WorldWideScience

Sample records for aging society aging

  1. The pedagogicalization of ageing societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine

    2011-01-01

    ' the' processes' of' opti) mizing'and'realizing'people’s'potentials'lifelong.'Active'and'healthy' ageing' unfolds' the' cure' to' the' social' problem' of' contemporary' ageing'societies'in'order'to'make'tomorrows'life'in'old'age'better' than' it' is' today.' The' pedagogical' issues' relate' to' the.......' This'paper'will'discuss'the'implications'of'the'pedagogicalization'of' ageing' within' the' framework' of' a' Vision' Paper' from' EU:' “More' Years,' Better' Lives:' The' Potential' Challenges' of' Demographic' Change”,'February'2011.'Disciplining'the'knowledge'production'of' ageing...

  2. Agglomeration processes in aging societies

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa Grafeneder-Weissteiner; Klaus Prettner

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates agglomeration processes in aging societies by introducing an overlapping generation structure into a New Economic Geography model. Whether higher economic integration leads to spatial concentration of economic activity crucially hinges on the economies' demographic properties. While population aging as represented by declining birth rates strengthens agglomeration processes, declining mortality rates weaken them. This is due to the fact that we allow for nonconstant ...

  3. [Ageing society and laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, H

    2000-09-01

    An interest in the ageing process has increased greatly with increasing the population of the aged. The goal of this interest is to improve the quality of life(QOL) in the aged. In this paper, the presidential address "Ageing Society and Laboratory Medicine" at the 46th annual meeting of JSCP in Kumamoto'99 was summarized on the important research for ageing in the past decades. The paper presented was age- and gene-related changes, the latent variation of serum constituents and lipids abnormality in the ageing process. Concerning to the definition of reference value of healthy populations and the subjects who had no combined ailments, the reference interval of individuals(intra-personal), followed 5 years categorized by age, sex, and social conditions, gave a narrow range of variation than did a larger mixed populations(inter-personal). The reference intervals set would be a more sensitive reference than is the customary "normal range" for values occurring in inter-personal. Concerning to the study of the relationship between laboratory test and activity of daily living(ADL), the higher serum levels for TP, Alb, Hb, Glu, TC were observed in the higher ADL. The basic research techniques were also evaluated in the paper. The serum lipoperoxides were correlated with serum lipoprotein free radicals which caused atherosclerosis. The higher frequency of cerebral- and myocardial-infarction in the aged were observed in the higher serum LDL-C and lower serum level of arachidonic acid(AA), eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), and AA/EPA ratio were observed in AMI patients with lower HDL-C groups than the healthy aged. Although Alzheimer(AD)'s disease had a progressive memory loss and immobile dementia and was reported the decrease of acetyltransferase activity in the brain, decrease of serum level of free choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine(PC) and sphingomyelin(SM)/PC ratio were observed in spite of keeping normal serum level of SM. The decreased serum levels of

  4. Advertising in an ageing society

    OpenAIRE

    Carrigan, Marylyn; Szmigin, Isabelle

    2000-01-01

    Age discrimination is one of the last forms of discrimination yet to be tackled by legislation. Despite the call of the United Nations for older people to be treated fairly, regardless of age, many industries still overtly discriminate against them. The advertising industry is a particular offender, either ignoring older people altogether or presenting them in caricatures or negative stereotypes. The authors suggest that regulation or legislation may be required, to raise awareness of the iss...

  5. Active Ageing in a Greying Society: Training for All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Roger

    2008-01-01

    With the ageing of society, policy-makers are aware of the need to retain older workers in employment. Across Europe, lifelong learning is increasingly important. Adults who remain active longer need (re-)training to maintain their productivity. However, vocational training tends to decline with age. The article analyses European employment policy…

  6. Sociological imagination for the aged society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how the sociological imagination may generate new insights regarding the dangers and possibilities that arise when an old order disintegrates and a new one has to be created. The new order is theorized as the “aged society”. The aged society is demarcated by rad

  7. Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society

    OpenAIRE

    Klug, A

    1997-01-01

    Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society, the proceedings of a Discussion held at The Royal Society on 7 and 8 May 1997. Organized and edited by J. Grimley Evans, R. Holliday, T. B. L. Kirkwood, P. Laslett and L. Tyler.

  8. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  9. Learning to Cope with an Ageing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The ageing of society is one of the biggest policy challenges of this time. Growing life expectancy and low birth rates mean that, for the fist time in human history, most people, and certainly the more prosperous social groups, will be spending a third of their lives in "retirement". This has profound social, cultural and economic implications,…

  10. On Population Kinetics of an Aging Society: Aging and Scurvy

    CERN Document Server

    Ely, J T A

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from skeletal remains and pictorial records for the past several millennia established that humans have had a very inadequate ascorbic acid intake and commonly exhibited signs of frank scurvy, as well as the invisible signs of subclinical scurvy (absence of AA in scorbutic urine is universal). They suffered scurvy's mortality, being a major cause of death especially in times of stress due to dietary fluctuations, climate, migrations, voyages, battles, etc. Rapid aging and death by acute scurvy, and infectious and degenerative diseases related to chronic scurvy added to the toll. In this era, the loss of function and changes in appearance that we see in humans in the second 50 years of life are theoretically simple to avoid. However, this is very rare because there is almost no one who does not eat the refined diet of the affluent societies. We present here an overview of a vast array of evidence on the connections between aging and scurvy.

  11. Failing ageing? Risk management in the active ageing society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Commission's recent policy initiative on social investment, Danish Long term care offers new and innovative perspectives in ageing and the management of the risks associated thereof with the introduction of reablement (rehabilitering). From the perspective...

  12. On Population Kinetics of an Aging Society: Aging and Scurvy

    OpenAIRE

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from skeletal remains and pictorial records for the past several millennia established that humans have had a very inadequate ascorbic acid intake and commonly exhibited signs of frank scurvy, as well as the invisible signs of subclinical scurvy (absence of AA in scorbutic urine is universal). They suffered scurvy's mortality, being a major cause of death especially in times of stress due to dietary fluctuations, climate, migrations, voyages, battles, etc. Rapid aging and death by ac...

  13. Psychotherapy in the Internet age society

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Drath

    2015-01-01

    The article regards a number of challenges for psychotherapy, posed by the dynamic development of the Internet and changes in the functioning of individuals and societies this causes. The author analyses the social role of psychotherapy - its tasks, the needs it fulfils, and the expectations it tries to meet. Subsequently, he refers to cultural changes related to the communication revolution, and points at areas which will require special attention in the coming years, so that psychotherapist...

  14. Future mobility in an ageing society: Where are we heading?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shergold, I.; Lyons, G.; Hubers, C.

    2014-01-01

    The demographic profile of UK society is changing as people live longer. Maintaining the wellbeing and quality of life of an ageing society is set to be extremely challenging. To what extent can the state afford to meet a potentially burgeoning demand for social care? What expectations will be place

  15. Challenges of a Modern Atlas of the Ageing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleisch, S.; Hil, D.; Korkut, S.; Meyer, P.

    2016-06-01

    Atlases are collections of illustrated data, often maps, which give an overview - as well as some details - of one or several topic areas. We noted that this description serves well especially for traditional paper and digital atlases. However, in our today's world of entertainment it might give a somewhat dated impression. For the topic area 'Ageing Society' we aim to visualise age related data in an interactive digital way that supports not only the content but also engages the users, offers opportunities for different stakeholders and levels of interest, and is able to accommodate a range of data as well as future updates. A set of guiding principles for the development process addresses these challenges. First implementations show that following the principles is feasible but expensive in terms of time and attention to detail needed. For each selected topic, a story guides the users through the data and highlights interesting aspects. The user can interrupt the story at any time and explore the data further through interacting with the detailed data representations, and switch back to the story when needed. This allows different levels of access which in combination with the specifically designed navigation concept as well as through the adherence to user aware design principles are very promising for the future developments of the Atlas of the Ageing Society and potentially other atlas products.

  16. The global agenda council on the ageing society: policy principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olshansky, S. Jay; Biggs, Simon; Achenbaum, W. Andrew;

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the World Economic Forum (WEF) created the Global Agenda Councils – an amalgamation of scientists, public policy makers, academics, physicians and business leaders with the task of devising transformational innovation in global governance for the purpose of advancing knowledge and collab......In 2008, the World Economic Forum (WEF) created the Global Agenda Councils – an amalgamation of scientists, public policy makers, academics, physicians and business leaders with the task of devising transformational innovation in global governance for the purpose of advancing knowledge...... and collaboratively developing solutions for the most crucial issues facing humanity. Because of its overarching effect on many aspects of society, a Council was created to address global issues associated with an ageing society. The Councils have the task of challenging prevailing assumptions, monitoring trends......, proposing solutions, devising strategies, making public policy proposals and evaluating the effectiveness of actions using measurable benchmarks. This report is the first product of the WEF’s Council on the Ageing Society – our goal is to lay down the initial principles that will guide our actions...

  17. Are societies with a high value on the Active Ageing Index more age-integrated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Dykstra (Pearl); M. Fleischmann (Maria)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCombining round four data from the European Social Survey (ESS) with indicators of Active Ageing, we examine conditions conducive to age integration. We use both a behavioural and an attitudinal measure of age integration: the prevalence of cross-age friendships and low levels of ageism.

  18. Caring for an aging society: cohort values and eldercare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karner, T X

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the impact of cohort values is important in trying to project future aging service needs. The cultural characteristics of cohorts yet to reach the age of 65 are compared with those already "old," with specific focus on the Baby Boomers. Aging policies (and available services) reflect the cultural notions of age and aging held as normative during the historical era in which they are enacted. Previous research into lifestyle preferences, consumer practices, and key characteristics is drawn upon to investigate the values of Baby Boomers in light of their projected needs for eldercare services. Cohort research and generational marketing practices offer a promising foundation for exploring how best to develop, target, and deliver aging services that most effectively utilize our social resources.

  19. [Social aspects of ageing and old age in socialist society (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, I

    1981-01-01

    The term social age(ing) is discussed within a historical context. The basic idea is that social and biological existence should not be separated although both can overlap. The paper also goes into the tasks of a social scientist engaged in the subject of age research. Some theoretical questions are based on the "way of life" theory and it's constituting elements.

  20. Quality of Life in Ageing Societies: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Ozgur; Cevik, Aylin Cakiroglu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the quality of life of the elderly in three aging countries: Italy, Portugal, and Turkey. This was done by using data provided by the European Quality of Life Survey completed in 2004. By doing so, we could then operationalize the conditions of the elderly in Turkey who have a rapid aging process…

  1. HOW COULD HOSPITALS ACT IN AN AGEING SOCIETY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leuca Mirela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The demographic changes are of great importance for all European societies. Their impact and effects have multiple, deep facets. Each European healthcare and welfare system will be facing considerable changes in the new demographic context. The hospital sector plays an important role in each health system. This paper focuses on the impact of the demographic changes on hospitals, presents and analyzes statistical data for the German hospitals sector in order to underline the importance of the older age groups for the number of the hospital inpatient cases, the provided range of medical services and disciplines and for the hospital disease costs. The paper also reveals main findings from 30 interviews conducted in 2010 with German health experts (from hospitals, health insurance companies, universities, institutes and regional healthcare policy makers that accepted to answer questions referring to the demographic impact on the German healthcare system and hospital sector. The results of the interviews show that hospitals will have to act and react to the demographic changes. German hospitals might play different roles in the healthcare service provision for older people when engaging in new models of integrated care that will have to be developed. Processes, structures, human resources expertise, hospital service provision and medical departments will undergo major changes in response to the demographic challenges. Networks, centres of excellence for older persons and integrated care will probably be indispensable structures of the German healthcare system in the future. Strategic partnerships with pre- and post-hospital healthcare service providers are considered to be top priorities for German hospitals when facing the demographic challenge. Central case management and process optimization can be essential factors of success in the hospital care of the older, multimorbid patients. Acute geriatric medicine will be a main quality feature for the

  2. Japan: Super-Aging Society Preparing for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Naoko; Akiyama, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    Japan has the highest proportion of older adults in the world. Aging is not only an immediate personal issue but also a salient factor in crucial public policies, such as pensions, health, and long-term care. The Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disaster of March 2011 has highlighted current and emerging issues of a…

  3. Human Capital Accumulation and the Macroeconomy in an Ageing Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijdra, Ben J.; Reijnders, Laurie S. M.

    2016-01-01

    How do population ageing shocks affect the long-run macroeconomic performance of an economy? To answer this question we build a general equilibrium overlapping generations model of a closed economy featuring endogenous factor prices. Finitely-lived individuals are endowed with perfect foresight and

  4. Considerations on Caring for Caregivers in an Aging Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dr Samir K

    2015-01-01

    While it is anticipated that healthcare systems around the world will continue to rely heavily on family members and friends to provide unpaid care especially to meet the needs of our aging population, current assumptions and issues around caregivers need to be challenged and addressed if we are to expect their future support. This paper builds on Williams et al's assertion that many current assumptions and issues around caregivers need to be challenged and addressed if we are to expect their future support. Indeed, with the pool of available caregivers expected to actually shrink in the future, this paper therefore examines four key policy issues in greater depth that we can address to enable individuals to age in place and others to maintain and take on caregiving roles. Through the establishment of policies that support robust and longterm capacity planning; make clear what care recipients and caregivers can expect to receive in the form of government supports; appreciate the increasing diversity that is occurring among those taking on caregiving roles and those requiring care; and recognize the need to invest in strategies that combat social isolation, we may not only improve our future health and well-being but ensure we are also enabled to care for ourselves as we age.

  5. Funded pensions - a remedy for an ageing society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Dybał

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author demonstrates that over the coming decades the EU, the OECD and many countries will face a significant acceleration of demographic ageing due to three main factors: the baby-boom generation reaching retirement age, continuing increases in life expectancy and decreased fertility since the 1970s. Eventually, all three factors mentioned will combine to produce a major financial challenge for pension systems in the coming years, when the number of pensioners will rapidly increase and the size of the working-age population will diminish. According to the data gathered, to prevent this situation, countries all over the world are reforming their pension systems. Most are reforming to decrease the fiscal costs of their existing systems. A few relatively young countries are establishing new systems or are increasing the generosity of their current systems. Nevertheless, the majority of the pension reforms are dealing with an existing pay-as-you-go defined benefit system, rather than reform of the overall system of pension provision. However, while these minor reforms alleviate some of the fiscal burden, fiscal problems will reappear in the long term. The only way to effectively solve the pension system issue on a permanent basis is to move toward the fully-funded defined contribution reforms currently underway in Latin America, Australia, Central and Eastern Europe and under consideration in a variety of other countries.

  6. Educating an Aging Society: The University of the Third Age in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenerall, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    The University of the Third Age in Finland has evolved from English and French models to include lectures, discussion groups, and research groups. A survey of 165 adult learners found their primary reason for participating was to acquire general education and self-knowledge. Socializing and meeting people were among the lowest ranked motivations.…

  7. How should Malaysia respond to its ageing society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D R; Chia, Y C

    2009-03-01

    As Malaysia ages its health and social care systems will have to adapt to a changing pattern of disease and dependency. Improved public health measures extend life expectancy at the relative expense of increased prevalence of currently incurable conditions such as dementia and Parkinson's disease. In this article we discuss how these demographic changes will impact and suggest possible means of coping with the altered epidemiology of disease and disability. Malaysia will need to swiftly develop sufficient expertise in acute Geriatric Medicine, rehabilitation of older people; the management of long-term conditions in older people with multiple complex problems within Primary Care; as well as an infrastructure for home and institutional care.

  8. Aging society and gerontechnology: a solution for an independent living?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piau, A; Campo, E; Rumeau, P; Vellas, B; Nourhashémi, F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies report that the majority of older adults wish to live in their own homes, for as long as possible. This creates a growing interest in technologies to enable older people to remain living independently at home. The purpose of this article is to provide a narrative review of current technology appropriate for older adults' home use. The key research questions were as follow: 1- What is the evidence demonstrating that gerontechnologies are effective in enabling independent living? 2- What are devices designed specifically for frail elderly persons ? Several publications were identified about devices targeting social isolation (videophonic communication, affective orthotic devices or companion-type robots, personal emergency response systems [security]), autonomy loss (technologies for maintenance of autonomy in the activities of daily living) and cognitive disorders (cognitive orthotics, wandering management systems, telemonitoring). Very few articles dealt specifically with the frail older person. In particular, there was extremely limited evidence on use and efficacy of these devices within this population. There is a need to obtain a consensus on definition of the technologies, and also to revisit work strategies and develop innovative business models. To meet this goal, we need to create a network of technological companies, aging services organizations, end-users, academics, and government representatives to explore the real needs of the frail older population and to develop and validate new devices promoting aging at home. PMID:24402399

  9. Behavioral and emotional problems reported by parents of children ages 6 to 16 in 31 societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rescorla, L.; Achenbach, T.; Ivanova, M.Y.;

    2007-01-01

    This study compared parents' ratings of behavioral and emotional problems on the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) for general population samples of children ages 6 to 16 from 31 societies (N = 55,508). Effect sizes for society ranged from .03 to .14. Effect...... sizes for gender were ≤ .01, with girls generally scoring higher on Internalizing problems and boys generally scoring higher on Externalizing problems. Effect sizes for age were ≤ .01 and varied across types of problems. Total Problems scores for 19 of 31 societies were within 1 SD of the overall mean...... of 22.5. Bisociety correlations for mean item scores averaged .74. The findings indicate that parents' reports of children's problems were similar in many ways across highly diverse societies. Nonetheless, effect sizes for society were larger than those for gender and age, indicating the need to take...

  10. HOW COULD HOSPITALS ACT IN AN AGEING SOCIETY?

    OpenAIRE

    Leuca Mirela

    2011-01-01

    The demographic changes are of great importance for all European societies. Their impact and effects have multiple, deep facets. Each European healthcare and welfare system will be facing considerable changes in the new demographic context. The hospital sector plays an important role in each health system. This paper focuses on the impact of the demographic changes on hospitals, presents and analyzes statistical data for the German hospitals sector in order to underline the importance of the ...

  11. "It's your badge of inclusion": the Red Hat Society as a gendered subculture of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E; Pai, Manacy; Redmond, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    Although studies document the health-enhancing effects of social engagement, they reveal little about the underlying mechanisms operating within specific organizational contexts. Limited attention is given to the role of inequality--particularly age and gender--in shaping either the organizations to which we belong or their consequences for our well-being. We address this issue by examining the Red Hat Society, a social organization for middle-aged and older women. Interviews with members (n=52) illustrate how age and gender inequality interact to shape the organization, which can be viewed as a gendered subculture of aging. Drawing on this framework, we discuss four processes through which participation generates benefits for older women involved in age- and gender-segregated organizations: enhancing social networks, countering invisibility, creating positive frames for aging experiences, and promoting youthful identities.

  12. Ageing Polulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen Trankjær; Bech, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    An ageing society is characterised by an increasing median age of the population. The purpose of this chapter is to document the existing knowledge about the association between population ageing and health care expenditure, and to supplement this overview by a summary of our original research. S...

  13. Population Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Weil, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Population aging is primarily the result of past declines in fertility, which produced a decades long period in which the ratio of dependents to working age adults was reduced. Rising old-age dependency in many countries represents the inevitable passing of this %u201Cdemographic dividend.%u201D Societies use three methods to transfer resources to people in dependent age groups: government, family, and personal saving. In developed countries, families are predominant in supporting children, w...

  14. Low carbon thermal technologies in an ageing society – What are the issues?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a commentary on the theme of this special issue, low carbon thermal technologies and older age, and the Conditioning Demand project. Drawing on the project findings, I discuss some key aspects of ageing that are relevant to the roll-out of low carbon technologies in domestic settings in ageing, developed societies. These include biological, cognitive, institutional and social dimensions. I conclude with some suggestions for ways of working to maximise the potential benefits of low carbon thermal technologies for older people. -- Highlights: •The specific needs of older people must be considered in low carbon transitions. •The vulnerability discourse however dominates in a way which is unhelpful. •Some physiological aspects of ageing affect person-technology fit. •Cultural aspects influence the success of integration of LCTs into domestic settings. •More inclusive design is needed if older people are to benefit from LCTs

  15. Library Trends in the Aging Society: Library Services for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ju L. Chang

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The coming of aging societies is a global trend and Taiwan is included as one of the aging societies, according to United Nations’ criteria. There are many social, educational, and medical issues ahead and much research is needed to form the proper policies and decision-making. This article traces the establishment and development of gerontology internationally, especially the responses from the American Library Association in forming the policies to serve the older population in recent years in the light of such social movement. The author concludes the paper with suggestions of the areas that library professionals need to consider for better services to the seniors in the future. [Article Content in Chinese

  16. Gestational age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ...

  17. Climate hazards, adaptation and "resilience" of societies (early Little Ice Age, west of France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athimon, Emmanuelle; Maanan, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Over the past ten to fifteen years, climate hazards and adaptation have received more attention due to the current climate change. Climate historians have gathered strong evidence that the world's climate has evolved over the past millennium and one of the most significant changes took place during the Little Ice Age. Recently, a set of questions has emerged: what were the effects of the Little Ice Age on human's societies? How did humans adapt to these climate changes? How did they react to extreme weather-related events? Using examples of climate hazards from the West of France during the beginning of the Little Ice Age (xivth-xviith centuries) such as storms, flooding, drought, harsh winters, the poster aims at showing how the past societies can constitute a source of inspiration for present ones. Through schemas, this research exposes the system's rebound capacity, points out the importance of the historical depth in research on human's adaptation and resilience and shows the value of integrating a historical approach. It reveals that History contributes to the knowledge of the relationship between societies and climate hazards. Data on climate hazards and adaptation of societies stem from historical sources such as chronicles, diaries, books of accounts, records of cities repairs. To protect themselves and their goods, medieval and modern societies had developed specific skills, practices and strategies. From the xivth to the xviiith century, there is an increase of defense by dikes in the low Loire, as for example the construction of those amongst Longué and Ponts-de-Cé between the early xivth century and 1407. The French kingdom's authorities also tried increasingly to provide technical, material, logistical and fiscal support: for instance, during the winter 1564-1565, several bridges have been destroyed by a river flooding in Nantes. The King Charles IX then offered to people of Nantes part of the funds from taxes on the main activities such as the

  18. ICT – An Agent of Change That Can Enrich a „Society of All Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena IANCULESCU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Demographic developments, including an aging population, change pathological models and pressures on health systems sustainability of the European Union. ICT can play a significant role in approaching these challenges because they allow the management and providing of health and social services more efficiently. Health informatics systems have the potential to play an important role in achieving well- being, independent living and delaying of the aging process and restoring the vitality of the mature body. The „Multidisciplinary Complex System for the Efficient Management of the Anti-Aging information (AgingNice” creates favourable conditions for the participation of all at the Information Society. AgingNice allows the sharing of the knowledge concerning the specific research and the promotion of the theoretical and practical information, both among the stakeholders from the medical area and at the citizen’s level. „Informational Centre of Dermatology (CID” is a complex system that has as target to achieve a modern informatics tool able to centralize in a single point a variety of web services and information classified by user’s type. Both health informatics systems demonstrate how ICT can improve the dissemination of health information, knowledge, comprising the users’ motivation concerning educational content and its new promoting methods.

  19. Forecasting Japan's physician shortage in 2035 as the first full-fledged aged society.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Yuji

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Japan is rapidly becoming a full-fledged aged society, and physician shortage is a significant concern. The Japanese government has increased the number of medical school enrollments since 2008, but some researchers warn that this increase could lead to physician surplus in the future. It is unknown how many physicians will be required to accommodate future healthcare needs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We simulated changes in age/sex composition of the population, fatalities (the number of fatalities for the consecutive five years, and number of physicians from 2010 to 2035. Two indicators were defined: fatalities per physician and fatalities by physician working hour, based on the data of the working hours of physicians for each tuple of sex and age groups. We estimated the necessary number of physicians in 2035 and the number of new physicians to maintain the indicator levels in 2010. RESULTS: The number of physicians per 1,000 population is predicted to rise from 2·00 in 2010 to 3·14 in 2035. The number of physicians aged 60 years or older is expected to increase from 55,375 (20% of physicians to 141,711 (36%. In 2010 and 2035, fatalities per physician were 23·1 and 24·0 for the total population, and 13·9 and 19·2 for 75 years or older, respectively. Fatalities per physician working hour are predicted to rise from 0·128 to 0·138. If working hours are limited to 48 hours per week in 2035, the number of fatalities per physician working hour is expected to be 0·196, and the number of new physicians must be increased by 53% over the current pace. DISCUSSION: The number of physicians per population continues to rise, but the estimated supply will not fulfill the demand for healthcare in the aging society. Strategies to increase the number of physicians and improve working conditions are urgently needed.

  20. Home educating in an extended family culture and aging society may fare best during a pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Dawson

    Full Text Available Large cities can contain populations that move rapidly from one section to another in an efficient transportation network. An emerging air-borne or contact based pathogen could use these transportation routes to rapidly spread an infection throughout an entire population in a short time. Further, in many developed countries, the aging population is increasing. The family structure in these societies may also affect the course of a disease. To help understand the impact of an epidemic on family structure in a networked population, an individual based computer model that randomly generates networked cities with a specified range of population and disease characteristics and individual schedules, infectivity, transmission and hygiene factors was developed. Several salient issues emerged. First, a city of highly active individuals may in fact diminish the number of fatalities because the average duration of the interactions between agents is reduced. Second, home schooling can significantly improve survival because the institutional clustering of weak individuals is minimized. Third, the worst scenario for an aging population is the nuclear family where the aged population is confined to large housing facilities. Naturally, hygiene is the first barrier to infection. The results suggest that societies where extended families and small groups manage most of their own affairs may also be the most suitable for defense against a pandemic. This may prove applicable in city planning and policy making.

  1. Childhood and its Age Limits in Society of Getmanat in the XVIII Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Serdiuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article will talk about the child in society of Hetman – the autonomous entity within the Russian Empire, which was rapidly losing the remnants of autonomy in the second half of the XVIII century, subjecting to the desire of the center to modernize and unify its border territory. Such interaction of traditions and innovations influenced the public's worldview and determined the attitude to the family, marriage, child. These topics are still relatively poorly studied in the Ukrainian material, particularly the problems of childhood. The studies of actually "little man" in Ukraine of XVIII century are made virtually from a clean slate and at the beginning it is necessary to determine whom society is considered as a child, and also when the childhood is ended. This issue is harder than it seems at first glance, because the society of Hetmanate in relation to children was guided by the stratagem of folk traditions, religious norms, the "old" law (the Lithuanian Statute, the Magdeburg right and sachsenspiegel inherited from the Commonwealth and the "new" laws of the Russian Empire. They determined the age of adulthood in different ways, when the individual became a child and was no longer to be, as well as the criteria of those age limits. It is important that the legal mechanisms of age-identification included in the action in the case of judicial proceedings, property disputes, marital conflicts. On a daily level, the perception of childhood and maturity depended on the combination of external features of an individual (body type, facial features, etc., conduct, and perform social roles. A huge role is played the institution of marriage, act of which was probably the most important and revealing marker of the fact that the kid finally became an adult.

  2. Home care for an aging society: Why it’s needed; how it can be effective

    OpenAIRE

    Chappell, Neena

    2012-01-01

    This video clip comprises the IRPP Keynote Address: “Home care for an aging society: Why it’s needed; how it can be effective” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Neena Chappell, Professor, University of Victoria. It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people ...

  3. Population aging in Albanian post-socialist society: Implications for care and family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meçe Merita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Population aging is becoming an inevitable phenomenon in Albanian post-socialist society, posing multi-faceted challenges to its individuals, families and society as a whole. Since 1991, the Albanian population has been exposed to intensive demographic changes caused by unintended aspects of socio-economic transition from a planned socialist economy to a market-oriented capitalist one (Hoff, 2008. Ongoing processes of re-organization of social institutions increased its socio-economic insecurity leading to the application of various coping mechanisms. While adjusting themselves to other aspects of life, people changed their decisions of having children and leaving the country (Hoff, 2008. On the other hand, replacement of former traditional extended family forms with diverse living arrangements and family structures has been the outcome of the combination of three factors: falling fertility, increasing life expectancy and increasing migration (INSTAT, 2014.

  4. Age management

    OpenAIRE

    Kratochvilová, Markéta

    2014-01-01

    The Bachelor‘s thesis focuses on Age Management and its areas of influence. This term is most often discussed in connection with a problem which is currently common for all European Union countries – the ageing of society. In the near future, the structure of society is very likely to be altered drastically as a consequence of this phenomenon and due to the severity of the effects, it is necessary to begin addressing this problem. The first part of the thesis concerns itself with processing d...

  5. Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  6. Age relations of cardiovascular risk factors in a traditional Melanesian society: the Kitava Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeberg, S; Berntorp, E; Nilsson-Ehle, P; Terént, A; Vessby, B

    1997-10-01

    This study examined cross-sectional age relations of blood pressure, anthropometric indexes, serum lipids, and hemostatic variables in 203 subsistence horticulturists aged 20-86 y in Kitava, Trobriand Islands, Papua New Guinea. The population is characterized by extreme leanness (despite food abundance), low blood pressure, low plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity, and rarity of cardiovascular disease. Tubers, fruit, fish, and coconut are dietary staples whereas dairy products, refined fat and sugar, cereals, and alcohol are absent and salt intake is low. Although diastolic blood pressure was not associated with age in Kitavans, systolic blood pressure increased linearly after 50 y of age in both sexes. Body mass index decreased with age in both sexes. Serum total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B increased in males between 20 and 50 y of age, whereas high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I decreased. There were no significant differences in these indexes with age in the few females studied. A slight linear age-related increase of lipoprotein(a) was present in males. Plasma fibrinogen, factor VII clotting activity, factor VIII clotting activity, and von Willebrand factor antigen increased with age in both sexes but plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity did not. The modest or absent relations between the indexes measured and age are apparently important explanations of the virtual nonexistence of stroke and ischemic heart disease in Kitava.

  7. Pension Systems and Pension Reform in an Aging Society. An Introduction to the Debate.

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, pension systems aim to fulfill a number of functions which include income security and consumption smoothing in old age, as well as income redistribution. The main rationale for pension reform lies in the interaction between current demographic trends (e.g. increasing old age dependency ratios) and the design of existing pension systems (particularly, the so called Pay-As-You-Go public systems). Under certain conditions, population aging can in fact undermine the ability of a p...

  8. Coordination among industry, academic society and regulatory body in the research on aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many activities for the coordinated research on aging management are reviewed, and examples of fruitful results are introduced according to the technical strategy map. Industry-Academia-Government exchanging system of the information each other on aging management was established for autonomy, diversity, collaboration. To clarify the concept of the role of industry, government and academia to address aging management without duplication algorithm is for the overall coordination of industrial and academic information and response issues, technological strategy map for aging management formulated. (author)

  9. Dementia before death in ageing societies--the promise of prevention and the reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Brayne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dementia and severe cognitive impairment are very closely linked to ageing. The longer we live the more likely we are to suffer from these conditions. Given population increases in longevity it is important to understand not only risk and protective factors for dementia and severe cognitive impairment at given ages but also whether protection affects cumulative risk. This can be explored by examining the effect on cumulative risk by time of death of factors found consistently to reduce risk at particular ages, such as education and social status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this analysis we report the prevalence of dementia and severe cognitive impairment in the year before death in a large population sample. In the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (a 10-y population-based cohort study of individuals 65 and over in England and Wales, these prevalences have been estimated by age, sex, social class, and education. Differences have been explored using logistic regression. The overall prevalence of dementia at death was 30%. There was a strong increasing trend for dementia with age from 6% for those aged 65-69 y at time of death to 58% for those aged 95 y and above at time of death. Higher prevalences were seen for severe cognitive impairment, with similar patterns. People with higher education and social class had significantly reduced dementia and severe cognitive impairment before death, but the absolute difference was small (under 10%. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing risk for dementia at a given age will lead to further extension of life, thus cumulative risk (even in populations at lower risk for given ages remains high. Ageing of populations is likely to result in an increase in the number of people dying with dementia and severe cognitive impairment even in the presence of preventative programmes. Policy development and research for dementia must address the needs of individuals who will continue to experience these

  10. From Zoomers to Geezerade: Representations of the Aging Body in Ageist and Consumerist Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Dupuis-Blanchard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on an analysis of representations of seniors in the media. In particular, we examine images of the bodies of seniors in the advertising campaigns promoting a product called Geezerade sold in Circle K convenience stores in the Atlantic provinces of Canada in the summer of 2011. We contrast these with images of seniors in the Canadian magazine Zoomer, formally CARP magazine, a magazine published by the Canadian Association of Retired People, a seniors advocacy organization. Following Goffman’s arguments in his seminal presidential address to the American Sociological Association, “the Interaction Order”, we take the position in this analysis that the body does not determine social practices but none-the-less the body is the sign vesicle that enables interaction. Concomitant however, while the images of bodies we see in the media do not determine the signs given and given off via bodily presentation, they none-the-less provide us with the categories by which we interpret those signs. We conclude that the images in the Geezerade campaign and Zoomer magazine represent a binary model of images of seniors that reflects ageist and classist assumptions about the bodies of seniors. Such a model limits the categories through which we understand the aging body and fails to account for the diversity of seniors’ bodies in society.

  11. Growth and welfare distribution in an Ageing society: An applied general equilibrium analysis for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Broer (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies the effects of the imminent ageing of the population on economic growth and the distribution of welfare in the Netherlands. It shows that in the current system of social security ageing leads to a considerable welfare loss for future generations. It discusses the effec

  12. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). METHO...

  13. Technical and Vocational Education and Training in an Ageing Society. Experts Meeting Proceedings (Adelaide, Australia, October 3-4, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom, Ed.; Maclean, Rupert, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most striking features of the modern world is its changing demographic profile. In almost any policy arena, the issue of demographic change (or ageing) sits alongside globalisation, climate change and the knowledge revolution as areas which are transforming societies, including the ways in which we organise and go about our work…

  14. Rural Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics View more Rural Aging The nation's population is aging, and with that change comes increased healthcare needs. ... Disease Control and Prevention report, The State of Aging and Health in America 2013 , the population 65 ...

  15. From Duty to Right: The Role of Public Education in the Transition to Aging Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Masao

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that currently advanced, aging economies experienced a qualitative change in the role of public education during the process of industrialization. In the early phases of the Industrial Revolution, public education was regarded as a duty that regulated child labor and thereby discouraged childbirth. As these economies developed and the population aged, younger generations came to view public education as a right, whereas older generations desirous of other public services bec...

  16. Lifestyle Modifications Versus Antihypertensive Medications in Reducing Cardiovascular Events in an Aging Society: A Success Rate-oriented Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Araki, Ryuichiro; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sato, Makiko; Takahashi, Sachiko; Suwa, Emi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is difficult to compare directly the practical effects of lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications on reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to compare the hypothetical potential of lifestyle modifications with that of antihypertensive medications in reducing CVD in an aging society using a success rate-oriented simulation. Methods We constructed a simulation model for virtual Japanese subpopulations according to sex and age at 10-year intervals from 40 years of age as an example of an aging society. The fractional incidence rate of CVD was calculated as the product of the incidence rate at each systolic blood pressure (SBP) level and the proportion of the SBP frequency distribution in the fractional subpopulations of each SBP. The total incidence rate was calculated by the definite integral of the fractional incidence rate at each SBP level in the sex- and age-specific subpopulations. Results If we consider the effects of lifestyle modifications on metabolic factors and transfer them onto SBP, the reductions in the total incidence rate of CVD were competitive between lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications in realistic scenarios. In middle-aged women, the preventive effects of both approaches were limited due to a low incidence rate. In middle-aged men and extremely elderly subjects whose adherence to antihypertensive medications is predicted to be low, lifestyle modifications could be an alternative choice. Conclusion The success rate-oriented simulation suggests that the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications or antihypertensive medications in preventing cardiovascular events largely depends on the baseline incidence rate and sex- and age-specific behavioral factors. PMID:27522993

  17. SOCIAL ECONOMY AND ACTIVE AGEING, AN INTEGRATED RESPONSE TO THE CHALLENGES OF MODERN SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura-Mihaela Alexandrescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles population ageing, a demographic phenomenon registering a rapid growth over the last decades in the modern world, including Romania, viewed here from the perspective of the efforts undertaken by countries to find solutions to curb its negative impact on social life.Conceptually, these solutions can be defined by the active ageing phrase and are operationally integrated in the social economy system, representing the focus of the present article which also includes the views of renowned scientific authorities. The world economic crisis and massive layoffs called for an evaluation of the efficiency of those active measures advocating for the professional insertion of the elderly. We recall here the decision taken by the European Union leadership to declare 2012 as “The European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations”.The interest in the field of social economy has increased due both to “acknowledging the limits of traditional public and private sectors in responding to today’s labour market challenges, and to the quality and quantity of the collective interest services” (European Parliament, Report on social economy”, 2009, p. 15. In light of this, understanding and capitalizing on the potential of social economy is essential and one of the solutions which appears to be most frequently mentioned. The article also covers the trends in population ageing and social implications, as well as various European and global initiatives whose results support the conclusion that developing social economy represents, indeed, one of the main solutions, so far underexploited, to the ageing challenge, providing substance to the concept of active ageing.

  18. Population Aging in the European Information Societies: Towards a Comprehensive Research Agenda in eHealth Innovations for Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, Mihaela; Solé-Casals, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Population ageing is one of the major social and economic challenges of our contemporary societies. With the advent of the information society, new research and technological developments have been promoted in the field of assistive technologies and information and communication technologies of benefit to elderly people. This article examines the potentialities of new informatics developments in generating solutions to better address elderly people’s daily-life, especially those with chronic illness and/or low autonomy. The authours attempt to propose a research agenda, by exposing various strengts and weaknesses of eHealth innovations for elderly, mainly grounded in secondary sources analysis. PMID:27493837

  19. Population Aging in the European Information Societies: Towards a Comprehensive Research Agenda in eHealth Innovations for Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, Mihaela; Solé-Casals, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    Population ageing is one of the major social and economic challenges of our contemporary societies. With the advent of the information society, new research and technological developments have been promoted in the field of assistive technologies and information and communication technologies of benefit to elderly people. This article examines the potentialities of new informatics developments in generating solutions to better address elderly people's daily-life, especially those with chronic illness and/or low autonomy. The authours attempt to propose a research agenda, by exposing various strengts and weaknesses of eHealth innovations for elderly, mainly grounded in secondary sources analysis. PMID:27493837

  20. Arterial Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Park, Sung-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Arterial ageing is characterized by age associated degeneration and sclerosis of the media layer of the large arteries. However, besides ageing, clinical conditions, which enhance oxidative stress and inflammation act to accelerate the degree of arterial ageing. In this review, we summarized the pathophysiology and contributing factors that accelerate arterial ageing. Among them, we focused on hypertension, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and vascular inflammation which are modifiabl...

  1. Do aging societies reduce intergenerational justice and increase pro-elderly policy bias?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhuysse, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Wide across the Western world, people are living longer lives and having fewer children. This has led to larger shares of elderly voters, who, many fear, are becoming an immensely powerful political pressure group. But what are the effects of population aging on public policy? This article reviews...

  2. Pioneering farmers cultivating new lands in the North – The expansion of agrarian societies during the Neolithic and Bronze Age in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    Pioneering farmers cultivating new lands in the North – The expansion of agrarian societies during the Neolithic and Bronze Age in Scandinavia......Pioneering farmers cultivating new lands in the North – The expansion of agrarian societies during the Neolithic and Bronze Age in Scandinavia...

  3. Senior Living Lab: An Ecological Approach to Foster Social Innovation in an Ageing Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Angelini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Senior Living Lab (SLL is a transdisciplinary research platform created by four Universities that aims at promoting ageing well at home through the co-creation of innovative products, services and practices with older adults. While most living labs for ageing well are focused on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs, this social laboratory adopts a transdisciplinary approach, bringing together designers, economists, engineers and healthcare professionals to develop multiple forms of social innovation using participatory methods. The SLL is based on an ecological approach, connecting professionals and users in a cooperative network and involving all of the stakeholders concerned with ageing well, such as existing associations, business entities and policy-makers. Three main themes for the co-design of products and services were identified at the beginning of the SLL conception, each sustained by a major business partner: healthy nutrition to cope with frailty, improved autonomous mobility to foster independence and social communication to prevent isolation. This article shows the innovative transdisciplinary approach of the SLL and discusses the particular challenges that emerged during the first year of its creation, investigating the role of ICTs when designing products and services for older adults.

  4. Happy Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁秉中

    2009-01-01

    Aging is a normal physiological process in human life.The decline in the ability to repair and regenerate predisposes the aging person to develop disabling problems in the cardiovascular and skeletal systems.Full awareness of aging problems and advocations on the means to prevent their occurrence are mounting.European and US groups rely on scientific,target-oriented means to treat aging manifestations. Oriental medicine aims at prevention,using nutrition and exercise to maintain internal harmony.

  5. Creative Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Charlene Lee; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Explores some divergent attitudes toward aging, negative as well as positive. Presents a neurophysiological framework to support the belief that aging is an active and creative process. Explores physical, psychological, and sociological aspects, and identifies three factors in the creative aging process. (Author/JAC)

  6. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  7. Teaching in the Knowledge Society: Education in the Age of Insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Andy

    This book discusses challenges facing teachers in the knowledge society today, focusing on the changing world and the changing work of teaching. Seven chapters discuss: (1) "Teaching for the Knowledge Society: Educating for Ingenuity" (e.g., profiting from, developing, and teaching for the knowledge society); (2) "Teaching Beyond the Knowledge…

  8. Longevity and health expectancy in an ageing society: implications for public health in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Noale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While the prolongation of life expectancy is due to medical, economic, social and public health advancements, longevity may not necessarily be an indicator of real development. Epidemiologic data indicate, in fact, that advanced age carries the risk of multiple diseases, disability and loss of autonomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: How the years gained are lived need to be assessed evaluating quality of life, health status, and disability. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Good health care planning should aim to ensure that the years of life gained are lived in good health conditions in the light of the World Health Organization's declaration that "increased longevity without quality of life is an empty prize. Health expectancy is more important than life expectancy".

  9. Gender roles and social policy in an ageing society: the case of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiko Makita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the major underpinnings of the Japanese welfare state in the context of social care from a feminist perspective. In Japan, familycare responsibilities have traditionally been assigned to women; hence, care has long been a women’s issue. However, as the social contract of a male breadwinner and a “professional housewife” gradually fades out, Japanese women find more opportunities to renegotiate their caring roles. Of course, this social transformation did not occur in isolation, it was influenced by patterns in economic development, state policies and mainly demographic changes. All this has stimulated new state responses in the form of social welfare expansion that arguably aim to relieve women of the burdens of family-care. The issue remains, however, as to whether Japan would be able to recognise that the main structural issues of population ageing do not originate from demographic changes, but from a strict gendered division of labour and gender inequality.

  10. Prediction of Female Breast Cancer Incidence among the Aging Society in Kanagawa, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing number of elderly “baby boomers” in Japan, the number of cancer patients is also expected to increase. Approximately 2 million baby boomers from nearby local areas are residing in metropolitan areas; hence, the geographical distribution of cancer patients will probably markedly change. We assessed the expected number of breast cancer (BC) patients in different regions (urban, outer city, town, rural) using estimates of the nation’s population and Kanagawa Cancer Registry data. To estimate future BC incidence for each region, we multiplied the 2010 rate by the predicted female population for each region according to age group. The incidence cases of BC in those aged ≥65 years is expected to increase in all areas; in particular, compared to rates in 2010, the BC incidence in urban areas was predicted to increase by 82.6% in 2035 and 102.2% in 2040. Although the incidence in all BC cases in urban areas showed an increasing trend, until peaking in 2040 (increasing 31.2% from 2010), the number of BC patients would continue to decrease in other areas. The number of BC patients per capita BC specialist was 64.3 patients in 2010; this value would increase from 59.3 in 2010 to 77.7 in 2040 in urban areas, but would decrease in other areas. Our findings suggest that the number of elderly BC patients is expected to increase rapidly in urban areas and that the demand for BC treatment would increase in the elderly population in urban areas. PMID:27532126

  11. Skin aging:

    OpenAIRE

    Puizina-Ivić, Neira

    2008-01-01

    There are two main processes that induce skin aging: intrinsic and extrinsic. A stochastic process that implies random cell damage as a result of mutations during metabolic processes due to the production of free radicals is also implicated. Extrinsic aging is caused by environmental factors such as sun exposure, air pollution, smoking, alcohol abuse, and poor nutrition. Intrinsicaging reflects the genetic background and depends on time. Various expressions of intrinsic aging include smooth, ...

  12. Civil society: the catalyst for ensuring health in the age of sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Julia; Buse, Kent; Gordon, Case

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Development Goal Three is rightly ambitious, but achieving it will require doing global health differently. Among other things, progressive civil society organisations will need to be recognised and supported as vital partners in achieving the necessary transformations. We argue, using illustrative examples, that a robust civil society can fulfill eight essential global health functions. These include producing compelling moral arguments for action, building coalitions beyond the ...

  13. Civil society: the catalyst for ensuring health in the age of sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia; Buse, Kent; Gordon, Case

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Development Goal Three is rightly ambitious, but achieving it will require doing global health differently. Among other things, progressive civil society organisations will need to be recognised and supported as vital partners in achieving the necessary transformations. We argue, using illustrative examples, that a robust civil society can fulfill eight essential global health functions. These include producing compelling moral arguments for action, building coalitions beyond the health sector, introducing novel policy alternatives, enhancing the legitimacy of global health initiatives and institutions, strengthening systems for health, enhancing accountability systems, mitigating the commercial determinants of health and ensuring rights-based approaches. Given that civil society activism has catalyzed tremendous progress in global health, there is a need to invest in and support it as a global public good to ensure that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development can be realised. PMID:27424031

  14. Civil society: the catalyst for ensuring health in the age of sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia; Buse, Kent; Gordon, Case

    2016-07-16

    Sustainable Development Goal Three is rightly ambitious, but achieving it will require doing global health differently. Among other things, progressive civil society organisations will need to be recognised and supported as vital partners in achieving the necessary transformations. We argue, using illustrative examples, that a robust civil society can fulfill eight essential global health functions. These include producing compelling moral arguments for action, building coalitions beyond the health sector, introducing novel policy alternatives, enhancing the legitimacy of global health initiatives and institutions, strengthening systems for health, enhancing accountability systems, mitigating the commercial determinants of health and ensuring rights-based approaches. Given that civil society activism has catalyzed tremendous progress in global health, there is a need to invest in and support it as a global public good to ensure that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development can be realised.

  15. Matte Svart Kristiansen & Kate Giles (eds., Dwellings, Identities and Homes. European Housing Culture from the Viking Age to the Renaissance (Hojbjerg: Jutland Archeological Society, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hoeren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Book review of: Matte Svart Kristiansen & Kate Giles (eds., Dwellings, Identities and Homes. European Housing Culture from the Viking Age to the Renaissance (Hojbjerg: Jutland Archeological Society, 2014

  16. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat;

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due to the expo......UNLABELLED: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due...... to the exponential increase in life expectancy and environmental risks. Advances in medical research have identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological player in neovascular AMD and intraocular inhibition of VEGF as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The wide......, unresolved medicolegal debates about the use of off-label substances and overwhelming problems in large population management. The burden of disease has turned into a burden of care with a dissociation of scientific advances and real-world clinical performance. Simultaneously, ground-breaking innovations...

  17. The Scribal Society: An Essay on Literacy and Schooling in the Information Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Alan C.

    Elaborating on the complex nature of literacy from a social, epistemological, psychological, and pedagogical perspective, this book describes the group of people called the "scribal society." The book notes that scribes were (and still are) not simply people who can decode and encode written language, or "text"--scribes must also possess knowledge…

  18. Preschool Psychopathology Reported by Parents in 23 Societies: Testing the Seven-Syndrome Model of the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1.5-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Masha Y.; Achenbach, Thomas M.; Rescorla, Leslie A.; Harder, Valerie S.; Ang, Rebecca P.; Bilenberg, Niels; Bjarnadottir, Gudrun; Capron, Christiane; De Pauw, Sarah S. W.; Dias, Pedro; Dobrean, Anca; Doepfner, Manfred; Duyme, Michele; Eapen, Valsamma; Erol, Nese; Esmaeili, Elaheh Mohammad; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Frigerio, Alessandra; Goncalves, Miguel M.; Gudmundsson, Halldor S.; Jeng, Suh-Fang; Jetishi, Pranvera; Jusiene, Roma; Kim, Young-Ah; Kristensen, Solvejg; Lecannelier, Felipe; Leung, Patrick W. L.; Liu, Jianghong; Montirosso, Rosario; Oh, Kyung Ja; Plueck, Julia; Pomalima, Rolando; Shahini, Mimoza; Silva, Jaime R.; Simsek, Zynep; Sourander, Andre; Valverde, Jose; Van Leeuwen, Karla G.; Woo, Bernardine S. C.; Wu, Yen-Tzu; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test the fit of a seven-syndrome model to ratings of preschoolers' problems by parents in very diverse societies. Method: Parents of 19,106 children 18 to 71 months of age from 23 societies in Asia, Australasia, Europe, the Middle East, and South America completed the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1.5-5 (CBCL/1.5-5). Confirmatory…

  19. Prevalence of premature ejaculation in young and middle-aged men in Korea: a multicenter internet-based survey from the Korean Andrological Society

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Jun; Park, Jong Kwan; Park, Kwangsung; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Sae-Woong; Yang, Dae Yul; Moon, Du Geon; Min, Kweon-Sik; Moon, Ki-Hak; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Hyun, Jae Seog; Park, Nam Cheol

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence and perception of premature ejaculation (PE) in young and middle-aged Korean men. The study was conducted using an Internet-assisted questionnaire. A total of 2 037 Korean male adults, aged 20 years or older, were randomly sampled based on age and residency. The questionnaire developed by the PE Study Group of the Korean Andrological Society includes four categories (overall sexual function, symptoms, distress and treatment) with a total o...

  20. Healthy Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Schans, Cees van der

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie gehouden bij de bijeenkomst voor het Regionaal Genootschap Fysiotherapie Het Noorden op 10 februari te Marum, over het belang van fysieke activiteit voor healthy ageing en de rol van de fysiotherapeut hierin

  1. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  2. A Respectable Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Clifford H.

    1983-01-01

    Contrasts the relatively abundant information on the young with the paucity of research knowledge on the aged, and asserts that psychologists have too few solutions to coping with the problems of aging. Suggests the integration of older adults into all aspects of society through structural change. (Author/AOS)

  3. Aging, Trade, and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Chisik, Richard; Onder, Harun; Qirjo, Dhimitri

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the role of demand-driven changes arising from population aging and how they affect the pattern of international trade as well as trade and immigration policy. An aging society can see a welfare-reducing reduction in its share of manufacturing output and this reduction is magnified by a decrease in trade costs (an increase in globalization). Immigration can ameliorate ...

  4. Biodemography of human ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W

    2010-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems to be...

  5. Aging and cosmetic enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Honigman, Roberta; David J. Castle

    2006-01-01

    Obsession with a youthful appearance has become commonplace in modern society and has resulted in an upswing in cosmetic procedures trying to reverse the aging process. We selectively review the literature on aging and cosmetic surgery, with particular regard for the aging face. We pay attention to psychosocial aspects of response to such cosmetic procedures, both in terms of outcome and with respect to risk factors for a poor outcome.

  6. Nursing care vehicles for future aged and welfare society; Kaigo sharyo-koreika/kodo fukushi shakai ni mukete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizaki, Y.; Yamagachi, M. [Deihatsu Mecor Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    While Japan is becoming a advanced aged and few children society, besides the welfare vehicles for public use and for various institutions, needs for home care, namely the personal use, increases rapidly. Therefore, it is expected that in the near future various welfare vehicles having different structures will be developed to meet to different uses and different needs. The welfare vehicles are roughly divided into two kinds as physically handicapped person self-operating vehicle, and nursing person operating and physically handicapped person boarding on vehicle. In this paper, the later, namely the nursing care vehicles, is introduced. As the nursing care vehicles used at present, transportation vehicles as wheelchair and stretcher, rotary sheet or a vehicle with a sheet lift, movable bath vehicle and other kind of care vehicles are explained respectively. At last, the functions which are required strictly for these nursing care vehicles are mentioned. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Age Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    The ages of rocks from the lunar highlands vary widely, even for a single rock sample. This makes it difficult to quantitatively test ideas for early lunar differentiation and formation of the crust. Lars Borg and Amy Gaffney (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), and Charles Shearer (University of New Mexico) have devised a set of guidelines to apply to geochronological data that leads to a relative ranking of the reliability of the age determined for a sample. Applying their guidelines to existing data for lunar highland rocks shows an upper limit on rock ages between 4340 and 4370 million years. This is essentially the same as the so-called model ages of the formation of KREEP (a chemical component enriched in potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorous) and of the formation of the deep source regions that melted to produce mare basalts. The numerous ages close to 4370 million years suggests a complicated and protracted cooling of the primordial lunar magma ocean or a widespread vigorous period of magmatic activity in the Moon.

  8. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    prevention strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful......Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...

  9. Aging Secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  10. Age Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for treating age spots include: Improved appearance. Enhanced self-esteem. Promotion of better skin health. What you need ... 480px View Render 320px View Connect with ASDS: Facebook LinkedIn YouTube Twitter Quick Links About ASDS Advocacy ...

  11. Aging perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosco, T.D.; Brehme, D.; Grigoruta, N.; Kaufmann, L.K.; Lemsalu, L.; Meex, R.C.R.; Schuurmans, A.T.; Sener, N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of successful ageing (SA) research, the literature is dominated by researcher-driven Anglophone conceptualisations. To date, lay perspectives of SA have not been examined in Europe or Turkey. The current study aims to conduct a mixed-methods examination of conceptualisation

  12. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Derks, Marloes G M; Tellier, Siri;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: We performed a novel, hypothesis-free and quantitative analysis of citation networks exploring the literature on successful ageing that exists in the Web of Science Core Collection Database using the CitNetExplorer software. Outcomes were visualized using timeline-based citation patterns...

  13. Biology of cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, F F; Wilson, J; Blesch, K S; Kaesberg, P R; Miller, R; Sprott, R

    1991-12-01

    The greatest risk factor for cancer is aging. Human cancer incidence increases exponentially with advancing age. Cancer growth rate and potential for metastatic spread may be influenced by age-specific change in host response. Because cancer and aging are, thus, inextricably linked, the American Cancer Society should encourage submission of research proposals that address the mechanisms of aging and how aging alters cancer development.

  14. Environmental Changes and Social Vulnerability in an Ageing Society: Portugal in the Transition from the 20th to the 21st Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Guardado Moreira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main structural changes human societies are actually facing relies on demographic ageing process, with strong impacts on health system and quality of life. Social and environmental factors can be used as predictors for health conditions, functional and cognitive autonomy, wellbeing and satisfaction on older ages. Reduced incomes, low educational level, situation of loneliness, can also be pointed as predictive factors of a major and premature deterioration of health. The adaptation of social structures must be a priority for all ageing societies. Portugal will also have to find answers to these challenges. The main objective of this study is to understand the process of vulnerability and multiple dependency situations caused by changes in the Portuguese demographic structure, manly regarding old people, as concerns the following aspects: a levels of well-being in ageing regions determined by a statistical indicator; b specific health care and long-term care.

  15. Après Nous le Déluge? Direct Democracy and Intergenerational Conflicts in Ageing Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlfeldt, Gabriel; Maennig, Wolfgang; Steenbeck, Malte

    2016-01-01

    To assess the likely effects of population ageing on the outcomes of direct democracy, we analyze the effect of age on voting decisions in public referenda. To this end, we provide the first quantitative review of the literature and a case study of the Stuttgart 21 referendum on one of the largest infrastructure projects in Germany. The evi-dence suggests that intergenerational conflicts arising from population ageing will likely be limited to areas in which the net present value differs part...

  16. 老龄社会对标准化的需求及对策研究%Requirements of Aging Society for Standardization and Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海霞

    2011-01-01

    Global societies are facing a more and more intensified population aging trend. Using standards as a mean of meeting challenges and requirements of aging society is highly concerned by international standardization organizations and some countries. This paper firstly analyzes the requirements from aging society that standardization is facing, and then reviews standardization status in aspect of standard amount related to the aged. Finally puts forward some countermeasures for Chinese administrative bodies and other stakeholders to use the mean of standardization to meet the aging society requirements.%全球社会正面临着人口老龄化不断加剧的发展形势,如何有效应用标准的手段应对老龄化社会带来的种种问题与挑战、满足老龄社会的需求,已经受到了国际标准化组织以及一些国家的高度关注.文章分析了老龄社会对标准化的需求,以及国内外涉及老年人需求的标准化情况,在此基础上提出了我国应对老龄社会的标准化对策建议.

  17. Golden Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      Sometimes, a moment can announce the end of an age. The gold market is like that. Within two transaction days, the gold slumped by 13%and saw a 25%tumble from the high point in August 2011. According to the classic investment theory, a 20%-above decline means the shift from“a bull”to“a bear”market.   The super bear market of gold has lasted a dozen years. But the bull-to-bear shift was completed within only 20 minutes. Wall Street’s analysts and ordinary Chinese people had different understandings to the golden age.   Expecting a bear market, Wall Street continuously dumped gold, resulting in a diving of gold price. Seeing the benefits, leisure Chinese madams made a gold rush, causing a slight bounce of gold price. On April 23, renowned investment bank Goldman Sachs suspended the short sale. So,“Chinese aunts”beating back Wall Street’s analysts became the hottest topic online for the time being.   What are the decisive factors for the crash of gold price? Will the gold market complete a real bull-to-bear shift? Will the golden age of gold be farther or nearer?

  18. New concept of age(ing: Prospective age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devedžić Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the last century was the century of world population growth, according to demographers, the XXI century will be century of population aging. Statistics undoubtedly show that number of elderly will continue it’s growth in the future. If old age is seen as period of life with reduced physical and mental capabilities and increased disability, and demographic aging as increase of dependent population, trends are quite disturbing, at least in certain societal segments. In developed countries, this population category is no longer treated as passive or as a "burden of society" and efforts are made for better social inclusion of older people. In contrast to growing interest in this phenomenon, the concepts that define the aging of the population remained stagnant. The aim of this paper is to introduce into domestic literature the term "prospective age" as a dynamic category which is more affected with socio-historical conditions, not only with biological as traditional definition of aging suggested. Papers written by Sanderson and Scherbov offer new methodological options for study of population aging, because it takes into account the biometric rather than chronological approach. Calculation of prospective years is a simple operation that requires pair of the same number of remained life expectancy from life tables for two different periods (the year of concern is index, and the one we are comparing with is standard year, so that phrase "40s is the new 30s" or "70s the new 60s" gets scientific foundation. Average remaining years of life represent a realistic indicator suggesting increased capacity, activity and vitality of individuals, which is due to accepted demographic parameters still considered old. „Prospective threshold“ is defined as the age when life expectancy falls below 15 years (it is subjective choice made by Sanderson and Scherbov, which is also used in this paper and during the elaboration of these ideas three demographic

  19. Aging Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore D Cosco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the proliferation of successful ageing (SA research, the literature is dominated by researcher-driven Anglophone conceptualisations. To date, lay perspectives of SA have not been examined in Europe or Turkey. The current study aims to conduct a mixed-methods examination of conceptualisations of SA in seven underrepresented countries. Using snowball sampling via social media sites, an online survey consisting of established closed-ended and open-ended items – translated into seven languages – was administered. Grounded theory methods and descriptive statistics were used to analyse qualitative and quantitative data, respectively.

  20. Ice ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Earth's climate undergoes great changes in cycles of 104 to 105 years. Deep sea sediments contain proof of these changes. The critical parameter is the O18/O16 isotope ratio. The astronomical theory is discussed of ice ages based on the changes in the shape of the Earth's orbit around the sun. Forecasts for the future are given - in the coming years the climate is expected to get warmer owing to increased CO2 levels in the atmosphere, and then a long cooler period is expected to follow. (M.D.)

  1. Aging Blepharoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inchang Cho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In performing upper blepharoplasty in the elderly, looking younger and keeping the eyelidsharmonious with the rest of the face have to be achieved at the same time. The most importantgoal in upper blepharoplasty for aging is correcting the drooping upper eyelid skin, and inthis process, the surgeon may or may not create a double eyelid fold. The pros and cons haveto be fully discussed with the patient, but the author personally prefers creating a doublefold unless the patient refuses, because it is efficient in correcting and preventing furtherdrooping of the skin. In most patients, the brow is elevated to compensate for the droopingeyelid, and when the drooping is corrected, brow ptosis may ensue. The surgeon has to preparefor these consequences before performing the procedure, and estimate the exact amountof skin to be excised. In the elderly, the skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle is thin, with adecreased amount of subcutaneous fat and retro-orbicularis oculi fat, and in most cases,excision of the skin alone is enough to correct the deformity. Removing large portions ofsoft tissue may also prolong the recovery period. Unlike younger patients, the lower skinflap should not be stretched too much in the elderly, as it may create an aggressive lookingappearance. A few wrinkles in the lower flap should remain untouched to create a naturallook. In this article, the author’s own methods of performing an aging blepharoplasty aredescribed specifically, with a step-by-step guide and surgical tips.

  2. Unmaking old age : political and cognitive formats of active ageing.

    OpenAIRE

    Lassen, A.J.; Moreira, T.

    2014-01-01

    Active ageing is a policy tool that dominates the way the ageing society has been constituted during the last decades. The authors argue that active ageing is an attempt at unmaking the concept of old age, by engaging in the plasticity of ageing in various ways. Through a document study of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different form...

  3. Changing Attitudes towards Ageing and the Aged amongst Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Antonio; Goncalves, Daniela; Martin, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Society is ageing. In Europe, the ageing of the population is a recurrent and discussed theme. The impact of the ageing of the population is varied and transversal in different fields. The increase in the number of elderly people implies an increase in the levels of dependence and, consequently, more sanitary, physical, and human resources. Also,…

  4. Unmaking old age: political and cognitive formats of active ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Moreira, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    Active ageing is a policy tool that dominates the way the ageing society has been constituted during the last decades. The authors argue that active ageing is an attempt at unmaking the concept of old age, by engaging in the plasticity of ageing in various ways. Through a document study...... and political in the way they aim at unmaking both the structures and the expectations that has made old age and format a new ideal of the ‘good late life’. The paper examines the role of knowledge in policy and questions whether the formats of active ageing should be made to co-exist, or whether the diversity...... of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different formats. In the WHO, active ageing configures individual lifestyle in order to expand the plasticity of ageing...

  5. 当代纽约:从人口老龄化到老年友好型城市的转变%Modern New York:From Aging Society to Age-Friendly City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李胜

    2015-01-01

    纽约作为美国标志性城市,是公认的金融、传媒、文化及国际大都市。自1950年前后进入老龄化社会以来,该市老年人口在经济状况、族裔构成、地域分布、健康状况等方面表现出与全美相似但又独具特色的特征。在人口老龄化背景下,纽约经济、政治、社会各个方面均产生程度不一的影响。为了更好地应对这一挑战,纽约最终走向老年友好型城市的发展道路。%As one iconic city of United States and all over the world,New York City is always described as the financial,medi-a,cultural and international center. Around the 1950s,New York City became one aging society,part of whose characters of aging are coincident with those of American society. However,this city has some distinguishing features. Without doubt,aging population puts crucial and deep influences on New York City from all dimensions. In order to effectively address this chal-lenge,New York City moves towards one Age-Friendly city from the aging society.

  6. Nexus: Where science meets society [In an age of discovery and innovation, how can benefits be passed along?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and scientists play a vital role in society. The degree of influence wielded by scientific opinion, the reputation of scientific bodies for impartially rendered insight, the priority accorded to scientific research and education all have contributed to the success of nations. The frontiers of science have never looked more promising than they do today. Opportunities abound. From nanotechnology, to bioengineering, to terahertz imaging, to string theory, to space science, we are in an Age of Discovery and Innovation. The challenge is how to mine these opportunities for all they are worth to impact human health and welfare and security, and to have greater public understanding of, and respect and appreciation for, science. If we continue to invest in science and engineering research across a range of disciplines, develop human capital, engage on key public policy issues pro-actively and consistently, and engage the public in new, creative and respectful ways,we can heal rifts and address rising expectations worldwide.Terrorism and national security are top-of-the-mind issues in the US, and of concern worldwide. There are various technologies being used to identify and track potential terrorists. The public, especially in the US, has a general feeling of unease, while some worry about the effect of security measures on civil liberties, and others worry about the scientific community itself on the ease of communication and interaction with scientists worldwide for the advance of science. What is not clear is how comprehensively current vulnerabilities are assessed. This is where the scientific community can play a much needed role, and can contribute to a more open discussion, not of terrorist targets, or specifically how risk assessment is used, but at least that it is used. We cannot protect against everything. But, we can use risk assessment to deploy resources in an efficacious way, to track the right things, to aggravate people less, and to calm unnecessary

  7. Signal transduction, receptors, mediators and genes: younger than ever - the 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society focused on aging and immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society was held in Weimar, from October 28 to 30, 2009. Special focus of the 2009 conference was "Aging and Senescence", which was co-organized by the SFB 728 "Environmentally-Induced Aging Processes" of the University of Düsseldorf and the study group 'Signal Transduction' of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ. In addition, several other areas of signal transduction research were covered and supported by different consortia associated with the Signal Transduction Society including the long-term associated study groups of the German Society for Immunology and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and for instance the SFB/Transregio 52 "Transcriptional Programming of Individual T Cell Subsets" located in Würzburg, Mainz and Berlin. The different research areas that were introduced by outstanding keynote speakers attracted more than 250 scientists, showing the timeliness and relevance of the interdisciplinary concept and exchange of knowledge during the three days of the scientific program. This report gives an overview of the presentations of the conference.

  8. Population aging and legal retirement age

    OpenAIRE

    Lacomba, Juan Antonio; Lagos, Francisco Miguel

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of population aging on the preferred legal retirement age. What is revealed is the crucial role that the indirect ???macro??? effects resulting from a change in the legal retirement age play in the optimal decision. Two Social Security systems are studied. Under a defined contribution scheme aging lowers the preferred legal retirement age. However, under a defined pension scheme the retirement age is delayed. This result shows the relevance of correctly c...

  9. Emerging Trends in Family Caregiving Using the Life Course Perspective: Preparing Health Educators for an Aging Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, Elise K.; Adams, Rebecca; Morrison, Sharon; Strack, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background: As life expectancy and morbidity related to chronic disease increase, the baby boomers will be called upon to provide care to aging members of their family or to be care recipients themselves. Purpose: Through the theoretical lens of the life course perspective, this review of the literature provides insight into what characteristics…

  10. [Stroke and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, J; Maquet, P

    2014-01-01

    Stroke risk increases with aging and one third of ischemic strokes occurs in very elderly (> or = 80 years). These are responsible of two thirds of the overall stroke-related morbi-mortality. Stroke in very elderly differs from younger individuals by sex ratio (more women), risk factors (more atrial fibrillation and hypertension) and usually a worse functional outcome. Very elderly are likely to benefit from stroke unit care and early revascularisation treatments although they have historically been excluded from this urgent management. These issues are likely to worsen in the future with the increasing impact of stroke on our aging societies.

  11. 老龄化社会的住宅建筑设计研究%Research on the residential building design of aging society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红梅

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the present situation of our country has entered the aging society,discusses the main trend of endowment pattern in China under the trend of aging society transformation.To the elderly and special needs in physiological,psychological and social three aspects as the basis,in a safe,convenient,comfortable and healthy for the principle,from the external environment should be built with residential facilities to start,to the internal details of the design concept of residential,To study the design ideas and countermeasures suitable for our aging society of residential buildings.%本文针对我国已经进入老龄化社会的现状,探讨了老龄化社会转型趋势下中国养老模式的主流趋势。并以老年人在生理、心理、社会三方面的特殊需求为依据,以安全、便利、舒适和健康为原则,从老龄住宅外部环境应配建的设施入手,到老龄住宅的内部细节设计理念,研究探讨适合我国老龄社会的住宅建筑的设计思路与对策。

  12. An Age-Old Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An aging society is defined by the UN as one where 10 per- cent of its population are aged above 60 years or those 65 years old and above make up 7 percent of the whole popula- tion.By this definition,China became an aging society seven years ago. Currently,China is home to 145 milfion people aged 60 years and above,accounting for 11 percent of the country’s population; and this group is growing at a rate of over 3 percent,meaning the country now has a sharply increasing elderly population.

  13. Aging and Aged in Organized Crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Menachem

    1989-01-01

    Examines problems of the aged in organized crime, basing discussion on organized crime bosses over age 60 operating in Italy, the United States, and Israel. Looks at problems stemming from normative system in organized crime, role of the aged, intergenerational problems, fears of the aged, excuses and justifications, standards of life, and…

  14. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold H. Epstein, ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  15. Skin Care and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It ... if they bother you. See additional resources on aging skin, including information on treatment options, specific conditions, ...

  16. Unmaking old age: political and cognitive formats of active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Moreira, Tiago

    2014-08-01

    Active ageing is a policy tool that dominates the way the ageing society has been constituted during the last decades. The authors argue that active ageing is an attempt at unmaking the concept of old age, by engaging in the plasticity of ageing in various ways. Through a document study of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different formats. In the WHO, active ageing configures individual lifestyle in order to expand the plasticity of ageing, based on epidemiological and public health conventions. In the EU, active ageing reforms the retirement behaviour of populations in order to integrate the plasticity of ageing into the institutions, based on social gerontological and demographic conventions. These conventional arrangements are cognitive and political in the way they aim at unmaking both the structures and the expectations that has made old age and format a new ideal of the 'good late life'. The paper examines the role of knowledge in policy and questions whether the formats of active ageing should be made to co-exist, or whether the diversity and comprehensiveness enable a local adaptation and translation of active ageing policies.

  17. Fluvial landscapes - human societies interactions during the last 2000 years: the Middle Loire River and its embanking since the Middle Ages (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanet, Cyril; Carcaud, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    This research deals with the study of fluvial landscapes, heavily and precociously transformed by societies (fluvial anthroposystems). It aims to characterize i), fluvial responses to climate, environmental and anthropogenic changes ii), history of hydraulical constructions relative to rivers iii), history of fluvial origin risks and their management - (Program: AGES Ancient Geomorphological EvolutionS of the Loire River hydrosystem). The Middle Loire River valley in the Val d'Orléans was strongly and precociously occupied, particularly during historical periods. Hydrosedimentary flows are there irregular. The river dykes were built during the Middle Ages (dykes named turcies) and the Modern Period, but ages and localizations of the oldest dykes were not precisely known. A systemic and multi-scaled approach aimed to characterize i), palaeo-hydrographical, -hydrological and -hydraulical evolutions of the Loire River, fluvial risks (palaeo-hazards and -vulnerabilities) and their management. It is based on an integrated approach, in and out archaeological sites: morpho-stratigraphy, sedimentology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomatics, geochronology, archaeology. Spatio-temporal variability of fluvial hazards is characterized. A model of the Loire River fluvial activity is developed: multicentennial scale variability, with higher fluvial activity episodes during the Gallo-Roman period, IX-XIth centuries and LIA. Fluvial patterns changes are indentified. Settlement dynamics and hydraulical constructions of the valley are specified. We establish the ages and localizations of the oldest discovered dikes of the Middle Loire River: after the Late Antiquity and before the end of the Early Middle Ages (2 dated dykes), between Bou and Orléans cities. During historical periods, we suggest 2 main thresholds concerning socio-environmental interactions: the first one during the Early Middle Ages (turcies: small scattered dykes), the second during the Modern Period (levees: high

  18. Population Aging and Inventive Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Irmen, Andreas; Litina, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    This research empirically establishes and theoretically motivates the hypothesis that population aging has a hump-shaped effect on inventive activity. We estimate this hump-shaped relationship in a panel of 33 OECD countries over the period 1960-2012. The increasing part of the hump captures the awareness that population aging requires inventive activity to guarantee current and future standards of living. The decreasing part reflects the tendency of aging societies to lose dynamism and the w...

  19. Age Prejudice of 'Act Your Age.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzo, Zander

    1978-01-01

    Many life-style decisions are often adversely influenced by prejudicial attitudes, norms, and laws about age. The relationship between ways of thinking about developmental tasks and age prejudice is discussed. (Author)

  20. Avoiding Aging? Social Psychology's Treatment of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E.; Redmond, Rebecca; von Rohr, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Population aging, in conjunction with social and cultural transformations of the life course, has profound implications for social systems--from large-scale structures to micro-level processes. However, much of sociology remains fairly quiet on issues of age and aging, including the subfield of social psychology that could illuminate the impact of…

  1. Old age psychiatry in the modern age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James P

    2015-11-01

    Old age psychiatry services globally are under threat. The discipline enjoyed its heyday in the two decades bridging the millennium. More recently there has been a move to integrate old age services with those of working age adults, to create 'ageless' services. Evidence is beginning to accumulate that this is a bad idea.

  2. Age and Value Orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Kh. Kukubayeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with value orientations and their role in men’s lives, particularly, in young people’s lives. This notion was introduced by the American theoretical sociologist T. Parsons, one of the creators of modern theoretical sociology. The scientist made an attempt to construct the structural and analytical theory of social action, combining personal interests (needs and aims and situation, it takes place in. The issue of value orientations remains acute for psychology. Herein we have considered several most important works, relating to the considered issue. Age aspects of young people’s value orientations are of peculiar interest to us. When analyzing this phenomenon, one should take into consideration the psychological formations, inhere for a certain age. In fact every age has its unique structure, which may change when passing from one development stage to another. Basing on this fact, we’ve considered the values, depending on the age features of the youth, relying upon the works of the scientists, working with different categories of the youth, such as: teenagers, students, children of different nationalities. It is not surprising that most scientists have come to the conclusion that the chief role in value orientation belongs to a family, originates in relations with parents and teachers. The positive reinforcement to the future develops throughout life in accordance with a lifestyle of a family, society and political situation in a state.Life orientations as a type of value orientations show different types of young people’s preferences. Value structure of its consciousness has its own specific character, depending on the age peculiarities. The dynamics of the transition from one age to another is accompanied with the reappraisal of values, eventually, influencing the life strategy of the future generation

  3. Healthy Aging -- Sexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Sexual health Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) Sexual health ... to discuss with your doctor. Sexual Health and Aging: Keep the Passion Alive (Copyright © Mayo Foundation) - This ...

  4. National Council on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Center for Benefits Access Center for Healthy Aging Donate Skip to Content a A Menu Economic ... Seniors Home Equity Older Workers Money Management Healthy Aging Falls Prevention Chronic Disease Management Flu + You Aging ...

  5. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age and exercise ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry ... as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also reduce your risk of heart disease, ...

  6. Ageing and digital games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Sara Mosberg

    2016-01-01

    of the book is to examine, analyse and discuss: 1) What older adults do with digital games and what meanings the use of digital games take on in the everyday life of older adults; 2) How older adults are perceived by society in relation to digital games; 3) How play and games can be used both......Digital games are still to a great degree considered a medium mainly for young boys. However, available statistics on Western media use show that this is far from the case. Increasingly, people of all ages and genders play digital games, also older adults in their early 60s and beyond. The aim...

  7. The Significance of the Old Age Education in Harmonious Society%浅论和谐社会老年教育的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡玉霞

    2011-01-01

    老年人是党和国家宝贵的政治财富和精神财富,他们是社会和谐的重要因素。老年教育是实现学习型社会和终身教育体系的重要方面,因此要充分认识和谐社会发展老年教育的意义,提高老年人晚年生活质量,促进社会的和谐发展。%The senior citizen is the party and the national precious politics wealth and the spiritual wealth,they are the social har-monious important attributes.The old age education is realizes the study society and the lifelong education system's important as-pect,must therefore understand fully the harmonious social development old age education the significance,improves the senior citizen old age quality of life,the promotion society's accord development.

  8. Higher Education in the Philippines and Malaysia:The Learning Region in the Age of Knowledge-Based Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Symaco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the developing world, the notion of the knowledge society has elicited a response especially among higher education institutions (HEIs and the role of this sector in developing human resources that are able to adapt and compete in such a society has led to the recognition of the government. In the case of the Philippines and Malaysia, for the country to be 'knowledge-'‐economy ready', its HEIs must embrace and facilitate a technology-'‐based orientation. This paper will look at the role of higher education in both the Philippines and Malaysia in relation to the requirements of the 'knowledge-'‐based' driven economy and how this sector responds and adapts to the challenging call to 'modernise' in order to perform and maximise its contribution to such objectives. Issues relating to this trend are also examined.

  9. Spectral ageing a new age perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, S; Rawlings, Katherine M Blundell & Steve

    2002-01-01

    We present an up-to-date critique of the physical basis for the spectral ageing method. We find that the number of cases where this method may be meaningfully applied to deduce the ages of classical double radio sources is small indeed. This critique is much more than merely a re-expression of anxieties about the calibration of spectral ageing (which have been articulated by others in the past).

  10. THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY IN THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY: ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC RESEARCH IN THE AGE OF CORPORATE SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA CERNAT

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge society lies on the ruins of national culture that thought people to function in a single universal form of science. This type of society is tightly related to a post-national multicultural world that nourishes the erosion of classical (Kantian and Humboldian cultural and scientific foundations of the university. We are now witnessing it’s transformation into a “multiversity” dominated by the competitive international academic market for students and scholars and “commodified” knowledge. The fiscal crisis of publicly financed universities forced them to constantly pursue other forms of income, the industry being the most obvious solution. In the place of universities of reason and culture the drastic decrease of public funding generated the commercialization of the universities. This is because there is an “asymmetric convergence”: while universities are adopting corporate values and principles the industry itself is not influenced by the academic values and norms. The pursuit of knowledge for mere intellectual curiosity and also the conception of the knowledge as a public good have been abandoned in favor of applied research serving corporate interests. The resulting academic capitalism is far from being the best solution to budget cuts and this study is trying to highlight some of advantages but also the most important shortcomings of this present trend in our universities.

  11. Experiences and Revelations of Dealing with Population Aging in International Society%国际社会应对老龄化的经验和启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原新

    2015-01-01

    人口老龄化是全球共同的未来景象,发达国家老龄化进程超前于我国,应对老龄社会的许多创新做法和改革措施都值得我们学习和借鉴。在应对老龄社会方面,强调政府重视和经济社会政策顶层设计,鼓励生育和积极的移民方案,促进老年人力资源开发利用和老年社会参与;在应对老年人问题上,强调政府、市场、家庭和个人共同应对,不但要重视对老年特殊人群的保障,还要加强对全体老年人的保障,提倡医养结合,完善老年人健康和社会照护体系,在强化社会化养老基础上继续巩固家庭和居家养老,精细化分级服务,既关心特殊人群的养老,又关注健康人群的助老。%Population aging is a common future vision in the world. The Aging process in the developed country is ahead of that in China and their innovations and reform measures dealing with aging society deserve our learning. In the aspect of coping with aging society, it is emphasized that the government should attach importance to top-level design of economic and social policies, encourage childbirth and positive immigrant projects, and promote human resource development and social participation of the elderly. In the aspect of the solving elderly problem, it is emphasized that the government, market, families and the elderly themselves should face it together. We should not only pay attention to the safeguard for the special elderly, but also reinforce the security to all the old people. It is necessary to advocate “the combination of medical care and the pension”, complete health and social care system for the elderly, intensify social pension system and stabilize home-based care system, classify the services, achieve the aim that taking care for both the special group and the health group of the old at the same time.

  12. [Insomnia in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Reizo; Furuta, Hisakazu

    2009-08-01

    Alterations of sleep structure with aging are attributed to change of circadian sleep-wake system and decrease of daytime activity with aging. Prevalence of insomnia and use of sleeping pills increases with age. Physical and psychiatric conditions play important roles in poor sleep in old age, and restless legs syndrome and sleep disordered breathing increase with aging as well. Early and appropriate intervention to insomnia will contribute to improvement of health and quality of life in the elderly. PMID:19768939

  13. UV, stress and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic—also called "photo-aging"—resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on ...

  14. Productive aging: a feminist critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, M

    1992-01-01

    This essay offers a feminist perspective on the call for a "productive aging" society, and says that the movement provides an answer before we have systematically asked questions about the meaning of old age. An emphasis on productivity, among other things, can devalue relational activities, often inherent in women's roles, and certain older people-older women in particular. The author proposes a number of measures for the short term, so that society can be responsible to older women who need and want jobs, as well as ideas for more far-reaching change.

  15. Age determination of raccoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, G.A.; Sanderson, G.C.; Rogers, J.P.

    1970-01-01

    Age criteria, based on 61 skulls and eye lenses from 103 known-age captives, are described for separating raccoons (Procyon lotor) into eight age-classes as follows: young-of-the-year, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-7, > 7 years. Criteria studied were eye lens nitrogen, cranial suture closure, tooth wear and incisor cementum layers. Lens nitrogen increased rapidly up to 12 months of age, but at much reduced rate thereafter. Total lens nitrogen was useful only in separating young-of-the-year from adults. The closure sequence for five cranial sutures accurately divided the total known-age sample of males into seven groups, and the adults into five groups. The tooth wear criteria divided the known-age sample into five relative age groups, but aging of individuals by this method was inaccurate. Histological sectioning of known-age teeth was the best method of observing layering in the cementum tissue. The technique of basing estimation of age on cementum ring counts, although subjective, was accurate for aging individuals through their fourth year but tended to underestimate the age of animals over 4 years old. However, suture closure or tooth wear can be used to identify males over 4 years old. In field studies, technical difficulties limit the utility of age estimation by cementum layers. Maximum root thickness of the lower canine was accurate in determining the sex of individuals from 5 months to ,at least 48 months of age.

  16. Ageing and infertility: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasch, Juan

    2010-12-01

    In many modern societies, the proportion of women who delay childbearing beyond the age of 35 years has increased greatly in recent decades. They are falsely reassured by popular beliefs that advances in new reproductive technologies can compensate for the age-realted decline in fertility, but science cannot beat the biological clock. Age is the single most important determinant of male and female fertility, either natural or treated. The consequences of advancing maternal age are not only for the risk of natural and assisted conception, but also for the outcome of pregnancy. Female fertility has a 'best-before date' of 35, and for men, it is probably before age 45-50.

  17. Aging According to Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Uses Erik Erikson's work to discuss how biographies treat aging. Explores how developmental theorists observe biographical representations of the life cycle and its applicability to aging. (Author/BHK)

  18. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  19. Memory and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory and Aging Losing keys, misplacing a wallet, or forgetting someone’s name are common experiences. But for people nearing or over age 65, such memory lapses can be frightening. They wonder if they ...

  20. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Preemie > Corrected Age ...

  1. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  2. Components of aging

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline has been linked to a reduction in attentional resources that are assumed to result from alterations in the aging brain. A core ability that is subject to age-related decline is visual attention, which enables individuals to select the most important information for conscious processing and action. However, visual attention is considered a conglomerate of various functions and the specific components underlying age differences in performance remain little understo...

  3. Language and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Susan; Anagnopoulos, Cheryl

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the effects of aging on language usage focusing on three areas of exploration: (1) changes in language in relation to changes in other cognitive abilities, (2) the linguistic consequences of normal aging versus those of dementia and aphasia, and (3) age-group differences in patterns of conversational interaction. (67 references) (GLR)

  4. Peroxisomes in yeast ageing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by the progressive decline in cellular functions that eventually leads to death. In human, ageing is associated with several age-related diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Over the years, research performed in several simpler sho

  5. Age and Farmer Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Tauer, Loren W.

    1994-01-01

    Farmer productivity by age was estimated, allowing for differences because of efficiency and returns to scale. Using Census of Agriculture data, estimates vary by state, but returns to scale average 1.07. Efficiency increases average 4.5 percent every ten years of age, to the age interval 35 to 44, and then decreases at that same rate.

  6. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan; Strulik, Holger

    the representative consumer is subject to physiological aging. In modeling aging we draw on recent research in the fields of biology and medicine. The speed of the aging process, and thus the time of death, are endogenously determined by optimal health investments. We calibrate the model to US data and proceed...

  7. Hodgkin's disease and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    modality, stage, and total tumour burden, whereas age had no prognostic significance. With regard to death from Hodgkin's disease only age and total tumour burden had independent significance. The significance of age would seem to stem from the fact that some older patients could not be given adequate...

  8. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  9. Ageing Management of CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper introduced the ageing management of CARR, including the ageing management system, instances of ageing components, difficulties we met and follow up plan, and put forward some suggestions on strengthening and promoting ageing management. We hope to enhance international exchange and collaboration. It is a great challenge to do research on how to manage ageing effectively in the beginning of life, but it will enhance the safety of reactor operation, extend the life of the reactor and improve the quality of operation, making this work very meaningful

  10. UV, stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  11. UV, stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB).

  12. Can aging be 'drugged'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Celine E; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The engines that drive the complex process of aging are being identified by model-organism research, thereby providing potential targets and rationale for drug studies. Several studies of small molecules have already been completed in animal models with the hope of finding an elixir for aging, with a few compounds showing early promise. What lessons can we learn from drugs currently being tested, and which pitfalls can we avoid in our search for a therapeutic for aging? Finally, we must also ask whether an elixir for aging would be applicable to everyone, or whether we age differently, thus potentially shortening lifespan in some individuals. PMID:26646496

  13. Intergenerational Justice in Aging Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhuysse, Pieter

    I present the Intergenerational Justice Index (IJI) - a simple four-dimensional indicator developed with the Bertelsmann Stiftung in order to compare intergenerational justice in practice across 29 OECD member states. The unit of analysis is countries, and the IJI is a macro-level snapshot linked...

  14. Comparison of cable ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaček, Vít; Kohout, Tomáš

    2010-03-01

    Two cable types, which currently are used in nuclear power plants (NPP) and which are composed by jacket/insulation materials, i.e. PVC/PVC and PVC/PE, were exposed to accelerated ageing conditions, in order to simulate their behavior after 10 years in service. The cables were aged under two different test conditions: With relatively high accelerating ageing speed:Radiation ageing was carried out at room temperature at a dose rate of 2900 Gy/h, followed by thermal ageing at 100 °C. This accelerated ageing condition was fairly fast, but still in compliance with the standards. With moderate ageing speed:The radiation and thermal ageing was performed simultaneously (superimposed) at a dose rate of 2.7-3.7Gy/h and a temperature of 68-70 °C. Such a test condition seems to be very close to the radiation and temperature impact onto the cables in the real NPP service. Finally, mechanical properties were measured to characterize the ageing status of the cables. The purpose of this study was to compare degradation effects, derived from both ageing methods, and to demonstrate that results obtained from high values of accelerating parameters and from fast ageing simulation can be very different from reality. The observed results corroborated this assumption.

  15. PerformAge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine

    2012-01-01

    The accountability discourse made possible by the bio-power (Michel Foucault, 1976/1978:139)unfolds the different facets of the phenomenon of individual and societal aging as a new aging discourse represented by images of independence, social mobility, and agency (Stephen Katz ans Debbie Laliberte...... a uniformly rosy picture of aging and old age, but unfold an opening up of life taking the heroines and heroes of aging life to the open road in search of themselves and new roles in life as a quest of self-knowledge, self-development – a role for the future. Different viewpoints enabling readers to identify...... closely with the aging self in motion – a life still in becoming as PerformAge....

  16. Active ageing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    of physical and productive activity; e.g. that a game of billiards is a technology of active aging. Thus, active aging is enacted in the socio-material practices of the technologies in this paper. The paper contributes with a strengthening of the concept of active aging, by focusing on entangled practices......In the recent decade the concept of active aging has become important in the Western hemisphere. The World Health Organization and The European Union have staged active aging as a core policy area and initiated programs of physical activity, independence and prolonged working lives among...... the elderly. As part of this rearticulation of old age, many new technologies take form. This paper uses a wide concept of technologies (devices, regimes, strategies and ways of doing) and argues that technologies form active aging subjectivities, and on the other hand, that these subjectivities...

  17. Ages of young stars

    CERN Document Server

    Soderblom, David R; Jeffries, Rob D; Mamajek, Eric E; Naylor, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Determining the sequence of events in the formation of stars and planetary systems and their time-scales is essential for understanding those processes, yet establishing ages is fundamentally difficult because we lack direct indicators. In this review we discuss the age challenge for young stars, specifically those less than ~100 Myr old. Most age determination methods that we discuss are primarily applicable to groups of stars but can be used to estimate the age of individual objects. A reliable age scale is established above 20 Myr from measurement of the Lithium Depletion Boundary (LDB) in young clusters, and consistency is shown between these ages and those from the upper main sequence and the main sequence turn-off -- if modest core convection and rotation is included in the models of higher-mass stars. Other available methods for age estimation include the kinematics of young groups, placing stars in Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, pulsations and seismology, surface gravity measurement, rotation and activ...

  18. Aging male syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valer Donca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging Male Syndrome is a medical condition through which men could pass between the ages of 35 and 65, when testosterone levelsin their body decline considerably. Androgen deficiency in the aging male has become a topic of increasing interest and debate throughout theworld. In contrast to female menopause, the process of aging in the male genital system is slow and highly variable between individuals. Thecharacteristic symptoms of Aging Male Syndrome include weakness, depression, fatigue and changes in body hair and skin, decreased sexualdesire, decreased lean body mass accompanied by increased visceral fat, decreased bone mineral density. Aging Male Syndrome is usually diagnosedby testing the blood for testosterone levels. The usual treatment method for Aging Male Syndrome includes testosterone injections,testosterone patches, testosterone gels and oral preparations.

  19. 老龄社会生育政策新内涵%New Connotation of Family Planning Policy in Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡乃军; 于淼

    2013-01-01

    在老龄社会,生育政策必须与国家人力资源发展规划相匹配。本文运用人口数据建立老龄化的时间表,代入计划生育政策变量,建立预测和分析模型,观察其对人口总量和人口结构的影响,论证了二胎间隔生育政策的必要性。继而运用典型案例分析方法进一步证明二胎间隔生育政策的可行性,由此推论生育政策内涵从“节制生育”到“调节人口结构和控制总量”的新内涵转变及其实现路径。%In aging society, family planning policy must be matched to the national human resource development planning. To demonstrate the necessity of the two-child policy, this paper first uses population data to form an aging timetable and establish the forecasting and analytical model to observe the impact of family planning policy on total population and population structure. Then the paper further demonstrates the feasibility of two-child policy by a case study. Based on the above analysis, one can draw a conclusion that the connotation of family planning policy should be changed from“birth control”to“adjusting population structure and controlling the total population”. Finally, the ways of implementation are discussed.

  20. Menopause accelerates biological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Chen, Brian H; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D J; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Horvath, Steve

    2016-08-16

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the "epigenetic clock"), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  1. EPL comes of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jérome, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-one years have now passed since the launch of Europhysics Letters which merged the physics letters journals of two learned societies: Journal de Physique Lettres and Lettere al Nuovo Cimento belonging, respectively, to the French Physical Society (SFP) and to the Italian Physical Society (SIF). This new journal was also supported by the UK Institute of Physics (IOP) and many other National Physical Societies, members of the European Physical Society (EPS). The aim of this merger was expressed by the words of G. H. Stafford, the President of EPS in 1985, for whom Europhysics Letters marked `an important milestone in the progress towards greater unity in Europe' which began with the creation of the European Physical Society nearly twenty years earlier. Europhysics Letters was supposed to be a strong European-based journal for the publication of short important communications covering all domains of physics under the supervision and the scientific control of EPS. In 2007, 21 years later, Europhysics Letters has now come of age and the Board of Directors, under the control of EPS, has decided to mature the journal, now re-branded as EPL and characterized by a new cover design and a new printed format, thus encouraging development into a top-tier journal, a leading global home for ground-breaking physics research letters. The objective is to make EPL a high-impact physics journal leading towards an increase in visibility, impact, prestige, scientific quality, reputation and impact factor although all scientists are currently aware that the presentation of impact factors must be taken with a grain of salt. A new publishing contract amongst the EPL partners will directly involve, besides EDPS (the publishing company of SFP) and SIF, the Institute of Physics through its publishing department (IOP Publishing) in a more active role, its task being hosting the on-line facilities of the journal. The combined publishing expertise and marketing knowledge of EDPS, IOP

  2. Mitochondria and the aging heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ketul R Chaudhary; Haitham El-Sikhry; John M Seubert

    2011-01-01

    The average human life span has markedly increased in modern society largely attributed to advances in medical and therapeutic sciences that have successfully reduced important health risks.However,advanced age results in numerous alterations to cellular and subcellular components that can impact the overall health and function of an individual.Not surprisingly,advanced age is a major risk factor for the development of heart disease in which elderly populations observe increased morbidity and mortality.Even healthy individuals that appear to have normal heart fimction under resting conditions,actually have an increased susceptibility and vulnerability to stress.This is confounded by the impact that stress and disease can have over time to both the heart and vessels. Although, there is a rapidly growing body of literature investigating the effects of aging on the heart and how age-related alterations affect cardiac fimction, the biology of aging and underlying mechanisms remain unclear .In this review,we summarize effects of aging on the heart and discuss potential theories of cellular aging with special emphasis on mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. The aging lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowery EM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Erin M Lowery,1 Aleah L Brubaker,2 Erica Kuhlmann,1 Elizabeth J Kovacs31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center, 2Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAAbstract: There are many age-associated changes in the respiratory and pulmonary immune system. These changes include decreases in the volume of the thoracic cavity, reduced lung volumes, and alterations in the muscles that aid respiration. Muscle function on a cellular level in the aging population is less efficient. The elderly population has less pulmonary reserve, and cough strength is decreased in the elderly population due to anatomic changes and muscle atrophy. Clearance of particles from the lung through the mucociliary elevator is decreased and associated with ciliary dysfunction. Many complex changes in immunity with aging contribute to increased susceptibility to infections including a less robust immune response from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Considering all of these age-related changes to the lungs, pulmonary disease has significant consequences for the aging population. Chronic lower respiratory tract disease is the third leading cause of death in people aged 65 years and older. With a large and growing aging population, it is critical to understand how the body changes with age and how this impacts the entire respiratory system. Understanding the aging process in the lung is necessary in order to provide optimal care to our aging population. This review focuses on the nonpathologic aging process in the lung, including structural changes, changes in muscle function, and pulmonary immunologic function, with special consideration of obstructive lung disease in the elderly.Keywords: aging, lung, pulmonary immunology, COPD

  4. Anorexia of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Renuka

    2015-08-01

    The anorexia of aging is common, leading to adverse health consequences. As populations age, the impacts from anorexia in the older population are set to increase. Only greater awareness will allow for prevention or early intervention. This article discusses the physiologic anorexia of aging, highlights contributing factors, and proposes management strategies, including screening, especially in primary care. Many neuroendocrine factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology; it is clear that further human research is necessary if there is to be a pharmacologic breakthrough. There are currently no approved pharmacologic treatment strategies to prevent or treat the anorexia of aging.

  5. Age, wage and productivity

    OpenAIRE

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same pace. However, other studies find no evidence of such an age related pay-productivity gap. We perform an analysis of the relationship between age, wage and productivity using a matched worker-firm pane...

  6. Hodgkin's disease and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Nissen, N I

    1989-01-01

    506 unselected, previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease were treated at the Finsen Institute between 1969 and 1983. The prognostic significance of age, sex, stage, systemic symptoms, histologic subtype, number of involved nodal regions, total tumour burden (peripheral + intrathoracic...... modality, stage, and total tumour burden, whereas age had no prognostic significance. With regard to death from Hodgkin's disease only age and total tumour burden had independent significance. The significance of age would seem to stem from the fact that some older patients could not be given adequate...

  7. The aging population: demographics and the biology of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasi, Eleni; Ayilavarapu, Srinivas; Jones, Judith

    2016-10-01

    profile and the effects of an aging society on the prevalence and incidence of periodontal diseases. We review the definitions of normal and successful aging, the principles of geriatric medicine and the highlights of biological aging at cellular, tissue and systems levels. PMID:27501488

  8. Telomeres and reproductive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Infertility, miscarriage and aneuploid offspring increase with age in women, and meiotic dysfunction underlies reproductive aging. How aging disrupts meiotic function in women remains unclear, but as women increasingly delay having children, solving this problem becomes an urgent priority. Telomeres consist of a (TTAGGG)(n) repeated sequence and associated proteins at chromosome ends, mediate aging in mitotic cells and may also mediate aging during meiosis. Telomeres shorten both during DNA replication and from the response to oxidative DNA damage. Oocytes do not divide in adult mammals, but their precursors do replicate during fetal oogenesis; eggs ovulated from older females have traversed more mitotic cell cycles before entering meiosis during fetal oogenesis than eggs ovulated from younger females. Telomeres also would be expected to shorten from inefficient DNA repair of oxidative damage, because the interval between fetal oogenesis and ovulation is exceptionally prolonged in women. We have tested the hypothesis that telomere shortening disrupts meiosis by shortening telomeres experimentally in mice, which normally do not exhibit age-related meiotic dysfunction. Interestingly, mouse telomeres are much longer than human telomeres, but genetic or pharmacological shortening of mouse telomeres recapitulates in mice the human reproductive aging phenotype as the mouse telomeres reach the length of telomeres from older women. These observations led us to propose a telomere theory of reproductive aging. Moreover, chronological oxidative stress increases with reproductive aging, leading to DNA damage preferentially at (TTAGGG)(n) repeats. Finally, if telomeres shorten with aging, how do they reset across generations? Telomerase could not play a significant role in telomere elongation during early development, because this enzyme is not active until the blastocyst stage, well after the stage when telomere elongation takes place. Rather, telomeres lengthen during the

  9. Nutrients, Microglia Aging, and Brain Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Wu; Janchun Yu; Aiqin Zhu; Hiroshi Nakanishi

    2016-01-01

    As the life expectancy continues to increase, the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) becomes a big major issue in the world. After cellular activation upon systemic inflammation, microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, start to release proinflammatory mediators to trigger neuroinflammation. We have found that chronic systemic inflammatory challenges induce differential age-dependent microglial responses, which are in line with the impairment of learning and ...

  10. Aging, frailty and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, T; Larbi, A; Witkowski, J M; McElhaney, J; Loeb, M; Mitnitski, A; Pawelec, G

    2010-10-01

    The concept of frailty as a medically distinct syndrome has evolved based on the clinical experience of geriatricians and is clinically well recognizable. Frailty is a nonspecific state of vulnerability, which reflects multisystem physiological change. These changes underlying frailty do not always achieve disease status, so some people, usually very elderly, are frail without a specific life threatening illness. Current thinking is that not only physical but also psychological, cognitive and social factors contribute to this syndrome and need to be taken into account in its definition and treatment. Together, these signs and symptoms seem to reflect a reduced functional reserve and consequent decrease in adaptation (resilience) to any sort of stressor and perhaps even in the absence of extrinsic stressors. The overall consequence is that frail elderly are at higher risk for accelerated physical and cognitive decline, disability and death. All these characteristics associated with frailty can easily be applied to the definition and characterization of the aging process per se and there is little consensus in the literature concerning the physiological/biological pathways associated with or determining frailty. It is probably true to say that a consensus view would implicate heightened chronic systemic inflammation as a major contributor to frailty. This review will focus on the relationship between aging, frailty and age-related diseases, and will highlight possible interventions to reduce the occurrence and effects of frailty in elderly people. PMID:20559726

  11. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I;

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...

  12. Aging, longevity and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Sander, Miriam; Wewer, Ulla M.;

    2011-01-01

    Session included speeches by Ralf Hemmingsen, Ulla Wewer, and Lene Juel Rasmussen and Keynote Addresses by four world renowned aging researchers: Povl Riis (The Age Forum), Bernard Jeune (University of Southern Denmark), George Martin (University of Washington, USA) and Jan Vijg (Albert Einstein School...

  13. The ageing spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contain 15 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of age on the appearance of magnetic resonance images of the spine; Potential for image analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the aging spine; Potential of x-ray diffraction computed tomography for discriminating between normal and osteoporotic bone; and Spinal fusion in the elderly

  14. The age of Schumpeter

    OpenAIRE

    Giersch, Herbert

    1983-01-01

    The centenary of Schumpeter's birth coincides with a revival of Schumpeterian economics. Could the third quarter of this Century justly be called the age of Keynes (Hicks, 1974), the fourth quarter has a fair chance of becoming the age of Schumpeter. Before giving substance to this proposition, I shall present a Short introduction to Schumpeter's life, work and paradigm.

  15. Age, Wage and Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same pace

  16. Biology of ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Living systems owe their survival and health to a series of complex biochemical pathways of maintenance and repair. These defense systems create the homeodynamic space of an individual, which is characterized by stress tolerance, molecular damage control and continuous remodeling. Ageing, age-rel...

  17. The Culture of Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE; SARTOR

    2009-01-01

    Dissimilarities between the Chinese and Western cultures are vast.Aging significantly points to these differences.The great Chinese thinker Confucius expressed very definite thoughts about his own aging process.In many ways his words contrast with the verses of the famous Western playwright,

  18. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2016-01-01

    Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes that can influence the performance of tasks. We are faced with an important challe

  19. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2016-01-01

    Background Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes that can influence the performance of tasks. We are faced with an impor

  20. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2015-01-01

    Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes which can influence performance of tasks. We are faced with an important challenge

  1. Healthy ageing through music

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Rosie; Bisschop Boele, E.H.; Smilde, Rineke

    2012-01-01

    Presentation in session ‘Healthy Ageing through Music’. Presentations: - Rineke Smilde: Music and Dementia - Evert Bisschop Boele: Creative Workshops with the Elderly - Rosie Burt-Perkins: Healthy ageing through instrumental music learning World Conference ISME, Thessaloniki, Greece, 20/7/2012

  2. Parylene C Aging Studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; White II, Gregory Von; Bernstein, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Parylene C is used in a device because of its conformable deposition and other advantages. Techniques to study Parylene C aging were developed, and "lessons learned" that could be utilized for future studies are the result of this initial study. Differential Scanning Calorimetry yielded temperature ranges for Parylene C aging as well as post-deposition treatment. Post-deposition techniques are suggested to improve Parylene C performance. Sample preparation was critical to aging regimen. Short-term (%7E40 days) aging experiments with free standing and ceramic-supported Parylene C films highlighted "lessons learned" which stressed further investigations in order to refine sample preparation (film thickness, single sided uniform coating, machine versus laser cutting, annealing time, temperature) and testing issues ("necking") for robust accelerated aging of Parylene C.

  3. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    expectancy in the same year ("the Preston curve"); cross-country income differences can explain differences in life expectancy at age 20 of up to a decade. Moreover, technological change in health care of about 1.1% per year can account for the observed shift in the Preston curve between 1980 and 2000.......This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process inuence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity and life...

  4. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    and life expectancy in the same year ("the Preston curve"); cross-country income differences can explain differences in life expectancy at age 20 of up to a decade. Moreover, technological change in health care of about 1.1% per year can account for the observed shift in the Preston curve between 1980......This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process influence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity...

  5. COOEE bitumen: chemical aging

    CERN Document Server

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2013-01-01

    We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

  6. Snubber aging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snubbers are safety-related devices used to restrain undesirable dynamic loads at various piping and equipment locations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Each snubber must accommodate a plant's normal thermal movements and be capable of restraining the maximum off-normal dynamic loads postulated for its specific location. The effects of snubber aging and the environments and mechanisms that degrade snubber performance need to be better understood. This paper describes the Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program in-plant aging research conducted to enhance the understanding of snubber aging and its consequences. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff and their subcontractors, Lake Engineering and Wyle Laboratories, visited eight sites (encompassing thirteen plants) to conduct interviews with NPP staff and to collet snubber aging, testing, and maintenance data. The research methodology, evaluations, results, conclusions, and recommendations are described in the paper. Effective methods for service-life monitoring of snubbers are included in the recommendations. (orig.)

  7. 老龄化城市老年代步工具设计研究%RESEARCH ON WALK-ASSISTANT TOOL DESIGN FOR AGING SOCIETY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹; 陈虹

    2015-01-01

    The aging trend is a hot issue that we have to face and the "silver economy" era provides a new direction and more needs for us. However, in Chinese society, the research and design for seniors are relatively lack. It is particularly serious for seniors to go out. Focusing on the real needs of older users, the paper is to expound the specific advice and supply the design suggestion through a analysis of living behavior, physiological characteristics and the emotional appeal by questionnaire investigation and interview of the seniors. The purpose is to promote the development of senor products.%社会老龄化是我国正在面临的一个重要课题,随之而来的“银发经济”时代为我们提供了一个新的指导方向,引发了更多市场需求。然而目前中国社会在这方面有很大的空白,老年人出行难的问题尤为突出。本文关注老年用户的真正需求,以设计研究适合老年人出行的代步工具为目的,对老年人的生活行为、生理特点、情感诉求进行分析,同时以问卷调查和访谈的形式研究老年人使用代步工具的生活形态和行为特点,并提出具体的设计建议。

  8. The aging heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, S C; Schwartz, A B

    1985-02-01

    Pathologic studies of the myocardium and valvular structures have failed to provide convincing evidence of gross or microscopic changes that can be ascribed to aging alone. Lipofuscin accumulation and basophilic degeneration in cardiac muscle cells appear to be the most consistent findings associated with aging, but they are found in other conditions. Without doubt, pathologic changes in the myocardium, valves, and coronary arteries are found more frequently in the hearts of elderly persons, but those changes are caused by disease processes associated with an aging population rather than the aging process itself. Both the sinus and atrioventricular nodes decrease in size with age owing to a loss of cellularity. These structures become infiltrated with collagen, elastic tissue, and reticular fibers. Some have found infiltration also with fat. Amyloid deposition, basophilic degeneration of cells, and lipofuscin accumulation occur but probably do not cause functional abnormalities. Similar but less dramatic changes occur in the bundle of His and individual bundle branches. Most of the data suggests that these aging changes are not due to vascular insufficiency. Age-related changes in intrinsic mechanical function have been identified as a prolongation of contraction duration, decreased inotropic responses to catecholamines and cardiac glycosides, and an increase in mechanical refractoriness. Other possible age-related changes include alterations in relaxation, which may or may not be independent of the prolongation of contraction, and changes in the viscoelastic properties of cardiac muscle. When examined in the context of the components of a model of excitation-contraction coupling, changes in action potential duration and the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum emerge as the most likely bases for the changes. The electrical characteristics of sinus, atrioventricular, and His-Purkinje cells as well as atrial and ventricular muscle cells change with age. The sinus

  9. An Age-Old Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly aging society will challenge China’s future labor force HUANG Sanbi,65,once an accountant in a university in Beijing,has been retired for nearly 10 years.Her day is full and well scheduled.Doing morning exercises, studying ways of maintaining her health and having fun with the family have become her daily "obligatory courses." She is one of the lucky ones,leading a happy life in her old age,not worrying about things like pension and medical insurance. However,many senior citizens in rural areas or with medium and low income are not well prepared for their retirement.Problems caused by an aging population pose a big challenge to China’s future development,despite its recent economic progress.

  10. Epigenetics and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sangita; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have revealed that progressive changes to epigenetic information accompany aging in both dividing and nondividing cells. Functional studies in model organisms and humans indicate that epigenetic changes have a huge influence on the aging process. These epigenetic changes occur at various levels, including reduced bulk levels of the core histones, altered patterns of histone posttranslational modifications and DNA methylation, replacement of canonical histones with histone variants, and altered noncoding RNA expression, during both organismal aging and replicative senescence. The end result of epigenetic changes during aging is altered local accessibility to the genetic material, leading to aberrant gene expression, reactivation of transposable elements, and genomic instability. Strikingly, certain types of epigenetic information can function in a transgenerational manner to influence the life span of the offspring. Several important conclusions emerge from these studies: rather than being genetically predetermined, our life span is largely epigenetically determined; diet and other environmental influences can influence our life span by changing the epigenetic information; and inhibitors of epigenetic enzymes can influence life span of model organisms. These new findings provide better understanding of the mechanisms involved in aging. Given the reversible nature of epigenetic information, these studies highlight exciting avenues for therapeutic intervention in aging and age-associated diseases, including cancer. PMID:27482540

  11. [Normal aging and cognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ska, Bernadette; Joanette, Yves

    2006-03-01

    It is now well documented that normal aging modifies the cognitive functioning and most observations suggest that cognition evolves in the direction of deterioration. The more frequently impaired functions are memory, attention and visual-spatial abilities. On the other hand, some abilities seem to increase, such as vocabulary. Considering the aging effect on cognition, questions remain regarding directionality, universality and reversibility. A great variability in aged related impacts is observed among subjects and among cognitive domains. Some individuals evolved more rapidly than others. Some cognitive functions are more affected by aging than others. General and specific factors are hypothesized to explain the aged related cognitive decline. Among them, educational level, health, cognitive style, life style, personality, are likely to modulate the aged related cognitive evolution by influencing attentional resources and cerebral plasticity. Cognitive resources are essential to develop adaptative strategies. During the life span, resources are activated and increased by learning and training. Considering the role of cognitive resources, successful aging is dependent on several conditions : absence of disease leading to a loss of autonomy, maintenance of cognitive and physical activities, and active and social engaged lifestyle. PMID:16527210

  12. Epigenetics and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sangita; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have revealed that progressive changes to epigenetic information accompany aging in both dividing and nondividing cells. Functional studies in model organisms and humans indicate that epigenetic changes have a huge influence on the aging process. These epigenetic changes occur at various levels, including reduced bulk levels of the core histones, altered patterns of histone posttranslational modifications and DNA methylation, replacement of canonical histones with histone variants, and altered noncoding RNA expression, during both organismal aging and replicative senescence. The end result of epigenetic changes during aging is altered local accessibility to the genetic material, leading to aberrant gene expression, reactivation of transposable elements, and genomic instability. Strikingly, certain types of epigenetic information can function in a transgenerational manner to influence the life span of the offspring. Several important conclusions emerge from these studies: rather than being genetically predetermined, our life span is largely epigenetically determined; diet and other environmental influences can influence our life span by changing the epigenetic information; and inhibitors of epigenetic enzymes can influence life span of model organisms. These new findings provide better understanding of the mechanisms involved in aging. Given the reversible nature of epigenetic information, these studies highlight exciting avenues for therapeutic intervention in aging and age-associated diseases, including cancer. PMID:27482540

  13. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target....... If the argument that the impact of ROS increases with age is true, then proteins would be expected to accumulate oxidised materials with age, and the rate of such accumulation should increase with time, reflecting impaired inefficiency of homeostasis. Here we review the evidence for the accumulation of oxidised......, or modified, extra- and intra-cellular proteins in vivo....

  14. Growth hormone and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bartke, Andrzej; Brown-Borg, Holly; Kinney, Beth; Mattison, Julie; Wright, Chris; Hauck, Steven; Coschigano, Karen; Kopchick, John

    2000-01-01

    The potential usefulness of growth hormone (GH) as an anti-aging therapy is of considerable current interest. Secretion of GH normally declines during aging and administration of GH can reverse age-related changes in body composition. However, mutant dwarf mice with congenital GH deficiency and GH resistant GH-R-KO mice live much longer than their normal siblings, while a pathological elevation of GH levels reduces life expectancy in both mice and men. We propose that the actions of GH on gro...

  15. Envy, politics, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christine R; Henniger, Nicole E

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, the phrase "politics of envy" has appeared more than 621 times in English-language newspapers, generally in opinion essays contending that political liberalism reflects and exploits feelings of envy. Oddly, this assertion has not been tested empirically. We did so with a large adult sample (n = 357). Participants completed a Dispositional Envy Scale and questions about political ideology, socioeconomic status, and age. Envy and age were moderately correlated; younger people reported greater envy. Political ideology and envy were weakly correlated; however, this relationship was not significant when controlling for age. PMID:23471177

  16. Vitamin D and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, J. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Aging affects the formation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D; calcitriol), the active form of vitamin D. Production of 1,25(OH)2D is reduced by 50% as a result of an age-related decline in renal function, although serum 1,25(OH)2D levels are maintained in part by secondary hyperparathyroidism. Aging also causes a decrease in calcium absorption that precedes the decrease in 1,25(OH)2D by 10 to 15 years. Because 1,25(OH)2D is dependent on an adequate supply of the substrate vitamin D, the...

  17. Forever young or ageing naturally?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hees, R.P.J.; Naldini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Age and ageing can be felt as negative occurrences. For monuments however, old age is traditionally considered to be a positive quality. Without a certain age the nomination of monument hardly applies. Ageing can be seen as the work of time, which has always been valued: ageing was sometimes even ar

  18. Myths of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Historical and contemporary images of ageing have generally reinforced negative stereotypes of old age. An examination of sculpture, painting, poetry, literature and film, as well as television, advertising, newspaper stories, birthday cards and road signs reveals that old age is often shown as being a time of loneliness, depression and physical decline. These conditions do occur but their prevalence and severity have been exaggerated. There are many myths of ageing that have been influenced by these representations: that old people with physical or cognitive decline are social problems; that families no longer care for their elders; that geriatric medicine is an unglamorous specialty. Low expectations of old people and ageist thinking can adversely affect how we speak of disadvantaged old people. The challenge is to question inaccurate assumptions. Key to the improvement of medical care of older people is to extend the teaching of geriatric medicine and improve and coordinate research. PMID:17348579

  19. Forest Stand Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Source data for forest stand age were obtained from the USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) DataMart and were projected for future scenarios based on selected...

  20. Aging of prokaryotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Simon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently it was thought that aging is a characteristic feature only of cells and organisms of eukaryotic origin. Recent studies on Caulobacter crescentus showed that their dimorphic life cycle associated with asymmetric cell division leads to a gradual increase in the time needed for the development of new bacteria generations, which may reflect aging of this organism. Moreover, as shown in Escherichia coli, accelerated exhaustion of proliferative capacity and bacteria death are caused by inheritance of certain structures from the mother cell during cell division. A similar phenomenon, called ‘conditional senescence’, has been observed during the stationary phase of growth in liquid cultures. The aim of this paper is to present the current state of knowledge on the causes, mechanisms and evolutionary significance of aging in bacteria. Some issues associated with bacterial aging will be discussed in the context of similar phenomena occurring in eukaryotic cells.

  1. HEU age determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed to determine the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Age which is defined as the time since the HEU was produced in an enrichment process. The HEU age is determined from the ratios of relevant uranium parents and their daughters viz 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U. Uranium isotopes are quantitatively measured by their characteristic gammas and their daughters by alpha spectroscopy. In some of the samples where HEU is enriched more than 99%, the only mode of HEU age determination is by the measurement of 231Pa since there is negligible quantity of 230Th due to very low atom concentrations of 234U in the sample. In this paper we have presented data and methodology of finding the age of two HEU samples

  2. Sleep and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging About Sleep We all look forward to a good night's ... health and quality of life. Two Types of Sleep There are two types of sleep: non-rapid ...

  3. Sleep and Aging: Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Sleep and Aging Insomnia Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint at ... at greater risk for falling. Health Issues and Insomnia Disorders that cause pain or discomfort during the ...

  4. Evolution and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, S. Moss; Alves, Domingos; Martins, J. S. Sa

    2000-01-01

    The idea of this review is to connect the different models of evolution to those of biological ageing through Darwin's theory. We start with the Eigen model of quasispecies for microevolution, then introduce the Bak-Sneppen model for macroevolution and, finally, present the Penna model for biological ageing and some of its most important results. We also explore the concept of coevolution using this model.

  5. Stress, Inflammation and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Lavretsky, Helen; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This editorial provides a summary of the state of research on stress-related changes associated with aging and discuss how factors such as inflammation and sex steroid alterations may interact with psychosocial stress to affect the risk for mood and cognitive disturbance in older individuals. The authors provide an integrated summary of four studies reported in this issue of the journal and views on future direction in stress and aging research and interventions targeting resilience to stress.

  6. Aging and Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jeanne F; Zitting, Kirsi-Marja; Chinoy, Evan D

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with numerous changes, including changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality. The circadian timing system interacts with a sleep-wake homeostatic system to regulate human sleep, including sleep timing and structure. This article reviews key features of the human circadian timing system, age-related changes in the circadian timing system, and how those changes may contribute to the observed alterations in sleep. PMID:26568120

  7. ELECTION ON RETIREMENT AGE

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco M. Lagos; Juan Antonio Lacomba

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between wage distribution, degree of redistribution of the Social Security and effective retirement age. We develop a two-staged political economy model. In the first stage government chooses the redistribution level of the Social Security Program, according to three different criteria. In second stage the retirement age is elected through a majority voting process by agents with different wages, knowing exactly the redistribution level and voting accordingly. We a...

  8. Exercise, Inflammation and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey A Woods; Wilund, Kenneth R.; Martin, Stephen A.; Kistler, Brandon M.

    2011-01-01

    Aging results in chronic low grade inflammation that is associated with increased risk for disease, poor physical functioning and mortality. Strategies that reduce age-related inflammation may improve the quality of life in older adults. Regular exercise is recommended for older people for a variety of reasons including increasing muscle mass and reducing risk for chronic diseases of the heart and metabolic systems. Only recently has exercise been examined in the context of inflammation. This...

  9. Age Discrimination in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Rymkevitch; Claudia Villosio

    2007-01-01

    The Framework Directive on Equal Treatment in Employment and Occupation (2000/78/EC) included age as one of its prohibited grounds of discrimination. Member States were required to transpose this Directive by December 2003. In Italy age discrimination was explicitly regulated by means of Legislative Decree no. 216, 9 July 2003. The Decree introduced the new specific prohibition of discrimination, defining its application, exceptions and remedies. The purpose of this paper is to explore, in a ...

  10. Aging of hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2005-06-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today's increasing life expectation, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and also more capable to deliver active products that are directed toward meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft and aging of the hair follicle. The latter manifests as decrease of melanocyte function or graying, and decrease in hair production in androgenetic and senescent alopecia. The scalp is also subject to intrinsic or physiologic aging and extrinsic aging caused by external factors. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation. Prototypes are familial premature graying and androgenetic alopecia. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and smoking. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a role in skin and hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds for hair include humefactants, hair conditioners, photoprotectors, and antioxidants. Current available treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil, oral finasteride, and autologous hair transplantation. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants are the mainstays of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are under current investigation.

  11. [Salutogenesis in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, U; Rölker, S; Hannich, H-J

    2004-10-01

    In this contribution, the significance of the salutogenic model (Antonovsky) and its core concept-the sense of coherence-for research into "successful aging" is explicated on the background of a gerodynamic perspective (Schroots). Common to both approaches is the idea that the basic principle of life is based on imbalance, disease, and suffering (heterostasis). According to this pessimistic view, aging is considered as the individual time dimension on which these inevitable impairments in biological, behavioral, and social respects take place. The continuous increase in entropy (disorder) will finally result in the death of the organism. In the face of gerontological research showing variability and individual plasticity in aging processes-especially for the third age-, the salutogenic question is why some people generally become (very) old and stay healthy. According to the salutogenic model, the sense of coherence determines the (re-)production of order over the life span and mediates the relationship between resources/stressors and health outcome. Considering activity/disengagement theory and the selective optimization with compensation model as an example, the integrative potential of the salutogenic model is shown. Finally, the value of the salutogenic model for the fourth age is discussed. Healthy aging is one chance of human existence, but in no way a collective duty that should be imposed on the individual.

  12. Genes of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2003-10-01

    According to developmental genetics theories, aging is a genetically programmed and controlled continuum of development and maturation. Being dynamic and malleable processes, development and aging are controlled not only by genes but also by environmental and epigenetic influences that predominate in the second half of life. Genetic mutations affect many phenotypes in flies, worms, rodents, and humans which share several diseases or their equivalents, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and infectious disorders as well as their susceptibility to them. Life span and stress resistance are closely linked. Oxidative stress actually constitutes a defined hypothesis of aging in that macromolecule oxidative damage accumulates with age and tends to be associated with life expectancy. DNA methylation, a force in the regulation of gene expression, is also one of the biomarkers of genetic damage. The mitotic clock of aging is marked, if not guided, by telomeres, essential genetic elements stabilizing natural chromosomic ends. The dream of humans to live longer, healthy lives is being tested by attempts to modify longevity in animal models, frequently by dietary manipulation. The quest continues to understand the mechanisms of healthy aging, one of the most compelling areas of research in the 21st century. PMID:14577056

  13. EPL comes of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jérome, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-one years have now passed since the launch of Europhysics Letters which merged the physics letters journals of two learned societies: Journal de Physique Lettres and Lettere al Nuovo Cimento belonging, respectively, to the French Physical Society (SFP) and to the Italian Physical Society (SIF). This new journal was also supported by the UK Institute of Physics (IOP) and many other National Physical Societies, members of the European Physical Society (EPS). The aim of this merger was expressed by the words of G. H. Stafford, the President of EPS in 1985, for whom Europhysics Letters marked `an important milestone in the progress towards greater unity in Europe' which began with the creation of the European Physical Society nearly twenty years earlier. Europhysics Letters was supposed to be a strong European-based journal for the publication of short important communications covering all domains of physics under the supervision and the scientific control of EPS. In 2007, 21 years later, Europhysics Letters has now come of age and the Board of Directors, under the control of EPS, has decided to mature the journal, now re-branded as EPL and characterized by a new cover design and a new printed format, thus encouraging development into a top-tier journal, a leading global home for ground-breaking physics research letters. The objective is to make EPL a high-impact physics journal leading towards an increase in visibility, impact, prestige, scientific quality, reputation and impact factor although all scientists are currently aware that the presentation of impact factors must be taken with a grain of salt. A new publishing contract amongst the EPL partners will directly involve, besides EDPS (the publishing company of SFP) and SIF, the Institute of Physics through its publishing department (IOP Publishing) in a more active role, its task being hosting the on-line facilities of the journal. The combined publishing expertise and marketing knowledge of EDPS, IOP

  14. E-Learning and the Third Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the general improvement in living conditions in industrialised Western countries, people aged over 60 years usually reach the third age in good mental and physical condition. Contemporary society has thus had to endeavour to offer the new old not only social services but also pastimes, leisure, social, cultural and educational…

  15. The Role of the General Practitioners in Aging Society%论人口老龄化社会中全科医生的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司庆燕; 陈士福; 潘洪伟

    2014-01-01

    中国已经进入老龄化社会,城市社区和农村基层仍有一些老年人缺乏医疗卫生保障,高龄慢性病老人成为看病最难的人群,需要培养更多的全科医生解决这一难题。宏观上,老龄化社会的全科医生可以产生一定的经济效益和广泛的社会效益;微观上,全科医生具有促使家庭医疗资源的有效利用、方便老年人就医、开展健康教育等作用。完善“全科医生-老年人”服务模式,需要政府进一步完善老年人医疗服务体系和保障体系,大力提升基层社区卫生服务机构的医疗条件,根据老年人的需要培养专门的全科医学人才,推行全科医生与老年人建立契约服务关系。%China has entered the aging society , in urban communities and rural grassroots their are still many older people lack of health insurance , elderly patients with chronic diseases become the most difficult people to see a doctor, this needs to train more general practitioners to solve these problems .From a macroscopical view , general practitioners can bring substantial economic benefits and broad social benefits .From a microscopic view , they also can make effective use of family medical resources , bring convenient for old people going to a doctor and carry out an important role of health education .Improving the "General Practitioner -Elderly"service mode , the govern-ment needs to further improve the elderly medical service system and security system , vigorously promote grass -roots community health service institutions of medical conditions , develop specialized general medical personnel ac-cording to the needs of the elderly , implement contractual service relationships between general practitioners and the elderly.

  16. Does an Aging Population Increase Inequality?

    OpenAIRE

    Weizsäcker, Robert K. von

    1995-01-01

    The paper reviews recent research on the impact of an aging population on the distribution of income. After briefly discussing the demographic conditions responsible for population aging, a short account is given of demographic trends in the industrialized world. In order to disentangle the many potential channels by which an aging society affects the dispersion of income, several levels of aggregation are distinguished. The paper differentiates between intra- and intergenerational issues, be...

  17. 人口老龄化及其应对之策--《全面建成小康社会积极应对人口老龄化》的启示%The Ageing Population and Its Solution----A Revelation ofBuilding a Moderately Prosperous Society and Coping with Population Ageing Actively

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶

    2016-01-01

    Population ageing is the result of a successful public health and social and economic development. Our country has entered the ageing society since 1999. Ageing research has developed rapidly, and ageing policy system has established gradually. According to the 2020 strategic planning of building a moderately prosperous society in an all-round way, all the citizens including the elderly will get a more comprehensive social protection at the appointed time. Based onBuilding a Moderately Prosperous Society and Coping with Population Ageing Actively edited by professor WU Cangping, the paper combs the evolution of human ageing and the development of international community about the concept on ageing, the process of ageing problem and policy construction in China, and the expectation of ageing policy after building a moderately prosperous society in an all-round way in the future.%人口老龄化是公共卫生和社会经济发展成功的结果。我国自1999年进入老龄化社会以来,老龄学术研究迅速发展,老龄政策体系逐步建立。按照2020年我国全面建成小康社会的战略规划,届时包括老年人在内的全体国民都将得到较为全面的社会保护。以邬沧萍教授主编的《全面建成小康社会积极应对人口老龄化》为依据,梳理了人类老龄化问题的演进、国际社会有关老龄问题观念的发展、我国老龄问题的提出和政策建构过程,以及对全面建成小康社会后老龄政策的展望。

  18. Hormesis in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2008-01-01

    Hormesis in aging is represented by mild stress-induced stimulation of protective mechanisms in cells and organisms resulting in biologically beneficial effects. Single or multiple exposure to low doses of otherwise harmful agents, such as irradiation, food limitation, heat stress, hypergravity, reactive oxygen species and other free radicals have a variety of anti-aging and longevity-extending hormetic effects. Detailed molecular mechanisms that bring about the hormetic effects are being increasingly understood, and comprise a cascade of stress response and other pathways of maintenance and repair. Although the extent of immediate hormetic effects after exposure to a particular stress may only be moderate, the chain of events following initial hormesis leads to biologically amplified effects that are much larger, synergistic and pleiotropic. A consequence of hormetic amplification is an increase in the homeodynamic space of a living system in terms of increased defence capacity and reduced load of damaged macromolecules. Hormetic strengthening of the homeodynamic space provides wider margins for metabolic fluctuation, stress tolerance, adaptation and survival. Hormesis thus counter-balances the progressive shrinkage of the homeodynamic space, which is the ultimate cause of aging, diseases and death. Healthy aging may be achieved by hormesis through mild and periodic, but not severe or chronic, physical and mental challenges, and by the use of nutritional hormesis incorporating mild stress-inducing molecules called hormetins. The established scientific foundations of hormesis are ready to pave the way for new and effective approaches in aging research and intervention.

  19. Cognitive aging in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related impairments in cognitive functions represent a growing clinical and social issue. Genetic and behavioral characterization of animal models can provide critical information on the intrinsic and environmental factors that determine the deterioration or preservation of cognitive abilities throughout life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Behavior of wild-type, mutant and gamma-irradiated zebrafish (Danio rerio was documented using image-analysis technique. Conditioned responses to spatial, visual and temporal cues were investigated in young, middle-aged and old animals. The results demonstrate that zebrafish aging is associated with changes in cognitive responses to emotionally positive and negative experiences, reduced generalization of adaptive associations, increased stereotypic and reduced exploratory behavior and altered temporal entrainment. Genetic upregulation of cholinergic transmission attenuates cognitive decline in middle-aged achesb55/+ mutants, compared to wild-type siblings. In contrast, the genotoxic stress of gamma-irradiation accelerates the onset of cognitive impairment in young zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings would allow the use of powerful molecular biological resources accumulated in the zebrafish field to address the mechanisms of cognitive senescence, and promote the search for therapeutic strategies which may attenuate age-related cognitive decline.

  20. Stress, Aging and Thirst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1998-01-01

    After growth during adolesence, total body water decreases progressively with aging from 65% of body weight to about 53% of body weight in the 70th decade; a majority of the loss occurs from the extracellular volume, from 42% to about 25%, respectively. Cellular volume also reaches equilibrium in the 70th decade at about 25% of body weight. Various stresses such as exercise, heat and attitude exposure, ad prior dehydration attenuate voluntary fluid intake (involuntary dehydration). Voluntary fluid intake appears to decrease with aging (involuntary dehydration in this sense aging can be considered as a stress. Kidney function and muscle mass (80% water) decrease somewhat with aging, and voluntary fluid intake (thirst) is also attenuated. Thirst is stimulated by increasing osmolality (hypernatremia) of the extracellular fluid and by decreased extracellular volume (mainly plasma volume) which act to increase intracellular fluid volume osmolality to activiate drinking. The latter decreases fluid compartment osmolality which ' It terminates drinking. However, this drinking mechanism seems to be attenuated with aging such that increasing plasma osmolality no longer stimulates fluid intake appropriately. Hypernatremia in the elderly has been associated all too frequently with greater incidence of bacterial infection and increased mortality. Involuntary dehydration can be overcome in young men by acclimation to an intermittent exercise-in-heat training program. Perhaps exercise training in the elderly would also increase voluntary fluid intake and increase muscle mass to enhance retention of water.

  1. [Strategies for successful ageing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco Ríos, Adriana Martha; López Velarde Peña, Tatiana; Martínez Gallardo Prieto, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the interest of anti-ageing medicine in the last few years, with a growth in the industry of products that promise to prolong life and restore all the suffering or "defects" produced by age. The understanding of ageing has changed over the years, giving rise to the possibility of intervening in different metabolic and cellular pathways, and thus, delaying the appearance of the degenerative chronic diseases that appear with age, and that are finally the causing factors of the vulnerability that leads to our death. It is hoped that we can help the clinician to orientate their patients, who, due to the overwhelming amount of information they receive by the Internet, arrive at the clinic full of questions, waiting to receive absolute answer from their physician in order to increase their longevity and quality of life. This article presents an analysis of the physical activity, diets, supplements and drugs that are being investigated as anti-ageing measures and of the many clinical studies that have produced encouraging, measurable and reproducible results. PMID:26656211

  2. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Dziechciaż

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: Bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging. The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists’ assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it.

  3. Asteroid family ages

    CERN Document Server

    Spoto, Federica; Knezevic, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    A new family classification, based on a catalog of proper elements with $\\sim 384,000$ numbered asteroids and on new methods is available. For the $45$ dynamical families with $>250$ members identified in this classification, we present an attempt to obtain statistically significant ages: we succeeded in computing ages for $37$ collisional families. We used a rigorous method, including a least squares fit of the two sides of a V-shape plot in the proper semimajor axis, inverse diameter plane to determine the corresponding slopes, an advanced error model for the uncertainties of asteroid diameters, an iterative outlier rejection scheme and quality control. The best available Yarkovsky measurement was used to estimate a calibration of the Yarkovsky effect for each family. The results are presented separately for the families originated in fragmentation or cratering events, for the young, compact families and for the truncated, one-sided families. For all the computed ages the corresponding uncertainties are pro...

  4. Redox theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P. Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome. The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity.

  5. Signatures of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Garwin, R.; Hammer, D.; Happer, W.; Lewis, N.; Schwitters, R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.

    1998-01-06

    The Department of Energy and its three weapons laboratories (LANL, LLNL, and SNL) have developed a Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) in response to their designated mission of maintaining an effective, i.e. reliable and safe, nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear tests (UGTs). The need to ensure the effectiveness of an aging stockpile presents new challenges of major importance. In this study we review what is known about the aging of critical constituents, particularly the high explosives, polymers, and metals in the enduring stockpile. We discuss data that are required to provide a fuller understanding of aging, and how to obtain that data as a basis for anticipating and addressing potential stockpile problems. Our particular concern is problems that may arise in the short term, i.e. within the next 5 to 10 years, and their implied requirements for preventive maintenance and remanufacture.

  6. Ageing Management Program Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aspects of plant ageing management (AM) gained increasing attention over the last ten years. Numerous technical studies have been performed to study the impact of ageing mechanisms on the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. National research activities have been initiated or are in progress to provide the technical basis for decision making processes. The long-term operation of nuclear power plants is influenced by economic considerations, the socio-economic environment including public acceptance, developments in research and the regulatory framework, the availability of technical infrastructure to maintain and service the systems, structures and components as well as qualified personnel. Besides national activities there are a number of international activities in particular under the umbrella of the IAEA, the OECD and the EU. The paper discusses the process, procedure and database developed for Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) surveillance of ageing process of Nuclear power Plant Krsko.(author)

  7. Cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jacob K; Engholm, Gerda; Skytthe, Axel;

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological cancer data shed light on key questions within basic science, clinical medicine and public health. For decades, Denmark has had linkable health registers that contain individual level data on the entire population with virtually complete follow-up. This has enabled high quality...... studies of cancer epidemiology and minimized the challenges often faced in many countries, such as uncertain identification of the study base, age misreporting, and low validity of the cancer diagnoses. However, methodological challenges still remain to be addressed, especially in cancer epidemiology...... studies among the elderly and the oldest-old. For example, a characteristic pattern for many cancer types is that the incidence increases up to a maximum at about ages 75-90 years and is then followed by a decline or a leveling off at the oldest ages. It has been suggested that the oldest individuals may...

  8. Glucose and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  9. Aspects of cutaneous ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, K L

    1991-09-01

    'Ageing is a multistep, multifaceted, time-dependent phenomenon characterized by the decreased ability of a system to respond to exogenous and endogenous stress from either physical, chemical or biologic agents'. Cutaneous ageing provides a visible model of the interaction between endogenous (intrinsic) factors and exogenous (extrinsic) factors. In skin, the principal extrinsic-factor is ultraviolet light (UV) which is responsible for the constellation of changes termed photoageing. In recent years, much interest has been directed towards defining the ageing processes in skin and excellent comprehensive reviews have been compiled. This review aims to highlight several areas of developing knowledge, and focuses on the potential importance of environmental changes as they influence skin ageing and carcinogenesis. Repeated reference to the effects of UV on the skin are inevitable in any review of skin ageing and this is scarcely surprising as the skin contains many cells as well as subcellular and extracellular chromophores which are capable of absorbing energy within the UV spectrum. Cellular chromophores include among others keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells, dermal fibroblasts and mast cells. Subcellular chromophores include keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin and a number of proteins, lipids and steroids (such as vitamin D). Urocanic acid, a photoisomerization product of the amino-acid histidine, may provide some limited photoprotection and some believe it to be important in UV induced immunosuppression. Understanding events at the molecular and biochemical level has unfortunately not been paralleled by clinical advances and the common, troublesome skin-problems of old age such as cancer, xerosis and pruritus remain a major cause of morbidity and yet are poorly explained.

  10. Genome instability and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2013-01-01

    Genome instability has long been implicated as the main causal factor in aging. Somatic cells are continuously exposed to various sources of DNA damage, from reactive oxygen species to UV radiation to environmental mutagens. To cope with the tens of thousands of chemical lesions introduced into the genome of a typical cell each day, a complex network of genome maintenance systems acts to remove damage and restore the correct base pair sequence. Occasionally, however, repair is erroneous, and such errors, as well as the occasional failure to correctly replicate the genome during cell division, are the basis for mutations and epimutations. There is now ample evidence that mutations accumulate in various organs and tissues of higher animals, including humans, mice, and flies. What is not known, however, is whether the frequency of these random changes is sufficient to cause the phenotypic effects generally associated with aging. The exception is cancer, an age-related disease caused by the accumulation of mutations and epimutations. Here, we first review current concepts regarding the relationship between DNA damage, repair, and mutation, as well as the data regarding genome alterations as a function of age. We then describe a model for how randomly induced DNA sequence and epigenomic variants in the somatic genomes of animals can result in functional decline and disease in old age. Finally, we discuss the genetics of genome instability in relation to longevity to address the importance of alterations in the somatic genome as a causal factor in aging and to underscore the opportunities provided by genetic approaches to develop interventions that attenuate genome instability, reduce disease risk, and increase life span. PMID:23398157

  11. The aging male project

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Saad

    2001-01-01

    With an increasing life expectancy and a decreasing reproduction rate, the population structure changes. A Jenapharm R & D program investigates the endocrinology of aging men. In men, a decrease in production of sex steroids and other hormones with age can be observed. The typical patterns of daily rhythmicity become less distinct. This is part of a very complex picture in which not only isolated hormones are involved, but also the influence of hormones on each other. Many factors from th...

  12. Modulating aging and longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    Provides information and an evaluation of a variety of approaches tried for modulating aging and longevity, including dietary supplementation with antioxidants, vitamins and hormones, genetic engineering, life-style alterations, and hormesis through mild stress. After decades of systematic....... This book provides the most up-to-date information and a critical evaluation of a variety of approaches being tried for modulating aging and longevity, including dietary supplementation with antioxidants, vitamins and hormones, genetic engineering, life-style alterations, and hormesis through mild stress...

  13. Religion and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret Hall, C

    1985-03-01

    Life history data and cultural values are used to suggest ways in which personal and social beliefs influence the quality of experiences of aging. Central questions are the extent to which an individual can select beliefs that lead to a longer, more meaningful life and the special influence that religion may have in enhancing aging. Responsiveness to needs of the elderly is a necessary component of enlightened planning for the future. Secularization and industrialization have diminished roles and expectations for the elderly. Religion may be an effective means to identify these concerns and improve the quality of life of older people. PMID:24307195

  14. Ageing and skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard; Warnke, Arne Jonas

    of countries. Specifically, repeated measures will enable an analysis of whether there is skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan of cohorts and overtime between cohorts. This is especially important because age-skill profiles observed on the basis of a single cross-section are difficult to interpret....... With this as a backdrop, this paper has sought to provide an overview of what is known about age-skill profiles and to conduct an analysis that demonstrates how trend data based on repeated cross-sectional observations of direct measures of skill at the cohort level can be used to estimate skill gain and skill loss over...

  15. Perceived age as clinically useful biomarker of ageing: cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Thinggaard, Mikael; McGue, Matt;

    2009-01-01

    young men, and 11 older women (assessors); 1826 twins aged >or=70. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Assessors: perceived age of twins from photographs. Twins: physical and cognitive tests and molecular biomarker of ageing (leucocyte telomere length). RESULTS: For all three groups of assessors, perceived age...... age, controlled for chronological age and sex, also correlated significantly with physical and cognitive functioning as well as with leucocyte telomere length. CONCLUSION: Perceived age-which is widely used by clinicians as a general indication of a patient's health-is a robust biomarker of ageing...

  16. 浅析健身气功在老龄化社会中的积极性作用%A Brief Analysis on the Positive Role of Fitness Qigong in the Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周筱霞

    2013-01-01

    China has entered the aging society. Fitness qigong possesses the characteristics of stretching and gentle movement, which plays a positive role in promoting senior citizens' health. Starting from the current situation, social pressure and improve-ment of China's aging population, this paper mainly deals with the positive role of fitness qigong in the aging society, and ex-pounds the unique role of fitness qigong in healthy aging from such three aspects as physical healthy, psychological health, and social adaptability.%目前我国已进入老龄化社会。健身气功动作舒展大方、缓慢柔和的特点对老年人健康促进起着积极的作用。本文从我国人口老龄化的现状与社会压力及健康老龄化入手,主要探讨健身气功在老龄化社会中发挥的积极性作用,分别从生理健康、心理健康和社会适应性三方面论述了健身气功对健康老龄化的独特作用。

  17. Aging changes in the face

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004004.htm Aging changes in the face To use the sharing ... Changes in face with age References Brodie SE. Aging and disorders of the eye. In: Fillit HM, ...

  18. IGBT accelerated aging data set.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Preliminary data from thermal overstress accelerated aging using the aging and characterization system. The data set contains aging data from 6 devices, one device...

  19. Bronze Age Acrobats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rune

    2014-01-01

    immaterial, ritual and cosmological exchange that characterized the second and early firstmillennium BC.Beliefs and ritual practices went hand in hand with the adoption of a series of elite items and an aristocratic lifestyle, thereby creating a unique and fascinating European Bronze Age....

  20. Taste perception with age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords: age, thresholds, supra-threshold intensities, pleasantness, optimally preferred concentration, olfactory deprivation,signal-to-noise ratio

    This thesis

  1. Psychological Aspects of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Craig M.

    1980-01-01

    Psychological aspects of aging, based on gerontological hypotheses and research, are presented under three headings: intellectual abilities; emotional capacities; and motor capabilities. Consequences are discussed. Well-being throughout life depends on fulfillment of fundamental human needs; existential needs for nourishment, stimulation, rest,…

  2. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  3. CETA and the Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Sanford F.; Osten, David F.

    1978-01-01

    To assess the impact of the 1973 Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) on older worker's problems, article examines CETA's history, options, and authority. Finds major systemic factors that encourage local prime sponsors to understate aging populations' needs. Concludes there is a need for substantial CETA changes to effectively serve…

  4. A Bittersweet Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    They are the first generation bom under the one-child policy that came into eifect about 30 years ago. Today this post-80s generation are mostly aged between 20-28 and lead independent lives. Their unique family environment is a far cry from that of their parents’ generation, and has helped shape a personality of

  5. Aging and the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the animal, there are many changes in the function of the body's organ systems. In the gastrointestinal tract there is a general modest decline in the function of the esophagus, stomach, colon,pancreas and liver. In the small intestine, there may be subtle alterations in the intestinal morphology, as well as a decline in the uptake of fatty acids and sugars.The malabsorption may be partially reversed by aging glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) or dexamethasone.Modifications in the type of lipids in the diet will influence the intestinal absorption of nutrients: for example, in mature rats a diet enriched with saturated as compared with polysaturated fatty acids will enhance lipid and sugar uptake, whereas in older animals the opposite effect is observed. Thus, the results of studies of the intestinal adaptation performed in mature rats does not necessarily apply in older animals. The age-associated malabsorption of nutrients that occurs with aging may be one of the several factors which contribute to the malnutrition that occurs with aging.

  6. Curcumin and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcumin has been used commonly as a spice, food additive, and an herbal medicine worldwide. Known as a bioactive polyphenolic, curcumin has a broad range of beneficial properties to human health. Recently, active research on curcumin with respect to aging and related traits in model organisms has d...

  7. Anthropocene Age Wicked Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Wu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Grand global challenges, including wicked human caused or influenced ones key to sustainability, characterize the Anthropocene Age. Among these are climate change driven by increased methane and CO2 in the atmosphere; consequent global warming and increasing intensity and incidence of extreme...

  8. Helping You Age Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Need and When / A Note on Complementary Medicines / Nutrition and the Aging Eye / In The Genes? Searching for Methuselah Winter 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 1 Page 9 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the ...

  9. Bioethics and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Castillo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this presentation is to discuss some concepts related to bioethics and ageing, specifically with regard to health and disease. Considerations on medical practice are made by referring to Kant and Heidelberg school of thought. Perception of time in the elderly and issues such as euthanasia and death are mentioned.

  10. The challenges of human population ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Miriam; Oxlund, Bjarke; Jespersen, Astrid;

    2015-01-01

    The 20th century saw an unprecedented increase in average human lifespan as well as a rapid decline in human fertility in many countries of the world. The accompanying worldwide change in demographics of human populations is linked to unanticipated and unprecedented economic, cultural, medical...... Copenhagen (UCPH) and the Center for Healthy Ageing at UCPH, which took place on 20-21 June 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Questions discussed here include the following: what is driving age-structural change in human populations? how can we create 'age-friendly' societies and promote 'ageing...

  11. Ageing management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the adoption of the 1997 act of parliament concerning the abolishment of nuclear power in Sweden plant lives are no longer limited until 2010 as they were following the referendum in 1980. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) has therefore in its most recent general regulations from 2004 introduced requirements for nuclear power plants to develop ageing management programmes which should have been in place by the end of 2005. Since SKI:s role is not to provide detailed regulations but to ensure that the licensees take the full responsibility for the safety of their plants the detailed contents of the programmes have not been stipulated by SKI. An ageing management programme should coordinate the plant efforts in other programmes such as maintenance, monitoring, inspection, environmental qualification, chemistry, periodic testing and surveillance programmes that should already exist. In this way an integrated and long term approach to these issues can be ensured and become a natural part in the overall management of the plant. To this end it is important that the ageing management programme, as all other central programmes and processes, is documented in the quality assurance system, overall management system and is included in the underlying safety analysis report of the plant. Once the ageing management programmes have been established SKI is planning to assess them specifically through a combination of inspection and document reviews during 2008 and 2009. Thereafter it is anticipated that the major regulatory effort will be concentrated to the assessment of the periodic safety reviews to determine the effectiveness of the programmes and whether further specific regulatory action is required. SKI will also continue its active involvement in national and international research efforts to improve the understanding of ageing and degradation mechanisms. (author)

  12. Aging men-Challenges ahead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno Lunenfeld

    2001-01-01

    The prolongation of life expectancy and the drastic reduction of fertility rate are the primary cause of an aging world. It is projected that the elderly (above 65) will increase within the next 25 years by 82 %, whereas the new born only by 3 %. Despite the enormous medical progress during the past few decades, the last years of life are still accompanied by increasing ill health and disability. The ability to maintain active and independent living for as long as possible is a crucial factor for aging in health and dignity. Therefore, the promotion of healthy aging and the prevention of disability in men, must assume a central role in medical research and medical practice as well as in the formulation of national health and social policies. Effective programs promoting health and aging will ensure a more efficient use of health and social services and improve the quality of life in older persons by enabling them to remain independent and productive. The most important and drastic gender differences in aging are related to organs and or systems dependant or influenced by reproductive hormones. In distinction to the course of reproductive aging in women, with the rapid decline in sex hormones and expressed by the cessation of menses, aging men experience a slow and continuous decline of hormones. This decline in endocrine function involves: A decrease of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA),oestrogens, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and melatonin. This decrease is concomitant with an increase of LH and FSH. In addition sex hormone binding globulin's (SHBG) increase with age resulting in further lowering the concentrations of free biologically active androgens. Interventions such as hormone replacement therapy may prevent, delay or alleviate the debilitating conditions which may result from secondary partial endocrine deficiency. Primary and secondary preventive strategies such as the promotion of

  13. Adult Graduates' Negotiations of Age(ing) and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siivonen, Päivi; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we will explore Finnish adult graduates' social positioning in relation to age and ageing, and the new discursive framing of employability that is firmly expressed in national as well as in European policy agendas. Age is here understood as a social construction and ageing as a lifelong process. We will analyse our joint interview…

  14. 人口老龄化对我国经济社会发展的影响及对策%The Influence and Countermeasures of Population Aging on the Development of Economy and Society in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛凯

    2012-01-01

    人口老龄化是经济社会发展进步的重要标志,也给经济社会发展带来重大的影响和挑战。妥善应时人口老龄化的挑战,对深入贯彻落实科学发展观,实现可持续发展具有重要意义,也是落实以人为本,构建和谐社会的重要方面之一。多年来,我国经济的迅速发展为应对人口老龄化奠定了坚实的物质基础,现阶段应当以转变经济发展方式、加强和创新社会管理为重点,破解人口老龄化带来的经济社会难题。%Population aging is an important sign of progress in economy and society. However, it brings great influence and challenge to the development of economy and society. To deal with the challenge of population aging is of great importance to carry out scientific development concept and realize sustainable development. What is more, it is one of the important aspects of constructing people - oriented harmonious society. Over the years, the rapid development of Chinese economy provides solid foundation to deal with population aging. At present, China should conform the economic development mode to solve the problem of population aging.

  15. Aging trends -- the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddlecom, A E; Domingo, L J

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a description of the trends in growth of the elderly population in the Philippines and their health, disability, education, work status, income, and family support. The proportion of elderly in the Philippines is much smaller than in other Southeast Asian countries, such as Singapore and Malaysia. The elderly population aged over 65 years increased from 2.7% of total population in 1990 to 3.6% in 1990. The elderly are expected to comprise 7.7% of total population in 2025. The proportion of elderly is small due to the high fertility rate. Life expectancy averages 63.5 years. The aged dependency ratio will double from 5.5 elderly per 100 persons aged 15-64 years in 1990 to 10.5/100 in 2025. A 1984 ASEAN survey found that only 11% of elderly rated their health as bad. The 1990 Census reveals that 3.9% were disabled elderly. Most were deaf, blind, or orthopedically impaired. 16% of elderly in the ASEAN survey reported not seeing a doctor even when they needed to. 54% reported that a doctor was not visited due to the great expense. In 1980, 67% of men and 76% of women aged over 60 years had less than a primary education. The proportion with a secondary education in 2020 is expected to be about 33% for men and 33% for women. 66.5% of men and 28.5% of women aged over 60 years were in the formal labor force in 1990. Women were less likely to receive cash income from current jobs or pensions. 65% of earnings from older rural people was income from agricultural production. 60% of income among urban elderly was from children, and 23% was from pensions. Family support is provided to the elderly in the form of coresidence. In 1988, 68% of elderly aged over 60 years lived with at least one child. Retirement or nursing homes are uncommon. The Philippines Constitution states that families have a duty to care for elderly members.

  16. Aging trends -- the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddlecom, A E; Domingo, L J

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a description of the trends in growth of the elderly population in the Philippines and their health, disability, education, work status, income, and family support. The proportion of elderly in the Philippines is much smaller than in other Southeast Asian countries, such as Singapore and Malaysia. The elderly population aged over 65 years increased from 2.7% of total population in 1990 to 3.6% in 1990. The elderly are expected to comprise 7.7% of total population in 2025. The proportion of elderly is small due to the high fertility rate. Life expectancy averages 63.5 years. The aged dependency ratio will double from 5.5 elderly per 100 persons aged 15-64 years in 1990 to 10.5/100 in 2025. A 1984 ASEAN survey found that only 11% of elderly rated their health as bad. The 1990 Census reveals that 3.9% were disabled elderly. Most were deaf, blind, or orthopedically impaired. 16% of elderly in the ASEAN survey reported not seeing a doctor even when they needed to. 54% reported that a doctor was not visited due to the great expense. In 1980, 67% of men and 76% of women aged over 60 years had less than a primary education. The proportion with a secondary education in 2020 is expected to be about 33% for men and 33% for women. 66.5% of men and 28.5% of women aged over 60 years were in the formal labor force in 1990. Women were less likely to receive cash income from current jobs or pensions. 65% of earnings from older rural people was income from agricultural production. 60% of income among urban elderly was from children, and 23% was from pensions. Family support is provided to the elderly in the form of coresidence. In 1988, 68% of elderly aged over 60 years lived with at least one child. Retirement or nursing homes are uncommon. The Philippines Constitution states that families have a duty to care for elderly members. PMID:12292274

  17. With age comes representational wisdom in social signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijsbergen, Nicola; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Schyns, Philippe G

    2014-12-01

    In an increasingly aging society, age has become a foundational dimension of social grouping broadly targeted by advertising and governmental policies. However, perception of old age induces mainly strong negative social biases. To characterize their cognitive and perceptual foundations, we modeled the mental representations of faces associated with three age groups (young age, middle age, and old age), in younger and older participants. We then validated the accuracy of each mental representation of age with independent validators. Using statistical image processing, we identified the features of mental representations that predict perceived age. Here, we show that whereas younger people mentally dichotomize aging into two groups, themselves (younger) and others (older), older participants faithfully represent the features of young age, middle age, and old age, with richer representations of all considered ages. Our results demonstrate that, contrary to popular public belief, older minds depict socially relevant information more accurately than their younger counterparts.

  18. With age comes representational wisdom in social signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijsbergen, Nicola; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Schyns, Philippe G

    2014-12-01

    In an increasingly aging society, age has become a foundational dimension of social grouping broadly targeted by advertising and governmental policies. However, perception of old age induces mainly strong negative social biases. To characterize their cognitive and perceptual foundations, we modeled the mental representations of faces associated with three age groups (young age, middle age, and old age), in younger and older participants. We then validated the accuracy of each mental representation of age with independent validators. Using statistical image processing, we identified the features of mental representations that predict perceived age. Here, we show that whereas younger people mentally dichotomize aging into two groups, themselves (younger) and others (older), older participants faithfully represent the features of young age, middle age, and old age, with richer representations of all considered ages. Our results demonstrate that, contrary to popular public belief, older minds depict socially relevant information more accurately than their younger counterparts. PMID:25455036

  19. Aging, exercise, and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, H L; Kramer, A F; Capaldi, D

    1992-12-01

    The authors investigated the relationship among aging, attentional processes, and exercise in 2 experiments. First they examined age differences on 2 attentional tasks, a time-sharing task and an attentional flexibility task. Young adults alternated attention between 2 sequenced tasks more rapidly and time-shared the processing of 2 tasks more efficiently than older adults. They then investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the same 2 attentional tasks in older adults. Following the 10-week exercise program, older exercisers showed substantially more improvement in alternation speed and time-sharing efficiency than older controls. Interestingly, this exercise effect was specific to dual-task processing. Both groups of subjects showed equivalent effects on single-task performance. These results indicate that aerobic exercise can exert a beneficial influence on the efficiency of at least 2 different attentional processes in older adults. PMID:1466833

  20. Age determination of mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapu, G.L.; Johnson, D.H.; Dane, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for distinguishing adult from yearling wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), from late winter through the nesting season, was developed by applying discriminant analysis procedures to selected wing feather characters of 126 yearlings and 76 adults (2-year-olds) hand-reared from wild eggs during 1974, 1975, and 1977. Average values for feather characters generally increased as the birds advanced from yearlings to adults. Black-white surface area of greater secondary covert 2 was the single most reliable aging character identified during the study. The error rate was lowest in females (3%) when discriminant functions were used with measurements of primary 1 weight and black-white area of greater secondary covert 2 and in males (9%) when the functions were used with black-white area of greater secondary coverts 1, 2, and 3. Methodology precludes aging of birds in the field during capture operations.

  1. Constipation in old age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of constipation increases with age. However, constipation is not a physiological consequence of normal ageing. Indeed, the aetiology of constipation in older people is often multifactorial with co-morbid diseases, impaired mobility, reduced dietary fibre intake and prescription medications contributing significantly to constipation in many instances. A detailed clinical history and physical examination including digital rectal examination is usually sufficient to uncover the causes of constipation in older people; more specialized tests of anorectal physiology and colonic transit are rarely required. The scientific evidence base from which to develop specific treatment recommendations for constipation in older people is, for the most part, slim. Constipation can be complicated by faecal impaction and incontinence, particularly in frail older people with reduced mobility and cognitive impairment; preventative strategies are important in those at risk.

  2. The Great Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Louis L.

    1992-01-01

    The Great Ice Age, a recent chapter in the Earth's history, was a period of recurring widespread glaciations. During the Pleistocene Epoch of the geologic time scale, which began about a million or more years ago, mountain glaciers formed on all continents, the icecaps of Antarctica and Greenland were more extensive and thicker than today, and vast glaciers, in places as much as several thousand feet thick, spread across northern North America and Eurasia. So extensive were these glaciers that almost a third of the present land surface of the Earth was intermittently covered by ice. Even today remnants of the great glaciers cover almost a tenth of the land, indicating that conditions somewhat similar to those which produced the Great Ice Age are still operating in polar and subpolar climates.

  3. 医疗保险应对人口老龄化的几点思考%On How to Implement Health Insurance in an Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁静萍

    2011-01-01

    21世纪的中国将是一个老龄化社会。我国的医疗保障制度经过近20年的改革探索,目前社会医疗保险制度已初具规模。但制度还不够完善,保障范围和水平还很低,还没有达到“人人享有卫生保健”的基本目标。为应对人口老龄化给医疗保险制度带来的压力。分析了人口老龄化对医疗保险基金的影响,列举了社保中心应对人口老龄化的几点举措,提出人口老龄化情况下关于医疗保险的几点想法。%Aging population will gain dominance by number in China well into the 21st century. After nearly 2 deeades of reforms and experiments in health care system, China's social health care system has now come into shape. However the whole system is still not well-developed yet to provide good health care services to every citizen. As medical insurance system feeling the pressure of aging population, this paper analyzed the possible impact and listed several pieces of advices for social security departments on addressing aging problems.

  4. Biological psychological and social determinants of old age: bio-psycho-social aspects of human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziechciaż, Małgorzata; Filip, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The aging of humans is a physiological and dynamic process ongoing with time. In accordance with most gerontologists' assertions it starts in the fourth decade of life and leads to death. The process of human aging is complex and individualized, occurs in the biological, psychological and social sphere. Biological aging is characterized by progressive age-changes in metabolism and physicochemical properties of cells, leading to impaired self-regulation, regeneration, and to structural changes and functional tissues and organs. It is a natural and irreversible process which can run as successful aging, typical or pathological. Biological changes that occur with age in the human body affect mood, attitude to the environment, physical condition and social activity, and designate the place of seniors in the family and society. Psychical ageing refers to human awareness and his adaptability to the ageing process. Among adaptation attitudes we can differentiate: constructive, dependence, hostile towards others and towards self attitudes. With progressed age, difficulties with adjustment to the new situation are increasing, adverse changes in the cognitive and intellectual sphere take place, perception process involutes, perceived sensations and information received is lowered, and thinking processes change. Social ageing is limited to the role of an old person is culturally conditioned and may change as customs change. Social ageing refers to how a human being perceives the ageing process and how society sees it. PMID:25528930

  5. Diabetes in the Aged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobin, Wulf

    1970-01-01

    In keeping with the already known high prevalence of diabetes among residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged, Toronto, annual screening disclosed an average incidence of 25.5% of abnormal glucose tolerance (two-hour post-glucose blood sugars above 140 mg./100 ml.) in residents not known to be diabetic. Forty-five (47%) of the 94 residents with abnormal screening values were considered subsequently to be diabetic according to our criteria. Long-term follow-up, particularly of 81 residents initially normoglycemic in 1964-5, confirmed that the natural course of glucose tolerance in this population was one of progressive deterioration. By contrast, improvement amounting to remission has been demonstrated in nine out of 20 residents several years after they had been declared diabetic, and is thought to have been induced by dietotherapy. Moderate hyperglycemia per se did not cause symptoms in these almost always keto-resistant and usually aglycosuric aged diabetics, who often claimed they felt better when hyperglycemic. Hypoglycemia was an ever present danger when anti-diabetic medication was used; it was the main reason for undertreatment. So far, data from our long-term study have not shown morbidity to be markedly increased in the diabetics, and mortality was found to be evenly distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic male residents. However, in the females there was a clear correlation between mortality rate and the diminished glucose tolerance. What may appear as overdiagnosis of diabetes in the aged is recommended in the hope that early institution of dietary treatment will delay the development of clinical diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic agents. This, in turn, would prevent iatrogenic hypoglycemia. It would also reduce the severity and frequency of spontaneous hypoglycemia which, we believe, occurs more commonly in the early phase of diabetes in the aged than is generally realized. PMID:5476778

  6. Blood rheology and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Başkurt, Oğuz K.; Simmonds, Michael J. ; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Geriatric Cardiology (2013) 10: 291301 ©2013 JGC All rights reserved; www.jgc301.com http://www.jgc301.com; | Journal of Geriatric Cardiology Review  Open Access  Blood rheology and aging Michael J. Simmonds1, Herbert J. Meiselman2, Oguz K. Baskurt3 1Heart Foundation Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Keck School of Medicine, University of S...

  7. Aging and space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  8. The aging lung

    OpenAIRE

    Lowery EM; Brubaker AL; Kuhlmann E; Kovacs EJ

    2013-01-01

    Erin M Lowery,1 Aleah L Brubaker,2 Erica Kuhlmann,1 Elizabeth J Kovacs31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center, 2Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAAbstract: There are many age-associated changes in the respiratory and pulmonary immune system. These changes include decreases in the volume of the thoracic cavity, reduced lung volume...

  9. Space age. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Space age had its world premiere at the large-screen Spaceport Theater at Cape Canaveral/Kennedy Spaceport. The first program was screened for invited guests who, that morning, also witnessed a launch of the Space Shuttle. Since that mission carried the first Japanese astronaut, it was a nice tie-in to the substantial co-production participation of space age by NHK Japan. A special press conference for the series and a twenty-minute preview reel was screened for journalists who were also at the Cape for the shuttle launch. Numerous first-hand newspaper articles were generated. CNN ran part of the preview reel. The first episode in the series, `The Quest for Planet Mars,` then ran twice a day for a week, prior to the Public Broadcasting Service broadcast on an Imax format screen at the Spaceport theater. The program was seen by thousands of visitors. Space age also had a special premier at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC with some 400 special guests, including scientists and government agency representatives.

  10. Old age and poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Drenka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of demographic changes in Serbia is followed by discussions on the need to provide safety at old age and solve the problems of poverty and social exclusion of older citizens. In the current state there are no mechanisms that guarantee an adequate life standard at old age, the consequence of which is a high poverty rate, deteriorating health and limited access to social programs. The results of the Survey on life standard from 2002 and 2007 show that poverty among population in general and pensioners has decreased, while the poverty risk among people older than 65 has increased twice. The restrictive methods of the reforms cause a change in the relation between the pensions and the earnings, so that more and more pensioners receive below average, i.e. minimal pensions. Not all old people are covered by pension insurance so that a significant number (around 400.000 does not have a safe monthly income at all. The state program of financial aid is of modest size and does not provide help to all of the poor. Welfare aid decreases the risk of poverty, but it do not guarantee an adequate level of material security at old age. The low level of minimal and average pensions, the decline of participation in the average earnings and the strict criteria of the social security system have brought to awareness the necessity of 'social pensions' and various help and support programs for the elderly. .

  11. [Resilience in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Jiménez, Andrea; López-Díaz, Alba L

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise and analyse articles published on resilience and old-age from 1990-2006. After a systematic search of five databases (Academic Search Premier-Ebsco Host, Medline, Psyc Articles, Ovid and Science Direct) 33 pieces of literature were included in the analysis. The selected articles had 31 different definitions of resilience, from eight disciplines, mainly health-related fields. It was also found that the research studied the association of resilience with individual (68 variables) and social/environmental factors (17 variables); the most frequent were age and health self-perception. Cultural and religious values were of special interest amongst the latter variables. The literature review demonstrated that resilience in old age is a topic having increasing research interest; this has been linked to various individual, social and cultural factors. However, this is a rapidly developing area that requires that a unified definition be established and that a theoretical and intervention model be created. PMID:22031004

  12. Dominance and Age in Bilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsong, David

    2014-01-01

    The present article examines the relationship between age and dominance in bilingual populations. Age in bilingualism is understood as the point in development at which second language (L2) acquisition begins and as the chronological age of users of two languages. Age of acquisition (AoA) is a factor in determining which of a bilingual's two…

  13. Ageing changes in the eye

    OpenAIRE

    Salvi, S M; Akhtar, S; Currie, Z

    2006-01-01

    Ageing changes occur in all the structures of the eye causing varied effects. This article attempts to review the parameters of what is considered within the “normal limits” of ageing so as to be able to distinguish those conditions from true disease processes. Improving understanding of the ageing changes will help understand some of the problems that the ageing population faces.

  14. The aging male project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saad

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing life expectancy and a decreasing reproduction rate, the population structure changes. A Jenapharm R & D program investigates the endocrinology of aging men. In men, a decrease in production of sex steroids and other hormones with age can be observed. The typical patterns of daily rhythmicity become less distinct. This is part of a very complex picture in which not only isolated hormones are involved, but also the influence of hormones on each other. Many factors from the external and intemal environment mediated by neurotransmitters constantly affect the highly sensitive hormonal balance. Therefore, aging has also been defined as "the gradual dysfunction of homeostatic processes". Declining testosterone (T levels are involved in 'andropausal' symptoms in men: loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, insulin receptor resistance, obesity, osteoporosis, disturbances of lipid metabolism, myocardial and circulatory disturbances, impaired well-being and mood. Data are derived from studies in hypogonadal men treated by T replacement. In such parients under T treatment libido increases, fat mass decreases, muscle strenth, bone mineral density and erythropoesis increase. Whether the symptoms of andropause in aging men could successfully be treated by T substitution remains to be investigated. Negative effects of T, especially on the prostate and the cardiovascular system, are under discussion. There is increasing evidence that low T levels seem to be a risk factor for both the prostate and the cardiovascular system. Jenapharm's new testosterone undecanoate formulation for intramuscular injection can be administered every three months. T levels remain within the physiologic range. No supraphysiologic peaks occur. In women, estrogens have beneficial non-genital effects. Studies concentrate on synthetic estrogens for men without feminizing properties such as gynecomastia and reduced testicular size. Several derivatives of 17-

  15. Age aspects of habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, M.; Murthy, J.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2016-04-01

    A `habitable zone' of a star is defined as a range of orbits within which a rocky planet can support liquid water on its surface. The most intriguing question driving the search for habitable planets is whether they host life. But is the age of the planet important for its habitability? If we define habitability as the ability of a planet to beget life, then probably it is not. After all, life on Earth has developed within only ~800 Myr after its formation - the carbon isotope change detected in the oldest rocks indicates the existence of already active life at least 3.8 Gyr ago. If, however, we define habitability as our ability to detect life on the surface of exoplanets, then age becomes a crucial parameter. Only after life had evolved sufficiently complex to change its environment on a planetary scale, can we detect it remotely through its imprint on the atmosphere - the so-called biosignatures, out of which the photosynthetic oxygen is the most prominent indicator of developed (complex) life as we know it. Thus, photosynthesis is a powerful biogenic engine that is known to have changed our planet's global atmospheric properties. The importance of planetary age for the detectability of life as we know it follows from the fact that this primary process, photosynthesis, is endothermic with an activation energy higher than temperatures in habitable zones, and is sensitive to the particular thermal conditions of the planet. Therefore, the onset of photosynthesis on planets in habitable zones may take much longer time than the planetary age. The knowledge of the age of a planet is necessary for developing a strategy to search for exoplanets carrying complex (developed) life - many confirmed potentially habitable planets are too young (orbiting Population I stars) and may not have had enough time to develop and/or sustain detectable life. In the last decade, many planets orbiting old (9-13 Gyr) metal-poor Population II stars have been discovered. Such planets had had

  16. Immune Dysfunction in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Dianne

    2016-08-01

    The aging process in people is associated with changes in adaptive and innate immune responses. Similar changes occur in aged horses. Age-related progressive impairment in the ability to respond to pathogen challenge and an increased inflammatory reactivity may predispose geriatric horses to many diseases of old age. Specific recommendations for immune modification of older horses, including an age-appropriate vaccination schedule, are not currently available. In addition, the effect of old age on risk of infectious disease is poorly documented. More work is needed to better understand the interactions of age on immunity, vaccine response, and disease risk in horses. PMID:27329495

  17. HISTORICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BELIEF IN WEREWOLVES IN WESTERN EUROPEAN SOCIETY FROM THE LATE MIDDLE AGES-EARLY MODERN TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kholina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian historiography in recent decades, there has been increased interest in the problems of everyday life in different historical periods and epochs. Regarding the middle ages and new time, an integral part of everyday life was the belief in the struggle between God and Devil, and Man in this confrontation was one of the conflicting parties. Holy Inquisition has been fighting with the followers of dark forces, witches and apostates – heretics since the XIII century. However, special attention should be paid to the fact that in addition to the above-mentioned victims of the ecclesiastical court, become and other devil's servants are werewolves. An important point is that the belief in creatures that can change their appearance, one way or another is present in all peoples of the world, but the massive scale, amounting to hysteria, she gets in Europe. According to the results of the research, the authors note that theories and facts that shaped the consciousness of man at the crossroads of two historical epochs – the middle ages and modern times, under the influence of Church ideologues and demonic studies, as well as reasoning of the average man which has been formed through the prism of perception of that time, belief in werewolves firmly occupies its own niche in daily life for a long time.

  18. Quantifying the shape of aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrycza, Tomasz F; Missov, Trifon I; Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In Biodemography, aging is typically measured and compared based on aging rates. We argue that this approach may be misleading, because it confounds the time aspect with the mere change aspect of aging. To disentangle these aspects, here we utilize a time-standardized framework and, instead...... of aging rates, suggest the shape of aging as a novel and valuable alternative concept for comparative aging research. The concept of shape captures the direction and degree of change in the force of mortality over age, which—on a demographic level—reflects aging. We 1) provide a list of shape properties...... suggested here aim to provide a general means to classify aging patterns independent of any particular mortality model and independent of any species-specific time-scale. Thereby they support systematic comparative aging research across different species or between populations of the same species under...

  19. 大数据与微时代:虚拟社会公共服务体系的双重建构%Big Data and Micro Age:Double Construction of Virtual Society Public Service System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶鹏

    2015-01-01

    大数据与微时代引发了虚拟社会的多重变革,新的服务理念和服务模式呼之欲出,虚拟社会公共服务的走向、模式、内涵正在发生深刻变化。但是受到推送途径、参与机制、数据基础、保障措施等因素的制约,虚拟社会公共服务的质量和效率相对有限,其体系面临着解构与重构。大数据与微时代是当前虚拟社会公共服务体系建构中不可或缺的重要因素,通过培育公共服务精神、推进虚拟社会公共服务均等化发展、强化多元参与主体间的良性互动、完善虚拟社会公共服务体系建构秩序等途径,科学、合理地对其加以运用,将会有效助推虚拟社会公众服务的不断创新和发展。%Big data and micro age trigger multiple reforms of virtual society,new service theory and service mode are ready to come out,and the trend,mode and connotation of virtual society public service are changing profoundly.Howev-er,due to the restriction of factors like pushing way,participation mechanism,data base,safeguard measures,the quali-ty and efficiency of virtual society public service are relatively limited,and virtual society public service system is faced with deconstruction and reconstruction.Big data and micro age are indispensable significant factors in the construction of current virtual society public service system,and can effectively propel the constant innovation and development of virtual society public service through educating public service spirits,promoting equalization of virtual society public service,in-tensifying the benign interaction of multivariate participants,perfecting construction order of virtual society public service system,and using scientifically and reasonably.

  20. Changing family structure and aging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, H

    1987-12-01

    Rapid industrialization, adaptation of modern values, and rural-urban migration in Korea have led to the replacement of the extended family with the nuclear of conjugal family. In 1980, 13% of Korean households were 1-generational, 70% were 2-generational, 17% were 3-generational and less than 1% were 4-generational. This trend has had serious implications for the aged, who have become increasingly isolated from Korean society. Hindering the adaptation of the aged to modern society are their low educational level, rural concentration, low income, and high rate of female members. Adult children who are well educated and prosperous economically are most likely to refuse to take responsibility for aged parents. Since some 23% of the aged currently live alone, Korean society must assume some of the responsibility that has traditionally been accepted by family members. There is a need for systematic programming that takes into account the current sociodemographic circumstances of Korea's aged population. Incentives such as tax exemptions and aged care allowances should be considered to encourage children to take responsibility for their aged parents. To meet the needs of the growing number of aged who are disabled and without family support, the number of geriatric hospitals and institutions must be expanded. Also important are supplementary programs such as housekeeping services, meals on wheels, and day care. Although the expansion of social welfare programs and institutions for the aged is essential, they can not in themselves meet the emotional needs of the aged that have traditionally been served by family connectedness. PMID:12315151

  1. [Relationships among self concept, perception of aging and physical aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Kim, M S; Choi, Y H

    1988-12-01

    Although everyone grows old, perception about the aging process and aging as measured physiologically vary widely. Perceptions of aging have psychologically influence on physical aging. This study was to examine the relationships between, self-concept, perception of aging, and physical aging in the elderly and to contribute to the theory development which may direct nursing intervention to promote well-being of the aged. Subjects were 70 women residents of a nursing home for the elderly in Seoul. Data collection was done from May 15 to June 15, 1988 using interview schedules and mechanical instruments. The instruments were selected items from the Health Self Concept Scale developed by Jacox and Stewart for self concept, and Secord and Jourad's Body Cathexis Scale and Osgood's Semantic Differential Scale for perception of aging. Physical aging was measured by mechanical instruments, inspection, questions, and palpation. The data were analysed for mean, t-test, ANOVA, and Pearson Correlation Coefficient using an S.P.S.S computerized program. The results of the analysis were as follows. 1. The mean level of self concept for the subject group was 16.97 (SD = +/- 6.17) in a range from 6-30. The mean level of perception of aging was 39.6. (SD = +/- 6.51) in a range from 13-65. The mean level of physical aging was 14.09 (SD = +/- 2.05) in a range from 8-40. 2. Relationships among self-concept, perception of aging, and physical aging. 1) There was a positive relationship between self-concept and perception of aging (r = 0.4461, p = 0.000). 2) There was a negative relationship between physical aging and perception of aging (r = -0.2975, p = 0.006). 3) There was a tendency toward a negative relationship between physical aging and self-concept, but not a significant relationship (r = -0.1033, p = 0.197). 3. 1) No general characteristic variables were related to self concept. 2) The general characteristic variable related to the level of perception of aging was religion (t = 4

  2. Evolutionary theories of aging can explain why we age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourg, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary theories of aging explain why we age. These theories take into account the fact that, in the wild, mean lifespan of many species is usually shorter than it could be in protected environments. In such conditions, because most of animals die before reaching old age, there is no selection in favor or against alleles with effects at old age. Alleles with negative effects at this age can thus accumulate in successive generations, particularly if they also have positive effects at young age and are thus retained by selection. This chapter describes the evolutionary theories of aging and their consequences for the understanding of the biology of aging as well as the challenges to these theories. It is argued that these theories offer a reasonable explanation to the existence of the aging process even if they can surely be refined.

  3. Mathematical Model of Age Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Golovinski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a mathematical model of competition for resources between representatives of different age groups. A nonlinear kinetic integral-differential equation of the age aggression describes the process of redistribution of resources. It is shown that the equation of the age aggression has a stationary solution, in the absence of age-dependency in the interaction of different age groups. A numerical simulation of the evolution of resources for different initial distributions has done. It ...

  4. Interpreting spotted dolphin age distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, Jay; Hohn, Aleta A.

    1984-01-01

    Previous work has determined the age distribution from a sample of spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) killed in the eastern Pacific tuna purse-seine fishery. In this paper we examine the usefulness of this age distribution for estimating natural mortality rates. The observed age distribution has a deficiency of individuals from 5-15 years and cannot represent a stable age distribution. Sampling bias and errors in age interpretation are examined as possible causes of the "dip" in the obs...

  5. AgeFactDB—the JenAge Ageing Factor Database—towards data integration in ageing research

    OpenAIRE

    Hühne, Rolf; Thalheim, Torsten; Sühnel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    AgeFactDB (http://agefactdb.jenage.de) is a database aimed at the collection and integration of ageing phenotype data including lifespan information. Ageing factors are considered to be genes, chemical compounds or other factors such as dietary restriction, whose action results in a changed lifespan or another ageing phenotype. Any information related to the effects of ageing factors is called an observation and is presented on observation pages. To provide concise access to the complete info...

  6. Constructing third age eHealth consumers by using personas from a cultural age perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ekström; E. Loos

    2015-01-01

    Society ages and our already extensive use of a host of different portable devices continues to expand. No leap of the imagination is needed to grasp that an exponential growth of the eHealth market is at hand. While the ageing of the baby boomers will have an impact on the global economy as a whole

  7. A Provocative Perspective on Population Aging and Old-Age Financial Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Holzmann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Population aging is typically associated with economic challenges for productivity and financial threats for the old-age financial protection system of a country. This paper takes an optimistic position and outlines key ingredients to make it a successful experience. Yet to turn this challenge into an opportunity requires a significant change in a society's mindset and policies, such as recognizing that population aging and increased life expectancy are quite likely the biggest challenge to m...

  8. Preschool psychopathology reported by parents in 23 societies: testing the seven-syndrome model of the child behavior checklist for ages 1.5-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Masha Y; Achenbach, Thomas M; Rescorla, Leslie A;

    2010-01-01

    To test the fit of a seven-syndrome model to ratings of preschoolers' problems by parents in very diverse societies.......To test the fit of a seven-syndrome model to ratings of preschoolers' problems by parents in very diverse societies....

  9. School Starting Age and the Crime-Age Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landersø, Rasmus; Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    to a discontinuity in school starting age for children born around New Year. Our analysis speaks against a simple invariant crime-age profile as is popular in criminology: we find that higher school starting age lowers the propensity to commit crime at young ages. We also find effects on the number of crimes......This paper uses register-based data to investigate the effects of school starting age on crime. Through this, we provide insights into the determinants of crime-age profiles. We exploit that Danish children typically start first grade in the calendar year they turn seven, which gives rise...

  10. The new electricity age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhold, Michael; Willnow, Klaus

    2010-09-15

    A sustainable energy system requires optimal integration of all components resulting in an integrated energy system. To setup the integrated energy system three steps have to be completed: 1. Optimal selection and allocation of the Energy Mix 2. Efficiency increase along all steps of the energy conversion chain 3. Holistic optimization across infrastructures and across regions using Smart Grid Technologies Due to greater complexity caused by growing demand for electricity and decentralized generation only end-to-end intelligence from power plants via networks to end-use applications, so-called smart grid technologies will enable the integrated energy system and thus the New Electricity Age.

  11. Ageing in Communal Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke; Grönvall, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we adopt the position that design of social media for the elderly and virtual senior communities may be informed by studying ‘real’ senior communities. Since current research efforts target the role of social media and virtual communities for supporting seniors ageing in place, i...... these findings apply to designers of social media technologies. .......e. in their homes, housing communities seem a natural place to begin this enquiry. We conducted observations and informal interviews in six different senior dwellings. In this paper we present the key findings from these visits related to social interaction and the formation of communities and explicate how...

  12. Ageing in communal place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke; Grönvall, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we adopt the position that design of social media for the elderly and virtual senior communities may be informed by studying `real´senior communities. Since current research efforts target the role of social media and virtual communities for supporting seniors ageing in place, i...... these findings apply to designers of social media technologies........e. in their homes, housing communities seems a natural place to begin this enquiry. We conducted observations and informal interviews in six different senior dwellings. In this paper we present the key findings from these visits related to social interaction and the formation of communities and explicate how...

  13. [Male aspect towards good aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Matti O

    2009-01-01

    Columnist "Kirsti" of Helsingin Sanomat newspaper divided middle age into three stages: early middle age (35-45 years), mid-middle age (45-55) and late middle age (55-65). Similarly, those at 65-75 are living juvenile old age, those at 75-85 midlife old age and those over 85, senescent old age. Classification of these ages according to the years of life does, however, not correspond with personal feelings. The intrinsic relation to life and death may provide a better definition of the stages of life. At the middle age we become aware of the limitation of life and begin to count the remaining years. PMID:19585910

  14. [Feeding and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Zaplana, Isabel; Maestre González, Elena

    2013-06-01

    Aging is characterized by an increase in relative population of 65 years and older, and can say that, in our country, it is a phenomenon demographic, political, social and health. Several studies have shown that the nutritional status of the general population and the elderly, in particular, is a valid indicator to predict longevity and quality of life of this group of people. The World Health Organization (who) pointed out that the elderly population is a group nutritionally very vulnerable as a result of anatomical and physiological changes associated with aging. Between 35-40 of the elderly has some kind of altered nutrition or malnutrition: protein or protein-energy malnutrition, selective deficiency of vitamins and minerals, inadequate water intake, obesity, etc. The best way to promote the quality of life and prevent disease is a proper diet, also called healthy eating, adapted to the special circumstances which older persons may present without forgetting gastronomy is not incompatible with health. In this article, some tips are also available for preparing and cooking food, as well as culinary strategies to introduce them in the daily menu.

  15. [Feeding and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Zaplana, Isabel; Maestre González, Elena

    2013-06-01

    Aging is characterized by an increase in relative population of 65 years and older, and can say that, in our country, it is a phenomenon demographic, political, social and health. Several studies have shown that the nutritional status of the general population and the elderly, in particular, is a valid indicator to predict longevity and quality of life of this group of people. The World Health Organization (who) pointed out that the elderly population is a group nutritionally very vulnerable as a result of anatomical and physiological changes associated with aging. Between 35-40 of the elderly has some kind of altered nutrition or malnutrition: protein or protein-energy malnutrition, selective deficiency of vitamins and minerals, inadequate water intake, obesity, etc. The best way to promote the quality of life and prevent disease is a proper diet, also called healthy eating, adapted to the special circumstances which older persons may present without forgetting gastronomy is not incompatible with health. In this article, some tips are also available for preparing and cooking food, as well as culinary strategies to introduce them in the daily menu. PMID:23909217

  16. Aging and intuitive physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léoni, Véronique; Mullet, Etienne; Chasseigne, Gerard

    2002-07-01

    The present study was aimed at comparing the judgment capacities manifested by young adults, middle-aged adults, and elderly people in an everyday life setting implying the consideration of direct as well as inverse relationships between the cues and the criterion. The chosen situation was borrowed from elementary physics and concerned the relationships between mass, volume and density. In forming their estimations of mass, all elderly people were able to use volume and density information. In addition, most of them were able to combine these pieces of information in a correct, multiplicative way. In forming their estimations of volume, all elderly people were able to use mass and density information but a majority of them used the density information in a direct way. By contrast, most young and middle-aged adults correctly used the density information in an inverse way. The findings strengthen and extend the case made by Chasseigne et al. [Acta Psychologica 97 (1997) 235] as regards the trouble elderly people face in using inverse relationships in a judgment situation. The difficulty elderly people face is not confined to learning settings. It may also be observed in ecological, non-learning environments, where the relationships considered do not entirely depend on the experimenter's choice.

  17. Aging in language dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Human languages evolve continuously, and a puzzling problem is how to reconcile the apparent robustness of most of the deep linguistic structures we use with the evidence that they undergo possibly slow, yet ceaseless, changes. Is the state in which we observe languages today closer to what would be a dynamical attractor with statistically stationary properties or rather closer to a non-steady state slowly evolving in time? Here we address this question in the framework of the emergence of shared linguistic categories in a population of individuals interacting through language games. The observed emerging asymptotic categorization, which has been previously tested--with success--against experimental data from human languages, corresponds to a metastable state where global shifts are always possible but progressively more unlikely and the response properties depend on the age of the system. This aging mechanism exhibits striking quantitative analogies to what is observed in the statistical mechanics of glassy systems. We argue that this can be a general scenario in language dynamics where shared linguistic conventions would not emerge as attractors, but rather as metastable states.

  18. Graduation at age 50+: Contested efforts to construct "third age" identities and negotiate cultural age stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2015-12-01

    The cultural and social contexts of aging have changed a great deal during the last two decades and aging experiences have become more differentiated. However, pervasive age stereotypes still exist that limit the agency and self-perception of older people, and part of the experience of new aging is to actively combat such negative stereotypes. The purpose of this study is to explore how lifelong learning and a degree attainment in midlife become embedded into new aging practices. The study will focus on a specific group of aging workers who attained a Master's degree from Finnish universities in their fifties. In order to better understand the aging experiences of these older graduates, this study seeks to address how they construct the meaning of aging in relation to their own educational and professional status. The data consist of 14 life-history interviews, which were analyzed as narrative identity performances. Differentiating oneself from the stereotype of physical and mental decline and positioning oneself in a favorable way in inter-generational relations were common ways of approaching aging. Age-negotiation and ambivalence about aging were expressed by structuring narratives around clear oppositions and contradictions. University studies at age 50+ became a talking point in countering cultural age-stereotypes, because it showed that aging workers could still accomplish significant goals and "renew" oneself intellectually. University studies also enabled collaboration with the younger generation and the breaking of narrow age boundaries.

  19. Smoking and cognitive change from age 11 to age 80

    OpenAIRE

    Deary, Ian J; Pattie, Alison; M. D. Taylor; Whiteman, Martha C; Starr, John M; Lawrence J Whalley

    2003-01-01

    Age related cognitive decline affects people’s quality of life and their ability to live independently. A recent review stated, "[we] are aware of no studies on the relationship between smoking and cognitive decline associated with normal aging or studies of the effect of smoking on cognition in normally aging individuals." Some previous studies examined smoking in relation to pathological cognitive aging, but lacked cognitive data before the initiation of smoking, and used crude clinical cog...

  20. Perceived age as a biomarker of ageing: a clinical methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, David A; Murray, Peter G; Tomlin, Cyrena C;

    2008-01-01

    of facial ageing is detailed. The methodology utilises facial photographs of subjects to present images to large numbers of age assessors who are primarily nationals of the country of study origin. In five observational studies in five different countries involving 874 female subjects it was found...... measure when large numbers of adult age assessors are used and can be utilised globally in studies to investigate facial ageing....

  1. Aging, Rejuvenation, and Epigenetic Reprogramming: Resetting the Aging Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Rando, Thomas A.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying cause of aging remains one of the central mysteries of biology. Recent studies in several different systems suggest that not only may the rate of aging be modified by environmental and genetic factors, but also that the aging clock can be reversed, restoring characteristics of youthfulness to aged cells and tissues. This Review focuses on the emerging biology of rejuvenation through the lens of epigenetic reprogramming. By defining youthfulness and senescence as epigenetic stat...

  2. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armanios, M.; Cabo, R. de; Mannick, J.; Partridge, L.; Deursen, J. van; Villeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing thr

  3. Modeled ground water age distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The age of ground water in any given sample is a distributed quantity representing distributed provenance (in space and time) of the water. Conventional analysis of tracers such as unstable isotopes or anthropogenic chemical species gives discrete or binary measures of the presence of water of a given age. Modeled ground water age distributions provide a continuous measure of contributions from different recharge sources to aquifers. A numerical solution of the ground water age equation of Ginn (1999) was tested both on a hypothetical simplified one-dimensional flow system and under real world conditions. Results from these simulations yield the first continuous distributions of ground water age using this model. Complete age distributions as a function of one and two space dimensions were obtained from both numerical experiments. Simulations in the test problem produced mean ages that were consistent with the expected value at the end of the model domain for all dispersivity values tested, although the mean ages for the two highest dispersivity values deviated slightly from the expected value. Mean ages in the dispersionless case also were consistent with the expected mean ages throughout the physical model domain. Simulations under real world conditions for three dispersivity values resulted in decreasing mean age with increasing dispersivity. This likely is a consequence of an edge effect. However, simulations for all three dispersivity values tested were mass balanced and stable demonstrating that the solution of the ground water age equation can provide estimates of water mass density distributions over age under real world conditions.

  4. Analyzing an Aging ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, R.

    2014-01-01

    The ISS External Survey integrates the requirements for photographic and video imagery of the International Space Station (ISS) for the engineering, operations, and science communities. An extensive photographic survey was performed on all Space Shuttle flights to the ISS and continues to be performed daily, though on a level much reduced by the limited available imagery. The acquired video and photo imagery is used for both qualitative and quantitative assessments of external deposition and contamination, surface degradation, dynamic events, and MMOD strikes. Many of these assessments provide important information about ISS surfaces and structural integrity as the ISS ages. The imagery is also used to assess and verify the physical configuration of ISS structure, appendages, and components.

  5. Xerostomia in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M

    1989-01-01

    Xerostomia is a symptom associated with a variety of causes. Disorders in the production and transport as well as excessive depletion of saliva may lead to xerostomia. It is difficult to make any general statement about the functional significance of salivary gland changes associated with aging, as the clinical evidence is controversial and data from different studies do not encourage any uniform conclusion. Rational treatments of xerostomias may be performed casually (for example, withdrawal or exchange of drugs inhibiting salivary secretion), but will often only be practical as a symptomatic therapy. Special attention should be directed toward maintenance of adequate oral hygiene in order to prevent clinical complications such as increased dental caries, monilial infection, dysgeusia and tooth sensitivity, which are associated with xerostomia and are often observed in elderly xerostomic patients.

  6. MedlinePlus: Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health screening - women - over 65 Related Health Topics Exercise for Seniors Nutrition for Seniors Seniors' Health National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Healthy Aging is the National Institute on Aging Languages ...

  7. Cognition and brain functional aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-jie LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available China has the largest population of elderly adults. Meanwhile, it is one of the countries showing fastest aging speed in the world. Aging processing is always companied with a series of brain structural and functional changes, which result in the decline of processing speed, working memory, long-term memory and executive function, etc. The studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI found certain aging effects on brain function activation, spontaneous activity and functional connectivity in old people. However, few studies have explored the brain functional curve during the aging process while most previous studies explored the differences in the brain function between young people and old people. Delineation of the human brain functional aging curve will promote the understanding of brain aging mechanisms and support the normal aging monitoring and early detection of abnormal aging changes. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.005

  8. Aging changes in the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003999.htm Aging changes in the breast To use the sharing ... chap 18. Minaker KL. Common clinical sequelae of aging. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. Aging changes in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004011.htm Aging changes in the lungs To use the sharing ... out (exhaled). Watch this video about: Gas exchange AGING CHANGES IN YOUR BODY AND THEIR AFFECTS ON ...

  10. Aging changes in body shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003998.htm Aging changes in body shape To use the sharing ... and both sexes. Height loss is related to aging changes in the bones, muscles, and joints. People ...

  11. Aging changes in the kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004010.htm Aging changes in the kidneys and bladder To use ... in the reproductive system can affect bladder control. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Kidneys and ...

  12. Aging changes in hormone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  13. Employment Age Discrimination on Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄捧

    2015-01-01

    Employment age discrimination against women is not an unusual phenomenon in China.Through describing the present situation and negative effect of this phenomenon,this paper claims laws are very important weapon to eliminate age discrimination against women.

  14. Large for gestational age (LGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002248.htm Large for gestational age (LGA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Large for gestational age means that a fetus or ...

  15. Aging changes in the senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/004013.htm Aging changes in the senses To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. As you age, the way your senses (hearing, vision, taste, smell, touch) give you information ...

  16. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees' shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (M age = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals' perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work. PMID:27458405

  17. Personality Plasticity After Age 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Costa, Paul T.; McCrae, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Rank-order consistency of personality traits increases from childhood to age 30. After that, different summaries of the literature predict a plateau at age 30, or at age 50, or a curvilinear peak in consistency at age 50. These predictions were evaluated at group and individual levels using longitudinal data from the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory over periods of up to 42 years. Consistency declined toward a non-zero asymptote with increasing time-interval. Although some scales showed increasing stability after age 30, the rank-order consistencies of the major dimensions and most facets of the Five-Factor Model were unrelated to age. Ipsative stability, assessed with the California Adult Q-Set, was also unrelated to age. These data strengthen claims of predominant personality stability after age 30. PMID:16861305

  18. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees' shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (M age = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals' perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work.

  19. Personality plasticity after age 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Costa, Paul T; McCrae, Robert R

    2006-08-01

    Rank-order consistency of personality traits increases from childhood to age 30. After that, different summaries of the literature predict a plateau at age 30, or at age 50, or a curvilinear peak in consistency at age 50. These predictions were evaluated at group and individual levels using longitudinal data from the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory for periods of up to 42 years. Consistency declined toward a nonzero asymptote with increasing time interval. Although some scales showed increasing stability after age 30, the rank-order consistencies of the major dimensions and most facets of the Five-Factor Model were unrelated to age. Ipsative stability, assessed with the California Adult Q-Set, also was unrelated to age. These data strengthen claims of predominant personality stability after age 30. PMID:16861305

  20. Aging, rejuvenation, and epigenetic reprogramming: resetting the aging clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Thomas A; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-01-20

    The underlying cause of aging remains one of the central mysteries of biology. Recent studies in several different systems suggest that not only may the rate of aging be modified by environmental and genetic factors, but also that the aging clock can be reversed, restoring characteristics of youthfulness to aged cells and tissues. This Review focuses on the emerging biology of rejuvenation through the lens of epigenetic reprogramming. By defining youthfulness and senescence as epigenetic states, a framework for asking new questions about the aging process emerges. PMID:22265401

  1. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p

  2. Farmer Productivity at Various Ages

    OpenAIRE

    Tauer, Loren W.

    1993-01-01

    The productivity of farmers at six different age cohorts was computed by estimating production functions using 1987 census data. The results suggest that farmers of different ages operate with slightly different technologies and use various inputs at different efficiencies. Compared with previous 1978 estimates, the productivity of middleaged farmers appears to be even greater than the productivity of younger and older farmers. The average age of U.S. farmers exceeds the age of highest produc...

  3. Lithuanian Population Aging Factors Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Agnė Garlauskaitė; Rasa Zabarauskaitė

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to identify the factors that determine aging of Lithuania’s population and to assess the influence of these factors. The article shows Lithuanian population aging factors analysis, which consists of two main parts: the first describes the aging of the population and its characteristics in theoretical terms. Second part is dedicated to the assessment of trends that influence the aging population and demographic factors and also to analyse the determinants of the agin...

  4. The clinical pharmacology of ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, C G

    2003-01-01

    The ageing of populations and individuals continues to be as vital, yet to some extent as neglected, a topic in pharmacology and therapeutics as was first realised about 30 years ago. In parallel with the realisation of the predicted demographic shifts in both the developed and developing world, there have since been major developments in the basic biological concepts of ageing, in the physiology of ageing, in the study of pathogenetic mechanisms underlying a variety of age-associated disorde...

  5. Personality Plasticity After Age 30

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Antonio; Costa, Paul T.; McCrae, Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Rank-order consistency of personality traits increases from childhood to age 30. After that, different summaries of the literature predict a plateau at age 30, or at age 50, or a curvilinear peak in consistency at age 50. These predictions were evaluated at group and individual levels using longitudinal data from the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory over periods of up to 42 years. Consistency declined toward a non-zero asymptote with increasing t...

  6. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  7. 一部从哲学的高度探讨应对人口老龄化的力作——谈《老龄社会的革命》%A Masterpiece Discussion of Coping with Population Aging from the Height of Philosophy—— Talk about the Revolution of Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬沧萍

    2015-01-01

    The Revolution of the Ageing Society is a masterpiece which discuss coping with population aging from the height of philosophy. The book points out that China's thinking and policy of response to population aging should be combined with the macroscopical arrangement of the socialist economy, politics, culture, society and ecological construction, and it should take a long-term view and precautions. The book has detailed materials and explains profound theories in simple languages. This book has the following light spots in aging theories: it puts forward that it is worth discussing moderate aging in science; under the background of population aging, the consideration of the meaning and value of life has important theoretical signiifcance and practical significance; it puts forward that age equal theory should be fully aware theoretically; seeing ifnancial industry as the important condition of sustainable development of an aging society has great theoretical value; it puts forward some ideas which can help people know the essence of pension problem during expounding these problems; it attaches great importance to long-term care in the maintenance of health; it stresses the important role of family and spreads the theory that respect and love the old man all over the world has important ethical and moral values; and it does researches on aging in the international perspective.%《老龄社会的革命》是一部从哲学的高度探讨应对人口老龄化的力作.书中指出,中国应对人口老龄化的思维和政策,要有同社会主义经济、政治、文化、社会、生态建设相结合的宏观布局,要高瞻远瞩,未雨绸缪.全书资料翔实,深入浅出.在老龄理论上,本书具有如下亮点:提出适度老龄化的论点在科学上是有讨论价值的;在人口老龄化背景下,重提必须考虑人生的意义和价值,有着重要的理论意义和现实意义;提出年龄平等理念,在理论上是应该充分认识的;把金融

  8. 一部从哲学的高度探讨应对人口老龄化的力作——谈《老龄社会的革命》%A Masterpiece Discussion of Coping with Population Aging from the Height of Philosophy—— Talk about the Revolution of Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬沧萍

    2015-01-01

    《老龄社会的革命》是一部从哲学的高度探讨应对人口老龄化的力作.书中指出,中国应对人口老龄化的思维和政策,要有同社会主义经济、政治、文化、社会、生态建设相结合的宏观布局,要高瞻远瞩,未雨绸缪.全书资料翔实,深入浅出.在老龄理论上,本书具有如下亮点:提出适度老龄化的论点在科学上是有讨论价值的;在人口老龄化背景下,重提必须考虑人生的意义和价值,有着重要的理论意义和现实意义;提出年龄平等理念,在理论上是应该充分认识的;把金融产业作为老龄化社会持续发展的重要条件,有很大的理论价值;在论述养老问题时提出的一些理念有助于人们认识养老问题的本质;在维护健康上,十分重视长期护理问题;强调家庭的重要作用,并由此推及敬爱天下老人,有重要的伦理道德价值;在国际视野中研究老龄问题.%The Revolution of the Ageing Society is a masterpiece which discuss coping with population aging from the height of philosophy. The book points out that China's thinking and policy of response to population aging should be combined with the macroscopical arrangement of the socialist economy, politics, culture, society and ecological construction, and it should take a long-term view and precautions. The book has detailed materials and explains profound theories in simple languages. This book has the following light spots in aging theories: it puts forward that it is worth discussing moderate aging in science; under the background of population aging, the consideration of the meaning and value of life has important theoretical signiifcance and practical significance; it puts forward that age equal theory should be fully aware theoretically; seeing ifnancial industry as the important condition of sustainable development of an aging society has great theoretical value; it puts forward some ideas which can help people know the essence of

  9. Is the Age Problem Resolved?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Akbar Navabi; Nematollah Riazi

    2003-03-01

    The cosmological, astrophysical, and nucleocosmochronological methods for estimating the age of the universe and the corresponding uncertainties are comparatively studied in the present paper.We are led to the conclusion that the newmeasurements of cosmological parameters, and the recent estimates of the age of globular clusters have led to the gradual disappearance of the age problem from the arena of modern cosmology.

  10. Age and Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, David

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the age factor in second language learning. Sketches some of the relevant research findings that have emerged in the last three decades and hones in on the results recently published on age-related research. Concludes with a discussion of whether there is an age factor in second language learning. (Author/VWL)

  11. Food for the ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, M.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The world’s ageing population is increasing and food professionals will have to address the needs of older generations more closely in the future. This unique volume reviews the characteristics of the ageing population as food consumers, the role of nutrition in healthy ageing and the design of food

  12. Information Literacy: Advancing Opportunities for Learning in the Digital Age. A Report of The Aspen Institute Forum on Communications and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Richard P.; Breivik, Patricia Senn

    This report is an informed observer's interpretation of the discussions that took place at the 1998 annual meeting of the Aspen Institute's Forum on Communications and Society (FOCAS). It summarizes the inquiry made by FOCAS members into the many issues surrounding information literacy, including what information literacy is, why we need an…

  13. Age-specific labor market dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A. C.

    2008-01-01

    One important finding concerns the fact that job separations for older workers constitute mostly a one-way exit out of the labor force, despite the fact that an ageing society calls for an active labor market participation from us all. Also, the allocation of labor for younger workers has shown to b

  14. The Influence of Genetics on Response to Treatment with Ranibizumab (Lucentis) for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Lucentis Genotype Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has a complex etiology arising from genetic and environmental influences. This past decade have seen several genes associated with the disease. Variants in five genes have been confirmed to play a major role. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether genes influence treatment response to ranibizumab for neovascular AMD. The hypothesis was that an individual’s genetic variation will determine treatment response. Methods The study was a two-site prospective open-label observational study of patients newly diagnosed with exudative (neovascular) AMD receiving intravitreal ranibizumab therapy. Treatment-naïve patients were enrolled at presentation and received monthly “as needed” therapy. Clinical data was collected monthly and DNA extracted. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, California) 660-Quad single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Regression analyses were performed to identify SNPs associated with treatment-response end points. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled. No serious adverse events were recorded. The primary outcome measure was change in ETDRS visual acuity at 12 months. A SNP in the CFH gene was found to be associated with less improvement in visual acuity while receiving ranibizumab therapy. The C3 gene, among others, was associated with reduced thickening and improved retinal architecture. VEGFA, FLT1, and CFH were associated with requiring fewer ranibizumab injections over the 12-month study. Conclusions This study is one of the first prospective pharmacogenetic study of intravitreal ranibizumab. Although preliminary, the results identify a number of putative genetic variants, which will be further examined by replication and functional studies to elucidate the complete pharmacogenetic architecture of therapy for AMD. PMID:22253485

  15. Ageing management for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years, ageing of research reactor facilities continues to be an important safety issue. Despite the efforts exerted by operating organizations and regulatory authorities worldwide to address this issue, the need for an improved strategy as well as the need for establishing and implementing a systematic approach to ageing management at research reactors was identified. This paper discusses, on the basis of the IAEA Safety Standards, the effect of ageing on the safety of research reactors and presents a proactive strategy for ageing management. A systematic approach for ageing management is developed and presented together with its key elements, along with practical examples for their application. (author)

  16. Telomere length variations in aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are gene sequences present at chromosomal ends and are responsible for maintaining genome integrity. Telomere length is maximum at birth and decreases progressively with advancing age and thus is considered as a biomarker of chronological aging. This age associated decrease in the length of telomere is linked to various ageing associated diseases like diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, cancer etc. and their associated complications. Telomere length is a result of combined effect of oxidative stress, inflammation and repeated cell replication on it, and thus forming an association between telomere length and chronological aging and related diseases. Thus, decrease in telomere length was found to be important in determining both, the variations in longevity and age-related diseases in an individual. Ongoing and progressive research in the field of telomere length dynamics has proved that aging and age-related diseases apart from having a synergistic effect on telomere length were also found to effect telomere length independently also. Here a short description about telomere length variations and its association with human aging and age-related diseases is reviewed.

  17. Exercise and the Aging Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium plays a critical role in the maintenance of cardiovascular health by producing nitric oxide and other vasoactive materials. Aging is associated with a gradual decline in this functional aspect of endothelial regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, age is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and is in part an important factor in the increased exponential mortality rates from vascular disease such as myocardial infarction and stroke that occurs in the ageing population. There are a number of mechanisms suggested to explain age-related endothelial dysfunction. However, recent scientific studies have advanced the notion of oxidative stress and inflammation as the two major risk factors underlying aging and age-related diseases. Regular physical activity, known to have a favorable effect on cardiovascular health, can also improve the function of the ageing endothelium by modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory processes, as we discuss in this paper.

  18. The steel scrap age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-01

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  19. Wisdom comes with age?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    ‘A relativistic generalization of the Navier-Stokes equations to quark-gluon plasmas’ – the work of a CERN physicist perhaps? No, actually it is the title of a high school student’s project! Thirteen of the world’s brightest young scientific minds were recently treated to a tour of CERN. The Bulletin finds out more. The Intel ISEF students during their visit to CERN.Thirteen science wunderkinds came to CERN for a three-day visit on 29 June. The high school students, aged between 16 and 18, were all winners of this year’s Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), the world’s largest pre-college science competition. As part of their prize they won a visit to CERN organized by the CERN openlab collaboration (see box). "The whole trip has been incredible, and this is my first time in Europe as well so that makes it even more exciting," said Ryan Alexander, just 16 years old, who won in the Energy and Tr...

  20. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  1. Ages and Ages: The Multiplication of Children's "Ages" in Early Twentieth-Century Child Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Clementine

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the trend, between 1905 and the late 1920s in UK and US child psychology, of "discovering," labelling and calculating different "ages" in children. Those new "ages"--from mental to emotional, social, anatomical ages, and more--were understood as either replacing, or meaningfully related to,…

  2. Health screening - men age 65 and older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - over age 65; Physical exam - men - over age 65; Yearly exam - men - over age 65; Checkup - men - over age 65; Men's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - men - over ...

  3. Health screening - women - ages 40 to 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - women - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - women - ages 40 to 64; Women's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  4. Health screening - women - over age 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - over age 65; Physical exam - women - over age 65; Yearly exam - women - over age 65; Checkup - women - over age 65; Women's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - women - over ...

  5. Health screening - women - ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - women - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - women - ages 18 to 39; Women's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  6. Health screening - men - ages 40 to 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - men - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - men - ages 40 to 64; Men's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - men - ages ...

  7. 我国老龄化社会中监护与照护制度的重构%Reconstruction of the Guardianship and Care System in the Aging Society in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽萍

    2014-01-01

    老龄化社会对我国现行的监护制度提出了严峻的挑战。在当今保障人权、尊重自己决定权、维持本人正常化生活的理念之下,应当反思现行监护制度的不足与缺陷,改革现有的监护制度,重视对于老年人的监护与照护制度。在未来的民法典中,应设立老年人监护与照护制度并行的“二元”保护模式,并明确规定任意监护制度,监护与照护的监督制度,以及国家的义务与责任等。%The current guardianship system of China is meeting a great deal of challenges in the aging society .Under the philosophy of the protection of human rights ,the respect for self-determination and normalization of personal life ,we should reflect on existing laws and regulations ,analyze the shortage and legal blank , and reform the guardianship system especially aging guardianship and aging care system .We should establish two modes ,guardianship and aging care system ,in order to protect the elder’ s right and interests in the future Civil Code of China . The self-determined guardianship , the supervision system , the national obligation and responsibility are absolutely necessary to achieve it .

  8. Active ageing and the unmaking of old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    problems. Together, they are crafted into one common statement: activity can unmake old age. Hence, these policies constitute solid formats with specific ideals of the good late life. But when these ideals become entangled with the everyday practices of the elderly, they are transformed in various ways......, in many ways, constitute an unmaking of old age, this is a generative unmaking that creates new forms of the good late life. The dissertation is divided into three parts, in which part 3 is comprised of four published articles. In part 1, I describe my process in the early phases of the project, and how I...... the ethnological diplomat. In chapter 8, I conclude by stating that active ageing attempts to solve the concern of ageing by unmaking old age. However, via this unmaking, something new is generated. In part 3, I demonstrate four different ways to engage in active ageing. In article A, I describe how I participated...

  9. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  10. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagiovanna Caprara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants’ satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished.

  11. THE LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE AGING AND RETIREMENT AGE

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai Robert, PAŞNICU

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to shed light on the policies and consequences of the current retirement age in Romania. The retirement age has been repeatedly incremented in Romania in the last couple of years in order to try to compensate for the fact that the country has a low general employment rate, only 30% of the population, while having 20% of the total population aged 65+. By using an econometric model we will first prove the existence of an optimal retirement age that might vary for each and every o...

  12. Electrical Aging Phenomena of Power Cables Aged by Switching Impulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Cao; A.Zanwar; S.Grzybowski

    2013-01-01

    Due to the insufficient information regarding the aging phenomenon of cables caused by switching impulses,we aged 15 kV XLPE and EPR cable samples by 10000 switching impulses in experiments and tested them.Plus in order to compare the aging phenomenon under multi-stress conditions,additional EPR cable samples were aged by rated AC voltage and current with switching impulses superimposed.We used measurements of partial discharge parameters to monitor the cables' conditions during their aging process,and the AC breakdown voltages measurement to evaluate the cables after aging.Moreover,the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements revealed the changes of insulation materials after aging.The measurement results confirm that the accelerated aging of cable samples had taken place.The impacts of each individual aging factor are shown through the selected measurements and comparison.The study also helps to assess the reliability of the XLPE and EPR cables under similar condition while serving in power systems.

  13. Evolution of ageing since Darwin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael R. Rose; Molly K. Burke; Parvin Shahrestani; Laurence D. Mueller

    2008-12-01

    In the late 19th century, the evolutionary approach to the problem of ageing was initiated by August Weismann, who argued that natural selection was more important for ageing than any physiological mechanism. In the mid-twentieth century, J. B. S. Haldane, P. B. Medawar and G. C. Williams informally argued that the force of natural selection falls with adult age. In 1966, W. D. Hamilton published formal equations that showed mathematically that two ‘forces of natural selection’ do indeed decline with age, though his analysis was not genetically explicit. Brian Charlesworth then developed the required mathematical population genetics for the evolution of ageing in the 1970’s. In the 1980’s, experiments using Drosophila showed that the rate of ageing evolves as predicted by Hamilton’s ‘forces of natural selection’. The discovery of the cessation of ageing late in life in the 1990’s was followed by its explanation in terms of evolutionary theory based on Hamilton’s forces. Recently, it has been shown that the cessation of ageing can also be manipulated experimentally using Hamilton’s ‘forces of natural selection’. Despite the success of evolutionary research on ageing, mainstream gerontological research has largely ignored both this work and the opportunity that it provides for effective intervention in ageing.

  14. Aging China -- policies in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusberg, C

    1987-01-01

    The International Forum on Aging was held in Beijing, China, in May of 1986 under the joint sponsorship of the Gerontological Society of America and the Chinese National Committee on Aging. 24 Chinese and American participants were also joined by experts from Canada, Australia, Hong Kong, Thailand, and Japan. Older persons in the West are by and large economically independent of their children and live in separate households. Nevertheless, both in the US and China families remain the preferred source of support for older persons. As a result of successful family planning policies, China will undergo a demographic transition in several decades that took a century in the West. This will result in the decline in the network of relatives, on which China's family support system has rested. Societal adjustments will have to be made including expanded joint ventures among government, families, neighborhoods, and collectives to provide for the old preferably in their own homes. The elderly will also participate more in economic and social development because of improved health, higher education, and declines in co-residency. For instance, an association of retired engineers in Chongqing has assisted over 6000 groups since 1980 through technical consultation for small enterprises in towns and rural areas. In 1987 only 6% of the rural population received some kind of pension, but policy makers envisage several different forms of social security schemes for the rural elderly. China's elderly population over 60 is projected to increase from 130 million in 2000 to 370 million in 2050, or from 11% to 26% of the total population. A Japanese model worth examining by China is the practice of combined occupation household, which permits rural areas to modernize while preserving the three-generation family household. The elderly continue to perform agricultural work on family property, while the younger family members take jobs in more urbanized nearby areas. PMID:12291355

  15. Estimating The Age-Productivity Profile Using Lifetime Earnings

    OpenAIRE

    Kotlikoff, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    Understanding how productivity varies with age is important for a variety of reasons. A decline in productivity with age implies that aging societies must increasingly depend on the labor supply of the young and middle age. It also means that policies designed to keep the elderly in the work force, while potentially good for the elderly, may decrease overall productivity. A third implication is that, absent government intervention, employers may not be willing to hire the elderly for the same...

  16. The aging memory: Modulating epigenetic modifications to improve cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is a major concern in society. Here, I discuss recent evidence that shows an age-related modulation of gene transcription by epigenetic modifications. Epigenetic modifications, such as histone acetylation, is unbalanced in aging, with an increase in histone deacetylation, that limits the expression of plasticity-related genes. By modifying the balance towards histone acetylation, histone deacetylase inhibitors present a new pharmacological approach to ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits.

  17. Successful aging and the epidemiology of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance DE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available David E Vance1, Teena McGuinness1, Karen Musgrove3, Nancy Ann Orel4, Pariya L Fazeli21School of Nursing, 2Department of Psychology and Center for Research in Applied Gerontology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 3Birmingham AIDS Outreach, Birmingham, AL, USA; 4Gerontology Program, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USAAbstract: By 2015, it is estimated that nearly half of those living with HIV in the US will be 50 years of age and older. This dramatic change in the demographics of this clinical population represents unique challenges for patients, health care providers, and society-at-large. Fortunately, because of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and healthy lifestyle choices, it is now possible for many infected with HIV to age successfully with this disease; however, this depends upon one’s definition of successful aging. It is proposed that successful aging is composed of eight factors: length of life, biological health, cognitive efficiency, mental health, social competence, productivity, personal control, and life satisfaction. Unfortunately, HIV and medication side effects can compromise these factors, thus diminishing one’s capacity to age successfully with this disease. This article explores how HIV, medication side effects from HAART, and lifestyle choices can compromise the factors necessary to age successfully. Implications for practice and research are posited.Keywords: HIV, AIDS, successful aging, spirituality, depression, hardiness

  18. Ageing of ships, LPG tankers

    OpenAIRE

    Ask, Martin

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades there have been several major ship accidents, and it is believed that old ships are more unsafe than newer ships. To get a better understanding of this phenomenon the thesis is investigating different issues with ship ageing. This thesis consists of a general description of the most important ageing issues, and the condition of sea water ballast tanks is identified as one of the most critical issue regarded to ageing on LPG-tankers. This investigation consists of...

  19. Control of NPP aging processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the control program on the NPP aging processes is considered. The methodological algorithms for the working programs plotting and realization, intended for accomplishing the measures for mitigating the aging mechanisms and factors, effecting the NPP safety, are presented. The efficiency of the equipment for the aging processes control and power units systems, aimed at the control of the NPP service life, is analyzed

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Andi Wijaya

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of...

  1. Postponing the legal retirement age

    OpenAIRE

    Lacomba, Juan Antonio; Lagos, Francisco Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reform of the pensionable age as an answer to the future financing problems of public pension systems. We use a two-staged model where, first, the government decides the redistribution level of the pension system and, secondly, individuals face a voting process on the legal retirement age. The results suggest that governments attempting to postpone the legal retirement age should increase the degree of intra-generational redistribution of the pension system in order to...

  2. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna Regina; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to pro...... to promote mobility in old age.......Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways...

  3. [Environmentally induced (extrinsic) skin aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutmann, J; Schikowski, T; Hüls, A; Vierkötter, A; Grether-Beck, S

    2016-02-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, particularly as a component of natural sunlight, is a major cause of environmentally induced aging of the skin. In addition, other environmental factors for premature skin aging include longer wavelength radiation in the visible light region and in particular in the shortwave infrared radiation region. Furthermore, particulate and gaseous components of air pollution significantly contribute to the aging process. PMID:26769311

  4. Aging and consumer decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Stephanie M.; Yoon, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Research on consumer decision making and aging is especially important for fostering a better understanding of ways to maintain consumer satisfaction and high decision quality across the life span. We provide a review of extant research on the effects of normal aging on cognition and decision processes and how these age-related processes are influenced by task environment, meaningfulness of the task, and consumer expertise. We consider how research centered on these topics generates insights ...

  5. Nutrients for the aging eye

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen HM; Johnson EJ

    2013-01-01

    Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-infla...

  6. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin; Minh Lam; Baron, Elma D.

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermo...

  7. Leisure in old age – disciplinary practices surrounding the discourse of active ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Hasmanová Marhánkova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, the World Health Organization adopted the term ‘‘active ageing’’, which currently represents a key vision of old age in Western societies facing the situation of demographic ageing. The meaning of the idea of active ageing is based on the concept of individuals actively and systematically influencing the conditions of their ageing through selfresponsibility and self-care. The aim of this article is to map how the idea of active ageing is constructed and the implications it presents with regard to the way in which seniors relate to their experience of old age. It concentrates on a pecific segment of senior-oriented social services (centres for seniors that offer leisure time activities and educational courses that represent an institutional context for the manifestation of the discourse of active ageing. A three-year ethnographic study was conducted in two such centres in the Czech Republic. The article focuses on various strategies for the disciplining of the ageing body. It points out that these disciplinary practices are an integral part of the daily running of the centres and that the seniors who intensively engage in them have internalised the idea of an active lifestyle as the most desirable lifestyle in old age. Active ageing was constructed by them as a project that must be worked on. Through the ‘‘technologies of self’’ embedded in the imperative of the necessity to move or do something, they participate in the production of the discourse of active ageing as a form of discipline of the body. At the same time, the article outlines how the idea of active ageing as the ‘‘correct’’ form of ageing influences the self-conception of these seniors and their attitudes towards ageing and their peers.

  8. Imaging in the Age of Precision Medicine: Summary of the Proceedings of the 10th Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christian J; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wibmer, Andreas G; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Dixon, Adrian K; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Geckle, Rena J; Muellner, Ada; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade, with its breakthroughs in systems biology, precision medicine (PM) has emerged as a novel health-care paradigm. Challenging reductionism and broad-based approaches in medicine, PM is an approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle. It involves integrating information from multiple sources in a holistic manner to achieve a definitive diagnosis, focused treatment, and adequate response assessment. Biomedical imaging and imaging-guided interventions, which provide multiparametric morphologic and functional information and enable focused, minimally invasive treatments, are key elements in the infrastructure needed for PM. The emerging discipline of radiogenomics, which links genotypic information to phenotypic disease manifestations at imaging, should also greatly contribute to patient-tailored care. Because of the growing volume and complexity of imaging data, decision-support algorithms will be required to help physicians apply the most essential patient data for optimal management. These innovations will challenge traditional concepts of health care and business models. Reimbursement policies and quality assurance measures will have to be reconsidered and adapted. In their 10th biannual symposium, which was held in August 2013, the members of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology discussed the opportunities and challenges arising for the imaging community with the transition to PM. This article summarizes the discussions and central messages of the symposium. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26465058

  9. School Starting Age and Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landersø, Rasmus; Nielsen, Helena Skyt; Simonsen, Marianne

    This paper investigates the effects of school starting age on crime while relying on variation in school starting age induced by administrative rules; we exploit that Danish children typically start first grade in the calendar year they turn seven, which gives rise to a discontinuity in children’s...... school starting age. Analyses are carried out using register-based Danish data. We find that higher age at school start lowers the propensity to commit crime, but that this reduction is caused by incapacitation while human capital accumulation is unaffected. Importantly, we also find that the individuals...

  10. Australia: the coming of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, A C

    1988-01-01

    Current demographic trends in Australia and their implications are assessed. The author concludes that "Australia faces a relatively favourable demographic future: ageing is proceeding at a slower pace here, the pattern of the labour force ageing is conducive to restructuring in the intermediate future, and a well-established immigration policy can be used to accommodate demographics with social and economic goals. The financing of social services for the aged will produce fewer concerns here partly because of less immediate demographic pressures and partly because of the orientation of the age-pension system." PMID:12233479

  11. [Medical drug abuse and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nubukpo, Philippe; Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is often underestimated among the aged. Opiate drugs (mostly pain killers) are the most frequently implicated in drug addiction after benzodiazepines (BZD) in the aged. The subjects aged of 65 years or more are the most represented among the BZD users in France. Frequency of BZD use varies according to various studies from 39 to 55% in this age group. Leading a lonely life is associated with the use of psychotropic drugs among retired people (OR=1.7). Vulnerability at this age must take into account not only polypathology, but also the faster aging of a minority of the population under opiate drugs substitution treatment (OST), more subjects to drugs interaction. Drug addiction among elderly often reflects the drift of "lawful" doctor's instructions that leads to an increase in drugs use. The difficulty has to do with a lack of specificity of diagnosis of addiction at this age, but perhaps also with physicans'instructions in the aged. Some authors suggest that continued and prolonged use should be considered the main criterion for BZD addiction at this age, with or without increase in doses and failed attempt at cessation. Besides, the prescription of BZD increases after retirement and loneliness.

  12. Relationships between Housing and Healthy Aging in Very Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Frank; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Schilling, Oliver; Nygren, Carita; Fange, Agneta; Sixsmith, Andrew; Sixsmith, Judith; Szeman, Zsuzsa; Tomsone, Signe; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to examine the relationship between aspects of objective and perceived housing and aspects of healthy aging, defined as independence in daily activities and subjective well-being. Furthermore, this research examined the comparability of relationships between housing and healthy aging in the five European countries.…

  13. Autologous stem cell transplantation for patients aged 60 years or older with refractory or relapsed classical Hodgkin's lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoullas, A; Brice, P; Gueye, M S; Mareschal, S; Chevallier, P; Bouabdallah, R; Nguyenquoc, S; Francois, S; Turlure, P; Ceballos, P; Monjanel, H; Bourhis, J-H; Guillerm, G; Mohty, M; Biron, P; Cornillon, J; Belhadj, K; Bonmati, C; Dilhuydy, M-S; Huynh, A; Bernard, M; Chrétien, M-L; Peffault de Latour, R; Tilly, H

    2016-07-01

    This report retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 91 patients aged 60 years or older with refractory/relapsed (R/R) classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) between 1992 and 2013 and were reported to the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies registry. The median age at transplant was 63 years. The majority of patients exhibited disease chemosensitivity to salvage treatment (57 complete responses, 30 partial responses, 1 progressive disease and 3 unknown). The most frequent conditioning regimen consisted of BCNU, cytarabine, etoposide, melphalan (BEAM) chemotherapy (93%). With a median follow-up of 54 months, 5-year estimates of overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) for the entire group were 67 and 54%, respectively. Despite the missing data, in univariate analysis, the number of salvage chemotherapy lines (1-2 versus ⩾3) significantly influenced the OS, unlike the other prognostic factors (stage III-IV at relapse, disease status before ASCT and negative positron emission tomography (PET) scan) encountered in younger patients. In spite of its limitations, this retrospective study with a long-term follow-up suggests that ASCT is a valid treatment option for chemosensitive R/R cHL in selected elderly patients, with an acceptable rate of toxicity.

  14. The aging mouth: differentiating normal aging from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamster, Ira B; Asadourian, Lynda; Del Carmen, Tessa; Friedman, Paula K

    2016-10-01

    Aging is the physiologic change that occurs over time. In humans, this change occurs at different rates and are related to lifestyle, environment and genetics. It can be challenging to differentiate normal aging from disease. In the oral cavity, with increasing age the teeth demonstrate wearing of the enamel, chipping and fracture lines, and a darker color. The pulp chamber and canals are reduced in size as a result of the deposition of secondary dentin. Coronal or root caries, however, represent disease. A limited amount of periodontal attachment loss occurs in association with aging, usually manifesting as recession on the buccal surface of teeth. Severe periodontitis occurs in 10.5-12% of the population, with the peak incidence being observed at 35-40 years of age. Changes to the mucosal tissue that occur with age include reduced wound-healing capacity. However, environmental factors, such as smoking, dramatically increase the risk of mucosal pathology. Reduced salivary gland function is often seen in association with medication usage, as well as with disorders such as diabetes mellitus. Both medication use and chronic disorders are more common in older adults. Masticatory function is of particular importance for older adults. Maintenance of a nutritionally complete diet is important for avoiding sarcopenia and the frailty syndrome. Successful oral aging is associated with adequate function and comfort. A reduced, but functional, dentition of 20 teeth in occlusion has been proposed as a measure of successful oral aging. Healthy oral aging is important to healthy aging from both biological and social perspectives. PMID:27501493

  15. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new

  16. Age and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noth, R H; Mazzaferri, E L

    1985-02-01

    The pattern of age-induced changes in each endocrine system is unique. Both hormone levels and target organ responsivity are altered in the aging endocrine-cardiovascular system. Serum levels of vasopressor hormones both increase (norepinephrine) and decrease (renin, aldosterone). Target organ responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation in the heart and probably also in vascular smooth muscle decrease due to postreceptor changes. These effects contribute to the clinical problems of hypertension and orthostatic hypotension which characterize the elderly. Aging produces mild carbohydrate intolerance and a minimal increase in fasting serum glucose in healthy, nonobese individuals, primarily due to decreasing postreceptor responsiveness to insulin. Aging decreases the metabolism of thyroxine, including its conversion to triiodothyronine, but clinically significant alterations of thyroid hormone levels do not occur. Changes in the end-organ response to thyroid hormones, however, significantly alter the clinical presentation of thyroid diseases. Aging shifts the serum vasopressin-serum osmolality relationship toward higher serum vasopressin levels probably due to altered baroreceptor input, probably contributing to the tendency toward hyponatremia in the elderly. Aging slows the metabolism of cortisol, but glucocorticoid levels in the human are essentially unaltered by age. However, recent data indicate that delta-5 adrenal steroids decrease markedly in both men and women. Nodules in the anterior pituitary, the thyroid, and the adrenal increase in frequency with aging. Finally, the reproductive system is primarily altered by endocrine cell death, by unknown mechanisms, resulting in decreased estrogen and testosterone levels in women and men. This most obvious age-related endocrine change turns out to be incompletely understood and is not representative of most age-related endocrine changes. Despite characterization of these many age-related alterations in endocrine systems

  17. Medicalization of women's third age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufert, P A; Lock, M

    1997-06-01

    Medicalization usually refers to the process whereby the normal processes of pregnancy, childbirth, menstruation and menopause have been claimed and redefined by medicine. Rather than discussing medicalization and menopause in terms of the number of women taking hormones, or the percentage of physicians convinced they should prescribe them, this paper looks at the visual image of the menopausal woman as portrayed in the pharmaceutical literature and in the mass media. Unlike the depressed and sickly looking women shown in the pharmaceutical advertisements in the 1970s, this 1990s version of the menopausal woman is shown glowing with fitness, with well-maintained teeth, hair and skin, far too fit to break a hip, have a heart attack, or witness the slow destruction of their minds by Alzheimer's disease. This image is not to be confused with the reality of being a menopausal woman, yet the two are intimately intertwined, for the image determines how menopausal women see themselves and how they are seen in the wider society. The final section of the paper discusses how health is the new virtue for women as they age as each individual is held responsible for what happens to her body, particularly in terms of the decisions made at the time of menopause. PMID:9219103

  18. AGES in brain ageing: AGE-inhibitors as neuroprotective and anti-dementia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukic-Stefanovic, S; Schinzel, R; Riederer, P; Münch, G

    2001-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, age-related cellular changes such as compromised energy production and increased radical formation are worsened by the presence of AGEs as additional, AD specific stress factors. Intracellular AGEs (most likely derived from methylglyoxal) crosslink cytoskeletal proteins and render them insoluble. These aggregates inhibit cellular functions including transport processes and contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death. Extracellular AGEs, which accumulate in ageing tissue (but most prominently on long-lived protein deposits like the senile plaques) exert chronic oxidative stress on neurons. In addition, they activate glial cells to produce free radicals (superoxide and NO) and neurotoxic cytokines such as TNF-alpha. Drugs, which inhibit the formation of AGEs by specific chemical mechanisms (AGE-inhibitors), including aminoguanidine, carnosine, tenilsetam, OPB-9195 and pyridoxamine, attenuate the development of (AGE-mediated) diabetic complications. Assuming that 'carbonyl stress' contributes significantly to the progression of Alzheimer's disease, AGE-inhibitors might also become interesting novel therapeutic drugs for treatment of AD. PMID:11708614

  19. Age and Clinical Dengue Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Joseph R.; Paul G Coleman

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between age and risk for classic dengue fever has never been quantified. We use data from clinical patients to show that the relative risk of having classical disease after primary dengue virus infection increases with age. This relationship has implications for strategies aimed at controlling dengue fever.

  20. The Multi-age Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Deborah C.

    2003-01-01

    Presents strategies for planning lessons for home-schoolers, science circuses, and summer science programs with multi-age groups of children. Suggests a spiraling curriculum centered on big ideas and varying a common activity in mixed-ability classrooms. Includes examples of activities for multi-age groups. (KHR)

  1. Brain aging and therapeutic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book brings together most up-to-date information on different aspects of brain aging and on the strategies for intervention and therapy of age-related brain disorders. It includes 18 chapters by leading researchers, and each chapter is a comprehensive and critical review of the topic...

  2. The Several Ages of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephen

    1976-01-01

    Examines the various stages of human development (as outlined by Erik Erikson and others) with their psychological stresses of recurring crises of identity and expectation and explores some of the implications for education's best serving human needs. Focuses on early childhood, late adolescence, middle age, and old age. (JT)

  3. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  4. Chinese Middle-Aged Confusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENXINXIN

    2003-01-01

    THE middle-aged generation,those of the age 40 to 55, is special in China. Born in the 1950s and early 1960s, they grew up in the most difficult and chaotic periods of recent Chinese history, having experienced and suffered the Great Leap Forward at the end of the fifties and the “cultural revolution” ( 1966-1976).

  5. Age distribution of anginose mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirer, Z; Holtzman, M; Melamed, I; Shalit, I

    1987-01-01

    The age distribution of anginose infectious mononucleosis in children was analysed retrospectively for the years 1966-85. During that period the disease became significantly more common in children of a young age and less common in older children. This shift could not be attributed either to socioeconomic conditions or to the diagnostic methods used. PMID:3619480

  6. Mobility decline in old age

    OpenAIRE

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways to promote mobility in old age.

  7. Appropriate for gestational age (AGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal age; Gestation; Development - AGA; Growth - AGA; Neonatal care - AGA; Newborn care - AGA ... can range from 38 to 42 weeks. Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to measure the size ...

  8. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  9. Telomerase and the aging process

    OpenAIRE

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    The level of telomerase activity is important in determining telomere length in aging cells and tissues. Here evidence on the importance of telomerase activity is reviewed with respect to aging rates of mammalian species and the health and life span of individuals within a species. The significance of telomerase reactivation for both cancer development and for immortalizing cells for therapeutic processes is assessed.

  10. Innovatie in de digital age....

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reep, Frans van der

    2013-01-01

    1e alinea column: Hoe ziet innovatie in de digital age eruit? Anders dan daarvoor? Is succes van innovatie in de digital age wel voorspelbaar? Bestaat er zoiets als een business logica voor innovatie? Voor echt nieuwe business is dat maar heel beperkt zo. Er zijn geen marktvoorbeelden waar je naar k

  11. ESTIMATION OF AGE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZINTER, JUDITH R.

    THIS NOTE DESCRIBES THE PROCEDURES USED IN DETERMINING DYNAMOD II AGE TRANSITION MATRICES. A SEPARATE MATRIX FOR EACH SEX-RACE GROUP IS DEVELOPED. THESE MATRICES WILL BE USED AS AN AID IN ESTIMATING THE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES IN THE LARGER DYNAMOD II MATRIX RELATING AGE TO OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES. THREE STEPS WERE USED IN THE PROCEDURE--(1)…

  12. Leading in a Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadgir, Sheri A.

    2011-01-01

    Technology is advancing more rapidly than at any time in history since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. In fact, experts say that the world is leaving the Industrial Age of the 20th century and entering an Information Age that will lead into the future. These advances mean that important changes are being made in all areas of life--and…

  13. Test Anxiety: Age Appropriate Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David B.; Driscoll, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The presentation covers information on test anxiety reduction strategies from over thirty years of experience with clients of a variety of ages. Dr. Ross is from the College of Lake County. Dr. Driscoll is a private practitioner and Director of the American Test Anxieties Association. The purpose is to address age appropriate test anxiety…

  14. Integration of the ageing workforce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenn, M.; Oehlke, P.; Kees, H.; Leonard, L.; Wendelen, E.; Linkola, P.; Neubauer, G.; Vries, S. de; O'Kelly, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    The age structure in Europe and other industrialized countries is changing as a result of declining birth rates and continuous rise in life expectancy. This report shows the facts and figures of an ageing workforce. It also describes the predjudices, personnel policies and problems connected to the

  15. Changing Age and Household Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerg Jacobsen, Rasmus; Hougaard Jensen, Svend E.

    2014-01-01

    finances by almost 1% of GDP on the yearly budget. While the net fiscal effect of changing household structures is minor, the gross effects are substantial. In a future characterized by population ageing, public finances may be adversely affected by changes in both age and household structures, thus...

  16. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Aging in the olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Arie S; Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J; Imamura, Fumiaki; Greer, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    With advancing age, the ability of humans to detect and discriminate odors declines. In light of the rapid progress in analyzing molecular and structural correlates of developing and adult olfactory systems, the paucity of information available on the aged olfactory system is startling. A rich literature documents the decline of olfactory acuity in aged humans, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Using animal models, preliminary work is beginning to uncover differences between young and aged rodents that may help address the deficits seen in humans, but many questions remain unanswered. Recent studies of odorant receptor (OR) expression, synaptic organization, adult neurogenesis, and the contribution of cortical representation during aging suggest possible underlying mechanisms and new research directions.

  18. Nutraceuticals, aging, and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Zicker, Steven C

    2004-01-01

    Decline in cognitive function that accompanies aging in dogs might have a biological basis, and many of the disorders associated with aging in canines might be preventable through dietary modifications that incorporate specific nutraceuticals. Based on previous research and the results of laboratory and clinical studies, antioxidants might be one class of nutraceutical that benefits aged dogs. Brains of aged dogs accumulate oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, which can lead to dysfunction of neuronal cells. The production of free radicals and lack of increase in compensatory antioxidant enzymes might lead to detrimental modifications to important macromolecules within neurons. Reducing oxidative damage through food ingredients rich in a broad spectrum of antioxidants significantly improves, or slows the decline of, learning and memory in aged dogs; however, determining which compounds, combinations, dosage ranges, when to initiate intervention, and long-term effects constitute critical gaps in knowledge about this subject.

  19. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, D.R.; Smith, D.W.; Vucetich, J.A.; Mech, L.D.; Stahler, D.R.; Packer, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Aging and skilled problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charness, N

    1981-03-01

    Information-processing models of problem solving too often are based on restrictive age ranges. On the other hand, gerontologists have investigated few problem-solving tasks and have rarely generated explicit models. As this article demonstrates, both fields can benefit by closer collaboration. One major issue in gerontology is whether aging is associated with irreversible decrement or developmental plasticity. If both processes occur, then an appropriate strategy for investigating aging is to equate age groups for molar problem-solving performance and search for differences in the underlying components. This strategy was adopted to examine the relation of age and skill to problem solving in chess. Chess players were selected to vary widely in age and skill such that these variables were uncorrelated. Problem-solving and memory tasks were administered. Skill level was the only significant predictor for accuracy in both a choose-a-move task and a speeded end-game evaluation task. Age (negatively) and skill (positively) jointly determined performance in an unexpected recall task. Efficient chunking in recall was positively related to skill, though negatively related to age. Recognition confidence, though not accuracy, was negatively related to age. Thus despite age-related declines in encoding and retrieval of information, older players match the problem-solving performance of equivalently skilled younger players. Apparently, they can search the problem space more efficiently, as evidenced by taking less time to select an equally good move. Models of chess skill that stress that role of encoding efficiency, as indexed by chunking in recall, need to be modified to account for performance over the life span.

  1. Space Age Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, the Egyptian Antiques Organization (EAO) asked Dr. Farouk El-Baz whether it would be possible to examine and sample the second chamber of the subterranean chamber carved in the bedrock near the Great Pyramid of Khufu in Giza, Egypt, without admitting people, air or contaminants. He felt it could by applying space technology to the task. The initial contact led to a two year project which he organized and headed a team, co-sponsored by EAO and the National Geographic Society (NGS), to apply space technology in an effort to examine and photograph the Giza Chamber. The NGS photographic division modified and tested a remotely controlled video system and a 35-millimeter camera, and developed a lighting system that would not elevate the chamber temperature. Still needed was a drill to cut through the limestone cap without using lubricants or cooling fluids that might contaminate the chamber, and an airlock that would admit the drill shaft and photo equipment but not the air. Bob Moores from Black & Decker Corporation tailored a new drill to the Giza exploration. The drill bit broke through into the chamber at a depth of 63 inches, a stainless steel tube was lowered through the airlock to take samples of the chamber air at several levels. The video camera sent images from the chamber revealing that there was a disassembled royal boat that had been there.

  2. The quality control theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Ladiges

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality control (QC theory of aging is based on the concept that aging is the result of a reduction in QC of cellular systems designed to maintain lifelong homeostasis. Four QC systems associated with aging are 1 inadequate protein processing in a distressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER; 2 histone deacetylase (HDAC processing of genomic histones and gene silencing; 3 suppressed AMPK nutrient sensing with inefficient energy utilization and excessive fat accumulation; and 4 beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR signaling and environmental and emotional stress. Reprogramming these systems to maintain efficiency and prevent aging would be a rational strategy for increased lifespan and improved health. The QC theory can be tested with a pharmacological approach using three well-known and safe, FDA-approved drugs: 1 phenyl butyric acid, a chemical chaperone that enhances ER function and is also an HDAC inhibitor, 2 metformin, which activates AMPK and is used to treat type 2 diabetes, and 3 propranolol, a beta blocker which inhibits BAR signaling and is used to treat hypertension and anxiety. A critical aspect of the QC theory, then, is that aging is associated with multiple cellular systems that can be targeted with drug combinations more effectively than with single drugs. But more importantly, these drug combinations will effectively prevent, delay, or reverse chronic diseases of aging that impose such a tremendous health burden on our society.

  3. What Causes Our Skin to Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Younger skin Causes of aging skin Creating anti-aging plan Fillers giving patients better, longer-lasting results Maximizing anti-aging products Selecting anti-aging products Sun damage Wrinkle ...

  4. Health screening - men - ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - men - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - men - ages 18 to 39; Men's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care exam - men - ...

  5. Exercise Promotes Healthy Aging of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartee, Gregory D; Hepple, Russell T; Bamman, Marcas M;

    2016-01-01

    Primary aging is the progressive and inevitable process of bodily deterioration during adulthood. In skeletal muscle, primary aging causes defective mitochondrial energetics and reduced muscle mass. Secondary aging refers to additional deleterious structural and functional age-related changes cau...

  6. Ageing Populations in Post-Industrial Democracies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhuysse, Pieter; Goerres, Achim

    by the age of the electorate (particularly pension reform and generosity), while it seems that the interests of the elderly are not necessarily privileged during the design of labour market reforms.’ - Intergenerational Justice Review‘Pieter Vanhuysse and Achim Goerres wish to shed light on the consequences...... of the state against the interests of a growing elderly voting bloc to safeguard fiscal viability, and looks at highly-topical responses such as pension cuts and increasing retirement age. It also examines the rise of ‘grey parties’, and asks what, if anything, makes such pensioner parties persist over time...... productive as they are politically contentious.' - Martin Kohli, Professor of Sociology, European University Institute Florence 'The process of population ageing has been compared to a seismic shift which has profound consequences on all aspects of our societies but is too slow to make headlines or matter...

  7. Third-Age Education in Canada and Japan: Attitudes toward Aging and Participation in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Shigeo; Cusack, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong learning is essential to participation in society, and presents important challenges for educational gerontology. This study compares Canadian and Japanese perspectives on (a) attitudes toward aging, (b) the learning needs of older adults, and (c) the role of centers of learning. Surveys were conducted of sample populations in two elder…

  8. Transgender, aging and old age - Do transgender people get old?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Sammarco Antunes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to understand transgender aging context in Brazil. Normal and abnormal were especially created by biological sciences. For being considered deviants, transgender people are not seen as human beings. They end up living in violent environments. Their life expectancy is low. Many of them do not believe to reach old age. They face a lot of prejudice and death threat. Those who get to what we call old age are considered survivals. This investigation was able to show satisfactorily their demands and needs. To be considered visible, they have to count on public policies to give them existence since their childhood. That way, we believe they will reach what we call old age with respect and dignity, already assured by the Universal Human Rights.

  9. Inflammation in Aging and Age-related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikeno

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The San Antonio Nathan Shock Center Conferences have attracted international speakers and participants since 1995. This annual conference, held in Bandera, Texas, USA, addresses a different topic in the biology of aging each year. The venue's intimate setting, relatively remote location, and common areas are ideal for a small conference (80–100 participants, where copious informal intellectual interchange supplements that of the formal sessions. The 2011 meeting, part of an annual series sponsored by the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, TX, USA, and the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Biology of Aging, addressed the causes of age-associated inflammation and its effect on age-associated diseases.

  10. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanios, Mary; de Cabo, Rafael; Mannick, Joan; Partridge, Linda; van Deursen, Jan; Villeda, Saul

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine. PMID:26646495

  11. Age-related skin changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božanić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity.

  12. Practical pathology of aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper M. M. Treuting

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington.

  13. The cell biology of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Race; Murphy, Coleen T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the original hypotheses of organismal longevity posits that aging is the natural result of entropy on the cells, tissues, and organs of the animal—a slow, inexorable slide into nonfunctionality caused by stochastic degradation of its parts. We now have evidence that aging is instead at least in part genetically regulated. Many mutations have been discovered to extend lifespan in organisms of all complexities, from yeast to mammals. The study of metazoan model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, has been instrumental in understanding the role of genetics in the cell biology of aging. Longevity mutants across the spectrum of model organisms demonstrate that rates of aging are regulated through genetic control of cellular processes. The regulation and subsequent breakdown of cellular processes represent a programmatic decision by the cell to either continue or abandon maintenance procedures with age. Our understanding of cell biological processes involved in regulating aging have been particularly informed by longevity mutants and treatments, such as reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling and dietary restriction, which are critical in determining the distinction between causes of and responses to aging and have revealed a set of downstream targets that participate in a range of cell biological activities. Here we briefly review some of these important cellular processes. PMID:26668170

  14. Cytomegalovirus infection accelerates epigenetic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananen, Laura; Nevalainen, Tapio; Jylhävä, Juulia; Marttila, Saara; Hervonen, Antti; Jylhä, Marja; Hurme, Mikko

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation (DNAm) have a central role in the regulation of gene expression and thereby in cellular differentiation and tissue homeostasis. It has recently been shown that aging is associated with profound changes in DNAm. Several of these methylation changes take place in a clock-like fashion, i.e. correlating with the calendar age of an individual. Thus, the epigenetic clock based on these kind of DNAm changes could provide a new biomarker for human aging process, i.e. being able to separate the calendar and biological age. Information about the correlation of the time indicated by this clock to the various aspects of immunosenescence is still missing. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, we now have analyzed the correlation of CMV seropositivity with the epigenetic age in the Vitality 90+cohort 1920 (122 nonagenarians and 21 young controls, CMV seropositivity rates 95% and 57%, respectively). The data showed that CMV seropositivity was associated with a higher epigenetic age in both of these age groups (median 26.5 vs. 24.0 (p < 0.02,Mann–Whitney U-test) in the young controls and 76.0 vs. 70.0 (p < 0.01) in the nonagenarians). Thus, these data provide a new aspect to the CMV associated pathological processes. PMID:26485162

  15. Women and exercise in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina L. Kendall

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with physiological declines, notably a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD and lean body mass, with a concurrent increase in body fat and central adiposity. Interest in women and aging is of particular interest partly as a result of gender specific responses to aging, particularly as a result of menopause. It is possible that the onset of menopause may augment the physiological decline associated with aging and inactivity. More so, a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome (an accumulation of cardiovascular disease risk factors including obesity, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose has been shown in middle-aged women during the postmenopausal period. This is due in part to the drastic changes in body composition, as previously discussed, but also a change in physical activity (PA levels. Sarcopenia is an age related decrease in the cross-sectional area of skeletal muscle fibers that consequently leads to a decline in physical function, gait speed, balance, coordination, decreased BMD, and quality of life. PA plays an essential role in combating physiological decline associated with aging. Maintenance of adequate levels of PA can result in increased longevity and a reduced risk for metabolic disease along with other chronic diseases. The aim of this paper is to review relevant literature, examine current PA guidelines, and provide recommendations specific to women based on current research.

  16. Epigenetic age analysis of children who seem to evade aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard F; Liu, Jia Sophie; Peters, Brock A; Ritz, Beate R; Wu, Timothy; Ophoff, Roel A; Horvath, Steve

    2015-05-01

    We previously reported the unusual case of a teenage girl stricken with multifocal developmental dysfunctions whose physical development was dramatically delayed resulting in her appearing to be a toddler or at best a preschooler, even unto the occasion of her death at the age of 20 years. Her life-long physician felt that the disorder was unique in the world and that future treatments for age-related diseases might emerge from its study. The objectives of our research were to determine if other such cases exist, and if so, whether aging is actually slowed. Of seven children characterized by dramatically slow developmental rates, five also had associated disorders displayed by the first case. All of the identified subjects were female. To objectively measure the age of blood tissue from these subjects, we used a highly accurate biomarker of aging known as "epigenetic clock" based on DNA methylation levels. No statistically significant differences in chronological and epigenetic ages were detected in any of the newly discovered cases. PMID:25991677

  17. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  18. Age, Technology and Labour Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Daveri, Francesco; Maliranta, Mika

    2006-01-01

    Is the process of workforce aging a burden or a blessing for the firm? Our paper seeks to answer this question by providing evidence on the age-productivity and age-earnings profiles for a sample of plants in three manufacturing industries (“forest”, “industrial machinery” and “electronics”) in Finland. Our main result is that exposure to rapid technological and managerial changes does make a difference for plant productivity, less so for wages. In electronics, the Finnish industry undergoing...

  19. Endocrine Disease in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andy E

    2016-08-01

    Aging horses may be at particular risk of endocrine disease. Two major equine endocrinopathies, pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction and equine metabolic syndrome, are commonly encountered in an aging population and may present with several recognizable signs, including laminitis. Investigation, treatment, and management of these diseases are discussed. Additionally, aging may be associated with development of rarer endocrinopathic problems, often associated with neoplasia, including diabetes mellitus and other confounders of glucose homeostasis, as well as thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal diseases. Brief details of the recognition and management of these conditions are presented. PMID:27449391

  20. Weight and age at menarche.

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, O; Peckham, C S; Moynihan, C.

    1989-01-01

    In the National Child Development Study (1958 cohort) information on their age at menarche and their weights and heights measured at 7, 11, and 16 years was available for 4427 girls. The distribution of age at menarche was not influenced by social class. Weight adjusted for height did not play an important part in the timing of sexual maturation of the girls in the study. Relative weight (weight expressed as a percentage of standard weight) at the ages of 7 and 11 years explained only 3.2%, a...

  1. Skin anti-aging strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall “well-being” and the perception of “health” in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in...

  2. Age factors in biometric processing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairhurst, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As biometrics-based identification and identity authentication become increasingly widespread in their deployment, it becomes correspondingly important to consider more carefully issues relating to reliability, usability and inclusion. One factor which is particularly important in this context is that of the relationship between the nature of the measurements extracted from a particular biometric modality and the age of the sample donor, and the effect which age has on physiological and behavioural characteristics invoked in a biometric transaction. In Age Factors in Biometric Processing an in

  3. Host Resistance and Immune Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaranayake, Thilinie; Shaw, Albert C

    2016-08-01

    Human immune system aging results in impaired responses to pathogens or vaccines. In the innate immune system, which mediates the earliest pro-inflammatory responses to immunologic challenge, processes ranging from Toll-like Receptor function to Neutrophil Extracellular Trap formation are generally diminished in older adults. Dysregulated, enhanced basal inflammation with age reflecting activation by endogenous damage-associated ligands contributes to impaired innate immune responses. In the adaptive immune system, T and B cell subsets and function alter with age. The control of cytomegalovirus infection, particularly in the T lineage, plays a dominant role in the differentiation and diversity of the T cell compartment. PMID:27394014

  4. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  5. Psychotherapy in the Internet age society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Drath

    2015-06-01

    In the light of contemporary research, the Internet appears to be both a source of danger to mental health, but equally - a space for utilising new methods of help. Making use of these possibilities, as the author claims, goes far beyond remote psychotherapy. It requires something more from help providers: understanding and considering the new types of human relationships which develop in communication facilitated by new media.

  6. Explaining age differences in women's emotional well-being: The role of subjective experiences of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne E; Toothman, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines explanations for the "paradox" of older women's better emotional well-being compared with younger women. We consider the role of subjective experiences of aging in a society that devalues older women. Using a sample of women (n = 872) from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (1995-1996 and 2004-2006), we examine the role of five components of the subjective experience of aging in explaining older women's better emotional well-being compared with younger women: age identity, conceptions of the timing of middle age, aging attitudes, aging anxieties, and self-assessed physiological changes. We find that, compared with women 50-54 years old, those 35-39 years old report lower positive affect, and those 25-49 report higher negative affect. These patterns are partially explained by younger women's greater anxiety about declines in health and attractiveness and older women's more youthful identities. Our study underscores the value of considering the implications of our ageist and sexist society for women's emotional well-being across adulthood. PMID:27029460

  7. The Development of Iron Technology in the Mediterranean Bronze Age

    OpenAIRE

    Leek, Rodney Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In the eastern Mediterranean region in the Bronze Age there were a number of elite controlled, complex societies that through cultural activities and trade and international agreements, participated in a regional exchange economy. In the transition to Iron Age there was a confusing period with wars, migrations and the collapse of most of the elite societies,. At this time, iron technology had already spread to some parts of the region. When the regional economy collapsed in c. 1200 BC it crea...

  8. Photoplethysmogram reflection index and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qawqzeh, Yousef K.; Reaz, M. B. I.; Maskon, O.; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Ali, M. A. M.

    2011-10-01

    This study conducted to investigate and study the effect of aging on Photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal and the effects of aging on the calculations of reflection index (RI). The results showed that PPG is highly affected by aging which noteworthy to be observed by the variations of PPG contour. Since we advance in age, PPG becomes more rounded which in turn make PPG inflection point and dicrotic notch less pronounced. As a conclusion, RI may provide a window to small and medium arteries compliance and it can be a measure of small and medium arteries stiffness. When small and medium arteries start stiffening, early detection of atherosclerosis in sub-clinical settings can be investigated and detected.

  9. Nutrition and the Aging Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Nutrition and the Aging Eye Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents ... and showed that an experimental combination of three anti-oxidant vitamins (C, E, and beta carotene) and ...

  10. Age-differentiated work systems

    CERN Document Server

    Frieling, Ekkehart; Wegge, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The disproportionate aging of the population of working age in many nations around the world is a unique occurrence in the history of humankind. In the light of demographic change, it is becoming increasingly important to develop and use the potential of older employees. This edited volume Age-differentiated Work Systems provides a final report on a six-year priority program funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and presents selected research findings of 17 interdisciplinary project teams. The idea is that it will serve both as a reference book and overview of the current state of research in ergonomics, occupational psychology and related disciplines. It provides new models, methods, and procedures for analyzing and designing age-differentiated work systems with the aim of supporting subject matter experts from different areas in their decisions on labor and employment policies. Therefore over 40 laboratory experiments involving 2,000 participants and 50 field studies involving over 25,000 employees...

  11. Aging and computational systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Kathleen M; Morgan, Amy E; Mc Auley, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Aging research is undergoing a paradigm shift, which has led to new and innovative methods of exploring this complex phenomenon. The systems biology approach endeavors to understand biological systems in a holistic manner, by taking account of intrinsic interactions, while also attempting to account for the impact of external inputs, such as diet. A key technique employed in systems biology is computational modeling, which involves mathematically describing and simulating the dynamics of biological systems. Although a large number of computational models have been developed in recent years, these models have focused on various discrete components of the aging process, and to date no model has succeeded in completely representing the full scope of aging. Combining existing models or developing new models may help to address this need and in so doing could help achieve an improved understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms which underpin aging.

  12. Small for gestational age (SGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called intrauterine growth restriction. The most common definition of small for gestational age (SGA) is a ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  13. [Skin aging: Molecular understanding of extrinsic and intrinsic processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrantonaki, E; Vogel, M; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Zouboulis, C C

    2015-10-01

    In an ever-aging society, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms accompanying skin aging has become essential. Most age-related morphological skin changes are triggered by a combination of intrinsic factors (e.g., genetics, hormones) and extrinsic ones (e.g., ultarviolet/infrared light exposure, smoking, pollution). In this article, new insights on the latest findings regarding the pathogenesis of skin aging are summarised, addressing the extent to which the aforementioned factorsmay influence the progress of skin aging and identifying the consequences on the morphology and physiology of skin. PMID:26385893

  14. Biological principles of aging and approaches for intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Aging and age related pathologies are among the main medical problems of modern societies. Although aging is generally seen as an inevitable normal developmental period, I believe that its acceptence as a disease -even though it might not- will have many pragmatical consequences and break the...... aiming to postpone aging resulted only with a few successes like caloric restriction and rapamycin in model animals. Therefore we likely need a paradigm shift in the future. Therefore, in this book extreme plant longevity/plant aging and traditional medicine were emphasized as new areas to focus on in...

  15. Detailed chronology of mid-altitude fluvial system response to changing climate and societies at the end of the Little Ice Age (Southwestern Alps and Cévennes, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrade, Laurent; Jacob-Rousseau, Nicolas; Bravard, Jean-Paul; Allignol, Françoise; Simac, L.

    2011-10-01

    Over a historical timescale, landscapes have been strongly affected by fluctuations in climate and by the impact of human societies. This study examines the historical evolution of mid-altitude fluvial systems in the Western Alps and Cévennes (SE Massif Central) in the context of marked climate and anthropogenic change at the end of the Little Ice Age (late 19th century). This work contributes to the reconstruction of river paleodynamics by investigating the nature and chronology of geomorphological changes in upper river basins. In order to produce a detailed reconstruction of hydromorphological changes, we combined two approaches: the study of historical archives and the use of bioindicators (the dating of terraces using dendrochronology and of silt benches using lichenometry in order to reconstruct the evolution of the river channels). The 19th century is a particularly propitious period for the study of surface dynamics because archives have preserved a wealth of qualitative and quantitative data concerning rivers (economic statistics, meteorological and hydrological observations, illustrative documents, descriptions by contemporary observers). It is also a period for which reliable dating methods are available for detrital deposits in rivers. The period provides new information on how the transition between the Little Ice Age and current climate conditions affected the evolution of drainage basins and stream channels by highlighting a succession of phases in the erosive process (e.g., the preparatory role of the drought of 1830-1838 in the erosion crisis of 1855-1870) and refining the chronology of events (very early onset of riverbed incision). The results highlight the effect of climate (small hydroclimatic fluctuations), amplified by strong anthropization, on the rhythm of landscape change and on the relative stabilization of the landscape at the end of the 19th century. In addition, the synchronization of phenomena on the two sides of the Rhone Valley

  16. Subjective wellbeing, health, and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Deaton, Angus; Stone, Arthur A

    2015-02-14

    Subjective wellbeing and health are closely linked to age. Three aspects of subjective wellbeing can be distinguished-evaluative wellbeing (or life satisfaction), hedonic wellbeing (feelings of happiness, sadness, anger, stress, and pain), and eudemonic wellbeing (sense of purpose and meaning in life). We review recent advances in the specialty of psychological wellbeing, and present new analyses about the pattern of wellbeing across ages and the association between wellbeing and survival at older ages. The Gallup World Poll, a continuing survey in more than 160 countries, shows a U-shaped relation between evaluative wellbeing and age in high-income, English speaking countries, with the lowest levels of wellbeing in ages 45-54 years. But this pattern is not universal. For example, respondents from the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe show a large progressive reduction in wellbeing with age, respondents from Latin America also shows decreased wellbeing with age, whereas wellbeing in sub-Saharan Africa shows little change with age. The relation between physical health and subjective wellbeing is bidirectional. Older people with illnesses such as coronary heart disease, arthritis, and chronic lung disease show both increased levels of depressed mood and impaired hedonic and eudemonic wellbeing. Wellbeing might also have a protective role in health maintenance. In an analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, we identify that eudemonic wellbeing is associated with increased survival; 29·3% of people in the lowest wellbeing quartile died during the average follow-up period of 8·5 years compared with 9·3% of those in the highest quartile. Associations were independent of age, sex, demographic factors, and baseline mental and physical health. We conclude that the wellbeing of elderly people is an important objective for both economic and health policy. Present psychological and economic theories do not adequately account for the variations in patterns

  17. Mitigating aging in CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aging degradation is a phenomenon we all experience throughout life, both on a personal basis and in business. Many industries have been successful in postponing the inevitable impact on their related systems and components through programs to maintain long-term reliability, maintainability and safety. However, this has not always been the case for nuclear power. While all power plants are experiencing the world trend of increasing operating costs with age, few (if any) have been able to fully define the parameters that solve the aging equation, particularly in relation to major components. Inspection and preventive maintenance have not been effective in predicting life-limiting degradation and failure. In CANDU nuclear plants, utilities are taking a comprehensive approach in dealing with the aging problem. Programs have been established to identify the current condition and degradation mechanisms of critical components, the failure of which would impact negatively on station competitiveness and safety. These include subcomponents under the general headings of reactor components, civil structures, piping (nuclear and conventional), steam generators, turbines and cables. In support of these efforts, R and D projects have been defined under the CANDU Owners Group to deal with generic issues on aging common to its members (e.g., investigation of degradation mechanisms, development of tools and techniques to mitigate the effects of aging, etc.). This paper describes recent developments of this cost-shared program with specific reference to concrete aging and crack repairs, flow-assisted corrosion in piping, elastomer service life, cable aging, degradation mechanisms in steam generators and lubricant breakdown. (author)

  18. Cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, R; Tournoy, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive aging and clinically probable Alzheimer's disease can be discriminated by means of clinical and neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional imaging techniques. Research at the level of cognitive brain systems and at the molecular level provides exciting new insights into the relation between aging and neurodegeneration. The advances at the clinical and at the basic research levels are necessary if we wish to meet the formidable challenge that the increasing prevalence ...

  19. Changing how we view aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Jimmie; Greenstein, Mindy

    2015-05-01

    It is time for medicine, particularly geriatric medicine, to incorporate an understanding of how the psychological aspects of aging interact with cancer. The impact has both negative elements--for example, the added stresses of other losses or comorbid ailments that come with age--and positive elements, particularly a lifetime of honing character strengths on which to draw during a challenging time. PMID:25944028

  20. Demographic Consequences of Defeating Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilov, Leonid A.; Gavrilova, Natalia S.

    2010-01-01

    A common objection against starting a large-scale biomedical war on aging is the fear of catastrophic population consequences (overpopulation). This fear is only exacerbated by the fact that no detailed demographic projections for radical life extension scenario have been conducted so far. This study explores different demographic scenarios and population projections, in order to clarify what could be the demographic consequences of a successful biomedical war on aging. A general conclusion o...

  1. Does Retirement Age Impact Mortality?

    OpenAIRE

    Hernaes, Erik; Markussen, Simen; Piggott, John; Vestad, Ola

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between retirement and mortality, using a unique administrative data set covering the full population of Norway. We make use of a series of retirement policy changes in Norway, which reduced the retirement age for a group of workers but not for others. By employing a difference-in-differences framework based on monthly birth cohort and treatment group status we first establish that the early retirement program significantly reduced the retirement age - this...

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Jayne Peffers; Xuan Liu; Peter David Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older dono...

  3. Aging and demographic plasticity in response to experimental age structures in honeybees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueppell, Olav; Linford, Robyn; Gardner, Preston; Coleman, Jennifer; Fine, Kari

    2008-08-01

    Honeybee colonies are highly integrated functional units characterized by a pronounced division of labor. Division of labor among workers is mainly age-based, with younger individuals focusing on in-hive tasks and older workers performing the more hazardous foraging activities. Thus, experimental disruption of the age composition of the worker hive population is expected to have profound consequences for colony function. Adaptive demography theory predicts that the natural hive age composition represents a colony-level adaptation and thus results in optimal hive performance. Alternatively, the hive age composition may be an epiphenomenon, resulting from individual life history optimization. We addressed these predictions by comparing individual worker longevity and brood production in hives that were composed of a single age cohort, two distinct age cohorts, and hives that had a continuous, natural age distribution. Four experimental replicates showed that colonies with a natural age composition did not consistently have a higher life expectancy and/or brood production than the single cohort or double cohort hives. Instead, a complex interplay of age structure, environmental conditions, colony size, brood production, and individual mortality emerged. A general trade-off between worker life expectancy and colony productivity was apparent, and the transition from in-hive tasks to foraging was the most significant predictor of worker lifespan irrespective of the colony age structure. We conclude that the natural age structure of honeybee hives is not a colony-level adaptation. Furthermore, our results show that honeybees exhibit pronounced demographic plasticity in addition to behavioral plasticity to react to demographic disturbances of their societies.

  4. Reflections of Urban Planning on the Context of an Aging Society%老龄化社会背景下对我国城市规划的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小云; 田银生; 陈锦棠

    2011-01-01

    从我国老龄化的社会背景出发,分析了城市“人口红利”优势的弱化、老龄产业的兴起与发展、老年住房供需矛盾突出、老年社会角色的延续与转换等相关性特征.认为我国城市管理者或规划师应前瞻性地认识中国老龄化社会发展趋势,对城市规划从城市发展策略、用地布局、交通组织、社区规划、公众参与等过程作出应对性的调整,制定适合老年主体人群的城市规划体系,以维护社会各阶层的合法利益,体现出城市规划的公共政策性.%This paper analyses relativity characters of the Chinese aging society, including the reducing of demographic dividend, the emergence and development of elderly industry, the contradiction between supply and demand of elderly housing, and the continuation of elder social roles. The authors consider that in order to safeguard the legitimate interests of all sectors of society and reflect the public policy of urban planning, discussion should focus on establishing urban planning system for elderly by regulating the city's development strategy, land layout, traffic organization, community planning, and public participation, etc.

  5. 基于城镇化背景下老龄化社会的环境设计与规划%Based on environmental design and planning of urban background of an aging society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路遥

    2016-01-01

    进入老年后,人的生活结构发生了重大转折,在生理、心理和社会等方面都发生着巨大的变化,影响了老人对环境的感知、判断、理解。老年人具有比其他年龄人群更多的闲暇时光,从而有了足够的时间与他们所在的住所及其环境发生更多的接触,住宅区由此而暴露出各种新的问题,如老年服务设施缺口较大,老年人的休闲场所少且选址不妥、环境不佳等问题正引起全社会的密切关注。这些变化和需求对住宅小区条件、环境等方面提出了新的课题。%After entering the elderly,people living structure has undergone a major turning point,in terms of physiological,psychological and social are undergoing tremendous changes that affect their perception of the environment,judgment and understanding.The elderly more than other age groups of leisure,thus more exposure have enough time with their homes and their environment where a variety of new special issue thus exposed residential areas,such as the elderly service facilities gap larger,older and less leisure venues and the location is wrong,the poor and other environmental problems are caused by the close attention of the whole society.These changes and the demand for residential quarters respect the conditions,environment,urban society and put forward new issues.

  6. Aging Differences in Ethnic Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Neelam A; de Castro Maymone, Mayra Buainain; Kundu, Roopal V

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and complex process that can be described clinically as features of wrinkles, sunspots, uneven skin color, and sagging skin. These cutaneous effects are influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors and often are varied based on ethnic origin given underlying structural and functional differences. The authors sought to provide updated information on facets of aging and how it relates to ethnic variation given innate differences in skin structure and function. Publications describing structural and functional principles of ethnic and aging skin were primarily found through a PubMed literature search and supplemented with a review of textbook chapters. The most common signs of skin aging despite skin type are dark spots, loss of elasticity, loss of volume, and rhytides. Skin of color has many characteristics that make its aging process unique. Those of Asian, Hispanic, and African American descent have distinct facial structures. Differences in the concentration of epidermal melanin makes darkly pigmented persons more vulnerable to dyspigmentation, while a thicker and more compact dermis makes facial lines less noticeable. Ethnic skin comprises a large portion of the world population. Therefore, it is important to understand the unique structural and functional differences among ethnicities to adequately treat the signs of aging. PMID:26962390

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of some of the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating lifespan and health, including mitochondria, telomeres, stem cells, sirtuins, Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1. We also provide future perspectives of lifespan and health, which are intimately linked fields. SUMMARY: Aging remains the biggest non-modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The biological, structural and mechanical changes in senescent cardiovascular system are thought to contribute in increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease in aging. Understanding the mechanisms contributing to such changes is therefore crucial for both prevention and development of treatment for cardiovascular diseases. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular aging, mitochondria, telomeres, sirtuin, stem cells.

  8. [Impact of aging on sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degauquier, C; Absil, A-S; Psalti, I; Meuris, S; Jurysta, F

    2012-01-01

    Numerous authors on sexual behaviors have studied the link between the persistence of a sexually active life and progressive aging. The knowledge of sexual health in the elderly has shown that biological sexual aging is extremely diverse and heterogeneous in men as well as in women, and contradicts the stereotype of age that would inevitably alter the sexual biological response in each human. Sexual diseases (lubrication, dyspareunia, erectile dysfunction, inability to achieve orgasm) and diseases of aging that impact sexual function have a growing incidence but don't never touch 100% of individuals. There is a decline in sexual interest correlated with the life-span, but the negative effects of age on desire are related to health problems. Moreover, sexual desire is more correlated with personal attitudes toward sexuality than with biological factors and diseases. Several predictors account for the pursuit of an active sexuality (including the presence of a partner, good health, having good sexual self-esteem, enjoyable past experience, an attitude that values the importance of sex in couple relationship), but the most decisive factor to successfully face the specific markers of aging is the ability to adapt to a more sensory sexuality, less focused on performance and coitus. PMID:22891587

  9. Chromospheric activity as age indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Chromospheric activity has been calibrated and widely used as age indicator. However, it has been suggested that the viability of such an age indicator is, in the best case, limited to stars younger than about 1.5 Gyr. I aim to define the age range for which chromospheric activity is a robust astrophysical clock. I collected literature measurements of the S-index in field stars, which is a measure of the strength of the H and K lines of the Ca II and a proxy for chromospheric activity, and exploited the homogeneous database of temperature and age determinations for field stars provided by the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood. Field data, inclusive data previously used to calibrate chromospheric ages, confirm the result found using open cluster data, i.e. there is no decay of chromospheric activity after about 2 Gyr. The only existing indication supporting the viability of chromospheric ages larger than 2 Gyr, is the similarity of chromospheric activity levels in the components of 35 dwarf b...

  10. Nutrients for the aging eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen HM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-inflammatories may provide benefit in decreasing the risk of age-related eye disease. Nutrients of interest are vitamins C and E, β-carotene, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. While a recent survey finds that among the baby boomers (45–65 years old, vision is the most important of the five senses, well over half of those surveyed were not aware of the important nutrients that play a key role in eye health. This is evident from a national survey that finds that intake of these key nutrients from dietary sources is below the recommendations or guidelines. Therefore, it is important to educate this population and to create an awareness of the nutrients and foods of particular interest in the prevention of age-related eye disease. Keywords: nutrition, aging, eye health

  11. Aging Men and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men worldwide and its incidence increases with age, mainly affecting elderly men aged 60 and above. Factors known to be associated with the development and progression of PCa are age, family history, and race/ethnicity, with age being the most important factor. The reasons for the increased incidence and mortality due to prostate cancer in elderly men are not entirely clear. Continued exposure to environmental and dietary factors may lead to accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes over the life-span, leading to altered expression and/or activity of tumor promoter and tumor suppressor genes. Changing levels of endogenous hormones (like androgens and metabolism in elderly men may also play a role in the development of prostate cancers which may be further influenced by testosterone replacement therapy. For many decades now preventative strategies and treatments such as radiation therapy or hormone therapy, and others have been administered to manage PCa; however current studies and evidence suggest that PCa is undertreated in elderly men, despite evidence of efficacy of these treatments, which leads to higher prevalence of mortality in this age group. Studies involving basic research, preventative and management strategies are still underway to understand the mechanisms of PCa development in elderly men and treatment of this disease in ageing male population.

  12. 包容性设计对老龄化社会公共空间营建的意义%The Significance of Inclusive Design in Public Open Space Design and Building for the Aging Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文英; 冯希亮

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive design is a way of designing products and environments so they are usable and appealing to everyone regardless of age, ability or circumstance by working with users to remove barriers in the social, technical, political and economic processes underpinning building and design. From the introduction of I'DGO research and case studies, this article discussed the background, concept and operation approach about Inclusive design, analyzed the relationship between the physical and mental conditions of the aged, living quality and outdoor environment, summarized the principle and design method of inclusive design in open space, proposed recommendations in response to the problems and new demands occurred in China at the aging society, put forwards that the study of gerontics should be combined to listen to the needs of vulnerable groups, through the approach of inclusive design, make the environment more inclusive to them, and promote social equality and justice.%包容性设计指设计的产品或环境不受使用者年龄和能力的影响即可被使用,或与使用者共同努力消除社会、技术、政治和经济过程中的障碍的基础建设和设计.通过阐述英国“户外空间的包容性设计(I’DGO)”项目的研究现状、实践案例,探讨了包容性设计的产生背景,概念内涵和操作方法,进一步分析老年人身心条件、生活质量与户外环境之间的关系,总结出包容性设计在公共空间营建中的原则和设计方法.针对老龄化趋势所产生的新需求以及我国包容性设计的现状,提出应结合老年学的研究,倾听来自社会弱势、边缘群体的呼声,通过包容性设计的途径,提高城市公共空间的建设对弱势人群的包容程度,促进实现社会环境的公平性.

  13. The changing understanding of ageing. Part 3: Diseases of ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis F. Lawler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This third and final paper in this series considers ageing mechanisms across species, with emphasis on conserved metabolic pathways that relate to disease. The growth hormone (GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1-insulin axis continues as an example of how critical pathways might relate to longevity and senescence. Aligning theory, research outcomes and clinical investigations at the levels of the cell, organism and population, is suggested as a means by which to consider the many complexities of the ageing process in an orderly fashion. A contentious debate revolves around whether ageing is purely a combined effect of stochastic events on residual programming relating to reproductive robustness, or whether ageing itself is programmed by natural selection. Emerging data indicate that the influence of genetic programming on specific late-life diseases, and even individual tissue pathologies, will probably need to be reconsidered in the light of newer theoretical possibilities. In particular, the evidence that late life and its diseases are objects of considerable investment of energy challenges theory that couples longevity with reproduction. Furthermore, the author suggests that ageing may have evolved at least partly as a means of niche preservation for contemporaries and for progeny.

  14. Studies of the Future Aged. An International Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Henning; Sheppard, Harold L., Ed.

    These six papers report on future-oriented studies of the situation of the elderly. "Changing Elderly in a Changing Society: Danish Elderly in the Next Century" (Henning Friis) reports on research dealing with preferences of the future elderly for their life when they grow older. "Aging Effectively: Meeting the Challenge of an Aging World" (J.…

  15. Blue Journal Conference. Aging and Susceptibility to Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Murthy, Mahadev; Balch, William E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie; White, Eric S.; Levy, Bruce D.; Busse, Paula J; Tuder, Rubin M.; Veena B Antony; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Budinger, G. R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the population in the United States and throughout the developed world has increased morbidity and mortality attributable to lung disease, while the morbidity and mortality from other prevalent diseases has declined or remained stable. Recognizing the importance of aging in the development of lung disease, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) highlighted this topic as a core theme for the 2014 annual meeting. The relationship between aging and lung disease was discussed in several...

  16. Age to age: insight into managing a multigenerational staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kay B

    2007-01-01

    Diversity in age and culture-medical practices and healthcare entities mirror the business world in the diversity of culture and age groups among their employees and patients. Differences create challenges, but with understanding and skillful communication, distinctions become opportunities for growth and excellence. The concept we are exploring is that as a generation we are who we are because of what was going on in our world during our formative years. We find that just naming ourselves aspart ofa group is a good starting point. The objective of this article is to identify characteristics of various age groups and to present ways to promote harmony and to maximize performance through practical management techniques. The goal is to better understand ourselves and each other so that our work is more productive and rewarding.

  17. Ageing management for systems, structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During operation, ageing will influence the quality of systems, structures and components (SSC). Experts make a distinction between the phenomena of conceptional ageing, technological ageing and physical ageing. The quality of SSC may be influenced by conceptional ageing, quality, technological or physical ageing. The contribution outlines the preconditions for a comprehensive, standardized ageing management of nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany. (orig.)

  18. Filter-adsorber aging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This evaluation of the general process in which characteristics of these two components gradually change with time or use included the compilation of information concerning failure experience, stressors, aging mechanisms and effects, and inspection, surveillance, and monitoring methods (ISMM). Stressors, the agents or stimuli that can produce aging degradation, include heat, radiation, volatile contaminants, and even normal concentrations of aerosol particles and gasses. In an experimental evaluation of degradation in terms of the tensile breaking strength of aged filter media specimens, over forty percent of the samples did not meet specifications for new material. Chemical and physical reactions can gradually embrittle sealants and gaskets as well as filter media. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance are associated with the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the exposure of the carbon to airborne moisture or volatile organic compounds. Inspection, surveillance, and monitoring methods have been established to observe filter pressure drop buildup, check HEPA filters and adsorbers for bypass, and determine the retention effectiveness of aged carbon. These evaluations of installed filters do not reveal degradation in terms of reduced media strength but that under normal conditions aged media can continue to effectively retain particles. However, this degradation may be important when considering the likelihood of moisture, steam, and higher particle loadings during severe accidents and the fact it is probable that the filters have been in use for an extended period

  19. Hearing in old age - epidemiological and etiological aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction The number of elderly persons is increasing all over the world. This strong demographic trend will affect our societies profoundly. Since the largest relative increase is expected to occur in the group of very old persons, over 80 years of age, the demands on the society and on relatives in terms of health- and social care are considerable.

  20. Narrating ageing: deconstructing negative conceptions of old age in four contemporary English novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oró-Piqueras, Maricel

    2013-01-01

    Characters in their late sixties, seventies and even eighties have become the main protagonists and narrators in contemporary fiction. Narratives of ageing not only allow the reader to go into deep confines of an ageing protagonist, they also offer a detailed account of how these protagonists as well as the society around them deal with an increasing reality within the Western world, namely, that a demographic change is taking place and, thus, social and individual conceptions related to old age and ageing need to be revised and redefined. Novels such as Pat Barker's The Century's Daughter, Margaret Forster's Diary of an Ordinary Woman, Doris Lessing's The Diaries of Jane Somers and Rose Tremain's The Cupboard invite the reader to explore the ageing process, both at an individual and social level, through the stories their main protagonists narrate to a member of a younger generation. As a human complex process within a broader demographic change, stories of ageing succeed in helping young and old protagonists (and ultimately the reader) to reflect on the ageing process from a multiplicity of perspectives. PMID:23273556

  1. [Accessible health information: a question of age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, E F

    2012-04-01

    Aging and digitalisation are important trends which have their impact on information accessibility. Accessible information about products and services is of crucial importance to ensure that all citizens can participate fully as active members of society. Senior citizens who have difficulties using new media run the risk of exclusion in today's information society. Not all senior citizens, however, encounter problems with new media. Not by a long shot. There is much to be said for 'aged heterogeneity', the concept that individual differences increase as people age. In two explorative qualitative case studies related to accessible health information--an important issue for senior citizens--that were conducted in the Netherlands, variables such as gender, education level and frequency of internet use were therefore included in the research design. In this paper, the most important results of these case studies will be discussed. Attention will be also paid to complementary theories (socialisation, life stages) which could explain differences in information search behaviour when using old or new media. PMID:22642049

  2. Aging fingerprints in combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zelenay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing is still a subject of discussion. In this work, soot particles emitted from two different cars, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger vehicle, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of the spectra from the unprocessed and aged soot particles revealed changes in the carbon functional group content, such as that of carboxylic carbon, which can be ascribed to both the condensation of secondary organic compounds on the soot particles and oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging. Changes in the morphology and size of the single soot particles were also observed upon aging. Furthermore, we show that the soot particles take up water in humid environments and that their water uptake capacity increases with photochemical aging.

  3. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Reports in this issue cover methods for Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses; 40Ar-39Ar ages for the New Quebec Crater and for basaltic rocks; U-Pb ages for a differentiated mafic sill in the Ogilvie Mountains, plutonic rocks in the Contwoyto-Nose Lakes are, zircons from the Anton Complex, the Clinton-Colden gabbro-anorthosite intrusion, the Himag plutonic suite, the Campbell granite, the Central Gneiss Belt, Silurian granites, a metarhyolite, plagiogranite and gabbro, and the Wage shear zone; Rb-Sr ages for granitic rocks; K-Ar and Rb-Sr geochronology of granites; a compilation of K-Ar ages; ages of archean and proterozoic mylonites and pre-Misi granitoid domes; and reconnaissance geochronology of Baffin Island

  4. 29 CFR 570.121 - Age certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as Amended Oppressive Child Labor § 570.121 Age... person is above the oppressive child labor age.” An age certificate is a statement of a minor's age... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Age certificates. 570.121 Section 570.121 Labor...

  5. Epigenetic drift in the aging genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current epigenetic studies on aging are dominated by the cross-sectional design that correlates subjects' ages or age groups with their measured epigenetic profiles. Such studies have been more aimed at age prediction or building up the epigenetic clock of age rather than focusing on ...

  6. Review of wire chamber aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  7. [IMPACT OF AGING IN PSYCHIATRY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Romina; Jauregui, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The changes associated with aging influence the clinical presentation and treatment approach of psychiatric illness. Several psychiatric disorders are common in old age as depression or set of diseases with cognitive impairment requiring geriatric knowledge. In many countries psychiatry of the elderly are called psychogeriatric. Regardless of the name objective of this article is to convey that the psychiatrist who treats patients over 65 years with multiple disorders, with frailty social problems and polypharmacy should have some tools in addition to the thorough understanding of psychiatric illness itself. Teamwork, meet physiological changes of aging and how these affect the response to drugs, atypical presentation of illness and keep in mind the importance of psychosocial and environmental issues both in presentation and in addressing and monitoring of disease. PMID:26650408

  8. Mass media and healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Laurie A; Johnson, Christine P

    2008-01-01

    Health effects associated with media use have largely focused on children and youth with little attention paid to adults, particularly older adults. However, adults aged 60 years and older report heavy television viewing, and unique health education challenges will be faced as the technically savvy baby-boomer cohort ages. Media health effects relevant to older adults include an established causative link with adiposity and correlations to increased risk of chronic disease, reduced physical activity, and undesirable food choice behaviors. Advertising has targeted older adults as a key market segment promoting anti-aging and health related products, with potential negative body image impacts. Implications for health practitioners and research are discussed in the context of these consequences. PMID:19042578

  9. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  10. The age of the elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to nuclear cosmochronology. The age of the Universe is estimated with the aid of radioactive nuclear-nuclear chronometers (NC). For calculations it is required that the proportion in which the appropriate pair of NC is at present ('relative abundance') and the proportion for the moment of their formation ('relative production') should be known. A short description is given of production of elements in the process of star evolution. The 'relative production' is calculated theoretically. The relative abundance is determined from experiments, mainly from meteorites. Recentl Lunar rocks have been also coming into use. The following elements are chosen as pairs of chronometers: Th-232/U-238; U-235/U-238; Pu-244/Th-232; J-129/J-127. Using this method the authors have determined the age of elements from 7 to 15 billion years, the best estimate being approximately 10 billion years. This age is quite in an agreement with calculations made by other methods

  11. Strategies for Aging in Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Dupuis-Blanchard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For healthy and independent older adults, aging in place can be seen as identical to any other adult living at home. Little is known about how frail seniors, particularly those who speak a minority language, manage the challenges of aging in place. The present qualitative descriptive study explores the strategies that Canadian French-speaking seniors have put in place to counter their loss of independence and promote their ability to stay in their home. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 39 older adults and transcribed, followed by content analysis to identify common themes related to study objectives. Six themes emerged in response to strategies described for aging in place. Findings reveal the limited extent to which language issues were perceived as a barrier by participants. In conclusion, the results of this study provide us with fruitful insights to guide community nursing practice, future research, and public policy.

  12. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Pitale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke. It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD. These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ′Barker′s Hypothesis′. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological.

  13. Autophagy in ageing and ageing-associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-qiang HE; Jia-hong LU; Zhen-yu YUE

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell self-digestion process via lysosomes that clears "cellular waste",including aberrantly modified proteins or protein aggregates and damaged organelles.Therefore,autophagy is considered a protein and organelle quality control mechanism that maintains normal cellular homeostasis.Dysfunctional autophagy has been observed in ageing tissues and several ageing-associated diseases.Lifespan of model organisms such as yeast,worms,flies,and mice can be extended through promoting autophagy,either by genetic manipulations such as over-expression of Sirtuin 1,or by administrations of rapamycin,resveratrol or spermidine.The evidence supports that autophagy may play an important role in delaying ageing or extending lifespan.In this review,we summarize the current knowledge about autophagy and its regulation,outline recent developments ie the genetic and pharmacological manipulations of autophagy that affects the lifespan,and discuss the role of autophagy in the ageing-related diseases.ow in Center for Neurodegenerative and Neuroimmunologic Diseases,Department of Neurology,University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School,Piscataway,NJ 08854,USA

  14. Does ageing aggravate parkinsonian disability?

    OpenAIRE

    Blin, J; DuBois, B; Bonnet, A M; Vidailhet, M; Brandabur, M; Agid, Y

    1991-01-01

    The influence of age of onset of Parkinson's disease on the severity and the pattern of motor symptoms was investigated by comparing the motor scores with and without levodopa therapy in two groups of patients divided according to age of onset (early less than 50, late greater than 60 years) and matched for disease duration (n = 69 in each group, Study I). The baseline score, that is, the motor disability of patients when off levodopa, was similar in the early- and late- onset groups. In cont...

  15. Dynapenia and Aging: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Manini, Todd M; Clark, Brian C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, we published an article arguing that the age-related loss of muscle strength is only partially explained by the reduction in muscle mass and that other physiologic factors explain muscle weakness in older adults (Clark BC, Manini TM. Sarcopenia =/= dynapenia. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008;63:829–834). Accordingly, we proposed that these events (strength and mass loss) be defined independently, leaving the term “sarcopenia” to be used in its original context to describe the age-...

  16. Capacitor ageing in electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. N. Vital

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The moment when an electronic component doesn’t work like requirements, previously established is a task that need to be considered since began of a system design. However, the use of different technologies, operating under several environmental conditions, makes a component choice a complex step in system design. This paper analyzes the effects that ageing phenomenon of capacitors may introduce in electronic devices operation. For this reason, reliability concepts, processes and mechanism of degradation are presented. Additionally, some mathematical models are presented to assist maintenance activities or component replacement. The presented approach compares the operability of intact and aged components.

  17. Physical activity, aging and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Tazkari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this medium case and prospective study we showed how different kinds of exercise affect cognitive function of healthy older adults. 89 adults aged 65 to 75 years without dementia took part in the study; 37 men and 52 women. They were assigned voluntary and non-randomly – due to individually interested subjects – into one control group (CG) and into two exercise groups (EG); the CG consisted of 28 participants with an average age of 67.93 years. The EG was divided into two sub-groups doing ...

  18. Ageing adults and digital games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Sara Mosberg

    times more implicitly. On this basis, the analysed research tends to offer digital games as disciplinary means to maintain, correct or tame the aging citizens. Either as technologies of the self, used in the individual’s self shaping, or as ways to contain and maintain the “disobedient” bodies and minds...... of the elderly, three dominant discourses are identified. These are concerned with a generational digital divide, maintenance of health and general wellbeing as well as the ageing adults as an attractive marked. Notions of economical productivity inform most of the available work, often explicitly and at other...

  19. Charity Bazaar Helps the Aged

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of people on September 24 participated in a charitybazaar held in Beijing International Club to help the aged Chinese in Beijing.The event demonstrated China's tradition of"respecting and caring for the aged,"and helped enhance relations be-tween the association of Former Diplomats of China,spouses of diplo-mats to China,and female diplomats. More than 40 embassies,international agencies and companies soldand/or donated goods.Dozens of domestic enterprises and institutions

  20. Detecting and mitigating inverter aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants use inverters to supply power to safety-related equipment, instrumentation, and controls. They convert direct current (dc) to alternating current (ac) power, thereby making low voltage ac power available even under a station blackout condition. As part of the U.S. NRC's nuclear plant aging research (NPAR) program, the operating experience of this equipment has been analyzed to determine the dominant failure modes and causes. This paper summarizes that data, and then describes methods which can be employed to detect inverter degradation prior to failure, as well as methods to minimize the failure effects. In both cases, the mitigation of inverter aging is emphasized

  1. Facial aging: A clinical classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiffman Melvin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classification of facial aging is to have a simple clinical method to determine the severity of the aging process in the face. This allows a quick estimate as to the types of procedures that the patient would need to have the best results. Procedures that are presently used for facial rejuvenation include laser, chemical peels, suture lifts, fillers, modified facelift and full facelift. The physician is already using his best judgment to determine which procedure would be best for any particular patient. This classification may help to refine these decisions.

  2. Debating the Little Ice Age

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Morgan; Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2014-01-01

    This paper replies to commentaries by Sam White and by Ulf Büntgen and Lena Hellmann on our 'The Waning of the Little Ice Age: Climate Change in Early Modern Europe'. White and Büntgen/Hellmann seek to prove that Europe experienced the kind of sustained falls in temperature between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries that can justify the notion of a Little Ice Age. Neither of them adequately addresses the cogency of the anecdotal or statistical evidence presented in our article, especially...

  3. Systems biology and bioinformatics in aging research: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuellen, Georg; Dengjel, Jörn; Hoeflich, Andreas; Hoeijemakers, Jan; Kestler, Hans A; Kowald, Axel; Priebe, Steffen; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Schmeck, Bernd; Schmitz, Ulf; Stolzing, Alexandra; Sühnel, Jürgen; Wuttke, Daniel; Vera, Julio

    2012-12-01

    In an "aging society," health span extension is most important. As in 2010, talks in this series of meetings in Rostock-Warnemünde demonstrated that aging is an apparently very complex process, where computational work is most useful for gaining insights and to find interventions that counter aging and prevent or counteract aging-related diseases. The specific topics of this year's meeting entitled, "RoSyBA: Rostock Symposium on Systems Biology and Bioinformatics in Ageing Research," were primarily related to "Cancer and Aging" and also had a focus on work funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The next meeting in the series, scheduled for September 20-21, 2013, will focus on the use of ontologies for computational research into aging, stem cells, and cancer. Promoting knowledge formalization is also at the core of the set of proposed action items concluding this report.

  4. Active ageing as lifestyle on Croatian islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klempić-Bogadi Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main feature of Croatian islands, in addition to their beautiful nature, is the fact that they are demographically and sociologically one of the most threatened areas affected by ageing. The ageing of the island population is the result of a long-term depopulation caused by the continuous emigration of the younger working-active population over the past hundred years, but also by the retirement return migration in the last thirty years. The most critical situation is on small islands where the majority of population is aged over 60 and this has a significant impact on all aspects of island life. The research conducted on small islands in the Šibenik archipelago in 2011 has shown that older people live alone, with no significant health problems limiting their daily activities, in their own households (homes, on modest pensions, and many of them supplement their income through agriculture. They very often financially help their children, who live mostly in nearby mainland cities. The necessity of self-reliance, due to the lack of younger generations, forces the inhabitants of Croatian island to lead an active life until their old age. Although they are no longer actively employed, they still continue to contribute significantly to the family and society through their involvement in various community activities.

  5. Universal Design: A Step toward Successful Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Carr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of aging successfully has become increasingly important as demographics shift towards an aging population. Successful aging has been defined to include (1 a low probability of disease and disease-related disability; (2 a high level of physical and cognitive functioning; and (3 an active engagement in life. The built environment can create opportunities or constraints for seniors to participate in social and productive activities. Universally designed spaces are more easily accessed and used by a spectrum of people without specialized adaptations. Thus, a universally designed environment creates opportunities for older adults to participate in these activities without the stigmatization associated with adapted or accessible designs. Providing older adults with specific universal design options (e.g., lever handle faucets has the potential to increase the ease of completing activities of daily living, which promotes a continual engagement in life. Literature regarding universal design is promising; however, its theory requires further attention from professionals designing the built environment, evidence of the significance of its application from academics, and the embracement of its core principles from society. Overall, universal design has the potential to provide a stepping stone toward successful aging.

  6. Aging exponents in self-organized criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, S. [Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia 30314 (United States)]|[Center for Nonlinear Studies, MS-B258, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 79}, 889 (1997)] we demonstrated that the avalanches in the Bak-Sneppen model display aging behavior similar to glassy systems. Numerical results for temporal correlations show a broad distribution with two distinct regimes separated by a time scale that is related to the age of the avalanche. This dynamical breaking of time-translational invariance results in a previously unrecognized critical exponent r. Here we present results for r from extensive numerical simulations of self-organized critical models in d=1 and 2. We find r{sub d=1}=0.45{plus_minus}0.05 and r{sub d=2}=0.23{plus_minus}0.05 for the Bak-Sneppen model, and our results suggest r=1/4 for the analytically tractable multitrade model in both dimensions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Age-Status Labeling in Homosexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnigerode, Fred A.

    1976-01-01

    Homosexual men (N=95) between 25 and 68 years of age were asked to classify themselves as young, middle-aged, or old. The popular suggestion of accelerated aging in homosexual men was not supported. (Author)

  8. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004012.htm Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells To use the ... lose some function as you age during adulthood. Aging changes occur in all of the body's cells, ...

  9. Age-related aneuploidy through cohesion exhaustion

    OpenAIRE

    Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy in older women is problematic, as oocytes are particularly prone to chromosome missegregation, and aneuploidy increases with age. Sister chromatid cohesion is weakened or lost with age, having a major impact in age-dependent aneuploidy, as discussed here.

  10. Visual heritage in the digital age

    CERN Document Server

    Ch'ng, Eugene; Chapman, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Heritage is everywhere, and an understanding of our past is increasingly critical to the understanding of our contemporary cultural context and place in global society. Visual Heritage in the Digital Age presents the state-of-the-art in the application of digital technologies to heritage studies, with the chapters collectively demonstrating the ways in which current developments are liberating the study, conservation and management of the past. Digital approaches to heritage have developed significantly over recent decades in terms of both the quantity and range of applications. However, rathe

  11. Aspects of the Aging Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luken, Paul C.

    Although social gerontologists recognize the heterogeneous nature of elderly populations, they have relied on the use of aggregate data and chronological age rather than sociological variables in their research. The notion of stigma, as developed by Goffman (1963), applied to the elderly focuses on social relationships rather than individual…

  12. Growth hormone, inflammation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal M. Masternak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant animals characterized by extended longevity provide valuable tools to study the mechanisms of aging. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 constitute one of the well-established pathways involved in the regulation of aging and lifespan. Ames and Snell dwarf mice characterized by GH deficiency as well as growth hormone receptor/growth hormone binding protein knockout (GHRKO mice characterized by GH resistance live significantly longer than genetically normal animals. During normal aging of rodents and humans there is increased insulin resistance, disruption of metabolic activities and decline of the function of the immune system. All of these age related processes promote inflammatory activity, causing long term tissue damage and systemic chronic inflammation. However, studies of long living mutants and calorie restricted animals show decreased pro-inflammatory activity with increased levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines such as adiponectin. At the same time, these animals have improved insulin signaling and carbohydrate homeostasis that relate to alterations in the secretory profile of adipose tissue including increased production and release of anti-inflammatory adipokines. This suggests that reduced inflammation promoting healthy metabolism may represent one of the major mechanisms of extended longevity in long-lived mutant mice and likely also in the human.

  13. Aging, Source Memory, and Misrecollections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Chad S.; Bawa, Sameer; Slotnick, Scott D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose an illusory recollection account of why cognitive aging is associated with episodic memory deficits. After listening to statements presented by either a female or a male speaker, older adults were prone to misrecollecting past events. The authors' illusory recollection account is instantiated in a new illusory recollection…

  14. Resilience in aging: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlete Portella Fontes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychological resilience is comprised of an adaptive functioning standard before the current and accumulated risks of life. Furthermore, it has a comprehensive range of psychological resources which are essential to overcome adversities, such as personal competences, self-beliefs and interpersonal control which interact with the social networks support. The objectives are to show the concepts of psychological resilience in elderly, relative to dominant theoretical models and the main data about psychological resilience in aging, found in an international and Brazilian review from 2007 to 2013. The descriptors "resilience, psychological resilience and aging", "resiliência e envelhecimento, velhice e velho", were used in PubMed, PsychInfo, SciELO and Pepsic databases. Fifty three international and eleven national articles were selected. The international articles were classified in four categories: psychological and social coping resources, emotional regulation before stressing experiences, successful resilience and aging and correlates, and resilience measures. The Brazilian articles were grouped in three: psychological and social resources, resilience in carers and theory review. Articles on psychological resources and on emotional regulation prevailed as key factors associated with psychological resilience in aging.

  15. The Global Age NGIOA @ Risk

    CERN Document Server

    Pandya, Jayshree

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Jayshree Pandya, founder of Risk Group LLC, is ahead of the curve in addressing the changing global fundamentals of the emerging Global Age.   The Global Age, and its changing global fundamentals has brought complex, chaotic, and turbulent times for every nation—where failures on all levels have become self-evident, repetitive, destructive, and potentially hopeless in nature and uncertainty. Nations are caught off guard.   From what is visible worldwide today, the promise of progress and prosperity for all nations does not seem to have materialized in this Global Age. Instead of progress and prosperity, we see crisis and catastrophe  overpowering and overwhelming the capability of most nations to meet their promise of progress and prosperity. Nations are in crisis. This introductory book addresses the global shifts and the changing global fundamentals of the Global Age, to lay out a much needed foundation of an integrated NGIOA risk governance framework for the near future. This book will make a conv...

  16. Old Age: Honor or Embarrassment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE SARTOR

    2010-01-01

    @@ "No, please don't ask me how old I am; I no longer celebrate my birthday," said one of my expat friends in Beijing the other day. I felt rebuked, almost as if I had insulted her. Certainly, Americans over 30 don't like to fess up to their birth year, their culture denigrates the aging process.

  17. A New Old Age Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伟

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sandra: I just read an artiele in today's newspaper that said there's going to be an old age home built in town. David: I think theyre just terrible. I don't know why anybody would put their parents in one of those.

  18. Ageing between Gerontology and Biomedicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Tiago; Palladino, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, public interest in the basic biological processes underlying the phenomenon of ageing has grown considerably. New developments in biotechnology and health maintenance programmes appear to be forging new relationships between biology, medicine and the lives of older people.

  19. Neurogenesis in the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Galvan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Galvan, Kunlin JinBuck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Blvd. Novato, CA, USAAbstract: Neurogenesis, or the birth of new neural cells, was thought to occur only in the developing nervous system and a fixed neuronal population in the adult brain was believed to be necessary to maintain the functional stability of adult brain circuitry. However, recent studies have demonstrated that neurogenesis does indeed continue into and throughout adult life in discrete regions of the central nervous systems (CNS of all mammals, including humans. Although neurogenesis may contribute to the ability of the adult brain to function normally and be induced in response to cerebral diseases for self-repair, this nevertheless declines with advancing age. Understanding the basic biology of neural stem cells and the molecular and cellular regulation mechanisms of neurogenesis in young and aged brain will allow us to modulate cell replacement processes in the adult brain for the maintenance of healthy brain tissues and for repair of disease states in the elderly.Keywords: neurogenesis, aging, brain, neural stem cells, subgranular zone, subventricular zone

  20. Voltaire's Portrayal of Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Lorna; Nelson, Judy

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed Voltaire's 50 plays to examine traits and roles assigned to elderly, influence of genre and author's age on portrayals, and factors to which elder's traits were attributed. Found elderly portrayed more favorably in tragedy than in comedy; no effect of period of life on portrayals. Wisdom was only trait consistently and specifically…