregulation of Cx43, SMA, c-kit, and Thy-1 confirmed by immunofluorescence staining, compared to standard cultures with foetal bovine serum. Moreover, PL-cultured ADMSCs exhibit a remarkable increase of both acetylated histones 3 and 4, with a patient-dependent time trend, and methylation at lysine 9 on histone 3 preceding the acetylation. Expression levels of p300 and SIRT-1, two major regulators of histone 3, are also upregulated after treatment with PL. In conclusion, PL could unravel novel biological properties beyond its routine employment in noncardiac applications, providing new insights into the plasticity of human ADMSCs.

  16. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation by the atherosclerotic plaque lipid lysophosphatidic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Haserück, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    Oxidized LDL and platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiovascular diseases. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a thrombogenic substance that accumulates in mildly-oxidized LDL and in human atherosclerotic lesions, and is responsible for the initial platelet activation, shape change, induced by mildly-oxidized LDL and extracts of lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques (Siess et al., 1999 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1999). LPA directly induced platelet shape c...

  17. Detection and measurement of the agonistic activities of PCBs and mono-hydroxylated PCBs to the constitutive androstane receptor using a recombinant yeast assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Ryo; Shiraishi, Fujio; Kageyama, Shiho; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are thought to exert their toxicities mainly by binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and by stimulating transcription of various genes, notably metabolizing enzymes including the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 family. However, PCBs and their metabolites could have potential to activate other nuclear receptors and subsequent events. We focused on the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) inducing CYP2B and measured the agonistic activity of PCBs and mono-hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) to the CAR using yeast cells transduced with the human CAR and its response pathway. Twenty-nine of 34 tested PCBs and 72 of 91 OH-PCBs exhibited CAR agonistic effects. Of 41 OH-PCBs that had the same chlorination patterns as the tested PCBs, 9 had activities more than twice those of their non-hydroxylated analogs. In particular, 2',4',6'-trichlorobiphenyl-4-ol and 2,2',4',6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl-4-ol were 332- and 22-fold more potent than their analogs and were 15 times and 2.8 times, respectively, as active as a reference substance, 4-tert-octylphenol. The activities of 17 of the OH-PCBs were reduced to less than half those of their non-hydroxylated analogs. Four OH-PCBs derived from 3 active PCBs were inactive. However, a consistent relationship between hydroxyl substituent position and activity could not be discerned. Comprehensive evaluation of the toxic potential of PCBs and their hydroxylated metabolites and their concentrations in the environment are required. PMID:26231822

  18. Plasma membrane associated phospholipase C from human platelets: Synergistic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by thrombin and guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of thrombin and GTPγS on the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides by membrane-associated phospholipase C (PLC) from human platelets were examined with endogenous [3H]inositol-labeled membranes or with lipid vesicles containing either [3H]phosphatidylinositol or [3H]phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. GTPγS (1 μM) or thrombin (1 unit/mL) did not stimulate release of inositol trisphosphate (IP3), inositol bisphosphate (IP2), or inositol phosphate (IP) from [3H]inositol-labeled membranes. IP2 and IP3, but not IP, from [3H]inositol-labeled membranes were, however, stimulated 3-fold by GTPγS (1 μM) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). A higher concentration of GTPγS (100 μM) alone also stimulated IP2 and IP3, but not IP, release. In the presence of 1 mM calcium, release of IP2 and IP3 was increased 6-fold over basal levels; however, formation of IP was not observed. At submicromolar calcium concentration, hydrolysis of exogenous phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by platelet membrane associated PLC was also markedly enhanced by GTPγS (100 μM) or GTPγS (1 μM) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). Under identical conditions, exogenous phosphatidylinositol (PI) was not hydrolyzed. The same substrate specificity was observed when the membrane-associated PLC was activated with 1 mM calcium. Thrombin-induced hydrolysis of PIP2 was inhibited by treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin or pretreatment of intact platelets with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) prior to preparation of membranes. Pertussis toxin did not inhibit GTPγS (100 μM) or calcium (1 mM) dependent PIP2 breakdown, while TPA inhibited GTPγS-dependent but not calcium-dependent phospholipase C activity

  19. In vitro and in vivo characterization of ultraviolet light C-irradiated human platelets in a 2 event mouse model of transfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhi

    Full Text Available UV-based pathogen reduction technologies have been developed in recent years to inactivate pathogens and contaminating leukocytes in platelet transfusion products in order to prevent transfusion-transmitted infections and alloimmunization. UVC-based technology differs from UVA or UVB-based technologies in that it uses a specific wavelength at 254 nm without the addition of any photosensitizers. Previously, it was reported that UVC irradiation induces platelet aggregation and activation. To understand if UVC-induced changes of platelet quality correlate with potential adverse events when these platelets are transfused into animals, we used a 2-event SCID mouse model in which the predisposing event was LPS treatment and the second event was infusion of UVC-irradiated platelets. We analyzed lung platelet accumulation, protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as an indication of lung injury, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 release in mice received UVC-irradiated or untreated control platelets. Our results showed UVC-irradiated platelets accumulated in lungs of the mice in a dose-dependent manner. High-doses of UVC-irradiated platelets were sequestered in the lungs to a similar level as we previously reported for UVB-irradiated platelets. Unlike UVB-platelets, UVC-platelets did not lead to lung injury or induce MIP-2 release. This could potentially be explained by our observation that although UVC treatment activated platelet surface αIIbβ3, it failed to activate platelet cells. It also suggests lung platelet accumulation and subsequent lung damage are due to different and separate mechanisms which require further investigation.

  20. Inhibition of human platelet aggregation by a novel S-nitrosothiol is abolished by haemoglobin and red blood cells in vitro: implications for anti-thrombotic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Megson, Ian L; Sogo, Naoki; Mazzei, Francesca A; Butler, Anthony R.; Walton, John C; Webb, David J.

    2000-01-01

    S-Nitrosothiols are nitric oxide (NO) donor drugs that have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation in platelet rich plasma (PRP) in vitro and to inhibit platelet activation in vivo. The aim of this study was to compare the platelet effects of a novel S-nitrosated glyco-amino acid, RIG200, with an established S-nitrosothiol, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in PRP, and to investigate the effects of cell-free haemoglobin and red blood cells on S-nitrosothiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggre...

  1. Release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelet alpha granules: modulation of physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M.; Markens, Beth A.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    An association between platelets, angiogenesis, and cancer has long been recognized, but the mechanisms linking them remains unclear. Platelets regulate new blood vessel growth through numerous stimulators and inhibitors of angiogenesis by several pathways, including differential exocytosis of angiogenesis regulators. Herein, we investigated the differential release of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors from platelets. Activation of human platelets with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimul...

  2. Isolation of coniferyl esters from Capsicum baccatum L., and their enzymatic preparation and agonist activity for TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobata, Kenji; Tate, Hitomi; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ohtsu, Keigo; Yazawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    Coniferyl esters--capsiconiate and dihydrocapsiconiate--were isolated from the fruits of the pepper, Capsicum baccatum L. var. praetermissum. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods to be coniferyl (E)-8-methyl-6-nonenoate (capsiconiate) and coniferyl 8-methylnonanoate (dihydrocapsiconiate). This finding was further confirmed by the lipase-catalyzed condensation of coniferyl alcohol with its corresponding fatty acid derivative. The agonist activity of the esters for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was evaluated by conducting an analysis of the intracellular calcium concentrations in TRPV1-expressing HEK293 cells. The EC50 values of capsiconiate and dihydrocapsiconiate were 3.2 and 4.2 microM, respectively. PMID:18190936

  3. Acquired platelet function defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  4. Interaction between human platelet factor 4 and protamine sulfate in the presence of a low molecular weight heparin in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of different protamine sulfate (PS) doses (15, 30 and 50 mg) upon the kinetics of human platelet factor 4 (PF4) combined with a low molecular weight (LMW) heparin of 7,400 daltons in the rabbit have been studied. The PF4 disappearance after pre-treatment with 1500 APTT units of LMW heparin followed a monoexponential curve with an half-life of 11.03±1.69 minutes. PS at each dosage given 1 minute after LMW heparin and PF4, caused an immediate and deep drop of PF4 circulating level. A second LMW heparin bolus 10 minuts later induced in which 50 mg of PS were given, the PF4 release was only 40% of that obtained in the order two groups of animals

  5. Platelets contribute to growth and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Bajpai, Meenu; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Kumar, Anupam; Sarin, Shiv K

    2016-09-01

    To determine the association of platelets with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and its metastasis. We examined platelets, laboratory, and radiological data of consecutive 420 HCC and 1008 cirrhosis cases. Follow-up information of platelet count in cirrhosis to HCC, pre- to post-therapy, and post-therapy to HCC outcome was analyzed. Cytokine profiling was performed in HCC and cirrhosis (n = 10 each). On the basis of imaging, HCC was divided into six subgroups. Cytosmears of HCC were assessed for platelet clustering around tumor cells. An in vitro Matrigel invasion assay was performed on human HCC cell lines using graded concentration of platelets. Baseline platelet numbers and platelet/lymphocyte ratios (PLRs) were significantly higher (p AFP, PIVKAII, platelets, and PLR increase (p AFP (p < 0.001) associated with distant metastasis. Platelet clustering seen in 75.7% of HCC group 3, 45% in group 2, and 12.5% in group 1 cases (p < 0.001). Invaded cells in Matrigel assay positively correlated with platelet concentration. Platelets can contribute to the development, growth, invasion, and metastasis of HCC. Rising platelet count after HCC therapy is indicative of incomplete response or recurrence. PMID:27457354

  6. Platelet-mediated transformation of mtDNA-less human cells: Analysis of phenotypic variability among clones from normal individuals-and complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation causing myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomyn, A.; Lai, S.T.; Shakeley, R.; Attardi, G. (California Instituteof Technology, Pasadena (United States)); Bresolin, N.; Scarlato, G. (Univ. of Milan (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    In the present work, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using human blood platelets as mitochondrial donors for the repopulation of mtDNA-less ([rho][sup o]) cells. The noninvasive nature of platelet isolation, combined with the prolonged viability of platelet mitochondria and the simplicity and efficiency of the mitochondria-transfer procedure, has substantially increased the applicability of the [rho][sup o] cell transformation approach for mitochondrial genetic analysis and for the study of mtDNA-linked diseases. This approach has been applied to platelets from several normal human individuals and one individual affected by the myoclonic-epilepsy-and-ragged-red-fibers (MERRF) encephalomyopathy. A certain variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the platelet-derived [rho][sup o] cell transformants from a given normal subject, and it was shown to be unrelated to their mtDNA content. The results of sequential transfer of mitochondria from selected transformants into a [rho][sup o] cell line different from the first [rho][sup o] acceptor strongly suggest that this variability reflected, at least in part, differences in nuclear gene content and/or activity among the original recipient cells. A much greater variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the transformants derived from the MERRF patient and was found to be related to the presence and amount of the mitochondrial tRNA[sup Lys] mutation associated with the MERRF syndrome. An analysis of the relationship between proportion of mtDNA carrying the MERRF mutation and degree of respiratory activity in various transformations derived from the MERRF patient revealed an unusual complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation, possibly reflecting the distribution of mutant mtDNA among the platelet mitochondria. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor: Evidence for more than one receptor class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cDNA encoding the human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor is presented. The cDNA contains an open reading frame that codes for a protein of 1106 amino acids. Comparison to the mouse PDGF receptor reveals an overall amino acid sequence identity of 86%. This sequence identity rises to 98% in the cytoplasmic split tyrosine kinase domain. RNA blot hybridization analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from human dermal fibroblasts detects a major and a minor transcript using the cDNA as a probe. Baby hamster kidney cells, transfected with an expression vector containing the receptor cDNA, express an ∼ 190-kDa cell surface protein that is recognized by an anti-human PDGF receptor antibody. The recombinant PDGF receptor is functional in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells as demonstrated by ligand-induced phosphorylation of the receptor. Binding properties of the recombinant PDGF receptor were also assessed with pure preparations of BB and AB isoforms of PDGF. Unlike human dermal fibroblasts, which bind both isoforms with high affinity, the transfected baby hamster kidney cells bind only the BB isoform of PDGF with high affinity. This observation is consistent with the existence of more than one PDGF receptor class

  8. [Isoenzyme fractions of serum and platelet lactate dehydrogenase in normal subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, M P; Palmucci, Z; Saccone, A; Rossi, M; Tresca, E; Nubile, G

    1984-04-30

    We determined the isoenzymatic fractions of platelets and seric LDH in off healthy people (50 males and 50 females). We broken the platelets by triton X 100 (octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol) in order to obtain the release of platelet LDH. The seric and platelet LDH isoenzymes were then separated by electrophoresis (Gelman sistem). We confirm the prevalence of LDH2 and LDH3 fractions in human platelets. PMID:6732960

  9. The organization of microtubules and microtubule coils in giant platelet disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. G.; Sauk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Normal human platelets are characteristically discoid in shape. The lentiform appearance is supported by a circumferential band of microtubules lying just under the cell membrane along its greatest circumference. Some of the cells from patients with giant platelet disorders are also disk-shaped, but the majority of their huge platelets are spherical. In the present study platelets from patients with the Gray platelet syndrome (GPS), May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA), and Epstein's syndrome (ES) were ...

  10. Platelets in Lung Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  11. Screening of agonistic activities against four nuclear receptors in wastewater treatment plants in Japan using a yeast two-hybrid assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daisuke Inoue; Koki Nakama; Kazuko Sawada; Taro Watanabe; Hisae Matsui; Kazunari Sei; Tsuyoshi Nakanishi; Michihiko Ike

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential endocrine disruptive effects through multiple nuclear receptors (NRs), especially non-steroidal NRs, in municipal wastewater, we examined the agonistic activities on four NRs (estrogen receptor c, thyroid hormone receptor α, retinoic acid receptor α and retinoid X receptor α) of untreated and treated wastewater from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Japan using a yeast two-hybrid assay.Investigation of the infiuent and effluent of seven WWTPs revealed that agonistic activities against steroidal and non-steroidal NRs were always detected in the infiuents and partially remained in the effluents.Further investigation of four WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge, pseudo-anoxic-oxic, anoxic-oxic and anaerobic-anoxic-oxic processes revealed that the ability to reduce the agonistic activity against each of the four NRs varies depending on the treatment process.These results indicated that municipal wastewater in Japan commonly contains endocrine disrupting chemicals that exert agonistic activities on steroidal and non-steroidal NRs, and that some of these chemicals are released into the natural aquatic environment.Although the results obtained in yeast assays suggested that measured levels of non-steroidal NR agonists in the effluent of WWTPs were not likely to cause any biological effect, further study is required to assess their possible risks in detail.

  12. Influence of mental stress on platelet bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Koudouovoh-Tripp, Pia; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that various mental stress conditions contribute, or at least influence, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in somatic, as well as in psychiatric disorders; blood platelets are supposed to represent a possible link in this respect. The anculeated platelets are the smallest corpuscular elements circulating in the human blood. They display different serotonergic markers which seem to reflect the central nervous serotonin metabolism. They are known as main effectors ...

  13. Indium-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy in carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated platelet accumulation in carotid arteries by means of a dual-radiotracer method, using indium-111-labeled platelets and technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin, in 123 patients (92 men, 31 women; median age 60 years). Sixty patients had symptoms of transient ischemic carotid artery disease, and 63 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease served as controls. Antiplatelet treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was taken by 53 of the 123 patients. In 36 of the 60 symptomatic patients, platelet scintigraphy was repeated 3-4 days after carotid endarterectomy. Comparison of different scintigraphic parameters (platelet accumulation index and percent of the injected dose of labeled platelets at the carotid bifurcation) showed no significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, and the severity of stenosis and the presence of plaque ulceration also had no influence on the parameters. There was no difference between patients with a short (less than 4 weeks) or long (greater than 4 weeks) interval from the last transient ischemic attack to scintigraphy and no difference between patients with or without antiplatelet treatment. Classifying the patients according to plaque morphology judged by high-resolution real-time ultrasonography also demonstrated no differences. No significant correlation was found between any scintigraphic parameter and other platelet function parameters such as platelet survival time, platelet turnover rate, and concentration of platelet-specific proteins. Quantification of platelet deposition after carotid endarterectomy in 36 patients demonstrated a significant increase of the median platelet accumulation index and the percent injected dose index

  14. Suppression of NF-κB signaling by andrographolide with a novel mechanism in human platelets: regulatory roles of the p38 MAPK-hydroxyl radical-ERK2 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wan J; Lin, Kuan H; Hsu, Ming J; Chou, Duen S; Hsiao, George; Sheu, Joen R

    2012-10-01

    Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, is isolated from leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our recent studies revealed that andrographolide possesses potent antiplatelet activity by activating the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-cyclic GMP pathway. Although platelets are anucleated cells, they also express the transcription factor, NF-κB, that may exert non-genomic functions in platelet activation. Therefore, we further investigated the inhibitory roles of andrographolide in NF-κB-mediated events in platelets. In this study, NF-κB signaling events, including IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation, were time-dependently activated by collagen in human platelets, and these signaling events were attenuated by andrographolide (35 and 75 μM). ODQ and KT5823, respective inhibitors of guanylate cyclase and cyclic GMP-dependent kinase (PKG), strongly reversed andrographolide-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, relative [Ca(2+)]i mobilization, and IKKβ, and p65 phosphorylation. In addition, SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK), but not PD98059 (an inhibitor of ERKs), markedly abolished IKKβ and p65 phosphorylation. SB203580, NAC (a free-radical scavenger), and BAY11-7082 (an inhibitor of NF-κB) all diminished ERK2 phosphorylation, whereas PD98059, BAY11-7082, and NAC had no effects on p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, SB203580, but not BAY11-7082 or PD98059, reduced collagen-induced hydroxyl radical ((·)HO) formation. KT5823 also markedly reversed andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p38 MAPK and ERK2 phosphorylation, and hydroxyl radical formation in platelets. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that andrographolide may involve an increase in cyclic GMP/PKG, followed by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/(·)HO-NF-κB-ERK2 cascade in activated platelets. Therefore, andrographolide may have a high therapeutic potential

  15. Effect of Follicular Fluid and Platelet-Activating Factor on Lactate Dehydrogenase C Expression in Human Asthenozoospermic Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Esmaeilpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of follicular fluid (FF and platelet-activating factor (PAF in artificial insemination improves sperm motility. Lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C is a key enzyme for sperm motility. In this study, the effects of FF and PAF on the sperm motility index and LDH-C expression were investigated. Moreover, LDH-C expression was compared between asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Methods: The expression of LDH-C was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT PCR and western blotting after it was treated with optimized concentrations of FF and PAF in twenty asthenozoospermic samples. Also, LDH-C expression was evaluated in five normozoospermic samples. Results: Samples with 75% FF and 100 nM of PAF had an increase in their percentages of progressive and slowly motile sperms and a decrease in their percentages of non-progressive and non-motile sperms. Moreover, LDH-C mRNA transcripts were not changed following PAF and FF treatment, and LDH-C protein was detected in highly progressive motile specimens treated with FF in the asthenozoospermic samples. Furthermore, LDH-C expression was more detectable in the normal sperms. Conclusion: Our results indicated that PAF had more beneficial effects than FF on sperm motility in the asthenozoospermic samples (P=0.0001, although the LDH-C expressions of the sperms were not changed significantly in both groups. We found no association between LDH-C expression and sperm motility after FF and PAF actions. This finding, however, requires further investigation. The fact that LDH-C protein was detected in the normozoospermic, but not asthenozoospermic, samples could be cited as a reason for the infertility in these patients.

  16. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  17. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Skanderup Falkenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets were Blechnum chilense (MeOH, Luma apiculata (H2O, Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1 and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1. The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1, and L. apiculata (H2O were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers.

  18. Metabolic Plasticity in Resting and Thrombin Activated Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Saranya; Chacko, Balu; Sawada, Hirotaka; Kramer, Philip A.; Johnson, Michelle S.; Benavides, Gloria A.; O’DONNELL, Valerie; Marques, Marisa B.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet thrombus formation includes several integrated processes involving aggregation, secretion of granules, release of arachidonic acid and clot retraction, but it is not clear which metabolic fuels are required to support these events. We hypothesized that there is flexibility in the fuels that can be utilized to serve the energetic and metabolic needs for resting and thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation. Using platelets from healthy human donors, we found that there was a rapid throm...

  19. Development of giant granules in platelets during prolonged storage.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. G.; Clawson, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Giant granules are uncommon in normal human platelets but are frequently observed in platelets from patients with the Chédiak-Higashi syndrome, some case of May-Hegglin anomaly, and individuals with chronic refractory anemia (preleukemia) or myelomonocytic leukema. However, the numbers of platelets containing the giant granule anomaly are so low that it has been impossible to isolate them in sufficient quantity to identify the mechanisms involved in their formation. Recently conditions were f...

  20. A role for prostaglandins and thromboxanes in the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, J.S.; Vilaire, G; Burch, J W

    1981-01-01

    Exposure of fibrinogen receptors by a variety of agonists is a prerequisite for platelet aggregation. Because the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxane A2 also occurs during platelet aggregation we wondered whether these agents participate in the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors. Therefore, we measured the binding of human 125I-fibrinogen to gel-filtered normal human platelets after prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis had been inhibited by aspirin or indomethacin. The fibri...

  1. Protein Kinase C ε Expression in Platelets from Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Carubbi; Prisco Mirandola; Maria Mattioli; Daniela Galli; Nicola Marziliano; Piera Angelica Merlini; Daniela Lina; Francesca Notarangelo; Maria Rita Cozzi; Marco Gesi; Diego Ardissino; Luigi De Marco; Marco Vitale; Giuliana Gobbi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Platelets play crucial roles in the pathophysiology of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Protein kinase C ε (PKCε) is virtually absent in human platelets and its expression is precisely regulated during human megakaryocytic differentiation. On the basis of what is known on the role of platelet PKCε in other species, we hypothesized that platelets from myocardial infarction patients might ectopically express PKCε with a pathophysiological role in the disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  2. Platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos compared to man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Särndahl Eva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on hemostasis and platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos is of importance for understanding the physiological, protective changes during hibernation. Objective The study objective was to document platelet activity values in brown bears shortly after leaving the den and compare them to platelet function in healthy humans. Methods Blood was drawn from immobilized wild brown bears 7-10 days after leaving the den in mid April. Blood samples from healthy human adults before and after clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid administration served as control. We analyzed blood samples by standard blood testing and platelet aggregation was quantified after stimulation with various agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry within 3 hours of sampling. Results Blood samples were collected from 6 bears (3 females between 1 and 16 years old and from 10 healthy humans. Results of adenosine diphosphate, aspirin, and thrombin receptor activating peptide tests in bears were all half or less of those in humans. Platelet and white blood cell counts did not differ between species but brown bears had more and smaller red blood cells compared with humans. Conclusion Using three different tests, we conclude that platelet function is lower in brown bears compared to humans. Our findings represent the first descriptive study on platelet function in brown bears and may contribute to explain how bears can endure denning without obvious thrombus building. However, the possibility that our findings reflect test-dependent and not true biological variations in platelet reactivity needs further studies.

  3. Detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA in actively healing human wounds treated with recombinant PDGF-BB and absence of PDGF in chronic nonhealing wounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, G F; Tarpley, J. E.; Tseng, J; Bready, J; Chang, D.; Kenney, W C; Rudolph, R; Robson, M. C.; Vande Berg, J.; Reid, P.

    1995-01-01

    Some human chronic dermal wounds treated with recombinant platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rPDGF-BB) show increased healing coupled with fibroblast activation and granulation tissue formation. To determine whether endogenous PDGF is associated with healing and nonhealing dermal ulcer phenotypes, we developed monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing the three isoforms of PDGF, AA, AB, and BB dimers, and capable of discriminating between two alternatively spliced A chain transcripts. We d...

  4. Platelet size and age determine platelet function independently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken to examine the interaction of platelet size and age in determining in vitro platelet function. Baboon megakaryocytes were labeled in vivo by the injection of 75Se-methionine. Blood was collected when the label was predominantly associated with younger platelets (day 2) and with older platelets (day 9). Size-dependent platelet subpopulations were prepared on both days by counterflow centrifugation. The reactivity of each platelet subpopulation was determined on both days by measuring thrombin-induced aggregation. Platelets were fixed after partial aggregation had occurred by the addition of EDTA/formalin. After removal of the aggregated platelets by differential centrifugation, the supernatant medium was assayed for remaining platelets and 75Se radioactivity. Comparing day 2 and day 9, no significant difference was seen in the rate of aggregation of a given subpopulation. However, aggregation was more rapid in the larger platelet fractions than in the smaller ones on both days. A greater percentage of the 75Se radioactivity appeared in the platelet aggregates on day 2 than on day 9. This effect was independent of platelet size, as it occurred to a similar extent in the unfractionated platelets and in each of the size-dependent platelet subpopulations. The data indicate that young platelets are more active than older platelets. This study demonstrates that size and age are both determinants of platelet function, but by independent mechanisms

  5. MicroRNA-145 regulates platelet-derived growth factor-induced human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by targeting CD40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Huang, Jiangnan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Yuanli; Xia, Mingjie; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the expression of microRNA (miR)-145 in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the effect of miR-145 in the biological behavior and expression of CD40 in VSMCs. Cells were treated with either miR-145 or miR-145 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was analyzed by a colony formation assay and a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a transwell assay, an invasion assay, and a wound healing assay. A luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the interaction between miR-145 and CD40. Expression of α-SMA, calponin, osteopontin (OPN), epiregulin, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and CD40 was measured using real-time RT-PCR for mRNA levels and Western blotting for protein levels. Overexpression of miR-145 significantly inhibited VSMC proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, OPN, epiregulin, AP-1 and CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was down-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. However, α-SMA and calponin expression at the mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. In addition, the luciferase reporter assay showed that CD40 may be a direct target gene of miR-145 in VSMC initiation and development. Moreover, these data demonstrate that the up-regulation of CD40 is critical for miR-145-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. In summary, CD40, a direct target of miR-145, reverses the inhibitory effects of miR-145. These results suggest that the specific modulation of miR-145 in human VSMCs may be an attractive approach for the treatment of proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:27186305

  6. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  7. Conicasterol E, a Small Heterodimer Partner Sparing Farnesoid X Receptor Modulator Endowed with a Pregnane X Receptor Agonistic Activity, from the Marine Sponge Theonella swinhoei

    OpenAIRE

    V. Sepe; Ummarino, R.; D'Auria, M.V.; Chini, M.G.; G. Bifulco; Renga, B.; D' Amore, C.; Debitus, Cécile; Fiorucci, S.; Zampella, A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the isolation and pharmacological characterization of conicasterol E isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei. Pharmacological characterization of this steroid in comparison to CDCA, a natural FXR ligand, and 6-ECDCA, a synthetic FXR agonist generated by an improved synthetic strategy, and rifaximin, a potent PXR agonist, demonstrated that conicasterol E is an FXR modulator endowed with PXR agonistic activity. Conicasterol E induces the expression of genes involved in bile...

  8. Genetic engineering of platelets to neutralize circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Sharkey, Charles C; Wun, Brittany; Liesveld, Jane L; King, Michael R

    2016-04-28

    Mounting experimental evidence demonstrates that platelets support cancer metastasis. Within the circulatory system, platelets guard circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from immune elimination and promote their arrest at the endothelium, supporting CTC extravasation into secondary sites. Neutralization of CTCs in blood circulation can potentially attenuate metastases to distant organs. Therefore, extensive studies have explored the blockade of platelet-CTC interactions as an anti-metastatic strategy. Such an intervention approach, however, may cause bleeding disorders since the platelet-CTC interactions inherently rely on the blood coagulation cascade including platelet activation. On the other hand, platelets have been genetically engineered to correct inherited bleeding disorders in both animal models and human clinical trials. In this study, inspired by the physical association between platelets and CTCs, platelets were genetically modified to express surface-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a cytokine known to induce apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. The TRAIL-expressing platelets were demonstrated to kill cancer cells in vitro and significantly reduce metastases in a mouse model of prostate cancer metastasis. Our results suggest that using platelets to produce and deliver cancer-specific therapeutics can provide a Trojan-horse strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26921521

  9. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... the methodology applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  10. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 370C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient

  11. Ethyl Acetate Extract from Tissue-Cultured Mountain Ginseng Adventitious Roots Inhibits In Vitro Platelet Aggregation in Whole Human Blood and Augments Peripheral Blood Flow in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, In Sun; Kim, Seul-Ki; Jeon, Min Hwa; Jeon, Won Kyung

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that in vitro anti-platelet activity of tissue-cultured mountain ginseng (TCMG) ethanol extracts show improved efficacy when compared with commercial ginseng products such as Korean red ginseng and Panax ginseng. However, information on the anti-platelet activity of the ethyl acetate fraction from TCMG adventitious roots is limited. Therefore, in this study, we further investigated the effects of an ethyl acetate extract of TCMG (EA-TCMG) adventitious roots on in vitro ...

  12. Rac1-mediated signaling plays a central role in secretion-dependent platelet aggregation in human blood stimulated by atherosclerotic plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Khandoga Anna L; Pandey Dharmendra; Dwivedi Suman; Brandl Richard; Siess Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Platelet activation requires rapid remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton which is regulated by small GTP-binding proteins. By using the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766, we have recently found that Rac1 is a central component of a signaling pathway that regulates dephosphorylation and activation of the actin-dynamising protein cofilin, dense and α-granule secretion, and subsequent aggregation of thrombin-stimulated washed platelets. Objectives To study whether NSC23766 inhi...

  13. Aggregatory behaviour of platelets incubated with subcellular fractions of normal and chagasic human syncytiotrophoblast Comportamento agregatório das plaquetas incubadas com frações subcelulares de sinciciotrofoblasto humano normal e chagásico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Eynard

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of human syncytiotrophoblast does not induce maternal blood platelet aggregation even though it is not an endothelium. It can be surmised that as occurs in endothelial injury the subcellular components of the syncytiotrophoblast may have pro-or antiaggregatory activity. During congenital Chagas' disease which is associated to trophoblast lesions, platelets may play a role in the development of T. cruzi-induced placentitis. In the present work the aggregatory behaviour of normal human blood platelets was recorded after their challenging with subcellular fractions of syncytiotrophoblast isolated from normal and chagasic women. Nuclear, Mitochondrial, Microsomal and Supernatant fractions isolated from normal and chagasic syncytiotrophoblast failed to induce per se any aggregatory reaction on platelets. When samples of platelet-rich plasma (PRP were preincubated with normal and chagasic nuclear fractions and then stimulated with collagen at threshold level (CT-PRP an inhibition of the aggregatory response was observed. Treatment of CT-PRP with normal and chagasic mitochondrial fractions induced inhibition of platelet aggregation whereas only chagasic fraction reduced latency time. Microsornal fraction from normal placentas showed no significant effects on platelet aggregation. It is concluded that subcellular fractions of normal human syncytiotrophoblast do not exhibit any effect on platelet aggregation, whereas those subcellular fractions enriched in intracellular membrane components isolated from chagasic placentas inhibit platelet aggregation.A superficie do sinciciotrofoblasto humano não induz agregação das plaquetas maternas apesar de não ser um endotélio. Lesões endoteliais propiciam o aparecimento de agregados plaquetários, o que nos leva a questionar se os componentes subcelulares do sinciciotrofoblasto também poderiam propiciar eventos semelhantes. Na doença de Chagas congênita, que está associada a lesões a nivel de

  14. Human platelet nitric oxide synthase activity: an optimized method Atividade da óxido nítrico sintase em plaquetas humanas: um método otimizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mitiko Kawamato

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the kinetic analysis of human platelet Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS activity by the rate of conversion of [³H] arginine to [³H]-citrulline in unstimulated fresh platelets. NOS activity was present in the membrane fraction and cytosol, and was Ca2+- and calmodulin dependent which is a characteristic of endothelial NOS. NOS activity was also dependent of NADPH since the omission of this cofactor induced an important decrease (85,2% in the enzyme activity. The kinetic varied with protein and arginine concentration but optimum concentrations were found up to 60 minutes, and up to 80 µg of protein at 120 nM of arginine and 0.5 µCi of ³H-arginine. NOS activity in the absence of FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide, FMN (flavin mononucleotide and BH4 (tetrahydrobiopterin was only 2.8% of the activity measured in the presence of these three cofactors. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by L-NAME (1 mM (98.1 % and EGTA (5 mM (98.8 %. Trifluoperazine (TFP caused 73.2% inhibition of the enzyme activity at 200 µM and 83.8 % at 500 µM. Under basal conditions, NOS Km for L-arginine was 0.84 ± 0.08 µM and mean Vmax values were 0.122 ± 0.025 pmol.mg-1.min-1. Mean human NOS platelet activity was 0.020 ± 0.010 pmol.mg-1.min-1. Results indicate that the eNOS in human platelet can be evaluated by conversion of [³H]-arginine to [³H]citrulline in an optimized method, which provide reproducible and accurate results with good sensitivity to clinical experiments involving neurological and psychiatric diseases.A análise cinética da atividade da óxido nítrico sintase (NOS plaquetária foi avaliada pela conversão de [³H]-arginina em [³H]-citrulina em plaquetas humanas frescas não estimuladas. A atividade da NOS foi detectada na fração citosólica e na membrana, além de ser dependente de Ca2+-calmodulina, que é uma característica da NOS endotelial (eNOS. A omissão de NADPH levou à diminuição da atividade da NOS dependente da

  15. Preliminary study of human washed platelet to promote human and mice cell proliferation%洗涤血小板各组分促人/鼠成纤维细胞增殖初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁; 王红; 钟锐; 贺曾; 吴瑕; 刘嘉馨

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析人血小板及其洗涤后获得的各组分补体灭活前后对小鼠成纤维细胞(L929)和人成纤维细胞(HDP)的增殖作用.方法 将所制备的新鲜人富血小板血浆(PRP)3份及血小板浓缩液(PC)5份(50 mL/份),分别用20 mL0.9%生理盐水洗涤2次,重悬以获得贫血小板血浆(PPP)、生理盐水上清、洗涤血小板(WP)3个组分,同未经处理的PRP及PC一道,分别冻融留取对照样品后作补体灭活处理,ELASA方法测试补体灭活前后血小板源性生长因子(PDGF-AB)、转化生长因子(TGF-β1)、血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)、表皮生长因子(EGF)含量,CCK-8试剂盒测定补体灭活前后对L929/HDP细胞的增殖作用.结果 PRP及洗涤各组分补体灭活前后PDGF-AB、VEGF及EGF含量比较,P>0.05,PC及各组分补体灭活前后PDGF-AB、VEGF、EG及TGF-β1含量比较均无明显差异(P>0.05).PRP及WP促L929细胞增殖比较:PRP为0.68±0.12 vs2.13±0.18(P <0.05),WP为0.69±0.12 vs 0.66±0.13(P >0.05);PC及WP促L929细胞增殖比较:PC为0.42±0.05 vs 1.94±0.19(P<0.05),WP为1.69±0.13 vs 1.93±0.19 (P >0.05).补体灭活前后,PRP及WP促HDP细胞增殖:PRP为1.36±0.09 vs 1.30±0.11(P>0.05),WP为1.26±0.04 vs 1.33±0.10(P >0.05);PC洗涤组分促细胞增殖:PC为1.32±0.07 vs 1.28±0.09 (e >0.05),WP为1.39±0.13 vs 1.44±0.13(P >0.05).结论 补体灭活对PRP与PC及洗涤获得的各组分PGFs含量影响较小,PGFs含量与促L929/HDP细胞的增殖作用存在非线性正相关关系,PGFs促细胞增殖 可能存在种间差异.%Objective To investigate the influences of human washed platelet components in mice and human fibroblast proliferation before and after complement inactivated.Methods Three doses (50 mL/dose)of fresh platelet rich plasma(PRP) and 5 doses of platelet concentrate(PC) were washed twice with 20 mL normal saline,then suspended to get platelet poor plasma(PPP),physiological saline supernatant,and washed platelet (WP

  16. Effects of epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor on c-fos and c-myc mRNA levels in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mRNA levels of two proto-oncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were determined in human foreskin fibroblasts exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF) or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in a serum-free, defined medium (MCDB 104). Untreated, quiescent cells were found to have low or undetectable levels of c-fos and c-myc mRNA. Within 10 min after the addition of EGF or PDGF the c-fos mRNA level increased, reached a peak at 30 min, and then declined to the control level after 60 min. The level of c-myc mRNA increased somewhat later and peaked after 8 h in cultures treated with either of the growth factors. The c-myc mRNA level remained elevated throughout the 24 h of investigation. The concentrations of EGF and PDGF required for a maximal effect on c-fos or c-myc expression were found to be similar to those that give maximal effect on cell proliferation. Both c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression were superinduced by the addition of cycloheximide. The present results conform to the view that the c-fos and c-myc proto-oncogenes may be important (or necessary) but not sufficient for the initiation of DNA synthesis. Moreover, the finding that both EGF and PDGF increase c-fos and c-myc expression supports the previous suggestion that these two growth factors may in part act via a common intracellular pathway in the prereplicative phase of human fibroblasts

  17. The α and β chains of human platelet glycoprotein Ib are both transmembrane proteins containing a leucine-rich amino acid sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary structure of the β chain of human glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), the platelet receptor for von Willebrand factor, has been established by a combination of cDNA cloning and amino acid sequence analysis. A λ phage cDNA expression library prepared from human erythroleukemia cells (HEL cells) was screened with a radiolabeled affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody to the β chain of GPIb. Eighteen positive clones were isolated and plaque-purified and the nucleotide sequences of three were determined. The composite sequence spanned 968 nucleotides and included a 5' untranslated region of 22 nucleotides, an open reading frame of 618 nucleotides encoding a signal peptide of 28 amino acids and a mature protein of 181 amino acids, a stop codon, and a 3' noncoding region of 307 nucleotides. The 3' noncoding sequence also contained a polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) 14 nucleotides upstream from the poly(A) tail of 18 nucleotides. Edman degradation of the intact β chain and of peptides produced by chemical cleavage yielded amino acid sequences spanning 76 residues that were identical to those predicted from the cDNA. The amino-terminal region of the β chain contains a leucine-rich sequence of 24 amino acids that is similar to a sequence that occurs as seven tandem repeats in the α chain of GPIb and nine tandem repeats in leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein. The amino-terminal region of the β chain of GPIb is followed by a transmembrane segment of 25 amino acids and an intracellular segment of 34 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the protein

  18. Isolation and characterization of two disintegrins inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation from the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disintegrins and disintegrin-like proteins are molecules found in the venom of four snake families (Atractaspididae, Elapidae, Viperidae, and Colubridae). The disintegrins are nonenzymatic proteins that inhibit cell-cell interactions, cell-matrix interactions, and signal transduction, and may have potential in the treatment of strokes, heart attacks, cancers, and osteoporosis. Prior to 1983, the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake) was known to be only neurotoxic; however, now there is evidence that these snakes can contain venom with: (1) neurotoxins; (2) hemorrhagins; and (3) both neurotoxins and hemorrhagins. In this study, two disintegrins, mojastin 1 and mojastin 2, from the venom of a Mohave rattlesnake collected in central Arizona (Pinal County), were isolated and characterized. The disintegrins in these venoms were identified by mass-analyzed laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI/TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry as having masses of 7.436 and 7.636 kDa. Their amino acid sequences are similar to crotratroxin, a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (C. atrox). The amino acid sequence of mojastin 1 was identical to the amino acid sequence of a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the Timber rattlesnake (C. horridus). The disintegrins from the Mohave rattlesnake venom were able to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole human blood both having IC5s of 13.8 nM, but were not effective in inhibiting the binding of human urinary bladder carcinoma cells (T24) to fibronectin

  19. Cardiac and vascular imaging with labeled platelets and leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of platelets in atherosclerosis and thrombosis in animal models and in clinical studies has been quantified with 111In-platelet scintigraphy. New in vitro quantitative techniques have been developed using 111In-labeled platelets to determine the number of adherent platelets on deendothelialized surfaces of damaged vessel walls and synthetic vascular grafts. In vivo imaging techniques are semi-quantitative in nature; in these studies 111In radioactivity on thrombotic vessels or graft surfaces of iliac, femoral, or popliteal arteries is compared with contralateral vessels. Background 111In radioactivity in the circulating blood pool of venous and capillary networks and radioactivity in marrow decreases the sensitivity of these techniques. Subtraction of blood pool radioactivity with 99mTc-labeled autologous red cells and calculation of 111In radioactivity associated with platelet thrombus on vessel walls also have been performed for coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries. Although platelet concentrates are used frequently after open heart surgery (one to six per patient), consumption of platelets in the artificial lung or oxygenator, lysis of platelets during pumping, and suction of blood only recently have been quantified with the use of 111In-labeled platelets. These studies also demonstrated far less trauma to platelets with the use of a membrane rather than a bubble oxygenator. Further reduction in platelet consumption and trauma was observed with the use of prostacyclin, a short-acting drug with significant beneficial effect on platelet thrombus reduction and disaggregation of aggregated platelets. The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation, infection and myocardial infarction, and in vivo evaluation with 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy in animals and humans has been described

  20. Platelet Concentration in Platelet-Rich Plasma Affects Tenocyte Behavior In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ilaria Giusti; Sandra D’Ascenzo; Annalisa Mancò; Gabriella Di Stefano; Marianna Di Francesco; Anna Rughetti; Antonella Dal Mas; Gianfranco Properzi; Vittorio Calvisi; Vincenza Dolo

    2014-01-01

    Since tendon injuries and tendinopathy are a growing problem, sometimes requiring surgery, new strategies that improve conservative therapies are needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) seems to be a good candidate by virtue of its high content of growth factors, most of which are involved in tendon healing. This study aimed to evaluate if different concentrations of platelets in PRP have different effects on the biological features of normal human tenocytes that are usually required during tendon...

  1. Stimulus-response coupling in platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the mechanism of stimulus-response coupling in platelets, the potentiating effect of succinate and lithium on platelet activation was examined. The action of succinate was immediate; preincubation with succinate did not lead to desensitization. Succinate was comparable to ADP in lowering cAMP levels previously elevated by PGl2. Since inhibition of cAMP is not a prerequisite for platelet activation, the mechanism of potentiation of succinate remains undefined. Lithium has also been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase in PGl2-pretreated platelets. Lithium, however, can also inhibit inositol phosphate (InsP) phosphatase and lead to an accumulation of InsP. In human platelets, lithium also enhanced the thrombin-induced accumulation of [3H]inositol-labelled inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), and inositol bisphosphate (InsP2). One hour after thrombin addition, all 3 inositol phosphates returned to near basal levels. In the presence of lithium, while labelled InsP2 and InsP3 returned to their respective basal levels, the InsP level remained elevated, consistent with the known inhibitory effect of lithium on InsP phosphatase. In thrombin-stimulated platelets prelabeled with [32P]phosphate, lithium led to a decrease in labelled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) as well as an enhanced production of labelled lysophosphatidylinositol, suggesting multiple effects of lithium on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. These observed effects, however, occurred too slowly to be the mechanism by which lithium potentiated agonist-induced platelet activation. To study the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of the specific, high affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, on thrombin-induced accumulation of [3H]inositol-labelled inositol phosphates was studied

  2. Platelet adhesion studies on dipyridamole coated polyurethane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldenhoff Y. B.J.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of polyurethanes (PUs by covalent attachment of dipyridamole (Persantinregistered is known to reduce adherence of blood platelets upon exposure to human platelet rich plasma (PRP. This effect was investigated in further detail. First platelet adhesion under static conditions was studied with four different biomaterial surfaces: untreated PU, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 1, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 2, and PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 3. In PU immobilised with 1 dipyridamole is directly linked to the surface, in PU immobilised with 2 there is a short hydrophilic spacer chain in between the surface and the dipyridamole, while conjugate molecule 3 is merely the spacer chain. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to characterise platelet adhesion from human PRP under static conditions, and fluorescence imaging microscopy was used to study platelet adhesion from whole blood under flow. SEM experiments encompassed both density measurements and analysis of the morphology of adherent platelets. In the static experiments the surface immobilised with 2 showed the lowest platelet adherence. No difference between the three modified surfaces emerged from the flow experiments. The surfaces were also incubated with washed blood platelets and labeled with Oregon-Green Annexin V. No capture of Oregon-Green Annexin V was seen, implying that the adhered platelets did not expose any phosphatidyl serine at their exteriour surface.

  3. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of [3H]serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of 125I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF

  4. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; WEI, BO; Shao, Chunkui; LI, JIALIN; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, a...

  5. Survival curves study of platelet labelling with 51Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet kinetics and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura were researched in the literature. An 'in vitro' platelet labelling with 51Cr procedure in implementation has been evaluated in human beings. Functions used for fitting considered the cases whether the curve was linear or exponential as well as the presence of hematies. (author)

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB-mediated induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human astrocytes: implications for HIV-associated neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel-Brown Crystal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 is an important factor for the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The mechanisms of MCP-1-mediated neuropathogenesis, in part, revolve around its neuroinflammatory role and the recruitment of monocytes into the central nervous system (CNS via the disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB. We have previously demonstrated that HIV-1/HIV-1 Tat upregulate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB, a known cerebrovascular permeant; subsequently, the present study was aimed at exploring the regulation of MCP-1 by PDGF-BB in astrocytes with implications in HAND. Specifically, the data herein demonstrate that exposure of human astrocytes to HIV-1 LAI elevated PDGF-B and MCP-1 levels. Furthermore, treating astrocytes with the human recombinant PDGF-BB protein significantly increased the production and release of MCP-1 at both the RNA and protein levels. MCP-1 induction was regulated by activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathways and the downstream transcription factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays demonstrated increased binding of NFκB to the human MCP-1 promoter following PDGF-BB exposure. Conditioned media from PDGF-BB-treated astrocytes increased monocyte transmigration through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, an effect that was blocked by STI-571, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (PDGF receptor (PDGF-R blocker. PDGF-BB-mediated release of MCP-1 was critical for increased permeability in an in vitro BBB model as evidenced by blocking antibody assays. Since MCP-1 is linked to disease severity, understanding its modulation by PDGF-BB could aid in understanding the proinflammatory responses in HAND. These results suggest that astrocyte

  7. Association of thrombospondin-1 with the actin cytoskeleton of human thrombin-activated platelets through an alphaIIbbeta3- or CD36-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumet, Anne; Jesus, Nando de; Legrand, Chantal; Dubernard, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an adhesive glycoprotein which, when secreted from alpha-granules of activated platelets, can bind to the cell surface and participate in platelet aggregate formation. In this study, we show that thrombin activation leads to the rapid and specific association of a large amount of secreted alpha-granular TSP-1 with the actin cytoskeleton. This cytoskeletal association of TSP-1 was correlated with platelet secretion, but not aggregation, and was inhibited by cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Association of TSP-1 with the actin cytoskeleton was mediated by membrane receptors, as shown by using MAII, a TSP-1-specific monoclonal antibody that inhibited both TSP-1 surface binding to activated platelets and cytoskeletal association. TSP-1 and its potential membrane receptors, e.g. alphaIIbbeta3 integrin, CD36 and CD47, concomitantly associated with the actin cytoskeleton. However, studies on platelets from a patient with type I Glanzmann's thrombasthenia lacking alphaIIbbeta3 and another with barely detectable CD36 showed normal TSP-1 surface expression and association with the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, no involvement of CD47 in TSP-1 association with the actin cytoskeleton could be inferred from experiments with control platelets using the function-blocking anti-CD47 antibody B6H12. Finally, assembly of signalling complexes, as observed through translocation of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and kinases to the actin cytoskeleton, was found to occur in concert with cytoskeletal association of TSP-1, in control platelets as well as in thrombasthenic and CD36-deficient platelets. Our results imply a role for the actin cytoskeleton in the membrane-surface expression process of TSP-1 molecules and suggest a possible coupling of TSP-1 receptors to signalling events occurring independently of alphaIIbbeta3 or CD36. These results provide new insights into the link between surface-bound TSP-1 and the contractile actin

  8. Acetyl eugenol, a component of oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum L.) inhibits aggregation and alters arachidonic acid metabolism in human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, K C; Malhotra, N

    1991-01-01

    In continuation of our studies with the oil of cloves--a common kitchen spice and a crude drug for home medicine--we have isolated yet another active component identified as acetyl eugenol (AE); the earlier reported active component being eugenol. The isolated material (IM) was found to be a potent platelet inhibitor; IM abolished arachidonate (AA)-induced aggregation at ca. 12 microM, a concentration needed to abolish the second phase of adrenaline-induced aggregation. Chemically synthesized acetyl eugenol showed similar effects on AA- and adrenaline-induced aggregation. A dose-dependent inhibition of collagen-induced aggregation was also observed. AE did not inhibit either calcium ionophore A23187- or thrombin-induced aggregation. Studies on aggregation and ATP release were done using whole blood (WB). AA-induced aggregation in WB was abolished at 3 micrograms/ml (14.6 microM) which persisted even after doubling the concentration of AA. ATP release was inhibited. Inhibition of aggregation appeared to be mediated by a combination of two effects: reduced formation of thromboxane and increased generation of 12-lipoxygenase product (12-HPETE). These effects were observed by exposing washed platelets to (14C)AA or by stimulating AA-labelled platelets with ionophore A23187. Acetyl eugenol inhibited (14C)TxB2 formation in AA-labelled platelets on stimulation with thrombin. AE showed no effect on the incorporation of AA into platelet phospholipids. PMID:2011614

  9. Triggering by Paf-acether and adrenaline of cyclo-oxygenase-independent platelet aggregation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fouque, F.; Vargaftig, B B

    1984-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (Paf-acether, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) induced full aggregation and a limited release reaction of human platelets in plasma or in blood. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition with aspirin only reduced aggregation when induced by threshold amounts of Paf-acether, whereas higher concentrations surmounted inhibition whether tested in citrated or in heparinized platelet-rich plasma or blood. Aspirin-induced inhibition of platelet secretion by Paf-acether wa...

  10. Complex formation of platelet thrombospondin with histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, L L; Nachman, R L; Harpel, P C

    1984-01-01

    Thrombospondin and histidine-rich glycoprotein are two proteins with diverse biological activities which have been associated with human platelets and other cell systems. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we have demonstrated that purified human platelet thrombospondin formed a complex with purified human plasma histidine-rich glycoprotein. The formation of the thrombospondin-histidine-rich glycoprotein complex was specific, concentration dependent, and saturable. Significant bindin...

  11. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E;

    1997-01-01

    (17.9%), of whom 18 (15.4%) had had no detectable antibodies before transfusion. There was a positive correlation between the transfused load of immunogenic materials and the frequency of alloimmunization against HLA antigens. In one third of the immunized patients, there was no history of previous......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patients......-antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay. HLA antibodies were detected by the standard lymphocyte cytotoxicity techniques. RESULTS: We found platelet-specific anti-HPA-5b (anti-Bra) in 2 cases (1.7%). One antibody was the result of de novo immunization. We detected lymphocytotoxic HLA antibodies in 21 patients...

  12. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten; Fenger-Eriksen, C; Ingerslev, J; Sørensen, Benny

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...... by tissue factor evaluated by means of impedance aggregometry. Citrated whole blood from healthy volunteers and haemophilia A patients with the addition of inhibitors of the contact pathway and fibrin polymerization was evaluated. In healthy persons, a second wave of platelet aggregation was found to...... coincide with the thrombin burst and to be abolished by thrombin inhibitors. In this system, platelet aggregation in severe haemophilia A (n = 10) was found to be significantly decreased as compared with healthy individuals (912 ± 294 vs. 1917 ± 793 AU × min, P = 0.003), most probably due to the weak level...

  13. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stokol

    Full Text Available Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V. Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM. A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis

  14. Lessons in platelet production from inherited thrombocytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecci, Alessandro; Balduini, Carlo L

    2014-04-01

    Our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of platelet production has greatly expanded in recent years due to the opportunity to culture in vitro megakaryocytes and to create transgenic animals with specific genetic defects that interfere with platelet biogenesis. However, in vitro models do not reproduce the complexity of the bone marrow microenvironment where megakaryopoiesis takes place, and experience shows that what is seen in animals does not always happen in humans. So, these experimental models tell us what might happen in humans, but does not assure us that these events really occur. In contrast, inherited thrombocytopenias offer the unique opportunity to verify in humans the actual effects of abnormalities in specific molecules on platelet production. There are currently 20 genes whose defects are known to result in thrombocytopenia and, on this basis, this review tries to outline a model of megakaryopoiesis based on firm evidence. Inherited thrombocytopenias have not yet yielded all the information they can provide, because nearly half of patients have forms that do not fit with any known disorder. So, further investigation of inherited thrombocytopenias will advance not only the knowledge of human illnesses, but also our understanding of human platelet production. PMID:24480030

  15. Glycine reduces platelet aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Schemmer, Peter; Zhong, Zhi; Galli, Uwe; Wheeler, Michael D.; Xiangli, Li; Bradford, Blair U.; Conzelmann, Lars O.; Forman, Dow; Boyer, José; Thurman, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a wide variety of white blood cells and macrophages (i.e. Kupffer cells, alveolar and peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils) contain glycine-gated chloride channels. Binding of glycine on the receptor stimulates Cl− influx causing membrane hyperpolarization that prevents agonist-induced influx of calcium. Since platelet-aggregation is calcium-dependent, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that glycine would inhibit platelet aggregation. Rats were fed ...

  16. Radioimmunoassay of platelet proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioimmunoassay of platelet-specific proteins has proven to be an excellent way of monitoring platelet activation in vivo. In contrast to earlier methods such as aggregometry, which has been the major tool used in the evaluation of antiplatelet drugs, the RIAs are capable of working with samples which have been subjected to physiological conditions such as haematocrit, oxygen tension, shear rate and ionized calcium concentration. Also, in contrast to aggregometry, no choice of agonist is necessary. Thus, for the first time it has been possible to monitor the effects of therapeutic intervention with drugs upon the platelet release reaction in vivo. It seems reasonable to equate the release reaction in vivo with activation in vivo, though the stimuli necessarily remain unknown. Nevertheless, the fact that a significant number of the compounds mentioned in Table 3 are indeed capable of reducing platelet activation in vivo and that this effect can be measured objectively is a major step forward in our understanding of platelet pharmacology. Two important goals remain to be achieved, however, the establishment of nonhuman animal models for the evaluation of newer compounds in vivo and longer-term goal of proving in the clinical setting the relevance or otherwise of platelet activation per se to the clinical outcome of a particular disease. In this respect, the availability of accurate, reliable and specific radioimmunoassays has a central role

  17. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies suggest that the effects of thapsigargin on human platelets are mediated by changes in intracellular calcium but not by intracellular histamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, S P; McNicol, A; Becker, A B;

    1992-01-01

    observed at 1 microM Tg. Preincubation of platelets with inhibitors of histamine metabolizing enzymes had little effect on intracellular histamine levels in platelets stimulated by 0.5 microM Tg. In addition, the inhibitors of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), alpha-methyl histidine (alpha-MH) and alpha......-fluoromethyl histidine (alpha-FMH) failed to inhibit Tg-induced aggregation. The intracellular histamine receptor antagonist, N,N-diethyl-2-[4-(phenylmethyl)phenoxy] ethanamine. HCl (DPPE), inhibited Tg-induced aggregation but with IC50 values dependent on the concentration of agonist used. The inhibitory effects of...

  18. Platelet serotonin transporter function predicts default-mode network activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scharinger

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence.A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD activity and platelet Vmax.The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity.This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation.

  19. Indium-111 labelled platelets: experimental and clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the present study became to develop a method of effective and gentle isolation and 111-In labelling of human platelets, as well as to employ these platelets in human clinical studies with the object of elucidating a number of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and processes in which platelets take part. 111-In-oxine presents obvious advantages over 51-Cr-sodium chromate; a high labelling efficiency, and more advantageous physical properties (a half life of 68 hours (against the half life of 28 days for 51-Cr) and considerably more effective gamma emission), making external registration by means of a gamma camera possible. Considering the role played by platelets in the development of atherosclerosis and its thromboembolic complications, in the early phases of deep venous thrombosis, and in graft rejection, it is natural that attempts have been made to use 111-In-labelled platelets for scintigraphic and kinetic evaluation of thromboembolic processes. Accumulation of 111-In-labelled platelets at sites of vessel wall injury, on pulmonary emboli (presumably on deep vein thrombi as well), and on catheter material has been demonstrated. Beyond this, the number of publications concerning the use of 111-In-labelled platelets for visualization of atherosclerosis, venous thromboembolism, arterial grafts, intracardiac thrombi, aortic aneurysms, renal allograft rejection, and other situations in which platelet thromboembolism takes place, provides evidence that a tool has finally been found for the study of their nature and response to therapeutic intervention. (eg)

  20. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Skanderup Falkenberg; Inge Tarnow; Alfonso Guzman; Per Mølgaard; Henrik Toft Simonsen

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H2O), Amomyrtus l...

  1. Tocotrienols-induced inhibition of platelet thrombus formation and platelet aggregation in stenosed canine coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papasian Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary supplementation with tocotrienols has been shown to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. Tocotrienols are plant-derived forms of vitamin E, which have potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, hypocholesterolemic, and neuroprotective properties. Our objective in this study was to determine the extent to which tocotrienols inhibit platelet aggregation and reduce coronary thrombosis, a major risk factor for stroke in humans. The present study was carried out to determine the comparative effects of α-tocopherol, α-tocotrienol, or tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF; a mixture of α- + γ- + δ-tocotrienols on in vivo platelet thrombosis and ex vivo platelet aggregation (PA after intravenous injection in anesthetized dogs, by using a mechanically stenosed circumflex coronary artery model (Folts' cyclic flow model. Results Collagen-induced platelet aggregation (PA in platelet rich plasma (PRP was decreased markedly after treatment with α-tocotrienol (59%; P P P P P Next, pharmacokinetic studies were carried out and tocol levels in canine plasma and platelets were measured. As expected, α-Tocopherol treatment increased levels of total tocopherols in post- vs pre-treatment specimens (57 vs 18 μg/mL in plasma, and 42 vs 10 μg/mL in platelets. However, treatment with α-tocopherol resulted in slightly decreased levels of tocotrienols in post- vs pre-treatment samples (1.4 vs 2.9 μg/mL in plasma and 2.3 vs 2.8 μg/mL in platelets. α-Tocotrienol treatment increased levels of both tocopherols and tocotrienols in post- vs pre-treatment samples (tocopherols, 45 vs 10 μg/mL in plasma and 28 vs 5 μg/mL in platelets; tocotrienols, 2.8 vs 0.9 μg/mL in plasma and 1.28 vs 1.02 μg/mL in platelets. Treatment with tocotrienols (TRF also increased levels of tocopherols and tocotrienols in post- vs pre-treatment samples (tocopherols, 68 vs 20 μg/mL in plasma and 31.4 vs 7.9 μg/mL in platelets; tocotrienols, 8.6 vs 1

  2. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonasSDe Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  3. Intravascular filarial parasites inhibit platelet aggregation. Role of parasite-derived prostanoids.

    OpenAIRE

    L. X. Liu; Weller, P F

    1992-01-01

    The nematode parasites that cause human lymphatic filariasis survive for long periods in their vascular habitats despite continual exposure to host cells. Platelets do not adhere to blood-borne microfilariae, and thrombo-occlusive phenomena are not observed in patients with circulating microfilariae. We studied the ability of microfilariae to inhibit human platelet aggregation in vitro. Brugia malayi microfilariae incubated with human platelets caused dose-dependent inhibition of agonist-indu...

  4. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Scharinger; Ulrich Rabl; Christian H. Kasess; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Tina Hofmaier; Kersten Diers; Lucie Bartova; Gerald Pail; Wolfgang Huf; Zeljko Uzelac; Beate Hartinger; Klaudius Kalcher; Thomas Perkmann; Helmuth Haslacher; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy...

  5. Expression of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by exposure to advanced glycosylation end products and inflammatory mediators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟丹; 刘乃丰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether advanced glycosylation end products modified bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA) affects endothelial cell lateral junction protein, platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in the presence or absence of inflammatory mediators.Methods Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to AGEs-BSA for 6, 12, 24, and 36 hours, and exposed to AGEs-BSA glycosylated with different concentrations of glucose, tumor necrosis factord-α (TNF-α), interferon (IFN-γ), TNF-α+IFN-γ and AGEs-BSA+TNF-α for 24 hours, respectively. Expression of PECAM-1 mRNA was measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with β-actin as an internal standard, and sequencing of RT-PCR products was performed to confirm the specificity of amplification for PECAM-1 gene. The endothelial cell surface expression of PECAM-1 was determined by flow cytometry (FCM).Results There were no significant changes in the expression of PECAM-1 mRNA and protein when the cells were exposed to AGEs-BSA with different concentrations or periods (P> 0.05). However, PECAM-1 expression was reduced in the cells treated with TNF-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α+IFN-γ and AGEs-BSA+TNF-α. The level of PECAM-1 treated with AGEs-BSA+TNF-α was lower than that of TNF-α treated alone (P<0.01).Conclusions AGEs-BSA had no effect on the expression of PECAM-1 mRNA and protein in cultured HUVEC. With the presence of inflammatory mediator TNF-α, AGEs-BSA decreased the level of PECAM-1, which might reduce the adhesion interaction between adjacent endothelial cells, enhance the permeability of endothelial cells, and might be implicated in the endothelial dysfunction and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. The significance of this phenomenon in intracellular signal transduction remains to be determined.

  6. Platelet-activating factor and hydrogen peroxide exert a dual modulatory effect on the transcription of LXRα and its target genes in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Quiroz, María E; Alba, Gonzalo; Sáenz, Javier; Geniz, Isabel; Jiménez, Juan; Martín-Nieto, José; Santa-María, Consuelo; Sobrino, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are ligand-activated nuclear receptors involved mainly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in many organs, including liver and intestine, as well as in macrophages and neutrophils. Besides, both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory properties have been ascribed to LXRs. The effect of the inflammatory condition on the expression of LXRα and its target genes has not been previously addressed in human neutrophils. We have described that platelet-activating factor (PAF) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators that link the haemostatic and innate immune systems. In this work we report that H2O2 at low doses (1 pM-1μM) exerts an inhibitory effect on TO901317-induced mRNA expression of LXRα and of its target genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, and the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c). However, an opposite behaviour, i.e., a transcription-enhancing effect, was found at higher H2O2 doses (100-500μM) on most of these genes. A similar dual effect was observed when the pro-inflammatory molecule PAF was used. Interestingly, H2O2 production separately elicited by 10nM PAF or 1μM H2O2 was similarly low, and analogously, H2O2 production levels elicited by 5μM PAF or 100μM H2O2 were similarly high when they were compared. On the other hand, low doses of PAF or H2O2 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2) and NF-κB activation, However, PAF or H2O2 at high doses did not produce changes in NF-κB activation levels. In summary, our results show that H2O2, either exogenous or PAF-induced, exerts a dual regulation on mRNA expression of LXRα and its target genes. PMID:27351826

  7. Platelets in Pulmonary Immune Responses and Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are essential for physiological hemostasis and are central in pathological thrombosis. These are their traditional and best known activities in health and disease. In addition, however, platelets have specializations that broaden their functional repertoire considerably. These functional capabilities, some of which are recently discovered, include the ability to sense and respond to infectious and immune signals and to act as inflammatory effector cells. Human platelets and platelets from mice and other experimental animals can link the innate and adaptive limbs of the immune system and act across the immune continuum, often also linking immune and hemostatic functions. Traditional and newly recognized facets of the biology of platelets are relevant to defensive, physiological immune responses of the lungs and to inflammatory lung diseases. The emerging view of platelets as blood cells that are much more diverse and versatile than previously thought further predicts that additional features of the biology of platelets and of megakaryocytes, the precursors of platelets, will be discovered and that some of these will also influence pulmonary immune defenses and inflammatory injury. PMID:27489307

  8. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  9. Platelet proteomics in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Vélez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, platelet proteomics has been applied successfully to the study of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. It is very well known that platelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying many CVDs, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACSs, since they are implied in thrombus formation after atheroma plaque rupture. This is the reason why molecules involved in platelet activation and aggregation are primary targets for treatment of ACSs. Many efforts are aimed at finding drugs that inhibit platelet activation; however it is difficult to separate the therapeutic benefits from harmful effects because pathological and physiological functions of platelets are due to the same mechanisms. Given that platelets lack a nucleus, proteomics is regarded as an ideal method to approach their biochemistry. Current platelet proteomic studies are focusing on the identification of platelet molecular and functional changes in normal and pathological states, enriching the comprehension of platelet biological function, and screening for new biomarkers and antiplatelet agents. In the present article, we introduce the reader to platelet biology and function, and revise recent advances in platelet proteomics applied to the study of CVDs, including a special emphasis on sample preparation requirements for proteome analysis of platelet clinical samples.

  10. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Cytosolic Ca2+ Concentration by Ginsenoside Ro Are Dependent on Phosphorylation of IP3RI and Dephosphorylation of ERK in Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Woo Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i is platelet aggregation-inducing molecule and is involved in activation of aggregation associated molecules. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of ginsenoside Ro (G-Ro, an oleanane-type saponin in Panax ginseng. G-Ro, without affecting leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, dose-dependently inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration was approximately 155 μM. G-Ro inhibited strongly thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which was strongly increased by A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared to G-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. G-Ro increased the level of cAMP and subsequently elevated the phosphorylation of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor I (IP3RI (Ser1756 to inhibit [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756 by G-Ro was decreased by PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. In addition, G-Ro inhibited thrombin-induced phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42 kDa, indicating inhibition of Ca2+ influx across plasma membrane. We demonstrate that G-Ro upregulates cAMP-dependent IP3RI (Ser1756 phosphorylation and downregulates phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42 kDa to decrease thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which contributes to inhibition of ATP and serotonin release, and p-selectin expression. These results indicate that G-Ro in Panax ginseng is a beneficial novel Ca2+-antagonistic compound and may prevent platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease.

  12. Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma, Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, and Stromal Vascular Fraction on the Survival of Human Transplanted Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Kim, Deok-Woo; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Yoon, Eul-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Traditional adipose tissue transplantation has unpredictable viability and poor absorption rates. Recent studies have reported that treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) are related to increased survival of grafted adipose tissue. This study was the first simultaneous comparison of graft survival in combination with PRP, ASCs, and SVF. Adipose tissues were mixed with each other, injected subcutaneously into the back o...

  13. Labelling of human platelets with 111indium-oxine and 99m-Tc-oxine. Comparison of in vitro and clinical use for monitoring of kidney transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the earliest signs of acute kidney transplant rejection are thrombotic depositions in the glomerulae vessels of the transplant. After injection of radioactive labelled platelets, the cell deposition can be visualized using a gamma camera. The authors have investigated cell labelling with 111indium-oxine and with 99m-Tc-oxine (half life 6 hours) and have studied the usefulness of these methods for the detection of transplant rejection. (Auth.)

  14. Role of platelet plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; L; Dean

    2010-01-01

    Platelets have essential roles in both health and disease. Normal platelet function is required for hemostasis.Inhibition of platelet function in disease or by pharmacological treatment results in bleeding disorders.On the other hand,hyperactive platelets lead to heart attack and stroke.Calcium is a major second messenger in platelet activation,and elevated intracellular calcium leads to hyperactive platelets.Elevated platelet calcium has been documented in hypertension and diabetes;both conditions increase the likelihood of heart attack and stroke. Thus,proper regulation of calcium metabolism in the platelet is extremely important.Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)is a major player in platelet calcium metabolism since it provides the only significant route for calcium efflux.In keeping with the important role of calcium in platelet function,PMCA is a highly regulated transporter.In human platelets,PMCA is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin,by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and by calpain-dependent removal of the inhibitory peptide.It is inhibited by tyrosine phosphorylation and calpain-dependent proteolysis.In addition,the cellular location of PMCA is regulated by a PDZ-domain-dependent interaction with the cytoskeleton during platelet activation.Rapid regulation by phosphorylation results in changes in the rate of platelet activation,whereas calpain-dependent proteolysis and interaction with the cytoskeleton appears to regulate later events such as clot retraction.In hypertension and diabetes,PMCA expression is upregulated while activity is decreased, presumably due to tyrosine phosphorylation.Clearly,a more complete understanding of PMCA function in human platelets could result in the identification of new ways to control platelet function in disease states.

  15. Cultivation and irradiation of human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with platelet lysate for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture; Cultivo e irradiacao de fibroblastos humanos em meio enriquecido com lisado de plaquetas para obtencao de camada de sustentacao em culturas de celulas da epiderme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshito, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    For over 30 years, the use of culture medium, enriched with bovine serum, and murines fibroblasts, with the rate of proliferation controlled by irradiation or by share anticarcinogenic drugs, has been playing successfully its role in assisting in the development of keratinocytes in culture, for clinical purposes. However, currently there is a growing concern about the possibility of transmitting prions and animals viruses to transplanted patients. Taking into account this concern, the present work aims to cultivate human fibroblasts in a medium enriched with human platelets lysate and determine the irradiation dose of these cells, for obtaining feeder layer in epidermal cell culture. For carrying out the proposed objective, platelets lysis has standardized, this lysate was used for human fibroblasts cultivation and the irradiation dose enough to inhibit its duplication was evaluated. Human keratinocytes were cultivated in these feeder layers, in culture medium enriched with the lysate. With these results we conclude that the 10% platelets lysate promoted a better adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblasts and in all dose levels tested (60 to 300 Gy), these had their mitotic activity inactivated by ionizing irradiation, being that the feeder layers obtained with doses from 70 to 150 Gy were those that provided the best development of keratinocytes in medium containing 2.5% of human platelet lysate. Therefore, it was possible to standardize both the cultivation of human fibroblasts as its inactivation for use as feeder layer in culture of keratinocytes, so as to eliminate xenobiotics components. (author)

  16. Regulating VEGF signaling in platelet concentrates via specific VEGF sequestering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, David G; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Murphy, William L

    2016-05-26

    Platelets contain an abundance of growth factors that mimic the composition of the wound healing milieu, and platelet-derived VEGF in particular can negatively influence wound healing if unregulated. Here, we sought to capture and regulate the activity of VEGF factor from human platelets using poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres. In this communication, we demonstrate that platelet freeze/thaw produced significantly higher levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) than either calcium chloride treatment, protease activated receptor 1 activating peptide (PAR1AP) treatment, or thrombin treatment. PEG microspheres containing a VEGF-binding peptide (VBP), derived from VEGFR2, sequestered VEGF from platelet concentrate, prepared via freeze/thaw, and reduced the bioactivity of platelet concentrate in HUVEC culture, which suggests that VBP microspheres sequestered and reduced the activity of VEGF from patient-derived platelets. Here, we demonstrate the ability of VEGF sequestering microspheres to regulate the activity of VEGF derived from a growth factor-rich autologous human blood product. PMID:27010034

  17. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit Platelet Aggregation via P2Y1 and P2Y12 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Chieh; Tsai, Fu-Ming; Chen, Mao-Liang; Wu, Semon; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Wang, Lu-Kai; Wang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) used to treat clinical psychotic syndromes cause a variety of blood dyscrasias. APDs suppress the aggregation of platelets; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We first analyzed platelet aggregation and clot formation in platelets treated with APDs, risperidone, clozapine, or haloperidol, using an aggregometer and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Our data indicated that platelet aggregation was inhibited, that clot formation time was increased, and that clot firmness was decreased in platelets pretreated with APDs. We also examined the role two major adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors, P2Y1 and P2Y12, play in ADP-mediated platelet activation and APD-mediated suppression of platelet aggregation. Our results show that P2Y1 receptor stimulation with ADP-induced calcium influx was inhibited by APDs in human and rats' platelets, as assessed by in vitro or ex vivo approach, respectively. In contrast, APDs, risperidone and clozapine, alleviated P2Y12-mediated cAMP suppression, and the release of thromboxane A2 and arachidonic acid by activated platelets decreased after APD treatment in human and rats' platelets. Our data demonstrate that each APD tested significantly suppressed platelet aggregation via different mechanisms. PMID:27069920

  18. Platelets stimulate fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundahl Joachim

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are thought to play a role in a variety of inflammatory conditions in the lung, some of which may lead to fibrosis. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that whole platelets and platelet lysate can mediate remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro by affecting fibroblast-mediated contraction of a collagen gel. We also sought to determine to what extent platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β contribute to this effect. Methods Washed platelets, isolated from healthy blood donors, and platelet lysate (freezing and thawing, were cast together with human lung fibroblasts in three-dimensional collagen gels. The gels were then released and cultured for four days. PDGF and TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in culture supernatants by ELISA. Results Both platelets and platelet lysate augmented fibroblast-mediated gel contraction in a time and concentration dependent manner (19.9% ± 0.1 (mean ± SEM of initial area vs. 48.0% ± 0.4 at 48 hours; P 1 and PDGF-AA/AB were released in co-culture. PDGF-AA/AB had a maximum release at 24 hours whereas TGF-β1 release increased with longer culture periods. Neutralising antibodies to these mediators partially inhibited platelet-induced gel contraction. Conclusion We conclude that platelets may promote remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro and that PDGF and TGF-β partially mediate this effect, also indicating a role for other mediators. The findings may be an important mechanism in regulating repair processes after injury.

  19. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells are related to chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoko; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hironori; Ninomiya, Itasu; Ahmed, A Karim; Harman, John W; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are crucial components of the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor progression and metastasis. In the circulation, the interaction between tumor cells and platelets increases invasiveness, protects tumor cells from shear stress and immune surveillance, and facilitates tumor cell extravasation to distant sites. However, the role and presence of platelets in the primary tumor have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the presence of platelets around breast cancer primary tumor cells and the associations between these cells. We further investigated the associations among platelets, tumor cells, chemoresistance, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We retrospectively analyzed data from 74 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑negative breast cancer who underwent biopsies before treatment and subsequent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. In biopsy specimens, we evaluated the expression of platelet-specific markers and EMT markers using immunohistochemistry. The associations among the expression of platelet‑specific markers in biopsy specimens, EMT, response to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy, and survival were analyzed. The presence of platelets was observed in 44 out of 74 (59%) primary breast cancer biopsy specimens. Platelet‑positive tumor cells showed EMT‑like morphological changes and EMT marker expression. Primary tumor cells associated with platelets were less responsive to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy (pCR rate: 10 vs. 50%, respectively; p=0.0001). Platelets were an independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy upon multivariable analysis (pbreast cancer. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells may represent novel predictors of chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:27349611

  20. 3H-spiroperidol binding sites in blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3H-spiroperidol, an antagonist of dopamine receptors in brain (striatum), was found to bind to human and rat platelet membrane preparations. The binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and specific. Unlabelled haloperidol displaced the specifically bound 3H-spiroperidol. Binding equilibrium was attained in 15 min at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. Scatchard analysis of 3H-spiroperidol binding revealed a single population of binding site with Kd of 7.6 nM in rat platelet membrane and Kd of 15 nM in human platelet membrane. Unlabelled 5-hydroxytryptamine produced no significant effect on 3H-spiroperidol binding to rat or human blood platelet membranes in the presence or absence of haloperidol. Some dopaminergic agents, known to inhibit spiroperidol binding in corpus striatum, also inhibited the same in rat and human blood platelet membranes under in vitro conditions. This study suggests the presence of specific 3H-spiroperidol binding sites in blood platelets

  1. Fluorescence labeling to study platelet and leucocyte deposition onto vascular grafts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toes, G J; van den Dungen, J J; Haan, J; Hermens, R A; van Oeveren, W

    1999-10-01

    Platelets and leucocytes are important participants in the response of the body to small diameter vascular grafts implanted into the arterial circulation. A sensitive and quick method for measuring platelet and leucocyte deposition contributes to material evaluation. With a newly developed fluorescence labeling method we examined the deposition of platelets and leucocytes onto vascular grafts in vitro. Human platelets and leucocytes were isolated and labeled with the fluorescence label Europium trichloride (EuCl3). After reconstitution of the labeled cells in plasma their functionality appeared intact and competitive with unlabeled cells. Eu-labeled platelets or leucocytes were then incubated with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), Dacron and polyurethane (PU) vascular grafts in autologous plasma. Beta-thromboglobin and thromboxane release from platelets and beta-glucuronidase release from leucocytes during the incubation experiments were measured. Platelets and leucocytes deposited significantly less onto ePTFE compared to Dacron and polyurethane (P release. PMID:10514073

  2. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  3. Adenosine-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation by acadesine. A novel antithrombotic mechanism in vitro and in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Bullough, D A; Zhang, C.; Montag, A; Mullane, K. M.; Young, M A

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of platelet aggregation by acadesine was evaluated both in vitro and ex vivo in human whole blood using impedance aggregometry, as well as in vivo in a canine model of platelet-dependent cyclic coronary flow reductions. In vitro, incubation of acadesine in whole blood inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 50% at 240 +/- 60 microM. Inhibition of platelet aggregation was time dependent and was prevented by the adenosine kinase inhibitor, 5'-deoxy 5-iodotubercidin, which block...

  4. A novel platelet concentrate: titanium-prepared platelet-rich fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunalı, Mustafa; Özdemir, Hakan; Küçükodacı, Zafer; Akman, Serhan; Yaprak, Emre; Toker, Hülya; Fıratlı, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    We developed a new product called titanium-prepared platelet-rich fibrin (T-PRF). The T-PRF method is based on the hypothesis that titanium may be more effective in activating platelets than the silica activators used with glass tubes in Chouckroun's leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) method. In this study, we aimed to define the structural characteristics of T-PRF and compare it with L-PRF. Blood samples were collected from 10 healthy male volunteers. The blood samples were drawn using a syringe. Nine milliliters was transferred to a dry glass tube, and 9 mL was transferred to a titanium tube. Half of each clot (i.e., the blood that was clotted using T-PRF or L-PRF) was processed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The other half of each clot was processed for fluorescence microscopy analysis and light microscopy analysis. The T-PRF samples seemed to have a highly organized network with continuous integrity compared to the other L-PRF samples. Histomorphometric analysis showed that T-PRF fibrin network covers larger area than L-PRF fibrin network; also fibrin seemed thicker in the T-PRF samples. This is the first human study to define T-PRF as an autogenous leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin product. The platelet activation by titanium seems to offer some high characteristics to T-PRF. PMID:24563860

  5. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with [3H]adenine and [32P]P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A2 formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC8) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of [3H]cAMP observed with PGE1 and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 μM PMA) and 42% (100 μM diC8) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of [3H]cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 μM) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1μM PMA and 100 μM diC8, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC8 on the stimulation of [3H]cAMp formation by PGE1 and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in 32P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE1 is present

  6. STIMULATED PLATELETS RELEASE AMYLOID β–PROTEIN PRECURSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Gregory M.; Galasko, Douglas; Shapiro, I. Paul; Saitoh, Tsunao

    1990-01-01

    Human platelets can be stimulated by thrombin or ionomycin to secrete soluble truncated amyloid β–protein precursor and particulate membrane fragments which contain C-terminal and N-terminal immunoreactive amyloid β–protein precursor. This suggests a possible circulating source of β–protein in serum which may play a role in the formation of amyloid deposits. The release of soluble amyloid β-protein precursor could be involved in normal platelet physiology.

  7. Size determination of binding polymers for (/sup 3/H)imipramine and (/sup 3/H)paroxetine in human platelet membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellerup, E.T.; Plenge, P. (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Nielsen, M. (Sct. Hans Mental Hospital, Roskilde (Denmark))

    1984-11-13

    Imipramine and paroxetine both inhibit the transport of serotonin in serotonergic neurons and in platelets; furthermore specific high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)imipramine and (/sup 3/H)paroxetine are located in these two cell types, probably on the serotonin transport mechanism. However, previous studies indicated that the binding site for (/sup 3/H)imipramine was different from the binding site for (/sup 3/H)paroxetine. The authors report that the polymers on which the two binding sites are located have different molecular weights.

  8. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED......). Inclusion criteria were trauma team activation and arterial cannula insertion on arrival. Blood samples were analyzed by multiple electrode aggregometry initiated by thrombin receptor agonist peptide 6 (TRAP) or collagen using a Multiplate device. Blood was sampled median 65 min after injury; median injury...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...

  9. GDP beta S enhances the activation of phospholipase C caused by thrombin in human platelets: evidence for involvement of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guanosine 5'-O-thiotriphosphate (GTP gamma S) and thrombin stimulate the activity of phospholipase C in platelets that have been permeabilized with saponin and whose inositol phospholipids have been prelabeled with [3H]inositol. Ca2+ has opposite effects on the formation of [3H]inositol phosphates induced by thrombin or GTP gamma S. While the action of GTP gamma S on the formation of [3H]inositol phosphates is inhibited by Ca2+, action of thrombin is stimulated by Ca2+. Guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S), which inhibits the function of GTP-binding proteins, also inhibits the effect of GTP gamma S on phospholipase C stimulation but, surprisingly, increases the effect of thrombin. Ca2+ increases the inhibitory effect of GDP beta S on GTP gamma S activation of phospholipase C, but Ca2+ further enhances the stimulatory effect of GDP beta S on the thrombin activation of phospholipase C. This indicates that two mechanisms are responsible for the activation of phospholipase C in platelets. A GTP-binding protein is responsible for regulation of phospholipase C induced by GTP gamma S, while the effect of thrombin on the stimulation of phospholipase C is independent of GTP-binding proteins. However, the effect of thrombin may be modulated by the action of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein

  10. GDP beta S enhances the activation of phospholipase C caused by thrombin in human platelets: evidence for involvement of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberdisse, E.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1987-05-14

    Guanosine 5'-O-thiotriphosphate (GTP gamma S) and thrombin stimulate the activity of phospholipase C in platelets that have been permeabilized with saponin and whose inositol phospholipids have been prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol. Ca/sup 2 +/ has opposite effects on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates induced by thrombin or GTP gamma S. While the action of GTP gamma S on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates is inhibited by Ca/sup 2 +/, action of thrombin is stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/. Guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S), which inhibits the function of GTP-binding proteins, also inhibits the effect of GTP gamma S on phospholipase C stimulation but, surprisingly, increases the effect of thrombin. Ca/sup 2 +/ increases the inhibitory effect of GDP beta S on GTP gamma S activation of phospholipase C, but Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhances the stimulatory effect of GDP beta S on the thrombin activation of phospholipase C. This indicates that two mechanisms are responsible for the activation of phospholipase C in platelets. A GTP-binding protein is responsible for regulation of phospholipase C induced by GTP gamma S, while the effect of thrombin on the stimulation of phospholipase C is independent of GTP-binding proteins. However, the effect of thrombin may be modulated by the action of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein.

  11. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  12. Calcium Sulfate and Platelet-Rich Plasma make a novel osteoinductive biomaterial for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intini Francesco E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the present study we introduce a novel and simple biomaterial able to induce regeneration of bone. We theorized that nourishing a bone defect with calcium and with a large amount of activated platelets may initiate a series of biological processes that culminate in bone regeneration. Thus, we engineered CS-Platelet, a biomaterial based on the combination of Calcium Sulfate and Platelet-Rich Plasma in which Calcium Sulfate also acts as an activator of the platelets, therefore avoiding the need to activate the platelets with an agonist. Methods First, we tested CS-Platelet in heterotopic (muscle and orthotopic (bone bone regeneration bioassays. We then utilized CS-Platelet in a variety of dental and craniofacial clinical cases, where regeneration of bone was needed. Results The heterotopic bioassay showed formation of bone within the muscular tissue at the site of the implantation of CS-Platelet. Results of a quantitative orthotopic bioassay based on the rat calvaria critical size defect showed that only CS-Platelet and recombinant human BMP2 were able to induce a significant regeneration of bone. A non-human primate orthotopic bioassay also showed that CS-Platelet is completely resorbable. In all human clinical cases where CS-Platelet was used, a complete bone repair was achieved. Conclusion This study showed that CS-Platelet is a novel biomaterial able to induce formation of bone in heterotopic and orthotopic sites, in orthotopic critical size bone defects, and in various clinical situations. The discovery of CS-Platelet may represent a cost-effective breakthrough in bone regenerative therapy and an alternative or an adjuvant to the current treatments.

  13. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood. PMID:25956790

  14. Roles of thrombin and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in platelet-subendothelial deposition after angioplasty in an ex vivo whole artery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet deposition at the site of injury caused by balloon angioplasty is associated with acute closure and restenosis. In a new ex vivo whole artery angioplasty model, the authors examined the roles of thrombin inhibition with D-Phe-Pro-ArgCH2Cl (PPACK) and inhibition of the platelet membrane fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) with monoclonal antibody 7E3 on platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury. Fresh rabbit aortas were mounted in a perfusion chamber. One half of the mounted arterial segment was dilated with a standard angioplasty balloon catheter and the uninjured half served as the control segment. The vessels were perfused with human blood at physiological pressure and shear rates of 180-250 second-1 for 30 minutes. Platelet deposition was measured using 111In-labeled platelets and scanning electron microscopy. With heparin (2 units/ml) anticoagulation, 8.2 ± 2.2 x 10(6) platelets/cm2 were deposited at the site of balloon injury compared with 0.7 ± 0.2 x 10(6) platelets/cm2 on uninjured segments (p less than 0.02, n = 7). PPACK was tested at a concentration (10 microM) that totally inhibited platelet aggregation in response to thrombin. 7E3 was tested at a concentration (10 micrograms/ml) that totally inhibited platelet aggregation. Platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury was reduced 47% by PPACK and 70% by 7E3 compared with heparin. At shear rates seen in nonstenotic coronary arteries, PPACK and 7E3 are more effective than heparin in reducing platelet deposition at the site of balloon injury. The significant inhibition of platelet deposition by PPACK demonstrates the importance of heparin-resistant thrombin in platelet thrombus formation

  15. Platelet proteomics in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Vélez; Ángel García

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, platelet proteomics has been applied successfully to the study of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It is very well known that platelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying many CVDs, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), since they are implied in thrombus formation after atheroma plaque rupture. This is the reason why molecules involved in platelet activation and aggregation are primary targets for treatment of ACSs. Many efforts are aimed...

  16. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Lakka Klement, Giannoula; Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor...

  17. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors. PMID:25999791

  18. Novel aspects of platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka-Moya Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation is an important process, which is critical for the hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. Recent studies have shown that the platelet aggregation is more complex and dynamic than it was previously thought. There are several mechanisms that can initiate the platelet aggregation and each of them operates under specific conditions in vivo. At the same time, the influence of certain plasma proteins on this process should be considered. This review intends to summarize the recent data concerning the adhesive molecules and their receptors, which provide the platelet aggregation under different conditions.

  19. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  20. Platelet Transfusion and Thrombosis: More Questions than Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Amy E; Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Platelets perform a vital role in hemostasis and their role in inflammation is becoming increasingly evident. Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in hospitals and platelet transfusions comprise a significant proportion. Over the past few decades, retrospective studies and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that blood transfusion is more harmful than previously thought and is associated with numerous complications, such as transfusion-associated lung injury, transfusion-associated cardiac overload, transfusion-associated immune modulation, and infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus. Recent data suggest an association between platelet transfusion and thrombosis. This review will highlight the mechanistic issues that may be relevant to the epidemiologic associations of platelet transfusion with thrombosis and mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26716501

  1. Association of Adiposity Indices with Platelet Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume in Chinese Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hou

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a prominent characteristic of inflammatory tissue lesions. It can affect platelet function. While mean platelet volume (MPV and platelet distribution width (PDW are sample platelet indices, they may reflect subcinical platelet activation. To investigated associations between adiposity indices and platelet indices, 17327 eligible individuals (7677 males and 9650 females from the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort Study (DFTJ-Cohort Study, n=27009 were included in this study, except for 9682 individuals with missing data on demographical, lifestyle, physical indicators and diseases relative to PDW and MPV. Associations between adiposity indices including waist circumstance (WC, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, body mass index (BMI, and MPV or PDW in the participants were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions. There were significantly negative associations between abnormal PDW and WC or WHtR for both sexes (ptrend<0.001 for all, as well as abnormal MPV and WC or WHtR among female participants (ptrend<0.05 for all. In the highest BMI groups, only females with low MPV or PDW were at greater risk for having low MPV (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.10, 1.62 ptrend<0.001 or PDW (OR=1.34, 95% CI=1.14, 1.58, ptrend<0.001 than those who had low MPV or PDW in the corresponding lowest BMI group. The change of PDW seems more sensitive than MPV to oxidative stress and hypoxia. Associations between reduced PDW and MPV values and WC, WHtR and BMI values in Chinese female adults may help us to further investigate early changes in human body.

  2. Platelets accelerate gastric ulcer healing through presentation of vascular endothelial growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, John L; Dicay, Michael; McKnight, Webb; Dudar, Genevieve K

    2006-01-01

    Platelets contain an array of growth factors that can modulate healing processes, including both pro- (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) and antiangiogenic (e.g., endostatin) factors. Previous studies have shown that circulating platelets contribute significantly to gastric ulcer healing, acting as a delivery system for these growth factors to the site of injury. In this study, we examined the effects of orally administered human platelets on the healing of gastric ulcers in ra...

  3. A revised model of platelet aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Suhasini; Dopheide, Sacha M.; Yap, Cindy L.; Ravanat, Catherine; Freund, Monique; Mangin, Pierre; Heel, Kathryn A.; Street, Alison; Harper, Ian S.; Lanza, Francois; Jackson, Shaun P.

    2000-01-01

    In this study we have examined the mechanism of platelet aggregation under physiological flow conditions using an in vitro flow-based platelet aggregation assay and an in vivo rat thrombosis model. Our studies demonstrate an unexpected complexity to the platelet aggregation process in which platelets in flowing blood continuously tether, translocate, and/or detach from the luminal surface of a growing platelet thrombus at both arterial and venous shear rates. Studies of platelets congenitally...

  4. Storage of human red blood cells and platelets. Some aspects concerning the factors leading to storage lesion characterized as morphological changes and vesiculation. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, C

    1988-01-01

    1. Storage renders erythrocytes more responsive to thermally induced morphological changes, especially the shedding of microvesicles. 4-8 week old cells can be morphologically "rejuvenated" by heating. 2. If pH increases during storage of platelets an extensive loss of small particles occurs. The platelet disintegration is associated with a loss in the metabolic activity, discharge of LDH, increased susceptibility to phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase C and is found to be initiated during the actual preparation of platelet concentrates. 3. Activation of platelets during preparation can be decreased by shortening the first centrifugation time or by using adenine in the anticoagulant. 4. A 4 hour prestorage of the whole blood unit prior to centrifugation strongly decreases the activation of platelets upon stimuli and results in platelet concentrates much more stable to storage. PMID:3070889

  5. Genomics of platelet disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, S K; Mumford, A D

    2016-07-01

    Genetic diagnosis in families with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) is not performed widely because of the genetic heterogeneity of this group of disorders and because in most cases, it is not possible to select single candidate genes for analysis using clinical and laboratory phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has revolutionized the scale and cost-effectiveness of genetic testing, and has emerged as a valuable tool for IPD. This review examines the potential utility of NGS as a diagnostic tool to streamline detection of causal variants in known IPD genes and as a vehicle for new gene discovery. PMID:27405671

  6. Platelet aggregation and quality control of platelet concentrates produced in the Amazon Blood Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Maria José Dantas Coêlho; Taysa de Castro Monteiro; Felicien Gonçalves Vasquez; Kátia Luz Torres Silva; Kleber Sandro Brasil dos Santos; Viviana Maria Araújo de Oliveira; Francimary de Oliveira Cavalcante

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study of platelet aggregation is essential to assess in vitro platelet function by different platelet activation pathways. OBJECTIVE: To assess aggregation and biochemical parameters of random platelet concentrates produced at the Fundação HEMOAM using the quality control tests defined by law. METHODS: Whole blood samples from 80 donors and the respective platelet concentrate units were tested. Platelet concentrates were tested (platelet count, aggregation and pH) on days 1, 3...

  7. Phosphoproteomic analysis of platelets activated by pro-thrombotic oxidized phospholipids and thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Zimman

    Full Text Available Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36 promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (dephosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36.

  8. Anti-Platelet Activities of Polyozellin In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ju Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Thrombosis and thromboembolic occlusions of blood vessels are a major complication in various peripheral vascular diseases. The agents for the inhibition of platelet function are recognized as key tools in the treatment of atherothrombosis. Therefore, it became a mainstay medication for a wide range of vascular diseases. Polyozellin (POZ, a major constituent of an edible mushroom Polyozellus multiplex, was reported to have anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenesis, anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, anti-platelet effect of POZ has not been investigated yet. Methods: In our study, the anti-platelet activities of POZ were measured by thrombin- or collagen-induced platelet aggregation in vitro, adenosine diphosphate (ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vivo, and the thrombus formation in vivo. Results: POZ effectively inhibited the platelet aggregation not only in vitro using freshly isolated human platelets, but also in vivo thrombin or collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In accordance with the anti-platelet activities in vitro, POZ enhanced anti-thrombotic effect in vivo pulmonary embolism model and arterial thrombosis model. Conclusion: These results indicate that POZ possesses anti-platelet activities and might be useful for developing the drug candidates or functional foods for treatment of cardiovascular diseases without side effects.

  9. Use of 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation for decontamination of platelet concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission of viral diseases through blood products remains an unsolved problem in transfusion medicine. We have developed a psoralen photochemical system for decontamination of platelet concentrates in which platelets are treated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). Bacteria, RNA viruses, and DNA viruses ranging in genome size from 1.2 x 10(6) daltons, encompassing the size range of human pathogens, were inoculated into platelet concentrates and subjected to treatment. This system inactivated 25 to 30 logs/h of bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, 6 logs/h of bacteriophage fd, 0.9 log/h of bacteriophage R17 and 1.1 logs/h of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in platelet concentrates maintained in standard storage bags. Platelet integrity and in vitro function before, immediately following photochemical treatment, and during prolonged storage after treatment, were evaluated by measuring: (1) extracellular pH; (2) platelet yields; (3) extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; (4) platelet morphology; (5) platelet aggregation responsiveness; (6) thromboxane beta-2 (TXB-2) production; (7) dense body secretion; and (8) alpha granule secretion. These assays demonstrated that this photochemical inactivation system inactivated bacteria and viruses in platelet concentrates with minimal adverse effects on the in vitro function of platelets in comparison to untreated control concentrates maintained under current, standard blood bank conditions

  10. Loss of fibrinogen receptors from the platelet surface during simulated extracorporeal circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro recirculation of fresh human heparinized blood in an extracorporeal circuit with a membrane oxygenator decreased fibrinogen- induced platelet aggregation and diminished the number of fibrinogen receptors and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/GPIIIa) antigenic sites on the platelet surface. In seven experiments, the mean +/- SD Km value for fibrinogen (i.e., molar concentration of fibrinogen required to cause 50% of the maximal rate of aggregation) was 1.58 x 10(-7) mol/L +/- 0.68 x 10(-7) mol/L. After recirculation, this value increased to 3.8 x 10(-7) mol/L +/- 1.94 x 10(-7) mol/L. The maximal aggregation rate of chymotrypsin-treated platelets decreased by 40% after 2 hours of recirculation. The number of fibrinogen receptors on platelets, which were treated with chymotrypsin after a recirculation, decreased from 41,370 +/- 24,000 to 13,230 +/- 10,230/platelet under the same conditions. The number of antigenic sites for monoclonal antibody reacting with GPIIb/GPIIIa complex of adenosine diphosphate-stimulated platelets decreased from 34,200 +/- 5,940 to 19,500 +/- 9,680/platelet after recirculation. Prostaglandin E1 (0. 3 mumol/L) in the perfusion circuit preserved the ability of platelets to react with fibrinogen. In conclusion, the loss of fibrinogen receptors from the surface of platelet membranes results from the interaction of platelets with the surfaces of perfusion circuits

  11. Role of platelets in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Serkan Yalçın

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, which is extremely useful process for humanbody is the response of living vascular tissues topathological phenomena that removes the pathogens andinitiates the healing procedure. Microorganisms, physicaltrauma, chemical, mechanical, irradiation, or thermal injury,ischemia and immune reactions are most commoncauses of this exceptionally important event for humanbody. Platelets are non-nucleated cells in blood that producedin bone marrow as derived from megakaryocytes.Apart from stop bleeding and achieving hemostasis thereare incredibly important roles of platelets in inflammation.Platelets contain important mediators for inflammationlike neutrophils or macrophages and can alter the courseof mechanism. In this article changing platelet function ininflammation and the effect of these functions to the processof inflammation will be discussed.Key words: Platelet, inflammation, cytokines

  12. The effects of hypercholestrolemia on rabbit platelets: Functional and biochemical alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental evidence points to hypercholesterolemia as an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and related occlusive vascular disorders. In spite of considerable support implicating cholesterol, the mechanism of its effect on this group of disorders is not entirely clear. Accumulation of fat and cholesterol in the platelets could influence the development of the initial fatty atheromatous lesions in human beings and animals. Since platelets may have a critical role in atherogenesis, we have examined the mechanisms underlying the relationship among platelets, cholesterol, phospholipid metabolism, and platelet function in rabbits fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (1% and 0.5%) and peanut oil (4% and 2%) 1 tab

  13. Electrophoresis of platelet monoamine oxidase in schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoamine oxidase is an important enzyme in the catabolism of biogenic amines and can be measured in human platelets. Platelet MAO has been reported to be reduced in schizophrenic and manic-depressive patients, though other reports are contradictory. The present study evaluated the possibility that qualitative genetic enzyme abnormalities of MAO could be responsible for the different enzyme activities of platelet MAO in different populations. However, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of platelet MAO from 10 manic-depressive, 12 schizophrenic, and 11 normal individuals did not reveal any genetic mutant forms. (author)

  14. Paraphenylene diamine exacerbates platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in response to a low dose of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Younes; Marhoume, Fatimazahra; Senhaji, Nezha; Kojok, Kevin; Boufous, Hicham; Naya, Abdallah; Oudghiri, Mounia; Darif, Youssef; Habti, Norddine; Zouine, Soukaina; Mohamed, Fekhaoui; Chait, Abderahmane; Bagri, Abdellah

    2016-02-01

    Paraphenylene daimine (PPD) is an aromatic amine that is widely used in several industrial products; however, its toxicity has been reported in several cases of cardiac arrests. As platelets play a key role in cardiovascular diseases, we aimed to determine the impact of PPD in vitro and in vivo on platelet function. Our findings demonstrated that platelet activation and aggregation were strongly enhanced by PPD. Treatment with PPD primed human platelets that became more reactive in response to low doses of collagen. Furthermore, PPD exacerbated thrombus formation in rats in comparison with those untreated. Our results suggest that PPD is an important platelet primer predisposing platelets to promote thrombus formation in response to vascular injury. This should prompt the authorities to consider controlling the marketing of this product. PMID:26763399

  15. Metabolic plasticity in resting and thrombin activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya Ravi

    Full Text Available Platelet thrombus formation includes several integrated processes involving aggregation, secretion of granules, release of arachidonic acid and clot retraction, but it is not clear which metabolic fuels are required to support these events. We hypothesized that there is flexibility in the fuels that can be utilized to serve the energetic and metabolic needs for resting and thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation. Using platelets from healthy human donors, we found that there was a rapid thrombin-dependent increase in oxidative phosphorylation which required both glutamine and fatty acids but not glucose. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation or glutamine utilization could be compensated for by increased glycolytic flux. No evidence for significant mitochondrial dysfunction was found, and ATP/ADP ratios were maintained following the addition of thrombin, indicating the presence of functional and active mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during the early stages of aggregation. Interestingly, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation and glutaminolysis alone or in combination is not sufficient to prevent platelet aggregation, due to compensation from glycolysis, whereas inhibitors of glycolysis inhibited aggregation approximately 50%. The combined effects of inhibitors of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were synergistic in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation contribute to platelet metabolism in the resting and activated state, with fatty acid oxidation and to a smaller extent glutaminolysis contributing to the increased energy demand.

  16. Three-dimensional multi-scale model of deformable platelets adhesion to vessel wall in blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Zhiliang; Kim, Oleg; Alber, Mark

    2014-08-01

    When a blood vessel ruptures or gets inflamed, the human body responds by rapidly forming a clot to restrict the loss of blood. Platelets aggregation at the injury site of the blood vessel occurring via platelet-platelet adhesion, tethering and rolling on the injured endothelium is a critical initial step in blood clot formation. A novel three-dimensional multi-scale model is introduced and used in this paper to simulate receptor-mediated adhesion of deformable platelets at the site of vascular injury under different shear rates of blood flow. The novelty of the model is based on a new approach of coupling submodels at three biological scales crucial for the early clot formation: novel hybrid cell membrane submodel to represent physiological elastic properties of a platelet, stochastic receptor-ligand binding submodel to describe cell adhesion kinetics and lattice Boltzmann submodel for simulating blood flow. The model implementation on the GPU cluster significantly improved simulation performance. Predictive model simulations revealed that platelet deformation, interactions between platelets in the vicinity of the vessel wall as well as the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors played significant roles in platelet adhesion to the injury site. Variation of the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors as well as changes of platelet stiffness can represent effects of specific drugs reducing or enhancing platelet activity. Therefore, predictive simulations can improve the search for new drug targets and help to make treatment of thrombosis patient-specific. PMID:24982253

  17. Platelet concentration in platelet-rich plasma affects tenocyte behavior in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Mancò, Annalisa; Di Stefano, Gabriella; Di Francesco, Marianna; Rughetti, Anna; Dal Mas, Antonella; Properzi, Gianfranco; Calvisi, Vittorio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2014-01-01

    Since tendon injuries and tendinopathy are a growing problem, sometimes requiring surgery, new strategies that improve conservative therapies are needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) seems to be a good candidate by virtue of its high content of growth factors, most of which are involved in tendon healing. This study aimed to evaluate if different concentrations of platelets in PRP have different effects on the biological features of normal human tenocytes that are usually required during tendon healing. The different platelet concentrations tested (up to 5 × 10(6) plt/µL) stimulated differently tenocytes behavior; intermediate concentrations (0.5 × 10(6), 1 × 10(6) plt/µL) strongly induced all tested processes (proliferation, migration, collagen, and MMPs production) if compared to untreated cells; on the contrary, the highest concentration had inhibitory effects on proliferation and strongly reduced migration abilities and overall collagen production but, at the same time, induced increasing MMP production, which could be counterproductive because excessive proteolysis could impair tendon mechanical stability. Thus, these in vitro data strongly suggest the need for a compromise between extremely high and low platelet concentrations to obtain an optimal global effect when inducing in vivo tendon healing. PMID:25147809

  18. Platelet Concentration in Platelet-Rich Plasma Affects Tenocyte Behavior In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Giusti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since tendon injuries and tendinopathy are a growing problem, sometimes requiring surgery, new strategies that improve conservative therapies are needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP seems to be a good candidate by virtue of its high content of growth factors, most of which are involved in tendon healing. This study aimed to evaluate if different concentrations of platelets in PRP have different effects on the biological features of normal human tenocytes that are usually required during tendon healing. The different platelet concentrations tested (up to 5 × 106 plt/µL stimulated differently tenocytes behavior; intermediate concentrations (0.5 × 106, 1 × 106 plt/µL strongly induced all tested processes (proliferation, migration, collagen, and MMPs production if compared to untreated cells; on the contrary, the highest concentration had inhibitory effects on proliferation and strongly reduced migration abilities and overall collagen production but, at the same time, induced increasing MMP production, which could be counterproductive because excessive proteolysis could impair tendon mechanical stability. Thus, these in vitro data strongly suggest the need for a compromise between extremely high and low platelet concentrations to obtain an optimal global effect when inducing in vivo tendon healing.

  19. The influence of environmental variables on platelet concentration in horse platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnovati, Riccardo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Gentilini, Fabio; Lambertini, Carlotta; Spadari, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) commonly refers to blood products which contain a higher platelet (PLT) concentration as compared to normal plasma. Autologous PRP has been shown to be safe and effective in promoting the natural processes of soft tissue healing or reconstruction in humans and horses. Variability in PLT concentration has been observed in practice between PRP preparations from different patients or from the same individual under different conditions. A change in PLT concentration could modify PRP efficacy in routine applications. The aim of this study was to test the influence of environmental, individual and agonistic variables on the PLT concentration of PRP in horses. Six healthy Standardbred mares were exposed to six different variables with a one-week washout period between variables, and PRP was subsequently obtained from each horse. The variables were time of withdrawal during the day (morning/evening), hydration status (overhydration/dehydration) treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and training periods on a treadmill. The platelet concentration was significantly higher in horses treated with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (P = 0.03). The leukocyte concentration increased 2-9 fold with respect to whole blood in the PRP which was obtained after exposure to all the variable considered. Environmental variation in platelet concentration should be taken into consideration during PRP preparation. PMID:27377748

  20. Activation of the Small GTPase Ral in Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Wolthuis, Rob M. F.; Franke, Barbara; van Triest, Miranda; Bauer, Bettina; Cool, Robbert H.; Camonis, Jacques H.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Bos, Johannes L.

    1998-01-01

    Ral is a ubiquitously expressed Ras-like small GTPase which is abundantly present in human platelets. The biological function of Ral and the signaling pathway in which Ral is involved are largely unknown. Here we describe a novel method to measure Ral activation utilizing the Ral binding domain of the putative Ral effector RLIP76 as an activation-specific probe. With this assay we investigated the signaling pathway that leads to Ral activation in human platelets. We found that Ral is rapidly ...

  1. The effect of erythropoietin on platelet function and fibrinolysis in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenver, Doris Irene; Jeppesen, L; Nielsen, B;

    1994-01-01

    The influence of erythropoietin therapy on platelet function and fibrinolysis was evaluated in 12 anemic hemodialysis patients. Six months of therapy with human erythropoietin (50 to 80 IU/kg initially) raised the hemoglobin level to 10.8 g/dl but did not increase platelet activity in vivo as mea...

  2. Platelet scintigraphy in atherothrombotic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari (Osaka National Hospital (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy for the measurement of in vivo thrombogenicity is a useful noninvasive technique with a number of applications. From 1982 to 1989, we explored clinical relevance of this method for 576 consecutive patients with atherothrombotic disease. There was a disease-related difference in the percentage of positive platelet accumulation; 85% in patients with Dacron bifurcation graft, 75% in abdominal or thoracic aneurysm, 40% in intra-cardiac thrombi, 33% in arteriosclerosis obliterans and 25% in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Labelled platelets accumulated frequently in the lesion with severe arteriographic abnormality. Aspirin clearly inhibited platelet accumulation on carotid atheroma but the effect of ticlopidine has been less conclusive. Short-term orally active PGI[sub 2] analogue had inhibitory effects on platelet accumulation in carotid atheroma and platelet aggregability, but did not cause significant reduction in plaque size. The results suggest the usefulness of platelet scintigraphy for monitoring the thrombogenicity in various atherothrombotic diseases. It will be necessary, however, to simplify the labelling procedures and to develop a new [sup 99m]Tc-labelled thrombus imaging agent, if thrombus imaging is to be considered for more generall use for patients with atherosclerosis. (author).

  3. Platelet scintigraphy in atherothrombotic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy for the measurement of in vivo thrombogenicity is a useful noninvasive technique with a number of applications. From 1982 to 1989, we explored clinical relevance of this method for 576 consecutive patients with atherothrombotic disease. There was a disease-related difference in the percentage of positive platelet accumulation; 85% in patients with Dacron bifurcation graft, 75% in abdominal or thoracic aneurysm, 40% in intra-cardiac thrombi, 33% in arteriosclerosis obliterans and 25% in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Labelled platelets accumulated frequently in the lesion with severe arteriographic abnormality. Aspirin clearly inhibited platelet accumulation on carotid atheroma but the effect of ticlopidine has been less conclusive. Short-term orally active PGI2 analogue had inhibitory effects on platelet accumulation in carotid atheroma and platelet aggregability, but did not cause significant reduction in plaque size. The results suggest the usefulness of platelet scintigraphy for monitoring the thrombogenicity in various atherothrombotic diseases. It will be necessary, however, to simplify the labelling procedures and to develop a new 99mTc-labelled thrombus imaging agent, if thrombus imaging is to be considered for more generall use for patients with atherosclerosis. (author)

  4. 混合血小板凝胶促进新西兰兔创面愈合的实验研究%The evaluation of pooled human platelet gel in the treatment of wound of New-Zealand rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳辉; 单桂秋; 张雅妮; 刘广亚; 吕品; 周谋; 丘勇新

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the pooled humen platelet gel on wound healing of New-Zealand rabbit. Methods Pooled human platelet-rich plasma and activating agents withwhich had different concentration of thrombin ( 10% calcium gluconate containing 1 000U/ml 、100U/ml 、0U/ml thrombin) were mixed in proportion of 10:1 by the volume rates to get platelet gel (PG). A total of 24 New Zealand rabbits ( 12 female and 12 male) a haft were selected and randomly divided into four groups. Every group contain 6 New Zealand rabbits and two skin wounds were made to each rabbit had been created two skin defects. The skin defectwounds were treated with different dressing:the control group was with asepticsis gauze, the three experimental groups were with PG dressing prepared according to the methods above. OnAt days 5,10,15 ,and 20 after operation,the dressing of every defects were changed and tissue specimen of each group were cutted and investigatedstudied by histological observation. Results Although the difference inon wound healing rates of the control and experimental groups hadwere not statistical significant ( P >0.05) ,the healing quality of the three experimental groups were obviously better than the control group by gross examination. Histological observation showed that the neogenesis skin of the three experimental groups was betterhave an advantage to than the control group: fibroblasts lined up in orderly and tightly,cells proliferated faster,new vessels appeared earlier and in larger quantitymore plentiful. Conclusion Pooled humaen platelet gel can promote the wound healing of New-Zealand rabbit and it has the potential to be. applicateed to clinical research.%目的 研究人源性混合血小板凝胶对新西兰兔创面愈合的影响.方法 采用手工分离的人源性混合血小板为原材料,加入不同激活剂(含有1 000 U/ml、100 U/ml、0 U/ml凝血酶的10%葡萄糖酸钙溶液)制备PG,血小板与激活剂按体积10∶1

  5. 人血小板裂解液替代胎牛血清促进骨髓间质干细胞的增殖%Human platelet lysates promotes the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许茹; 夏文杰; 戎霞; 叶欣; 邵媛; 王敏; 罗广平; 付涌水

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of human platelet lysates (HPL) obtained from platelet-rich plasma on the proliferation and biological characteristics of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro. Methods HPL was obtained by repeated freeze-thawing of human plateletes, and the MSCs separated by density gradient centrifugation from 6 donors were expanded in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FCS) or HPL at different concentrations. The optimal concentration of HPL for cells culture was determined according to the cell proliferation kinetics. The cultured MSCs were characterized for their proliferation, cell phenotype, and cell cycle distribution. Results The HPL-supplemented medium contained 4 essential growth factors for the growth of MSCs, namely platelet-derived growth factors (0.53±0.06 ng/ml), basic fibroblast growth factor (37.5±4.31 pg/ml), insulin-like growth factor-1 (0.15+0.06 mg/ml) and transforming growth factor (5150±463 pg/ml). Cultured in the presence of HPL at the optimal concentration of 7.5%, the MSCs displayed a spindle-shaped fibroblast-like morphology without obvious changes in the proliferation activity till passage 8 (P>0.05), similar to those of cells in FCS-supplemented culture medium. Flow cytometry and cell cycle analysis revealed no differences in the phenotypes or cell cycle distribution between the cells cultured in the presence of 7.5% HPL and 10% FCS. Conclusion The culture medium supplemented by 7.5% HPL can promote the expansion of human MSCs and maintain the basic biological characteristics of the cells.%目的 探讨人血小板裂解液(human platelet lysates,HPL)对骨髓间质干细胞(mesenchymal stem cells,MSCs)增殖以及生物学特性的影响.方法 通过对机采血小板反复冻融获得HPL,采用密度梯度离心法从骨髓中分离MSCs,分别用10%胎牛血清(feotal calf serum,FCS)和LD-DMEM添加不同浓度的HPL进行培养,以确定最佳HPL浓度.分离6株人源MSCs,从原代开

  6. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla SD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shakti D Shukla,1,* Rory L Fairbairn,1,* David A Gell,1 Roger D Latham,1 Sukhwinder S Sohal,1,2 Eugene H Walters,1 Ronan F O’Toole11Breathe Well Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells.Objective: To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken.Results: PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial

  7. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  8. Platelet aggregation in platelet suspensions from Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    OpenAIRE

    Agwu, D E; Holub, B J; Johnstone, I. B.; Crane, S.

    1983-01-01

    Blood obtained from Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) by cardiac puncture was used to develop a method for preparing platelet suspensions suitable for biochemical and aggregometric studies. The aggregation responses of gerbil platelet suspensions to 10 microM adenosine diphosphate and to 0.2 U/mL thrombin were immediate and irreversible. In addition, thrombin produced a short lag period. Bovine acid-soluble collagen (1:800) produced a long lag period coupled with an irreversible aggre...

  9. Cloning, expression and functional analyses of human platelet-derived growth factor-B chain peptide for wound repair of cat corneal endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Wen-juan; ZHAO Gui-qiu; WANG Chuan-fu; WANG Li-mei; WANG Xiao-ji

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the biological function of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on the survival and proliferation of cat corneal endothelial cells so as to provide bases for further studies of its role in wound repair and its clinical application.Methods: Total RNA was extracted from the placenta tissues of healthy pregnant women undergoing hysterotokotomy and PDGF eDNA was obtained with re-verse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The prokaryotic expression vector pET-PDGF-B was constructed and expressed the recombinant PDGF-B in Escherichia coli (E.coli) BL21 (DE3). After purification and refolding on Ni2+-chelation affinity chromatography (NTA) column, it was used to culture cat corneal endothelial cells. Cell proliferation was tested by modified tertrazolium salt (MTT) and flow cytometer. And the morphologic change and the ultrastructure were ob-served under an inverted phase contrast microscope, a scan-ning electron microscope and a transmission electon microscope, respectively.Results: PDGF-B chain peptide (PDGF-BB) gene was successfully inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector, pET-28a(+). The purified recombined protein pET-PDGF-B showed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacry-lamide gel electropheresis (SDS-PAGE) with the molecular weight of about 27 u, which was in agreement with the de-duced value. MTT and flow cytometry showed that PDGF-BB promoted the survival and proliferation of cat corneal en-dothelial cells.Conclusions: The construction of recombinant prokary-otic expression vector pET-PDGF-B and the preparation of PDGF-BB protein provide a foundation for further study of the function of PDGF-BB and producing biological PDGF-BB protein. The expressed PDGF-BB promotes the prolif-eration of cultured cat corneal endothelial cells.

  10. Distinct properties of telmisartan on agonistic activities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ among clinically used angiotensin II receptor blockers: drug-target interaction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Kurosaki, Eiji; Niimi, Tatsuya; Gato, Katsuhiko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Suwa, Akira; Honbou, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Sanagi, Masanao; Tomura, Yuichi; Orita, Masaya; Yonemoto, Takako; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    A proportion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves glucose dyshomeostasis and insulin resistance in a clinical setting. Of these ARBs, telmisartan has the unique property of being a partial agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the detailed mechanism of how telmisartan acts on PPARγ and exerts its insulin-sensitizing effect is poorly understood. In this context, we investigated the agonistic activity of a variety of clinically available ARBs on PPARγ using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Based on physicochemical data, we then reevaluated the metabolically beneficial effects of telmisartan in cultured murine adipocytes. ITC and SPR assays demonstrated that telmisartan exhibited the highest affinity of the ARBs tested. Distribution coefficient and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays were used to assess lipophilicity and cell permeability, for which telmisartan exhibited the highest levels of both. We next examined the effect of each ARB on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. To investigate the impact on adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with each ARB in addition to standard inducers of differentiation for adipogenesis. Telmisartan dose-dependently facilitated adipogenesis and markedly augmented the mRNA expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), accompanied by an increase in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and protein expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). In contrast, other ARBs showed only marginal effects in these experiments. In accordance with its highest affinity of binding for PPARγ as well as the highest cell permeability, telmisartan superbly activates PPARγ among the ARBs tested, thereby providing a fresh avenue for treating hypertensive patients with metabolic derangement. PMID:24424487

  11. Nephropathy in type 1 diabetes is associated with increased circulating activated platelets and platelet hyperreactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Michelson, Alan D.; Barnard, Marc R.;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased platelet activation compared to non-diabetic controls. Platelet hyperreactivity has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in Type 2 DM, and with diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the relationship between platelet activation and...... with normoalbuminuria, is associated with circulating activated platelets and platelet hyperreactivity to ADP, despite the confounding variable of more nephropathy patients receiving aspirin. This platelet activation is likely to contribute to the known increased risk of cardiovascular events in...

  12. Time-dependent inhibitory effects of cGMP-analogues on thrombin-induced platelet-derived microparticles formation, platelet aggregation, and P-selectin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, Gyrid [Proteomic Unit at University of Bergen (PROBE), University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Herfindal, Lars; Kopperud, Reidun [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Aragay, Anna M. [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB, CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Holmsen, Holm; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Kleppe, Rune [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Selheim, Frode, E-mail: Frode.Selheim@biomed.uib.no [Proteomic Unit at University of Bergen (PROBE), University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • We investigated the impact of cyclic nucleotide analogues on platelet activation. • Different time dependence were found for inhibition of platelet activation. • Additive effect was found using PKA- and PKG-activating analogues. • Our results may explain some of the discrepancies reported for cNMP signalling. - Abstract: In platelets, nitric oxide (NO) activates cGMP/PKG signalling, whereas prostaglandins and adenosine signal through cAMP/PKA. Cyclic nucleotide signalling has been considered to play an inhibitory role in platelets. However, an early stimulatory effect of NO and cGMP-PKG signalling in low dose agonist-induced platelet activation have recently been suggested. Here, we investigated whether different experimental conditions could explain some of the discrepancy reported for platelet cGMP-PKG-signalling. We treated gel-filtered human platelets with cGMP and cAMP analogues, and used flow cytometric assays to detect low dose thrombin-induced formation of small platelet aggregates, single platelet disappearance (SPD), platelet-derived microparticles (PMP) and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP)-induced P-selectin expression. All four agonist-induced platelet activation phases were blocked when platelets were costimulated with the PKG activators 8-Br-PET-cGMP or 8-pCPT-cGMP and low-doses of thrombin or TRAP. However, extended incubation with 8-Br-PET-cGMP decreased its inhibition of TRAP-induced P-selectin expression in a time-dependent manner. This effect did not involve desensitisation of PKG or PKA activity, measured as site-specific VASP phosphorylation. Moreover, PKG activators in combination with the PKA activator Sp-5,6-DCL-cBIMPS revealed additive inhibitory effect on TRAP-induced P-selectin expression. Taken together, we found no evidence for a stimulatory role of cGMP/PKG in platelets activation and conclude rather that cGMP/PKG signalling has an important inhibitory function in human platelet activation.

  13. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. The present study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, CSM Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by platelet rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators, with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7, with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution, whereas platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that platelet viability and aggregation were best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  14. Quantitation of thrombogenicity of hemodialyzer with technetium-99m and indium-111 labeled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Kapadvanjwala, Mansoor; Ruzius, Kees; Serafini, A.N.; Zilleruelo, G.E.; Sfakianakis, G.N. (Miami Univ., FL (United States). School of Medicine Althin CD-Medical Inc., Miami Lakes, FL (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The platelet thromobogenicity of a hemodialyzer was quantified with [sup 99m]Tc- and [sup 111]In-labeled platelets. The platelets collected from blood of Beagle dogs, Yorkshire pigs and human volunteers were labeled with [sup 111]in-tropolone (detergent-free) and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO. Hemodialysis was performed with a hollow-fiber dialyzer (HFD) in a flow-loop, the temperature of which was maintained at 37[sup o]C, with flow-rates of 7, 150 and 270 mL/min; after dialysis, the HFD radioactivity was measured with an ionization chamber and imaged with a [gamma]-camera. The radioactivity of samples of hollow-fibers taken from the top, middle and bottom of the dialyzer was determined with a [gamma]-counter. The mean values of hemodialyzer-adherent platelet radioactivity were calculated for both radionuclides. The canine platelets were found to be more thrombogenic than porcine and human platelets. The adhesivity of porcine platelets to the biomaterial (cellulose-acetate) of the dialyzer approximated that of human platelets. The [sup 99m]Tc label underestimated the thrombus formation (P < 0.01 ). The dynamic processes of thrombosis and embolization from the hemodialyzer resulted in the large standard deviations around the mean values of the adherent thrombus. In spite of this limitation of the dynamic pathology, the quantitation of comparative throbogenicity with [sup 111]In- and [sup 99m]Tc-labeled platelets suggests that both radionuclides could be used for measurement of device-induced thrombogenicity and may provide an estimation of prosthesis-induced thrombogenicity of human platelets from animal studies. (Author).

  15. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Navdaev

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  16. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Steven

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP, P-selectin expression (CD62p, circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted.

  17. In vitro effect of the herbicide glyphosate on human blood platelet aggregation and coagulation Efeito in vitro do herbicida glifosato na agregação plaquetária e coagulação sanguínea em humanos

    OpenAIRE

    Teresinha de Jesus C. Neiva; Ana Carolina R. Moraes; Rafaella Schwyzer; Cidônia de Lourdes Vituri; Tania Rubia F. Rocha; Fries, Diana M.; Márcio A. Silva; Aloisio Luiz Benedetti

    2010-01-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine] is a broad-spectrum, non-selective, post-emergence herbicide that is extensively used in agriculture. Published data referring to the effects of this product on human health are contradictory. We showed previously that long-term treatment of rats with low doses of Glyphosate-Biocarb® may induce hepatic histological changes and bleeding without decreasing platelet counts. The aim of the current study was to investigate, in vitro, the effect of glyphosat...

  18. Fasudil inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by up-regulation of p27kip1 via the ERK signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ai-jun; LING Feng; WANG Dong; WANG Qiang; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2011-01-01

    Background RhoA/ Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway is involved in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Inhibition of ROCK has been proposed as a treatment for PAH. But the mechanism of RhoA/ROCK pathway and its downstream signaling in proliferation of human PASMCs is unclear. We investigated the effect of fasudil, a selective ROCK inhibitor, on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced human PASMC proliferation, and the possible association between RhoA/ROCK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK),p27KiP1.Methods Human PASMCs were cultured with the stimulation of 10 ng/ml PDGF, and different concentrations of fasudil were added before the addition of mitogen. Cell viability and cell cycle were determined with MTT and flow cytometry respectively. ROCK activity, ERK activity and protein expression of proliferating cell nuclear angigen (PCNA) and p27Kip1 were measured by immunoblotting.Results By MTT assay, PDGF significantly increased the OD value that represented human PASMC proliferation, and pretreatment with fasudil significantly reversed this effect in a dose-dependent manner. After PDGF stimulation, the percentage of cells in S phase increased dramatically from 15.6% to 24.3%, while the percentage in G0/G1 phase was reduced from 80.6% to 59%. And pretreatment with fasudil reversed the cell cycle effect of PDGF significantly in a dose-dependent manner. PDGF markedly induced ROCK activity and ERK activity with a peak at 15 minutes, which were significantly inhibited by fasudil. In addition, fasudil significantly inhibited PDGF-induced PCNA expression and fasudil also upregulated p27Kip1 expression in human PASMCs, which decreased after PDGF stimulation.Conclusion RhoA/ROCK is vital for PDFG-induced human PASMC proliferation, and fasudil effectively inhibited PDGF-induced human PASMC proliferation by up-regulation of p27Kip1, which may be associated with inhibition of ERK activity.

  19. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat platelet GPIIb/IIIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies against rat platelets were produced by fusion of spleen cells from mice intravenously immunized with whole rat platelets. All four antibodies immunoprecipitated two major platelet membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 130,000 and 82,000 (nonreduced) and of 120,000 and 98,000 (reduced), which were structurally analogous to human glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, i.e. rat GPIIb/IIIa. Two of four antibodies, named P9 and P55, strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation of washed rat platelets and caused approximately 50% inhibition of human fibrinogen binding to ADP-stimulated rat platelets, suggesting that rat GPIIb/IIIa serves as a fibrinogen receptor in ADP-induced aggregation. In contrast, two other antibodies, named P14 and P34, themselves caused aggregation of rat platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the secretion of 14C-serotonin from 14C-serotonin-labeled PRP. These results indicate that rat GPIIb/IIIa plays an important role in platelet aggregation

  20. Allogeneic Platelet Releasate Preparations Derived via a Novel Rapid Thrombin Activation Process Promote Rapid Growth and Increased BMP-2 and BMP-4 Expression in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McLaughlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The administration of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs represents a promising regenerative therapy for the treatment of orthopedic injuries. While ASCs can be easily isolated from liposuction-derived adipose tissue, most clinical applications will likely require in vitro culture expansion of these cells using nonxenogeneic components. In this study, platelet releasate was generated using a novel rapid thrombin activation method (tPR. ASCs grown in media supplemented with tPR proliferated much faster than ASCs grown in media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The cells also retained the ability to differentiate along chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic lineages. The tPR cultured ASCs displayed elevated expression of BMP-4 (5.7 ± 0.97-fold increase and BMP-2 (4.7 ± 1.3-fold increase and decreased expression of PDGF-B (4.0 ± 1.4-fold decrease and FGF-2 (33 ± 9.0-fold decrease. No significant changes in expression were seen with TGF-β and VEGF. This pattern of gene expression was consistent across different allogeneic tPR samples and different ASC lines. The use of allogeneic rapidly activated tPR to culture ASCs is associated with both an increased cell yield and a defined gene expression profile making it an attractive option for cell expansion prior to cell-based therapy for orthopedic applications.

  1. LAS PROTEÍNAS β3 Y PDI AISLADAS DE PLAQUETAS HUMANAS SE UNEN CON EL ROTAVIRUS ECwt IN VITRO β3 and PDI proteins isolated from human platelets bind with ECwt rotavirus in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mayorga

    2010-01-01

    policlonal contra β3 y establecer que β3 y PDI se unen in vitro, luego de incubar las proteínas aisladas con el rotavirus ECwt, e in vivo, después de incubar el rotavirus con las vellosidades aisladas del intestino delgado de ratón lactante de la cepa ICR.Background. Commercial integrin β3 is currently not available and commercial PDI is too expensive, which is making access difficult to these proteins needed for conducting experiments aimed at the establishment of possible interactions between integrin β3 and PDI and wild type rotavirus strains. Objective. To explore a methodology allowing isolation of proteins β3 and PDI from human platelets to be used as antigens in the generation of rabbit polyclonal antibodies useful in the assessment of interactions between these proteins and rotavirus ECwt. Materials and methods. Proteins β3 and PDI from human platelet lysates were separated using preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions and then eluted. Interactions of these proteins with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blotting and capture ELISA. Results. Proteins from human platelet lysates were separated by preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identification of proteins β3 and PDI present in a gel slice was performed through their reaction with commercial antibodies in a Western blotting analysis. Protein purity was established after electroelution from a gel slice. Polyclonal antibodies against protein β3 were generated in rabbit. Incubation of eluted proteins β3 and PDI with rotavirus ECwt showed in co-immunoprecipitation and ELISA assays that these proteins bound virus in vitro. The same binding was showed to occur when rotavirus was incubated with isolated small intestinal villi from suckling mice. Conclusions. Relatively high amounts of proteins β3 and PDI were partially purified from human platelets by preparative electrophoresis. The isolation of these proteins allowed the generation of

  2. Mandibular defect reconstruction using three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold in combination with platelet-rich plasma and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: de novo synthesis of bone in a single case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckert, Karl-Heinz; Jopp, Stefan; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2009-03-01

    This publication describes the clinical case of a 71-year-old female patient. Using polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), a critical-sized defect in the anterior mandible was regenerated using de novo-grown bone. A bacterial infection had caused a periimplantitis in two dental implants leading to a large destruction in the anterior mandible. Both implants were removed under antibiotic prophylaxis. A PCL scaffold was prepared especially for this clinical case. In a second procedure with antibiotic prophylaxis, the bony defect was reopened. The PCL scaffold was fitted and charged with PRP and rhBMP-2 (1.2 mg). After complication-free wound healing, the radiological control demonstrated de novo-grown bone in the anterior mandible 6 months postoperatively. Dental implants were inserted in a third operation. A bone biopsy of the newly grown bone, as well as of the bordering local bone, was taken and histologically examined. The bone samples were identical and presented vital laminar bone. PMID:18767969

  3. Calpain Activity and Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Platelet Regulate Haemostatic Situation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery and Coagulation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human platelets express Toll-like receptors (TLR 4. However, the mechanism by which TLR4 directly affects platelet aggregation and blood coagulation remains to be explored. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the platelet TLR4 expression in patients who underwent CABG surgery; we explored the correlation between platelet TLR4 expression and the early outcomes in hospital of patients. Additionally, C57BL/6 and C57BL/6-TlrLPS−/− mice were used to explore the roles of platelet TLR4 in coagulation by platelet aggregometry and rotation thromboelastometry. In conclusion, our results highlight the important roles of TLR4 in blood coagulation and platelet function. Of clinical relevance, we also explored novel roles for platelet TLR4 that are associated with early outcomes in cardiac surgery.

  4. Large-scale expansion of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in human platelet lysate as a substitute of fetal bovine serum%人血小板裂解液替代胎牛血清大规模扩增人脐带间充质干细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李炳尧; 武晓云; 吴岩

    2014-01-01

    背景:目前国内外大多数实验仍采用经典的培养基和胎牛血清进行脐带间充质干细胞培养,血清培养潜在的不安全因素限制了未来临床应用的可行性。  目的:以人血小板裂解液替代胎牛血清培养、鉴定人间充质干细胞,以期进一步应用于临床低密度扩增人间充质干细胞。  方法:人血小板裂解液通过反复冻融、离心、过滤、浓缩等方法制备。以 IMDM 为基础培养基,添加5%浓缩血小板裂解液作为实验组培养基;以添加体积分数10%胎牛血清为对照组培养基。采用酶消化法分离培养人脐带间充质干细胞,以3000/cm2的浓度进行传代培养,待细胞扩增至P5代后,进行细胞形态与直径、免疫表型、成骨成脂分化、克隆形成率等细胞生物学特性检测,并比较两者之间的差别。  结果与结论:人血小板裂解液扩增的脐带间充质干细胞形态细长,有更高的细胞累积群倍数;克隆形成检测结果显示两者形成的克隆效率差异无显著性意义,流式细胞术检测结果显示两者有相似的细胞表型,体外诱导分化显示两者都具有成骨、成脂分化能力,但人血小板裂解液扩增的间充质干细胞成骨分化能力更强。提示人血小板裂解液可以取代胎牛血清用于临床低密度扩增人间充质干细胞。%BACKGROUND:Classic media and fetal bovine serum are commonly used in the culture of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, but the potential risk of serum culture limits its clinical application. OBJECTIVE:To use human platelet lysate alternative to fetal bovine serum for large-scale production of mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutic applications. METHODS:Human platelet lysate was prepared by repeated freezing and thawing, centrifugation, filtration, and concentration. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in Iscove’s Modified Dulbecco’s Medium

  5. Procoagulant platelet balloons: evidence from cryopreparation and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M W; Siljander, P

    2001-05-01

    Visualisation of the procoagulant transformation of human platelets has recently become possible through use of an in vitro approach combined with fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Here, we extended these studies to the ultrastructural level by employing both rapid freezing/freeze-substitution and conventional ambient-temperature chemical fixation for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Procoagulant transformation was only inducible by adhering platelets to collagen fibrils or to the collagen-related peptide and exposing them to physiological extracellular Ca2+ levels. Under these conditions prominent, 2- to 4-micron-wide balloon-like structures were regularly observed, regardless of the specimen fixation protocol. In strong contrast to normal platelets in their vicinity, the balloons' subcellular architecture proved remarkably poor: dilute cytoplasm, no cytoskeleton, only a few, randomly distributed organelles and/or their remnants. Cryofixed balloons displayed intact and smooth surfaces whereas conventional specimen processing caused plasma membrane perforations and shrinkage of the balloons. Our results clearly show that neither the balloons themselves, nor their simple ultrastructure reflect fixation artefacts caused by inadequate membrane stabilisation. The balloons are interpreted as to be transformed and/or fragmented procoagulant platelets. Thus, the generation of balloons represents a genuine, final stage of platelet ontogenesis, presumably occurring alternatively to aggregate formation. PMID:11449892

  6. Palmitic acid-labeled lipids selectively incorporated into platelet cytoskeleton during aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experiments showed that during the early stages (20-30 seconds) of aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2 microM) or thrombin (0.1 U/mL) of rabbit or human platelets prelabeled with [3H]palmitic acid, labeled lipid became associated with the cytoskeleton isolated after lysis with 1% Triton X-100, 5 mM EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)]-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid. The association appeared to be related to the number of sites of contact and was independent of the release of granule contents. We have now investigated the nature of the labeled lipids by thin-layer and column chromatography and found differences between the distribution of the label in intact platelets (both stimulated and unstimulated) and the isolated cytoskeletons. In both species, and with either ADP or thrombin as aggregating agent, 70-85% of the label in both intact platelets and in the cytoskeletons was in phospholipids. The distribution of label among the phospholipids in the cytoskeletons was similar to that in intact platelets except that the percentage of label in phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in the cytoskeletons of human platelets than in the intact platelets, and the percentage of label in phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylinositol was significantly lower in the cytoskeletons of rabbit platelets and thrombin-aggregated human platelets than in intact platelets. The cytoskeletons contained a lower percentage of label in triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester than the intact platelets. Contrary to a report in the literature, we found no evidence for the incorporation of diacylglycerol and palmitic acid into the cytoskeleton

  7. Thrombin promotes platelet-mediated melanoma cell adhesion to endothelial cells under flow conditions: role of platelet glycoproteins P-selectin and GPIIb-IIIA.

    OpenAIRE

    Dardik, R.; Savion, N; Kaufmann, Y; D. Varon

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the role of platelets in human melanoma cell (line 397) interaction with vascular endothelial cells (ECs) under flow conditions. The ability of the tumour cells to adhere to the EC monolayer was significantly reduced by application of flow at a shear rate of 250 s(-1). A 2.2-fold increase in tumour cell adhesion to ECs under flow was observed upon addition of thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP)-activated platelets but not resting platelets. A similar increase (2.5-fold) i...

  8. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  9. Human platelet Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G. Identification as a 40,000-molecular-weight membrane protein shared by monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenfeld, S I; Looney, R J; Leddy, J P; Phipps, D C; Abraham, G N; Anderson, C L

    1985-01-01

    We have recently shown that human monocytes and U937 cells possess two molecular classes of Fc gamma receptor. One, a 72,000-mol-wt sialoglycoprotein, has high affinity for certain subclasses of human and murine monomeric IgG. The other is a 40,000-mol-wt protein (p40) with low affinity for monomeric IgG but with the capacity to bind IgG aggregates or IgG-coated particles. In the present study, a 40,000-mol-wt single chain protein, apparently identical to p40 from U937 cells, was isolated fro...

  10. Evaluation of platelet aggregation in platelet concentrates: storage implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Teresinha J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemo-derivatives is nowadays a fundamentally important therapeutic modality in the exercise of medicine. Among the various hemo-components employed, we have the platelet concentrate (PC, indicated in cases of hemorrhagic disturbances. We previously showed that platelet function in blood donors is reduced in their screening phase and after the separation process of PCs. Currently, we are providing evidence for the existence of biochemical and functional changes in PC preparations stored for three days at temperatures of 20 ± 2 ºC. Platelet concentrates from 40 healthy donors, collected in CPD anticoagulant and PL-146 polyvinylchloride containers, were examined in order to determine the pH value, pCO2 ,pO2 and lactate concentrations. In addition, the aggregation of platelets with thrombin and collagen were examined to evaluate platelet function. A pH increase from 7.07 ± 0.04 to 7.36 ± 0.07 (p < 0.01 was observed. The pCO2 concentration decreased progressively from 69.2 ± 7.7 mmHg to 28.8 ± 6.2 mmHg (p < 0.001 during the storage period. In contrast, pO2 value increase from 103.4 ± 30.6 to 152.3 ± 24.6 mmHg (p < 0.001 was evidenced during the 48 hours of storage. The lactate concentration increased from 17.97 ± 5.2 to 57.21 ± 5.7 mg/dl (p < 0.001. Platelet aggregation using 0.25 U/ml-thrombin and 2.0 µg/ml-collagen showed significant hypofunction from 61.8 ± 2.7% to 24.8 ± 9.8% and 62.7±5.0 to 33.4± 6.2 (p < 0.001, respectively. We concluded that the evaluated biochemical parameters and the platelet function changed significantly when the platelets were kept under routine storage conditions.

  11. Platelet-rich fibrin versus albumin in surgical wound repair: a randomized trial with paired design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial.......To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial....

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Ligands and Receptors That Regulate Human Cytotrophoblast Survival Are Dysregulated in Severe Preeclampsia and Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelets Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yan; McMaster, Michael; Woo, Kirstin; Janatpour, Mary; Perry, Jean; Karpanen, Terhi; Alitalo, Kari; Damsky, Caroline; Fisher, Susan J.

    2002-01-01

    Human placental development combines elements of tumorigenesis and vasculogenesis. The organ’s specialized epithelial cells, termed cytotrophoblasts, invade the uterus where they reside in the interstitial compartment. They also line uterine arteries and veins. During invasion, ectodermally derived cytotrophoblasts undergo pseudovasculogenesis, switching their adhesion molecule repertoire to mimic that of vascular cells. Failures in this transformation accompany the pregn...

  13. Establishing biological reference intervals for novel platelet parameters (immature platelet fraction, high immature platelet fraction, platelet distribution width, platelet large cell ratio, platelet-X, plateletcrit, and platelet distribution width and their correlations among each other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Sachdev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to establish biological reference interval for novel platelet parameters. Settings and Design: A total of 945 healthy individuals, age ranges from 18 to 64 years (881 males and 64 females coming for voluntary blood donation from June to August 2012 (3 months were enrolled after exclusion of rejection criteria. Materials and Methods: The samples were assayed by running in complete blood count + reticulocyte mode on the Sysmex XE-2100 hematology analyzer and the reference interval for the population was calculated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Statistical analysis used: Tests were performed using SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions , developed by IBM corporation, version 13. Student t test and pearsons correlation analysis were also used. Results: The normal range for various parameters was platelet count: 150-520 × 10 3 /cu mm, immature platelet fraction (IPF: 0.3-8.7%, platelet distribution width (PDW: 8.3-25.0 fL, mean platelet volume (MPV: 8.6-15.5 fL, plateletcrit (PCT: 0.15-0.62%, high immature platelet fraction (H-IPF: 0.1-2.7%, platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR: 11.9-66.9% and platelet-X (PLT-X (ch: 11.0-22.0. Negative correlation was observed between platelet count (r = −0.468 to r = −0.531; P < 0.001 and PCT (r = −0.080 to r = −0.235; P < 0.05 to P < 0.001 with IPF, PDW, MPV, H-IPF, P-LCR, and platelet-X. IPF/H-IPF showed a positive correlation among them and also with PDW, MPV, P-LCR, platelet-X (r = +0.662 to r = +0.925; P < 0.001. Conclusions: These novel platelet parameters offer newer avenues in research and clinical use. Establishing biological reference interval for different platelet parameters would help determine true high and low values and help guide treatment decisions.

  14. Prolonged platelet preservation by transient metabolic suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badlou, Bahram Alamdary

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Different clinical studies have shown that transfusion of stored platelets results in better haemostasis in patients with thrombocytopenia with and without a platelet function defect. Objectives: Current preservation procedures aim to optimally preserve the metabolic status of platel

  15. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    OpenAIRE

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a biomimetic microfluidic platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow and blood vessel microenvironments.Application of shear stress in this bioreactor triggers physiological proplatelet production, and platelet release.

  16. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  17. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  18. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  19. New treatment for low platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodeck, B

    1995-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved WinRho SD, a new treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). A clinical trial in children with acute ITP found that WinRho SD is as effective as IVIG or prednisone, but less expensive and dramatically easier to administer. WinRho SD is the first polyclonal antibody product shown to increase platelets in ITP patients. Platelets usually rise within one to two days and peak within seven to fourteen days after initial therapy. On average, platelet levels are maintained for approximately thirty days. Each year, 50,000 people nationally suffer from ITP as a complication of HIV infection, while another 18,000 manifest the disease as a primary condition. PMID:11362579

  20. The interplay between platelets and coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Weeterings, C.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet activation and blood coagulation are two processes often studied separately, but which cannot be seen independently from each other. Platelets play a pivotal role in coagulation, not only by providing negatively charged phospholipids, but also in localizing the coagulation process from a diffuse plasma environment to an anionic surface, most likely via specific receptors on the platelets. On the other hand, the main product of coagulation, thrombin, is a potent platelet activator, th...

  1. Mean platelet volume in gestational diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Güdücü, Nilgün; Görmüş, Uzay; İşçi, Herman; Başgül Yiğiter, Alin; Dünder, İlkkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to compare mean platelet volume of pregnants with gestational diabetes mellitus to a healthy control group and to detect the relationship between mean platelet volume and fasting blood glucose.Materials and methods: Patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (n=43) were compared to a healthy control group (n=43) retrospectively by searching medical records.Results: Platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and the contr...

  2. Manipulating megakaryocytes to manufacture platelets ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Karagiannis, P; Eto, K.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, platelet transfusion has proven a reliable way to treat patients suffering from thrombocytopenia or similar ailments. An undersupply of donors, however, has demanded alternative platelet sources. Scientists have therefore sought to recapitulate the biological events that convert hematopoietic stem cells into platelets in the laboratory. Such platelets have shown good function and potential for treatment. Yet the number manufactured ex vivo falls well short of clinical applicatio...

  3. Platelets: Covert Regulators of Lymphatic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bertozzi, Cara C.; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymp...

  4. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of

  5. Portable dynamic light scattering instrument and method for the measurement of blood platelet suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer-Spurej, Elisabeth [Canadian Blood Services and Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Centre for Blood Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Brown, Keddie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Labrie, Audrey [Canadian Blood Services and Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Centre for Blood Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Marziali, Andre [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Glatter, Otto [Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University, Graz (Austria)

    2006-08-07

    No routine test exists to determine the quality of blood platelet transfusions although every year millions of patients require platelet transfusions to survive cancer chemotherapy, surgery or trauma. A new, portable dynamic light scattering instrument is described that is suitable for the measurement of turbid solutions of large particles under temperature-controlled conditions. The challenges of small sample size, short light path through the sample and accurate temperature control have been solved with a specially designed temperature-controlled sample holder for small diameter, disposable capillaries. Efficient heating and cooling is achieved with Peltier elements in direct contact with the sample capillary. Focusing optical fibres are used for light delivery and collection of scattered light. The practical use of this new technique was shown by the reproducible measurement of latex microspheres and the temperature-induced morphological changes of human blood platelets. The measured parameters for platelet transfusions are platelet size, number of platelet-derived microparticles and the response of platelets to temperature changes. This three-dimensional analysis provides a high degree of confidence for the determination of platelet quality. The experimental data are compared to a matrix and facilitate automated, unbiased quality testing.

  6. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  7. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengjie Yuan

    Full Text Available Piperlongumine (PL is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known.We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen.PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect.PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals.

  8. Characteristics of an autologous leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin patch intended for the treatment of recalcitrant wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, Rasmus; Holmstrøm, Kim; Clausen, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    , antibody arrays, and cell culture assays, we show that the patch is a three-layered membrane comprising a fibrin sheet, a layer of platelets, and a layer of leukocytes. Mean recovery of platelets from the donated blood was 98% (±95%CI 0.8%). Mean levels of platelet-derived growth factor AB, human......We have investigated the physical, biochemical, and cellular properties of an autologous leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin patch. This was generated in an automated device from a sample of a patient's blood at the point of care. Using microscopy, cell counting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...

  9. Elevated Lipoprotein(A Impairs Platelet Radiolabeling Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Granegger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Platelet radiolabeling in clinical routine usually results in labeling efficiencies (LE above 80%. A variety of risk factors and clinical conditions are known to impair platelet labeling yield, among them elevated triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins. The potential influence of lipoprotein(a (Lp(a, an atherogenic lipoprotein particle containing a kringle subunit, which is widely found in the proteins of fibrinolysis pathway, has never been studied. Normal Lp(a levels range below 30 mg/ dl. The exact prevalence of elevated Lp(a is unknown, most likely ranging below 10%. Even more rare is an isolated elevation despite an otherwise normal lipoprotein profile. Methods: We examined the role of isolated elevated Lp(a (> 50 mg/dl, ranging up to 440 mg/dl compared to patients with normal lipid profile. Platelets were radiolabeled with in-111-oxine at 37 °C for 5 minutes using ISORBE-consensus methodology. Results: The findings indicate that already at levels below 100 mg/dl Lp(a decreases LE. LE assessment after cross-incubation of hyper-Lp(a platelets with normal Lp(a plasma and vice versa reveals that platelets rather than the plasmatic environment are responsible for the deterioration of labeling yield. This behavior already has been reported for elevated low-density lipoproteins. Apparently, the quantitative influence of LDL and Lp(a/mg is comparable. Plotting the sum of LDL and Lp(a versus LE reveals a clear significant negative correlation. Conclusion: As extremely elevated Lp(a, particularly above 150 mg/dl, may significantly impair labeling results. We therefore recommend to include extremely elevated Lp(a into the list of parameters, which should be known before performing radiolabeling of human platelets.

  10. Platelet storage pool deficiency associated with inherited abnormalities of the inner ear in the mouse pigment mutants muted and mocha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, R T; Reddington, M; Howlett, O; Novak, E K

    1991-10-15

    Several inherited human syndromes have combined platelet, auditory, and/or pigment abnormalities. In the mouse the pallid pigment mutant has abnormalities of the otoliths of the inner ear together with a bleeding abnormality caused by platelet storage pool deficiency (SPD). To determine if this association is common, two other mouse pigment mutants, muted and mocha, which are known to have inner ear abnormalities, were examined for hematologic abnormalities. Both mutants had prolonged bleeding times accompanied by abnormalities of dense granules as determined by whole mount electron microscopy of platelets and by labeling platelets with mepacrine. When mutant platelets were treated with collagen, there was minimal secretion of adenosine triphosphate and aggregation was reduced. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to thrombin treatment was partially reduced in muted platelets and markedly reduced in mocha platelets. Similar reductions in constitutive lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney proximal tubule cells were noted in the two mutants. These studies show that several mutations that cause pigment dilution and platelet SPD are associated with abnormalities of the inner ear. Also, these mutants, like previously described mouse pigment mutants, are models for human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and provide additional examples of single genes that simultaneously affect melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. PMID:1912584

  11. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions

  12. A monoclonal antibody to the platelet membrane IIb-IIIa glycoprotein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybridoma that secretes monoclonal mouse anti-platelet antibody has been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized Balb/c mice with NS-1 myeloma cells using polyethylene glycol. Bulk production of the antibody was accomplished in vivo by injecting the cloned hybridoma cells intraperitoneally into pristane-primed mice. The antibody was purified from the ascitic fluid and characterised as belonging to the IgG1 sub-class by straphylococcal protein A-sepharose affinity chromatography. Purity was ascertained by SDS PAGE and isoelectric focusing. The antibody inhibited clot retraction of normal human blood and platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin or epinephrine. Equilibrium binding studies revealed that the number of antibody molecules bound per platelet varied between 21 000 and 67 000 with an average of 42 000. Immunoprecipitation experiments with radioactively labelled platelets showed that the antibody bound the IIb-IIa glycoprotein complex. Platelets of patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (a hereditary defect in which these glycoproteins are deficient) failed to bind the antibody. Immunofluorescent techniques showed that the antigen was present on megakaryocytes and platelets but not on the other cells from defibrinated peripheral blood. The antibody was also able to inhibit specifically the binding of radiolabelled human fibrinogen to ADP-stimulated platelets

  13. Calpain Activator Dibucaine Induces Platelet Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent calpains are a family of cysteine proteases that have been demonstrated to play key roles in both platelet glycoprotein Ibα shedding and platelet activation and altered calpain activity is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Calpain activators induce apoptosis in several types of nucleated cells. However, it is not clear whether calpain activators induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that the calpain activator dibucaine induced several platelet apoptotic events including depolarization of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Platelet apoptosis elicited by dibucaine was not affected by the broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Furthermore, dibucaine did not induce platelet activation as detected by P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or α-thrombin, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor were significantly inhibited in platelets treated with dibucaine. Taken together, these data indicate that dibucaine induces platelet apoptosis and platelet dysfunction.

  14. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  15. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA, an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f. var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001 and CRP (P<0.01, a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent.

  16. Loss of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors during simulated extracorporeal circulation: prevention with prostaglandin E1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiopulmonary bypass prolongs bleeding time and increases postoperative blood loss. During in vitro recirculation in an extracorporeal circuit containing a membrane oxygenator and primed with fresh heparinized human blood, the authors previously observed thrombocytopenia, impaired platelet aggregation, and depletion of granular contents, all of which were prevented with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). To investigate these changes further, they studied the number and affinity of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by measuring the binding of 3H-yohimbine. Before recirculation, they found 235 alpha 2-adrenergic receptors per platelet, a Kd of 3.37 nmol/L, complete aggregation with 1.04 mumol/L epinephrine, and a platelet count of 281,000 microliters-1. After 2 minutes of recirculation, 9.44 mumol/L epinephrine was required to produce complete aggregation, and the platelet count was 104,000 microliters-1 (44% of control). After 2 hours of recirculation, the platelet count had increased to 123,000 microliters-1. However, epinephrine did not induce platelet aggregation even at 100 mumol/L. Moreover, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were not detectable, and affinity for yohimbine could not be calculated. Two minutes after PGE1 0.3 mumol/L was added to the circuit, platelet numbers, response to epinephrine, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites per platelet, and affinity for yohimbine were not significantly different from control values. At 2 hours, the number of alpha 2-adrenergic sites was not significantly changed from control, but the affinity of yohimbine for platelets was significantly decreased 2.5-fold

  17. Platelet dysfunction and inhibition of multiple electrode platelet aggregometry caused by penicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Beckerath Nicolas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beta-lactam antibiotics, e.g. penicillin, may inhibit platelet function and lead to reduced response in light transmission aggregometry and adhesion. However, influence on platelet function tests more commonly used in clinical practice, such as multiple electrode platelet aggregometry (MEA, have not been described so far. We report a case of a patient with local streptococcus infection. Treatment with penicillin resulted in mild bleeding tendency after 3 days. While coagulation parameters were normal, assessment of platelet function by MEA revealed strong platelet inhibition of both ADP and arachidonic acid induced platelet aggregation comparable to normal responders to antiplatelet therapy. Change of antibiotic regime resulted in recovery of platelet function. Thus, penicillin therapy may impact on platelet function and consecutively commonly used platelet function assays, e.g. MEA.

  18. High Glucose Inhibits the Aspirin-Induced Activation of the Nitric Oxide/cGMP/cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Pathway and Does Not Affect the Aspirin-Induced Inhibition of Thromboxane Synthesis in Human Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Isabella; Viretto, Michela; Barale, Cristina; Mattiello, Luigi; Doronzo, Gabriella; Pagliarino, Andrea; Cavalot, Franco; Trovati, Mariella; Anfossi, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Since hyperglycemia is involved in the “aspirin resistance” occurring in diabetes, we aimed at evaluating whether high glucose interferes with the aspirin-induced inhibition of thromboxane synthesis and/or activation of the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) pathway in platelets. For this purpose, in platelets from 60 healthy volunteers incubated for 60 min with 5–25 mmol/L d-glucose or iso-osmolar mannitol, we evaluated the influence of a 30-min incubation with lysine...

  19. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  20. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniccia R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rita Paniccia,1,2 Raffaella Priora,1,2 Agatina Alessandrello Liotta,2 Rosanna Abbate1,2 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Thrombosis Center, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Heart and Vessels, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Abstract: In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]. POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well

  1. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  2. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. This study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, C S M Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by the platelet-rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7 with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution while platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that the platelet viability and aggregation were the best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  3. Platelet aggregation and serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in pregnancy associated with diabetes, hypertension and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Claudio A M; Leal, Daniela B R; Adefegha, Stephen A; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, José E P; Rezer, João F P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Abdalla, Faida H; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-07-01

    Platelet aggregation and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in pregnant women living with some disease conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The subject population is consisted of 15 non-pregnant healthy women [control group (CG)], 15 women with normal pregnancy (NP), 7 women with hypertensive pregnancy (HP), 10 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 12 women with human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnancy (HIP) groups. The aggregation of platelets was checked using an optical aggregometer, and serum ADA activity was determined using the colorimetric method. After the addition of 5 µM of agonist adenosine diphosphate, the percentage of platelet aggregation was significantly (p pregnancy and pregnancy-associated diseases suggest that platelet aggregation and ADA activity could serve as peripheral markers for the development of effective therapy in the maintenance of homeostasis and some inflammatory process in these pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27273565

  4. Platelet collagen receptors and coagulation. A characteristic platelet response as possible target for antithrombotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Munnix, Imke C A; Siljander, Pia R M

    2005-04-01

    Collagen is a unique agonist of platelets, because it acts as an immobilized ligand that only causes platelet activation after stable adhesion. This review addresses the present understanding of how platelet interaction with collagen supports the process of thrombin generation and coagulation. Only some of the collagen-adhered platelets, that is, those showing profound changes in shape and shedding microparticles (resembling apoptotic cells), appear to contribute to the procoagulant activity of platelets. The main signaling receptor for collagen, glycoprotein VI, plays a key role in the platelet procoagulant response during thrombus formation; this is a reason why new anti-glycoprotein-VI antibodies are promising antithrombotic tools. PMID:16039967

  5. Reticulated platelets interfere with flow cytometric reticulocyte counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, K; Sarria, B; Fairweather-Tait, S J; Hughes, D A

    2007-10-01

    As part of an iron absorption study, we needed to accurately count reticulocytes in the peripheral blood of healthy human volunteers before measuring their enrichment with stable iron isotopes given in an oral dose. Recent studies have suggested the usefulness of reticulocyte counting by flow cytometry, through a combination of differential light scatter and measurement of the stoichiometric binding of thiazole orange (TO) to RNA within the maturing erythrocyte. Using this method we set out to improve the precision of our quantitative analysis by counting more cells, as reticulocytes normally comprise <2% of the red cell population. To ensure exclusion of other cell types, we identified WBCs and platelets with CD16+CD45- allophycocyanin and CD61- phycoerythrin, respectively. After removal of CD16(+) CD45(+) TO(+) WBCs and CD61(+) TO(-) platelets from analysis, the remaining cells were a combination of CD61(-) TO(-) erythrocytes, CD61(-) TO(+) reticulocytes and CD61(+) TO(+) reticulated platelets. Reticulocyte counts were lower after exclusion of CD61(+) TO(+) cells from analysis. They were similarly lower when erythrocyte precursors were positively identified through their glycophorin A expression and TO uptake. We conclude that it is necessary to exclude reticulated platelets from flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis. PMID:17824916

  6. Injection of Autologous Fat Alone and in Combination With Autologous Platelet Gel for Nasolabial Fold Augmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasemi; Tabaie; Azizjalali; Berenjiardestani; Fereshtenejad; Amirizadeh; Fateh

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, soft tissue augmentation has become popular due to development of convenient techniques. Autologous fat is one of the safest fillers for this purpose. Moreover, healing effects of autologous platelet gel on acute and chronic human skin wounds have been shown in recent studies. Objectives In this study, the effect of subcutaneous injection of autologous fat alone and in combination with platelet gel was compare...

  7. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Thomas; Sorena Rahmanian; Aarash Bordbar; Bernhard Ø Palsson; Neema Jamshidi

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by diseas...

  8. An introduction to application of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) in skin rejuvenation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahnaz Banihashemi; Solmaz Nakhaeizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous concentration of human platelets contained in a small volume of plasma characterized by haemostatic and tissue repairing effects. Tissue repairing effects and being enriched by various kind of growth factors, has made them the focus of attention for different procedures. PRP has been effective in bony defects, wound healing and recently for aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. The purpose of this review is to evaluate and summarize the applicati...

  9. Streptococcus sanguinis-induced cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase-1 release from platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cognasse, Fabrice; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Chabert, Adrien; Jackson, Elke; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Garraud, Olivier; McNicol, Archie

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus sanguinis (S.sanguinis), a predominant bacterium in the human oral cavity, has been widely associated with the development of infective endocarditis. Platelets play both a haemostatic function and can influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. Previous studies have shown that S.sanguinis can interact with, and activate, platelets. Results The aim of this study was to determine whether S.sanguinis stimulates the release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, ...

  10. Thrombokinetics with In-111-oxine labelled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-oxine has been employed as a redioactive platelet label for thrombosis imaging and thrombokinetic studies in man. To evaluate it's suitability for platelet survival and turnover, thrombokinetic studies were carried out in hematological normal subjects, in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and chronic congestive splenomegaly. For In-111-oxine labelled platelets, platelets were collected by differential centrifugation from 44 ml of whole blood drawn into 6 ml of acid citrate dextrose solution. Platelet suspension was incubated with In-111-oxine, which was extracted before use by the method of Thakur and co-workers. The survival, recovery and turnover of In-111-labeled platelets were 8.6 +- 0.5 days, 63.0 +- 5.4% and 3.9 +- 0.3 x 104/ μl/day, respectively, which were similar with those of Cr-51 method. Platelet disappearance curves labelled with In-111 and Cr-51 simultaneously were similar in one case. In patients with ITP, platelet survival shortened in the same degree with Cr-51 method. The two simultaneous labeling studies between In-111 and Cr-51 showed no differences. In the patients with congestive splenomegaly, the same results were obtained. Thrombokinetic studies with In-111-oxine labelled platelets offer the advantages of reduced blood requirements, and the ability to perform external imaging of platelet distribution. (author)

  11. Effects of Physical (Inactivity on Platelet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (inactivity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects’ cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality.

  12. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet aggregation system is a device used to determine changes in platelet shape and platelet aggregation following...

  13. Polymers for the rapid and effective activation and aggregation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne; McMillan, Loraine; Morrison, Alex; Petrik, Juraj; Bradley, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Platelets are responsible for plugging sites of vascular injury, where upon activation they spread out and become cross-linked, preventing further blood loss. It is desirable to control the activation process on demand for applications such as the rapid staunching of blood flow following trauma. Polymers are the material of choice in many biological areas, with physical properties that allow control of morphology as well as ease of functionalisation and production. Herein, polymer microarrays were used to screen a complex human fluid (platelet rich plasma) to identify polyacrylates that could be used to modulate platelet activation. Several polymers were identified which rapidly activated platelets as determined by CD61P binding and subsequent confirmation by scanning electron microcopy analysis. This approach enabled a direct comparison between the natural agonist collagen and synthetic polymers with respect to the activation status of the platelets as well as the number of bound platelets. Further investigations under physiological flow demonstrated that the static microarray experiments gave viable candidates for potential medical applications while specific protein binding to the polymers was identified as a possible mode of action. The approach demonstrates the ability of polymer microarrays to identify new polymers for specific biological activation events and in this case allowed the identification of materials that allowed higher levels of platelets to bind in advanced activation states than the natural standard collagen in static and flow studies. PMID:21719101

  14. Phospholipase A2 activity in platelets. Immuno-purification and localization of the enzyme in rat platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsman, A J; Leunissen-Bijvelt, J; Van den Koedijk, C D; Neys, F W; Verkleij, A J; Van den Bosch, H

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study on phospholipase A2 activity in platelet lysates from various species was carried out using identical assay conditions with phosphatidylethanolamine as substrate. Platelet phospholipase A2, both when expressed as activity per ml blood and as specific activity in KCl extracts, was low in human, cow, pig and goat. Moderate activities, in increasing order, were found in sheep, horse and rabbit, while rats showed by far the highest activity. In the latter four species total lysate activity was recovered in 1 M KCl extracts, suggesting that the enzyme occurs either in soluble form or as a peripheral membrane-associated protein. Immune cross-reactivity with monoclonal antibodies against rat liver mitochondrial phospholipase A2 was studied in dot-blot and monoclonal antibody-Sepharose binding experiments. Only sheep and rat platelet extracts contained cross-reactive phospholipase(s) A2. Immuno-affinity chromatography of rat platelet extracts indicated virtually complete binding of total phospholipase A2 activity and yielded pure enzyme in a single purification step. Enzyme visualization by immunogold electron microscopy showed a predominant localization in the matrix of alpha-granules. PMID:2519886

  15. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected ...

  16. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research.......Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than...... previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous...

  17. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research. PMID:26926584

  18. Autologous Platelet Gel: An In Vitro Analysis of Platelet-Rich Plasma Using Multiple Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kevin; Vang, See; Brady, Chad; Isler, Jack; Allen, Keith; Anderson, John; Holt, David

    2006-01-01

    Autologous platelet gel (APG) has become an expanding field for perfusionists. By mixing platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with thrombin and calcium, platelet gel is prepared and used in many surgical settings. There are many devices used to produce PRP. This study evaluates the Medtronic Magellan Autologous Platelet Separator. The purpose of this study was to show that processing two cycles of the same syringe could reduce the amount of blood required to produce a specific volume of PRP. Three 60-m...

  19. Differential Dynamics of Platelet Contact and Spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dooyoung; Fong, Karen P.; King, Michael R.; Brass, Lawrence F.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet spreading is critical for hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. However, the detailed dynamics of platelet spreading as a function of receptor-ligand adhesive interactions has not been thoroughly investigated. Using reflection interference contrast microscopy, we found that both adhesive interactions and PAR4 activation affect the dynamics of platelet membrane contact formation during spreading. The initial growth of close contact area during spreading was controlled by the combi...

  20. Structure and thermodynamics of platelet dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Harnau, Ludger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Various properties of fluids consisting of platelike particles differ from the corresponding ones of fluids consisting of spherical particles because interactions between platelets depend on their mutual orientations. One of the main issues in this topic is to understand how structural properties of such fluids depend on factors such as the shape of the platelets, the size polydispersity, the orientational order, and the platelet number density. A statistica...

  1. Absence of platelet phenotype in mice lacking the motor protein myosin Va.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Harper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The motor protein myosin Va plays an important role in the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Mutation of the Myo5a gene causes Griscelli syndrome type 1 in humans and the dilute phenotype in mice, which are both characterised by pigment dilution and neurological defects as a result of impaired vesicle transport in melanocytes and neuroendocrine cells. The role of myosin Va in platelets is currently unknown. Rab27 has been shown to be associated with myosin Va cargo vesicles and is known to be important in platelet dense granule biogenesis and secretion, a crucial event in thrombus formation. Therefore, we hypothesised that myosin Va may regulate granule secretion or formation in platelets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Platelet function was studied in vitro using a novel Myo5a gene deletion mouse model. Myo5a(-/- platelets were devoid of myosin Va, as determined by immunoblotting, and exhibited normal expression of surface markers. We assessed dense granule, α-granule and lysosomal secretion, integrin α(IIbβ(3 activation, Ca(2+ signalling, and spreading on fibrinogen in response to collagen-related peptide or the PAR4 agonist, AYPGKF in washed mouse platelets lacking myosin Va or wild-type platelets. Surprisingly, Myo5a(-/- platelets showed no significant functional defects in these responses, or in the numbers of dense and α-granules expressed. CONCLUSION: Despite the importance of myosin Va in vesicle transport in other cells, our data demonstrate this motor protein has no non-redundant role in the secretion of dense and α-granules or other functional responses in platelets.

  2. Platelet transfusion goals in oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in platelet component preparation and transfusion support over the years, platelet products remain a limited resource due to their short (5 day) shelf life, and therefore their optimal use in the non-bleeding thrombocytopenic patient continue to draw much attention. There have been a number of national and international guidelines for platelet transfusion therapy in patients with hematologic diseases, some within the last 1-2 years that have incorporated key randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which address issues, such as the optimal platelet dose, the most appropriate threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions, and whether prophylactic platelet transfusions are superior to therapeutic-only platelet transfusion practices for the prevention life-threatening bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. This review highlights key RCTs and recent systematic reviews focused on optimal platelet transfusion therapy in adult and pediatric patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia secondary to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), discuss how recent innovations in platelet component processing may affect transfusion efficiency, and introduce renewed concepts on adjuvant therapies to prevent bleeding in the hypoproliferative thrombocytopenic patient. PMID:26637759

  3. Platelets: covert regulators of lymphatic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Cara C; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L

    2010-12-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymphatic vessels during embryonic development. Genetic experiments demonstrate that podoplanin, a transmembrane protein expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells, engages the platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) when exposed to blood, leading to SYK-SLP-76-dependent platelet activation. When components of this pathway are disrupted, aberrant vascular connections form, resulting in blood-lymphatic mixing. Furthermore, platelet-null embryos manifest identical blood-lymphatic mixing. The identification of platelets as the critical cell type mediating blood-lymphatic vascular separation raises new questions in our understanding of lymphatic development and platelet biology. PMID:21071706

  4. The Study of Platelet Volume Indices in Platelet Aphaeresis Procedure: An Experience Of 271 Platelet Aphaeresis Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpit C Patel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet activity can be assessed by platelet volume indices like MPV, PDW and P-LCR. Aim: To develop an approach in blood bank professional, a habit of looking at platelet indices in hematology analyzer report of aphaeresis donors and QC samples of platelet aphaeresis products. Methods and materials: A retrospective data analysis was done for 271 platelet aphaeresis procedures conducted on CS3000 plus with AMS cell separator, Fenwal, USA and COM.TEC, Fresenius Kabi, Germany. Samples of the donors were collected before aphaeresis and 1 to 2 ml sample from each bag was collected in the satellite pouch attached to bag and analysis was done on day 0 and day 7. Platelet parameters were measured on automated hematology analyzers SYSMEX KX-21 and Horiba Micros 60.Statistical analysis: Statistical analysis was done by calculating and lsquo;r value' and a paired t test at 95 % confidence interval. A P value of <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: The mean platelet yield was 3.39+/-0.88 x 1011/unit. The platelet yield correlated negatively with MPV, PDW and PLCR (r value -0.224, -0.045 and -0.159 respectively for correlation between MPV, PDW and PLCR with the yield, P <0.0001.The mean values of PVI of SDP were significantly smaller than that of donor pre-donation samples (paired t test P value < 0.05.The size of stored single donor platelet on day 7 were significantly larger than that of day 0 (P value < 0.05. Conclusion: The platelet indices are useful to study - selectively smaller platelet separation by automated cell separators, storage lesions and yield prediction. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(3.000: 207-210

  5. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  6. Growth-promoting action and growth factor release by different platelet derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaretti, F; Tia, M; D'Esposito, V; De Pascale, M; Del Corso, M; Sepulveres, R; Liguoro, D; Valentino, R; Beguinot, F; Formisano, P; Sammartino, G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Platelet derivatives are commonly used in wound healing and tissue regeneration. Different procedures of platelet preparation may differentially affect growth factor release and cell growth. Preparation of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is accompanied by release of growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and several cytokines. When compared with the standard procedure for platelet-rich plasma (PRP), PRF released 2-fold less PDGF, but >15-fold and >2-fold VEGF and TGFβ1, respectively. Also, the release of several cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNγ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and TNFα) was significantly increased in PRF-conditioned medium (CM), compared to PRP-CM. Incubation of both human skin fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with PRF-derived membrane (mPRF) or with PRF-CM enhanced cell proliferation by >2-fold (pVEGF in the PRF-CM. Thus, the procedure of PRP preparation leads to a larger release of PDGF, as a possible result of platelet degranulation, while PRF enhances the release of proangiogenic factors. PMID:23855408

  7. Angiogenic factor-enriched platelet-rich plasma enhances in vivo bone formation around alloplastic graft material

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Seok; Kim, Jae-Jin; Park, Eun-Jin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Although most researchers agree that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a good source of autogenous growth factors, its effect on bone regeneration is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether increasing angiogenic factors in the human PRP to enhance new bone formation through rapid angiogenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS In vitro, the human platelets were activated with application of shear stress, 20 µg/ml collagen, 2 mM CaCl2 and 10U thrombin/1 × 109 platelets. L...

  8. Compartmentation and compartment-specific regulation of PDE5 by protein kinase G allows selective cGMP-mediated regulation of platelet functions

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Lindsay S.; Elbatarny, Hisham S.; Crawley, Scott W.; Bennett, Brian M.; Maurice, Donald H.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally accepted that nitric oxide (NO) donors, such as sodium nitroprusside (SNP), or phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, including sildenafil, each impact human platelet function. Although a strong correlation exists between the actions of NO donors in platelets and their impact on cGMP, agents such as sildenafil act without increasing global intra-platelet cGMP levels. This study was undertaken to identify how PDE5 inhibitors might act without increasing cGMP. Our data identify ...

  9. Evaluation of the Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy Involved in the Healing of Sports-Related Soft Tissue Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Middleton, Kellie K.; Barro, Victor; Muller, Bart; Terada, Satosha; Fu, Freddie H.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are the most common cause of severe long-term pain and physical disability, and affect hundreds of millions of people around the world. One of the most popular methods used to biologically enhance healing in the fields of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine includes the use of autologous blood products, namely, platelet rich plasma (PRP). PRP is an autologous concentration of human platelets to supra-physiologic levels. At baseline levels, platelets function as a ...

  10. Comparative effects of thrombopoietin and interleukin-6 on murine megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thrombocytopoiesis-stimulating factor (TSF or thrombopoietin) derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells is known to increase platelet production and to increase the number of morphologically unrecognizable early megakaryocytes, ie, small acetylcholinesterase-positive (SAChE+) cells in mice. Other recent studies have concluded that interleukin-6 (IL-6) also stimulates murine megakaryocytopoiesis both in vitro and in vivo. Some workers have suggested that IL-6 is thrombopoietin. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of TSF and IL-6 on percent 35S incorporation into platelets, platelet sizes, and the percentages of SAChE+ cells in C3H mice, and to determine if they produce the same or different responses. The results showed that two or four injections of a partially purified TSF (total dose of 2 or 4 units (U) over a 1- or 2-day period) increased percent 35S incorporation into platelets (P less than .005) and platelet sizes (P less than .005) of both normal and rebound-thrombocytotic mice when compared with values from other mice treated with human serum albumin, the carrier protein for both TSF and IL-6. In eight separate experiments, it was shown that IL-6 (40,000 U, 4 micrograms), when given to rebound-thrombocytotic mice in four injections over a 2-day period, produced a small but significant (P less than .005) increase in percent 35S incorporation into platelets. Additional studies showed that negative results were obtained when similar high doses of IL-6 were administered in two doses over a 1-day period. TSF, but not IL-6, stimulated an increase in platelet sizes of normal mice (P less than .005 to 0.0005); however, IL-6 increased platelet sizes of rebound-thrombocytotic mice when given in two of four injections (P less than .05 to .0005)

  11. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ashish; Chandra, Tulika; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. The present study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, CSM Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by platelet rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml) was collected in antic...

  12. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ashish; Chandra, Tulika; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. This study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, C S M Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by the platelet-rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml) was collected in antico...

  13. Platelet-rich fibrin: Evolution of a second-generation platelet concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Raja V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a platelet concentrate that has been used widely to accelerate soft-tissue and hard-tissue healing. The preparation of PRP has been described by several authors. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF was first described by Choukroun et al. in France. It has been referred to as a second-generation platelet concentrate, which has been shown to have several advantages over traditionally prepared PRP. Its chief advantages include ease of preparation and lack of biochemical handling of blood, which makes this preparation strictly autologous. This article describes the evolution of this novel platelet concentrate, referred to as PRF.

  14. A novel role of sesamol in inhibiting NF-κB-mediated signaling in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chao-Chien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our previous studies revealed that sesamol possesses potent antiplatelet activity through increasing cyclic AMP formation. Although platelets are anucleated cells, they also express the transcription factor, NF-κB, that may exert non-genomic functions in platelet activation. Therefore, we further investigated the inhibitory roles of sesamol in NF-κB-mediated platelet function. Methods Platelet aggregation, Fura 2-AM fluorescence, and immunoblotting analysis were used in this study. Results NF-κB signaling events, including IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation, were markedly activated by collagen (1 μg/ml in washed human platelets, and these signaling events were attenuated by sesamol (2.5~25 μM. Furthermore, SQ22536 and ODQ, inhibitors of adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase, respectively, strongly reversed the sesamol (25 μM-mediated inhibitory effects of IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. The protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, H89, also reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of IκBα degradation. Moreover, BAY11-7082, an NF-κB inhibitor, abolished IκBα degradation, phospholipase C (PLCγ2 phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC activation, [Ca2+]i mobilization, and platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Preincubation of platelets with the inhibitors, SQ22536 and H89, both strongly reversed sesamol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and [Ca2+]i mobilization. Conclusions Sesamol activates cAMP-PKA signaling, followed by inhibition of the NF-κB-PLC-PKC cascade, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and platelet aggregation. Because platelet activation is not only linked to hemostasis, but also has a relevant role in inflammation and metastasis, our data demonstrating that inhibition of NF-κB interferes with platelet function may

  15. Comparative evaluation of the role of the adhesion molecule CD177 in neutrophil interactions with platelets and endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliyev, Boris K; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    Neutrophil-specific glycoprotein CD177 is expressed on a subset of human neutrophils and has been shown to be a counter-receptor for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31). Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction of CD177 with endothelial PECAM-1 supports neutrophil transendothelial migration resulting in preferential transmigration of the CD177-expressing neutrophil subset. As PECAM-1 is also abundantly expressed on platelets, we addressed a follow-up suggestion that CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction may mediate platelet-neutrophil interactions and CD177-positive neutrophils may have a competitive advantage over CD177-negative neutrophils in binding platelets. Here, we report that CD177-positive and CD177-negative neutrophils do not differ significantly in their capacity to form platelet-neutrophil conjugates as assayed in whole blood and in mixed preparations of isolated platelets and neutrophils. Under flow conditions, neither platelet nor neutrophil activation resulted in preferential binding of platelets to CD177-expressing neutrophils. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in the ability of both neutrophil subsets to adhere to and migrate across surface-adherent activated platelets, whereas predominantly CD177-positive neutrophils migrated across HUVEC monolayers. In addition, we demonstrated that S(536) N dimorphism of PECAM-1, which affects CD177/PECAM-1 interaction, did not influence the equal capacity of the two neutrophil subsets to interact with platelets but influenced significantly the transendothelial migration of CD177-expressing neutrophils. Thus, CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction, while contributing to neutrophil-endothelial cell interaction in neutrophil transendothelial migration, does not contribute to or is redundant in platelet-neutrophil interactions. PMID:22690867

  16. Platelets are associated with xenograft tumor growth and the clinical malignancy of ovarian cancer through an angiogenesis-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Liu, Xishi

    2015-04-01

    Platelets are known to facilitate tumor metastasis and thrombocytosis has been associated with an adverse prognosis in ovarian cancer. However, the role of platelets in primary tumour growth remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that the expression levels of various markers in platelets, endothelial adherence and angiogenesis, including, platelet glycoprotein IIb (CD41), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), lysyl oxidase, focal adhesion kinase and breast cancer anti‑estrogen resistance 1, were expressed at higher levels in patients with malignant carcinoma, compared with those with borderline cystadenoma and cystadenoma. In addition, the endothelial markers CD31 and VEGF were found to colocalize with the platelet marker CD41 in the malignant samples. Since mice transplanted with human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3) demonstrated elevated tumor size and decreased survival rate when treated with thrombin or thrombopoietin (TPO), the platelets appeared to promote primary tumor growth. Depleting platelets using antibodies or by pretreating the cancer cells with hirudin significantly attenuated the transplanted tumor growth. The platelets contributed to late, but not early stages of tumor proliferation, as mice treated with platelet‑depleting antibody 1 day prior to and 11 days after tumor transplantation had the same tumor volumes. By contrast, tumor size in the early TPO‑injected group was increased significantly compared with the late TPO‑injected group. These findings suggested that the interplay between platelets and angiogenesis may contribute to ovarian cancer growth. Therefore, platelets and their associated signaling and adhesive molecules may represent potential therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. PMID:25502723

  17. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-12-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  18. An overview of platelet indices and methods for evaluating platelet function in thrombocytopenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille Just; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Nybo, Mads

    2014-01-01

    haematology analysers and commonly used methods for testing platelet function. The test principles, advantages and disadvantages of each test are described. We also evaluate the current literature regarding the clinical utility of the test for prediction of bleeding in thrombocytopenia in haematological and...... thrombocytopenia. Flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry and platelet secretion tests are used to diagnose specific platelet function defects. The flow cytometric activation marker P-selectin and surface coverage by the Cone and Plate[let] analyser™ predict bleeding in selected thrombocytopenic populations. To...... fully uncover the clinical utility of platelet-related tests, information about the prevalence of platelet function defects in thrombocytopenic conditions is required. Finally, knowledge of the performance in thrombocytopenic samples from patients is essential....

  19. In vitro effect of the herbicide glyphosate on human blood platelet aggregation and coagulation Efeito in vitro do herbicida glifosato na agregação plaquetária e coagulação sanguínea em humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresinha de Jesus C. Neiva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl-glycine] is a broad-spectrum, non-selective, post-emergence herbicide that is extensively used in agriculture. Published data referring to the effects of this product on human health are contradictory. We showed previously that long-term treatment of rats with low doses of Glyphosate-Biocarb® may induce hepatic histological changes and bleeding without decreasing platelet counts. The aim of the current study was to investigate, in vitro, the effect of glyphosate on human blood platelet aggregation and coagulation. Materials and methods: Platelet aggregation was determined in the platelet-rich plasma using the agents: 6µM-adenosine diphosphate, 6µM-epinephrine and 4µg/mL-collagen. Pretreatment with 500µg/mL glyphosate showed significant hypofunction of the three aggregating agents. The inhibitory effect was dose-dependent at concentrations from 50 to 500 µg/mL. The release of ATP was lower for glyphosate-treated platelets after stimulation by collagen. On the other hand, glyphosate did not promote any inhibitory effects on prothrombin time, thromboplastin time and thrombin time. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that glyphosate promotes changes in the platelet metabolism with an inhibitory effect on primary hemostasis.O glifosato [N-(phosphonomethyl-glycine] é um herbicida pós-emergente não seletivo de amplo espectro muito utilizado na agricultura. Dados da literatura referentes aos efeitos desse produto na saúde humana são contraditórios. Em estudos prévios demonstramos que ratos previamente tratados com glifosato apresentavam lesões hepáticas e sangramento sem alterações quantitativas de plaquetas. O objetivo do presente estudo é investigar os efeitos in vitro do glifosato (GP na agregação plaquetária e coagulação sanguínea em humanos. A agregação plaquetária foi determinada em plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP usando os agentes adenosina difosfato (ADP 6µM, epinefrina 6µM e col

  20. The origin and function of platelet glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll;

    2012-01-01

    compartments. However, studies have in the past demonstrated the presence of glycosyltransferase activities associated with platelets. We show that members of three distinct glycosyltransferase families are found within and on the surface of platelets. Immunocytology and flow cytometry results indicate that...

  1. Platelets and fibrin strands during clot retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, E; Korell, U; Richter, J

    1984-03-15

    The ultrastructure of platelet fibrin contacts (PFC) and the course of the strands was investigated in serial sections of retracted clots with the help of specimen tilting. We found after retraction in a test tube as well as under isometric conditions in the resonance thrombograph, after HARTERT, an uniform type of PFC. The side to side contact between platelet surface and fibrin strands displayed a 15 nm wide space which was bridged of 10 - 30 nm by filamentary structure. In each case the direction of the fibrin strands changed on contact with the platelet surface (bend). These bends recurred if the adhering strands ran over a longer distance on the platelet surface. The bends can be explained by non-directional movement of the platelets or of their pseudopodia. Microfilaments (actomyosin) which run straight in pseudopodia and often also twisted in the platelet body support this assumption. The described mechanism - contact of the thrombin activated platelets with fibrin strands and simultaneous nondirectional movement of the platelets which bind further sections of the adhering strands to their surface - would provide a more satisfactory explanation for the retraction of the clot to 1/10 of its original volume. PMID:6539004

  2. Metabolomic analysis of platelets during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paglia, Giuseppe; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Rolfsson, Óttar; Hansen, Morten Bagge; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Gudmundsson, Sveinn; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platelet concentrates (PCs) can be prepared using three methods: platelet (PLT)-rich plasma, apheresis, and buffy coat. The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive data set that describes metabolism of buffy coat-derived PLTs during storage and to compare it with a previously...

  3. Novel agents for anti-platelet therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xuebin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anti-platelet therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with thrombotic diseases. The most commonly used anti-platelet drugs, namely, aspirin, ticlopidine, and clopidogrel, are effective in the prevention and treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists (e.g., abciximab, eptifibatide and tirofiban have demonstrated good clinical benefits and safety profiles in decreasing ischemic events in acute coronary syndrome. However, adverse events related to thrombosis or bleeding have been reported in cases of therapy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. Cilostazol is an anti-platelet agent used in the treatment of patients with peripheral ischemia, such as intermittent claudication. Presently, platelet adenosine diphosphate P2Y(12 receptor antagonists (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, cangrelor, and ticagrelor are being used in clinical settings for their pronounced protective effects. The new protease-activated receptor antagonists, vorapaxar and atopaxar, potentially decrease the risk of ischemic events without significantly increasing the rate of bleeding. Some other new anti-platelet drugs undergoing clinical trials have also been introduced. Indeed, the number of new anti-platelet drugs is increasing. Consequently, the efficacy of these anti-platelet agents in actual patients warrants scrutiny, especially in terms of the hemorrhagic risks. Hopefully, new selective platelet inhibitors with high anti-thrombotic efficiencies and low hemorrhagic side effects can be developed.

  4. Performance evaluation of PL-11 platelet analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张有涛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and report the performance of PL-11 platelet analyzer. Methods Intravenous blood sam-ples anticoagulated with EDTA-K2 and sodium citrate were tested by the PL-11 platelet analyzer to evaluate the intra-assay and interassay coefficient of variation(CV),

  5. Spontaneous intravascular platelet aggregation in angiographic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of intravascular platelet aggregation is activated in angiographic clinical studies using 76% Verografin solution. It has been shown in experiments op rats that verografin (2 ml/kg) and iodamide (2 ml/ kg) together with the activation of intravascular platelet aggregation inhibit antiaggregation properties of the vascular wall

  6. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing). PMID:24224894

  7. The Ratio of ADP- to TRAP-Induced Platelet Aggregation Quantifies P2Y12-Dependent Platelet Inhibition Independently of the Platelet Count

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, Christoph B.; Meyer, Melanie; Bauer, Hans; Schnabel, Katharina; Weik, Patrick; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the association of clinical factors with P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition as monitored by the ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation and conventional ADP-induced aggregation, respectively. Background Controversial findings to identify and overcome high platelet reactivity (HPR) after coronary stent-implantation and to improve clinical outcome by tailored anti-platelet therapy exist. Monitoring anti-platelet therapy ex vivo underlies several ...

  8. Preliminary evaluation of a radioimmunoassay for platelet derived growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Together with insulin and epidermal growth factor, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is one of the most important and powerful mitogens. The authors developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a double incubation solid phase for human PDGF, in some biological fluids. Immunoglobulins were immobilized via protein A. using purified recombinant protein A at 1 mg/L with monoclonal antibody against human recombinant PDGF (BB) at 1000 fmol/tube, a binding capacity of approx. 17% was obtained. Non-specific binding (NSB%) was 50 ng/mL in 9 of 10 serum samples tested. (author). 18 refs, 8 figs

  9. Reaction of [3H]-taurine maleimide with platelet surface thiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurine Maleimide (2-maleimidoethanesulfonate, TM) was synthesized from [2-3H]-taurine and methoxycarbonylmaleimide (MCM). The yield of a 1 μmol synthesis approached 100% (based on taurine) when MCM was used in 4-fold excess. The product (TM*) was purified by ion exchange chromatography. TM* reacted irreversibly with thiol groups on the surface of washed human platelets, leading to incorporation of radioactivity into platelet pellets. Incorporation was blocked by cysteine, mercuribenzenesulfonate (MBS), dithiobisnitrobenzoate, and N-ethylmaleimide, but not by taurine or by inhibitors of anion transport. Reaction of TM* with platelets showed the dependence on time and concentration characteristics of a bimolecular reaction. The number of reactive sites ranged from 1 to 5 x 105/platelet, and the apparent rate constant from 1 to 3 x 103/(M x min). TM was less effective than MBS as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation induced by several agents. TM had no effect on the uptake of serotonin, taurine, or phosphate by the platelets, processes which are sensitive to MBS. These differences, considered with the similarity in size and charge of TM and MBS, suggest that classes of thiols defined as exofacial by their accessibility to MBS can differ substantially in their reactivity with other impermeant reagents

  10. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  11. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachem, Ahmed [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Yacoub, Daniel [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Zaid, Younes [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Mourad, Walid [Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Merhi, Yahye, E-mail: yahye.merhi@icm-mhi.org [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  12. Evidence for serotonin binding in vitro by platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is presented for in vitro high affinity binding of serotonin (5-HT) by beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) from human blood. Results include: 1) identification by radioimmunoassay of PF4 in specifically bound material obtained by 5-HT affinity chromatography of human platelet extracts; 2) binding of 72% and 6% of radiolabelled PF4 on 5-HT and control affinity columns, respectively; and 3) binding of approximately 8 moles of 5-HT per mole of purified beta TG in the presence of ferrous ion and heparin in ultrafiltration studies, with Scatchard analysis indicating a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(-8) M

  13. Evidence for serotonin binding in vitro by platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemstra, V L

    1983-02-01

    Evidence is presented for in vitro high affinity binding of serotonin (5-HT) by beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) from human blood. Results include: 1) identification by radioimmunoassay of PF4 in specifically bound material obtained by 5-HT affinity chromatography of human platelet extracts; 2) binding of 72% and 6% of radiolabelled PF4 on 5-HT and control affinity columns, respectively; and 3) binding of approximately 8 moles of 5-HT per mole of purified beta TG in the presence of ferrous ion and heparin in ultrafiltration studies, with Scatchard analysis indicating a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(-8) M. PMID:6189240

  14. Evidence for serotonin binding in vitro by platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heemstra, V.L.

    1983-02-01

    Evidence is presented for in vitro high affinity binding of serotonin (5-HT) by beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) from human blood. Results include: 1) identification by radioimmunoassay of PF4 in specifically bound material obtained by 5-HT affinity chromatography of human platelet extracts; 2) binding of 72% and 6% of radiolabelled PF4 on 5-HT and control affinity columns, respectively; and 3) binding of approximately 8 moles of 5-HT per mole of purified beta TG in the presence of ferrous ion and heparin in ultrafiltration studies, with Scatchard analysis indicating a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(-8) M.

  15. Platelet stimulation by antifibronectin antibodies requires the Fc region of antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Holderbaum, D; Culp, L. A.; Bensusan, H B; Gershman, H.

    1982-01-01

    Anti-human fibronectin antibodies produced in a goat or in rabbits stimulate the release of serotonin from washed or gelatin/Sepharose-treated human platelets in a dose-dependent manner. This finding led us to propose that fibronectin on the platelet plasma membrane might serve as a collagen receptor on these cells [Bensusan, H. B., Koh, T. L., Henry, K. G., Murray, B. A. & Culp, L. A. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 5864-5868]. To determine whether direct interaction of the antibody wi...

  16. The inflammatory and tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, thapsigargin, activates platelets by selective mobilization of calcium as shown by protein phosphorylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastrup, Ole; Linnebjerg, H; Bjerrum, P J;

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the activation of human blood platelets by the inflammatory and tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, thapsigargin. The effect of thapsigargin was compared with other common agonists (calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol ester TPA and thrombin). Platelet aggregation, serotonin release...

  17. Quality assessment of platelet concentrates prepared by platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC and apheresis-PC methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ravindra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC, and apheresis-PC were prepared and their quality parameters were assessed. Study Design: In this study, the following platelet products were prepared: from random donor platelets (i platelet rich plasma - platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, and (ii buffy coat poor- platelet concentrate (BC-PC and (iii single donor platelets (apheresis-PC by different methods. Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: swirling, volume of the platelet concentrate, platelet count, WBC count and pH. Results: A total of 146 platelet concentrates (64 of PRP-PC, 62 of BC-PC and 20 of apheresis-PC were enrolled in this study. The mean volume of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 62.30±22.68 ml, 68.81±22.95 ml and 214.05±9.91 ml and ranged from 22-135 ml, 32-133 ml and 200-251 ml respectively. The mean platelet count of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 7.6±2.97 x 1010/unit, 7.3±2.98 x 1010/unit and 4.13±1.32 x 1011/unit and ranged from 3.2-16.2 x 1010/unit, 0.6-16.4 x 1010/unit and 1.22-8.9 x 1011/unit respectively. The mean WBC count in PRP-PC (n = 10, BC-PC (n = 10 and apheresis-PC (n = 6 units was 4.05±0.48 x 107/unit, 2.08±0.39 x 107/unit and 4.8±0.8 x 106/unit and ranged from 3.4 -4.77 x 107/unit, 1.6-2.7 x 107/unit and 3.2 - 5.2 x 106/unit respectively. A total of 26 units were analyzed for pH changes. Out of these units, 10 each were PRP-PC and BC-PC and 6 units were apheresis-PC. Their mean pH was 6.7±0.26 (mean±SD and ranged from 6.5 - 7.0 and no difference was observed among all three types of platelet concentrate. Conclusion: PRP-PC and BC-PC units were comparable in terms of swirling, platelet count per unit and pH. As expected, we found WBC contamination to be less in BC-PC than PRP-PC units. Variation in volume was more in BC-PC than PRP-PC units and this suggests that further standardization is required for preparation of BC

  18. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  1. The use of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D for studying nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Martinez MJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maria Jose Santos-Martinez1–3, Iwona Inkielewicz-Stepniak1,4, Carlos Medina1, Kamil Rahme5,6, Deirdre M D'Arcy1, Daniel Fox3, Justin D Holmes3,5, Hongzhou Zhang3, Marek Witold Radomski3,51School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, 3Center for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 4Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland; 5Materials and Supercritical Fluids Group, Department of Chemistry and the Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 6Department of Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Applied Science, Notre Dame University, Zouk Mosbeh, LebanonAbstract: Interactions between blood platelets and nanoparticles have both pharmacological and toxicological significance and may lead to platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet aggregation is usually studied using light aggregometer that neither mimics the conditions found in human microvasculature nor detects microaggregates. A new method for the measurement of platelet microaggregation under flow conditions using a commercially available quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D has recently been developed. The aim of the current study was to investigate if QCM-D could be used for the measurement of nanoparticle-platelet interactions. Silica, polystyrene, and gold nanoparticles were tested. The interactions were also studied using light aggregometry and flow cytometry, which measured surface abundance of platelet receptors. Platelet activation was imaged using phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. QCM-D was able to measure nanoparticle-induced platelet microaggregation for all nanoparticles tested at concentrations that were undetectable by light aggregometry and flow cytometry. Microaggregates were measured by changes in frequency and dissipation, and the presence of platelets on the sensor surface was confirmed and imaged by

  2. Toll-Like Receptor Signalling Is Not Involved in Platelet Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae In Vitro or In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Marianne C. L.; Hou, Baidong; van der Poll, Tom; Nieuwland, Rienk; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae strains vary considerably in their ability to cause invasive disease in humans, which is at least in part determined by the capsular serotype. Platelets have been implicated as sentinel cells in the circulation for host defence. One of their utensils for this function is the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We here aimed to investigate platelet response to S. pneumoniae and a role for TLRs herein. Platelets were stimulated using four serotypes of S. pneumonia including an unencapsulated mutant strain. In vitro aggregation and flow cytometry assays were performed using blood of healthy volunteers, or blood of TLR knock out and WT mice. For in vivo pneumonia experiments, platelet specific Myd88 knockout (Plt-Myd88-/-) mice were used. We found that platelet aggregation was induced by unencapsulated S. pneumoniae only. Whole blood incubation with all S. pneumoniae serotypes tested resulted in platelet degranulation and platelet-leukocyte complex formation. Platelet activation was TLR independent, as responses were not inhibited by TLR blocking antibodies, not induced by TLR agonists and were equally induced in wild-type and Tlr2-/-, Tlr4-/-, Tlr2/4-/-, Tlr9-/- and Myd88-/- blood. Plt-Myd88-/- and control mice displayed no differences in bacterial clearance or immune response to pneumonia by unencapsulated S. pneumoniae. In conclusion, S. pneumoniae activates platelets through a TLR-independent mechanism that is impeded by the bacterial capsule. Additionally, platelet MyD88-dependent TLR signalling is not involved in host defence to unencapsulated S. pneumoniae in vivo. PMID:27253707

  3. Does bipolar pacemaker current activate blood platelets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Grunde; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Brandes, Axel

    2009-01-01

    platelets and muscle cells contain actin and myosin filaments, and both cells are activated following calcium influx. Muscle cells open their calcium channels and contract when exposed to an electric current. Current through a bipolar pacemaker lead will expose a small volume of blood, including platelets......, to the depolarizing current. Platelet activation may ensue, resulting in aggregation, release reaction, and contraction. In contrast, a unipolar pacemaker system will not depolarize blood, but transmit current directly into the myocardium, and the current afterward passes through other tissues before...

  4. Platelet additive solutions: a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, P F

    2007-12-01

    Platelet additive solutions (PASs) were first developed in the 1980s, and continued to be improved over the following years. The use of PASs as replacement for plasma has a number of benefits, both for the quality of the platelet concentrates and for the patients. However, some PASs have been associated with a lower platelet yield in the PCs, a shorter storage time, and a lower increment in the patient when compared to PCs in plasma. A number of reformulations of the PASs have taken place to counteract these disadvantages. Most PASs use acetate as nutrient for the platelets, which has the benefit of generating bicarbonate when oxidized by the platelets, thus supplying its own buffering capacity. Alternatively, glucose is used, but may cause deterioration of pH in the stored PCs due to the formation of lactic acid. Addition of other buffering substances, such as phosphate, can be added to ensure maintenance of neutral pH. An important finding was the inhibiting effect of potassium and magnesium on platelet activation. The initially developed PASs lacked these two ingredients and showed reduced storage times of the PCs in PAS when compared to those stored in plasma. However, when these constituents are included in the PAS, storage time is similar and even exceeds those seen for PCs in plasma. Considerable research is done in further formulating the optimal PAS. Bicarbonate is being considered as buffer for these PASs. Also, L-carnitine appears to have a favorable effect on stored platelets, including a reduction of platelet metabolism, and inhibition of apoptosis. Another area of optimization is lowering of plasma content needed for maintaining platelet quality. Where current PASs still need at least 30% residual plasma, there is a trend towards lowering the plasma content to less than 5% with the newer PASs. Preservation of purinergic platelet receptor functionality by ADP-degrading activities in plasma appears to play an important role in this respect. Development

  5. Pseudo grey platelet syndrome--grey platelets due to degranulation in blood collected into EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockbill, S R; Burmester, H B; Heptinstall, S

    1988-10-01

    We have studied a woman with a history of mild bruising and bleeding, with a normal platelet count and normal clotting factors, who had platelets that appeared grey when stained and viewed under the microscope. Unlike the grey platelet syndrome, the abnormality was only evident when blood had been collected into EDTA and not when citrate or heparin was used as anticoagulant. This 'pseudo grey platelet syndrome' was associated with platelet dense body and alpha granule secretion with no aggregation and occurred on removal of extracellular Ca2+. We discovered that a plasma factor was responsible which could be an immunoglobulin but which is clearly different from the EDTA-sensitive antibodies which cause platelet aggregation and agglutination. We were not able to demonstrate a relationship between the mild bleeding tendency and the in vitro abnormality. PMID:3143601

  6. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs

    OpenAIRE

    Jungbluth, P; Grassmann, JP; Thelen, S; Wild, M.; Sager, M; Windolf, J.; M Hakimi

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of a...

  7. Platelet protein S directly inhibits procoagulant activity on platelets and microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenuiter, Fabian; Davis, Nicole F.; Duan, Erning; Gale, Andrew J.; Heeb, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant plasma protein S (PS) is essential for maintaining hemostatic balance. About 2.5% of PS is stored in platelets and released upon platelet stimulation. So far, little is known about the functionality and importance of platelet (plt)PS. A platelet-associated protease cleaves plasma-derived (pd)PS and pltPS in the “thrombin-sensitive region”, abolishing activated protein C (APC) cofactor activity. However we showed that cleaved PS retains APC-independent anticoagulant activities (“...

  8. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential. PMID:24065244

  9. The effect of time of day and exercise on platelet functions and platelet-neutrophil aggregates in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Hatice; Kiliç, Nedret

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation state changes by exercise. The effect of exercise time on platelet activation state and formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates are not known yet. In this study the effect of exercise and time of day were examined on platelet activity with platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Ten moderately active males aged 27+/- 1.63 (mean+/-S.D.) years completed sub-maximal (70% VO(2max)) exercise trials for 30 min. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately post-exercise and after 30 min of recovery. Whole blood was analysed for haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean platelet count (MPV) and platelet aggregation (PA). Platelet-neutrophil aggregates and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) levels were assayed. Platelet count showed significant increase after morning exercise ((236+/- 32)x10(9) l(-1) versus (202+/- 34)x10(9) l(-1) baseline, p 11912

  10. Donor demographic and laboratory predictors of single donor platelet yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet transfusions are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality in patients who are severely thrombocytopenic and are at risk of spontaneous bleeding. Platelets are currently obtained either by fractionation of whole blood or by platelet apheresis. The quality of single donor platelets (SDP in terms of yield influences platelet recovery in the recipient and allows prolonging intervals between transfusions. Material and Methods: Donor demographic and laboratory data were analyzed prior to performing plateletpheresis to identify donor factors that influence platelet yield. The study was conducted on 130 healthy, first-time plateletpheresis donors over a period of 4 years. The plateletpheresis procedures were performed using Fresenius Kabi COM.TEC and Hemonetics MCS plus separator. A relationship between pre-donation donor variables and yield of platelets was studied using the Pearson correlation. Results: The mean platelet yield was 3.160.62x1011 per unit. A positive correlation was observed between platelet yield and pre-donation platelet count, body mass index (BMI; Kg/m2 of the donor, while a negative correlation was observed between age and the platelet yield. Conclusion: Donor pre-donation platelet count, BMI and donor age influence platelet yield. Young healthy donors with a high platelet count and better BMI can give a better platelet yield in the SDP.

  11. Monitoring of antithrombotic therapy with radiolabelled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of drug efficacy and monitoring in antithrombotic therapy was approached by identification, using III-In labelled platelets, of so-called active atherosclerotic lesions sites being characterized by an enhanced platelet trapping over certain vascular areas. Morphological control of a view of these areas revealed either parietal thrombosis or exulcerated atherosclerotic lesios, whereas advanced lisions were inactive in so far as the platelet uptake is concerned. Demonstrating that the platelet uptake remains rather constant for weeks, it was tried to interfere with various antiplatelet agents and different methodology in order to achieve optimal follow-up data from patients suffering from latent or clinically manifest atherosclerosis. (author). 77 refs.; 9 figs.; 14 tabs

  12. COX-2 Inhibition by Use of Rofecoxib or High Dose Aspirin Enhances ADP-Induced Platelet Aggregation in Fresh Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Borgdorff, P.; Handoko, M.L.; Wong, Y.Y.; Tangelder, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Increased cardiovascular risk after use of selective or nonselective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-inhibitors might partly be caused by enhanced platelet aggregability. However, an effect of COX-2 inhibition on platelets has so far not been observed in humans. Methods: We tested in healthy volunteers the effect of COX-2-inhibition nearly in-vivo, i.e. immediately after and even during blood sampling. Results: Measurement within 2 minutes after venipuncture, but not 60 minutes later, showed th...

  13. VEGF Levels in Plasma in Relation to Platelet Activation, Glycemic Control, and Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Diekman, Mattheus J.M.; Tiller, Anna; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Koolwijk, Pieter; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human plasma samples have suggested that circulating VEGF is a cause of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. However, artificial release of VEGF from platelets as a source of VEGF in plasma samples, as also occurs in serum samples, has not been ruled out in these studies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We determined VEGF levels in plasma collected in both citrate and PECT, a medium that inactivates platelets, in ...

  14. Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelet substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on studies on the physiology of blood platelets in thrombocytopenic patients and rabbits. Methods for the detection of platelet antibodies and the preservation of platelets in vitro were investigated. Studies on the effect of low doses of x irradiation (up to 1000 R) on platelet function indicate that platelets exposed to ionizing radiation have increased functional activity. A list is included of publications that report the results of the studies in detail

  15. Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelet substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, M G

    1976-04-28

    Progress is reported on studies on the physiology of blood platelets in thrombocytopenic patients and rabbits. Methods for the detection of platelet antibodies and the preservation of platelets in vitro were investigated. Studies on the effect of low doses of x irradiation (up to 1000 R) on platelet function indicate that platelets exposed to ionizing radiation have increased functional activity. A list is included of publications that report the results of the studies in detail.

  16. Anaphylactic actions of platelet-activating factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Stimler, N. P.; Bloor, C. M.; Hugli, T E; Wykle, R. L.; McCall, C E; O'Flaherty, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) is a potent inducer of systemic anaphylactoid reactions in animals. It was found to be similarly potent in contracting smooth muscle of guinea pig ileum and lung and in enhancing vascular permeability when injected subcutaneously into these animals. This factor, therefore, possesses in vitro and in vivo bioactions that resemble those of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins. However, platelet-activating factor induces a slowl...

  17. Differences in intracellular calcium dynamics cause differences in α-granule secretion and phosphatidylserine expression in platelets adhering on glass and TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the activation of purified human platelets due to their adhesion on glass and TiO2 in the absence of extracellular calcium was investigated. Differences in α-granule secretion between platelets adhering on the two surfaces were detected by examining the expression and secretion of the α-granule markers P-selectin (CD62P) and β-thromboglobulin. Similarly, differences in the expression of phosphatidylserine (PS), and in the activation of the major integrin GPIIb/IIIa, on the surfaces of the adhering platelets, were also observed. While all of these activation markers were expressed in platelets adhering on glass, the surface markers were not expressed in platelets adhering on TiO2, and β-thromboglobulin secretion levels were substantially reduced. Differences in marker expression and secretion correlated with differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics. Calcium ionophore treatment triggered α-granule secretion and PS expression in TiO2-adhering platelets but had no effect on the activation of GPIIb/IIIa. These results demonstrate specificity in the way surfaces of artificial materials activate platelets, link differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics observed in the platelets adhering on the two surfaces to the differences in some of the platelet responses (α-granule secretion and PS expression), but also highlight the involvement of synergistic, calcium-independent pathways in platelet activation. The ability to control activation in surface-adhering platelets makes this an attractive model system for studying platelet signaling pathways and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27124595

  18. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Danieli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries.

  19. The genetics of normal platelet reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-10-14

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a substantial variation in platelet function seen among normal persons. Candidate gene association studies represent a valiant effort to define the genetic component in an era where genetic tools were limited, but the single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in those studies need to be validated by more objective, comprehensive approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of quantitative functional traits in much larger cohorts of more carefully selected normal subjects. During the past year, platelet count and mean platelet volume, which indirectly affect platelet function, were the subjects of GWAS. The majority of the GWAS signals were located to noncoding regions, a consistent outcome of all GWAS to date, suggesting a major role for mechanisms that alter phenotype at the level of transcription or posttranscriptional modifications. Of 15 quantitative trait loci associated with mean platelet volume and platelet count, one located at 12q24 is also a risk locus for coronary artery disease. In most cases, the effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci are admittedly small, but the results of these studies have led to new insight into regulators of hematopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis that would otherwise be unapparent and difficult to define. PMID:20610812

  20. Silica Nanoparticles Effects on Blood Coagulation Proteins and Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Gryshchuk; Natalya Galagan

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation is important prior to their using as the drug carriers or therapeutic agents. The aim of present work was studying of the primary effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on haemostasis in vitro. We studied the effect of SiNPs on blood coagulation directly estimating the activation of prothrombin and factor X and to verify any possible effect of SiNPs on human platelets. It was shown that SiNPs shortened coagulation time in APTT and PT te...