WorldWideScience

Sample records for aging aircraft airports

  1. Hydrogen aircraft and airport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtchen, U.; Behrend, E.; Pohl, H.-W.; Rostek, N.

    1997-01-01

    First flight tests with a hydrogen demonstrator aircraft, currently under investigation in the scope of the German-Russia Cryoplane project, are scheduled for 1999. Regular service with regional aircraft may begin around 2005, followed by larger Airbus-type airliners around 2010-2015. The fuel storage aboard such airliners will be of the order of 15 t or roughly 200 m 3 LH 2 . This paper investigates a number of safety problems associated with the handling and air transport of so much hydrogen. The same is done for the infrastructure on the airport. Major risks are identified, and appropriate measures in design and operation are recommended. It is found that hydrogen aircraft are no more dangerous than conventional ones - safer in some respects. (author)

  2. Aircraft noise in the region of the Bucharest-Otopeni Airport. [noise pollution in airport environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, M.; Gherghel, C.; Curtoglu, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aircraft noise, especially in the region adjoining airports, constitutes a problem that will be aggravated in the near future because of increasing aircraft traffic and the appearance of new types of large tonnage aircraft with continuously increasing powers and speeds. Criteria for the evaluation of aircraft noise are reported and some results of studies carried out in the region of Bucharest-Otopeni Airport are detailed.

  3. Impact of New large Aircraft on Airport Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The object of this project is to assess the impact of the introduction of proposed new large aircraft (NLA) on current airport design standards and administered by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This report identifies several key design a...

  4. Airport acoustics: Aircraft noise distribution and modelling of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Airport acoustics: Aircraft noise distribution and modelling of some aircraft parameters. MU Onuu, EO Obisung. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol. 17 (Supplement) 2005: pp. 177-186. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  5. An Algorithm for Managing Aircraft Movement on an Airport Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maresca

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the development of an algorithm for safely and optimally managing the routing of aircraft on an airport surface in future airport operations. This tool is intended to support air traffic controllers’ decision-making in selecting the paths of all aircraft and the engine startup approval time for departing ones. Optimal routes are sought for minimizing the time both arriving and departing aircraft spend on an airport surface with engines on, with benefits in terms of safety, efficiency and costs. The proposed algorithm first computes a standalone, shortest path solution from runway to apron or vice versa, depending on the aircraft being inbound or outbound, respectively. For taking into account the constraints due to other traffic on an airport surface, this solution is amended by a conflict detection and resolution task that attempts to reduce and possibly nullify the number of conflicts generated in the first phase. An example application on a simple Italian airport exemplifies how the algorithm can be applied to true-world applications. Emphasis is given on how to model an airport surface as a weighted and directed graph with non-negative weights, as required for the input to the algorithm.

  6. The community response to aircraft noise around six Spanish airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Faus, L. J.; Garcia, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    The community response to aircraft noise has been studied through a social survey. A total of 1800 persons living in the vicinity of six major Spanish airports have been interviewed at their homes concerning the environmental quality of the area, dissatisfaction with road traffic noise and aircraft noise, activities interfered with by noise, most disturbing aircraft types, and subjective evaluation of airport impact. All the responses obtained in this survey have been compared with aircraft noise levels corresponding to the residence locations of the people interviewed (values of NEF levels were calculated with the INM model). The results obtained in this work allow one to evaluate the impact of aircraft noise under a wide range of different situations.

  7. Risk assessment of aircraft accidents anywhere near an airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaran, Gustavo; Jensen Mariani Santiago Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This work analyzes the more suitable areas to build new facilities, taking into account the conditions imposed by an airport located nearby. Initially, it describes the major characteristics of the airport. Then, the restrictions imposed to ensure the normal operation of the aircraft are analyzed. Following, there is a summary of the evolution of studies of aircraft accidents at nuclear facilities. In the second part, three models of aircraft crash probabilities are presented, all of them developed in the U.S.A, each with an increasing level of complexity in modeling the likelihood of accidents. The first model is the 'STD-3014' Department of Energy (DOE), the second is the 'ACRAM'(Aircraft Crash Risk Assessment Methodology) prepared by the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory'(LLNL) and finally the more advanced 'ACRP-3', produced by the 'Transportation Research Board'. The results obtained with the three models establish that the risks imposed on the airport vicinity, remain low due to the improvement and innovation in the aircraft's safety, reducing the risk margin for the location of new nuclear facilities near an airport. (author) [es

  8. Aircraft Noise and Quality of Life around Frankfurt Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Eikmann

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL and health-related quality of life (HQoL were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft noise affected EQoL in general, although to a much smaller extent. HQoL was associated with aircraft noise annoyance, noise sensitivity and partly with aircraft noise exposure, in particular in the subgroup of multimorbid residents. The results suggest a recursive relationship between noise and health, yet this cannot be tested in cross-sectional studies. Longitudinal studies would be recommendable to get more insight in the causal paths underlying the noise-health relationship.

  9. Calculation of odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe [National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Oxboel, Arne [FORCE Technology, Park Alle 345, 2605 Broendby (Denmark)

    2006-07-31

    In a new approach the odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport are calculated using actual fuel flow and emission measurements (one main engine and one APU: Auxiliary Power Unit), odour panel results, engine specific data and aircraft operational data for seven busy days. The calculation principle assumes a linear relation between odour and HC emissions. Using a digitalisation of the aircraft movements in the airport area, the results are depicted on grid maps, clearly reflecting aircraft operational statistics as single flights or total activity during a whole day. The results clearly reflect the short-term temporal fluctuations of the emissions of odour (and exhaust gases). Aircraft operating at low engine thrust (taxiing, queuing and landing) have a total odour emission share of almost 98%, whereas the shares for the take off/climb out phases (2%) and APU usage (0.5%) are only marginal. In most hours of the day, the largest odour emissions occur, when the total amount of fuel burned during idle is high. However, significantly higher HC emissions for one specific engine cause considerable amounts of odour emissions during limited time periods. The experimentally derived odour emission factor of 57 OU/mg HC is within the range of 23 and 110 OU/mg HC used in other airport odour studies. The distribution of odour emission results between aircraft operational phases also correspond very well with the results for these other studies. The present study uses measurement data for a representative engine. However, the uncertainties become large when the experimental data is used to estimate the odour emissions for all aircraft engines. More experimental data is needed to increase inventory accuracy, and in terms of completeness it is recommended to make odour emission estimates also for engine start and the fuelling of aircraft at Copenhagen Airport in the future. (author)

  10. Calculation of odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Oxbøl, Arne

    2006-07-31

    In a new approach the odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport are calculated using actual fuel flow and emission measurements (one main engine and one APU: Auxiliary Power Unit), odour panel results, engine specific data and aircraft operational data for seven busy days. The calculation principle assumes a linear relation between odour and HC emissions. Using a digitalisation of the aircraft movements in the airport area, the results are depicted on grid maps, clearly reflecting aircraft operational statistics as single flights or total activity during a whole day. The results clearly reflect the short-term temporal fluctuations of the emissions of odour (and exhaust gases). Aircraft operating at low engine thrust (taxiing, queuing and landing) have a total odour emission share of almost 98%, whereas the shares for the take off/climb out phases (2%) and APU usage (0.5%) are only marginal. In most hours of the day, the largest odour emissions occur, when the total amount of fuel burned during idle is high. However, significantly higher HC emissions for one specific engine cause considerable amounts of odour emissions during limited time periods. The experimentally derived odour emission factor of 57 OU/mg HC is within the range of 23 and 110 OU/mg HC used in other airport odour studies. The distribution of odour emission results between aircraft operational phases also correspond very well with the results for these other studies. The present study uses measurement data for a representative engine. However, the uncertainties become large when the experimental data is used to estimate the odour emissions for all aircraft engines. More experimental data is needed to increase inventory accuracy, and in terms of completeness it is recommended to make odour emission estimates also for engine start and the fuelling of aircraft at Copenhagen Airport in the future.

  11. Nuisance Caused by Aircraft Noise in the Vicinity of Tehran International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Frost

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise measurement and social questionnaire surveys in three residential areas around Mehrabad International Airport (Tehran, Iran were based upon randomly selected dwellings in each area. A total of 193 individuals responded and many are annoyed and dissatisfied with aircraft noise and in consequence they would like to move. Aircraft noise is the strongest negative environmental factor affecting the residents in the vicinity of Mehrabad Airport and it could be a hazard for their health.

  12. Large eddy simulation of air pollution produced by aircraft engine emissions inside the airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synylo, Kateryna [National Aviation University (Ukraine)], email: synylo@nau.edu.ua

    2011-07-01

    With the increase of air traffic movement, air pollution from airport emissions has become an important concern. In the past, various research has been undertaken on the impact of aircraft engines on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, however the impact that emissions have on airports themselves is not taken into account by the most frequently used monitoring software programs. The aim of this paper is to present the use of a CFD simulation to determine the dynamic and fluid mechanics characteristics of aircraft emissions near the ground. The CFD simulation was carried out using Fluent 6.3 software and the effects of counter-rotating vortices and wind conditions on fulfilled gases jet. It was found that numerical simulation is able to resolve difficult equations and provide realistic results. This study demonstrated that the use of CFD computation could be used to improve local air quality modeling and assessment of the impact of aircraft emissions at airports.

  13. Integrated Mode Choice, Small Aircraft Demand, and Airport Operations Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor); Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    A mode choice model that generates on-demand air travel forecasts at a set of GA airports based on changes in economic characteristics, vehicle performance characteristics such as speed and cost, and demographic trends has been integrated with a model to generate itinerate aircraft operations by airplane category at a set of 3227 airports. Numerous intermediate outputs can be generated, such as the number of additional trips diverted from automobiles and schedule air by the improved performance and cost of on-demand air vehicles. The total number of transported passenger miles that are diverted is also available. From these results the number of new aircraft to service the increased demand can be calculated. Output from the models discussed is in the format to generate the origin and destination traffic flow between the 3227 airports based on solutions to a gravity model.

  14. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  15. Wide Body Aircraft Demand Potential at Washington National Airport,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    the city-pair markets. Probably the most important feature of FA-7 is the fact that it allows for investigation of the behavior of airlines to changes...FINANCIAL INFORMfATION YLIGHTS BY AIRCRAFT TPE ~.4/J \\ FUEL COSUMED PASSENGERS UARRIED BY TOA IR F FLIGHITS TOTAL AIRCRAFT USAGE coded data. Sample...the various levels of operations. Similar behavior can be identified in the simultaneous increase of both types of aircraft at Dulles. Tables lAthrough

  16. Aircraft LTO emissions regulations and implementations at European airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunos, Siti Nur Mariani Mohd; Ghafir, Mohammad Fahmi Abdul; Wahab, Abas Ab

    2017-04-01

    Aviation affects the environment via the emission of pollutants from aircraft, impacting human health and ecosystem. Impacts of aircraft operations at lower ground towards local air quality have been recognized. Consequently, various standards and regulations have been introduced to address the related emissions. This paper discussed both environmental regulations by focusing more on the implementations of LTO emissions charges, an incentive-based regulation introduced in Europe as an effort to fill the gap in addressing the environmental issues related to aviation.

  17. PM EMISSIONS PRODUCED BY AIRCRAFT UNDER THE OPERATIONS AT THE AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Zaporozhets

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The effects of aircraft engine emissions within the planetary boundary layer under the landing/ take-off operations contribute sufficiently to deterioration of air pollution in the vicinity of the airports and nearby residential areas. Currently the primary object of airport air quality are the nitrogen oxides and particle matter (PM10, PM2.5 and ultrafine PM emissions from aircraft engine exhausts as initiators of photochemical smog and regional haze, which may further impact on human health. Analysis of PM emission inventory results at major European airports highlighted on sufficiently high contribution of aircraft engines and APU. The paper aims to summarize the knowledge on particle size distributions, particle effective density, morphology and internal structure of aircraft PM, these properties are critical for understanding of the fate and potential health impact of PM. It also aims to describe the basic methods for calculation of emission and dispersion of PM, produced by aircrafts under the LTO operations. Methods: analytical solution of the atmospheric diffusion equation is used to calculate the maximum PM concentration from point emission source. The PM concentration varies inversely proportional to the wind velocity u1 and directly proportional to the vertical component of the turbulent exchange coefficient k1/u1. The evaluation of non-volatile PM concentration includes the size and shape of PM. PolEmiCa calculates the distributions of PM fractions for aircraft and APU exhausts (height of installation was given H=4,5m like for Tupolev-154. Results: The maximum concentration of PM in exhaust from APU is higher and appropriate distance is less than in case for gas. PM polydispersity leads to the separation of maximums concentration in space for individual fractions on the wind direction and therefore it contributes to the reduction of maximum total concentration. Discussion:But although the APU has contributed significantly to

  18. Aircraft impact risk assessment data base for assessment of fixed wing air carrier impact risk in the vicinity of airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, F.; Read, J.

    1979-06-01

    The FIXED WING AIRCRAFT accidents occurring to US air carriers during the years 1956 through 1977 are listed, with those resulting in impact within five miles of airports in the contiguous US being considered in detail as to location of impact relative to the airport runways

  19. Water Injection on Commercial Aircraft to Reduce Airport Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Fucke, Lars; Eames, David J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The potential nitrogen oxide (NO(x) reductions, cost savings, and performance enhancements identified in these initial studies of waterinjection technology strongly suggest that it be further pursued. The potential for engine maintenance cost savings from this system should make it very attractive to airline operators and assure its implementation. Further system tradeoff studies and engine tests are needed to answer the optimal system design question. Namely, would a low-risk combustor injection system with 70- to 90-percent NO(x) reduction be preferable, or would a low-pressure compressor (LPC) misting system with only 50-percent NO(x) reduction but larger turbine inlet temperature reductions be preferable? The low-pressure compressor injection design and operability issues identified in the report need to be addressed because they might prevent implementation of the LPC type of water-misting system. If water-injection technology challenges are overcome, any of the systems studied would offer dramatic engine NO(x) reductions at the airport. Coupling this technology with future emissions-reduction technologies, such as fuel-cell auxiliary power units will allow the aviation sector to address the serious challenges of environmental stewardship, and NO(x) emissions will no longer be an issue at airports.

  20. Methods for determining unimpeded aircraft taxiing time and evaluating airport taxiing performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to improve the methods of determining unimpeded (nominal taxiing time, which is the reference time used for estimating taxiing delay, a widely accepted performance indicator of airport surface movement. After reviewing existing methods used widely by different air navigation service providers (ANSP, new methods relying on computer software and statistical tools, and econometrics regression models are proposed. Regression models are highly recommended because they require less detailed data and can serve the needs of general performance analysis of airport surface operations. The proposed econometrics model outperforms existing ones by introducing more explanatory variables, especially taking aircraft passing and over-passing into the considering of queue length calculation and including runway configuration, ground delay program, and weather factors. The length of the aircraft queue in the taxiway system and the interaction between queues are major contributors to long taxi-out times. The proposed method provides a consistent and more accurate method of calculating taxiing delay and it can be used for ATM-related performance analysis and international comparison.

  1. Aircraft Noise Perception Study in Brazil: A Perspective on Airport Sustainable Growth and Environmental Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    deArantesGomesEller, Rogerio; Urbina, Ligia Maria Soto; Porto, Protogenes Pires

    2003-01-01

    Aircraft noise perception is related to several variables that are tangible and objective, such as the number of operations, flight schedules. Other variables, instead, are more subjective, such as preferences. However, although their elusiveness, they contribute to determine the individuals' perception of this type of externality. Despite the fact that the complaints related to aeronautical noise have been registered since the decade of 50, it has been observed that the perception of noise seems to have grown, especially since the 80's. It has been argued that this change in noise perception has its roots on the accelerated expansion of air traffic. But, it is necessary to point out the important role played on modeling preferences, by the growing environmental conscience and the higher welfare and quality of life standards and expectations. In that context, the main objective of this paper is to study the aeronautical noise perception in the neighborhoods of the Aeroporto Internacional de Sao Paulo - AISP (the biggest airport of South America). Specifically, it analyzes the relationship between aircraft noise perception and social class, which is expected to be positive. Since noise perception is an intangible variable, this study chose as a proxy the value losses of residential properties, caused by aeronautical noise. The variable social class has been measured utilizing average per capita income of the population who live nearby the airport. The comparison of both, the lowest and the highest social class suggests that the relationship between social class and noise perception is positive in the AISP region. Moreover, it was observed that all social classes are very susceptible to aircraft noise annoyance. In fact, the magnitude of the noise perception proxy for both social classes -the residential value losses- was found to be comparable to levels encountered in developed countries.

  2. Air Pollution Effects on Aircrafts Movement in and Around Airport: Solutions and Recommendations (Case Study: Djalaluddin Airport, Gorontalo, Indonesia)

    OpenAIRE

    Adisaamita, Sakti Adji

    2014-01-01

    - The study was conducted by collecting information/data from Djalaluddin airport, Gorontalo, Indonesia in order to measure, prevent or minimize the air pollution impacts on airports and its surrounding, such that air pollution impacts can be managed and monitored effectively and efficiently not only in the current situation but also in the future conditions. The data used were primary and secondary data. The primary data were based on field survey, interview and discussion with official g...

  3. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J [and others

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  4. Characterization of aircraft deicer and anti-icer components and toxicity in airport snowbanks and snowmelt runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, S.R.; Geis, S.W.; Loyo-Rosales, J. E.; Rice, C.P.; Sheesley, R.J.; Failey, G.G.; Cancilla, Devon A.

    2006-01-01

    Snowbank samples were collected from snowbanks within a medium-sized airport for four years to characterize aircraft deicer and anti-icer (ADAF) components and toxicity. Concentrations of ADAF components varied with median glycol concentrations from individual sampling periods ranging from 65 to 5940 mg/L. Glycol content in snowbanks ranged from 0.17 to 11.4% of that applied to aircraft. Glycol, a freezing point depressant, was selectively removed during melt periods before snow and ice resulting in lower glycol concentrations after melt periods. Concentrations of ADAF components in airport runoff were similar during periods of snowmelt as compared to active ADAF application periods; however, due to the long duration of snowmelt events, greater masses of glycol were transported during snowmelt events. Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEO), selected APEO degradation products, and 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole were detected in snowbank samples and airport snowmelt. Concentrations of APEO parent products were greater in snowbank samples than in runoff samples. Relative abundance of APEO degradation products increased in the downstream direction from the snowbank to the outfalls and the receiving stream with respect to APEO parent compounds and glycol. Toxicity in Microtox assays remained in snowbanks after most glycol had been removed during melt periods. Increased toxicity in airport snowbanks as compared to other urban snowbanks was not explained by additional combustion or fuel contribution in airport snow. Organic markers suggest ADAF additives as a possible explanation for this increased toxicity. Results indicate that glycol cannot be used as a surrogate for fate and transport of other ADAF components. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  5. Take-off engine particle emission indices for in-service aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H; Shook, Michael A; Ziemba, Luke D; DiGangi, Joshua P; Winstead, Edward L; Rauch, Bastian; Jurkat, Tina; Thornhill, Kenneth L; Crosbie, Ewan C; Robinson, Claire; Shingler, Taylor J; Anderson, Bruce E

    2017-12-19

    We present ground-based, advected aircraft engine emissions from flights taking off at Los Angeles International Airport. 275 discrete engine take-off plumes were observed on 18 and 25 May 2014 at a distance of 400 m downwind of the runway. CO 2 measurements are used to convert the aerosol data into plume-average emissions indices that are suitable for modelling aircraft emissions. Total and non-volatile particle number EIs are of order 10 16 -10 17 kg -1 and 10 14 -10 16 kg -1 , respectively. Black-carbon-equivalent particle mass EIs vary between 175-941 mg kg -1 (except for the GE GEnx engines at 46 mg kg -1 ). Aircraft tail numbers recorded for each take-off event are used to incorporate aircraft- and engine-specific parameters into the data set. Data acquisition and processing follow standard methods for quality assurance. A unique aspect of the data set is the mapping of aerosol concentration time series to integrated plume EIs, aircraft and engine specifications, and manufacturer-reported engine emissions certifications. The integrated data enable future studies seeking to understand and model aircraft emissions and their impact on air quality.

  6. Take-off engine particle emission indices for in-service aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard H.; Shook, Michael A.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Digangi, Joshua P.; Winstead, Edward L.; Rauch, Bastian; Jurkat, Tina; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Crosbie, Ewan C.; Robinson, Claire; Shingler, Taylor J.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2017-12-01

    We present ground-based, advected aircraft engine emissions from flights taking off at Los Angeles International Airport. 275 discrete engine take-off plumes were observed on 18 and 25 May 2014 at a distance of 400 m downwind of the runway. CO2 measurements are used to convert the aerosol data into plume-average emissions indices that are suitable for modelling aircraft emissions. Total and non-volatile particle number EIs are of order 1016-1017 kg-1 and 1014-1016 kg-1, respectively. Black-carbon-equivalent particle mass EIs vary between 175-941 mg kg-1 (except for the GE GEnx engines at 46 mg kg-1). Aircraft tail numbers recorded for each take-off event are used to incorporate aircraft- and engine-specific parameters into the data set. Data acquisition and processing follow standard methods for quality assurance. A unique aspect of the data set is the mapping of aerosol concentration time series to integrated plume EIs, aircraft and engine specifications, and manufacturer-reported engine emissions certifications. The integrated data enable future studies seeking to understand and model aircraft emissions and their impact on air quality.

  7. 78 FR 38069 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Airport, Dallas, Texas (DFW); Honolulu International Airport, Honolulu, Hawaii (HNL); Boston--Logan... private aircraft terminal; Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, Minneapolis, Minnesota (MSP...

  8. Inspection of aging aircraft: A manufacturer's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemaier, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Douglas, in conjunction with operators and regulators, has established interrelated programs to identify and address issues regarding inspection of aging aircraft. These inspection programs consist of the following: Supplemental Inspection Documents; Corrosion Prevention and Control Documents; Repair Assessment Documents; and Service Bulletin Compliance Documents. In addition, airframe manufacturers perform extended airframe fatigue tests to deal with potential problems before they can develop in the fleet. Lastly, nondestructive inspection (NDI) plays a role in all these programs through the detection of cracks, corrosion, and disbonds. However, improved and more cost effective NDI methods are needed. Some methods such as magneto-optic imaging, electronic shearography, Diffractor-Sight, and multi-parameter eddy current testing appear viable for near-term improvements in NDI of aging aircraft.

  9. Evaluation of a New Strategy for Attending Takeoffs and Landings to Reduce Aircraft Operating Costs and Passenger Delays at the Mexico City International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-García Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate a strategy for attending the takeoffs and landings at a congested airport, in order to reduce aircraft operating costs and passenger delay times. The continuous growth of air transport activity has created congestion at major airports worldwide, this situation produces increases in the aircraft operating costs and passenger discomfort. In the strategy evaluated the traditional rule for attending to aircraft, on a first-come-first-served basis, was substituted with a sequence that reduces operating costs and passenger delays. In order to perform this evaluation a discrete-event simulation model was developed for the Mexico City International Airport. Results showed that it is possible to obtain significant benefits if the proposed strategy is applied, an annual benefit of around 28.6 million pesos could be achieved.

  10. A plume-in-grid approach to characterize air quality impacts of aircraft emissions at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rissman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the impacts of aircraft emissions during the landing and takeoff cycle on PM2.5 concentrations during the months of June and July 2002 at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Primary and secondary pollutants were modeled using the Advanced Modeling System for Transport, Emissions, Reactions, and Deposition of Atmospheric Matter (AMSTERDAM. AMSTERDAM is a modified version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model that incorporates a plume-in-grid process to simulate emissions sources of interest at a finer scale than can be achieved using CMAQ's model grid. Three fundamental issues were investigated: the effects of aircraft on PM2.5 concentrations throughout northern Georgia, the differences resulting from use of AMSTERDAM's plume-in-grid process rather than a traditional CMAQ simulation, and the concentrations observed in aircraft plumes at subgrid scales. Comparison of model results with an air quality monitor located in the vicinity of the airport found that normalized mean bias ranges from −77.5% to 6.2% and normalized mean error ranges from 40.4% to 77.5%, varying by species. Aircraft influence average PM2.5 concentrations by up to 0.232 μg m−3 near the airport and by 0.001–0.007 μg m−3 throughout the Atlanta metro area. The plume-in-grid process increases concentrations of secondary PM pollutants by 0.005–0.020 μg m−3 (compared to the traditional grid-based treatment but reduces the concentration of non-reactive primary PM pollutants by up to 0.010 μg m−3, with changes concentrated near the airport. Examination of subgrid-scale results indicates that median aircraft contribution to grid cells is higher than median puff concentration in the airport's grid cell and outside of a 20 km × 20 km square area centered on the airport, while in a 12 km × 12 km square ring centered on the airport, puffs have median concentrations over an order of magnitude higher than aircraft

  11. THE AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT RATE IN CIVIL AVIATION DURING AIR TRANSPORT OPERATIONS AT THE AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Запорожець

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aircraft accident dates in civil aviation Ukraine and in republics of participants Agreement werecollected. The aircraft accident rate per 1 million flights was defined for civil aviation Ukraine and republicsof participants Agreement. Dynamics of aircraft accident rate was represented for civil aviation Ukraine.This dynamics was done for civil aviation of republics of participants Agreement and worldwide.

  12. Comparison of methodologies estimating emissions of aircraft pollutants, environmental impact assessment around airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurniawan, Jermanto S.; Khardi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Air transportation growth has increased continuously over the years. The rise in air transport activity has been accompanied by an increase in the amount of energy used to provide air transportation services. It is also assumed to increase environmental impacts, in particular pollutant emissions. Traditionally, the environmental impacts of atmospheric emissions from aircraft have been addressed in two separate ways; aircraft pollutant emissions occurring during the landing and take-off (LTO) phase (local pollutant emissions) which is the focus of this study, and the non-LTO phase (global/regional pollutant emissions). Aircraft pollutant emissions are an important source of pollution and directly or indirectly harmfully affect human health, ecosystems and cultural heritage. There are many methods to asses pollutant emissions used by various countries. However, using different and separate methodology will cause a variation in results, some lack of information and the use of certain methods will require justification and reliability that must be demonstrated and proven. In relation to this issue, this paper presents identification, comparison and reviews of some of the methodologies of aircraft pollutant assessment from the past, present and future expectations of some studies and projects focusing on emissions factors, fuel consumption, and uncertainty. This paper also provides reliable information on the impacts of aircraft pollutant emissions in short term and long term predictions.

  13. Assessment of NDE needs for aging corporate and private aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Eugene R.

    1998-03-01

    Considerable attention has been focused on the life extension of ageing military and commercial aircraft by the government and major aircraft fabricators. A vital, but often neglected segment of the aircraft industry is the are of inspecting ageing fleets of corporate and privately-owned aircraft. Many of these aircraft are inspected and maintained by the various FAA-approved repair stations located around the country. Nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods, equipment, and trained inspectors are a key aspect of maintaining these aircraft; however, there are currently several issues that need to be addressed by the private sector NDI community. Personnel training and certification to an accepted standard is critically needed in this industry since experience and capability in NDI can vary considerably between FAA stations and inspectors. Also, the updating of NDI methods are standards is needed. A review of these issues and suggestions for improvement are presented.

  14. Airports and Airfields - Volusia County Airports (Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — The Public Use Airports database is a geographic point database of aircraft landing facilities in the United States and U.S. Territories. This database has been...

  15. Smart aircraft fastener evaluation (SAFE) system: a condition-based corrosion detection system for aging aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Seifert, Greg; Paul, Clare A.

    1996-05-01

    The smart aircraft fastener evaluation (SAFE) system is an advanced structural health monitoring effort to detect and characterize corrosion in hidden and inaccessible locations of aircraft structures. Hidden corrosion is the number one logistics problem for the U.S. Air Force, with an estimated maintenance cost of $700M per year in 1990 dollars. The SAFE system incorporates a solid-state electrochemical microsensor and smart sensor electronics in the body of a Hi-Lok aircraft fastener to process and autonomously report corrosion status to aircraft maintenance personnel. The long-term payoff for using SAFE technology will be in predictive maintenance for aging aircraft and rotorcraft systems, fugitive emissions applications such as control valves, chemical pipeline vessels, and industrial boilers. Predictive maintenance capability, service, and repair will replace the current practice of scheduled maintenance to substantially reduce operational costs. A summary of the SAFE concept, laboratory test results, and future field test plans is presented.

  16. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    Modern airports are centers of transportation that service a large number of aircraft and passengers every day. To facilitate this large volume of transportation, airports are subject to many logistical and decision problems that must continuously be solved to make sure each flight and passenger ...

  17. Airport Catchment Area- Example Warsaw Modlin Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachut, Jakub

    2017-10-01

    The form and functions of airports change over time, just like the form and function of cities. Historically, airports are understood as places of aircraft landing, control towers operation and location of other facilities used for communication and transport. This traditional model is giving way to the concept of so-called Airport Cities, based on the assumption that, in addition to its infrastructure and air services, also non-air services are performed, constituting a source of income. At the same time, their reach and impact on the economy of the areas around the airport are expanding. Idea City Airport appeared in the United States in the late twentieth century. The author is J. D. Kasarda, he believes that it is around these big air ports that airport cities develop. In the world, there are currently 45 areas which can be classified in this category, out of which 12 are located in Europe. Main air traffic hubs in Europe are not only the most important passenger traffic junctions, but also largest centres dispatching goods (cargo). It can be said that, among the 30 largest airports, 24 are the largest in terms of both passenger and freight traffic. These airports cover up to 89.9% of the total freight transport of all European airports. At the same time, they serve 56.9% of all passengers in Europe. Based on the concept of Airport City was developed document THE INTEGRATED REGIONAL POLYCENTRIC DEVELOPMENT PLANS FOR THE WARSAW MODLIN AIRPORT CATCHMENT AREA. The plan developed takes into account the findings of the Mazovian voivodeship spatial development plan, specifying the details of its provisions where possible. The development is the first step for the implementation of the concept of the Modlin Airport City. The accomplishment of this ambitious vision will only be possible with hard work of a number of entities, as well as taking into account the former Modlin Fortress, currently under revitalisation, in concepts and plans.

  18. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Airport Class of user LaGuardia 4, 5 Newark O'Hare 2, 3, 5 Ronald Reagan National 1 Air carriers 48 40 120... aircraft operations at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, the term “commuters” means aircraft...

  19. NASGRO 3.0: A Software for Analyzing Aging Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, S. R.; Shivakumar, V.; Beek, J. M.; Yeh, F.; Williams, L. C.; Forman, R. G.; McMahon, J. J.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Structural integrity analysis of aging aircraft is a critical necessity in view of the increasing numbers of such aircraft in general aviation, the airlines and the military. Efforts are in progress by NASA, the FAA and the DoD to focus attention on aging aircraft safety. The present paper describes the NASGRO software which is well-suited for effectively analyzing the behavior of defects that may be found in aging aircraft. The newly revised Version 3.0 has many features specifically implemented to suit the needs of the aircraft community. The fatigue crack growth computer program NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 was originally developed to analyze space hardware such as the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station and the associated payloads. Due to popular demand, the software was enhanced to suit the needs of the aircraft industry. Major improvements in Version 3.0 are the incorporation of the ability to read aircraft spectra of unlimited size, generation of common aircraft fatigue load blocks, and the incorporation of crack-growth models which include load-interaction effects such as retardation due to overloads and acceleration due to underloads. Five new crack-growth models, viz., generalized Willenborg, modified generalized Willenborg, constant closure model, Walker-Chang model and the deKoning-Newman strip-yield model, have been implemented. To facilitate easier input of geometry, material properties and load spectra, a Windows-style graphical user interface has been developed. Features to quickly change the input and rerun the problem as well as examine the output are incorporated. NASGRO has been organized into three modules, the crack-growth module being the primary one. The other two modules are the boundary element module and the material properties module. The boundary-element module provides the ability to model and analyze complex two-dimensional problems to obtain stresses and stress-intensity factors. The material properties module allows users to store and

  20. 77 FR 23598 - Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List: Addition of Recently Approved Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... burdens on, nor takes away any existing rights or privileges from the public, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(b... special procedures that apply to all aircraft (except public aircraft) entering or departing the United... International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, or Miami International Airport. In a statement issued...

  1. APPROXIMATED NUMERICAL MODELING OF DYNAMIC MOVEMENT OF THE AIRCRAFT IN TURBULENT ATMOSPHERE ON APPROACH ZONE TO THE AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bayramov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of dynamic modeling method upon ECAST to assess reactions of aircraft of Airbus type to random atmospheric disturbances without the use of Monte-Carlo method is considered. Application of the method will determine the significance of aircraft reactions to these disturbances, which will help in predicting the flight safety level.

  2. Aging Military Aircraft Landscape : A Case for End-of-Life Fleet Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcamp, J.M.; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Curran, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    Military aircraft fleets are continuing to age despite increased structural integrity concerns and rising maintenance costs. Aircraft are not being replaced or retired in large numbers but are instead having their lives extended beyond their original design service lives. Because aging aircraft cost

  3. Does exposure to aircraft noise increase the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the population living in the vicinity of airports? Results of an ecological study in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Evrard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of aircraft noise on health is of growing concern. We investigated the relationship between this exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. We performed an ecological study on 161 communes (commune being the smallest administrative unit in France close to the following three major French airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac. The mortality data were provided by the French Center on Medical Causes of Death for the period 2007-2010. Based on the data provided by the French Civil Aviation Authority, a weighted average exposure to aircraft noise (L den AEI was computed at the commune level. A Poisson regression model with commune-specific random intercepts, adjusted for potential confounding factors including air pollution, was used to investigate the association between mortality rates and L den AEI. Positive associations were observed between L den AEI and mortality from cardiovascular disease [adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR per 10 dB(A increase in L den AEI = 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.25], coronary heart disease [MRR = 1.24 (1.12-1.36], and myocardial infarction [MRR = 1.28 (1.11-1.46]. Stroke mortality was more weakly associated with L den AEI [MRR = 1.08 (0.97-1.21]. These significant associations were not attenuated after the adjustment for air pollution. The present ecological study supports the hypothesis of an association between aircraft noise exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction. However, the potential for ecological bias and the possibility that this association could be due to residual confounding cannot be excluded.

  4. AIRPORT NOISE CHARGES AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES: APPLICATION TO REGIONAL AIRPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCA MANTECCHINI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There have always been conflicts among airports and local communities due to the aeronautical noise generated by airport operations. In fact, this is a factor that - if not properly managed - could severely cut down the growth of air traffic in an airport with direct effects on the economic and territorial system. Beside this, in the last decade the critical issues related to the impact of aeronautical noise on airport operations have greatly reduced, thanks to technological improvements in aircraft design. Nevertheless, the reduction of noise emissions during a single aircraft operation does not make the issue of the airports’ location less important. This is the case of regional airports in EU, which have recently experimented a large traffic increase due to the development of low-cost traffic. It is now clear that the problem cannot be reduced to its mere technological aspect, but it ought to be dealt with the involvement of the various stakeholders in order to mitigate the emissions and adequately compensate the impacts to local communities. Typically, there are two possible countermeasures to mitigate the effects of aircraft noise: operational measures, based on the application of technological and organizational devices and market-based measures. The application of noise taxes, aiming at compensating the negative externalities generated by airport operations is becoming increasingly widespread in EU. In this paper, a methodology for the application of noise taxes based on the actual noise of aircraft operating into an airport is discussed and implemented in a test case.

  5. Rural Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Rural Airports database is the list of rural airports compiled annually by BTS for the Treasury Department/IRS. It is used by airlines to assist in establishing...

  6. Airport Heterotopia

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    2008-01-01

    Airports are areas of transit, places of in-between-ness where mobility is key; airports function not just as transfer points where people are moved from one place to another, but also as areas where mobile technology is critically important to make sure that travellers can stay connected. The airport serves as a node in the network of flows that is air travel. Airports orchestrate social life into distinct movements and behaviors.The ontology of the airport is peculiarly split between a sens...

  7. A study of foreign object damage (FOD) and prevention method at the airport and aircraft maintenance area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, R.; Ismail, N.; Mustapa, S.

    2016-10-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) is common risk for aviation industry since long time ago and it has contributed to many terrible incidents and fatalities. The cost of FOD cases every year is very high, which is around RM 1.2 billion. Therefore, a proper technique and strategy has to be taken by the designated organizations including airlines to further eliminate the FOD occurrences. It is not easy to control FOD due to some circumstances such as inappropriate working behaviour, poor working environment, insufficient technology and also disorganized housekeeping system. The main purpose of this research is to discuss and explain further about FOD and the techniques to prevent FOD. FOD is a universal concern in aviation industry and it is one of the reasons that contribute to aircraft failure and unwanted damages such as fatalities and causalities. Throughout this research, many information related to FOD problems and their impact on aviation industry are gathered and presented.

  8. Airport Heterotopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Airports are areas of transit, places of in-between-ness where mobility is key; airports function not just as transfer points where people are moved from one place to another, but also as areas where mobile technology is critically important to make sure that travellers can stay connected....... The airport serves as a node in the network of flows that is air travel. Airports orchestrate social life into distinct movements and behaviors. The ontology of the airport is peculiarly split between a sense of placelessness, while at the same time being a place of material organization and social complexity....... It is a system of interconnected material worlds, and thus a heterotopia; a blending space of overlapping ontologies. Ursula Le Guin playfully examines this concept of overlapping ontologies in her short story collection Changing Planes, where airport travellers can shift realities due to the unpleasantries...

  9. Sustainable Airport Waste Management: The Case of Kansai International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Baxter

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The global air transport industry is predicted to continue its rapid growth. A by-product of air transport operations, however, is the substantial volumes of waste generated at airports. To mitigate the environmental impact of waste and to comply with regulatory requirements, airports are increasingly implementing sustainable waste management policies and systems. Using an in-depth case study research design, this study has examined waste management at Kansai International Airport from 2002 to 2015. Throughout its history the airport has implemented world best practices to achieve its goal of being an eco-friendly airport. The qualitative data gathered for the study were analysed using document analysis. The quantitative data were analysed using t-tests. Statistically significant results were found in the reduction in waste per passenger and aircraft movement (for total waste, incinerated waste, and landfill waste. In addition, a statistically significant increase in the proportion of waste recycled, and a decrease in the proportion of waste sent to landfill was observed. As such, quantitatively speaking, Kansai International Airport has shown significant waste management improvements. The study concludes that Kansai Airport’s waste management approaches and policies can be transferred to other airport facilities. This would greatly improve sustainability across airports, globally.

  10. Economic utilization of general aviation airport runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The urban general aviation airport economics is studied in detail. The demand for airport services is discussed, and the different types of users are identified. The direct cost characteristics of the airport are summarized; costs to the airport owner are largely fixed, and, except at certain large airports, weight is not a significant factor in airport costs. The efficient use of an existing airport facility is explored, with the focus on the social cost of runway congestion as traffic density at the airport build up and queues form. The tradeoff between aircraft operating costs and airport costs is analyzed in terms of runway length. The transition from theory to practice is treated, and the policy of charging prices only on aircraft storage and fuel is felt likely to continue. Implications of the study from the standpoint of public policy include pricing that spreads traffic peaks to improve runway utilization, and pricing that discriminates against aircraft requiring long runways and causes owners to adopt V/STOL equipment.

  11. Advances in Protective Coatings and Their Application to Ageing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Aerospace Material Specification Selectively (1997) Strippable Acrylic Finishing Schemes - Matt and Glossy - 23. K.R. Baldwin and C.J.E. Smith, Repair...corrosion through design, the selection of military and civil aircraft during the last thirty years. Research materials that are resistant to corrosion and...compliant coatings. initiation of corrosion. This paper first examines the general principles involved in 2.2 Materials selection the corrosion

  12. Conservation science in a terrorist age: the impact of airport security screening on the viability and DNA integrity of frozen felid spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloor, Kayleen T; Winget, Doug; Swanson, William F

    2006-09-01

    In response to growing terrorism concerns, the Transportation Security Administration now requires that all checked baggage at U.S. airports be scanned through a cabinet x-ray system, which may increase risk of radiation damage to transported biologic samples and other sensitive genetic material. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of these new airport security regulations on the viability and DNA integrity of frozen felid spermatozoa. Semen was collected from two domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) and one fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus), cryopreserved in plastic freezing straws, and transferred into liquid nitrogen dry shippers for security screening. Treatment groups included frozen samples from each male scanned once or three times using a Transportation Security Administration-operated cabinet x-ray system, in addition to non-scanned samples (i.e., negative control) and samples previously scanned three times and exposed to five additional high-intensity x-ray bursts (i.e., positive control). Dosimeters placed in empty dry shippers were used to quantify radiation exposure. Following treatment, straws were thawed and spermatozoa analyzed for post-thaw motility (percentage motile and rate of progressive movement), acrosome status, and DNA integrity using single-cell gel electrophoresis (i.e., the comet assay). Dosimeter measurements determined that each airport screening procedure produced approximately 16 mrem of radiation exposure. Our results indicated that all levels of radiation exposure adversely affected (P 0.05) among treatment groups. Results also showed that the amount of double-stranded DNA damage was greater (P cat species scanned three times compared to samples scanned once or negative controls. Findings suggest that new airport security measures may cause radiation-induced damage to frozen spermatozoa and other valuable biologic samples transported on passenger aircraft and that alternative modes of sample

  13. Airport Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Airport Screening Fact Sheet Adopted: May 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan ... a safe level. An American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society industry standard states that the maxi- mum ...

  14. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  15. Public Use Airports, Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [public_use_airports_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Public Use Airports database is a geographic point database of aircraft landing facilities in the United States and U.S. Territories. Attribute data is provided...

  16. LH2 airport requirements study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  17. Airport Gate Activity Monitoring Tool Suite for Improved Turnaround Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this research is to create a suite of tools for monitoring airport gate activities with the objective of improving aircraft turnaround. Airport ramp...

  18. Cyclic hygrothermal aging of aircraft lightning protections: Phenomenological overview

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles; El Yagoubi, Jalal; Saghir, Shahid; Selvakumaran, Lakshmi; Askari, Abe H.

    2012-01-01

    The recent transition to full composite fuselages is a major breakthrough in aeronautical design. To ensure satisfactory lightning protection, the electrical properties of the primary composite structure need to be improved and a design solution lies on bonding a metallic fishnet to the fuselage. An important issue is the prediction of the aging behavior of this top layer when exposed to severe aging conditions representative of flight environment. Multiple aging mechanisms affect this top layer made of thermoset resin and metallic fishnet with complex geometry and a first modeling strategy is a necessary starting point to better understand its evolution. This paper describes the overall phenomenology and the different mechanisms that can be expected in such a structure.

  19. Cyclic hygrothermal aging of aircraft lightning protections: Phenomenological overview

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2012-04-23

    The recent transition to full composite fuselages is a major breakthrough in aeronautical design. To ensure satisfactory lightning protection, the electrical properties of the primary composite structure need to be improved and a design solution lies on bonding a metallic fishnet to the fuselage. An important issue is the prediction of the aging behavior of this top layer when exposed to severe aging conditions representative of flight environment. Multiple aging mechanisms affect this top layer made of thermoset resin and metallic fishnet with complex geometry and a first modeling strategy is a necessary starting point to better understand its evolution. This paper describes the overall phenomenology and the different mechanisms that can be expected in such a structure.

  20. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Stephen (Technical Monitor); Andersson, Kari; Carr, Francis; Feron, Eric; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can considerably help one understand airport dynamics, and may provide quantitative estimates of operational airport improvements. In this paper, three models are proposed to capture the dynamics of busy hub airport operations. Two simple queuing models are introduced to capture the taxi-out and taxi-in processes. An integer programming model aimed at representing airline decision-making attempts to capture the dynamics of the aircraft turnaround process. These models can be applied for predictive purposes. They may also be used to evaluate control strategies for improving overall airport efficiency.

  1. An artificial intelligence-based structural health monitoring system for aging aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Tang, Stanley S.; Chen, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce operating expenses, airlines are now using the existing fleets of commercial aircraft well beyond their originally anticipated service lives. The repair and maintenance of these 'aging aircraft' has therefore become a critical safety issue, both to the airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration. This paper presents the results of an innovative research program to develop a structural monitoring system that will be used to evaluate the integrity of in-service aerospace structural components. Currently in the final phase of its development, this monitoring system will indicate when repair or maintenance of a damaged structural component is necessary.

  2. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DOD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Pt. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community.

  3. The Second Joint NASA/FAA/DoD Conference on Aging Aircraft. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Conference was to bring together world leaders in aviation safety research, aircraft design and manufacturing, fleet operation and aviation maintenance to disseminate information on current practices and advanced technologies that will assure the continued airworthiness of the aging aircraft in the military and commercial fleets. The Conference included reviews of current industry practices, assessments of future technology requirements, and status of aviation safety research. The Conference provided an opportunity for interactions among the key personnel in the research and technology development community, the original equipment manufacturers, commercial airline operators, military fleet operators, aviation maintenance, and aircraft certification and regulatory authorities. Conference participation was unrestricted and open to the international aviation community. Appendix B contains the name and addresses of the 623 participants in the Conference.

  4. A review of Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) as a competitive South-East Asia hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardai, A. M.; Er, A. Z.; Johari, M. K.; Noor, A. A. Mohd

    2017-12-01

    This paper is aimed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KUL) against its competitors in Southeast Asia countries. Due to the geographical and market relevance issues, several airport hubs around KUL are chosen for comparison: Changi International Airport (SIN), Suvarnabhumi International Airport (BKK) and Soekarno-Hatta International Airport (CGK). Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis is used to evaluate the comparative situation between the airports in relation to changing industry and market environment. The study discovers some competitive edges for KUL. Nonetheless, the airport still has to be improved to face future challenges and it is under imminent threat of new aircraft technology.

  5. Airport Pricing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  6. Aging Evaluation Programs for Jet Transport Aircraft Structural Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with criteria and procedures in evaluationof timely preventive maintenance recommendations that willsupport continued safe operation of aging jet transports untiltheir retirement from service. The active service life of commercialaircraft has increased in recent years as a result of low fuelcost, and increasing costs and delivery times for fleet replacements.Air transport industry consensus is that older jet transportswill continue in service despite anticipated substantial increasesin required maintenance. Design concepts, supportedby testing, have worked well due to the system that is used to ensureflying safety. Continuing structural integrity by inspectionand overhaul recommendation above the level contained inmaintenance and service bulletins is additional requirement, insuch cases. Airplane structural safety depends on the performanceof all participants in the system and the responsibility forsafety cannot be delegated to a single participant. This systemhas three major participants: the manufacturers who design,build and support airplanes in service, the airlines who operate,inspect and mantain airplanes and the airworthiness authoritieswho establish rules and regulations, approve the design andpromote airline maintenance performance.

  7. Airports Geographic Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  8. Air quality modeling for community-scale assessments around airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transportation infrastructure (including roadway traffic, ports, and airports) is critical to the nation’s economy. With a growing economy, aircraft activity is expected to grow across the world, and in the U.S. airport-related emissions, while generally small, are not an i...

  9. Software Tool for Significantly Increasing Airport Throughput, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Airportal effort seeks to optimize aircraft surface movements through approaches that could double or...

  10. An Assessment of Airport Sustainability, Part 1—Waste Management at Copenhagen Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Baxter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Airports play a vital role in the air transport industry value chain, acting as the interface point between the air and surface transport modes. However, substantial volumes of waste are produced as a by-product of the actors’ operations. Waste management is therefore becoming especially important to airports. Using a qualitative and quantitative case study research approach, this paper has examined the waste management strategies and systems at Copenhagen Airport, Scandinavia’s major air traffic hub, from 1999 to 2016. The two major sources of waste at Copenhagen Airport are the waste generated from aircraft serving the airport and the waste arising from ground activities undertaken in the land and airside precincts. The growth in passengers and aircraft movements has had a concomitant impact on the volume of waste generated. Swept waste and sludge are processed by an external provider. Waste generated in the passenger terminals and the airport operator’s facilities is handled at a central container station, where it is sorted for incineration, recycling or for landfill. The environmental impact of the waste produced at the airport is mitigated through the recycling of waste wherever possible.

  11. Heraklion Airport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter

    Heraklion City is located on Crete Island, Grece with a population of 150000. In the project for extension of the airport at Heraklion, part of the runway is placed in the sea. The runway must be designed to resist attack from the waves. the observed wave and wind data in the period of 1949......-1988 are collected by Athanassoulis et. al. (1992). The data are based on the visual observations made by deck officers aboard travelling ships. Extreme wave height analysis has been performed both on the observed wave heights and on hindcasted from wind data (AHL,1995). Because the damage to the slope protections...... depends on both the size and the number of waves it is necessary for the design process to havean estimate of the duration of the storms throughout the structure lifetime. This report gives the estimate of wave history corresponding to various intervals of wave heights in the lifetime of the structure....

  12. ANALYSING SURFACE MOVEMENT DELAYS IN AN AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Queuing effect can be in the different components of ground operations. Causes of surface – movement delays are long taxi – in and taxi – out operations during departure and arrival of aircraft. Surface movement delays in an airport are analyzed

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE GENERAL REACTION SCORE WITH THE NATURAL KILLER CELLS ACTIVITY AMONG WOMEN WITH AIRCRAFT NOISE EXPOSURE IN THE AREA OF ADI SOEMARMO AIRPORT SOLO (Hubungan antara general reaction score dengan aktivitas sel NK pada wanita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Hartono

    2011-07-01

    performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and birth defects, the evidence is limited.The aims of the research is  to find out the correlation of the general reaction score with The Natural Killer cell activity among women with aircraft noise exposure in the area of Adi Sumarmo Airport Solo.The research findings are expected to contribute to the scientific knowledge development and to give benefits for local government and among people in the area of Adi Sumarmo Airport in preventing the effect of aircraft noise. The research design was an analytical survey with a cross sectional approach, taking place at the Dibal and Gagak Sipat Village, Ngemplak Sub district, Boyolali District. The research was conducted from July 2008 to June 2009. The number of respondens was 39. They were divided into 3 groups; group 1 was exposed to 92.29 dB of noise level (13 respondents; group 2 was exposed to 71.79 dB of noise level (13 respondents; and group 3 was exposed to 52.17 dB of noise level (13 respondents. The samples were taken using simple random sampling. The data were analyzed by Pearson Correlation and Anova followed by Post Hoc Test using LSD test completed with Homogenous Subsets. The Anova test showed that there was significant differences in the general reaction score among all groups (p = 0.000. The Pearson correlation test showed that there was a negative association between the general reaction score with the Natural Killer cells activity (r = - 0.613; p < 0.05.

  14. Airport choice model in multiple airport regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Muñoz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to analyze travel choices made by air transportation users in multi airport regions because it is a crucial component when planning passenger redistribution policies. The purpose of this study is to find a utility function which makes it possible to know the variables that influence users’ choice of the airports on routes to the main cities in the Colombian territory. Design/methodology/approach: This research generates a Multinomial Logit Model (MNL, which is based on the theory of maximizing utility, and it is based on the data obtained on revealed and stated preference surveys applied to users who reside in the metropolitan area of Aburrá Valley (Colombia. This zone is the only one in the Colombian territory which has two neighboring airports for domestic flights. The airports included in the modeling process were Enrique Olaya Herrera (EOH Airport and José María Córdova (JMC Airport. Several structure models were tested, and the MNL proved to be the most significant revealing the common variables that affect passenger airport choice include the airfare, the price to travel the airport, and the time to get to the airport. Findings and Originality/value: The airport choice model which was calibrated corresponds to a valid powerful tool used to calculate the probability of each analyzed airport of being chosen for domestic flights in the Colombian territory. This is done bearing in mind specific characteristic of each of the attributes contained in the utility function. In addition, these probabilities will be used to calculate future market shares of the two airports considered in this study, and this will be done generating a support tool for airport and airline marketing policies.

  15. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnaire is created and distributed via various channels including e-mail, and online forums. After the basic structure of the questionnaire had been defined, the questions were developed in cooperation with employees form the environmental department of VIE, who had a sustainable influence on the questions’ order and formulation. As the survey was supposed to be answered by residents around VIE. Findings: Results of the online study show that only parts of the participants are affected by air traffic noise at VIE. Even less experienced a significant change over the last five years. About one third of the participants stated that they are affected by air traffic noise in one way or another. The majority of these people live in Lower Austria, the federal state in which the airport is located. The participants obviously judge air traffic noise during day time more importantly than air traffic noise at night. Research limitations/implications: Due to the low number of returns, no statistically relevant conclusions can be drawn, the results of the survey can be used to make some general statements. Originality/value: Economic growth and deregulation lead to growing aircraft operations. Vienna International Airport with its approximately 260,000 flight movements per year is the biggest airport in Austria and a major hub in Europe. The combination of constantly growing air transport and the resulting noise exposure, as well as the steadily increasing

  16. Apron layout design and flight-to-gate assignment at Lanseria International airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard, T.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is continuously increasing and more efficient air transport systems are required to handle the air travel demand. The study investigates the expansion of Lanseria International Airport in Gauteng, South Africa. Expansion of Lanseria requires a study of the airport apron layout to ensure efficient passenger-aircraft flow as well as the efficient flow of aircraft to and from the airport. The candidate layout designs are based on the layout concept of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, USA. In the study, different airport apron layouts were compared, including the existing layout of Atlanta Airport, via a simulation model of each. Designs based mainly on passenger transfer distance between the terminal building and aircraft were evaluated. The cross-entropy method was used to develop a generic flight-to-gate assignment program that minimises passenger transfer distances.

  17. Secondary aerosol formation from photochemical aging of aircraft exhaust in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Miracolo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were performed to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on fine particle emissions from an in-use CFM56-2B gas turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber from a rake inlet installed one-meter downstream of the engine exit plane of a parked and chocked aircraft. The chamber was then exposed to sunlight and/or UV lights to initiate photo-oxidation. Separate tests were performed at different engine loads (4, 7, 30, 85 %. Photo-oxidation created substantial secondary particulate matter (PM, greatly exceeding the direct PM emissions at each engine load after an hour or less of aging at typical summertime conditions. After several hours of photo-oxidation, the ratio of secondary-to-primary PM mass was on average 35 ± 4.1, 17 ± 2.5, 60 ± 2.2, and 2.7 ± 1.1 for the 4, 7, 30, and 85 % load experiments, respectively. The composition of secondary PM formed strongly depended on load. At 4 % load, secondary PM was dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA. At higher loads, the secondary PM was mainly secondary sulfate. A traditional SOA model that accounts for SOA formation from single-ring aromatics and other volatile organic compounds underpredicts the measured SOA formation by ~60 % at 4 % load and ~40 % at 85 % load. Large amounts of lower-volatiliy organic vapors were measured in the exhaust; they represent a significant pool of SOA precursors that are not included in traditional SOA models. These results underscore the importance of accounting for atmospheric processing when assessing the influence of aircraft emissions on ambient PM levels. Models that do not account for this processing will likely underpredict the contribution of aircraft emissions to local and regional air pollution.

  18. 49 CFR 27.72 - Boarding assistance for aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boarding assistance for aircraft. 27.72 Section 27... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.72 Boarding assistance... enplanements. (b) Airports shall, in cooperation with carriers serving the airports, provide boarding...

  19. State of the art: Asphalt for airport pavement surfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg White

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport runways and taxiways are commonly comprised of a flexible pavement with an asphalt surface. Marshall-designed asphalt with sawn grooves is the most frequent airport asphalt surface material. However, some airports have adopted alternate asphalt mixtures for improved resistance to shear stress and for increased surface texture, allowing grooving to be avoided. Of the alternate asphalt mixtures, stone mastic asphalt is the most commonly reported. Resistance to shear stress is a critical performance requirement for airport surface asphalt. Shear stress resistance minimises the risk of rutting, shoving and groove closure. However, fracture resistance must not be ignored when developing even more shear resistance asphalt mixtures. Significant distress in airport asphalt surfaces, compliant with the traditional prescriptive specification, has increased interest in a performance-based airport asphalt specification. Commonly reported distresses include groove closure in slow moving aircraft areas and shearing in heavy aircraft braking zones. Development of reliable performance-indicative test methods is expected in the future and will enable warranted performance-based asphalt mixture design for airport surfaces. Keywords: Airport, Pavement, Asphalt, Surface

  20. Airport Network Flow Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    The Airport Network Flow Simulator is a FORTRAN IV simulation of the flow of air traffic in the nation's 600 commercial airports. It calculates for any group of selected airports: (a) the landing and take-off (Type A) delays; and (b) the gate departu...

  1. The Distribution and Environmental Impacts of Noise Pollution Sadouqi Martyr Yazd International Airport Using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zarei Mahmoud Abadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Persecutors of aircraft noise at an airport has a close relationship with the alternate of landing and take-off weight of the aircraft and operations planning during the night. Now aircraft that spill in Yazd airport and take-off of aircraft is of jet engines or so-turbofan mean that the resulting sound will be very high. Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional  measurement of noise from aircraft traffic noise measuring station 7,The completed questionnaires to assess the effects of noise pollution in Yazd International Airport and the surrounding noise sensitive areas in 2014 by a portable audio device measurement is done. Results: The most amount of noise caused by aircraft traffic in the airport area and in adjacent areas with average noise level 84.8 dB at station No. 5 Regional Airport, located south of the airport, with an average noise level which was 75.5 dB. The results of analysis of questionnaires showed that 75 percent of people living in residential areas around the airport are being harassed by aircraft noise. Results indicate that, sleep disorders, nervousness, stress and mental illness and interfere with speech, regardless of the priority of different factors in the study area, are of the highest impact of aircraft noise. Conclusion: Aircraft noise is the strongest negative environmental factors that affect employees and residents around Yazd International Airport and can be harmful to health. The noise for health personnel, particularly those of daily tasks, are daily exposed to aircraft intense noise , are highly undesirable. So, essentially preventive severe conditions such as mandatory use of protective devices and soundproof acoustic shortening service personnel are needed for these people.

  2. Aircraft Vortex Wake Decay Near the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    A multi-faceted experimental and analytical research program was carried out to explore the details of aircraft wake vortex breakdown under conditions representative of those which prevail at low altitudes in the vicinity of airports. Three separate ...

  3. Airports offer unrealized potential for alternative energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Travis L; Belant, Jerrold L; Blackwell, Bradley F; Martin, James A; Schmidt, Jason A; Wes Burger, L; Patterson, James W

    2012-03-01

    Scaling up for alternative energy such as solar, wind, and biofuel raises a number of environmental issues, notably changes in land use and adverse effects on wildlife. Airports offer one of the few land uses where reductions in wildlife abundance and habitat quality are necessary and socially acceptable, due to risk of wildlife collisions with aircraft. There are several uncertainties and limitations to establishing alternative energy production at airports, such as ensuring these facilities do not create wildlife attractants or other hazards. However, with careful planning, locating alternative energy projects at airports could help mitigate many of the challenges currently facing policy makers, developers, and conservationists.

  4. Creep-age forming of AA7475 aluminum panels for aircraft lower wing skin application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego José Inforzato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Creep-age forming (CAF is an interesting process for the airframe industry, as it is able to form or shape panels into smooth, but complex, curvatures. In the CAF process, the ageing cycle of the alloy is used to relax external loads imposed to the part, through creep mechanisms. Those relaxed stresses impose a new curvature to the part. At the end of the process, significant spring back (sometimes about 70% is observed and the success in achieving the desired form depends on how the spring back can be predicted in order to compensate it by tooling changes. Most of the applications relate to simple (non stiffened panels. The present work deals with the CAF of aluminum panels for aircraft wing skin application. CAF was performed using vacuum-bagging autoclave technique in small scale complex shape stiffened panels, machined from an AA7475 alloy plate. An analytical reference model from the literature was employed estimate the spring back effect in such panel geometry. This model that deals with simple plates was adapted to stiffened panels using a geometric simplification, resulting in a semi-empirical model. The results demonstrate that CAF is a promising process to form stiffened panels, and the spring back can be roughly estimated through a simple model and few experiments.

  5. INNOVATION OF AIRPORTS AND AERODROMES IN TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz BALCERZAK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to characterize changes occurring in EU transport policy, taking into account innovation of airports and aerodromes. To face challenges like: increase in air traffic, ensuring safety of flight operations, regional development or requirements of passengers it is necessary to determine desired direction network of airports and aerodromes within the aviation policy, which is part of the national and European transport policy. Overview of national and EU studies, strategies and legislative plans enable to specify changes taking place in the EU aviation policy, as well as to create potential scenarios of its development with particular attention to the innovation of aerodromes and airports. Based on the above analysis it should be noted, that aims of the European institutions and agencies are: reduction amount of restrictive rules on general aviation (including GA aerodromes, spread concepts of multimodality and Small Aircraft Transport Systems, enhance competitiveness of the EU aviation sector but also reduction investment funding at airports. Conclusions may be a theoretical inspiration in the process of updating master plans of aerodromes and airports.

  6. Airport Capital Improvement Planning: Stewardship for Airport Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    "Airport Capital Improvement Planning: Stewardship for Airport Development", was : originally written in October, 1995. It documented an effort to implement the : concept of capital improvement planning with the airport development industry. : Airpor...

  7. A model for transfer baggage handling at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Torben C.; Timler Holm, Janus; Lindorff Larsen, Jakob

    This work deals with the handling of baggage from passengers changing aircraft at an airport. The transfer baggage problem is to assign the bags from each arriving aircraft to an infeed area into the airport infrastructure. The infrastructure will then distribute the bags to the handling faciliti...... is studied and future approaches for improving robustness are discussed. The presented solution approach runs successfully as part of the operation control systems at Frankfurt Airport since 2008.......This work deals with the handling of baggage from passengers changing aircraft at an airport. The transfer baggage problem is to assign the bags from each arriving aircraft to an infeed area into the airport infrastructure. The infrastructure will then distribute the bags to the handling facilities...... and robustness. The model can be solved with a commercial MIP-solver. Furthermore, the use of the model in the dynamic environment during daily operations is introduced. The model includes two different approaches for increasing the robustness of the generated solutions. The uncertainty of the input data...

  8. Estimation of nuclear power plant aircraft hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, P.

    1978-01-01

    The standard procedures for estimating aircraft risk to nuclear power plants provide a conservative estimate, which is adequate for most sites, which are not close to airports or heavily traveled air corridors. For those sites which are close to facilities handling large numbers of aircraft movements (airports or corridors), a more precise estimate of aircraft impact frequency can be obtained as a function of aircraft size. In many instances the very large commercial aircraft can be shown to have an acceptably small impact frequency, while the very small general aviation aircraft will not produce sufficiently serious impact to impair the safety-related functions. This paper examines the in between aircraft: primarily twin-engine, used for business, pleasure, and air taxi operations. For this group of aircraft the total impact frequency was found to be approximately once in one million years, the threshold above which further consideration of specific safety-related consequences would be required

  9. Tanzania - Mafia Island Airport

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation design and subsequent data gathering activities will address the following key research questions: a) Has the Mafia Island Airport Upgrade Project...

  10. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  11. Sustainable Development and Airport Surface Access: The Role of Technological Innovation and Behavioral Change

    OpenAIRE

    Ryley, Tim; Elmirghani, Jaafar; Budd, Tom; Miyoshi, Chikage; Mason, Keith; Moxon, Richard; Ahmed, Imad; Qazi, Bilal; Zanni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable development reflects an underlying tension to achieve economic growth whilst addressing environmental challenges, and this is particularly the case for the aviation sector. Although much of the aviation-related focus has fallen on reducing aircraft emissions, airports have also been under increasing pressure to support the vision of a low carbon energy future. One of the main sources of airport-related emissions is passenger journeys to and from airports (the surface access compon...

  12. 8 CFR 234.4 - International airports for entry of aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false International airports for entry of aliens. 234.4 Section 234.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS DESIGNATION OF PORTS OF ENTRY FOR ALIENS ARRIVING BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 234.4 International airports for entry...

  13. 42 CFR 71.45 - Food, potable water, and waste: U.S. seaports and airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Food, potable water, and waste: U.S. seaports and... Inspection § 71.45 Food, potable water, and waste: U.S. seaports and airports. (a) Every seaport and airport..., or waste water or other polluting materials. Arriving aircraft shall discharge such matter only at...

  14. 78 FR 5861 - National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems: Clarification of Wildlife Hazard Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    .... These airports are typically smaller and have less air traffic, more piston-powered aircraft, and...), American white pelicans (8.4 percent), double-crested cormorants (6.6 percent), and sandhill cranes (6.4...

  15. Fast Aircraft Turnaround Enabled by Reliable Passenger Boarding

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Schultz

    2018-01-01

    Future 4D aircraft trajectories demand comprehensive consideration of environmental, economic, and operational constraints, as well as reliable prediction of all aircraft-related processes. Mutual interdependencies between airports result in system-wide, far-reaching effects in the air traffic network (reactionary delays). To comply with airline/airport challenges over the day of operations, a change to an air-to-air perspective is necessary, with a specific focus on the aircraft ground opera...

  16. Missouri airport investment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The studys purpose is to provide MoDOT with insight to the potential ROI for airport : investments in terms of economic development. To do so, this study addresses two central : objectives: first, an approach to evaluate airport investments; and s...

  17. A Queuing Model of the Airport Departure Process

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Simaiakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model of the aircraft departure process at an airport. The modeling procedure includes the estimation of unimpeded taxi-out time distributions and the development of a queuing model of the departure runway system based on the transient analysis of D/E/1 queuing systems. The parameters of the runway service process are estimated using operational data. Using the aircraft pushback schedule as input, the model predicts the expected runway schedule and takeoff ti...

  18. The Airport Network Flow Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    The impact of investment at an individual airport is felt through-out the National Airport System by reduction of delays at other airports in the the system. A GPSS model was constructed to simulate the propagation of delays through a nine-airport sy...

  19. Aviation noise overload in the immediate proximity of the Warsaw-Okecie airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Z.; Maziarka, S.

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented for investigations on noise overload around the Warszawa-Okecie airport on persons inhabiting the area where it exceeds 100 dB for a single aircraft flight. Of 256 subjects, 91.1 percent complained about aircraft noise overload. In the population studied considerable differences were noted respecting the subjective sensitivity scale. Statistical analysis showed numerous correlations between the individual noise sensitivity threshold and the subject's state of health, age, sex, type of work, etc. At the same time investigations demonstrated various forms and levels of disturbance in the organism for individual subjects and groups. The most frequent complaint was chronic fatigue (68.1 percent), followed by nervousness (36.6 percent), frequent headaches (36.2 percent), hearing disturbances (30.0 percent) and sleep disorders (23.9 percent).

  20. Traffic Management System on Airport Manoeuvring Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Borković

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years the number of flights at the busiestairports in the world has doubled, which, in the meantime hasled to a situation in which runways and taxi ways (manoeuvringareas cannot follow such substantial increase. As the result,many airports could not use their capacities in the full range interms of handling passengers and cargo. As a consequence,there were delays and traffic congestion, fuel was unnecessarilywasted, all of which caused negative impact on the environment.Traffic capacity increase on the ground cannot be consideredwithout the development and implementation of thesystem infrastructure that would optimize traffic flows and itsdistribution on the airport itself In these terms, and for positivesolution of these problems, a new system for surveillance andcontrol of aircraft on the airport manoeuvring areas is necessary,one which could be implemented fairly quickly, would becomplementary with the existing international standards andwould be upgraded to the existing and available technology andinfrastructure. With the implementation of the Advanced SurfaceMonitoring and Control System (A-SMGCS the aircrafttaxiing time could be significantly shortened and could be determinedmore accurately, which would have positive impacton the flight schedule. The unnecessary aircraft braking actionscould be also avoided, and this would reduce the fuel consumption,as well as noise and environmental pollution.

  1. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Airport. Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey Atlantic City International Airport. Englewood, Colorado... Airport. Hillsboro, Oregon Hillsboro Airport. Johnson City, New York Binghamton Regional Airport. Lansing..., California Southern California Logistics Airport. Waterford, Michigan Oakland County International Airport...

  2. Optimal assignment of incoming flights to baggage carousels at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Torben C.

    The problem considered in this report is an assignment problem occurring at airports. This problem concerns the assignment of baggage carousels in baggage claim halls to arriving aircraft (baggage carousel assignment problem). This is a highly dynamic problem since disruptions frequently occur du...... and in general is a substantial support in decision making....

  3. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requests a conveyance from a military department, the instrument of conveyance requires the following... basis of race, color, religion, age, sex, handicap or national origin, as to airport employment..., age, sex, handicap or national origin. (5) That the grantee agrees to comply with all requirements...

  4. Estimates of Potential Increases in Airport Capacity through ATC (Air Traffic Control) System Improvements in the Airport and Terminal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    departures); and (3) departures-only. A fleet mix typical of most majur airports was selected consisting of 15 percent small aircraft (e.g., Swearingen SW-4...schedules predicated on VFR operations can result in substantial delays when weather conditions force the use of IFR operations. 5.1 Difference Between

  5. Copenhagen Airport Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Copenhagen Airport Cohort 1990-2012 presents a unique data source for studies of health effects of occupational exposure to air pollution (ultrafine particles) and manual baggage handling among airport employees. We describe the extent of information in the cohort and in the follow...... covers 69 175 men in unskilled positions. The exposed cohort includes men in unskilled jobs employed at Copenhagen Airport in the period 1990-2012 either as baggage handlers or in other outdoor work. The reference cohort includes men in unskilled jobs working in the greater Copenhagen area. FINDINGS...... TO DATE: The cohort includes environmental Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in Copenhagen Airport, information on job function/task for each calendar year of employment between 1990 and 2012, exposure to air pollution at residence, average weight of baggage lifted per day and lifestyle...

  6. Airport Status Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web service that allows end-users the ability to query the current known delays in the National Airspace System as well as the current weather from NOAA by airport...

  7. Study of noise inside the peshawar airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Khan, A.R.; Shah, J.; Noor, S.; Aslam, T.

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the noise-study conducted at five different locations within the vicinity of International Airport, Peshawar (Pakistan). The sites selected for this study were Apron, Concourse Hall, Cargo Shed, Car Parking and Utility Block. Noise-levels were recorded during 'landing' and 'taking off' of aircrafts of six international, flights, operating from this Airport. The average noise levels at Apron, Concourse Hall, Cargo Shed, Car Parking and Utility Block were found to be in the range of 87.2-90.3, 77.7-82.0, 82.6-87.5, 0.1-84.5 and 85.0-85.8 dB (A) respectively. The results are discussed, with reference to permissible occupational noise-exposure limits. The health-impacts due to higher noise-level and their possible remedial measures have also been discussed. (author)

  8. A service life extension (SLEP) approach to operating aging aircraft beyond their original design lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentz, Alan Carter

    With today's uncertain funding climate (including sequestration and continuing budget resolutions), decision makers face severe budgetary challenges to maintain dominance through all aspects of the Department of Defense (DoD). To meet war-fighting capabilities, the DoD continues to extend aircraft programs beyond their design service lives by up to ten years, and occasionally much more. The budget requires a new approach to traditional extension strategies (i.e., reuse, reset, and reclamation) for structural hardware. While extending service life without careful controls can present a safety concern, future operations planning does not consider how much risk is present when operating within sound structural principles. Traditional structural hardware extension methods drive increased costs. Decision makers often overlook the inherent damage tolerance and fatigue capability of structural components and rely on simple time- and flight-based cycle accumulation when determining aircraft retirement lives. This study demonstrates that decision makers should consider risk in addition to the current extension strategies. Through an evaluation of eight military aircraft programs and the application and simulation of F-18 turbine engine usage data, this dissertation shows that insight into actual aircraft mission data, consideration of fatigue capability, and service extension length are key factors to consider. Aircraft structural components, as well as many critical safety components and system designs, have a predefined level of conservatism and inherent damage tolerance. The methods applied in this study would apply to extensions of other critical structures such as bridges. Understanding how much damage tolerance is built into the design compared to the original design usage requirements presents the opportunity to manage systems based on risk. The study presents the sensitivity of these factors and recommends avenues for further research.

  9. 77 FR 33083 - Airworthiness Directives; WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Airworthiness Directives; WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... directive (AD) for certain WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation Models 2T-1A, 2T-1A-1, and 2T-1A-2 airplanes... information identified in this AD, contact WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation; 15955 South Airport Rd., Battle...

  10. Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-31

    number turboprop aircraft. Aircraft in which the main propulsive force of aircraft departures actually performed pursuant to pub- is supplied by a...conventional propeller driven by a gas lished schedules at each airport. Scheduled departures per- turbine. Additional propulsive force may be supplied from...NYE6NAYI13NAL a 7 TI0G 32 326 60 -?2 7-220 6 6 SI 06-10-30 2; :2 ALL TYPES i 335 035 331 .132 99.05 163 64 MAJUR , 342 65 ffl4AJ3XI LC-f SI6RhATILPIAL

  11. Analysis of Ground-Wind Vortex Sensing System Data from O'Hare International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    From July 1976 through September 1977, aircraft wake vortex data were collected on the approach to runways 14R, 27R, and 32L at O'Hare International Airport. The vortices from over 21,000 aircraft were tracked using the propeller anemometer Ground-Wi...

  12. Airport Capital Improvement Plan : stewardship for airport development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This document summarizes efforts of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office : of the Associate Administrator for Airports to implement the concept of Airport Capital : Improvement Planning (ACIP). It is based on the experiences of the FAA's ...

  13. Use of social media by airports

    OpenAIRE

    Halpern, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates use of social media by airports according to geographical location of the airport, airport size, and airport ownership and operation. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a content analysis of airport websites. The sample consists of 1559 airports worldwide that are members of Airports Council International (ACI). Findings: Almost one-fifth of airports use at least one type of social media; 13% use Facebook, 12% use Twitter, 7% use LinkedIn...

  14. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  15. Determination of aircraft noise variability using an acoustic camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merino Martinez, R.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, aircraft noise is one of the major problems to be dealt with by the aerospace industry and especially suffered by the residents living in the vicinities of airports. The enforcement of noise control environmental laws around airports is hindered due to the large variability observed in the

  16. Airport Configuration Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is presently poor knowledge throughout the National Airspace System (NAS) of the airport configurations currently in use at each airport. There is even less...

  17. Water Supply Systems For Aircraft Fire And Rescue Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This Advisory Circular (AC) provides guidance for the selection : of a water source and standards for the design of a distribution system to : support aircraft rescue and fire fighting (ARFF) service operations on : airports.

  18. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watson

    Full Text Available Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO. In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration.

  19. Flight delay performance at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy Yablonsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of this paper is to determine the annual cyclical flight delays at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then using other data such as annual precipitation, passenger and aircraft traffic volumes and other factors, we attempted to correlate these factors with overall delays. These data could assist airport management in predicting periods of flight delay.Design/methodology/approach: Data were taken and analyzed from the data base “Research and Innovation Technology Administration” (RITA for the years 2005-2011 for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The data included 2.8 million flights originating and departing from this airport. Data were also gathered from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA showing precipitation. Additional data were gathered from the FAA regarding delay causes, number and types of delays and changes to the infrastructure of ATL airportFindings: There is a repeatable annual pattern of delays at ATL that can be modeled using delay data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. This pattern appears to be caused primarily by the frequency and amount of precipitation that falls at ATL and by the amount of flights that arrive and depart at ATL.Originality/value: This information could assist airport operations personnel, FAA air traffic controllers and airlines in anticipating and mitigating delays at specific times of the year.

  20. Background noise analysis in urban airport surroundings of Brazilian cities, Congonhas Airport, São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Scatolini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To perform a quantitative analysis of the background noise at Congonhas Airport surroundings based on large sampling and measurements with no interruption. METHODS Measuring sites were chosen from 62 and 72 DNL (day-night-level noise contours, in urban sites compatible with residential use. Fifteen sites were monitored for at least 168 hours without interruption or seven consecutive days. Data compilation was based on cross-reference between noise measurements and air traffic control records, and results were validated by airport meteorological reports. Preliminary diagnoses were established using the standard NBR-13368. Background noise values were calculated based on the Sound Exposure Level (SEL. Statistic parameters were calculated in one-hour intervals. RESULTS Only four of the fifteen sites assessed presented aircraft operations as a clear cause for the noise annoyance. Even so, it is possible to detect background noise levels above regulation limits during periods of low airport activity or when it closes at night. CONCLUSIONS All the sites monitored showed background noise levels above regulation limits between 7:00 and 21:00. In the intervals between 6:00-6:59 and 21:00-22:59 the noise data, when analyzed with the current airport operational characteristics, still allow the development of additional mitigating measures.

  1. Copenhagen Airport Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2017-01-01

    TO DATE: The cohort includes environmental Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in Copenhagen Airport, information on job function/task for each calendar year of employment between 1990 and 2012, exposure to air pollution at residence, average weight of baggage lifted per day and lifestyle...... covers 69 175 men in unskilled positions. The exposed cohort includes men in unskilled jobs employed at Copenhagen Airport in the period 1990-2012 either as baggage handlers or in other outdoor work. The reference cohort includes men in unskilled jobs working in the greater Copenhagen area. FINDINGS...

  2. THE CAPACITY AND CIRCULATION OF PASSENGER TERMINAL BUILDING IN REGIONAL AIRPORT (CASE: MINANGKABAU AND ADISUTJIPTO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORTS OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Defiani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dissertation explains about capacity and flow inside terminal buildings in two regional airports in Indonesia: Minangkabau and Adisutjipto International Airports. Both airports have similar characteristics of passengers’ number and locations as tourism areas. Secondary data in the form of existing terminal layouts and air traffic numbers were gained from both airports authorities in Indonesia. The analysis was carried out using the formulas from Japan International Cooperation Agency – Directorate General of Civil Aviation of Indonesia(JICA-DGCA studies in 1996 for significant areas in the terminal building, Ashford and Wright formula for calculating aircraft movement per hour, Microsoft Excel for calculating the 10-year passenger growth rate, and SPSS for determining the linear equation for domestic departure resulted in the forecasted saturation in the near 2020 for both of airports, especially on passengers’ handling areas such as boarding lounge (for departure and baggage claim area (for arrival. The research resulted in ideas to overcome problems related to the increasing capacity by adding areas (if possible and changing layouts. Some other options such as implementation of more effective signage and the suggestion of centralizing security checking areas also are being brought—though needed further research. There should be an addition of numbers of security check lines, appropriately to the increasing number of passengers. If a single queuing line creates delays, then the need for extra line(s is a necessity Keywords: Airport, Terminal Building, Capacity, Flow, Minangkabau, Adisutjipto

  3. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual designs of Quiet Turbofan STOL Short-Haul Transport Aircraft for the mid-1980 time period are developed and analyzed to determine their technical, operational, and economic feasibility. A matrix of aircraft using various high-lift systems and design parameters are considered. Variations in aircraft characteristics, airport geometry and location, and operational techniques are analyzed systematically to determine their effects on the market, operating economics, and community acceptance. In these studies, the total systems approach is considered to be critically important in analyzing the potential of STOL aircraft to reduce noise pollution and alleviate the increasing air corridor and airport congestion.

  4. The employment and income benefits of airport operation on the country in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Huderek-Glapska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The air transport market in Poland is undergoing significant changes, which take place both on the demand and supply side. Polish airports have experienced the unprecedented growth of air traffic. However, the increase in the number of airline connections - which benefits airports, passengers, aircraft industry and, indirectly, the whole society - at the same time results in the growth of social costs reflected by the intensification of noise and environmental pollution. The benefits of airport operation are reflected in the generation of employment and income. Existing literature reveals a gap in the knowledge in respect of impact of aviation in countries in transition. Material and methods: This paper investigates the applicability of socio-economic impact of air transport model to country in transition. In particular, it presents the employment and income benefits of airport operation. The input-output model is employed to measure the economic benefits of airport operation. The largest airport in Poland, Warsaw Chopin Airport is used as a case study. Results: The estimation results for the income and employment effects are found to be significant.  The operations of Warsaw Chopin Airport contributed to the generation of 527.8m EUR in current prices in 2011. Altogether, 19,349 jobs have been generated as the result of the direct, indirect and induced impact of Warsaw Chopin Airport.  Conclusion:  The size of production in the airport expressed in the number of aircraft operations and the number of passengers and goods serviced is positively correlated with the level of economic impact. The restriction on the development of the airport reflected by the inability to meet transport needs expressed by the society may generate opportunity costs.  

  5. Werkgelegenheidsmonitor Lelystad Airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidberg, J.; Burghouwt, G.; de Wit, J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005 kwam BCI tot de conclusie dat onder bepaalde condities 800 arbeidsplaatsen per miljoen passagiers op Lelystad Airport mogen worden verwacht. In een second opinion in opdracht van de Gemeente Lelystad bevestigde SEO (2006) de aannemelijkheid van dit aantal. Naarmate het groot commercieel

  6. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ...--Logan International Airport, Boston, Massachusetts (BOS); Las Vegas--McCarran International Airport, Las... following four additional airports: St. Paul International Airport, Minneapolis, Minnesota (MSP); Charlotte...

  7. SAR Raw Data Generation for Complex Airport Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The method of generating the SAR raw data of complex airport scenes is studied in this paper. A formulation of the SAR raw signal model of airport scenes is given. Via generating the echoes from the background, aircrafts and buildings, respectively, the SAR raw data of the unified SAR imaging geometry is obtained from their vector additions. The multipath scattering and the shadowing between the background and different ground covers of standing airplanes and buildings are analyzed. Based on the scattering characteristics, coupling scattering models and SAR raw data models of different targets are given, respectively. A procedure is given to generate the SAR raw data of airport scenes. The SAR images from the simulated raw data demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  8. Responding effectively to fuel spills at airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Fuel spills are among the most frequent causes of emergency calls faced by airport firefighters. Most fuel spills are a result of human error and careless procedures. They always constitute an emergency and require fast, efficient action to prevent disaster. A fuel spill is an accidental release of fuel, in this case, from an aircraft fuel system, refueling vehicle or refueling system. A normal release of a few drops of fuel associated with a disconnection or other regular fueling operations should not be classified as a fuel spill. However, anytime fuel must be cleaned up and removed from an area, a fuel spill has occurred. Volatile fuels pose significant threats to people, equipment, facilities and cargo when they are released. Anyone near a spill, including ramp workers, fueling personnel and aircraft occupants, are in danger if the fuel ignites. Buildings and equipment in a spill area, such as terminals, hangars, aircraft, fuel trucks and service equipment also are at risk. An often neglected point is that aircraft cargo also is threatened by fuel spills

  9. Modeling Intercity Mode Choice and Airport Choice in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Ashiabor, Senanu Y.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a framework to model travel choice behavior in order to estimate intercity travel demand at nation-level in the United States. Nested and mixed logit models were developed to study national-level intercity transportation in the United States. A separate General Aviation airport choice model to estimates General Aviation person-trips and number of aircraft operations though more than 3000 airports was also developed. The combination of the General Aviati...

  10. The effects of radar on avian behavior: Implications for wildlife management at airports

    OpenAIRE

    Sheridan, Eleanor R

    2014-01-01

    Airports are areas with a high availability of resources for wildlife to forage, breed, and roost. Airports also have different types of radars to assist with air traffic control as well as tracking of wildlife that could become a risk for aircraft. The effect of radar electromagnetic radiation on wildlife behavior is not well understood. The goal of this study was to determine if bird behavior is affected by radar in two contexts: static radar (e.g., surveillance radar) and approaching radar...

  11. Hydrant refueling system as an optimisation of aircraft refuelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HROMÁDKA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At large international airports, aircraft can be refuelled either by fuel trucks or using dedicated underground pipeline systems. The latter, hydrant refuelling, is considered to be an optimal fuelling method as it increases safety, shortens the aircraft turnaround time and cuts the overall costs. However, at smaller airports, implementation of this system can lead to high investment costs. Thus, the paper discusses the airport size from which this system may be efficient to implement. Various definitions of term “airport size” are assessed. Based on data collection, the hydrant system model is created within the paper. As a result, methodology for assessing the suitability of hydrant system implementation is set. This methodology can be used at every airport using three simple inputs.

  12. Literature review of the airport business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona Benitez, R.B.; Lodewijks, G.

    2008-01-01

    Airports are very important for economic growth. The demand for airport capacity has been growing very fast and private companies are now also investing in airport infrastructure. Airports must however be regulated because they are natural monopolies with high market power. Airports have variables

  13. The monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Huang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    At present, the civil aviation airports use the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems to monitor the aircrafts, vehicles and the other moving objects. Surface surveillance radars can cover most of the airport scenes, but because of the terminals, covered bridges and other buildings geometry, surface surveillance radar systems inevitably have some small segment blind spots. This paper presents a monocular vision imaging technology model for airport surface surveillance, achieving the perception of scenes of moving objects such as aircrafts, vehicles and personnel location. This new model provides an important complement for airport surface surveillance, which is different from the traditional surface surveillance radar techniques. Such technique not only provides clear objects activities screen for the ATC, but also provides image recognition and positioning of moving targets in this area. Thereby it can improve the work efficiency of the airport operations and avoid the conflict between the aircrafts and vehicles. This paper first introduces the monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance and then the monocular vision measurement accuracy analysis of the model. The monocular visual imaging technology model is simple, low cost, and highly efficient. It is an advanced monitoring technique which can make up blind spot area of the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems.

  14. Is liquid hydrogen a solution for mitigating air pollution by airports?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janic, Milan [OTB Research Institute, Delft University of Technology Jaffalaan 9, 2628 BX Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    This paper investigates the potential of LH{sub 2} (Liquid Hydrogen) as an alternative fuel for achieving more sustainable long-term development of large airports in terms of mitigating their air pollution. For such purpose, a methodology for quantifying the potential of LH{sub 2} is developed. It consists of two models: the first model enables the estimation of the fuel demand and the specification of the fuel production and storage capacity needed to satisfy that demand at a given airport under given conditions; the other model enables assessment of the effects of introducing LH{sub 2} on mitigating air pollution at that airport. The main inputs for the methodology are scenarios of the long-term growth of air traffic demand at the airport in terms of the annual number of ATM (Air Transport Movements), i.e. flights and related LTO (Landing and Take-Off) cycles and their time characteristics, the aircraft fleet mix, characterized by the aircraft size and proportions of conventional and cryogenic aircraft, the fuel consumption per particular categories of aircraft/flights; and specifically, the fuel consumption and related emission rates of particular air pollutants by these aircraft during LTO cycles. The output from the methodology includes an estimation of the long-term development of demand at a given airport in terms of the volume and structure of ATM, which depend on: the scenarios of traffic growth and introduction of cryogenic aircraft, the required production and storage capacity of particular fuel types, the fuel consumed, and the quantities of related air pollutants emitted during LTO cycles carried out during the period concerned. The airport planners and policy makers can use the methodology for estimating, planning, design, and managing the fuel production and storage capacity, as well as for setting a cap on the air pollution depending of the circumstances. (author)

  15. The Need for an Implant Identification Card at Airport Security Check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Erden; Kosuge, Dennis; MacDowell, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Joint replacement surgery is having an increasing demand as national healthcare systems confront an ever ageing population. Surgical complications associated with lower limb arthroplasty are well known but less investigation has been performed examining its effect on air travel, more specifically, unwanted and significant inconvenience caused to travelers going through airport security. In lower limb arthroplasty clinics, 50 patients who met our selection criteria were given questionnaires. Ten airport security officers from 4 international airports (London Stansted, London Gatwick, London Heathrow, and Amsterdam Schiphol International Airport) were also given a separate questionnaire. The opinion of the Civil Aviation Authority was also sought. All 50 patients (mean age, 70.4 years; range, 55 to 84 years) who were presenting in lower limb arthroplasty clinics and who met our selection criteria volunteered to enter the study. Twenty-eight of these patients were female (mean age, 69.1 years; range, 55 to 84 years) and 22 were male (mean age, 71.2 years; range, 58 to 81 years). Of the patients, 14% stated that their joint replacements did not set off the airport security alarm. Responses were received from 10 airport security officers as well. Six airport security officers were male and 4 were female. All of the airport officers were aware of some form of implant identification card with 90% stating that these were useful to them at airport security. Eight-four percent of the patients stated that an implant identification card outlining what joint replacement they possessed and when this had been done would be very useful. Sixteen percent of the patients did not think a card would be beneficial since all of them had set off the airport alarm system only once or less in their lifetime. It is the opinion of airport security officers and patients that joint replacement implant identification cards streamline airport security checks and decrease the need for more

  16. The microburst - Hazard to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, J.; Serafin, R.

    1984-01-01

    In encounters with microbursts, low altitude aircraft first encounter a strong headwind which increases their wing lift and altitude; this phenomenon is followed in short succession by a decreasing headwind component, a downdraft, and finally a strong tailwind that catastrophically reduces wing lift and precipitates a crash dive. It is noted that the potentially lethal low altitude wind shear of a microburst may lie in apparently harmless, rain-free air beneath a cloud base. Occasionally, such tell-tale signs as localized blowing of ground dust may be sighted in time. Microbursts may, however, occur in the heavy rain of a thunderstorm, where they will be totally obscured from view. Wind shear may be detected by an array of six anemometers and vanes situated in the vicinity of an airport, and by Doppler radar equipment at the airport or aboard aircraft.

  17. Full-scale aircraft tire pressure tests

    OpenAIRE

    FABRE, C; BALAY, Jean Maurice; LERAT, P; MAZARS, A

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an outdoor full-scale test planned to improve experimental and theoretical knowledge related to the effects of aircraft internal tire inflation pressure on the behavior and damage of flexible pavement. Since modern aircraft can have tire pressures greater than 15 bar, the tests will focus on pressures from 15 bar to 17.5 bar. The experimental pavement located on the Toulouse-Blagnac airport in France will include up to seven al different test sections, representative of c...

  18. [Relationship between noise and blood pressure in an airport environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, N; Aoudi, S; Tizi, M; Larbi, K; Bougherbal, R

    2013-06-01

    The authors have tried to assess the noise annoyance and its relation with the development of hypertension for the staff working at the civilian airport of Algiers. This population is constantly subject to aircraft noises. The noise, through creating stress, acts on the central nervous system and on the autonomic nervous system and is likely to cause hypertension by increasing peripheral resistance, total cholesterol, fatty acids, adrenaline, cortisol and blood glucose. A number of studies revealed that starting from 65 decibels, the noise causes hypertension for patients of more than 40 years following 5 years of exposure. An analytical study was conducted in 2000, which made the comparison between two groups of men working at Air Algérie company. There were 91 officers belonging to air crew, whose number was estimated at that time at 547, and whose average age was 49 years, compared with 111 officers of the ground crew on a total of 1200 persons and whose average age was 56 years. All those officers have received work medical consultation. Patients with suspected hypertension were systematically oriented to cardiologist. Similarly, everyone has had a biological assessment, an ophthalmologic consultation and ENT consultation as well. Hypertension was found in 9.25% of the ground crew and in 16.63% of the air crew (Pnoise nuisance, at a younger age and with less risk factors than the ground crew, who develops hypertension with similar prevalence to general population's but at a younger age. The air crew gives more importance to treatment due to the risk of losing their navigation license. The ENT examination was abnormal in 39% of the air crew versus 8% of the ground crew. In the light of these results, the noise seems to really interfere in the development of hypertension in airport environment. It would be more interesting to identify the number of strokes and particularly acute coronary syndromes which are far from being rare in this population subject to this

  19. Small Aircraft Transportation System, Higher Volume Operations Concept: Normal Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Terence S.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Williams, Daniel M.; Adams, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    This document defines the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept for normal conditions. In this concept, a block of airspace would be established around designated non-towered, non-radar airports during periods of poor weather. Within this new airspace, pilots would take responsibility for separation assurance between their aircraft and other similarly equipped aircraft. Using onboard equipment and procedures, they would then approach and land at the airport. Departures would be handled in a similar fashion. The details for this operational concept are provided in this document.

  20. Airports and Navigation Aids Database System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Airport and Navigation Aids Database System is the repository of aeronautical data related to airports, runways, lighting, NAVAID and their components, obstacles, no...

  1. Assessment procedure and probability determination methods of aircraft crash events in siting for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qiyan; Zhang Lijun; Huang Weiqi; Yin Qingliao

    2010-01-01

    Assessment procedure of aircraft crash events in siting for nuclear power plants, and the methods of probability determination in two different stages of prelimi- nary screening and detailed evaluation are introduced in this paper. Except for general air traffic, airport operations and aircraft in the corridor, the probability of aircraft crash by military operation in the military airspaces is considered here. (authors)

  2. Scarcity rents and airport charges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouwt, G.; de Wit, W.

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses the responses related to scarcity rents and airport charges. The Commission has asked ITF/SEO to provide evidence on scarcity rents in the London airport system. Different reports submitted in response to the Commission’s consultation make different assumptions on the way

  3. Airport industry connectivity report: 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, T.; Lieshout, R.; Burghouwt, G.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an update of the 'Airport Industry Connectivity Report 2004-2014'. It's focused on more recent developments and charting how Europe’s connectivity has evolved over the past 12 months. Airport connectivity is an increasingly discussed topic in European policy circles. With good reason.

  4. An Analysis of Delay and Travel Times at Sao Paulo International Airport (AISP/GRU): Planning Based on Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Erico Soriano Martins; Mueller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of flight delays in Brazil, mostly verified at the ground (airfield), is responsible for serious disruptions at the airport level but also for the unchaining of problems in all the airport system, affecting also the airspace. The present study develops an analysis of delay and travel times at Sao Paulo International Airport/ Guarulhos (AISP/GRU) airfield based on simulation model. Different airport physical and operational scenarios had been analyzed by means of simulation. SIMMOD Plus 4.0, the computational tool developed to represent aircraft operation in the airspace and airside of airports, was used to perform these analysis. The study was mainly focused on aircraft operations on ground, at the airport runway, taxi-lanes and aprons. The visualization of the operations with increasing demand facilitated the analyses. The results generated in this work certify the viability of the methodology, they also indicated the solutions capable to solve the delay problem by travel time analysis, thus diminishing the costs for users mainly airport authority. It also indicated alternatives for airport operations, assisting the decision-making process and in the appropriate timing of the proposed changes in the existing infrastructure.

  5. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in neighborhoods adjacent to a commercial airport: a land use regression modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spengler John D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing concern in communities surrounding airports regarding the contribution of various emission sources (such as aircraft and ground support equipment to nearby ambient concentrations. We used extensive monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 in neighborhoods surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, and land-use regression (LUR modeling techniques to determine the impact of proximity to the airport and local traffic on these concentrations. Methods Palmes diffusion tube samplers were deployed along the airport's fence line and within surrounding neighborhoods for one to two weeks. In total, 644 measurements were collected over three sampling campaigns (October 2007, March 2008 and June 2008 and each sampling location was geocoded. GIS-based variables were created as proxies for local traffic and airport activity. A forward stepwise regression methodology was employed to create general linear models (GLMs of NO2 variability near the airport. The effect of local meteorology on associations with GIS-based variables was also explored. Results Higher concentrations of NO2 were seen near the airport terminal, entrance roads to the terminal, and near major roads, with qualitatively consistent spatial patterns between seasons. In our final multivariate model (R2 = 0.32, the local influences of highways and arterial/collector roads were statistically significant, as were local traffic density and distance to the airport terminal (all p Conclusion Our study has shown that there are clear local variations in NO2 in the neighborhoods that surround an urban airport, which are spatially consistent across seasons. LUR modeling demonstrated a strong influence of local traffic, except the smallest roads that predominate in residential areas, as well as proximity to the airport terminal.

  6. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in neighborhoods adjacent to a commercial airport: a land use regression modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkiewicz, Gary; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Vallarino, Jose; Melly, Steven J; Spengler, John D; Levy, Jonathan I

    2010-11-17

    There is growing concern in communities surrounding airports regarding the contribution of various emission sources (such as aircraft and ground support equipment) to nearby ambient concentrations. We used extensive monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in neighborhoods surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, and land-use regression (LUR) modeling techniques to determine the impact of proximity to the airport and local traffic on these concentrations. Palmes diffusion tube samplers were deployed along the airport's fence line and within surrounding neighborhoods for one to two weeks. In total, 644 measurements were collected over three sampling campaigns (October 2007, March 2008 and June 2008) and each sampling location was geocoded. GIS-based variables were created as proxies for local traffic and airport activity. A forward stepwise regression methodology was employed to create general linear models (GLMs) of NO2 variability near the airport. The effect of local meteorology on associations with GIS-based variables was also explored. Higher concentrations of NO2 were seen near the airport terminal, entrance roads to the terminal, and near major roads, with qualitatively consistent spatial patterns between seasons. In our final multivariate model (R2 = 0.32), the local influences of highways and arterial/collector roads were statistically significant, as were local traffic density and distance to the airport terminal (all p GIS variables, and the regression model structure was robust to various model-building approaches. Our study has shown that there are clear local variations in NO2 in the neighborhoods that surround an urban airport, which are spatially consistent across seasons. LUR modeling demonstrated a strong influence of local traffic, except the smallest roads that predominate in residential areas, as well as proximity to the airport terminal.

  7. Fast Aircraft Turnaround Enabled by Reliable Passenger Boarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schultz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Future 4D aircraft trajectories demand comprehensive consideration of environmental, economic, and operational constraints, as well as reliable prediction of all aircraft-related processes. Mutual interdependencies between airports result in system-wide, far-reaching effects in the air traffic network (reactionary delays. To comply with airline/airport challenges over the day of operations, a change to an air-to-air perspective is necessary, with a specific focus on the aircraft ground operations as major driver for airline punctuality. Aircraft ground trajectories primarily consists of handling processes at the stand (deboarding, catering, fueling, cleaning, boarding, unloading, loading, which are defined as the aircraft turnaround. Turnaround processes are mainly controlled by ground handling, airport, or airline staff, except the aircraft boarding, which is driven by passengers’ experience and willingness/ability to follow the proposed boarding procedures. This paper provides an overview of the research done in the field of aircraft boarding and introduces a reliable, calibrated, and stochastic aircraft boarding model. The stochastic boarding model is implemented in a simulation environment to evaluate specific boarding scenarios using different boarding strategies and innovative technologies. Furthermore, the potential of a connected aircraft cabin as sensor network is emphasized, which could provide information on the current and future status of the boarding process.

  8. Lightning Impacts on Airports - Challenges of Balancing Safety & Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Matthias; Deierling, Wiebke; Nelson, Eric; Stone, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and lightning pose a safety risk to personnel working outdoors, such as people maintaining airport grounds (e.g., mowing grass or repairing runway lighting) or servicing aircraft on ramps (handling baggage, food service, refueling, tugging and guiding aircraft from/to gates, etc.). Since lightning strikes can cause serious injuries or death, it is important to provide timely alerts to airport personnel so that they can get to safety when lightning is imminent. This presentation discusses the challenges and uncertainties involved in using lightning information and stakeholder procedures to ensure safety of outdoor personnel while keeping ramp operations as efficient as possible considering thunderstorm impacts. The findings presented are based on extensive observations of airline operators under thunderstorm impacts. These observations reveal a complex picture with substantial uncertainties related to the (1) source of lightning information (e.g., sensor type, network, data processing) used to base ramp closure decisions on, (2) uncertainties involved in the safety procedures employed by various stakeholders across the aviation industry (yielding notably different rules being applied by multiple airlines even at a single airport), and (3) human factors issues related to the use of decision support tools and the implementation of safety procedures. This research is supported by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official policy or position of the FAA.

  9. The Public Safety Zones around Small and Medium Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Mascio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper planning around airports safeguards the surrounding territory from risks of air accidents. Many countries have defined Public Safety Zones (PSZs beyond the runway thresholds as a result of targeted risk assessment methods. Therefore, national aviation Authorities could limit building construction and industrial development in order to contain the risk for dwellers to be involved in aircraft accidents. The number of people who live, work or congregate in these areas should be limited. The procedure to set Public Safety Zones is based on advanced technical analyses for major infrastructures. For smaller airports, simplified schemes are used, but, sometimes, they are not as effective when considering the actual safety conditions. This article aims to identify the shape and size of the Public Safety Zones for small and medium one-runway airports. The influence of the volume and mix of traffic on the PSZ geometry has been evaluated using the program named SARA (Sapienza Airport Risk Analysis; the results are correlated with the current Risk Plans generally adopted in Italy. According to the air traffic, the Risk Plans are characterized by a dynamic definition and fit the results obtained from risk assessment.

  10. Aircrafts' taxi noise. Sound power level and directivity frequency band results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, C.; Pavón, I.; Ruiz, M.; Pagan Munoz, Raul; Recuero, M.

    2009-01-01

    When noise mapping airports, the main noise sources are take offs and landings. But aircrafts' taxi noise can also be important, and should be considered, for instance when there are residential buildings near the airport's terminal. Main prediction tools, like Integrated Noise Model (INM), do not

  11. Using happiness surveys to value intangibles: The case of airport noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Praag, B.M.S.; Baarsma, B.E.

    2005-01-01

    We assess the monetary value of the noise damage, caused by aircraft noise nuisance around Amsterdam Airport, as the sum of hedonic house price differentials and a residual cost component. The residual costs are assessed from a survey, including an ordinal life satisfaction scale, on which

  12. Purchase motivators in Brazilian airports: A typology of airports consumers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Brantes Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance their revenue streams, airports have increasingly assumed the role of commercial hubs. However, they differ from traditional retailers because of the atmospheric and psychological issues inherent to the act of traveling. Given the scarcity of studies aimed at understanding the motivators of airport purchases in Brazil, this study seeks to investigate the shopping behavior of Brazilian passengers, researching buying motivations at airports. To this end, 157 Brazilian passengers at Santos Dumont airport (Rio de Janeiro were invited to participate in a survey. The survey instrument was developed based on the variables and constructs suggested by Geuens, Vantomme e Brengman (2004.The results revealed four dimensions of buying motivation: two of them linked to the characteristics of an airport – “Atmospheric” and “Airport Related” - and two others linked to traditional buying behavior – “Social” and “Functional”. Based on the revealed motivational dimensions, the Brazilian passengers were classified in four different groups: Interactive Consumer, Self-centered Consumer, Traditional Consumer and Apathetic/Indifferent Consumer.

  13. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ...] Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, Dallas... fee airport designation for Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, in Dallas, Texas. User fee airports.... Generally, the type of airport that would seek designation as a user fee airport would be one at which a...

  14. U.S. Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories: State of the Practice and Recommendations for Airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This document presents highlights from five research reports on airport greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories. It presents the most salient findings for policy makers and U.S. airports seeking to better understand and inventory airport GHG emiss...

  15. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for... 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL from the conditions, release certain...

  16. Particulate matter pollution from aviation-related activity at a small airport of the Aegean Sea Insular Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psanis, C; Triantafyllou, E; Giamarelou, M; Manousakas, M; Eleftheriadis, K; Biskos, G

    2017-10-15

    The unprecedented growth in aviation during the last years has resulted in a notable increase of local air pollution related to airports. The impacts of aviation on air quality can be extremely high particularly around airports serving remote insular regions with pristine atmospheric environments. Here we report measurements that show how the atmospheric aerosol is affected by the activity at a small airport in a remote region. More specifically, we provide measurements performed at the airport of Mytilene, Greece, a regional yet international airport that serves the entire island of Lesvos; the third largest island of the country. The measurements show that the activity during landing, taxiing and take-off of the aircrafts accounted for up to a 10-fold increase in particulate matter (PM) mass concentration in the vicinity of the airport. The number concentration of particles having diameters from 10 to 500nm also increased from ca. 4×10 2 to 8×10 5 particlescm -3 , while the mean particle diameter decreased to 20nm when aircrafts were present at the airport. Elemental analysis on particle samples collected simultaneously at the airport and at a remote site 3km away, showed that the former were significantly influenced by combustion sources, and specifically from the engines of the aircrafts. Our results show that despite their small size, local airports serving remote insular regions should be considered as important air pollution hotspots, raising concerns for the exposure of the people working and leaving in their vicinities to hazardous pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Approaches towards airport economic performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana STRYČEKOVÁ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to assess how economic benchmarking is being used by airports as a means of performance measurement and comparison of major international airports in the world. The study focuses on current benchmarking practices and methods by taking into account different factors according to which it is efficient to benchmark airports performance. As methods are considered mainly data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis. Apart from them other approaches are discussed by airports to provide economic benchmarking. The main objective of this article is to evaluate the efficiency of the airports and answer some undetermined questions involving economic benchmarking of the airports.

  18. An overview of practice and regulations concerning aircraft noise protection in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Bojana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of studies and regulation concerning the issue of aircraft noise protection in Republic of Serbia. After crossing the limit of 50.000 operations in 2014, Airport 'Nikola Tesla' is classified as major airport, and with that urged to fulfill various requirements related to nose protection. Major airports are obliged to monitor noise, as well as to prepare strategic noise maps and action plans aiming to decrease number of people exposed to aircraft noise above acceptable level.

  19. Airport Surface Access and Mobile Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martin-Domingo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Airport Surface Access faces two main opposite issues: (1 cars, being the main transport mode, contribute to the increasing level of congestion and pollution of cities; and (2 simultaneously, parking fees are one important source of airports commercial revenue, creating a dilemma for airports when facing the problem. Following the recent trend of air passengers travelling with Smartphone (78% in 2013, the purpose of this paper is to monitor the adoption of mobile Applications (Apps by airports and to analyze if the information and functions provided in those Apps can help to overcome the above two issues. Design/methodology/approach: 31 iPhone App of some of the largest European airports were evaluated in the lab using the evaluation model of Destinations Mobile Applications (Scolari and Fernández-Cavia 2014 adapted for for the Airport Surface Access on Airport Apps Findings and Originality/value: The Apps evaluated provided a very limited functionality to help passengers to plan and book their trips to/from the airports on public transports and gave high priority to parking information and services. Originality/value: Although Airport Surface Access has been a widely researched, the originality of this paper is the analysis of airport mobile Apps as a potential tool for airports to deal with the surface airport access problems.Access, Airports, Mobile Internet, Commercial Revenues

  20. Scheduling Aircraft Landings under Constrained Position Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Chandran, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Optimal scheduling of airport runway operations can play an important role in improving the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS). Methods that compute the optimal landing sequence and landing times of aircraft must accommodate practical issues that affect the implementation of the schedule. One such practical consideration, known as Constrained Position Shifting (CPS), is the restriction that each aircraft must land within a pre-specified number of positions of its place in the First-Come-First-Served (FCFS) sequence. We consider the problem of scheduling landings of aircraft in a CPS environment in order to maximize runway throughput (minimize the completion time of the landing sequence), subject to operational constraints such as FAA-specified minimum inter-arrival spacing restrictions, precedence relationships among aircraft that arise either from airline preferences or air traffic control procedures that prevent overtaking, and time windows (representing possible control actions) during which each aircraft landing can occur. We present a Dynamic Programming-based approach that scales linearly in the number of aircraft, and describe our computational experience with a prototype implementation on realistic data for Denver International Airport.

  1. NASA Research on an Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Surface operations at airports in the US are based on tactical operations, where departure aircraft primarily queue up and wait at the departure runways. There have been attempts to address the resulting inefficiencies with both strategic and tactical tools for metering departure aircraft. This presentation gives an overview of Spot And Runway Departure Advisor with Collaborative Decision Making (SARDA-CDM): an integrated strategic and tactical system for improving surface operations by metering departure aircraft. SARDA-CDM is the augmentation of ground and local controller advisories through sharing of flight movement and related operations information between airport operators, flight operators and air traffic control at the airport. The goal is to enhance the efficiency of airport surface operations by exchanging information between air traffic control and airline operators, while minimizing adverse effects on stakeholders and passengers. The presentation motivates the need for departure metering, and provides a brief background on the previous work on SARDA. Then, the concept of operations for SARDA-CDM is described. Then the preliminary results from testing the concept in a real-time automated simulation environment are described. Results indicate benefits such as reduction in taxiing delay and fuel consumption. Further, the preliminary implementation of SARDA-CDM seems robust for two minutes delay in gate push-back times.

  2. A Multi Agent Based Model for Airport Service Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Ip

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aviation industry is highly dynamic and demanding in nature that time and safety are the two most important factors while one of the major sources of delay is aircraft on ground because of it complexity, a lot of machinery like vehicles are involved and lots of communication are involved. As one of the aircraft ground services providers in Hong Kong International Airport, China Aircraft Services Limited (CASL aims to increase competitiveness by better its service provided while minimizing cost is also needed. One of the ways is to optimize the number of maintenance vehicles allocated in order to minimize chance of delay and also operating costs. In the paper, an agent-based model is proposed for support decision making in vehicle allocation. The overview of the aircrafts ground services procedures is firstly mentioned with different optimization methods suggested by researchers. Then, the agent-based approach is introduced and in the latter part of report and a multi-agent system is built and proposed which is decision supportive for CASL in optimizing the maintenance vehicles' allocation. The application provides flexibility for inputting number of different kinds of vehicles, simulation duration and aircraft arrival rate in order to simulation different scenarios which occurs in HKIA.

  3. The Impact of Rising Temperatures on Aircraft Takeoff Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R. M.; Thompson, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    Steadily rising mean and extreme temperatures as a result of climate change will likely impact the air transportation system over the coming decades. As air temperatures rise at constant pressure, air density declines, resulting in less lift generation by an aircraft wing at a given airspeed and potentially imposing a weight restriction on departing aircraft. This study presents a general model to project future weight restrictions across a fleet of aircraft with different takeoff weights operating at a variety of airports. We construct performance models for five common commercial aircraft and 19 major airports around the world and use projections of daily temperatures from the CMIP5 model suite under the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emissions scenarios to calculate required hourly weight restriction. We find that on average, 10-30% of annual flights departing at the time of daily maximum temperature may require some weight restriction below their maximum takeoff weights, with mean restrictions ranging from 0.5 to 4% of total aircraft payload and fuel capacity by mid- to late century. Both mid-sized and large aircraft are affected, and airports with short runways and high tempera- tures, or those at high elevations, will see the largest impacts. Our results suggest that weight restriction may impose a non-trivial cost on airlines and impact aviation operations around the world and that adaptation may be required in aircraft design, airline schedules, and/or runway lengths.

  4. Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Residences Near Two Civil Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, Sanford; Howe, Richard R.; Tabachnick, Barbara G.; Pearsons, Karl S.; Sneddon, Matthew D.

    1995-01-01

    A large-scale field study of noise-induced sleep disturbance was conducted in the vicinities of Stapleton International Airport (DEN) and Denver International Airport (DIA) in anticipation of the closure of the former and opening of the latter. Both indoor and outdoor measurements of aircraft and other nighttime noises were made during four time periods. Measurements were made in 57 homes located as close as feasible to the runway ends of the two airports. Sleep disturbance was measured by several indices of behaviorally confirmed awakening (button pushes upon awakening) and body movement (as measured with wrist-worn actimeters). A total of 2717 subject-nights of observations were made over the course of the study. Although average noise event levels measured outdoors decreased markedly at DEN after closure of the airport and increased slightly at DIA after its opening, indoor noise event levels varied much less in homes near both airports. No large differences were observed in noise-induced sleep disturbance at either airport. Indoor sound exposure levels of noise events were, however, closely related to and good predictors of actimetrically defined motility and arousal.

  5. Airport landside operations and air service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, P. B.; Whitlock, E. M.; Lamagna, F.; Mundy, R. A.; Oberhausen, P. J.

    The following areas are discussed: airport curbside planning and design; analysis of New Orleans airport ground transportation system; time series analysis of intercity air travel volume; economic justification of air service to small communities; and general aviation and the airport and airway system (an analysis of cost allocation and recovery).

  6. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Airports, Airport Planning and Programming, Routing Symbol APP-501, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Room 619... Programming, Routing Symbol APP-501, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Room 619, Washington, DC 20591; between 9 a... recognition of the interest of all segments of the airport community in the AIP. The agency will consider all...

  7. 77 FR 58208 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of receipt of... International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico (SJU) in the Airport Privatization Pilot Program and has determined....S.C. Section 47134 establishes an airport privatization pilot program and authorizes the Department...

  8. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  9. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  10. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA... (Miami International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ.../Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Buffalo...

  11. Methodology to Improve Aviation Security With Terrorist Using Aircraft as a Weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    of aircraft was traced to 1931 in Peru (Jenkins, n.d.). Since then, aircraft have been hijacked for various reasons ranging from hijackers seeking...1.5.2 Tourism 1.5.3 ... Figure 7. Process Decomposition17 of Airport System. 2. Passenger Process Decomposition As each stakeholder has

  12. 14 CFR 139.315 - Aircraft rescue and firefighting: Index determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft rescue and firefighting: Index... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.315 Aircraft rescue and firefighting: Index determination. (a) An index is required by paragraph (c) of this section for each certificate holder. The Index is determined...

  13. Study of carbon dioxide emission inventory from transportation sector at Kualanamu International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryati, I.; Indrawan, I.; Alihta, K. N.

    2018-02-01

    Transportation includes sources of greenhouse gas emission contributor in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is one of the air pollutant gases that cause climate change. The source of CO2 emissions at airports comes from road and air transportation. Kualanamu International Airport is one of the public service airports in North Sumatera Province. The purpose of this study is to inventory the emission loads generated by motor vehicles and aircraft and to forecast contributions of CO2 emissions from motor vehicles and aircraft. The research method used is quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative method used is to estimate emission loads of motor vehicles based on vehicle volume and emission factors derived from the literature and using the Tier-2 method to calculate the aircraft emission loads. The results for the maximum CO2 concentration were 6,206,789.37 μg/m3 and the minimal CO2 concentration was 4,070,674.84 μg/Nm3. The highest aircraft CO2 emission load is 200,164,424.5 kg/hr (1.75 x 109 ton/year) and the lowest is 38,884,064.5 kg/hr (3.40 x 108 ton/year). Meanwhile, the highest CO2 emission load from motor vehicles was 51,299.25 gr/hr (449,38 ton/year) and the lowest was 38,990.42 gr/hr (341,55 ton/year). CO2 contribution from a motor vehicle is 65% and 5% from aircraft in Kualanamu International Airport.

  14. Airport Performance and Construction Enlargement Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanun, Y.; Setiawan, M. I.; Kurniasih, N.; Hasyim, C.; Ahmar, A. S.

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation of transportation infrastructure project should consider the contribution towards infrastructure growth. This research aims to analyze the effect of Construction enlargement activities towards airport performance. This research is correlation study. The population includes 148 airports in Indonesia. By using total sampling, there were 148 sample airports. The result shows that the construction enlargement activities variable has relatively strong relationship to Airport Performance variable, while the adjusted R Square score shows the increasing construction enlargement activities that affected by the other factors aside from airport performance.

  15. An Aircraft Service Staff Rostering using a Hybrid GRASP Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Vincent; Wu, Gene Pak Kit; Ip, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    The aircraft ground service company is responsible for carrying out the regular tasks to aircraft maintenace between their arrival at and departure from the airport. This paper presents the application of a hybrid approach based upon greedy randomized adaptive search procedure (GRASP) for rostering technical staff such that they are assigned predefined shift patterns. The rostering of staff is posed as an optimization problem with an aim of minimizing the violations of hard and soft constrain...

  16. Wind data from Kennedy Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A 700-foot array of horizontal and vertical single-axle anemometers was installed at New York's Kennedy Airport on 30-foot poles under the approach to Runway 31R. One-minute average measurements were recorded continuously, with a few breaks, from Sep...

  17. Wind data from Memphis airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A 1300-foot array of horizontal and vertical single-axis anemometers was installed at the Memphis, TN Airport on 10- and 13-foot poles under the approach to Runway 727. One-minute average measurements were recorded continuously from mid August 1995 t...

  18. Supersonics/Airport Noise Plan: An Evolutionary Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the Plan for the Airport Noise Tech Challenge Area of the Supersonics Project. It is given in the context of strategic planning exercises being done in other Projects to show the strategic aspects of the Airport Noise plan rather than detailed task lists. The essence of this strategic view is the decomposition of the research plan by Concept and by Tools. Tools (computational, experimental) is the description of the plan that resources (such as researchers) most readily identify with, while Concepts (here noise reduction technologies or aircraft configurations) is the aspects that project management and outside reviewers most appreciate as deliverables and milestones. By carefully cross-linking these so that Concepts are addressed sequentially (roughly one after another) by researchers developing/applying their Tools simultaneously (in parallel with one another), the researchers can deliver milestones at a reasonable pace while doing the longer-term development that most Tools in the aeroacoustics science require. An example of this simultaneous application of tools was given for the Concept of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles. The presentation concluded with a few ideas on how this strategic view could be applied to the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Quiet Aircraft Tech Challenge Area as it works through its current roadmapping exercise.

  19. Comparison of alternate fuels for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of candidate alternate fuels for aircraft is presented. The fuels discussed include liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene. Each fuel is evaluated from the standpoint of production, transmission, airport storage and distribution facilities, and use in aircraft. Technology deficient areas for cryogenic fuels, which should be advanced prior to the introduction of the fuels into the aviation industry, are identified, as are the cost and energy penalties associated with not achieving those advances. Environmental emissions and safety aspects of fuel selection are discussed. A detailed description of the various fuel production and liquefaction processes and their efficiencies and economics is given.

  20. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  1. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  2. Development of Fast-Time Stochastic Airport Ground and Runway Simulation Model and Its Traffic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Mori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport congestion, in particular congestion of departure aircraft, has already been discussed by other researches. Most solutions, though, fail to account for uncertainties. Since it is difficult to remove uncertainties of the operations in the real world, a strategy should be developed assuming such uncertainties exist. Therefore, this research develops a fast-time stochastic simulation model used to validate various methods in order to decrease airport congestion level under existing uncertainties. The surface movement data is analyzed first, and the uncertainty level is obtained. Next, based on the result of data analysis, the stochastic simulation model is developed. The model is validated statistically and the characteristics of airport operation under existing uncertainties are investigated.

  3. THE KINETICS OF CONTAMINANTS ACCUMULATION IN THE JET FUEL DURING THE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS OF ITS PREPARATION FOR AIRCRAFT REFUELING

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Brailko

    2017-01-01

    Much attention is payed to the tasks for ensuring domestic and international aircraft safety and regularity, which are multifaceted and complex. One of them is the system of ensuring the quality of aviation fuel for refueling aircraft at airports. A significant influence of the quality, chemical composition and fuel range on the reliability and lifetime of components and parts of the aircraft fuel system was studied in the process of development and experience accumulation of aircraft operati...

  4. Airports and Airfields, Airports within Johnson County as well as runway depicted with attribute information of both airport and runway., Published in Not Provided, Johnson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Airports and Airfields dataset current as of unknown. Airports within Johnson County as well as runway depicted with attribute information of both airport and runway..

  5. Methodology for designing aircraft having optimal sound signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahai, A.K.; Simons, D.G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology with which aircraft designs can be modified such that they produce optimal sound signatures on the ground. With optimal sound it is implied in this case sounds that are perceived as less annoying by residents living near airport vicinities. A novel design and

  6. Airline's choice of aircraft size-explanations and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, P.; Givoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    When facing a growth in demand, airlines tend to respond more by means of increasing frequencies than by increasing aircraft size. At many of the world's largest airports there are fewer than 100 passengers per air transport movement, although congestion and delays are growing. Furthermore, demand

  7. SOME ISSUES OF THE AIRPORT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Ovidiu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, the recommended standards for the operation and management of civil-use airports are provided by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. In most individual countries, airports are managed directly by the government, most often under the ministry of transport. In some countries, including EU countries, some airports are privately owned and operated, although, despite private ownership, they are still subject to much of the country’s regulations regarding aviation operations. The complex system of civil airports is made up of individual airport facilities of varying sizes, serving various purposes, all organized into plans of regional, national, and international levels. The range of rules, regulations, and policies, administered from varying levels of government, cover the full spectrum of airport and aviation system operations. Furthermore, a large number of professional and industry organizations play a large part in influencing the policies by which airport management must operate their facilities. By understanding where an airport manager’s airport falls within the civil aviation system, what rules must be followed, and what sources of support and assistance exist, the task of efficiently managing the complex system that is an airport, becomes highly facilitated.

  8. Book Review: Airport Competition: The European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Gumelar Pratama

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The competitive business environment in aviation industry has changed since European Integration. Not only airlines become more competitive after s­uch integration, but also other main infrastructure of aviation, airports. At the first stage of regional development, competition in airport industry seems to be impossible since all countries in a region still have clear jurisdictional boundaries. The other side of the coin is that airport competition becomes an important issue in a more integrated region, such as European Union (EU. This occurs because an airport owner from another country can buy other airports outside its state jurisdiction, under the same region. Articles in this book prove the claim of the existence of airport competition. Under the introductory part, the editors outlined three cases from EU: UK Civil Aviation Authority action to Heathrow Airport in 2008, Blocked Takeover of Bratislava Airport 2006 and European Commission Prohibition on Subsidies to Ryanair by Brussels South Charleroi Airport 2004. All of the cases are inevitable proofs that airport competition undoubtedly exists in Europe.

  9. Business Centre Development Model of Airport Area in Supporting Airport Sustainability in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, MI; Surjokusumo, S.; Ma'soem, DM; Johan, J.; Hasyim, C.; Kurniasih, N.; Sukoco, A.; Dhaniarti, I.; Suyono, J.; Sudapet, IN; Nasihien, RD; Mudjanarko, SW; Wulandari, A.; Ahmar, Ansari S.; Wajdi, MBN

    2018-01-01

    Airport is expected to play the role in enhancing the economic level of the region, especially the local people around the airport. The Aero City concept in developing an airport might also develop a city centreed in the airport that combining airport oriented business development, business actors and local people around the airport area. This study aims to generate development model of business centre at the airports in Indonesia. This is a mixed method based study. The population includes 296 airports under government management, government subsidiary and military. By using stratified random sampling, there were 151 sample airports. The results show that business centre development in the airport area will be related with the airport management and the commercial property (business centre) growth at the airport. Aero City in Indonesia can be developed by partnership system between government and private sector that consists of construction, development, and implementation of commercial property such as hotel, apartment, retail, office, etc. Based on the result of T-Value test, Airport Performance variable predicted to have significant influence on Gross Regional Domestic Product Central Business District performance.

  10. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is included...

  11. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b) If... in the National Airport Plan. Only work on an airport included in the current Plan is eligible for... not required to proceed with planning or development of an airport included in the National Airport...

  12. Superconducting and conventional electromagnetic launch system for civil aircraft assisted take-off

    OpenAIRE

    Bertola, Luca; Cox, Thomas; Wheeler, Patrick; Garvey, Seamus D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares three possible linear motor topologies for an electromagnetic launch system to assist civil aircraft take-off. Assisted launch of civil aircraft has the potential of reducing the required runway length, reducing noise and emissions near airports and improving overall aircraft efficiency through reducing engine thrust requirements. A comparison is made of practical designs of a linear induction motor, a linear permanent magnet synchronous motor and a superconducting linear ...

  13. Optimizing towing processes at airports

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jia Yan

    2015-01-01

    This work addresses the optimization of push-back and towing processes at airports, as an important part of the turnaround process. A vehicle routing based scheduling model is introduced to find a cost optimal assignment of jobs to towing tractors in daily operations. A second model derives an investment strategy to optimize tractor fleet size and mix in the long-run. Column generation heuristics are proposed as solution procedures. The thesis concludes with a case study of a major European ...

  14. NextGen-Airportal Project Technologies: Systems Analysis, Integration, and Evaluation (SAIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alex; Trapani, Andrew; Poage, Jim; Howell, Daniel; Slocum, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been conducting Concept & Technology (C&T) research to enable capacity, efficiency, and safety improvements under the Airspace Systems Program, Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). These C&Ts provide various benefits (e.g., improved airport departure/arrival throughputs, fuel saving, and taxi efficiency) with costs and benefits apportioned among various Air Traffic Management (ATM) system stakeholders (e.g., FAA, aircraft operators, or public).

  15. Airport surface moving map displays: OpEval-2 evaluation results and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livack, Garret; McDaniel, James I.; Battiste, Vernol

    2001-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), in cooperation with the Cargo Airline Association (CAA) and three of its member airlines (Airborne Express, Federal Express, and United Parcel Service), have embarked upon an aggressive yet phased approach to introduce new Free Flight-enabling technologies into the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). General aviation is also actively involved, represented primarily by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA). These new technologies being evaluated include advanced cockpit avionics and a complimentary ground infrastructure. In support of this initiative, a series of operational evaluations (OpEvals) have been conducted or are planned. The OpEvals have evaluated in-flight as well as airport surface movement applications. Results from the second OpEval, conducted at Louisville, Kentucky in October 2000, indicated that runway incursions might be significantly reduced with the introduction of a cockpit-based moving map system derived from emerging technologies. An additional OpEval is planned to evaluate the utility of an integrated cockpit and airport surface architecture that provides enhanced pilot and controller awareness of airport surface operations. It is believed that the combination of such an airborne and a ground-based system best addresses many of the safety issues surrounding airport surface operations. Such a combined system would provide both flight crews and controllers with a common awareness, or shared picture of airport surface operations.

  16. Deterministic decomposition and seasonal ARIMA time series models applied to airport noise forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Claudio; Quartieri, Joseph; Tepedino, Carmine

    2017-06-01

    One of the most hazardous physical polluting agents, considering their effects on human health, is acoustical noise. Airports are a strong source of acoustical noise, due to the airplanes turbines, to the aero-dynamical noise of transits, to the acceleration or the breaking during the take-off and landing phases of aircrafts, to the road traffic around the airport, etc.. The monitoring and the prediction of the acoustical level emitted by airports can be very useful to assess the impact on human health and activities. In the airports noise scenario, thanks to flights scheduling, the predominant sources may have a periodic behaviour. Thus, a Time Series Analysis approach can be adopted, considering that a general trend and a seasonal behaviour can be highlighted and used to build a predictive model. In this paper, two different approaches are adopted, thus two predictive models are constructed and tested. The first model is based on deterministic decomposition and is built composing the trend, that is the long term behaviour, the seasonality, that is the periodic component, and the random variations. The second model is based on seasonal autoregressive moving average, and it belongs to the stochastic class of models. The two different models are fitted on an acoustical level dataset collected close to the Nice (France) international airport. Results will be encouraging and will show good prediction performances of both the adopted strategies. A residual analysis is performed, in order to quantify the forecasting error features.

  17. Sustainable Development and Airport Surface Access: The Role of Technological Innovation and Behavioral Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Qazi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development reflects an underlying tension to achieve economic growth whilst addressing environmental challenges, and this is particularly the case for the aviation sector. Although much of the aviation-related focus has fallen on reducing aircraft emissions, airports have also been under increasing pressure to support the vision of a low carbon energy future. One of the main sources of airport-related emissions is passenger journeys to and from airports (the surface access component of air travel, which is the focus of this paper. Two aspects associated with the relationship between sustainable development and airport surface access are considered. Firstly, there is an evaluation of three technological innovation options that will enable sustainable transport solutions for surface access journeys: telepresence systems to reduce drop-off/pick-up trips, techniques to improve public transport and options to encourage the sharing of rides. Secondly, the role of behavioral change for surface access journeys from a theoretical perspective, using empirical data from Manchester airport, is evaluated. Finally, the contribution of technology and behavioral intervention measures to improvements in sustainable development are discussed.

  18. 75 FR 41922 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... rule and invites public comment on the release of land at Fort Smith Regional Airport under the.... John Parker, Airport Director, Fort Smith Regional Airport, at the following address: Fort Smith...

  19. From regional airport to international flight destination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber; Lassen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    in the northern part of Denmark, but in the past decade the airport has experienced growth in the number of international arrivals. This paper explores who these international travellers are and why they fly to Northern Denmark. Both Aalborg Airport and Northern Denmark in general has an interest in increasing...... the number of international arrivals, and in the effort to attract more visitors, a better understanding of this group of travellers is necessary. This paper explains that a significant number of the foreign arrivals come to Northern Denmark to visit friends and relatives, and that the geographical reach...... of the airport is larger than expected. This finding challenges the current approach to regional development associated with the airport and this paper suggests two new focus points for the further strategic route development in Aalborg Airport: awareness of the geographical reach of the airport...

  20. The impact of mobile marketing in airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Florido-Benítez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper seeks to analyze the effects of mobile marketing tool at airports and passengers. Design/methodology: This research approach consist of going through data files and bibliographical sources in search of information gathered by authors, institutions and organizations regarding our case study. Findings: Mobile marketing to increase passenger satisfaction and commercial income in the airports. Large airports are taking advantage of the consolidation of mobile devices in the 21st century to create applications for branding and communication. Originality/value: This paper is the first research that examines the impact of mobile marketing in airports. First, to evaluate the effects that mobile marketing is having over the levels of passenger satisfaction at airports. Second, to analyze the impact of mobile marketing on passengers behavior in the aerodrome; lastly, to study the effects of this tool on the perceived image of an airport.

  1. CYBER SECURITY FOR AIRPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kasthurirangan Gopalakrishnan; Manimaran Govindarasu; Doug W. Jacobson; Brent M. Phares

    2013-01-01

    In today’s information age, government organizations and business enterprises are heavily relying on interconnected computer systems to manage a variety of public services including energy, transportation, water, etc. While this increased connectivity has many operational advantages benefitting the public, they have also become vulnerable to cyber attacks such as Corporate Security Breaches, Spear Phishing, and Social Media Fraud. The aviation sector is one the critical infrastructure systems...

  2. AIRPORTS CLASSIFICATION AND PRIORITY OF THEIR RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Marintseva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is important for Ukraine to have a network of airports, which would promote the current and long-term implementation of air transportation needs of the population and the economics. This study aims to establish criteria of airports classification to determine their role in the development of the air transport system of Ukraine. Methodology. The methods of statistical analysis were used for the processing of data according to categories of airport productivity and geographic information system for data visualization. Findings. It is established that the existing division of Ukrainian airports into international and domestic, as well as into coordinated and non-coordinated ones is not relevant for determining the role of airport in the development of air transport system of the country and accordingly for the priority in financing of their modernization. The approach to the determination of airports classifications using analysis of performance categories was developed. Originality. Classification criterions of the airports in Ukraine are proposed: by type of activity and by the maintenance of scheduled route network. It is proposed to classify the airports by the type of activity to the primary commercial, commercial, cargo primary commercial, cargo commercial and general aviation. According to the scheduled route network maintenane it is proposed to classify the airports as the primary, non-primary and auxiliary hubs. An example of classification by the given criteria is submitted. Practical value. The value of the obtained results is in the possibility of using the proposed classification in the task of determining the priorities for financing the country's airports. As opposed to the practice of directed funding procedure in the framework of the state program of airports development, it is proposed to take into account the fact that the resumption of the functioning of the airport and/or its modernization should be as a response to

  3. Scheduling of outbound luggage handling at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Torben C.; Pisinger, David

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the outbound luggage handling problem at airports. The problem is to assign handling facilities to outbound flights and decide about the handling start time. This dynamic, near real-time assignment problem is part of the daily airport operations. Quality, efficiency......). Another solution method is a decomposition approach. The problem is divided into different subproblems and solved in iterative steps. The different solution approaches are tested on real world data from Frankfurt Airport....

  4. The impact of mobile marketing in airports

    OpenAIRE

    Florido-Benítez, Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to analyze the effects of mobile marketing tool at airports and passengers. Design/methodology: This research approach consist of going through data files and bibliographical sources in search of information gathered by authors, institutions and organizations regarding our case study. Findings: Mobile marketing to increase passenger satisfaction and commercial income in the airports. Large airports are taking advantage of the consolidation of mobile devic...

  5. Travel time variability and airport accessibility

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    This discussion paper resulted in a publication in Transportation Research Part B: Methodological (2011). Vol. 45(10), pages 1545-1559. This paper analyses the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since it is likely that the cost of missing a flight is high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed, including trip purpose, type of airport, flight characteristics, travel experience, type of che...

  6. Airport Merchandising Using Micro Services Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Hari Bhaskar Sankaranarayanan; Viral Rathod

    2016-01-01

    Airport offers an ecosystem where passengers, airlines, airport, and merchants meet under one roof during travel. During the journey, there is a good amount of time spent by passengers on waiting or transit before boarding the flight. Passengers look for spending that time by shopping, dining, and entertainment. Airport merchants and airlines look for merchandising opportunities to acquire new customers, up-sell, and cross-sell their products and services. Highly pe...

  7. 77 FR 44515 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... commercial service airport sponsor's inability to comply with the law and/or the standards of compliance as a...) proposes that the FAA may consider a commercial service airport's inability to comply with the law and/or... the access plan represents an Agency determination that the commercial service airport has met the law...

  8. Denver's airport of doom; the story behind the world's possibly most controversial airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Big airport projects have often been prone to controversy. Schiphol’s Polderbaan project, Heathrow’s expansion, and the construction of Berlin’s new airport all suffered from political, financial or technical issues. However, Denver International Airport (often referred to as DIA) caused uproar in

  9. Evaluation of model-predicted hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) near a mid-sized U.S. airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, Lakshmi Pradeepa; Vizuete, William; Arunachalam, Saravanan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate modeling of aircraft-emitted pollutants in the vicinity of airports is essential to study the impact on local air quality and to answer policy and health-impact related issues. To quantify air quality impacts of airport-related hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), we carried out a fine-scale (4 × 4 km horizontal resolution) Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) model simulation at the T.F. Green airport in Providence (PVD), Rhode Island. We considered temporally and spatially resolved aircraft emissions from the new Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). These model predictions were then evaluated with observations from a field campaign focused on assessing HAPs near the PVD airport. The annual normalized mean error (NME) was in the range of 36-70% normalized mean error for all HAPs except for acrolein (>70%). The addition of highly resolved aircraft emissions showed only marginally incremental improvements in performance (1-2% decrease in NME) of some HAPs (formaldehyde, xylene). When compared to a coarser 36 × 36 km grid resolution, the 4 × 4 km grid resolution did improve performance by up to 5-20% NME for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The change in power setting (from traditional International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) 7% to observation studies based 4%) doubled the aircraft idling emissions of HAPs, but led to only a 2% decrease in NME. Overall modeled aircraft-attributable contributions are in the range of 0.5-28% near a mid-sized airport grid-cell with maximum impacts seen only within 4-16 km from the airport grid-cell. Comparison of CMAQ predictions with HAP estimates from EPA's National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) did show similar annual mean concentrations and equally poor performance. Current estimates of HAPs for PVD are a challenge for modeling systems and refinements in our ability to simulate aircraft emissions have made only incremental improvements. Even with unrealistic increases in HAPs aviation emissions the model

  10. Airport Movement Area Closure Planner, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR research develops an automation tool improving temporary and permanent runway closure management. The Movement Area Closure Planner (MACP) provides airport...

  11. Airport Improvement Program (AIP) : reauthorization issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses the Airport Improvement Program and its complement, the PFC, within the broader context of airport capital development finance.5 After a brief history of federal support for airport construction and improvement, the report descr...

  12. Aircraft route forecasting under adverse weather conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hauf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper storm nowcasts in the terminal manoeuvring area (TMA of Hong Kong International Airport are used to forecast deviation routes through a field of storms for arriving and departing aircraft. Storms were observed and nowcast by the nowcast system SWIRLS from the Hong Kong Observatory. Storms were considered as no-go zones for aircraft and deviation routes were determined with the DIVSIM software package. Two days (21 and 22 May 2011 with 22 actual flown routes were investigated. Flights were simulated with a nowcast issued at the time an aircraft entered the TMA or departed from the airport. These flights were compared with a posteriori simulations, in which all storm fields were known and circumnavigated. Both types of simulated routes were then compared with the actual flown routes. The qualitative comparison of the various routes revealed generally good agreement. Larger differences were found in more complex situations with many active storms in the TMA. Route differences resulted primarily from air traffic control measures imposed such as holdings, slow-downs and shortcuts, causing the largest differences between the estimated and actual landing time. Route differences could be enhanced as aircraft might be forced to circumnavigate a storm ahead in a different sense. The use of route forecasts to assist controllers coordinating flights in a complex moving storm field is discussed. The study emphasises the important application of storm nowcasts in aviation meteorology.

  13. Study of V/STOL aircraft implementation. Volume 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portenier, W. J.; Webb, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    A high density short haul air market which by 1980 is large enough to support the introduction of an independent short haul air transportation system is discussed. This system will complement the existing air transportation system and will provide relief of noise and congestion problems at conventional airports. The study has found that new aircraft, exploiting V/STOL and quiet engine technology, can be available for implementing these new services, and they can operate from existing reliever and general aviation airports. The study has also found that the major funding requirements for implementing new short haul services could be borne by private capital, and that the government funding requirement would be minimal and/or recovered through the airline ticket tax. In addition, a suitable new short haul aircraft would have a market potential for $3.5 billion in foreign sales. The long lead times needed for aircraft and engine technology development will require timely actions by federal agencies.

  14. Assessment of aircraft risk reduction at Pantex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.T.; Hedtke, R.; Fike, D.; Diniz, J.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of an aircraft crashing into the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex plant facility has been of concern in risk assessments. In response to public concerns, and in an effort to reduce risks associated with overflights of Pantex, several changes to navigational aids at Amarillo International Airport have been implemented. For over one year, a radar airspace monitor and recording system has been connected to the airport surveillance radar at Amarillo to record the flight paths, aircraft types, and traffic density of aircraft in the vicinity of the Pantex plant. The data has provided a better understanding of the overflight risk at Pantex as well as a means to measure the effectiveness of risk reduction efforts

  15. Amphibious Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A brief self composed research article on Amphibious Aircrafts discussing their use, origin and modern day applications along with their advantages and disadvantages...

  16. Alternate aircraft fuels: Prospects and operational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The potential use of coal-derived aviation fuels was assessed. The studies addressed the prices and thermal efficiencies associated with the production of coal-derived aviation kerosene, liquid methane and liquid hydrogen and the air terminal requirements and subsonic transport performance when utilizing liquid hydrogen. The fuel production studies indicated that liquid methane can be produced at a lower price and with a higher thermal efficiency than aviation kerosene or liquid hydrogen. Ground facilities of liquefaction, storage, distribution and refueling of liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft at airports appear technically feasibile. The aircraft studies indicate modest onboard energy savings for hydrogen compared to conventional fuels. Liquid hydrogen was found to be superior to both aviation kerosene and liquid methane from the standpoint of aircraft engine emissions.

  17. Background noise analysis in urban airport surroundings of Brazilian cities, Congonhas Airport, São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatolini, Fabio; Alves, Cláudio Jorge Pinto

    2016-12-22

    To perform a quantitative analysis of the background noise at Congonhas Airport surroundings based on large sampling and measurements with no interruption. Measuring sites were chosen from 62 and 72 DNL (day-night-level) noise contours, in urban sites compatible with residential use. Fifteen sites were monitored for at least 168 hours without interruption or seven consecutive days. Data compilation was based on cross-reference between noise measurements and air traffic control records, and results were validated by airport meteorological reports. Preliminary diagnoses were established using the standard NBR-13368. Background noise values were calculated based on the Sound Exposure Level (SEL). Statistic parameters were calculated in one-hour intervals. Only four of the fifteen sites assessed presented aircraft operations as a clear cause for the noise annoyance. Even so, it is possible to detect background noise levels above regulation limits during periods of low airport activity or when it closes at night. All the sites monitored showed background noise levels above regulation limits between 7:00 and 21:00. In the intervals between 6:00-6:59 and 21:00-22:59 the noise data, when analyzed with the current airport operational characteristics, still allow the development of additional mitigating measures. Avaliar quantitativamente o ruído de fundo no entorno do aeroporto de Congonhas, com base em ampla amostragem e medições sem interrupção. Locais de medição escolhidos a partir de curvas de ruído de 62 e 72 LDN (day-night level), em equipamentos urbanos de uso compatível com o residencial. Quinze locais foram avaliados por mais de 168 horas consecutivas cada um (sete dias). A compilação baseou-se em cruzamentos de dados do controle de tráfego aéreo e os resultados foram validados por meio de relatórios meteorológicos do aeroporto. Diagnósticos preliminares foram estabelecidos utilizando a NBR-13368. O ruído de fundo foi calculado com base no Sound

  18. Management strategies for regional airports: A study applied to -Lleida-Alguaire airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Daries-Ramon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of this article is to analyse the current situation at Lleida-Alguaire Airport and propose possible actions to increase its profitability. Design/methodology/approach: This study presents the method as a research tool applied to regional airports, in particular, Lleida-Alguaire Airport. Findings: The study shows the importance of air transport and the current situation of Spanish airports, specifically in Catalonia, exposing the main air traffic imbalances between different airports and their effect on tourism. Finally, it describes and analyses the situation of Lleida-Alguaire Airport. Practical implications: Some actions in relation with aeronautical traffic are presented in order to improve and increase the efficiency of the system. Originality/value: This article is one of the first works to focus on regional airports and it seeks ways to improve their economic and social efficiency.

  19. The first detected airline introductions of yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) to Europe, at Schiphol International airport, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez-Justicia, A; Gloria-Soria, A; den Hartog, W; Dik, M; Jacobs, F; Stroo, A

    2017-12-08

    Air-borne introduction of exotic mosquitoes to Schiphol airport in the Netherlands has been considered plausible based upon findings of mosquitoes in aircraft cabins during 2008, 2010 and 2011. Beginning in 2013, surveillance efforts at Schiphol had focused on promptly detecting accidental introductions at the airport facilities in order to quickly react and avoid temporary proliferation or establishment of mosquito populations, identify the origin of the introductions, and avoid potential transmission of vector-borne diseases. BG-Mosquitaire mosquito traps were set at the most likely locations for arrival of the invasive Aedes mosquitoes as part of the mosquito monitoring program at Schiphol airport. Samples were collected bi-weekly. Upon detection of exotic specimens, information about the origin of the flights arriving to the particular location at the airport where specimens were captured was requested from airport authorities. The GIS tool Intersect was then used to identify airports of origin common to positive trapping locations during the specific trapping period. Captured Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were subsequently genotyped at 12 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and compared to a reference database of 79 populations around the world to further narrow down their location of origin. In 2016, six adult yellow fever mosquitoes were captured indoors and outdoors at the airport of Schiphol in the Netherlands confirming, for the first time, air-borne transport of this mosquito vector species into Europe. Mosquitoes were captured during three time periods: June, September and October. Containers carried by aircrafts are considered the most likely pathway for this introduction. GIS analysis and genetic assignment tests on these mosquitoes point to North America or the Middle East as possible origins, but the small sample size prevents us from reliably identifying the geographic origin of this introduction. The arrival of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes to Schiphol

  20. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new...

  1. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Receipt and... application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C. 47134. The... application to the FAA for exemption under the pilot program. 49 U.S.C. 47134 establishes an airport...

  2. Virtual queuing at airport security lanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de R.; Samoilovich, I.; Rhee, van der B.

    2013-01-01

    Airports continuously seek opportunities to reduce the security costs without negatively affecting passenger satisfaction. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities of implementing virtual queuing at airport security lanes, by offering some passengers a time window during which they can arrive

  3. Eindhoven Airport : towards zero CO2 emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorge Simoes Pedro, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Eindhoven airport is growing and it is strongly committed to take this opportunity to invest in innovative solutions for a sustainable development. Therefore, this document proposes a strategic plan for reaching Zero CO2 emissions at Eindhoven airport. This document proposes to reduce the CO2

  4. Travel time variability and airport accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since the cost of missing a flight is likely to be high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed. Second, the willingness to pay (WTP) for

  5. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  6. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  7. [Airport security check of medical substances used during patient repatriation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felkai, Péter

    2012-09-16

    During airport security check of passenger luggage, hazardous items and substances are prohibited to be taken into the restricted safety zone of the airport and the aircraft. Among equipment of the medical staff escorting the patient, there are several devices and materials which are considered hazardous for security reasons. However, medical equipment and substances are indispensable for treating patients during the flight. The aim of the author was to present his experience obtained with the use of an instrument developed for testing liquids, aerosols and gels for security reasons. An instrument based on Raman spectroscopy was used for the identification of medical substances. The results confirmed that the instrument was able to recognize the tested medical substances. The non-destructive testing maintained sample integrity and asepsis. The data indicate that the instrument has a promising utility for the identification of medical substances. It seems important that during repatriation medical substances should be selected not only on the ground of their medical necessity, but their packaging should be also taken into consideration. It is necessary to perform more tests on different medical substances used in emergency care in order to make the database of medical substances stored in the library of instrument more complete.

  8. Emotionality in response to aircraft noise: A report of development work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    A literature search and pilot study conducted to investigate the topic of emotional response to aircraft noise are described. A Tell-A-Story Technique was developed for use in the pilot study which required respondents to make up stories for a series of aircraft-related and non-aircraft-related pictures. A content analysis of these stories was made. The major finding was that response patterns varied among three groups of respondents - those currently living near airports, those who had lived near airports in the past, and those who had never lived near airports. Negative emotional feelings toward aircraft were greatest among respondents who had lived near airports in the past but no longer did. A possible explanation offered for this finding was that people currently living near airports might adapt to the situation by denying some of their negative feelings, which they might feel more free to express after they had moved away from the situation. Other techniques used in the pilot study are also described, including group interviews and a word association task.

  9. Future aircraft networks and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yan

    2011-07-01

    Because of the importance of air transportation scheduling, the emergence of small aircraft and the vision of future fuel-efficient aircraft, this thesis has focused on the study of aircraft scheduling and network design involving multiple types of aircraft and flight services. It develops models and solution algorithms for the schedule design problem and analyzes the computational results. First, based on the current development of small aircraft and on-demand flight services, this thesis expands a business model for integrating on-demand flight services with the traditional scheduled flight services. This thesis proposes a three-step approach to the design of aircraft schedules and networks from scratch under the model. In the first step, both a frequency assignment model for scheduled flights that incorporates a passenger path choice model and a frequency assignment model for on-demand flights that incorporates a passenger mode choice model are created. In the second step, a rough fleet assignment model that determines a set of flight legs, each of which is assigned an aircraft type and a rough departure time is constructed. In the third step, a timetable model that determines an exact departure time for each flight leg is developed. Based on the models proposed in the three steps, this thesis creates schedule design instances that involve almost all the major airports and markets in the United States. The instances of the frequency assignment model created in this thesis are large-scale non-convex mixed-integer programming problems, and this dissertation develops an overall network structure and proposes iterative algorithms for solving these instances. The instances of both the rough fleet assignment model and the timetable model created in this thesis are large-scale mixed-integer programming problems, and this dissertation develops subproblem schemes for solving these instances. Based on these solution algorithms, this dissertation also presents

  10. The Evaluation of Factors Influencing Flights Delay at Czech International Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Zámková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this article was examination of factors influencing flights delay at three most important international airports in Czech Republic. Data of selected Airlines operating in Czech Republic, whose flights are mainly oriented to international airports in Prague, Brno and Ostrava, were used for needs of this article. Analysis of contingency tables including Pearson chi-squared test was used for data processing. Dependences were presented in graphical form by correspondence analysis. Results from analysis showed that delay caused by technical reasons and maintenance is the most frequent in Prague as well as delay caused by high concentration of airspace, operational management and crew duty norms. Problems caused by departure delay from previous destination are significantly more frequent in Brno and Ostrava by reason of small number of alternative available aircraft. Delays caused by supplier (handling, catering, … are mostly short, in particular by reason of potential penalty. Delays caused by technical problems and necessary maintenance service last mostly longer time and are more frequently on aircraft of type Boeing. Delays of borrowed aircraft of type Airbus are more frequently caused by rental and control of this aircraft by other companies which causes communication and planning difficulties.

  11. A formulation to analyze system-of-systems problems: A case study of airport metroplex operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalasomayajula, Sricharan Kishore

    A system-of-systems (SoS) can be described as a collection of multiple, heterogeneous, distributed, independent components interacting to achieve a range of objectives. A generic formulation was developed to model component interactions in an SoS to understand their influence on overall SoS performance. The formulation employs a lexicon to aggregate components into hierarchical interaction networks and understand how their topological properties affect the performance of the aggregations. Overall SoS performance is evaluated by monitoring the changes in stakeholder profitability due to changes in component interactions. The formulation was applied to a case study in air transportation focusing on operations at airport metroplexes. Metroplexes are geographical regions with two or more airports in close proximity to one another. The case study explored how metroplex airports interact with one another, what dependencies drive these interactions, and how these dependencies affect metroplex throughput and capacity. Metrics were developed to quantify runway dependencies at a metroplex and were correlated with its throughput and capacity. Operations at the New York/New Jersey metroplex (NYNJ) airports were simulated to explore the feasibility of operating very large aircraft (VLA), such as the Airbus A380, as a delay-mitigation strategy at these airports. The proposed formulation was employed to analyze the impact of this strategy on different stakeholders in the national air transportation system (ATS), such as airlines and airports. The analysis results and their implications were used to compare the pros and cons of operating VLAs at NYNJ from the perspectives of airline profitability, and flight delays at NYNJ and across the ATS.

  12. Risk of subacromial shoulder disorder in airport baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sanne Pagh; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2018-01-01

    age,exposure variables showed close to significant associations with subacromial shoulder disorder.Results could not confirm our hypothesis that combined information on work task duration and shoulder load intensity was stronger associated with subacromial shoulder disorder than seniority.......Musculoskeletal shoulder-load among baggage handlers measured by combining duration and intensity based on biomechanical and epidemiological information may be a stronger predictor of subacromial shoulder disordersthanbaggage handler seniority.In 2012, a cohort of baggage handlers employed...... at Copenhagen Airport in 1990-2012, and a cohort of unskilledotherwise employed men answered a survey.Self-reported information on work tasks during employment in the airport in combination with work task specific biomechanically modelled forces in the shoulder joint was used to estimate shoulder-load. Exposure...

  13. Birds and airports: non-lethal control of Chimango caracara (Milvago chimango) in a military airport of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marateo German; Grilli, Pablo G; Soave, Guillermo E; Ferretti, Vanina; Bouzas, Nancy M; Almagro, Ramiro

    2012-01-01

    The congregation of certain bird species near aircraft runways has increased the strike hazards. Monitoring-control plans for birds in airports have been done in several countries, although the antecedents of such problems in Argentina are isolated cases, some incidents have been recorded. Two of them occurred in the Campo de Mayo airport, where this work was performed. At that site, the potentially most hazardous species was the Chimango caracara (Milvago chimango). Our objective was assessing fireworks effectiveness as a control method over Chimango caracara during two consecutive years. At the first implementation, this method showed 80% success in block of animals from overflying the runway and 100% effectiveness for removal of overnight roosting bird flocks, no overnight roosting individuals were recorded during 284 days. This decrease was statistically significant. The flocks that returned to the area to roost were much smaller, and although some habituation to pyrotechnics as deterrents occurred, the numbers of control days was generally smaller than next control periods. The lapse of the Chimango caracara delaying to return to roost was positively correlated with control period duration, and negatively correlated with the number of days interruptions during the previous control period. This is the first record of Chimango caracara as a bird strike hazard species, and the first effective non-lethal control technique report for this species.

  14. Study on the probability of the aircraft crash at the Experimental Power Reactor (RDE) site in Puspiptek Serpong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarianto Sugeng B S; Siti Alimah; June Mellawati

    2016-01-01

    With regard to RDE site licensing process, probability of aircraft crash at RDE site area of Puspiptek Serpong has been assessed. The objective of the research (assessment) is to determine the probability of occurrence of aircraft crash at the RDE site area. The methodology used in the research consist of secondary and primary data collection, identification of potential hazards sources (airports) in the vicinity of RDE site and mapping of its distribution, initial screening using a value of Screening Distance Value (SDV) and Safety Region of Flight Operations value (KKOP), as well as the calculation of the probability of the aircraft crash in the site area. The study was conducted in December 2015 - June 2016. The results showed that in the vicinity of the RDE site there are seven airports airport, namely Soekarno-Hatta (Soetta), Halim Perdanakusuma, Atang Sendjaja, Budiarto, Pondok Cabe, Rumpin and Pulau Panjang, with distances ranging from 11.72 to 79.64 km. Based on the SDV (small airport is 10 km and a large airport is 16 km), the RDE site is in outside of the airports SDV radius. However, based on KKOP (14.5 km radius), the RDE site is in inside of the two airports KKOP radius (Budiarto and Pondok Cabe). Probability calculations showed that the potential of aircraft crash in the site area of RDE coming from the Budiarto airports is 0.0066 x 10"-"7 events/year and from Pondok Cabe 0.0278 x10"-"7 events/year. The probability value was lower than the criteria based on IAEA report (10"-"7 events/year), so the RDE site categorized safe from the potential of aircraft crash. (author)

  15. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Eliana; Mantovani, Alice; Franceschini, Chiara; Bassano, Davide; Palmeri, Luca; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-15

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po' Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15-50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events

  16. Creep age forming of Al-Cu-Li alloy: Application to thick sheet forming of double curvature aircraft panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Wael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Creep-age-forming of a thick Al-Cu-Li sheet is studied. An industrial stamping press is used to form a double curvature panel at a reduced scale. This forming, which includes several relaxation steps, is modelled using ABAQUS. A material model describing an elasto-viscoplastic behaviour with anisotropy effect has been identified and implemented in ABAQUS using Fortran subroutine. The numerical model is validated by comparing experiments and numerical results in terms of deformed shapes and an improved forming cycle is suggested.

  17. Passengers’ Perspective Toward Airport Service Quality (ASQ (Case Study at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Kurniawan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passenger satisfaction towards airport service quality is influenced by the level of service at the previous service quality. It causes the new facility is expected to exceed the previous service quality. Service quality improvement of people mover system in Grand Design of Soekarno Hatta International Airport (SHIA expected to support increasing airport service quality management. People mover existing conditions that occur on a free shuttle bus has caused some customer complaint. The purpose of this thesis is providing strategic support as complaint handling on people mover system to enhancing SHIA service quality. The discussion involves a passenger's perspectives, passengers’ satisfaction, and airport service quality to get a purpose of research. This thesis utilizes Fodness and Murray (2007 theory regarding the accurate scale to measure SHIA service quality by using Servqual method and Kano Model approach. Airport Service Quality (ASQ aims to give an airport more competitive in the relationship between business and operations. In this thesis offers support strategy in service quality attributes and considerations to assist airport management in improving airport service quality. This thesis finds the value gap between airport management and passengers’ perspectives that serve as accurate scale in each service attributes on people mover facility at SHIA that must be met to achieve satisfaction based on passengers’ perspectives. Also, this thesis finds several services attributes that must be met on people mover facility at SHIA as a basic service needs by passengers need. Airport management at SHIA should focus on the improved operating system of people mover system related to attributes punctuality, free of charge, information about the schedule, headway, and safety. This thesis presents the relationship between the value gap with service attributes that must be met by passengers’ perspectives, passengers’ satisfaction, and

  18. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    as their purchases of aircraft carrier systems, makes it more than likely that the country is preparing such an acquisition. China has territorial disputes in the South China Sea over the Spratly Islands and is also worried about the security of its sea lines of communications, by which China transports the majority......, submarines, aircraft and helicopters, is not likely to be fully operational and war-capable until 2020, given the fact that China is starting from a clean sheet of paper. The United States of America (USA), the United Kingdom (UK), Russia and India are currently building or have made decisions to build new...

  19. An Algorithm for the Nucleolus of Airport Profit Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Inarra, E.; Tijs, S.H.; Zarzuelo, J.

    2003-01-01

    Airport profit games are a generalization of airport cost games as well as of bankruptcy games.In this paper we present a simple algorithm to compute the nucleolus of airport profit games.In addition we prove that there exists an unique consistent allocation rule in airport profit problems, and it

  20. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... agency conducting a project for airport system planning shall submit a financial status report on a form... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325 Financial...

  1. Observed Changes in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Properties at Memphis International Airport During August 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity Program, Langley Research Center embarked on a series of field measurements of wake vortex characteristics and associated atmospheric boundary layer properties. One measurement period was at the Memphis International Airport in August 1995. Atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds, turbulence, radiation, and soil properties were measured from a variety of sensor systems and platforms including sodars, profilers, aircraft and towers. This research focused on: (1) changes that occurred in tower data during sunrise and sunset transitions, (2) vertical variation of temperature and cross-head winds at selected times utilizing combinations of sensors, and (3) changes measured by an OV-10 aircraft during approaches and level flights. Significant but not unusual changes are documented and discussed in terms of expected boundary layer behavior. Questions on measurement and prediction of these changes from existing and near-term capabilities are discussed in the context of a future Aircraft Vortex Spacing System.

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Lowering Permissible Noise Levels Around U.S. Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boshen Jiao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft noise increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases and mental illness. The allowable limit for sound in the vicinity of an airport is 65 decibels (dB averaged over a 24-h ‘day and night’ period (DNL in the United States. We evaluate the trade-off between the cost and the health benefits of changing the regulatory DNL level from 65 dB to 55 dB using a Markov model. The study used LaGuardia Airport (LGA as a case study. In compliance with 55 dB allowable limit of aircraft noise, sound insulation would be required for residential homes within the 55 dB to 65 dB DNL. A Markov model was built to assess the cost-effectiveness of installing sound insulation. One-way sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulation were conducted to test uncertainty of the model. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of installing sound insulation for residents exposed to airplane noise from LGA was $11,163/QALY gained (95% credible interval: cost-saving and life-saving to $93,054/QALY gained. Changing the regulatory standard for noise exposure around airports from 65 dB to 55 dB comes at a very good value.

  3. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms Using Hamburg Airport Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid; Schier, Sebastian; Lee, Hanbong; Jung, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have been independently developing and testing their own concepts and tools for airport surface traffic management. Although these concepts and tools have been tested individually for European and US airports, they have never been compared or analyzed side-by-side. This paper presents the collaborative research devoted to the evaluation and analysis of two different surface management concepts. Hamburg Airport was used as a common test bed airport for the study. First, two independent simulations using the same traffic scenario were conducted; one by the DLR team using the Controller Assistance for Departure Optimization (CADEO) and the Taxi Routing for Aircraft: Creation and Controlling (TRACC) in a real-time simulation environment, and one by the NASA team based on the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) in a fast-time simulation environment. A set of common performance metrics was defined. The simulation results showed that both approaches produced operational benefits in efficiency, such as reducing taxi times, while maintaining runway throughput. Both approaches generated the gate pushback schedule to meet the runway schedule, such that the runway utilization was maximized. The conflict-free taxi guidance by TRACC helped avoid taxi conflicts and reduced taxiing stops, but the taxi benefit needed be assessed together with runway throughput to analyze the overall performance objective.

  4. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms for Hamburg Airport Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid; Schier, Sebastian; Lee, Hanbong; Jung, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have been independently developing and testing their own concepts and tools for airport surface traffic management. Although these concepts and tools have been tested individually for European and US airports, they have never been compared or analyzed side-by-side. This paper presents the collaborative research devoted to the evaluation and analysis of two different surface management concepts. Hamburg Airport was used as a common test bed airport for the study. First, two independent simulations using the same traffic scenario were conducted: one by the DLR team using the Controller Assistance for Departure Optimization (CADEO) and the Taxi Routing for Aircraft: Creation and Controlling (TRACC) in a real-time simulation environment, and one by the NASA team based on the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) in a fast-time simulation environment. A set of common performance metrics was defined. The simulation results showed that both approaches produced operational benefits in efficiency, such as reducing taxi times, while maintaining runway throughput. Both approaches generated the gate pushback schedule to meet the runway schedule, such that the runway utilization was maximized. The conflict-free taxi guidance by TRACC helped avoid taxi conflicts and reduced taxiing stops, but the taxi benefit needed be assessed together with runway throughput to analyze the overall performance objective.

  5. An RFID-based luggage and passenger tracking system for airport security control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastianos, George E.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Kountouriotis, Vassilios I.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2014-06-01

    Market analysis studies of recent years have shown a steady and significant increase in the usage of RFID technology. Key factors for this growth were the decreased costs of passive RFIDs and their improved performance compared to the other identification technologies. Besides the benefits of RFID technologies into the supply chains, warehousing, traditional inventory and asset management applications, RFID has proven itself worth exploiting on experimental, as well as on commercial level in other sectors, such as healthcare, transport and security. In security sector, airport security is one of the biggest challenges. Airports are extremely busy public places and thus prime targets for terrorism, with aircraft, passengers, crew and airport infrastructure all subject to terrorist attacks. Inside this labyrinth of security challenges, the long range detection capability of the UHF passive RFID technology can be turned into a very important tracking tool that may outperform all the limitations of the barcode tracking inside the current airport security control chain. The Integrated Systems Lab of NCSR Demokritos has developed an RFID based Luggage and Passenger tracking system within the TASS (FP7-SEC-2010-241905) EU research project. This paper describes application scenarios of the system categorized according to the structured nature of the environment, the system architecture and presents evaluation results extracted from measurements with a group of different massive production GEN2 UHF RFID tags that are widely available in the world market.

  6. Flying personal planes: modeling the airport choices of general aviation pilots using stated preference methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camasso, M J; Jagannathan, R

    2001-01-01

    This study employed stated preference (SP) models to determine why general aviation pilots choose to base and operate their aircraft at some airports and not others. Thirteen decision variables identified in pilot focus groups and in the general aviation literature were incorporated into a series of hypothetical choice tasks or scenarios. The scenarios were offered within a fractional factorial design to establish orthogonality and to preclude dominance in any combination of variables. Data from 113 pilots were analyzed for individual differences across pilots using conditional logit regression with and without controls. The results demonstrate that some airport attributes (e.g., full-range hospitality services, paved parallel taxiway, and specific types of runway lighting and landing aids) increase pilot utility. Heavy airport congestion and airport landing fees, on the other hand, decrease pilot utility. The importance of SP methodology as a vehicle for modeling choice behavior and as an input into the planning and prioritization process is discussed. Actual or potential applications include the development of structured decision-making instruments in the behavioral sciences and in human service programs.

  7. Aircraft cybernetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  8. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  9. The Material Politics of Future Airport Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper aims to conceptualize the relationship between materiality, design and the politics of airports. The paper is conceptual and theoretical but will use as its empirical backcloth the ‘Airport City Futures’ (AirCiF) research projects. AirCiF is funded by the Danish Innovation Fund with 10...... understanding of the processing of airport passengers must include a plethora of disciplines. In relation to this there is a need to explore even further into the newer ‘material turn’ literature (Jensen 2016). In particular the connection between actor networks (Latour 2005), vibrant materialities (Bennett...

  10. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Off-Nominal Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, B.; Williams, D.; Consiglio, M.; Conway, S.; Adams, C.; Abbott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to conduct concurrent, multiple aircraft operations in poor weather, at virtually any airport, offers an important opportunity for a significant increase in the rate of flight operations, a major improvement in passenger convenience, and the potential to foster growth of charter operations at small airports. The Small Aircraft Transportation System, (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept is designed to increase traffic flow at any of the 3400 nonradar, non-towered airports in the United States where operations are currently restricted to one-in/one-out procedural separation during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The concept's key feature is pilots maintain their own separation from other aircraft using procedures, aircraft flight data sent via air-to-air datalink, cockpit displays, and on-board software. This is done within the Self-Controlled Area (SCA), an area of flight operations established during poor visibility or low ceilings around an airport without Air Traffic Control (ATC) services. The research described in this paper expands the HVO concept to include most off-nominal situations that could be expected to occur in a future SATS environment. The situations were categorized into routine off-nominal operations, procedural deviations, equipment malfunctions, and aircraft emergencies. The combination of normal and off-nominal HVO procedures provides evidence for an operational concept that is safe, requires little ground infrastructure, and enables concurrent flight operations in poor weather.

  11. Optimization of airport security process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianan

    2017-05-01

    In order to facilitate passenger travel, on the basis of ensuring public safety, the airport security process and scheduling to optimize. The stochastic Petri net is used to simulate the single channel security process, draw the reachable graph, construct the homogeneous Markov chain to realize the performance analysis of the security process network, and find the bottleneck to limit the passenger throughput. Curve changes in the flow of passengers to open a security channel for the initial state. When the passenger arrives at a rate that exceeds the processing capacity of the security channel, it is queued. The passenger reaches the acceptable threshold of the queuing time as the time to open or close the next channel, simulate the number of dynamic security channel scheduling to reduce the passenger queuing time.

  12. 76 FR 30422 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport, Helena, Montana AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Request to Release Airport Property... Airport (HLN) under the provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act...

  13. 76 FR 18622 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport, Helena, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property... Airport (HLN) under the provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act...

  14. Environmental Aspects of Aircraft and Airfield Deicing - An Air Force Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    e l l e n c e COD of Aircraft Deicers ADF Kg O2/Kg compd Ethylene glycol 1.14 T Propylene glycol 1.47 T Isopropyl alcohol 2.11 T Neopentyl glycol ...showed that commercial airports use about 25 million gallons of Aircraft Deicing Fluid (ADF) annually, of which 22.1 M (88%) is Propylene Glycol (PG...S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e AF Aircraft Deicing Overview 70% (107) of bases reported using aircraft deicers Propylene Glycol (PG), AMS 1424

  15. The image of the airport through mobile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro Florido-Benítez

    2016-01-01

    The image airports project via their applications (apps) affects -- directly or indirectly-- passengers’ satisfaction. Today, airports are competing to attract more airlines and passengers to improve commercial revenues. Airport apps (as mobile marketing tools) are offering a broad range of opportunities to both passengers and airports. Apps are the best solution if airports want to improve the passenger experience as well as differentiate themselves from their competitors. The results of thi...

  16. CERN lands a slot at Geneva Airport

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    From left to right:Carlo Lamprecht, Luciano Maiani and Jean-Pierre Jobin. When you step off your plane at Geneva Airport there's a good chance you'll come face-to-face with an advertising hoarding bearing the message 'CERN, the world's largest particle physics research laboratory, where the World Wide Web was born...five minutes from here'. This may be obvious to you, but it certainly isn't to the majority of the 7 million travellers who pass through the gates of Geneva Airport every year. On the initiative of the Chairman of its Board of Directors, State Councillor Carlo Lamprecht, Geneva International Airport has therefore come up with the idea of highlighting CERN's presence by giving the Laboratory its own hoarding. The hoarding was inaugurated on 24 May by Carlo Lamprecht, Airport Director Jean-Pierre Jobin and CERN Director-General Luciano Maiani.

  17. Future Airportal Surveillance and Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent advances in airport surface surveillance and other sensor, automation, and data sharing technologies now allow the consideration of a significant change in...

  18. Airport Information Retrieval System (AIRS) System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    This report presents the system design for a prototype air traffic flow control automation system developed for the FAA's Systems Command Center. The design was directed toward the immediate automation of airport data for use in traffic load predicti...

  19. Communicating airport noise emission data to the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Luis; Asensio, Cesar; de Arcas, Guillermo

    2017-05-15

    Despite the efforts that the aviation industry has undertaken during the last few decades, noise annoyance remains high, partly because of the continuous transport demands of modern societies and partly because of changes in citizen expectations and their growing environmental concerns. Although modern aircraft are considerably quieter than their predecessors, the number of complaints has not decreased as much as expected. Therefore, the aeronautical sector has tried more sociological and/or psychological strategies to gain acceptance through awareness and community engagement. In this regard, noise communication to the public is crucial for managers and policy makers. Noise information is a difficult technical topic for non-experts, which is an issue that must first be addressed to take advantage of the new possibilities that have recently been opened by the internet and information and communication technologies. In this review paper, we have compiled the literature that shows the increasing importance of communicating noise information from aircraft and the variety of indicators used to communicate with the public. We also examined the methods of representing noise data, using visualization strategies, and new tools airports are currently using to address this communication problem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of Business processes in Airport Services Company in Macedonia using the TQM Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeta Mitreva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is to show a full diagnostic to some of the business processes in the company for airport services in Macedonia was made. The methodology of TQM (Total Quality Management system was applied in the company, especially in the sector for de-icing and protection against frost on aircrafts. With the implementation of this system, an optimal solution was found for uninterrupted operation in the airport traffic. In this way there was a change in the company paradigm – do not work hard but smart, with a constant improvement of processes, while taking into account the needs and desires of customers and profit. This research shows that other methods and techniques were applied such as Pareto Diagram, Ishikawa approach, Checklist, Map of trends, all in order to identify problems and find an optimal solution.

  1. MANAGEMENT AND CHALLENGES OF BRAZILIAN AIRPORT INFRASTRUCTURE: OPERATIONAL DIFFICULTIES FOR LARGE EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Knupp Rodrigues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to present, discuss and reflect on the solutions and consequences for the achievement of major events in Brazil in relation to the main operational difficulties in its current airport infrastructure. Operational difficulties refers to various factors that hinder or prevent the development of airport activities, such as aircraft delays, flight cancellations and customer discomfort. Therefore, this article seeks to think over the structure of the facilities, the lack of investment, the deadlines for solutions and other problems that need definite solution so that they will not occur again. In order to reach our objectives, we use data from literature and documentary analysis of statistical data. We present the main difficulties of operational modal Brazilian air transportation, the options for solution and the importance of actions for social, technical and financial development in Brazil.

  2. Small Aircraft Transportation System, Higher Volume Operations Concept: Off-Nominal Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Terence S.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Baxley, Brian T.; Williams, Daniel M.; Conway, Sheila R.

    2005-01-01

    This document expands the Small Aircraft Transportation System, (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept to include off-nominal conditions. The general philosophy underlying the HVO concept is the establishment of a newly defined area of flight operations called a Self-Controlled Area (SCA). During periods of poor weather, a block of airspace would be established around designated non-towered, non-radar airports. Aircraft flying enroute to a SATS airport would be on a standard instrument flight rules flight clearance with Air Traffic Control providing separation services. Within the SCA, pilots would take responsibility for separation assurance between their aircraft and other similarly equipped aircraft. Previous work developed the procedures for normal HVO operations. This document provides details for off-nominal and emergency procedures for situations that could be expected to occur in a future SCA.

  3. Time to retire : Indicators for aircraft fleets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcamp, Jeffrey; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Curran, R.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that aircraft fleets are aging alongside rising operations and support costs. Logisticians and fleet managers who better understand the milestones and timeline of an aging fleet can recognise potential savings. This paper outlines generalised milestones germane to military aircraft

  4. STRATEGIC MARKET POSITION OF THE GDANSK AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Ćwikliński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Airports are a key link of the air transport infrastructure, which is a part of the whole transportation system. Their potential is determined by a network of airlines relations and affects the long-term, strategic position in the market of aviation services. The most possible scenario of the macro-environment of the Gdansk Airport has a relatively high predictability and generally positive influencing on the potential for development in the next years. Only international and demographic areas can constitute a barrier to achieving the strategic objectives. Gdansk Airport takes permanently the third position on the Polish market. Strategic gap analysis leads to the conclusion that, compared to its main competitors Airport Gdansk has a gap of compliance trends, but in relation to smaller regional airports excess gap. GDN services are located in the square "Star" in the BCG matrix. This airport has prepared an investment program till 2035. The dynamics of the projected increase in the number of passengers and air operations in Gdansk is generally slightly higher than the growth nationwide forecasts. The strategic challenge for next years will be to strengthen the status of the GDN as a Polish aviation gateway to Scandinavia.

  5. Optimizing integrated airport surface and terminal airspace operations under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Christabelle S.

    In airports and surrounding terminal airspaces, the integration of surface, arrival and departure scheduling and routing have the potential to improve the operations efficiency. Moreover, because both the airport surface and the terminal airspace are often altered by random perturbations, the consideration of uncertainty in flight schedules is crucial to improve the design of robust flight schedules. Previous research mainly focused on independently solving arrival scheduling problems, departure scheduling problems and surface management scheduling problems and most of the developed models are deterministic. This dissertation presents an alternate method to model the integrated operations by using a machine job-shop scheduling formulation. A multistage stochastic programming approach is chosen to formulate the problem in the presence of uncertainty and candidate solutions are obtained by solving sample average approximation problems with finite sample size. The developed mixed-integer-linear-programming algorithm-based scheduler is capable of computing optimal aircraft schedules and routings that reflect the integration of air and ground operations. The assembled methodology is applied to a Los Angeles case study. To show the benefits of integrated operations over First-Come-First-Served, a preliminary proof-of-concept is conducted for a set of fourteen aircraft evolving under deterministic conditions in a model of the Los Angeles International Airport surface and surrounding terminal areas. Using historical data, a representative 30-minute traffic schedule and aircraft mix scenario is constructed. The results of the Los Angeles application show that the integration of air and ground operations and the use of a time-based separation strategy enable both significant surface and air time savings. The solution computed by the optimization provides a more efficient routing and scheduling than the First-Come-First-Served solution. Additionally, a data driven analysis is

  6. Electromagnetic launch systems for civil aircraft assisted take-off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertola Luca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the feasibility of different technologies for an electromagnetic launcher to assist civil aircraft take-off. This method is investigated to reduce the power required from the engines during initial acceleration. Assisted launch has the potential of reducing the required runway length, reducing noise near airports and improving overall aircraft efficiency through reducing engine thrust requirements. The research compares two possible linear motor topologies which may be efficaciously used for this application. The comparison is made on results from both analytical and finite element analysis (FEA.

  7. Aircraft Route Recovery Based on An Improved GRASP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircrafts maintenance, temporary airport closures are common factors that disrupt normal flight schedule. The aircraft route recovery aims to recover original schedules by some strategies, including flights swaps, and cancellations, which is a NP-hard problem. This paper proposes an improved heuristic procedure based on Greedy Random Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP to solve this problem. The effectiveness and high global optimization capability of the heuristic is illustrated through experiments based on large-scale problems. Compared to the original one, it is shown that the improved procedure can find feasible flight recovered schedules with lower cost in a short time.

  8. Airport Traffic Conflict Detection and Resolution Algorithm Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denise R.; Chartrand, Ryan C.; Wilson, Sara R.; Commo, Sean A.; Ballard, Kathryn M.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2016-01-01

    Two conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) algorithms for the terminal maneuvering area (TMA) were evaluated in a fast-time batch simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. One CD&R algorithm, developed at NASA, was designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The second algorithm, Enhanced Traffic Situation Awareness on the Airport Surface with Indications and Alerts (SURF IA), was designed to increase flight crew awareness of the runway environment and facilitate an appropriate and timely response to potential conflict situations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the aircraft-based CD&R algorithms during various runway, taxiway, and low altitude scenarios, multiple levels of CD&R system equipage, and various levels of horizontal position accuracy. Algorithm performance was assessed through various metrics including the collision rate, nuisance and missed alert rate, and alert toggling rate. The data suggests that, in general, alert toggling, nuisance and missed alerts, and unnecessary maneuvering occurred more frequently as the position accuracy was reduced. Collision avoidance was more effective when all of the aircraft were equipped with CD&R and maneuvered to avoid a collision after an alert was issued. In order to reduce the number of unwanted (nuisance) alerts when taxiing across a runway, a buffer is needed between the hold line and the alerting zone so alerts are not generated when an aircraft is behind the hold line. All of the results support RTCA horizontal position accuracy requirements for performing a CD&R function to reduce the likelihood and severity of runway incursions and collisions.

  9. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA. In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  10. Customer experiences and return patronage in airport hotels: Evidence from OR Tambo International Airport, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswald Mhlanga

    2018-05-01

    Contribution/value-add: To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this study is a first attempt to determine customer experiences and return patronage in hotels at or near airports in South Africa. The results could help airport hotels to gain a competitive advantage over other hotel categories.

  11. 75 FR 57106 - Public Notice for Sale of Airport Property at Houlton International Airport, Houlton, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    .... Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21) requires the FAA to provide an... obligation to use certain airport property for aeronautical purposes. The revenue generated from the disposal... Airport Revenue, published in the Federal Register on February 16, 1999. DATES: Comments must be received...

  12. Simple Models for Airport Delays During Transition to a Trajectory-Based Air Traffic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Peter

    It is now widely recognised that a paradigm shift in air traffic control concepts is needed. This requires state-of-the-art innovative technologies, making much better use of the information in the air traffic management (ATM) system. These paradigm shifts go under the names of NextGen in the USA and SESAR in Europe, which inter alia will make dramatic changes to the nature of airport operations. A vital part of moving from an existing system to a new paradigm is the operational implications of the transition process. There would be business incentives for early aircraft fitment, it is generally safer to introduce new technologies gradually, and researchers are already proposing potential transition steps to the new system. Simple queuing theory models are used to establish rough quantitative estimates of the impact of the transition to a more efficient time-based navigational and ATM system. Such models are approximate, but they do offer insight into the broad implications of system change and its significant features. 4D-equipped aircraft in essence have a contract with the airport runway and, in return, they would get priority over any other aircraft waiting for use of the runway. The main operational feature examined here is the queuing delays affecting non-4D-equipped arrivals. These get a reasonable service if the proportion of 4D-equipped aircraft is low, but this can deteriorate markedly for high proportions, and be economically unviable. Preventative measures would be to limit the additional growth of 4D-equipped flights and/or to modify their contracts to provide sufficient space for the non-4D-equipped flights to operate without excessive delays. There is a potential for non-Poisson models, for which there is little in the literature, and for more complex models, e.g. grouping a succession of 4D-equipped aircraft as a batch.

  13. Comparative study of automotive, aircraft and biogenic emissions of aldehydes and aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, C S; Custodio, D; de Oliveira, R C S; Varandas, L S; Arbilla, G

    2010-02-01

    Air samples were collected in three well characterized locations in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: downtown, the idle and taxi way areas of the national airport and an urban forest, where the main emissions are from vehicular, aircraft and biogenic sources, respectively. Aldehydes and BTEX concentrations show a characteristic profile which may be attributed to the emission sources. Formaldehyde/acetaldehyde ratios, in the early morning, were 1.39, 0.62 and 2.22 in downtown, airport and forest, respectively. Toluene/benzene ratios, for downtown, airport and forest areas, were 1.11, 1.82 and 1.06, respectively. The results show that the impact of the urban emissions on the forest is negligible as well as the impact of aircraft emissions over the urban area.

  14. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecorari, Eliana, E-mail: eliana.pecorari@unive.it [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Mantovani, Alice [OSMOTECH S.r.l., via Francesco Sforza, 15, 20122 Milano (Italy); Franceschini, Chiara [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Bassano, Davide [SAVE S.p.A., Marco Polo Venice airport viale G. Galilei 30/1, 30173 Tessera-Venezia (Italy); Palmeri, Luca [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, v. Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy); Rampazzo, Giancarlo [Department of Environmental Science, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari Venice, Calle Larga Santa Marta 2137, Dorsoduro, 30123 Venezia (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po’ Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15–50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events

  15. Analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft exhaust dispersion and deposition using a Lagrangian particle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecorari, Eliana; Mantovani, Alice; Franceschini, Chiara; Bassano, Davide; Palmeri, Luca; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The risk of air quality degradation is of considerable concern particularly for those airports that are located near urban areas. The ability to quantitatively predict the effects of air pollutants originated by airport operations is important for assessing air quality and the related impacts on human health. Current emission regulations have focused on local air quality in the proximity of airports. However, an integrated study should consider the effects of meteorological events, at both regional and local level, that can affect the dispersion and the deposition of exhausts. Rigorous scientific studies and extensive experimental data could contribute to the analysis of the impacts of airports expansion plans. This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of meteorology on aircraft emission for the Marco Polo Airport in Venice. This is the most important international airport in the eastern part of the Po’ Valley, one of the most polluted area in Europe. Air pollution is exacerbated by meteorology that is a combination of large and local scale effects that do not allow significant dispersion. Moreover, the airport is located near Venice, a city of noteworthy cultural and architectural relevance, and nearby the lagoon that hosts several areas of outstanding ecological importance at European level (Natura 2000 sites). Dispersion and deposit of the main aircraft exhausts (NOx, HC and CO) have been evaluated by using a Lagrangian particle model. Spatial and temporal aircraft exhaust dispersion has been analyzed for LTO cycle. Aircraft taxiing resulted to be the most impacting aircraft operation especially for the airport working area and its surroundings, however occasionally peaks may be observed even at high altitudes when cruise mode starts. Mixing height can affect concentrations more significantly than the concentrations in the exhausts themselves. An increase of HC and CO concentrations (15–50%) has been observed during specific meteorological events

  16. Aircraft accident analysis for emergency planning and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolosi, S.L.; Jordan, H.; Foti, D.; Mancuso, J.

    1996-01-01

    Potential aircraft accidents involving facilities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) are evaluated to assess their safety significance. This study addresses the probability and facility penetrability of aircraft accidents at the Site. The types of aircraft (large, small, etc.) that may credibly impact the Site determine the types of facilities that may be breached. The methodology used in this analysis follows elements of the draft Department of Energy Standard ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities'' (July 1995). Key elements used are: the four-factor frequency equation for aircraft accidents; the distance criteria for consideration of airports, airways, and jet routes; the consideration of different types of aircraft; and the Modified National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) formula for projectile penetration, perforation, and minimum resistant thickness. The potential aircraft accident frequency for each type of aircraft applicable to the Site is estimated using a four-factor formula described in the draft Standard. The accident frequency is the product of the annual number of operations, probability of an accident, probability density function, and area. The annual number of operations is developed from site-specific and state-wide data

  17. Factors associated with pilot fatality in work-related aircraft crashes, Alaska, 1990-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensyl, D M; Moran, K; Conway, G A

    2001-12-01

    Work-related aircraft crashes are the leading cause of occupational fatality in Alaska, with civilian pilots having the highest fatality rate (410/100,000/year). To identify factors affecting survivability, the authors examined work-related aircraft crashes that occurred in Alaska in the 1990s (1990-1999), comparing crashes with pilot fatalities to crashes in which the pilot survived. Using data from National Transportation Safety Board reports, the authors carried out logistic regression analysis with the following variables: age, flight experience, use of a shoulder restraint, weather conditions (visual flight vs. instrument flight), light conditions (daylight vs. darkness), type of aircraft (airplane vs. helicopter), postcrash fire, crash location (airport vs. elsewhere), and state of residence. In the main-effects model, significant associations were found between fatality and postcrash fire (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 6.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.38, 17.37), poor weather (AOR = 4.11, 95% CI: 2.15, 7.87), and non-Alaska resident status (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.20). Protective effects were seen for shoulder restraint use (AOR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.77) and daylight versus darkness (AOR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25, 0.99). The finding that state of residence was associated with survivability offers new information on pilot survivability in work-related aircraft crashes in Alaska. These results may be useful in targeting safety interventions for pilots who fly occupationally in Alaska or in similar environments.

  18. Levels And Spectra Of Aircraft Noise And People\\'s Reactions In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of sound levels and spectral distribution as well as people\\'s reactions to aircraft noise in three Nigerian international airports have been conducted. The study comprised physical measurements and social survey. Results show that maximum octave band pressure levels (BPLs) for Margaret Ekpo, Port Harcourt and ...

  19. Comparison of alternate fuels for aircraft. [liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene were assessed as alternate fuels for aircraft in terms of cost, capital requirements, and energy resource utilization. Fuel transmission and airport storage and distribution facilities are considered. Environmental emissions and safety aspects of fuel selection are discussed and detailed descriptions of various fuel production and liquefaction processes are given. Technological deficiencies are identified.

  20. Risk based decision support for new air traffic operations with reduced aircraft separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijker, L.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    With the steady increase in air traffic, the aviation system is under continuous pressure to increase aircraft handling capacity. Various new Air Traffic Management systems and flight procedures are proposed to increase airport capacity while maintaining the required level of safety. Newly proposed

  1. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Concept and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, B.; Williams, D.; Consiglio, M.; Adams, C.; Abbott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to conduct concurrent, multiple aircraft operations in poor weather at virtually any airport offers an important opportunity for a significant increase in the rate of flight operations, a major improvement in passenger convenience, and the potential to foster growth of operations at small airports. The Small Aircraft Transportation System, (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept is designed to increase capacity at the 3400 non-radar, non-towered airports in the United States where operations are currently restricted to one-in/one-out procedural separation during low visibility or ceilings. The concept s key feature is that pilots maintain their own separation from other aircraft using air-to-air datalink and on-board software within the Self-Controlled Area (SCA), an area of flight operations established during poor visibility and low ceilings around an airport without Air Traffic Control (ATC) services. While pilots self-separate within the SCA, an Airport Management Module (AMM) located at the airport assigns arriving pilots their sequence based on aircraft performance, position, winds, missed approach requirements, and ATC intent. The HVO design uses distributed decision-making, safe procedures, attempts to minimize pilot and controller workload, and integrates with today's ATC environment. The HVO procedures have pilots make their own flight path decisions when flying in Instrument Metrological Conditions (IMC) while meeting these requirements. This paper summarizes the HVO concept and procedures, presents a summary of the research conducted and results, and outlines areas where future HVO research is required. More information about SATS HVO can be found at http://ntrs.nasa.gov.

  2. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Williams [West Virginia University Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  4. Location of airports - selected quantitative methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Merkisz-Guranowska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of air transport in  the economic development of a country and its regions cannot be overestimated. The decision concerning an airport's location must be in line with the expectations of all the stakeholders involved. This article deals with the issues related to the choice of  sites where airports should be located. Methods: Two main quantitative approaches related to the issue of airport location are presented in this article, i.e. the question of optimizing such a choice and the issue of selecting the location from a predefined set. The former involves mathematical programming and formulating the problem as an optimization task, the latter, however, involves ranking the possible variations. Due to various methodological backgrounds, the authors present the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches and point to the one which currently has its own practical application. Results: Based on real-life examples, the authors present a multi-stage procedure, which renders it possible to solve the problem of airport location. Conclusions: Based on the overview of literature of the subject, the authors point to three types of approach to the issue of airport location which could enable further development of currently applied methods.

  5. Optimization of airport security lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Current airport security management system is widely implemented all around the world to ensure the safety of passengers, but it might not be an optimum one. This paper aims to seek a better security system, which can maximize security while minimize inconvenience to passengers. Firstly, we apply Petri net model to analyze the steps where the main bottlenecks lie. Based on average tokens and time transition, the most time-consuming steps of security process can be found, including inspection of passengers' identification and documents, preparing belongings to be scanned and the process for retrieving belongings back. Then, we develop a queuing model to figure out factors affecting those time-consuming steps. As for future improvement, the effective measures which can be taken include transferring current system as single-queuing and multi-served, intelligently predicting the number of security checkpoints supposed to be opened, building up green biological convenient lanes. Furthermore, to test the theoretical results, we apply some data to stimulate the model. And the stimulation results are consistent with what we have got through modeling. Finally, we apply our queuing model to a multi-cultural background. The result suggests that by quantifying and modifying the variance in wait time, the model can be applied to individuals with various habits customs and habits. Generally speaking, our paper considers multiple affecting factors, employs several models and does plenty of calculations, which is practical and reliable for handling in reality. In addition, with more precise data available, we can further test and improve our models.

  6. Louisiana Airport System Plan Five-Year Capital Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The Louisiana Airport System Plan (LASP) Five-Year-Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a development plan for all commercial service, reliever, and general aviation airports in Louisiana. It is a detailed listing of potential projects based on the a...

  7. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE FOR THE ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE AIRPORT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildan Durmaz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Air transportation industry is a globally growing industry. As an inseparable part of this industry, airport management is also becoming more crucial issue to be dealt with. Airports offer economic and social benefits to the society, but also environmental impacts of airport operations are increasing due to high traffic growth. While airport capacity is increasing, airport operators are being responsible for mitigating environmental constraints. Today to implement airport environmental management system is seen as a critical way of solution. To ensure effective implementation of this system, an organizational change with definite roles, responsibilities and structure are needed. This study illustrates a way of organizational response to market forces and national regulations guiding the achievement of sustainable airports by determining the structure and the roles in an airport organization.

  8. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  9. Congestion Pricing for Aircraft Pushback Slot Allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Lan; Xing, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    In order to optimize aircraft pushback management during rush hour, aircraft pushback slot allocation based on congestion pricing is explored while considering monetary compensation based on the quality of the surface operations. First, the concept of the "external cost of surface congestion" is proposed, and a quantitative study on the external cost is performed. Then, an aircraft pushback slot allocation model for minimizing the total surface cost is established. An improved discrete differential evolution algorithm is also designed. Finally, a simulation is performed on Xinzheng International Airport using the proposed model. By comparing the pushback slot control strategy based on congestion pricing with other strategies, the advantages of the proposed model and algorithm are highlighted. In addition to reducing delays and optimizing the delay distribution, the model and algorithm are better suited for use for actual aircraft pushback management during rush hour. Further, it is also observed they do not result in significant increases in the surface cost. These results confirm the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed model and algorithm.

  10. Congestion Pricing for Aircraft Pushback Slot Allocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Liu

    Full Text Available In order to optimize aircraft pushback management during rush hour, aircraft pushback slot allocation based on congestion pricing is explored while considering monetary compensation based on the quality of the surface operations. First, the concept of the "external cost of surface congestion" is proposed, and a quantitative study on the external cost is performed. Then, an aircraft pushback slot allocation model for minimizing the total surface cost is established. An improved discrete differential evolution algorithm is also designed. Finally, a simulation is performed on Xinzheng International Airport using the proposed model. By comparing the pushback slot control strategy based on congestion pricing with other strategies, the advantages of the proposed model and algorithm are highlighted. In addition to reducing delays and optimizing the delay distribution, the model and algorithm are better suited for use for actual aircraft pushback management during rush hour. Further, it is also observed they do not result in significant increases in the surface cost. These results confirm the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed model and algorithm.

  11. Congestion Pricing for Aircraft Pushback Slot Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    In order to optimize aircraft pushback management during rush hour, aircraft pushback slot allocation based on congestion pricing is explored while considering monetary compensation based on the quality of the surface operations. First, the concept of the “external cost of surface congestion” is proposed, and a quantitative study on the external cost is performed. Then, an aircraft pushback slot allocation model for minimizing the total surface cost is established. An improved discrete differential evolution algorithm is also designed. Finally, a simulation is performed on Xinzheng International Airport using the proposed model. By comparing the pushback slot control strategy based on congestion pricing with other strategies, the advantages of the proposed model and algorithm are highlighted. In addition to reducing delays and optimizing the delay distribution, the model and algorithm are better suited for use for actual aircraft pushback management during rush hour. Further, it is also observed they do not result in significant increases in the surface cost. These results confirm the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed model and algorithm. PMID:28114429

  12. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  13. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  14. Aspect Of Reliability In Airport Business Continuity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozłowski Michał

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the issue of ensuring the continuity of the operation at the airport. Requirements and objectives relating to business continuity management have been defined in accordance with ISO 22301 international standard. Conducted a study of reliability issues operation of the airport. Defined the function of the reliability and operational readiness of the airport. Presented the concept of using function of operational readiness in the risk assessment for the continuity of the airport.

  15. Access to automatic defibrillation at airports on an example of Warsaw Chopin Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Pawłowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac arrest and cessation of blood circulation is the most common cause of death of people around the world. Immediate notification of emergency services and cardiopulmonary resuscitation combined with an automatic external defibrillator (AED increases the chances of survivors. Warsaw Chopin Airport is the only public place in Poland and the third one in Europe where a complex and integrated life saving system has been implemented in the ICC. The paper presents an analysis of the access to automatic defibrillation at airports at the Warsaw Chopin Airport

  16. 14 CFR 152.113 - Application requirements: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application requirements: Airport planning....113 Application requirements: Airport planning. (a) Application for Federal assistance. An eligible sponsor or planning agency that desires to obtain Federal aid for eligible airport master planning or...

  17. The dynamic spatial impact of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warffemius, P.; van der Hoorn, T.; Klaassen, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about the agglomeration effect of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and its implications for location policy regarding the airport region. We focus on a specific case, namely the important concentration of European Distribution Centers (EDCs) around the airport. The traditional answer to the

  18. Measuring the size of an airport's catchment area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although much empirical research exists on the factors that drive passenger airport choice, not much is known about the related topic of airport catchment area size. This paper presents a novel methodology to assess the size of airport catchment areas and the airport’s market shares therein using a

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueling Stations Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Airport Relies on Natural Gas Fueling Stations on

  20. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National (DCA)  Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International (IAD) |

  1. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a form...

  2. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport from...

  3. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation safety... must grant Aviation Safety Inspectors bearing FAA Form 110A free and uninterrupted access to public-use...

  4. Electric Ground Support Equipment at Airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-12-12

    Airport ground support equipment (GSE) is used to service airplanes between flights. Services include refueling, towing airplanes or luggage/freight carts, loading luggage/freight, transporting passengers, loading potable water, removing sewage, loading food, de-icing airplanes, and fire-fighting. Deploying new GSE technologies is a promising opportunity in part because the purchasers are generally large, technologically sophisticated airlines, contractors, or airports with centralized procurement and maintenance departments. Airlines could particularly benefit from fuel diversification since they are highly exposed to petroleum price volatility. GSE can be particularly well-suited for electrification because it benefits from low-end torque and has frequent idle time and short required ranges.

  5. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: International Airport Dulles. [studies by Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The vibration levels of windows, walls, and floors were measured along with the associated noise levels of Concorde, subsonic aircraft and some nonaircraft events. Test sites included Sully Plantation which is adjacent to Dulles International Airport and three residential homes located in Montgomery County, Maryland. The measured vibration response levels due to Concorde operations were found to be: (1) higher than the levels due to other aircraft, (2) less than the levels due to certain household events which involve direct impulsive loading such as door and window closing, (3) less than criteria levels for building damage, and (4) comparable to levels which are perceptible to people.

  6. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  7. A review of recent wake vortex research for increasing airport capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, James N.; Holzäpfel, Frank

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a brief review of recent wake vortex research as it affects the operational problem of spacing aircraft to increase airport capacity and throughput. The paper addresses the questions of what do we know about wake vortices and what don't we know about wake vortices. The introduction of Heavy jets in the late 1960s stimulated the study of wake vortices for safety reasons and the use of pulsed lidars and the maturity of computational fluid dynamics in the last three decades have led to extensive data collection and analyses which are now resulting in the development and implementation of systems to safely decrease separations in the terminal environment. Although much has been learned about wake vortices and their behavior, there is still more to be learned about the phenomena of aircraft wake vortices.

  8. Passenger choice attributes in choosing a secondary airport: A study of passenger attributes in using Lanseria International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmarie Kriel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The economic deregulation of the airline industry in South Africa in 1991 was a landmark event and brought about various changes in the air transport market, both locally and internationally. One important after-effect of deregulation was the entry of low-cost carriers (LCCs in 2001, which increased competition in the market and offered passengers the freedom to choose between full-cost carriers and LCCs. It is generally accepted that LCCs have been very successful across the globe, and the main reason for this lies in their simplified lower cost business models. One way of achieving lower costs is for LCCs to operate from secondary or alternative airports. This trend is observed in most regions of the world. In South Africa, and more specifically the Gauteng province, Lanseria International Airport is considered as an alternative airport to OR Tambo International Airport (the main international airport of South Africa and located about 30 km east of the Johannesburg Central Business District [CBD]. Currently, two LCCs operate from this airport with a third LCC airline indicating that it will shortly begin operations from this airport. Objectives: The research presented here reflects on the aspects passengers consider when selecting a secondary airport for their travel needs. It also compares the research findings of passenger attributes when choosing Lanseria Airport as a secondary airport in 2010 to a similar study in 2013 after another LCC commenced operations from the airport. Method: In this exploratory research a face-to-face survey was used as the quantitative data collection method in order to identify the factors that influenced passengers’ airport choice decisions at Lanseria International Airport. Results: From this research it emerged that when airports in a metropolitan area are close to one another, one of the main considerations for passengers is access time when selecting an airport. Even after a second LCC started

  9. Taxi-Out Time Prediction for Departures at Charlotte Airport Using Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanbong; Malik, Waqar; Jung, Yoon C.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the taxi-out times of departures accurately is important for improving airport efficiency and takeoff time predictability. In this paper, we attempt to apply machine learning techniques to actual traffic data at Charlotte Douglas International Airport for taxi-out time prediction. To find the key factors affecting aircraft taxi times, surface surveillance data is first analyzed. From this data analysis, several variables, including terminal concourse, spot, runway, departure fix and weight class, are selected for taxi time prediction. Then, various machine learning methods such as linear regression, support vector machines, k-nearest neighbors, random forest, and neural networks model are applied to actual flight data. Different traffic flow and weather conditions at Charlotte airport are also taken into account for more accurate prediction. The taxi-out time prediction results show that linear regression and random forest techniques can provide the most accurate prediction in terms of root-mean-square errors. We also discuss the operational complexity and uncertainties that make it difficult to predict the taxi times accurately.

  10. 75 FR 58019 - Notice of Intent to Rule on Request to Release Airport Property at the Kearney Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... to Release Airport Property at the Kearney Municipal Airport, Kearney, NE AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request to Release Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  11. 76 FR 20071 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Burnet Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Burnet Municipal Airport, Burnet, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request To Release Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  12. 76 FR 12408 - Notice of Intent to Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Ellington Field Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... To Release Airport Property at Ellington Field Airport, Houston, Texas AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  13. 78 FR 20168 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport, Boulder, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  14. 77 FR 39793 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Portland-Hillsboro Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... To Release Airport Property at Portland--Hillsboro Airport, Hillsboro, OR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Proposal to Release Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  15. 75 FR 76778 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Kearney Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... To Release Airport Property at the Kearney Municipal Airport, Kearney, NE AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to... provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st Century (AIR 21...

  16. 78 FR 32699 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request to Release Airport Property at the Fort Worth Spinks Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... to Release Airport Property at the Fort Worth Spinks Airport, Fort Worth, Texas AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA... the provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the 21st...

  17. Optimization of airport bus timetable in cultivation period considering passenger dynamic airport choice under conditions of uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Yang, Z.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Wang, W.

    2016-01-01

    An airport bus service, which is newly introduced in a multi-airport region, commonly leads to a gradually increasing market share of airports until a new state of equilibrium is reached. With the goal of speeding up and enlarging the increase in market share, this paper proposes a timetable

  18. 77 FR 59035 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the St. George Airport, St...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... To Release Airport Property at the St. George Airport, St. George, UT AGENCY: Federal Aviation... rule and invite public comment on the release of land at St. George Airport under the provisions of..., City of St. George, Utah, at the following address: Mr. Gary Esplin, City Manager, City of St. George...

  19. Number and mass analysis of particles emitted by aircraft engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasiński Remigiusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emissions from aircraft is a complex issue because of the limited possibility of measurements in flight conditions. Most of the studies on this subject were performed on the basis of stationary test. Engine certification data is used to calculate total emissions generated by air transport. However, it doesnt provide any information about the local effects of air traffic. The main threat to local communities is particulate matter emissions, which adversely affects human health. Emissions from air transport affect air quality, particularly in the vicinity of the airports; it also contributes to the greenhouse effect. The article presents the measurement results of the concentration and size distribution of particles emitted during aircraft landing operation. Measurements were carried out during the landings of aircraft at a civilian airport. It was found that a single landing operation causes particle number concentration value increase of several ten-fold in a short period of time. Using aircraft engine certification data, the methodology for determination of the total number of particles emitted during a single landing operation was introduced.

  20. Louisiana Airports, Geographic NAD83, FEMA (1997)[airports_FEMA_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is is a point dataset for the locations and attributes of 20 Louisiana airports. The attributes include name, address, city, county (sic), state, phone,...

  1. Autonomous Airport Operations for Safe and Efficient Use of Airports, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concepts of Virtual Towers and Autonomous Airport Operations emerged as cost-effective options in early conceptualization of the Next-Generation Air...

  2. Optimal Hybrid Renewable Airport Power System: Empirical Study on Incheon International Airport, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoin Baek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to global energy problems (e.g., the oil crisis, the Fukushima accident, the Paris Agreement, the South Korean government has executed a strict renewable energy plan to decrease the country’s dependence on fossil fuel. Public facilities, such as international airports, which use substantial amounts of electricity, are the most in need of government regulation. In this study, we attempt to determine the optimal hybrid electricity generation system for South Korea’s largest airport: Incheon International Airport. In the analysis, we use three scenarios: the current load, 120% of the current load, and 140% of the current load, according to the plan to expand Incheon International Airport. According to the COE (cost of electricity and the NPC (net present cost of the result, it is economically feasible to completely cover the potential increase in the electric load with PV power. Government policy implications and limitations are discussed.

  3. Public Use Airport Runways, Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [public_use_airport_runway_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Public Use Airport Runways database is a geographic dataset of runways in the United States and US territories containing information on the physical...

  4. Mapping and Managing essential resource flows in airport regions - the case of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldermans, R.J.; Wandl, A.; Van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Metropolitan airports are focal points of large amounts of essential resource flows, such as energy, materials, water and food. These flows are predominantly linear, whilst externalising both the negative and positive impacts associated with them. Moreover, qualitative and quantitative understanding

  5. Ant Colony Algorithm and Simulation for Robust Airport Gate Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport gate assignment is core task for airport ground operations. Due to the fact that the departure and arrival time of flights may be influenced by many random factors, the airport gate assignment scheme may encounter gate conflict and many other problems. This paper aims at finding a robust solution for airport gate assignment problem. A mixed integer model is proposed to formulate the problem, and colony algorithm is designed to solve this model. Simulation result shows that, in consideration of robustness, the ability of antidisturbance for airport gate assignment scheme has much improved.

  6. How much noise reduction at airports?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijesen, M.G.; van der Straaten, J.W.; Dekkers, J.E.C.; van Elk, R.; Blokdijk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Airport noise nuisance is a negative externality especially when it occurring near urban areas. Like all externalities, noise nuisance may be a reason for government intervention. When intervening, governments should set quantitative policy targets with care. In practice, this issue is generally

  7. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Receipt and... preliminary application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C... final application to the FAA for exemption under the pilot program. 49 U.S.C. Section 47134 establishes...

  8. Airport industry connectivity report: 2004-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouwt, G.; Lieshout, R.

    2014-01-01

    Airport connectivity is an increasingly discussed topic in European policy circles. With good reason. Connectivity is closely connected with productivity, economic growth and international trade. And with the centre of global economic activity shifting eastward, it is essential that Europe remains

  9. Measuring the Regional Economic Significance of Airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    How much did your company spend duringthe year (1982) on capital Improvenents at c. Aviation Fuel ........... $ HIA (i.e, majur purchase of equipment...FEDERAL FACILITIES Air Ritio’nal Guard 780400 Air Traffic Control 650500 Airport Mail Facilities 650500 Airways Facilities 650500 Armed Forces 780400

  10. Airport Information Retrieval System (AIRS) User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-01

    The handbook is a user's guide for a prototype air traffic flow control automation system developed for the FAA's System Command Center. The system is implemented on a time-sharing computer and is designed to provide airport traffic load predictions ...

  11. EVALUATION OF SCENARIOS OF AIR POLLUTANTS EMISSIONS BY THE AIRPORT EXPANSION AND ASSOCIATED INFRASTRUCTURE - CASE STUDY OF THE EXTENSION OF VIRACOPOS AIRPORT AT CAMPINAS, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia H.G. Coelho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the airport segment faces environmental externalities especially related to the increase in emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs from combustion of fossil fuels by the aircraft engine, by the machinery for the maintenance of the planes and also by the vehicles used for passengers connections (private cars, taxicabs or public transportation system. In this scope, the current work presents the case study of the expansion of the Viracopos International Airport at Campinas – São Paulo, Brazil. To evaluate that, the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC was implemented to estimate the emissions of GHGs by aircraft for the years 2008 (before expansion, 2012 (current picture and 2018 (future scenario observing the changes in demand for passengers and cargo transportation. To evaluate the emissions from the vehicles it was used the AIMSUN microsimulation software to estimate emissions in the years 2012 and to simulate sensitivity scenarios for the year 2018. It was found that the inventory of CO2 emissions for both types of transports considered for the Viracopos airport showed similar orders of magnitude, what can be inferred about the equivalent contribution of these two modes on emissions of GHGs for the study area. These results may serve as a basis for establishing emission management plans of air pollutants by the competent organizations and to propose more targeted and effective measures to reduce the GHG emissions by these sources.

  12. Development of Airport Noise Mapping using Matlab Software (Case Study: Adi Soemarmo Airport - Boyolali, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarani, Pertiwi; Setiyo Huboyo, Haryono; Setyanti, Diny; Budiawan, Wiwik

    2018-02-01

    Noise is considered as one of the main environmental impact of Adi Soemarmo International Airport (ASIA), the second largest airport in Central Java Province, Indonesia. In order to manage the noise of airport, airport noise mapping is necessary. However, a model that requires simple input but still reliable was not available in ASIA. Therefore, the objective of this study are to develop model using Matlab software, to verify its reliability by measuring actual noise exposure, and to analyze the area of noise levels‥ The model was developed based on interpolation or extrapolation of identified Noise-Power-Distance (NPD) data. In accordance with Indonesian Government Ordinance No.40/2012, the noise metric used is WECPNL (Weighted Equivalent Continuous Perceived Noise Level). Based on this model simulation, there are residence area in the region of noise level II (1.912 km2) and III (1.16 km2) and 18 school buildings in the area of noise levels I, II, and III. These land-uses are actually prohibited unless noise insulation is equipped. The model using Matlab in the case of Adi Soemarmo International Airport is valid based on comparison of the field measurement (6 sampling points). However, it is important to validate the model again once the case study (the airport) is changed.

  13. Fleet Management Decision Making With Individual Aircraft Tracking Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcamp, Jeffrey; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Curran, R.

    2017-01-01

    Individual aircraft tracking data can be used by aircraft fleet managers to detect patterns in historical usage as a means to aid aging aircraft decision-making. This work tackles two aspects of applying these tracking data: investigating retirement patterns and assessing how base assignment can

  14. Algorithm for modelling the removal of snow from streches of the manoeuvring aera of an airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Martinez-Diaz, M.; Perez Perez, I.

    2016-07-01

    This article presents an algorithm and a structured methodology to address the issue of the optimisation of resources when clearing snow from stretches of the manoeuvring area of an airport. This overall issue is how to best utilise limited resources to remove snow from taxiways and runways so as to leave surfaces in an acceptable state for aircraft operations. To achieve this the airfield is divided into subsets of significant stretches for the purpose of operations and target times are set at which these are to be open to aircraft traffic. The manoeuvring area is also divided into zones, with the condition that the subsets of significant stretches lie within just one of these zones. The mathematical model contains operating restrictions with regard to the fulfilment of partial operational targets applied to the subsets of significant stretches, and also concerning the snow-clearing machines. The problem is solved by an iterative optimisation process based on linear programming applied successively to the zones that make up the manoeuvring area during each iteration. The method is particularised for the case of the manoeuvring area of Adolfo Suarez Madrid - Barajas Airport. (Author)

  15. A novel wireless local positioning system for airport (indoor) security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekavat, Seyed A.; Tong, Hui; Tan, Jindong

    2004-09-01

    A novel wireless local positioning system (WLPS) for airport (or indoor) security is introduced. This system is used by airport (indoor) security guards to locate all of, or a group of airport employees or passengers within the airport area. WLPS consists of two main parts: (1) a base station that is carried by security personnel; hence, introducing dynamic base station (DBS), and (2) a transponder (TRX) that is mounted on all people (including security personnel) present at the airport; thus, introducing them as active targets. In this paper, we (a) draw a futuristic view of the airport security systems, and the flow of information at the airports, (b) investigate the techniques of extending WLPS coverage area beyond the line-of-sight (LoS), and (c) study the performance of this system via standard transceivers, and direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) systems with and without antenna arrays and conventional beamforming (BF).

  16. Allocation of Ground Handling Resources at Copenhagen Airport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tor Fog

    Operating an airport is a very complex task involving many stakeholders. The primary role of airport management is to ensure that the airport provides sufficient capacity in all operational areas and that all the companies carrying out business at the airport have the best possible working...... described here are currently implemented and used in various settings at Copenhagen Airport. These include weekly operational planning of check-in counter allocation and long-term capacity/demand analyses of the airport’s stands and gates....... conditions. Moreover, management must ensure that the airport stays competitive and that its business goals are met to the greatest possible extent. The European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) expects demand for air services in Europe to double by 2030 and identifies airport...

  17. A methodology for the valuation and selection of adaptable technology portfolios and its application to small and medium airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinon, Olivia J.

    The increase in the types of airspace users (large aircraft, small and regional jets, very light jets, unmanned aerial vehicles, etc.), as well as the very limited number of future new airport development projects are some of the factors that will characterize the next decades in air transportation. These factors, associated with a persistent growth in air traffic will worsen the current gridlock situation experienced at some major airports. As airports are becoming the major capacity bottleneck to continued growth in air traffic, it is therefore primordial to make the most efficient use of the current, and very often, underutilized airport infrastructure. This research thus proposes to address the increase in air traffic demand and resulting capacity issues by considering the implementation of operational concepts and technologies at underutilized airports. However, there are many challenges associated with sustaining the development of this type of airports. First, the need to synchronize evolving technologies with airports’ needs and investment capabilities is paramount. Additionally, it was observed that the evolution of secondary airports, and their needs, is tightly linked to the environment in which they operate. In particular, sensitivity of airports to changes in the dynamics of their environment is important, therefore requiring that the factors that drive the need for technology acquisition be identified and characterized. Finally, the difficulty to evaluate risk and make financially viable decisions, particularly when investing in new technologies, cannot be ignored. This research provides a methodology that addresses these challenges and ensures the sustainability of airport capacity-enhancement investments in a continuously changing environment. In particular, it is articulated around the need to provide decision makers with the capability to valuate and select adaptable technology portfolios to ensure airport financial viability. Hence, the four

  18. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarella, Maurizio; D'Amico, Fabrizio; De Blasiis, Maria Rosaria; Di Benedetto, Alessandro; Fiani, Margherita

    2017-12-26

    The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  19. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Rigid Airport Pavement Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Barbarella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the structural efficiency of airport infrastructures is a complex task. Faulting is one of the most important indicators of rigid pavement performance. The aim of our study is to provide a new method for faulting detection and computation on jointed concrete pavements. Nowadays, the assessment of faulting is performed with the use of laborious and time-consuming measurements that strongly hinder aircraft traffic. We proposed a field procedure for Terrestrial Laser Scanner data acquisition and a computation flow chart in order to identify and quantify the fault size at each joint of apron slabs. The total point cloud has been used to compute the least square plane fitting those points. The best-fit plane for each slab has been computed too. The attitude of each slab plane with respect to both the adjacent ones and the apron reference plane has been determined by the normal vectors to the surfaces. Faulting has been evaluated as the difference in elevation between the slab planes along chosen sections. For a more accurate evaluation of the faulting value, we have then considered a few strips of data covering rectangular areas of different sizes across the joints. The accuracy of the estimated quantities has been computed too.

  20. The yellow cake accident at the Ezeiza Airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.E.; Puntarulo, L.J.; Canibano, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    In January 1987 several drums containing yellow cake fell from about six meters during the loading operation of a Boeing 747 T-100 cargo aircraft. As a result of the accident, about 50% of the 38 drums involved lost their lids and a fraction of the radioactive content was released on an area of about 200 meters squared. Small amounts of yellow cake were dispersed down wind until about 100 meters from the accident place. The shipment was prepared for transport in standard 200 liter steel drums fulfilling the applicable Transport Regulations and the accident was the consequence of an erroneous operation during the cargo associated with a mechanical failure of the cargo lift. In order to avoid human contamination, immediate action was taken by the airport emergency team and in the meantime, the specialized groups of the National Atomic Energy Commission and the Federal Fire Brigades, were convened to take care of the decontamination and radiological evaluation problems. This paper describes the accidental sequences, the accident scenery, the countermeasures taken, the recovery and decontamination actions, and finally, as a conclusion, a brief description of the toxic and radiological aspects of the accident's mode

  1. Heavy Metal Pollution Around International Hatay Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özkan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to determine the heavy metal pollution in the agricultural lands around Hatay airport and travel possible alteration in the amount of heavy metal on the land in accordance with the distance to the airport. For this purpose, the airport was chosen as the center and 27 soil samples were obtained around the airport at 2 km intervals in depth ranging from 0 to 30 cm. Lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, nickel (Ni, chrome (Cr, cobalt (Co, aluminium (Al, iron (Fe, copper (Cu, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn elements in soil samples were analysed using MP-AES instrument by DTPA method. (3 repetition for each sample. As a result of the analysis, heavy metal concentrations were found as Pb 0-1.45 mg/kg, Cd 0-0.220 mg/kg, Ni 0-3.95 mg/kg, Cr 0-0.780 mg/kg, Co 0-0.270 mg/kg, Al 0-0.700 mg/kg, Fe 1.47- 16.2 mg/kg, Cu 0.400-5.35 mg/kg, Mn 0-19 mg/kg and Zn 0.050-3.14 mg/kg. When comparing the obtained data through this study with allowable concentrations of heavy metals in soil of Environment and Forest Directorates Guidance, it was determined that the heavy metal concentration of the soil does not pose any problems in terms of heavy metal pollution. Besides, iron concentration was decreased when the distance to the airport is increased.

  2. First report on invasion of yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, at Narita International Airport, Japan in August 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukehiro, Nayu; Kida, Nori; Umezawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Arai, Naoko; Jinnai, Tsunesada; Inagaki, Shunichi; Tsuchiya, Hidetoshi; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The invasion of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti at Narita International Airport, Japan was detected for the first time. During the course of routine vector surveillance at Narita International Airport, 27 Ae. aegypti adults emerged from larvae and pupae collected from a single larvitrap placed near No. 88 spot at passenger terminal 2 on August 8, 2012. After the appearance of Ae. aegypti in the larvitrap, we defined a 400-m buffer zone and started an intensive vector survey using an additional 34 larvitraps and 15 CO2 traps. International aircraft and passenger terminal 2 were also inspected, and one Ae. aegypti male was collected from the cargo space of an international aircraft from Darwin via Manila on August 28, 2012. Larvicide treatment with 1.5% fenitrothion was conducted in 64 catch basins and one ditch in the 400-m buffer zone. Twenty-four large water tanks were also treated at least once with 0.5% pyriproxyfen, an insect growth regulator. No Ae. aegypti eggs or adults were found during the 1-month intensive vector survey after finding larvae and pupae in the larvitrap. We concluded that Ae. aegypti had failed to establish a population at Narita International Airport.

  3. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Par 2; Analysis Using the Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation; the failure to increase capacity at the same rate as the growth in demand results in unreliable service and systemic delay. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making that affects geographic access, economic access, and airline finances, extending the analysis of these factors using historic data (from Part 1 of the report). The Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM) was used to evaluate how exogenous factors (passenger demand, airline operating costs, and airport capacity limits) affect geographic access (markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size), economic access (airfares), airline finances (profit), and air transportation efficiency (aircraft size). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of airport capacity limits, as well as the effect of increased hedged fuel prices, which serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed; also incorporated are demand elasticity curves based on historical data that provide information about how passenger demand is affected by airfare changes.

  4. Field Trial Measurements to Validate a Stochastic Aircraft Boarding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schultz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Efficient boarding procedures have to consider both operational constraints and the individual passenger behavior. In contrast to the aircraft handling processes of fueling, catering and cleaning, the boarding process is more driven by passengers than by airport or airline operators. This paper delivers a comprehensive set of operational data including classification of boarding times, passenger arrival times, times to store hand luggage, and passenger interactions in the aircraft cabin as a reliable basis for calibrating models for aircraft boarding. In this paper, a microscopic approach is used to model the passenger behavior, where the passenger movement is defined as a one-dimensional, stochastic, and time/space discrete transition process. This model is used to compare measurements from field trials of boarding procedures with simulation results and demonstrates a deviation smaller than 5%.

  5. Terminal Control Area Aircraft Scheduling and Trajectory Optimization Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samà Marcella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation authorities are seeking optimization methods to better use the available infrastructure and better manage aircraft movements. This paper deals with the realtime scheduling of take-off and landing aircraft at a busy terminal control area and with the optimization of aircraft trajectories during the landing procedures. The first problem aims to reduce the propagation of delays, while the second problem aims to either minimize the travel time or reduce the fuel consumption. Both problems are particularly complex, since the first one is NP-hard while the second one is nonlinear and a combined solution needs to be computed in a short-time during operations. This paper proposes a framework for the lexicographic optimization of the two problems. Computational experiments are performed for the Milano Malpensa airport and show the existing gaps between the performance indicators of the two problems when different lexicographic optimization approaches are considered.

  6. Acoustical design economic trade off for transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, A.

    The effects of ICAO fixed certification limits and local ordinances on acoustic emissions from jets on commercial transport aircraft and costs of operations are explored. The regulations effectively ban some aircraft from operation over populated areas, impose curfews on airports and, in conjunction with local civil aviation rules, levy extra taxes and quotas on noisier equipment. Jet engine manufacturers have attempted to increase the flow laminarity, decrease the exhaust speed and develop acoustic liners for selected duct areas. Retrofits are, however, not usually cost effective due to increased operational costs, e.g., fuel consumption can increase after engine modification because of increased weight. Finally, an attempt is made to assess, monetarily, the costs of noise pollution, wherein fines are levied for noisy aircraft and the money is spent insulating homes from noise.

  7. Predicting capacities of runways serving new large aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gopalakrishnan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simplified approach for predicting the allowable load repetitions of New Large Aircraft (NLA loading for airfield runways based on Non-Destructive Test (NDT data. Full-scale traffic test results from the Federal Aviation Administration’s National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF were used to develop the NDT-based evaluation methodology. Four flexible test pavement sections with variable (unbound layer thicknesses were trafficked using six-wheel and four-wheel NLA test gears until the test pavements were deemed failed. Non-destructive tests using a Heavy Weight Deflectometer (HWD were conducted prior to the initiation of traffic testing to measure the pavement surface deflections. In the past, pavement surface deflections have been successfully used as an indicator of airport pavement life. In this study, the HWD surface deflections and the derived Deflection Basin Parameters (DBPs were related to functional performance of NAPTF flexible pavements through simple regression analysis. The results demonstrated the usefulness of NDT data for predicting the performance of airport flexible pavements serving the next generation of aircrafts.

  8. Aircraft target detection algorithm based on high resolution spaceborne SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Hao, Mengxi; Zhang, Cong; Su, Xiaojing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, an image classification algorithm for airport area is proposed, which based on the statistical features of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and the spatial information of pixels. The algorithm combines Gamma mixture model and MRF. The algorithm using Gamma mixture model to obtain the initial classification result. Pixel space correlation based on the classification results are optimized by the MRF technique. Additionally, morphology methods are employed to extract airport (ROI) region where the suspected aircraft target samples are clarified to reduce the false alarm and increase the detection performance. Finally, this paper presents the plane target detection, which have been verified by simulation test.

  9. Airport solid waste generation and its interfaces with tourism: Hugo Cantergiani Airport’s case, Caxias do Sul-RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaciel Gustavo Kunz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The tourism phenomenon cannot be separated of transport systems and it needs to be examined in the light of the environmental dimension, in particular the air mode. The aim of this research was to investigate the situation of solid waste generation at Hugo Cantergiani Airport, located in Caxias do Sul-RS. The research, which applied a descriptive and exploratory approach, involved document survey, direct observation and solid waste characterization. The period of the sample was of 18 and a half days, spread over three weeks/months in 2012. The operational movimentation at the airport during the conduct of the research was of 15,543 passengers. At the time of the sample 878.76 kg of waste were weighed of which 606.83 kg were segregated and characterized. In relation to this amount around 70% were derived from services undertaken at the airport site and around 30% came from the aircraft itself. The results revealed that there was a production by passenger at the aircraft of 30g/passenger/trip and at the airport site a per capita production of 40g/person/day. The most representative components were as follows: biological contaminant (29.54%, putrescible organic matter (27.16%, plastic (19.15% and paper and paperboard (14.04%. These types of studies contribute to fill gaps in knowledge related to the gravimetric composition of solid waste in the context of airports, to assess the environmental impacts caused by the generation of such wastes and to provide guidelines for the management plan of solid waste at airports, tourism supporting infrastructures.

  10. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  11. Does Traffic-related Air Pollution Explain Associations of Aircraft and Road Traffic Noise Exposure on Children's Health and Cognition? A Secondary Analysis of the United Kingdom Sample From the RANCH Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte; Crombie, Rosanna; Head, Jenny; van Kamp, Irene; van Kempen, Elise; Stansfeld, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether air pollution at school (nitrogen dioxide) is associated with poorer child cognition and health and whether adjustment for air pollution explains or moderates previously observed associations between aircraft and road traffic noise at school and children's cognition in the 2001–2003 Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH) project. This secondary analysis of a subsample of the United Kingdom RANCH sample examined 719 children who were 9–10 years of age from 22 schools around London's Heathrow airport for whom air pollution data were available. Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Air pollution exposure levels at school were moderate, were not associated with a range of cognitive and health outcomes, and did not account for or moderate associations between noise exposure and cognition. Aircraft noise exposure at school was significantly associated with poorer recognition memory and conceptual recall memory after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide levels. Aircraft noise exposure was also associated with poorer reading comprehension and information recall memory after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide levels. Road traffic noise was not associated with cognition or health before or after adjustment for air pollution. Moderate levels of air pollution do not appear to confound associations of noise on cognition and health, but further studies of higher air pollution levels are needed. PMID:22842719

  12. Does traffic-related air pollution explain associations of aircraft and road traffic noise exposure on children's health and cognition? A secondary analysis of the United Kingdom sample from the RANCH project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte; Crombie, Rosanna; Head, Jenny; van Kamp, Irene; van Kempen, Elise; Stansfeld, Stephen A

    2012-08-15

    The authors examined whether air pollution at school (nitrogen dioxide) is associated with poorer child cognition and health and whether adjustment for air pollution explains or moderates previously observed associations between aircraft and road traffic noise at school and children's cognition in the 2001-2003 Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH) project. This secondary analysis of a subsample of the United Kingdom RANCH sample examined 719 children who were 9-10 years of age from 22 schools around London's Heathrow airport for whom air pollution data were available. Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Air pollution exposure levels at school were moderate, were not associated with a range of cognitive and health outcomes, and did not account for or moderate associations between noise exposure and cognition. Aircraft noise exposure at school was significantly associated with poorer recognition memory and conceptual recall memory after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide levels. Aircraft noise exposure was also associated with poorer reading comprehension and information recall memory after adjustment for nitrogen dioxide levels. Road traffic noise was not associated with cognition or health before or after adjustment for air pollution. Moderate levels of air pollution do not appear to confound associations of noise on cognition and health, but further studies of higher air pollution levels are needed.

  13. Estimation of directivity and sound power levels emitted by aircrafts during taxiing, for outdoor noise prediction purpose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, C.; Pavón, I.; Ruiz, M.; Pagan Munoz, Raul; Recuero, M.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated noise model (INM) is the most internationally used software to calculate noise levels near airports. Take off, landing or pass by operations can be modeled by INM, but it does not consider aircrafts taxiing, which, in some cases, can be important to accurately evaluate and reduce

  14. Measuring and Explaining Airport Efficiency and Sustainability: Evidence from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carlucci

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available From an environmental point of view, it is widely recognized in economic literature that an efficient management of regional airports produces positive effects both for congestion reduction in the larger airports and for better use of existing infrastructures. Regional airports generally suffer from economic vulnerabilities because of scarcity of traffic volume; besides, their small catchment areas often determine low cash flow levels. As a result, significant problems of economic sustainability arise. In this context, airport infrastructure providers have the incentive to hide failures in their strategic decisions, justifying the low share of cost recovery through market characteristics. By means of the DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis method this paper analyses overall technical, pure technical, and scale efficiency of 34 Italian airports in the period 2006–2016 in order to investigate how a number of factors impact on the efficiency and economic sustainability of regional airports. Our findings reveal that airport size, presence of low-cost carriers and cargo traffic have a significant influence on the technical and scale efficiency of Italian airports. In other words, air transport privatization and deregulation can positively affect regional airport efficiency and sustainability. This is to say that the market mechanism is a useful tool in achieving regional airport sustainability even if the empirical analysis of the effects of privatization and deregulation is recommended for evaluating such political programs.

  15. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  16. Bioelectric Control of a 757 Class High Fidelity Aircraft Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Wheeler, Kevin; Stepniewski, Slawomir; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of a recent experiment in fine grain Electromyographic (EMG) signal recognition, We demonstrate bioelectric flight control of 757 class simulation aircraft landing at San Francisco International Airport. The physical instrumentality of a pilot control stick is not used. A pilot closes a fist in empty air and performs control movements which are captured by a dry electrode array on the arm, analyzed and routed through a flight director permitting full pilot outer loop control of the simulation. A Vision Dome immersive display is used to create a VR world for the aircraft body mechanics and flight changes to pilot movements. Inner loop surfaces and differential aircraft thrust is controlled using a hybrid neural network architecture that combines a damage adaptive controller (Jorgensen 1998, Totah 1998) with a propulsion only based control system (Bull & Kaneshige 1997). Thus the 757 aircraft is not only being flown bioelectrically at the pilot level but also demonstrates damage adaptive neural network control permitting adaptation to severe changes in the physical flight characteristics of the aircraft at the inner loop level. To compensate for accident scenarios, the aircraft uses remaining control surface authority and differential thrust from the engines. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time real time bioelectric fine-grained control, differential thrust based control, and neural network damage adaptive control have been integrated into a single flight demonstration. The paper describes the EMG pattern recognition system and the bioelectric pattern recognition methodology.

  17. Database on aircraft accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Koriyama, Tamio

    2013-11-01

    The Reactor Safety Subcommittee in the Nuclear Safety and Preservation Committee published 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' as the standard method for evaluating probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities in July 2002. In response to this issue, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization has been collecting open information on aircraft accidents of commercial airplanes, self-defense force (SDF) airplanes and US force airplanes every year since 2003, sorting out them and developing the database of aircraft accidents for the latest 20 years to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities. In this report the database was revised by adding aircraft accidents in 2011 to the existing database and deleting aircraft accidents in 1991 from it, resulting in development of the revised 2012 database for the latest 20 years from 1992 to 2011. Furthermore, the flight information on commercial aircrafts was also collected to develop the flight database for the latest 20 years from 1992 to 2011 to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities. The method for developing the database of aircraft accidents to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities is based on the report 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' described above. The 2012 revised database for the latest 20 years from 1992 to 2011 shows the followings. The trend of the 2012 database changes little as compared to the last year's report. (1) The data of commercial aircraft accidents is based on 'Aircraft accident investigation reports of Japan transport safety board' of Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. The number of commercial aircraft accidents is 4 for large fixed-wing aircraft, 58 for small fixed-wing aircraft, 5 for large bladed aircraft and 99 for small bladed aircraft. The relevant accidents

  18. Building Airport Surface HITL Simulation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Fay Cherie

    2016-01-01

    FutureFlight Central is a high fidelity, real-time simulator designed to study surface operations and automation. As an air traffic control tower simulator, FFC allows stakeholders such as the FAA, controllers, pilots, airports, and airlines to develop and test advanced surface and terminal area concepts and automation including NextGen and beyond automation concepts and tools. These technologies will improve the safety, capacity and environmental issues facing the National Airspace system. FFC also has extensive video streaming capabilities, which combined with the 3-D database capability makes the facility ideal for any research needing an immersive virtual and or video environment. FutureFlight Central allows human in the loop testing which accommodates human interactions and errors giving a more complete picture than fast time simulations. This presentation describes FFCs capabilities and the components necessary to build an airport surface human in the loop simulation capability.

  19. Database on aircraft accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Koriyama, Tamio

    2012-09-01

    The Reactor Safety Subcommittee in the Nuclear Safety and Preservation Committee published the report 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' as the standard method for evaluating probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities in July 2002. In response to the report, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization has been collecting open information on aircraft accidents of commercial airplanes, self-defense force (SDF) airplanes and US force airplanes every year since 2003, sorting out them and developing the database of aircraft accidents for latest 20 years to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into nuclear reactor facilities. This year, the database was revised by adding aircraft accidents in 2010 to the existing database and deleting aircraft accidents in 1991 from it, resulting in development of the revised 2011 database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010. Furthermore, the flight information on commercial aircrafts was also collected to develop the flight database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010 to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities. The method for developing the database of aircraft accidents to evaluate probability of aircraft crash into reactor facilities is based on the report 'The criteria on assessment of probability of aircraft crash into light water reactor facilities' described above. The 2011 revised database for latest 20 years from 1991 to 2010 shows the followings. The trend of the 2011 database changes little as compared to the last year's one. (1) The data of commercial aircraft accidents is based on 'Aircraft accident investigation reports of Japan transport safety board' of Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. 4 large fixed-wing aircraft accidents, 58 small fixed-wing aircraft accidents, 5 large bladed aircraft accidents and 114 small bladed aircraft accidents occurred. The relevant accidents for evaluating

  20. Optimization of ramp area aircraft push back time windows in the presence of uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, William Jeremy

    It is well known that airport surface traffic congestion at major airports is responsible for increased taxi-out times, fuel burn and excess emissions and there is potential to mitigate these negative consequences through optimizing airport surface traffic operations. Due to a highly congested voice communication channel between pilots and air traffic controllers and a data communication channel that is used only for limited functions, one of the most viable near-term strategies for improvement of the surface traffic is issuing a push back advisory to each departing aircraft. This dissertation focuses on the optimization of a push back time window for each departing aircraft. The optimization takes into account both spatial and temporal uncertainties of ramp area aircraft trajectories. The uncertainties are described by a stochastic kinematic model of aircraft trajectories, which is used to infer distributions of combinations of push back times that lead to conflict among trajectories from different gates. The model is validated and the distributions are included in the push back time window optimization. Under the assumption of a fixed taxiway spot schedule, the computed push back time windows can be integrated with a higher level taxiway scheduler to optimize the flow of traffic from the gate to the departure runway queue. To enable real-time decision making the computational time of the push back time window optimization is critical and is analyzed throughout.

  1. Preliminary Validation of the Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel; Consiglio, Maria; Murdoch, Jennifer; Adams, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a preliminary validation of the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept for normal conditions. Initial results reveal that the concept provides reduced air traffic delays when compared to current operations without increasing pilot workload. Characteristic to the SATS HVO concept is the establishment of a newly defined area of flight operations called a Self-Controlled Area (SCA) which would be activated by air traffic control (ATC) around designated non-towered, non-radar airports. During periods of poor visibility, SATS pilots would take responsibility for separation assurance between their aircraft and other similarly equipped aircraft in the SCA. Using onboard equipment and simple instrument flight procedures, they would then be better able to approach and land at the airport or depart from it. This concept would also require a new, ground-based automation system, typically located at the airport that would provide appropriate sequencing information to the arriving aircraft. Further validation of the SATS HVO concept is required and is the subject of ongoing research and subsequent publications.

  2. Comparison and validation of wake vortex characteristics collected at different airports by different scanning lidar sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobois, Ludovic; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Cappellazzo, Valerio; Musson, Christian; Treve, Vincent

    2018-04-01

    Today, the demand for increasing airport capacity is high, in particular for increasing runway throughput from an ATM perspective. Runway capacity is often directly linked with the minima longitudinal separation between aircraft on approach phase or between aircraft on departure. The separation minima are based on surveillance capabilities and on wake turbulence (WT) in order to mitigate respectively collision risk and WT-induced accidents, therefore WT hazard becomes a major concern for ATM. For ten years, many research LIDAR systems have been used for better understanding wake vortices behaviors in the operational environment within large range of wind and turbulence conditions. All these studies[1][2] helped to design new concepts of wake separations between aircrafts thanks to the proven capabilities of LIDAR systems to assess the risks of wake vortex (WV) encounters through the circulation retrievals. The re-categorization project, called RECAT [8], has been launched by a joint EUROCONTROL - FAA initiative in order to renew and optimize the out-of-date currently applied ICAO regulations on distance separation. Nowadays, the first phase of regional RECAT projects, which consists in defining new distance separation matrices composed of six/seven static aircraft categories instead of three, entered the operational phase and is deployed in several airports in United States and Europe. In addition, other concepts like Time-Based Separation have also been studied and deployed in London Heathrow. The airports where these solutions have been deployed obtained significant benefits as increased runway throughput and improved resilience to disruptions. For implementing such new WT solutions at an airport, a local safety assessment before the implementation and a risk monitoring after are usually needed. Before implementation, it may be required to determine for the targeted airport the relative variations of risk of wake vortex encounters, given the local ATM rules, the

  3. Comparison and validation of wake vortex characteristics collected at different airports by different scanning lidar sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thobois Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the demand for increasing airport capacity is high, in particular for increasing runway throughput from an ATM perspective. Runway capacity is often directly linked with the minima longitudinal separation between aircraft on approach phase or between aircraft on departure. The separation minima are based on surveillance capabilities and on wake turbulence (WT in order to mitigate respectively collision risk and WT-induced accidents, therefore WT hazard becomes a major concern for ATM. For ten years, many research LIDAR systems have been used for better understanding wake vortices behaviors in the operational environment within large range of wind and turbulence conditions. All these studies[1][2] helped to design new concepts of wake separations between aircrafts thanks to the proven capabilities of LIDAR systems to assess the risks of wake vortex (WV encounters through the circulation retrievals. The re-categorization project, called RECAT [8], has been launched by a joint EUROCONTROL – FAA initiative in order to renew and optimize the out-of-date currently applied ICAO regulations on distance separation. Nowadays, the first phase of regional RECAT projects, which consists in defining new distance separation matrices composed of six/seven static aircraft categories instead of three, entered the operational phase and is deployed in several airports in United States and Europe. In addition, other concepts like Time-Based Separation have also been studied and deployed in London Heathrow. The airports where these solutions have been deployed obtained significant benefits as increased runway throughput and improved resilience to disruptions. For implementing such new WT solutions at an airport, a local safety assessment before the implementation and a risk monitoring after are usually needed. Before implementation, it may be required to determine for the targeted airport the relative variations of risk of wake vortex encounters, given the

  4. Comparison of Predictive Modeling Methods of Aircraft Landing Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Ousmane H.

    2012-01-01

    Expected increases in air traffic demand have stimulated the development of air traffic control tools intended to assist the air traffic controller in accurately and precisely spacing aircraft landing at congested airports. Such tools will require an accurate landing-speed prediction to increase throughput while decreasing necessary controller interventions for avoiding separation violations. There are many practical challenges to developing an accurate landing-speed model that has acceptable prediction errors. This paper discusses the development of a near-term implementation, using readily available information, to estimate/model final approach speed from the top of the descent phase of flight to the landing runway. As a first approach, all variables found to contribute directly to the landing-speed prediction model are used to build a multi-regression technique of the response surface equation (RSE). Data obtained from operations of a major airlines for a passenger transport aircraft type to the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are used to predict the landing speed. The approach was promising because it decreased the standard deviation of the landing-speed error prediction by at least 18% from the standard deviation of the baseline error, depending on the gust condition at the airport. However, when the number of variables is reduced to the most likely obtainable at other major airports, the RSE model shows little improvement over the existing methods. Consequently, a neural network that relies on a nonlinear regression technique is utilized as an alternative modeling approach. For the reduced number of variables cases, the standard deviation of the neural network models errors represent over 5% reduction compared to the RSE model errors, and at least 10% reduction over the baseline predicted landing-speed error standard deviation. Overall, the constructed models predict the landing-speed more accurately and precisely than the current state-of-the-art.

  5. Expanding Regional Airport Usage to Accommodate Increased Air Traffic Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Small regional airports present an underutilized source of capacity in the national air transportation system. This study sought to determine whether a 50 percent increase in national operations could be achieved by limiting demand growth at large hub airports and instead growing traffic levels at the surrounding regional airports. This demand scenario for future air traffic in the United States was generated and used as input to a 24-hour simulation of the national airspace system. Results of the demand generation process and metrics predicting the simulation results are presented, in addition to the actual simulation results. The demand generation process showed that sufficient runway capacity exists at regional airports to offload a significant portion of traffic from hub airports. Predictive metrics forecast a large reduction of delays at most major airports when demand is shifted. The simulation results then show that offloading hub traffic can significantly reduce nationwide delays.

  6. Research and Analysis on Energy Consumption Features of Civil Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jianping; Xu, Junku; Su, Jixiang

    2017-11-01

    Civil aviation is an important part of China’s transportation system, and also the fastest-growing field of comprehensive transportation. Airports, as a key infrastructure of the air transportation system, are the junctions of air and ground transportation. Large airports are generally comprehensive transportation hubs that integrate various modes of transportation, serving as important functional zones of cities. Compared with other transportation hubs, airports cover a wide area, with plenty of functional sections, complex systems and strong specialization, while airport buildings represented by terminals have exhibited characteristics of large space, massive energy consumption, high requirement for safety and comfort, as well as concentrated and rapidly changing passenger flows. Through research and analysis on energy consumption features of civil airports, and analysis on energy consumption features of airports with different sizes or in different climate regions, this article has drawn conclusions therefrom.

  7. Benefits Assessment for Single-Airport Tactical Runway Configuration Management Tool (TRCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa; Phojanamonogkolkij, Nipa; Lohr, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The System-Oriented Runway Management (SORM) concept was developed as part of the Airspace Systems Program (ASP) Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project, and is composed of two basic capabilities: Runway Configuration Management (RCM), and Combined Arrival/Departure Runway Scheduling (CADRS). RCM is the process of designating active runways, monitoring the active runway configuration for suitability given existing factors, and predicting future configuration changes; CADRS is the process of distributing arrivals and departures across active runways based on local airport and National Airspace System (NAS) goals. The central component in the SORM concept is a tool for taking into account all the various factors and producing a recommendation for what would be the optimal runway configuration, runway use strategy, and aircraft sequence, considering as many of the relevant factors required in making this type of decision, and user preferences, if feasible. Three separate tools were initially envisioned for this research area, corresponding to the time scale in which they would operate: Strategic RCM (SRCM), with a planning horizon on the order of several hours, Tactical RCM (TRCM), with a planning horizon on the order of 90 minutes, and CADRS, with a planning horizon on the order of 15-30 minutes[1]. Algorithm development was initiated in all three of these areas, but the most fully developed to date is the TRCM algorithm. Earlier studies took a high-level approach to benefits, estimating aggregate benefits across most of the major airports in the National Airspace Systems (NAS), for both RCM and CADRS [2]. Other studies estimated the benefit of RCM and CADRS using various methods of re-sequencing arrivals to reduce delays3,4, or better balancing of arrival fixes5,6. Additional studies looked at different methods for performing the optimization involved in selecting the best Runway Configuration Plan (RCP) to use7-10. Most of these previous studies were high

  8. The effects of pushback delays on airport ground movement

    OpenAIRE

    Stergianos, Christofas; Atkin, Jason; Schittekat, Patrick; Nordlander, Tomas Eric; Gerada, C.; Morvan, Herve

    2015-01-01

    With the constant increase in air traffic, airports are facing capacity problems. Optimisation methods for specific airport processes are starting to be increasingly utilised by many large airports. However, many processes do happen in parallel, and maximising the potential benefits will require a more complex optimisation model, which can consider multiple processes simultaneously and take into account the detailed complexities of the processes where necessary, rather than using more abstrac...

  9. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required for...

  10. Amsterdam's Airport Library Serves Passengers in 30 Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam started offering the world's first library in an airport. This article describes Airport Library which is no ordinary library. It holds more than 1,200 items, but it lends nothing. It operates 24/7, yet it's only staffed by volunteers for 2 or 3 hours a day. It offers just nine public-access…

  11. Systemic Approach to Traffic Evaluation of Mostar Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldo Raguž

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The attempt of this work is to systematically find solutionsfor Mostar Airport development through technical and technologicalharmonization of traffic processes undertaken in twoseparate organizations - airport and air traffic control and coordinationbetween other traffic branches. The work uses theindicators of traffic flows and tourist trends in the region, andtogether with the mentioned simulations it attempts to evaluatethe traffic potentials in the region by affecting the change in thecurrent negative traffic flows at Mostar Airport.

  12. Analysis and design on airport safety information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport safety information management system is the foundation of implementing safety operation, risk control, safety performance monitor, and safety management decision for the airport. The paper puts forward the architecture of airport safety information management system based on B/S model, focuses on safety information processing flow, designs the functional modules and proposes the supporting conditions for system operation. The system construction is helpful to perfecting the long effect mechanism driven by safety information, continually increasing airport safety management level and control proficiency.

  13. Physical environment. [environmental impact statement required for general aviation airport construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Environmental legislation affecting airports and the more common environmental effects resulting from airport construction are discussed with special emphasis on general aviation airports. The discussion is focused on the regulation of noise, pollution, and water quality.

  14. 77 FR 50759 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando... Maps submitted by the Sanford Airport Authority for Orlando Sanford International Airport under the... Aviation Administration, Orlando Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Citadel...

  15. A Portable Low-Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Olalekan; Mead, Iq; Bright, Vivien; Baron, Ronan; Saffell, John; Stewart, Gregor; Kaye, Paul; Jones, Roderic

    2013-04-01

    sensor nodes is being deployed in and around the airport perimeter. We present here some of the early results from the deployment showing some regional pollution episodes influenced by meteorology, as well as localised pollution effects related to aircraft taxiing, take-off and landing at the airport. We show how SNAQ can provide measurement data useful for validation of air quality models currently used for LHR, the generation of emission inventories for the airport as well as pollution source attribution within and around LHR.

  16. Application of the methodology for improving the business processes for the compamy for Airport services TAV Airports Holding, Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitreva, Elizabeta; Taskov, Nako; Lazarovski, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we will make a full diagnosis of some business processes in the company for Airport services TAV Airports Holding, Macedonia. Based on the analysis we have made on the existing quality system an appropriate methodology is designed for each feature of the TQM (Total Quality Management) system in order to find the optimal solution for smooth operation of the airport traffic, in order to meet the wishes and needs of the customer, while the company makes a profit. The methodol...

  17. Modeling Aircraft Emissions for Regional-scale Air Quality: Adapting a New Global Aircraft Emissions Database for the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, S.; Baek, B. H.; Vennam, P. L.; Woody, M. C.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F.; Fleming, G.

    2012-12-01

    Commercial aircraft emit substantial amounts of pollutants during their complete activity cycle that ranges from landing-and-takeoff (LTO) at airports to cruising in upper elevations of the atmosphere, and affect both air quality and climate. Since these emissions are not uniformly emitted over the earth, and have substantial temporal and spatial variability, it is vital to accurately evaluate and quantify the relative impacts of aviation emissions on ambient air quality. Regional-scale air quality modeling applications do not routinely include these aircraft emissions from all cycles. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), a software system that dynamically models aircraft performance in space and time to calculate fuel burn and emissions from gate-to-gate for all commercial aviation activity from all airports globally. To process in-flight aircraft emissions and to provide a realistic representation of these for treatment in grid-based air quality models, we have developed an interface processor called AEDTproc that accurately distributes full-flight chorded emissions in time and space to create gridded, hourly model-ready emissions input data. Unlike the traditional emissions modeling approach of treating aviation emissions as ground-level sources or processing emissions only from the LTO cycles in regional-scale air quality studies, AEDTproc distributes chorded inventories of aircraft emissions during LTO cycles and cruise activities into a time-variant 3-D gridded structure. We will present results of processed 2006 global emissions from AEDT over a continental U.S. modeling domain to support a national-scale air quality assessment of the incremental impacts of aircraft emissions on surface air quality. This includes about 13.6 million flights within the U.S. out of 31.2 million flights globally. We will focus on assessing spatio-temporal variability of these commercial aircraft emissions, and

  18. Small transport aircraft technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  19. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  20. 75 FR 57829 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... for Correction On September 9, 2010, the Federal Aviation Administration published a Notice of... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration [Docket No. FAA-2010-0831] Airport... Aviation Administration (FAA). ACTION: Notice of proposed policy; notice of proposed amendment to sponsor...

  1. 78 FR 42419 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... IV of the Compliance Guidance Letter to clarify this issue. Comment: Including the statement, ``going... arrangements which currently co-mingle commercial and residential activities. Going forward, airport sponsors... ``residential property.'' It defines residential property as a piece of real property used for single- or multi...

  2. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... application may be mailed or delivered to the FAA at the following address: Lynn D. Martin, Airports... property be released for sale to Matt Mildenberger of Mitten's, Inc. for a restaurant. On March 5, 2013... application, notice and other documents determined by the FAA to be related to the application in person at...

  3. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... transparent. As a result of these efforts, the agency expects to have reliable information on the utilization... issued, most commenters supported FAA's proposal to allow existing residential through-the-fence access... commenters supported the FAA's proposal to allow through-the-fence access where it exists, if the airport can...

  4. Mission Analysis and Aircraft Sizing of a Hybrid-Electric Regional Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antcliff, Kevin R.; Guynn, Mark D.; Marien, Ty V.; Wells, Douglas P.; Schneider, Steven J.; Tong, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore advanced airframe and propulsion technologies for a small regional transport aircraft concept (approximately 50 passengers), with the goal of creating a conceptual design that delivers significant cost and performance advantages over current aircraft in that class. In turn, this could encourage airlines to open up new markets, reestablish service at smaller airports, and increase mobility and connectivity for all passengers. To meet these study goals, hybrid-electric propulsion was analyzed as the primary enabling technology. The advanced regional aircraft is analyzed with four levels of electrification, 0 percent electric with 100 percent conventional, 25 percent electric with 75 percent conventional, 50 percent electric with 50 percent conventional, and 75 percent electric with 25 percent conventional for comparison purposes. Engine models were developed to represent projected future turboprop engine performance with advanced technology and estimates of the engine weights and flowpath dimensions were developed. A low-order multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) environment was created that could capture the unique features of parallel hybrid-electric aircraft. It is determined that at the size and range of the advanced turboprop: The battery specific energy must be 750 watt-hours per kilogram or greater for the total energy to be less than for a conventional aircraft. A hybrid vehicle would likely not be economically feasible with a battery specific energy of 500 or 750 watt-hours per kilogram based on the higher gross weight, operating empty weight, and energy costs compared to a conventional turboprop. The battery specific energy would need to reach 1000 watt-hours per kilogram by 2030 to make the electrification of its propulsion an economically feasible option. A shorter range and/or an altered propulsion-airframe integration could provide more favorable results.

  5. Bacteria that Travel: The Quality of Aircraft Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Handschuh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The travelling population is increasing globally year on year. International tourist arrival figures reached 1087 million in 2013 and 1133 million in 2014; of which 53% and 54% respectively accounted for air transport. The water on board aircraft is sourced from surface or ground water; piped to a central filling point and distributed to each aircraft by water service vehicles at the home base or at the destination airport. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the microbial, chemical (pH; Total and Free chlorine and physical (temperature quality of water from two aircraft, long- and short-haul, as well as from the original water source and the water service vehicle. A total of 154 water samples were collected and analysed. Long-haul flights were found to be significantly poorer in terms of microbial quality than short haul flights (p = 0.015. Furthermore, correlation and regression analysis showed that the water service vehicle was a significant source of increased microbial load in aircraft. Microbial diversity was also demonstrated, with 37 bacterial species identified belonging to eight classes: γ-Proteobacteria; β-Proteobacteria; α-Proteobacteria; Bacilli; Actinobacteria; Flavobacteria; Sphingobacteria and Cytophaga; using phenotypic and 16S rDNA sequence-based analysis. We present a novel quantified study of aircraft-related potable water supplies.

  6. Aircraft Carrier Exposure Testing of Aircraft Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Eui

    2004-01-01

    .... Test and control specimens were affixed on exposure racks and installed on aircraft carriers to compare adhesive bonding primers for aluminum and to determine the static property behavior of various...

  7. 77 FR 22376 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Grant Assurances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... established after December 30, 1987, will be expended by it for the capital or operating costs of the airport... structures (such as runways, taxiways, aprons, terminal buildings, hangars, and roads), including all... the Airport and Airway Trust Fund. * * * * * Issued in Washington, DC on April 10, 2012. Benito De...

  8. The impact of high speed rail on airport competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, I.; Lijesen, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of introducing a high speed train connection on competition between airports, focusing on the new HST-link between Amsterdam and Brussels. We conduct a detailed analysis regarding the airport choice of passengers living in the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Northern France

  9. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a) Transportation...

  10. 78 FR 55330 - Policy Regarding Airport Rates and Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... center, headquarters office, or flight kitchen on an airport does not constitute an aeronautical use... flights subsidized under the Essential Air Service Program from the general application of a 2-part... address congestion. 6.3 An airport proprietor may exempt flights subsidized under the Essential Air...

  11. 78 FR 3311 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ...-airport employees such as Fixed-Base Operators (FBO) or airline mechanics.\\2\\ The FAA intended to propose.... The existing level of training indicates that as a group certificated airports are willing to conduct...) What constitutes acceptable friction levels; (iv) What is an acceptable testing frequency; (v) Are...

  12. Ethnic and Cultural Focus in Airport Driver Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, John; Rankin, William

    2009-01-01

    A series of linked relationships is advanced which together suggest changes should be made to training programs for airside drivers at major airports in the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom. Overall, the links suggest a relationship between the number of airside incidents such as collisions at airports, the ethnic diversity evident…

  13. Art at the Airport: An Exploration of New Art Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Many airports have transformed empty waiting spaces into mini malls, children's play areas, and displays of beautiful art, making a long wait a bit more pleasant. For the modern airport, showcasing art has become an important component, with perks including a built-in global audience, as well as the vast spaces of modern architecture. For the art…

  14. Behind Start of Take-Off Roll Aircraft Sound Level Directivity Study - Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Michael C.; Roof, Christopher J.; Fleming, Gregg G.; Rapoza, Amanda S.; Boeker, Eric R.; McCurdy, David A.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the Department of Transportation's Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe) conducted a noise measurement study to examine aircraft sound level directivity patterns behind the start-of-takeoff roll. The study was conducted at Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) from October 4 through 20, 2004.

  15. Assessment of secondhand smoke in international airports in Thailand, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungskulniti, Nipapun; Charoenca, Naowarut; Peesing, Jintana; Trangwatana, Songwut; Hamann, Stephen; Pitayarangsarit, Siriwan; Chitanondh, Hatai

    2015-11-01

    To assess secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in Thai international airports using a fine particulate indicator, particulate matter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), and to compare with 2012 exposure findings in international airports in the USA. Smoking rooms in the four largest international airports that serve the most travellers and with the most operating designated smoking rooms (DSRs) were monitored using PM2.5 monitoring equipment following an approved research protocol for assessing fine particle pollution from tobacco smoke. Monitoring was conducted inside and just outside DSRs and throughout the airport terminals in all four airports. Altogether 104 samples were taken to assess SHS exposure in four airports. Simultaneous samples were taken multiple times in a total of 11 DSRs available for sampling in the research period. Levels of PM2.5 in DSRs were extremely high in all four airports and were more dangerous inside DSRs than in the US airports (overall mean=532.5 vs 188.7 µg/m(3)), higher outside DSRs than in the US airports (overall mean=50.1 vs 43.7 µg/m(3)), and at comparable levels with the US airports in the terminals away from DSRs (overall mean=13.8 vs 11.5 µg/m(3). Findings show that travellers and employees in or near DSRs in the airports assessed in Thailand are being exposed to even higher levels of SHS than in US airports that still have DSRs. Extremely high levels of SHS in and adjacent to DSR show that these rooms are not providing safe air quality for employees and travellers. These high levels of exposure are above those levels reported in US airports and show the need for remedial action to ensure safe air quality in international airports in Thailand. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. A Geometric Fuzzy-Based Approach for Airport Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nadia Postorino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport classification is a common need in the air transport field due to several purposes—such as resource allocation, identification of crucial nodes, and real-time identification of substitute nodes—which also depend on the involved actors’ expectations. In this paper a fuzzy-based procedure has been proposed to cluster airports by using a fuzzy geometric point of view according to the concept of unit-hypercube. By representing each airport as a point in the given reference metric space, the geometric distance among airports—which corresponds to a measure of similarity—has in fact an intrinsic fuzzy nature due to the airport specific characteristics. The proposed procedure has been applied to a test case concerning the Italian airport network and the obtained results are in line with expectations.

  17. Analysis of wind data for airport runway design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellasio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide a methodology, and examples of application, for analyzing wind data for the correct orientation of airport runways. Design/methodology/approach: More than 90000 observed wind data have been analyzed for each one of the three airports used as case studies. Both observed and estimated gusts have been considered. Findings: If only observed data are considered, each single runway of the three airports used as case studies is correctly oriented. When estimated gusts are considered, the FAA requirements are not satisfied by a single runway in some airports (which anyway satisfy such requirements by using more runways. Practical implications: The correct orientation of runways minimize the crosswind components, then increase the safety of the airports. Originality/value: The paper provides a methodology to evaluate the orientation of existing runways and to design new runways. Such methodology is based on the analysis wind data, considering both observed values and estimated gusts.

  18. Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults? How can you reduce anesthesia risks in older patients? Age Age may bring wisdom but it also brings ... Ask your physician to conduct a pre-surgery cognitive test — an assessment of your mental function. The physician can use the results as a ...

  19. Location Planning for Dynamic Wireless Charging Systems for Electric Airport Passenger Buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Helber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the ground vehicles operating on the airside parts of commercial airports are currently powered by diesel engines. These include vehicles such as apron buses, fuel trucks, and aircraft tractors. Hence, these vehicles contribute to the overall CO 2 emissions of the aviation transport system and thus negatively influence its environmental footprint. To reduce this damaging environmental impact, these vehicles could potentially be electrified with on-board batteries as their energy sources. However, the conductive charging of such vehicles via stationary cable connections is rather time-consuming. A dynamic wireless charging system to supply public transportation passenger buses with electric energy while in motion has recently been installed on the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST campus and in the Korean city of Gumi. In this paper, we study configuration problems related to the use of this technology to make airport operations more environmentally sustainable. We concentrate on the power supply for apron buses and analyze the location planning problems related to the distribution of the required power supply and the wireless charging units in the apron road system. To this end, we develop a formal optimization model and discuss the first numerical results.

  20. Multi-objective Optimization of Departure Procedures at Gimpo International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghyun; Lim, Dongwook; Monteiro, Dylan Jonathan; Kirby, Michelle; Mavris, Dimitri

    2018-04-01

    Most aviation communities have increasing concerns about the environmental impacts, which are directly linked to health issues for local residents near the airport. In this study, the environmental impact of different departure procedures using the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT) was analyzed. First, actual operational data were compiled at Gimpo International Airport (March 20, 2017) from an open source. Two modifications were made in the AEDT to model the operational circumstances better and the preliminary AEDT simulations were performed according to the acquired operational procedures. Simulated noise results showed good agreements with noise measurement data at specific locations. Second, a multi-objective optimization of departure procedures was performed for the Boeing 737-800. Four design variables were selected and AEDT was linked to a variety of advanced design methods. The results showed that takeoff thrust had the greatest influence and it was found that fuel burn and noise had an inverse relationship. Two points representing each fuel burn and noise optimum on the Pareto front were parsed and run in AEDT to compare with the baseline. The results showed that the noise optimum case reduced Sound Exposure Level 80-dB noise exposure area by approximately 5% while the fuel burn optimum case reduced total fuel burn by 1% relative to the baseline for aircraft-level analysis.

  1. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Part 1; Analysis of Historical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation (+4% annual growth), resulting in unreliable service and systemic delays. Estimates of the impact of delays and unreliable air transportation service on the economy range from $32B to $41B per year. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making with regards to: (1) geographic access, (2) economic access, and (3) airline finances. This analysis evaluated markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size, airfares, and profit from 2005-2009. During this period, airlines experienced changes in costs of operation (due to fluctuations in hedged fuel prices), changes in travel demand (due to changes in the economy), and changes in infrastructure capacity (due to the capacity limits at EWR, JFK, and LGA). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of capacity limits at airports, as well as the effect of increased costs of operation (i.e. hedged fuel prices). The increases in costs of operation serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed.

  2. Simulation to assess the efficacy of US airport entry scrreening of passengers for pandemic influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcmahon, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present our methodology and stochastic discrete-event simulation developed to model the screening of passengers for pandemic influenza at the US port-of-entry airports. Our model uniquely combines epidemiology modelling, evolving infected states and conditions of passengers over time, and operational considerations of screening in a single simulation. The simulation begins with international aircraft arrivals to the US. Passengers are then randomly assigned to one of three states -- not infected, infected with pandemic influenza and infected with other respiratory illness. Passengers then pass through various screening layers (i.e. pre-departure screening, en route screening, primary screening and secondary screening) and ultimately exit the system. We track the status of each passenger over time, with a special emphasis on false negatives (i.e. passengers infected with pandemic influenza, but are not identified as such) as these passengers pose a significant threat as they could unknowingly spread the pandemic influenza virus throughout our nation.

  3. Children's cognition and aircraft noise exposure at home--the West London Schools Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T; Stansfeld, S; Haines, M; Head, J

    2004-01-01

    The association of aircraft noise exposure with cognitive performance was examined by means of a cross-sectional field survey. Two hundred thirty six children attending 10 primary schools around Heathrow Airport in west London were tested on reading comprehension, immediate/delayed recall and sustained attention. In order to obtain the information about their background, a questionnaire was delivered to the parents and 163 answers were collected. Logistic regression models were used to assess performance on the cognitive tests in relation to aircraft noise exposure at home and possible individual and school level confounding factors. A significant dose-response relationship was found between aircraft noise exposure at home and performance on memory tests of immediate/delayed recall. However there was no strong association with the other cognitive outcomes. These results suggest that aircraft noise exposure at home may affect children's memory.

  4. Methodology for Analysis, Modeling and Simulation of Airport Gate-waiting Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation presents methodologies to estimate gate-waiting delays from historical data, to identify gate-waiting-delay functional causes in major U.S. airports, and to evaluate the impact of gate operation disruptions and mitigation strategies on gate-waiting delay. Airport gates are a resource of congestion in the air transportation system. When an arriving flight cannot pull into its gate, the delay it experiences is called gate-waiting delay. Some possible reasons for gate-waiting delay are: the gate is occupied, gate staff or equipment is unavailable, the weather prevents the use of the gate (e.g. lightning), or the airline has a preferred gate assignment. Gate-waiting delays potentially stay with the aircraft throughout the day (unless they are absorbed), adding costs to passengers and the airlines. As the volume of flights increases, ensuring that airport gates do not become a choke point of the system is critical. The first part of the dissertation presents a methodology for estimating gate-waiting delays based on historical, publicly available sources. Analysis of gate-waiting delays at major U.S. airports in the summer of 2007 identifies the following. (i) Gate-waiting delay is not a significant problem on majority of days; however, the worst delay days (e.g. 4% of the days at LGA) are extreme outliers. (ii) The Atlanta International Airport (ATL), the John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) and the Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) experience the highest gate-waiting delays among major U.S. airports. (iii) There is a significant gate-waiting-delay difference between airlines due to a disproportional gate allocation. (iv) Gate-waiting delay is sensitive to time of a day and schedule peaks. According to basic principles of queueing theory, gate-waiting delay can be attributed to over-scheduling, higher-than-scheduled arrival rate, longer-than-scheduled gate-occupancy time, and reduced gate

  5. Multirole cargo aircraft options and configurations. [economic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, D. W.; Vaughan, J. C., III

    1979-01-01

    A future requirements and advanced market evaluation study indicates derivatives of current wide-body aircraft, using 1980 advanced technology, would be economically attractive through 2008, but new dedicated airfreighters incorporating 1990 technology, would offer little or no economic incentive. They would be economically attractive for all payload sizes, however, if RD and T costs could be shared in a joint civil/military arrangement. For the 1994-2008 cargo market, option studies indicate Mach 0.7 propfans would be economically attractive in trip cost, aircraft price and airline ROI. Spanloaders would have an even lower price and higher ROI but would have a relatively high trip cost because of aerodynamic inefficiencies. Dedicated airfreighters using propfans at Mach 0.8 cruise, laminar flow control, or cryofuels, would not provide any great economic benefits. Air cushion landing gear configurations are identified as an option for avoiding runway constraints on airport requirements and/or operational constraints are noted.

  6. An Aircraft Service Staff Rostering using a Hybrid GRASP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Ip

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aircraft ground service company is responsible for carrying out the regular tasks to aircraft maintenace between their arrival at and departure from the airport. This paper presents the application of a hybrid approach based upon greedy randomized adaptive search procedure (GRASP for rostering technical staff such that they are assigned predefined shift patterns. The rostering of staff is posed as an optimization problem with an aim of minimizing the violations of hard and soft constraints. The proposed algorithm iteratively constructs a set of solutions by GRASP. Furthermore, with multi-agent techniques, we efficiently identify an optimal roster with minimal constraint violations and fair to employees. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. 75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... disruption and cancellations varied by airport and by day, but DCA, JFK, LGA, and EWR all were affected by the storms. However, the flight disruptions were not limited to the slot-controlled airports... cancellations. These rules are expected to accommodate routine weather and other cancellations under all but the...

  8. 76 FR 21420 - Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue; Policy Regarding Airport Rates and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... airport destination not currently served, (b) nonstop service where no nonstop service is currently offered, (c) new entrant carrier, and/or (d) increased frequency of flights to a specific destination. The... assistance in marketing new service; and a subsidy of air service if airport revenue is not used for that...

  9. Airport electric vehicle powered by fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Pablo; Soria, Antonio; Mielgo, Javier; Sierra, José Francisco; de Blas, Juan; Gauchia, Lucia; Martínez, Juan M.

    Nowadays, new technologies and breakthroughs in the field of energy efficiency, alternative fuels and added-value electronics are leading to bigger, more sustainable and green thinking applications. Within the Automotive Industry, there is a clear declaration of commitment with the environment and natural resources. The presence of passenger vehicles of hybrid architecture, public transport powered by cleaner fuels, non-aggressive utility vehicles and an encouraging social awareness, are bringing to light a new scenario where conventional and advanced solutions will be in force. This paper presents the evolution of an airport cargo vehicle from battery-based propulsion to a hybrid power unit based on fuel cell, cutting edge batteries and hydrogen as a fuel. Some years back, IBERIA (Major Airline operating in Spain) decided to initiate the replacement of its diesel fleet for battery ones, aiming at a reduction in terms of contamination and noise in the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, due to extreme operating conditions in airports (ambient temperature, intensive use, dirtiness, …), batteries suffered a very severe degradation, which took its toll in terms of autonomy. This reduction in terms of autonomy together with the long battery recharge time made the intensive use of this fleet impractical in everyday demanding conditions.

  10. Level of service at airport passenger terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Tamara D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport terminals are designed by level of service standards which are regulated by International Air Transport Association (IATA. Level of service offered to passengers, regarding to the primary processes, is not necessarily equivalent to the level of service perceived by them. The fact that passengers spending longer times in terminals makes the secondary processes more important in passenger experience. Aiming to improving airport attractiveness, and business success, passenger perception is approached by paying close attention. This paper discusses the two aspects of level of service. Concept of level of service used in air traffic industry with purpose of designing and planning of passenger terminal is derived from the Highway Capacity Manual. Subject of the paper regards last changes which have been introduced during 2014. Second part of the paper explains the needs of examining and analyzing passenger perception from the management point of view, and gives overview of methods which are conducted during researches. Similarities and differences are shown among measurements of level of service and perceived level of service, including the importance of these aspects mutual complementing.

  11. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  12. Modeling of noise pollution and estimated human exposure around İstanbul Atatürk Airport in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkurt, Nesimi; Sari, Deniz; Akdag, Ali; Kutukoglu, Murat; Gurarslan, Aliye

    2014-06-01

    The level of aircraft noise exposure around İstanbul Atatürk Airport was calculated according to the European Noise Directive. These calculations were based on the actual flight data for each flight in the year 2011. The study area was selected to cover of 25km radius centered on the Aerodrome Reference Point of the airport. The geographical data around İstanbul Atatürk Airport was used to prepare elevation, residential building, auxiliary building, hospital and school layers in SoundPlan software. It was found that 1.2% of the land area of İstanbul City exceeds the threshold of 55dB(A) during daytime. However, when the exceedance of threshold of 65dB(A)is investigated, the affected area is found quite small (0.2% of land area of city). About 0.3% of the land area of İstanbul City has noise levels exceeding 55dB(A) during night-time. Our results show that about 4% of the resident population was exposed to 55dB(A) or higher noises during daytime in İstanbul. When applying the second threshhold criteria, nearly 1% of the population is exposed to noise levels greater than 65dB(A). At night-time, 1.3% of the population is exposed to 55dB(A) or higher noise levels. © 2013.

  13. Some health effects of aircraft noise with special reference to shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Sanaa A M; Sharaf, Nevin E; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; ElGelil, Khalid S Abd

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft noise is an environmental stressor. A positive relationship exists between noise and high blood pressure. Shift work is an additional hazardous working condition with negative effect on the behavior attitude of workers. This study aimed at investigating some health hazards for shift work on workers at Cairo International Airport (CIA), Egypt, as a strategic work place, with more than one stressor. Assessment of noise effects were carried out in four working sites at the airport besides control sites. The average noise level in the exposure sites was 106.5 dB compared with 54 dB at the control sites. The study comprised a group of 200 male workers exposed to aircraft noise and 110 male workers not exposed to noise as control group. All workers had full general medical examination after filling specially formulated questionnaire. Hearing impairment, raised blood pressure, headaches, disturbed sleep, and symptoms of anxiety were more prominent among the exposed workers than the control. Symptoms of upper respiratory tract were reported among night shifters of both groups with high tendency for smoking. Thus, night-shift workers at CIA work under more than one stressor. Hypertension and smoking might act as intermediate factors on the causal pathway of complaints, making aircraft noise and night shift acting as two synergistic stressors. Airport workers are in need for aggressive hearing conservation programs. Organization of the working hours schedule is mandatory to avoid excessive noise exposure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Service quality improvement of ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittichai Sricharoenpramong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to: 1 evaluate the service quality of the ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport (DMK, 2 compare the ground staff quality service perception of Thai passengers at DMK, and 3 provide guidelines for service quality improvement of the DMK airlines ground staff. A sample size of 400 Thai domestic passengers was accidentally selected at DMK. A questionnaire was used as a research tool for data collection. Five dimensions of service quality were evaluated: reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. It was found that the service quality of ground staff was moderate. The highest dimension of service quality realization was tangibles, followed successively by reliability, assurance, empathy, and responsiveness. The passengers' perception of the ground staff's service quality varied by gender and age group. Guidelines were proposed for the improvement of ground staff service quality at DMK based on the findings. Keywords: airport, ground staff, quality of service

  15. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... summarized as follows: Comment: Residential through-the-fence access provides a supportive community that... accommodate new aircraft types. Secondly, while through-the-fence communities sometimes attempt to limit ownership to aircraft owners, there is no effective way to prevent turnover of these properties to non...

  16. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yamada, Michiko

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to ionizing radiation accelerates the aging process has been actively investigated at ABCC-RERF since 1958, when longitudinal cohort studies of the Adult Health Study (AHS) and the Life Span Study (LSS) were initiated. In their 1975 overall review of aging studies related to the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, Finch and Beebe concluded that while most studies had shown no correlation between aging and radiation exposure, they had not involved the large numbers of subjects required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Extending LSS mortality data up to 1978 did not alter the earlier conclusion that any observed life-shortening was associated primarily with cancer induction rather than with any nonspecific cause. The results of aging studies conducted during the intervening 15 years using data from the same populations are reviewed in the present paper. Using clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory techniques, a broad spectrum of aging parameters have been studied, such as postmortem morphological changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, laboratory tests, tissue changes, and morbidity. With respect to the aging process, the overall results have not been consistent and are generally thought to show no relation to radiation exposure. Although some preliminary results suggest a possible radiation-induced increase in atherosclerotic diseases and acceleration of aging in the T-cell-related immune system, further study is necessary to confirm these findings. In the future, applying the latest gerontological study techniques to data collected from subjects exposed 45 years ago to A-bomb radiation at relatively young ages will present a new body of data relevant to the study of late radiation effects. (author) 103 refs

  17. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.; Beebe, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that ionizing radiation accelerates natural aging has been under investigation at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission since 1959. Postmortem observations of morphologic and chemical changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, clinical laboratory tests, tissue changes, morbidity, and mortality have all been examined by ABCC investigators interested in this hypothesis. These studies have been beset with conceptual difficulties centered on the definition and measurement of aging. An empirical approach early led to the calculation of an index of physiologic age as a linear combination of age-related tests of various organ systems. Most studies have been negative but have not involved the large numbers that might be required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Mortality, however, has been examined on the basis of a large sample and over the period 1950-1972 had provided no support for the hypothesis of radiation-accelerated aging. Ionizing radiation dose, of course shorten human life, but its life-shortening effect appears to be the result of specific radiation-induced disease, especially neoplasms. The hypothesis is now much less attractive than it was 10-20 years ago but still has some value in stimulating research on aging. The experience of the A-bomb survivors provides an unusual opportunity for a definitive test of the hypothesis. (auth.)

  18. Evaluation of feasible machine learning techniques for predicting the time to fly and aircraft speed profile on final approach : Predictive dynamic support tool on final approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrema, Herrema Floris; Treve, V; Curran, R.; Visser, H.G.; Lovell, D.; Fricke, H.

    2016-01-01

    currently, at many airports, the runway throughput is the limiting factor for the overall capacity. Among the most important constraining parameters is the separation minima expressed in distance. On the top of these minima, the difference of the leader and follower aircraft speed profiles imposes

  19. Hearing loss and contributing factors among airport workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, H M; Rampal, K G

    2012-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common and important source of disability among the workers and often caused by occupational noise exposure. Aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and contributing factors of hearing loss among airport workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an airport in Malaysia. This study used stratified sampling method that involved 358 workers who were working in 3 different units between November 2008 and March 2009. Data for this study were collected by using questionnaires eliciting sociodemographic, occupational exposure history (previous and present), life-style including smoking habits and health-related data. Otoscopic and pure-tone audiometric tests were conducted for hearing assessment. Noise exposure status was categorize by using a noise logging dosimeter to obtain 8-hour Time-Weighted Average (TWA). Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 12.0.1 and EpiInfo 6.04. The prevalence of hearing loss was 33.5%. Age >40 years old (aOR 4.3, 95%CI 2.2-8.3) is the main risk factors for hearing loss followed by duration of noise exposure >5 years (aOR 2.5, 95%CI 1.4-4.7), smoking (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.4), duration of service >5 years (aOR 2.1, 95%CI 1.1-3.9), exposure to explosion (aOR 6.1, 95%CI 1.3-29.8), exposure to vibration (aOR 2.2, 95%CI 1.1-4.3) and working in engineering unit (aOR 5.9, 95%CI 1.1-30.9). The prevalence rate ratio of hearing loss for nonsmokers aged 40 years old and younger, smokers aged 40 years old and younger, non-smokers older than 40 years old and smokers older than 40 years old was 1.0, 1.7, 2.8 and 4.6 respectively. This result contributes towards better understanding of risk factors for hearing loss, which is relatively common among Malaysian workers.

  20. 77 FR 55896 - Notice of Release Effecting Federal Grant Assurance Obligations Due to Airport Layout Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Grant Assurance Obligations Due to Airport Layout Plan Revision at Mather Airport, Sacramento, CA AGENCY... Airport Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95837. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with the Wendell H. Ford... Mather Airport, Sacramento, California, which will provide for a release from the Grant Agreement...

  1. 78 FR 15804 - Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance: Rolla National Airport (VIH), Rolla, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Assurance: Rolla National Airport (VIH), Rolla, MO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... request to change approximately 10 acres of airport property at the Rolla National Airport (VIH) from... following is a brief overview of the request: The Rolla National Airport (VIH) is proposing the release of...

  2. 41 CFR 102-37.520 - What is the authority for public airport donations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for public airport donations? 102-37.520 Section 102-37.520 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.520 What is the authority for public airport donations? The authority for public airport donations is 49 U.S.C. 47151. 49 U...

  3. 78 FR 64048 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Bob Hope Airport, Burbank, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Hope Airport, Burbank, California AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...-Pasadena Airport Authority, for Bob Hope Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et. seq (Aviation... announces that the FAA finds that the noise exposure maps submitted for Bob Hope Airport are in compliance...

  4. Toxicity and chemical analyses of airport runoff waters in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, Zaneta; Wolska, Lidia; Cieszynska, Monika; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological effects of various compounds in complex airport effluents using a chemical and ecotoxicological integrated strategy. The present work deals with the determination of sum of PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, cations, anions, phenols, anionic, cationic, non-ionic detergents, formaldehyde and metals--as well as TOC and conductivity--in runoff water samples collected from 2009 to 2011 at several locations on two Polish international airports. Two microbiotests (Vibrio fischeri bacteria and the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus) have been used to determine the ecotoxicity of airport runoff waters. The levels of many compounds exceeded several or even several tens of times the maximum permissible levels. Analysis of the obtained data shows that samples that displayed maximum toxicity towards the bioindicators Vibrio fischeri were not toxic towards Thamnocephalus platyurus. Levels of toxicity towards T. platyurus are strongly correlated with pollutants that originate from the technological operations related to the maintenance of airport infrastructure. The integrated (chemical-ecotoxicological) approach to environmental contamination assessment in and around airports yields extensive information on the quality of the environment. These methodologies can be then used as tools for tracking the environmental fate of these compounds and for assessing the environmental effect of airports. Subsequently, these data will provide a basis for airport infrastructure management.

  5. Convenient Airports: Point of View of the Passengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Adival Aparecido, Jr.; Alves, Claudio Jorge Pinto

    2003-01-01

    The competition among airlines or among airports aiming at to increase the demand for its services has been more and more incited. Knowledge the perception of the users for the offered services means to meet the customer's needs and expectations in order either to keep the customer, and therefore keep a significant advantage over competitors. The passenger of the air transportation wants rapidity, security and convenience. Convenience can be translated by comfort that the passenger wants for the price that he can pay. In this paper had been identified. as a result of a survey achieved in six Brazilian airports during 2002, the best indicators in the passenger's perception. These indicators among any others were listed m the handbook of Airports Council International (ACI). Distinctive perceptions were observed among passengers with different travel motivations. This survey had been carried through in the airports of Brasilia, Porto Alegre, Salvador. Fortaleza, Curitiba and Bel6m. Considering this survey we can identified the most attractive airport among them. This work is a way to help improve quality of service, in particular, m these six airports of the Brazilian network. The results should be published and made available to all the parties concerned (airport authority, airlines and service providers) and should lead to corrective action when the passenger is not satisfied with the service.

  6. CRITERIA OF THE AVIATION NOISE ASSESSMENT FOR AERODROME ENVIRONS ZONING OF THE AIRPORTS AND PROTECTIVE MEASURES JUSTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Kartyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems in the sphere of an adverse ecological effect assessment of aerodrome environs aviation noise are analyzed. It is noted, that there is no modern standard and methodical base for such assessment. It is shown that when planning the build- ing, and also when developing noise-protective actions for residential areas in the zones of aviation noise increased level im- pact it’s most effectively to carry out acoustic zoning of areas near airports borders and flight routes. The system of transport sources noise rationing in Russia doesn't consider the established practice of its application. The aircraft of noisy types were actively taken out of service and aviation noise impact near the airports decreased, but the problem of noise protection, de- mands control when planning land use. Noise measurements in residential areas, near houses and inside, showed the excess of maximum allowed level values to 25-35 dBA (on equivalent value and to 25-40 dBA (on the maximum value.As a consequence of the European states policy in the sphere of aviation noise management and of aerodrome en- virons zoning noise levels at the airports of Europe and their surroundings were stabilized and the sizes of noise contours were reduced. For different countries there was made the analysis of legislative bases of the implementation of the re-striction requirement for residential areas and the possibility of using the territory under noise impact. For rationing theaerodrome environs noise of the airports it’s offered to take a sound equivalent level in which admissible values are ranged on three zones for the main standard criterion. The authors present acoustic measurements results in houses near the airport Vnukovo on condition of using standard two-chamber trimmable and folding windows with the ventilating valve. It is shown that the popular window designs can't provide inside noise reduction at night to the standard L Amax level = 45 dBA from the aviation source

  7. Metabarcoding avian diets at airports: implications for birdstrike hazard management planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Megan L; White, Nicole E; Murray, Dáithí C; Houston, Jayne; Rutherford, William; Bellgard, Matthew I; Haile, James; Bunce, Michael

    2013-12-11

    Wildlife collisions with aircraft cost the airline industry billions of dollars per annum and represent a public safety risk. Clearly, adapting aerodrome habitats to become less attractive to hazardous wildlife will reduce the incidence of collisions. Formulating effective habitat management strategies relies on accurate species identification of high-risk species. This can be successfully achieved for all strikes either through morphology and/or DNA-based identifications. Beyond species identification, dietary analysis of birdstrike gut contents can provide valuable intelligence for airport hazard management practices in regards to what food is attracting which species to aerodromes. Here, we present birdstrike identification and dietary data from Perth Airport, Western Australia, an aerodrome that saw approximately 140,000 aircraft movements in 2012. Next-generation high throughput DNA sequencing was employed to investigate 77 carcasses from 16 bird species collected over a 12-month period. Five DNA markers, which broadly characterize vertebrates, invertebrates and plants, were used to target three animal mitochondrial genes (12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, and COI) and a plastid gene (trnL) from DNA extracted from birdstrike carcass gastrointestinal tracts. Over 151,000 DNA sequences were generated, filtered and analyzed by a fusion-tag amplicon sequencing approach. Across the 77 carcasses, the most commonly identified vertebrate was Mus musculus (house mouse). Acrididae (grasshoppers) was the most common invertebrate family identified, and Poaceae (grasses) the most commonly identified plant family. The DNA-based dietary data has the potential to provide some key insights into feeding ecologies within and around the aerodrome. The data generated here, together with the methodological approach, will greatly assist in the development of hazard management plans and, in combination with existing observational studies, provide an improved way to monitor the effectiveness of

  8. An integrated approach to the probabilistic assessments of aircraft strikes and structural mode of damages to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbout, P.; Brais, A.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities of an aircraft striking a Canadian nuclear power plant in the vicinity of an airport and of inducing structural failure modes have been evaluated. This evaluation, together with other studies, may enhance decisions in the development of general criteria for the siting of reactors near airports. The study made use, for assessment, of the probabilistic approach and made judicious applications of the finite Canadian, French, German, American and English resources that were available. The tools, techniques and methods used for achieving the above, form what may be called an integrated approach. This method of approach requires that the study be made in six consecutive steps as follows: the qualitative evaluation of having an aircraft strike on a site situated near an airport with the use of the logic model technique; the statistical data gathering on aircraft movements and accidents; evaluating the probability distribution and calculating the basic event probabilities; evaluating the probability of an aircraft strike and the application of the sensitivity approach; generating the probability density distribution versus strike impact energy, that is, the evaluation of the energy envelope; and the probabilistic evaluation of structural failure mode inducements

  9. Factors influencing passengers’ choice of transport mode to Warsaw Chopin Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górecka Aleksandra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Airport accessibility is an important factor for airport choice and therefore also for airport competition. When air passengers choose an itinerary, they reflect on the transport chain from door to door. Therefore, factors affecting the traveller’s decision for a particular option go beyond the price and quality of air services from airport to airport. The decision for or against a particular air service and a particular airport is to a certain extent dependent on the accessibility of the airport.

  10. Reduction of Uncertainty Propagation in the Airport Operations Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Sanz, A.; Gomez Comendador, F.; Arnaldo Valdes, R.

    2016-07-01

    Airport operations are a complex system involving multiple elements (ground access, landside, airside and airspace), stakeholders (ANS providers, airlines, airport managers, policy makers and ground handling companies) and interrelated processes. To ensure appropriate and safe operation it is necessary to understand these complex relationships and how the effects of potential incidents, failures and delays (due to unexpected events or capacity constraints) may propagate throughout the different stages of the system. An incident may easily ripple through the network and affect the operation of the airport as a whole, making the entire system vulnerable. A holistic view of the processes that also takes all of the parties (and the connections between them) into account would significantly reduce the risks associated with airport operations, while at the same time improving efficiency. Therefore, this paper proposes a framework to integrate all relevant stakeholders and reduce uncertainty in delay propagation, thereby lowering the cause-effect chain probability of the airport system (which is crucial for the operation and development of air transport). Firstly, we developed a model (map) to identify the functional relationships and interdependencies between the different stakeholders and processes that make up the airport operations network. This will act as a conceptual framework. Secondly, we reviewed and characterised the main causes of delay. Finally, we extended the system map to create a probabilistic graphical model, using a Bayesian Network approach and influence diagrams, in order to predict the propagation of unexpected delays across the airport operations network. This will enable us to learn how potential incidents may spread throughout the network creating unreliable, uncertain system states. Policy makers, regulators and airport managers may use this conceptual framework (and the associated indicators) to understand how delays propagate across the airport

  11. A Generic Approach to Analyze the Impact of a Future Aircraft Design on the Boarding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Yildiz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The turnaround process constitutes an important part of the air transportation system. Airports often represent bottlenecks in air traffic management (ATM, thus operations related to the preparation of the aircraft for the next flight leg have to be executed smoothly and in a timely manner. The ATM significantly depends on a reliable turnaround process. Future paradigm changes with respect to airplane energy sources, aircraft design or propulsion concepts will also influence the airport layout. As a consequence, operational processes associated with the turnaround will be affected. Airlines aim for efficient and timely turnaround operations that are correlated with higher profits. This case study discusses an approach to investigate a new aircraft design with respect to the implications on the turnaround. The boarding process, as part of the turnaround, serves as an example to evaluate the consequences of new design concepts. This study is part of an interdisciplinary research to investigate future energy, propulsion and designs concepts and their implications on the whole ATM system. Due to these new concepts, several processes of the turnaround will be affected. For example, new energy storage concepts will influence the fueling process on the aircraft itself or might lead to a new infrastructure at the airport. This paper aims to evaluate the applied methodology in the case of a new boarding process, due to a new aircraft design, by means of a generic example. An agent-based boarding simulation is applied to assess passenger behavior during boarding, particularly with regard to cabin layout and seat configuration. The results of the generic boarding simulation are integrated into a simplified, deterministic and generic simulation of the turnaround process. This was done to assess the proposed framework for future investigations which on the one hand address the ATM system holistically and on the other, incorporate additional or adapted

  12. Take control of your 802.11n airport network

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Make your 802.11n-based AirPort network fast, reliable, and secure! Find real-world advice from Wi-Fi wizard Glenn Fleishman on setting up the 802.11n models of Apple's AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, and Time Capsule, with full information about the simultaneous dual-band models introduced in early 2009. You'll get help with all the special networking details, such as how to set the best band and channel for your network, use pre-802.11n base stations and clients without hurting performance, set up complex Int

  13. Technology and politics: The regional airport experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Gerhardt, J. M.; Dominus, M. I.

    1976-01-01

    The findings of a comparative study of the following six regional airports were presented: Dallas/Fort Worth, Kansas City, Washington, D.C., Montreal, Tampa, and St. Louis. Each case was approached as a unique historical entity, in order to investigate common elements such as: the use of predictive models in planning, the role of symbolism to heighten dramatic effects, the roles of community and professional elites, and design flexibility. Some of the factors considered were: site selection, consolidation of airline service, accessibility, land availability and cost, safety, nuisance, and pollution constraints, economic growth, expectation of regional growth, the demand forecasting conundrum, and design decisions. The hypotheses developed include the following: the effect of political, social, and economic conflicts, the stress on large capacity and dramatic, high-technology design, projections of rapid growth to explain the need for large capital outlays.

  14. PROBABILISTIC MODEL FOR AIRPORT RUNWAY SAFETY AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav SZABO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Laboratory of Aviation Safety and Security at CTU in Prague has recently started a project aimed at runway protection zones. The probability of exceeding by a certain distance from the runway in common incident/accident scenarios (take-off/landing overrun/veer-off, landing undershoot is being identified relative to the runway for any airport. As a result, the size and position of safety areas around runways are defined for the chosen probability. The basis for probability calculation is a probabilistic model using statistics from more than 1400 real-world cases where jet airplanes have been involved over the last few decades. Other scientific studies have contributed to understanding the issue and supported the model’s application to different conditions.

  15. Aircraft operations management manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Three Major Transfer Airports in Northeast Asia Focusing on Incheon International Airport Using a Conjoint Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Won Chung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due mainly to the privatization and commercialization of airline companies and deregulation of the aviation rules, the demand for air transport has continuously been increasing. Airport authorities state that transfer passengers, who contribute to the large portion of the airports’ profits, are gaining much more importance, particularly in the Northeast Asia region where the air transport industry is very vital. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the competitiveness of IIA (Incheon International Airport with other major airports located in Northeast Asia in passenger transfers made between Southeast Asia and China to North America using Conjoint Analysis. Results have indicated that airport brand is the most important attribute for the competitiveness of airport, followed by cost, connectivity and duty free shops. In further analysis focusing on brand value of the three airports measured by the use of transfer passengers, it was revealed that IIA needs more effort in developing their brand identity to become the leading transfer hub airport. Based on the results, recommendations for increasing the brand value have also been suggested.

  17. Mobile Apps: Improve Airports ́ Brand Image and Differentiate Among Competitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro Florido-Benítez

    2016-01-01

    The image airports project via their applications (apps) affects -- directly or indirectly--passengers’ satisfaction. Today, airports are competing among each other to attract more airlines and passengers to improve commercial revenues. Airport apps (as mobile marketing tools) are offering a wide range of opportunities to both passengers and airports. Apps are the best solution if airports want to improve the passenger experience as well as differentiate themselves from their competitors. The...

  18. The Aircraft Electric Taxi System: A Qualitative Multi Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Frank

    The problem this research addresses is the airline industry, and the seemingly unwillingness attitude towards adopting ways to taxi aircraft without utilizing thrust from the main engines. The purpose of the study was to get a better understanding of the decision-making process of airline executives, in respect to investing in cost saving technology. A qualitative research method is used from personal interviews with 24 airline executives from two major U.S. airlines, related industry journal articles, and aircraft performance data. The following three research questions are addressed. RQ1. Does the cost of jet fuel influence airline executives' decision of adopting the aircraft electric taxi system technology? RQ2 Does the measurable payback period for a return on investment influence airline executives' decision of adopting ETS technology? RQ3. Does the amount of government assistance influence airline executives' decision of adopting ETS technology? A multi case research study design is used with a triangulation technique. The participant perceptions indicate the need to reduce operating costs, they have concerns about investment risk, and they are in favor of future government sponsored performance improvement projects. Based on the framework, findings and implications of this study, a future research paper could focus on the positive environmental effects of the ETS application. A study could be conducted on current airport area air quality and the effects that aircraft main engine thrust taxiing has on the surrounding air quality.

  19. Modeling the impact of improved aircraft operations technologies on the environment and airline behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ryan Patrick

    The overall goal of this thesis is to determine if improved operations technologies are economically viable for US airlines, and to determine the level of environmental benefits available from such technologies. Though these operational changes are being implemented primarily with the reduction of delay and improvement of throughput in mind, economic factors will drive the rate of airline adoption. In addition, the increased awareness of environmental impacts makes these effects an important aspect of decision-making. Understanding this relationship may help policymakers make decisions regarding implementation of these advanced technologies at airports, and help airlines determine appropriate levels of support to provide for these new technologies. In order to do so, the author models the behavior of a large, profit-seeking airline in response to the introduction of advanced equipage allowing improved operations procedures. The airline response included changes in deployed fleet, assignment of aircraft to routes, and acquisition of new aircraft. From these responses, changes in total fleet-level CO2 emissions and airline profit were tallied. As awareness of the environmental impact of aircraft emissions has grown, several agencies (ICAO, NASA) have moved to place goals for emissions reduction. NASA, in particular, has set goals for emissions reduction through several areas of aircraft technology. Among these are "Operational Improvements," technologies available in the short-term through avionics and airport system upgrades. The studies in this thesis make use of the Fleet-Level Environmental Evaluation Tool (FLEET), a simulation tool developed by Purdue University in support of a NASA-sponsored research effort. This tool models the behavior of a large, profit-seeking airline through an allocation problem. The problem is contained within a systems dynamics type approach that allows feedback between passenger demand, ticket price, and the airline fleet composition

  20. Aircraft de-icer: Recycling can cut carbon emissions in half

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    Flight-safety regulations in most countries require aircraft to be ice-free upon takeoff. In icy weather, this means that the aircraft usually must be de-iced (existing ice is removed) and sometimes anti-iced (to protect against ice-reformation). For both processes, aircraft typically are sprayed with an ‘antifreeze’ solution, consisting mainly of glycol diluted with water. This de/anti-icing creates an impact on the environment, of which environmental regulators have grown increasingly conscious. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for example, recently introduced stricter rules that require airports above minimum size to collect de-icing effluents and send them to wastewater treatment. De-icer collection and treatment is already done at most major airports, but a few have gone one step further: rather than putting the effluent to wastewater, they recycle it. This study examines the carbon savings that can be achieved by recycling de-icer. There are two key findings. One, recycling, as opposed to not recycling, cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40–50% — and even more, in regions where electricity-generation is cleaner. Two, recycling petrochemical-based de-icer generates a 15–30% lower footprint than using ‘bio’ de-icer without recycling. - Highlights: ► Carbon footprint of aircraft de-icing can be measured. ► Recycling aircraft de-icer cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40–50%. ► Recycling ‘fossil’ de-icer is lower carbon than not recycling ‘bio’ de-icer.

  1. Aircraft Weather Mitigation for the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, H. Paul, III

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric effects on aviation are described by Mahapatra (1999) as including (1) atmospheric phenomena involving air motion - wind shear and turbulence; (2) hydrometeorological phenomena - rain, snow and hail; (3) aircraft icing; (4) low visibility; and (5) atmospheric electrical phenomena. Aircraft Weather Mitigation includes aircraft systems (e.g. airframe, propulsion, avionics, controls) that can be enacted (by a pilot, automation or hybrid systems) to suppress and/or prepare for the effects of encountered or unavoidable weather or to facilitate a crew operational decision-making process relative to weather. Aircraft weather mitigation can be thought of as a continuum (Figure 1) with the need to avoid all adverse weather at one extreme and the ability to safely operate in all weather conditions at the other extreme. Realistic aircraft capabilities fall somewhere between these two extremes. The capabilities of small general aviation aircraft would be expected to fall closer to the "Avoid All Adverse Weather" point, and the capabilities of large commercial jet transports would fall closer to the "Operate in All Weather Conditions" point. The ability to safely operate in adverse weather conditions is dependent upon the pilot s capabilities (training, total experience and recent experience), the airspace in which the operation is taking place (terrain, navigational aids, traffic separation), the capabilities of the airport (approach guidance, runway and taxiway lighting, availability of air traffic control), as well as the capabilities of the airplane. The level of mitigation may vary depending upon the type of adverse weather. For example, a small general aviation airplane may be equipped to operate "in the clouds" without outside visual references, but not be equipped to prevent airframe ice that could be accreted in those clouds.

  2. 14 CFR 152.111 - Application requirements: Airport development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sketch or sketches of the airport layout indicating the location for each item of work proposed, using... Department of Housing and Urban Development as an area of special flood hazard as defined in the Flood...

  3. Aviation and Airports, Transportation & Public Facilities, State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities header image Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities / Aviation and Airports Search DOT&PF State of pages view official DOT&PF Flickr pages Department of Transportation & Public Facilities PO Box

  4. Microscopic Analysis and Modeling of Airport Surface Sequencing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The complexity and interdependence of operations on the airport surface motivate the need for a comprehensive and detailed, yet flexible and validated analysis and...

  5. The economic impact of South Africa’s international airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructure is strongly linked to economic growth and plays a major role in providing greater mobility and choice, leading to an improvement in incomes and welfare. Transport infrastructure such as highways, bridges, ports, airports and railways is critical in achieving economic growth. If the supply of these facilities does not keep up with rising demand, the cost of moving goods will increase, and there will be a downward pressure on profits and growth. Airports play a critical role in generating employment within an economy, creating wealth, contributing to the tax base, stimulating tourism and contributing to world trade. While the latter two are less easily measured, it is possible to determine a base impact that an airport has on an economy by measuring the direct and indirect gross domestic product, employment and taxation impacts. This study quantifies these for the three main international airports in South Africa.

  6. The Correlations between Airport Sustainability and Indonesian Economic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, M. I.; Dhaniarti, I.; Utomo, W. M.; Sukoco, A.; Mudjanarko, S. W.; Hasyim, C.; Prasetijo, J.; Kurniasih, N.; Wajdi, M. B. N.; Purworusmiardi, T.; Suyono, J.; Sudapet, I. N.; Nasihien, R. D.; Wulandari, D. A. R.; Ade, R. T.; Atmaja, W. M. T.; Sugeng; Wulandari, A.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to analyze the correlation between airport performances with Gross domestic product-regional (GDP-regional) performance. This research uses quantitative research method with correlation study approach. Based on the T-Value Test Result, the T-value for the Airport Performance variable is 14,264. T-Value Test Results and compared with T-table equal to 1,976 (significant level 0,05) hence T-count> T-table so variable of Airport Perform predicted have significant correlation to GDP-regional. This means that good airport performance will either improve the performance of Water supply, Sewerage, Waste Management and Remediation Activities; Wholesale and Retail Trade; Repair of Motor Vehicles and Motorcycles; Accommodation and Food Service Activities; Financial and Insurance Activities; Business Activities; Public Administration and Defence; Compulsory Social Security; Education; Human Health and Social Work Activities; Other Services Activities; Manufacturing; and Electricity and Gas, better.

  7. Environmental Impacts of Airport Operations: Maintenance, and Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luther, Linda

    2007-01-01

    ... impacts associated with airport operations and expansion are likely to be debated. This issue is important to various stakeholders, particularly those whose health, property values, and quality of life may be affected by such impacts...

  8. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... expected to serve; (2) The name, location, telephone number, and emergency capability of each hospital and... installation, and government agency on the airport or in the communities it serves that agrees to provide...

  9. Predictor of Airport Runway Capacity (PARC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Estimates of arrival and departure capacities of individual airport runways are used to predict occurrences of demand-capacity imbalance, and to meter arrivals and...

  10. Hydrogen applications for Lambert-St. Louis International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Today, major airports are facing challenges related to pollution, energy efficiency, and safety and security. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, regarded as one of the key energy solutions of the 21st century are more energy efficient and reliable ...

  11. Airport Information Retrieval System (AIRS) System Support Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This handbook is a support manual for prototype air traffic flow control automation system developed for the FAA's Systems Command Center. The system is implemented on a time-sharing computer and is designed to provide airport traffic load prediction...

  12. The Joint Airport Weather Studies Project - Current analysis highlights in the aviation safety context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, J.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objective of the Joint Airport Weather Studies Project was to obtain high-resolution velocity, turbulence, and thermodynamic data on a convective outflow called a microburst, an intense downdraft and resulting horizontal outflow near the surface. Data collection occurred during the summer of 1982 near Denver, CO. Data sensors included three pulsed-microwave Doppler and two pulsed CO2 lidar radars, along with 27 Portable Automated Mesonet surface weather stations, the FAA's low-level-wind-shear alert system (LLWSAS), and five instrumented research aircraft. Convective storms occurred on 75 of 91 operational days, with Doppler data being collected on at least 70 microbursts. Analyses reported included a thorough examination of microburst-climatology statistics, the capability of the LLWSAS to detect adequately and accurately the presence of low-altitude wind shear danger to aircraft, the capability of a terminal Doppler radar system development to provide improved wind-shear detection and warning, and progress toward improved wind-shear training for pilots.

  13. European Blackbirds Exposed to Aircraft Noise Advance Their Chorus, Modify Their Song and Spend More Time Singing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sierro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Noise pollution has a strong impact on wildlife by disrupting vocal communication or inducing physiological stress. Songbirds are particularly reliant on vocal communication as they use song during territorial and sexual interactions. Birds living in noisy environments have been shown to change the acoustic and temporal parameters of their song presumably to maximize signal transmissibility. Also, research shows that birds advance their dawn chorus in urban environments to avoid the noisiest hours, but little is known on the consequences of these changes in the time they spent singing at dawn. Here we present a comprehensive view of the European blackbird singing behavior living next to a large airport in Madrid, using as a control a population living in a similar but silent forest. Blackbird song is composed of two parts: a series of loud low-frequency whistles (motif and a final flourish (twitter. We found that airport blackbirds were more likely to sing songs without the twitter part. Also, when songs included a twitter part, airport blackbirds used a smaller proportion of song for the twitter than control blackbirds. Interestingly, our results show no differences in song frequency between airport and control populations. However airport blackbirds not only sang earlier but also increased the time they spent singing when chorus and aircraft traffic overlapped on time. This effect disappeared as the season progressed and the chorus and the aircraft traffic schedule were separated on time. We propose that the typical urban upshift in frequency might not be useful under the noise conditions and landscape structure found near airports. We suggest that the modifications in singing behavior induced by aircraft noise may be adaptive and that they are specific to airport acoustic habitat. Moreover, we found that adjustment of singing activity in relation to noise is plastic and possibly optimized to cope with aircraft traffic activity. In a

  14. Collaborative airport passenger management with a virtual control room

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Florian; Grunewald, Erik; Schiele, Martin; Ayazkhani, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Key performance indicator-driven connection management at airports with public transportation services Integrated traffic management across a range of shareholders within a widespread network requires a definition of KPIs to assess intermodal performance. Their purpose is to monitor and analyze the technical performance of individual modules of a transportation network, e.g. an airport. Actions recommended to optimize operations and to maintain operation durin...

  15. Feasibility study of introducing smart technologies in Barcelona Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Guiu, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the project are to define and evaluate the diferent alternatives for implementing new Smart concepts and technologies in Barcelona Airport. The structure of the project activities will follow an initial approach (not exhaustive) consisting of: Context and background, justification of the project, assessment of Barcelona Airport baseline, identification of needs, technolgy Stae-of the art, definition of potential solutions and implementation scenarios, evaluation of altern...

  16. Dynamic Control of Airport Departures: Algorithm Development and Field Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Simaiakis, Ioannis; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2012-01-01

    Surface congestion leads to significant increases in taxi times and fuel burn at major airports. In this paper, we formulate the airport surface congestion management problem as a dynamic control problem. We address two main challenges: the random delay between actuation (at the gate) and the server being controlled (the runway), and the need to develop control strategies that can be implemented in practice by human air traffic controllers. The second requirement necessitates a strategy that ...

  17. Analysis of efficiency of the Brazilian international airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rodriguez Brochado

    2008-07-01

    Brazil. Analysis of correlations was used to select the 0 variable most representative of this system and after that, it was calculated efficiency of the system for classic and inverted the borders by means of model BCC guided for output. Finally, it was possible to identify which improvements are necessary for the inefficient airports, in way to identify which improvements are necessary to operational level to reach the efficiency. Key-words: Data Envelopment Analysis, Efficiency, Airports.

  18. ADMS-AIRPORT: MODEL INTER-COMPARISIONS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    OpenAIRE

    Carruthers, David; McHugh, Christine; Church, Stephanie; Jackson, Mark; Williams, Matt; Price, Catheryn; Lad, Chetan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The functionality of ADMS-Airport and details of its use in the Model Inter-comparison Study of the Project for the Sustainable Development of Heathrow Airport (PSDH) have previously been presented, Carruthers et al (2007). A distinguishing feature is the treatment of jet engine emissions as moving jet sources rather than averaging these emissions into volume sources as is the case in some other models. In this presentation two further studies are presented which each contribu...

  19. SOLAR AIRCRAFT DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    RAHMATI, Sadegh; GHASED, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Generally domain Aircraft uses conventional fuel. These fuel having limited life, high cost and pollutant. Also nowadays price of petrol and other fuels are going to be higher, because of scarcity of those fuels. So there is great demand of use of non-exhaustible unlimited source of energy like solar energy. Solar aircraft is one of the ways to utilize solar energy. Solar aircraft uses solar panel to collect the solar radiation for immediate use but it also store the remaining part ...

  20. The International Airport of Florianopolis and the productive agglomerate around

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Regina Garcia Lopes

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study looks forward to highlight the process of productive cooperation at the Hercílio Luz International Airport, as well as emphasizing the importance of airports in general as business centers. The choice of Hercílio Luz airport is due to the fact that this airport is considered a strategic segment in the integration process of the Brazilian and the American CONESUL productive centers. Focusing on the economic dimension, this study also addresses direct and indirect production relations. In order to identify and evaluate the productive structure available at the place, a case study including Infraero (the Brazilian government’s agency which controls the airports, the flight companies and the service companies was developed. To analyze the productive cooperation among them, the concept of cluster was employed as guiding theory. The results suggest that it is not possible to characterize the existence of a cluster at the Hercílio Luz International Airport, thought there is an indicative of its formation in the space.

  1. Occupational noise-induced hearing loss among workers at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anino, J O; Afullo, A; Otieno, F

    2010-02-01

    Occupational noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) occurs among workers exposed to excessive amounts of noise for long durations. The average level of noise in some locations at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) was above the safe limit of 85dB hence workers were thought to be at risk. To determine the occurrence and socio demographic attributes for NIHL at JKIA. Cross sectional descriptive study. Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, Nairobi, Kenya. Mean age of respondents was 37 years with range 22 to 62, SD 8.98. Mean duration of exposure to noise was 10.7 years with range 1 to 40, SD 8.15. Prevalence of NIHL was 15.3%, with ground crew at 14.8% and air crew 16.1%. Ground crew had significantly poorer mean hearing threshold level at 3, 4 and 6 kHz than air crew (p = 0.015). Male workers were affected more than female counterparts with a male to female ratio of 4:3. 97% of those affected were non-managers, 3% managers while 68% of those affected resided in Embakasi Division close to the airport. Hearing threshold level at 4 kHz deteriorated with increasing age whereby those aged 50 years and above had a 13.7 times higher relative risk than those aged 20 to 29 years. Duration of exposure more than 10 years also had significantly higher risk (p hearing loss at 4 kHz. Occupational noise induced hearing loss occurs atJKIA and that ground crew and older workers are more vulnerable. We recommend that prevention programmes be put in place.

  2. 78 FR 9770 - Notice of Intent to Rule on Request to Release Airport Property at the Woodbine Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... sale of property are to be used for the capital development of the airport. Fair Market Value (FMV.... The land was originally acquired by the Borough of Woodbine in 1947 from the Reconstruction Finance...

  3. Airport level of service: A model according to departing passengers’ perceptions at a small-sized airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Well Elias Gonçalves

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study proposes a conceptual model of level of service evaluation to a small-sized airport with a focus on departing passengers. Design/Methodology: The variables selected to compose the model were chosen according to their adequacy to departing passengers and the airport’s characteristics. A survey was conducted, and, posteriorly, exploratory factor analysis was used in order to verify the adequacy of the conceptual model proposed and also to improve it according to the results obtained. Findings: The results show that the level of service of the airport is composed of three dimensions: airport characteristics, passenger processing, and prices. The relative importance of the dimensions according to their contribution to the composition of the airport’s overall level of service was also determined. Originality/value: The paper combines theoretical and practical findings in a model for level of service evaluation to a small-sized airport from an air transportation management perspective.

  4. Environmental Assessment Use of Golden Triangle Regional Airport by 14th Flying Training Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    NOISE LEVEL COMMON INDOOR NOISE LEVELS (dBA) NOISE LEVELS - .- 110 Rock Band - 1- 100 Gas Lawn Mower at 3 ft . Inside Subway Train (New York...1- 90 Diesel Truck at 50 ft. Food Blender at 3 ft. Noise Urban Daytime - 1- 80 Garbage Disposal at 3 ft. Shouting at 3 ft. Gas Lawn Mower at 100ft

  5. Environmental Assessment T-1, T-6, and T-37 Aircraft Operations at Perry Municipal Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    110 Rock Band - 1- 100 Inside Subway Train (New York) Gas Lawn Mower at 3 ft. Diesel Truck at 50 ft. - 1- 90 Food Blender at 3 ft. Noisy Urban...Daytime - 1- 80 Garbage Disposal at 3 ft. Shouting at 3 ft. Gas Lawn Mower at 100ft. Vacuum Cleaner at 10ft. - 1- 70 Commercial Area Normal

  6. Classification of Wind Farm Turbulence and Its Effects on General Aviation Aircraft and Airports : Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this project was to estimate the potential impact of a new motor vehicle government mandate for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology on the demand for aftermarket devices, applications, and infrastructure that leverages the same dedicated...

  7. Classification of Wind Farm Turbulence and Its Effects on General Aviation Aircraft and Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) has researched and developed connected vehicle technology, which allows vehicles to communicate with each other, roadway infrastructure, traffic management centers, and travelers' ...

  8. Monetary valuation of aircraft noise; a hedonic analysis around Amsterdam airport Ecological Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.E.C.; van der Straaten, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    In densely-populated countries and in particular in large metropolitan areas, the presence of so much human activity causes all sorts of negative externalities, for example traffic noise disturbance. These externalities call for corrective measures by the government. Economists have developed a

  9. Aircraft-Based Satellite Navigation Augmentation to Enable Automated Landing and Movement on the Airport Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Qasem Turki

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables a paralyzed user to interact with an external device through brain signals. A BCI measures identifies patterns within these measured signals, translating such patterns into commands. The P300 is a pattern of a scalp potentials elicited by a luminance increment of an attended target rather than a non-target character of an alphanumeric matrix. The Row-Column Paradigm (RCP) can utilize responses to series of illuminations of matrix target and non-target characters to spell out alphanumeric strings of P300-eliciting target characters, yet this popular RCP speller faces three challenges. Theadjacent problem concerns the proximity of neighboring characters, the crowding problem concerns their number. Both adjacent and crowding problems concern how these factors impede BCI performance. The fatigue problem concerns how RCP use is tiring. This dissertation addressed these challenges for both desktop and mobile platforms. A new P300 speller interface, the Zigzag Paradigm (ZP), reduced the adjacent problem by increasing the distance between adjacent characters, as well as the crowding problem, by reducing the number neighboring characters. In desktop study, the classification accuracy was significantly improved 91% with the ZP VS 80.6% with the RCP. Since the ZP is not suitable for mobile P300 spellers with a small screen size, a new P300 speller interface was developed in this study, the Edges Paradigm (EP). The EP reduced the adjacent and crowding problems by adding flashing squares located upon the outer edges of the character matrix in the EP. The classification accuracy of the EP (i.e., 93.3%) was significantly higher than the RCP (i.e., 82.1%). We further compared three speller paradigms (i.e., RCP, ZP, and EP), and the result indicated that the EP produced the highest accuracy and caused less fatigue. Later, the EP is implemented in a simulator of a Samsung galaxy smart phone on the Microsoft Surface Pro 2. The mobile EP was compared with the RCP under the mobility situation when a user is moving on a wheelchair. The results showed that the EP significantly improved the online classification accuracy and user experience over the RCP.

  10. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  11. Automated Inspection of Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the development of a robotic system designed to assist aircraft inspectors by remotely deploying non-destructive inspection (NDI) sensors and acquiring, processing, and storing inspection data. Carnegie Mellon University studie...

  12. Aircraft Depainting Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kozol, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    ... of aircraft and component stripping at various levels of maintenance. Under this program, the Navy pursued development of non-HAP chemical paint strippers as alternatives for methylene chloride based strippers...

  13. The Aircraft Industry, 2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel, Keith

    2006-01-01

    .... and global economic growth. The overall outlook for the industry is positive. Orders for commercial aircraft are up from a boom in air travel that is likely to continue well into the next decade...

  14. The Aircraft Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fitzgerald, Tim; Baiche, Noureddine; Brewer, Mike; Collins, Al; Knapp, Kathy; Kott, Marilyn; McGill, Duncan; Mensah, Dunstan; Neighbors, Mark; Reardon, Dee

    2005-01-01

    .... As the airline companies prepare to buy new Boeing and Airbus passenger jets, they remain under intense pressure to cut costs in order to remain profitable, forcing aircraft and engine manufacturers...

  15. Essentials of aircraft armaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to provide a complete exposure about armaments from their design to launch from the combat aircraft. The book details modern ammunition and their tactical roles in warfare. The proposed book discusses aerodynamics, propulsion, structural as well as navigation, control, and guidance of aircraft armament. It also introduces the various types of ammunition developed by different countries and their changing trends. The book imparts knowledge in the field of design, and development of aircraft armaments to aerospace engineers and covers the role of the United Nations in peacekeeping and disarmament. The book will be very useful to researchers, students, and professionals working in design and manufacturing of aircraft armaments. The book will also serve air force and naval aspirants, and those interested in working on defence research and developments organizations. .

  16. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  17. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  18. Depreciation of aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  19. Multifuel rotary aircraft engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C.; Berkowitz, M.

    1980-01-01

    The broad objectives of this paper are the following: (1) to summarize the Curtiss-Wright design, development and field testing background in the area of rotary aircraft engines; (2) to briefly summarize past activity and update development work in the area of stratified charge rotary combustion engines; and (3) to discuss the development of a high-performance direct injected unthrottled stratified charge rotary combustion aircraft engine. Efficiency improvements through turbocharging are also discussed.

  20. 2002 Industry Studies: Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    aircraft to a defense electronics, systems integration and information technology company.39 Northrop Grumman no longer seeks a position as a prime...between the military and civil market . Though also upgrading the H-1 helicopter series for the USMC, Bell has mortgaged its future on tiltrotor technology ...business in export dollars, the industry has been forced to look for new markets as worldwide aircraft sales have dropped. Because the U.S. national

  1. Aircraft to aircraft intercomparison during SEMAPHORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Dominique; Durand, Pierre

    1998-10-01

    During the Structure des Echanges Mer-Atmosphère, Propriétés des Hétérogénéités Océaniques: Recherche Expérimentale (SEMAPHORE) experiment, performed in the Azores region in 1993, two French research aircraft were simultaneously used for in situ measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. We present the results obtained from one intercomparison flight between the two aircraft. The mean parameters generally agree well, although the temperature has to be slightly shifted in order to be in agreement for the two aircraft. A detailed comparison of the turbulence parameters revealed no bias. The agreement is good for variances and is satisfactory for fluxes and skewness. A thorough study of the errors involved in flux computation revealed that the greatest accuracy is obtained for latent heat flux. Errors in sensible heat flux are considerably greater, and the worst results are obtained for momentum flux. The latter parameter, however, is more accurate than expected from previous parameterizations.

  2. Object Tracking with LiDAR: Monitoring Taxiing and Landing Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Koppanyi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobile light detection and ranging (LiDAR sensors used in car navigation and robotics, such as the Velodyne’s VLP-16 and HDL-32E, allow for sensing the surroundings of the platform with high temporal resolution to detect obstacles, tracking objects and support path planning. This study investigates the feasibility of using LiDAR sensors for tracking taxiing or landing aircraft close to the ground to improve airport safety. A prototype system was developed and installed at an airfield to capture point clouds to monitor aircraft operations. One of the challenges of accurate object tracking using the Velodyne sensors is the relatively small vertical field of view (30°, 41.3° and angular resolution (1.33°, 2°, resulting in a small number of points of the tracked object. The point density decreases with the object–sensor distance, and is already sparse at a moderate range of 30–40 m. The paper introduces our model-based tracking algorithms, including volume minimization and cube trajectories, to address the optimal estimation of object motion and tracking based on sparse point clouds. Using a network of sensors, multiple tests were conducted at an airport to assess the performance of the demonstration system and the algorithms developed. The investigation was focused on monitoring small aircraft moving on runways and taxiways, and the results indicate less than 0.7 m/s and 17 cm velocity and positioning accuracy achieved, respectively. Overall, based on our findings, this technology is promising not only for aircraft monitoring but for airport applications.

  3. A Benchmarking of Operational Efficiency in Asia Pacific International Cargo Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-won Chung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares operational efficiency of major cargo airports in the Asia Pacific region. The multi-dimensional scaling cluster analysis by R-square method was used as the benchmarking tool to provide airport management with a means to examine various aspects of their operational efficiency against those of other airports. Ten operational efficiency factors for the clustering and efficiency estimation of airports in the Asia Pacific region were used in a regression model to overcome the complexity of multi-dimensional scaling approach. The resulting classification is used to identify the efficiency benchmarks of leading air cargo airports which have implications for Incheon airport in Korea.

  4. Designing Public Space for Mobility: Contestation, Negotiation and Experiment at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaeva, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates airport design, using the example of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, from the point of view of managers, architects and designers. It is argued that existing accounts of the airport as a space of transit as well as a place for shopping and entertainment have underrated the comp......The paper investigates airport design, using the example of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, from the point of view of managers, architects and designers. It is argued that existing accounts of the airport as a space of transit as well as a place for shopping and entertainment have underrated...

  5. 150 Passenger Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucovsky, Adrian; Romli, Fairuz I.; Rupp, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    It has been projected that the need for a short-range mid-sized, aircraft is increasing. The future strategy to decrease long-haul flights will increase the demand for short-haul flights. Since passengers prefer to meet their destinations quickly, airlines will increase the frequency of flights, which will reduce the passenger load on the aircraft. If a point-to-point flight is not possible, passengers will prefer only a one-stop short connecting flight to their final destination. A 150-passenger aircraft is an ideal vehicle for these situations. It is mid-sized aircraft and has a range of 3000 nautical miles. This type of aircraft would market U.S. domestic flights or inter-European flight routes. The objective of the design of the 150-passenger aircraft is to minimize fuel consumption. The configuration of the aircraft must be optimized. This aircraft must meet CO2 and NOx emissions standards with minimal acquisition price and operating costs. This report contains all the work that has been performed for the completion of the design of a 150 passenger commercial aircraft. The methodology used is the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) developed at Georgia Tech Aerospace Systems Design laboratory (ASDL). This is an eight-step conceptual design process to evaluate the probability of meeting the design constraints. This methodology also allows for the evaluation of new technologies to be implemented into the design. The TIES process begins with defining the problem with a need established and a market targeted. With the customer requirements set and the target values established, a baseline concept is created. Next, the design space is explored to determine the feasibility and viability of the baseline aircraft configuration. If the design is neither feasible nor viable, new technologies can be implemented to open up the feasible design space and allow for a plausible solution. After the new technologies are identified, they must be evaluated

  6. Review of Design Aspects and Challenges of Efficient and Quiet Amphibious Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Rhea P. Liem Ph.

    2018-04-01

    Apart from the commercial and military aviation sectors, the general aviation (GA) sector is expected to experience a rapid growth, especially in Asia. The increasing economic activities in the region would demand for more efficient and convenient transportation, which would open door to more GA services. This development would require sufficient infrastructure supports, including airports. However, insufficient land area has often imposed limitations in airport development. As such, some areas (e.g., remote islands) are not easily accessible by air. One implication is that travels can only be done via land or water, which might prolong the travel time. This applies to business travels, with the significant increase in business and economic activities, which in turns demands for more efficient and faster mobility. In other cases, this involves some rural areas where the infrastructures are not very well-developed, and where the geographical terrains are too challenging to build a pad for vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) air vehicles. Under such circumstances, it would be imperative to enable air travels to carry critical logistics such as medical supplies, food, and even sick patients. In this regard, we propose to develop a low-payload, low-altitude amphibious aircraft, which can takeoff and land on both water and land. Aircraft design process is a complex procedure and multidisciplinary in nature, and for amphibious aircraft design we need to consider the two takeoff and landing modes, which imposes further challenges to the design. In this paper we present two preliminary design projects, for two-seater and ten-seater aircraft. To design an efficient and quiet amphibious aircraft, we conduct some experiments on noise shielding mechanisms to reduce the propeller noise. The challenges and resulting designs are briefly discussed in this paper. Amphibious aircraft development will be very relevant to Indonesia, which is the world’s largest archipelago with

  7. [Occupational health studies on airport transport workers. I. Results of ergonomic time and motion studies (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenfranz, J; Löwenthal, I; Kylian, H; Klimmer, F; Flöring, R; Gärtner, K H; Brockmann, W

    1980-01-01

    Loading and unloading of aircrafts involves lifting, moving, and carrying of heavy cargo in unfavourable body positions and in narrow spaces. This transport work was subjected to an investigation in a big airport. Forty-three male transport workers and foremen were studied during 46 total shifts. The type of activity was recorded by using the standardized procedure, the so-called "Arbeitswissenschaftliches Erhebungsverfahren zur Tätigkeitsanalyse" (AET). For time and motion analysis, body positions were recorded by continuous observation during the total shift. For typical activities the energy expenditure was determined. The strain caused by transport work was estimated by recording the heart rate with a portable cardiocorder during the total shift. The results show that both dynamic and static work are involved in the loading and unloading of aircrafts. The heart rate varied characteristically according to the body position and to type of activity. The body position was mainly determined by the height of the bellies (from 0.61-1.97 m) of different aircrafts. An additional influence due to weight carrying could be observed only in body positions with low energy expenditure. Recommendations for changing the height of the bellies or to the appropriate selection of workers were made.

  8. Quantitative Inspection Technologies for Aging Military Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Bowler, J. R., Theodoulidis, T. and Polakis, N. 2012, IEEE Trans. Mag.- IEEE Xplore . 45. Xie, H., Ji, Y. and Bowler, J. R. Eddy Current Pancake Coil...March 2012, IEEE Trans. Mag, Vol. 48, pp. 1159-1170. 38. Impedance of a Horizontal Coil in a Borehole: A Model for Eddy-Current Borehole Probes...40. Waves and Fields in Inhomogeneous Media. Chew, W. C. New York: s.n., 1995, IEEE Press. 41. Thin-Skin Eddy-Current Interaction with Semi

  9. Z Specification of Gate and Apron Control Management at Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazir Ahmad Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of an air traffic control (ATC system is an open issue and has become a challenging problem due to its complexity and increase of traffic at airports and in airspace. Consequently, automated ATC systems are suggested to improve efficiency ensuring the safety standards. It is reported that the number of collisions that occurred at airports surface is three times larger than in airspace. Further, it is observed that gates and aprons congestions cause significant delays at airports; hence, effective monitoring and guidance mechanisms are required to control ground air traffic. In this paper, formal procedure of managing air traffic from gate to enter in the active area of airport for taxiing is provided using Z notation. An integration of gate and apron controllers is described to manipulate the information for correct decision making and flow management. Graph theory is used for representation of airport topology and appropriate routs. In static part of the model, safety properties are described in terms of invariants over the critical data types. In dynamic model, the state space is updated by defining pre- and postconditions ensuring the safety. Formal specification is analysed using Z/Eves tool.

  10. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7)

  12. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Ashley

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7)

  13. Sources of sub-micrometre particles near a major international airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Masiol

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The international airport of Heathrow is a major source of nitrogen oxides, but its contribution to the levels of sub-micrometre particles is unknown and is the objective of this study. Two sampling campaigns were carried out during warm and cold seasons at a site close to the airfield (1.2 km. Size spectra were largely dominated by ultrafine particles: nucleation particles ( < 30 nm were found to be  ∼ 10 times higher than those commonly measured in urban background environments of London. Five clusters and six factors were identified by applying k means cluster analysis and positive matrix factorisation (PMF, respectively, to particle number size distributions; their interpretation was based on their modal structures, wind directionality, diurnal patterns, road and airport traffic volumes, and on the relationship with weather and other air pollutants. Airport emissions, fresh and aged road traffic, urban accumulation mode, and two secondary sources were then identified and apportioned. The fingerprint of Heathrow has a characteristic modal structure peaking at  < 20 nm and accounts for 30–35 % of total particles in both the seasons. Other main contributors are fresh (24–36 % and aged (16–21 % road traffic emissions and urban accumulation from London (around 10 %. Secondary sources accounted for less than 6 % in number concentrations but for more than 50 % in volume concentration. The analysis of a strong regional nucleation event showed that both the cluster categorisation and PMF contributions were affected during the first 6 h of the event. In 2016, the UK government provisionally approved the construction of a third runway; therefore the direct and indirect impact of Heathrow on local air quality is expected to increase unless mitigation strategies are applied successfully.

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of aircraft ground deicing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft ground deicing plays an important role of guaranteeing the aircraft safety. In practice, most airports generally use as many deicing fluids as possible to remove the ice, which causes the waste of the deicing fluids and the pollution of the environment. Therefore, the model of aircraft ground deicing should be built to establish the foundation for the subsequent research, such as the optimization of the deicing fluid consumption. In this article, the heat balance of the deicing process is depicted, and the dynamic model of the deicing process is provided based on the analysis of the deicing mechanism. In the dynamic model, the surface temperature of the deicing fluids and the ice thickness are regarded as the state parameters, while the fluid flow rate, the initial temperature, and the injection time of the deicing fluids are treated as control parameters. Ignoring the heat exchange between the deicing fluids and the environment, the simplified model is obtained. The rationality of the simplified model is verified by the numerical simulation and the impacts of the flow rate, the initial temperature and the injection time on the deicing process are investigated. To verify the model, the semi-physical experiment system is established, consisting of the low-constant temperature test chamber, the ice simulation system, the deicing fluid heating and spraying system, the simulated wing, the test sensors, and the computer measure and control system. The actual test data verify the validity of the dynamic model and the accuracy of the simulation analysis.

  15. Making Aircraft Vortices Visible to Radar by Spraying Water into the Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft trailing vortices pose a danger to following aircraft during take-off and landing. This necessitates spacing rules, based on aircraft type, to be enforced during approach in IFR (Instrument Flight Regulations) conditions; this can limit airport capacity. To help choose aircraft spacing based on the actual location and strength of the wake, it is proposed that wake vortices can be detected using conventional precipitation and cloud radars. This is enabled by spraying a small quantity water into the wake from near the wing. The vortex strength is revealed by the doppler velocity of the droplets. In the present work, droplet size distributions produced by nozzles used for aerial spraying are considered. Droplet trajectory and evaporation in the flow-field is numerically calculated for a heavy aircraft, followed by an evaluation of radar reflectivity at 6 nautical miles behind the aircraft. Small droplets evaporate away while larger droplets fall out of the wake. In the humid conditions that typically prevail during IFR, a sufficient number of droplets remain in the wake and give good signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). For conditions of average humidity, higher frequency radars combined with spectral processing gives good SNR.

  16. Land Acquisition and Relocation Assistance for Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Assisted Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    This advisory circular (AC) provides guidance to sponsors of airport projects developed under the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) to meet the requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (Pl 9...

  17. 76 FR 70468 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Airport Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... (SIDA); (4) submission to TSA of identifying information about individuals to whom the airport operator... information on individuals with unescorted access to a SIDA. Airport operators must ensure that individuals...

  18. A Study on Relative Importance and Priority Regarding Airport Selection Attributes Utilizing AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Oun Oh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate relative importance and priority regarding airport selection attributes using Incheon International Airport and Gimpo International Airport, the two main gateway airports to Seoul, Korea, as the target. For the purpose, a survey was carried out with aviation experts as target utilizing five factors which consist of 15 airport selection attributes. The analysis has been conducted on the relative importance and priority of the airport selection factors by expert group using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. As a result of the analysis, the relative importance of airport selection attributes turned out to be different depending on the expert group. Aviation experts working in government agencies and aviation experts working in educational institutions and research institutes regarded accessibility as the most important airport selection factor, and aviation experts working for airlines and companies related to air travel regarded operation as the most important selection factor.

  19. 75 FR 57373 - Amendment to Class D Airspace; Miami Opa Locka Airport, FL, and Hollywood, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...This action amends Class D airspace at Opa Locka Airport, Miami, FL; and Hollywood, FL, by correcting the geographic coordinates of the airport to aid in the navigation of our National Airspace System.

  20. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a standoff sensor that can measure 3D components of wind velocity in the vicinity of an airport has the potential to improve airport throughput,...