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Sample records for aggressive skull base

  1. Recurrence of Skull Base Meningiomas: The Role of Aggressive Removal in Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Peixoto de Freitas, Paulo Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The recurrence of meningiomas is a crucial aspect that must be considered during the planning of treatment strategy. The Simpson grade classification is the most relevant surgical aspect to predict the recurrence of meningiomas. We report on a series of patients with recurrent skull base meningiomas who were treated with the goal of radical removal. Design A retrospective study. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with recurrent skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures The goal of obtaining aggressive resection (i.e., Simpson grades I and II). Results The average age was 54 years, the mean follow-up period was 52.1 months, and Simpson grades I and II were obtained in 82%. The overall mortality was 5.8%. Transient cranial nerve deficits occurred in 11.7%; the definitive morbidity was also 5.8%. A second recurrence occurred in 5.8%. Conclusions Radical removal of recurrent skull base meningiomas is achievable and should be considered an option with a good outcome and an acceptable morbidity. The common surgical finding that was responsible for recurrence in this study was incomplete removal during the first surgery. We recommend extensive dura and bone removal in the surgical treatment of such recurrent lesions. PMID:27175316

  2. Skull Base Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  3. Skull base bone hyperpneumatization

    OpenAIRE

    Houet, E J; Kouokam, L.M.; Nchimi, A L

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a long standing history of compulsive Valsalva maneuvers, complaining of episodes of vertigo underwent head computed tomography. Axial CT slices at the level of the skull base (Fig. A) and the first cervical vertebrae (Fig. B) shows an extensive unusual pneumatization of both the body and lateral processes of the first cervical vertebrae (arrows), with air pouches dissecting planes between bone cortex and the periosteum around the occipital bone and the lateral process...

  4. THIRTY YEARS IN SKULL BASE SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Deliang; LIU; Liangfa

    2012-01-01

    <正>The skull base generally refers to the anterior, middle and posterior cranial fossa and structures on the outside side of these skull areas. The cranial roof and skull base are separated by a line connecting the external occipital protuberance, parietal notch and supraorbital ridge[1].The skull base supports the brain above, is connected to

  5. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol

  6. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benecke, J.E. Jr. (Otologic Medical Group, Inc., Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol.

  7. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, J E

    1989-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol. PMID:2601534

  8. CT skull base & calvarium normal variant pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, P

    2013-01-01

    Intended learning outcomes - To recognise the varied neurological appearances of skull based normal variants with the brain. Highlighting the importance of differentiation of normal and variant anatomy from the pitfalls of misdiagnosing a pathological condition Content of Presentation -Pictorial review of 12 common examples of neuroradiological normal variant conditions of skull base and calvarium anatomical areas of the brain, including sutures, asymmetry of bones, benign growths, thicken...

  9. Skull base development and craniosynostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaser, Susan I. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Padfield, Nancy [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada); Chitayat, David [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada); Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Toronto (Canada); Forrest, Christopher R. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Centre for Craniofacial Care and Research, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Abnormal skull shape resulting in craniofacial deformity is a relatively common clinical finding, with deformity either positional (positional plagiocephaly) or related to premature ossification and fusion of the skull sutures (craniosynostosis). Growth restriction occurring at a stenosed suture is associated with exaggerated growth at the open sutures, resulting in fairly predictable craniofacial phenotypes in single-suture non-syndromic pathologies. Multi-suture syndromic subtypes are not so easy to understand without imaging. Imaging is performed to define the site and extent of craniosynostosis, to determine the presence or absence of underlying brain anomalies, and to evaluate both pre- and postoperative complications of craniosynostosis. Evidence for intracranial hypertension may be seen both pre- and postoperatively, associated with jugular foraminal stenosis, sinovenous occlusion, hydrocephalus and Chiari 1 malformations. Following clinical assessment, imaging evaluation may include radiographs, high-frequency US of the involved sutures, low-dose (20-30 mAs) CT with three-dimensional reformatted images, MRI and nuclear medicine brain imaging. Anomalous or vigorous collateral venous drainage may be mapped preoperatively with CT or MR venography or catheter angiography. (orig.)

  10. Skull base development and craniosynostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnormal skull shape resulting in craniofacial deformity is a relatively common clinical finding, with deformity either positional (positional plagiocephaly) or related to premature ossification and fusion of the skull sutures (craniosynostosis). Growth restriction occurring at a stenosed suture is associated with exaggerated growth at the open sutures, resulting in fairly predictable craniofacial phenotypes in single-suture non-syndromic pathologies. Multi-suture syndromic subtypes are not so easy to understand without imaging. Imaging is performed to define the site and extent of craniosynostosis, to determine the presence or absence of underlying brain anomalies, and to evaluate both pre- and postoperative complications of craniosynostosis. Evidence for intracranial hypertension may be seen both pre- and postoperatively, associated with jugular foraminal stenosis, sinovenous occlusion, hydrocephalus and Chiari 1 malformations. Following clinical assessment, imaging evaluation may include radiographs, high-frequency US of the involved sutures, low-dose (20-30 mAs) CT with three-dimensional reformatted images, MRI and nuclear medicine brain imaging. Anomalous or vigorous collateral venous drainage may be mapped preoperatively with CT or MR venography or catheter angiography. (orig.)

  11. Skull base tumors; Tumoren der Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Naumann, N.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Nabhan, A.; Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgische Klinik des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Modern imaging techniques have great importance in the diagnosis and therapy of skull-base pathologies. Many of these lesions, especially in relation to their specific location, can be evaluated using CT and MR imaging. Tumors commonly found in the anterior skull base include carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, esthesioneuroblastoma and meningioma. In the central cranial fossa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, metastases, meningioma, pituitary adenoma and neurinoma have to be considered. The most common neoplasms of the posterior skull base, including the CP angle, are neurinoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chordoma and paraganglioma. One major task of imaging is the evaluation of the exact tumor extent as well as its relationship to the neighboring neurovascular structures. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate the most important anatomical landmarks of the skull base. The typical imaging findings of the most common tumors involving the skull base are also presented. (orig.) [German] Die moderne Bildgebung hat einen besonderen Stellenwert bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Schaedelbasispathologien. Zahlreiche Laesionen koennen anhand ihrer CT- und MRT-Befunde, insbesondere unter Beruecksichtigung ihrer genauen Lokalisation, artdiagnostisch eingeordnet werden. Im Bereich der vorderen Schaedelbasis sind v. a. Karzinome, Rhabdomyosarkome, Aesthesioneuroblastome und Meningeome vorzufinden. Im Bereich der mittleren Schaedelbasis ist in erster Linie an nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Meningeome, Hypophysenadenome und Neurinome zu denken. Zu den haeufigsten Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube, unter Einschluss des Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkels, gehoeren Neurinome, Meningeome, nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Chordome und Paragangliome. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der Schnittbildgebung liegt in der Bestimmung der exakten Tumorausdehnung und in der Beurteilung der Lagebeziehung des Tumors zu den komplexen anatomischen Strukturen wie Hirnnerven und

  12. Sinonasal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma with Skull Base Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Dare, Amos O.; Datta, Rajiv V.; Thom R. Loree; Hicks, Wesley L.; Grand, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a rare tumor of the skull base. As the incidence of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma has increased, atypical presentations involving the skull or cranial base exclusively have been reported. In immunocompetent patients with no previous history or predisposing factors, the diagnosis of primary NHL of the skull base may be delayed. We present four cases of nasal and paranasal sinus NHL with both skull base and intracranial involvement in immunocompet...

  13. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisar, A.; Silver, C.; Kalnicki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing.

  14. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing

  15. Carbon ion radiotherapy of skull base chondrosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of carbon ion radiotherapy in chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Patients and Methods: Between November 1998 and September 2005, 54 patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ion radiation therapy (RT) using the raster scan technique at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. All patients had gross residual tumors after surgery. Median total dose was 60 CGE (weekly fractionation 7 x 3.0 CGE). All patients were followed prospectively in regular intervals after treatment. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE v.3.0) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 3-84 months). Only 2 patients developed local recurrences. The actuarial local control rates were 96.2% and 89.8% at 3 and 4 years; overall survival was 98.2%at 5 years. Only 1 patient developed a mucositis CTCAE Grade 3; the remaining patients did not develop any acute toxicities >CTCAE Grade 2. Five patients developed minor late toxicities (RTOG/EORTC Grades 1-2), including bilateral cataract (n = 1), sensory hearing loss (n = 1), a reduction of growth hormone (n = 1), and asymptomatic radiation-induced white matter changes of the adjacent temporal lobe (n = 2). Grade 3 late toxicity occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) only. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT is an effective treatment for low- and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base offering high local control rates with low toxicity

  16. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Skull Base Chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mizoe, Jun–etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Bessho, Hiroki; Onda, Takeshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the results of the clinical study of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for skull base and paracervical spine tumors at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan. Methods: The study is comprised of three protocols: a pilot study, a phase I/II dose escalation study, and a phase II study. All the patients were treated by 16 fractions for 4 weeks with total doses of 48.0, 52.8, 57.6, and 60.8 Gy equivalents (GyE). Results: As a result of the dose escalatio...

  17. Anterior and middle skull base reconstruction after tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; WU Sheng-tian; LI Zhi; LIU Pi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical management of skull base tumors is still challenging today due to its sophisticated operation procedure. Surgeons who specialize in skull base surgery are making endeavor to promote the outcome of patients with skull base tumor. A reliable skull base reconstruction after tumor resection is of paramount importance in avoiding life-threatening complications, such as cerebrospinal fluid leakage and intracranial infection. This study aimed at investigating the indication, operation approach and operation technique of anterior and middle skull base reconstruction.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on 44 patients who underwent anterior and middle skull base reconstruction in the Department of Neurosurgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between March 2005 and March 2008. Different surgical approaches were selected according to the different regions involved by the tumor. Microsurgery was carried out for tumor resection and combined endoscopic surgery was performed in some cases. According to the different locations and sizes of various defects after tumor resection, an individualized skull base soft tissue reconstruction was carried out for each case with artificial materials, pedicled flaps, free autologous tissue, and free vascularized muscle flaps, separately. A skull base bone reconstruction was carried out in some cases simultaneously.Results Soft tissue reconstruction was performed in all 44 cases with a fascia lata repair in 9 cases, a free vascularized muscle flap in 1 case, a pedicled muscle flap in 14 cases, and a pedicled periosteal flap in 20 cases. Skull base bone reconstruction was performed on 10 cases simultaneously. The materials for bone reconstruction included titanium mesh, free autogenous bone, and a Medpor implant. The result of skull base reconstruction was satisfactory in all patients. Postoperative early-stage complications occurred in 10 cases with full recovery after conventional treatment.Conclusions The specific

  18. Osteomyelitis of the base of the skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, J.R.; Grobman, L.; Quencer, R.; Serafini, A.

    1986-03-01

    Infection in the marrow of the temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones is an uncommon, but increasing occurrence. It is usually secondary to infections beginning in the external auditory canal and is caused almost uniformly by the gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Technetium and gallium scintigraphy help in the early detection of such infections while CT scans demonstrate dissolution of bone in well-developed cases. Headache is the predominant symptom. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and aspiration herald the inevitable march of cranial nerves. We have diagnosed and treated 17 cases of osteomyelitis of the skull base. Although the total mortality rate is 53%, it is now a curable disease. Six of our last 8 patients remain alive, although 1 is still under treatment. Treatment is medical and requires the long-term concomitant intravenous administration of an aminoglycoside and a broad spectrum semisynthetic penicillin effective against the causative organism.

  19. Transnasal endoscopy-assisted skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Aldo M

    2006-09-01

    Skull base surgery (SBS), which originated in the 19th century, became refined in the 20th century in parallel with technological advancements and is now in the midst of further refinements largely driven by advances in endoscopic sinus surgery. With the development of modern SBS, lesions that were once inoperable and potentially fatal can now be eradicated successfully by means of endoscopy-assisted procedures that reduce or completely eliminate intracranial trauma, minimize postsurgical morbidity, and make full recovery possible. It is absolutely mandatory to have the appropriate instrumentation for endoscopy-assisted SBS. Among the new technologies available are advanced endoscopes, high-speed suction irrigation drills, digital video cameras, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and systems for 3-dimensional computer-assisted image-guided surgical navigation. An experienced endoscopic surgeon working with multidisciplinary teams, and using new instrumentation and techniques, can bring SBS to new levels of success in the 21st century. PMID:17040018

  20. Osteomyelitis of the base of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection in the marrow of the temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones is an uncommon, but increasing occurrence. It is usually secondary to infections beginning in the external auditory canal and is caused almost uniformly by the gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Technetium and gallium scintigraphy help in the early detection of such infections while CT scans demonstrate dissolution of bone in well-developed cases. Headache is the predominant symptom. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and aspiration herald the inevitable march of cranial nerves. We have diagnosed and treated 17 cases of osteomyelitis of the skull base. Although the total mortality rate is 53%, it is now a curable disease. Six of our last 8 patients remain alive, although 1 is still under treatment. Treatment is medical and requires the long-term concomitant intravenous administration of an aminoglycoside and a broad spectrum semisynthetic penicillin effective against the causative organism

  1. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring for Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Skull Base: A Technical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic, endonasal approaches to the skull base is both feasible and safe. Numerous reports have recently emerged from the literature evaluating the efficacy of different neuromonitoring tests during endonasal procedures, making them relatively well-studied. The authors report on a comprehensive, multimodality approach to monitoring the functional integrity of at risk nervous system structures, including the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cranial nerves, corticospinal tract, corticobulbar tract, and the thalamocortical somatosensory system during endonasal surgery of the skull base. The modalities employed include electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, free-running and electrically triggered electromyography, transcranial electric motor evoked potentials, and auditory evoked potentials. Methodological considerations as well as benefits and limitations are discussed. The authors argue that, while individual modalities have their limitations, multimodality neuromonitoring provides a real-time, comprehensive assessment of nervous system function and allows for safer, more aggressive management of skull base tumors via the endonasal route.

  2. Transoral robotic surgery of the central skull base: preclinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nogueras, F J J; Katati, M J; Arraez Sanchez, M A; Molina Martinez, M; Sanchez Carrion, M

    2014-06-01

    In this study we explored possible applications of the da Vinci system in approaching the skull base at optic chiasm level on two cryopreserved cadavers, using an entirely transoral robotic technique (TORS). We used a standard 12 mm endoscopy and 8 mm terminals. Bone drilling was performed manually. The da Vinci system is equipped with very good illumination and 3D viewing, thus providing excellent vision and great maneuverability even in the less accessible areas of the skull. Our experience demonstrates that an entirely transoral skull base robotic approach to this complex anatomical region has many advantages as compared to traditional techniques. PMID:24077869

  3. Three-dimensional MR imaging of skull-base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates skull base lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic value of three-dimensional (3D) MR imaging performed with 3D reconstruction of the head. MR imaging was performed at 1.0 T and a 1.5 T, M before and after application of Gd-DTPA. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 19 patients with skull base lesions were examined with standard 2D MR imaging and 3D fast low-angle shot imaging. A 3D reconstruction mode, based on the ray-tracing model, enabled us to construct arbitrarily complex extraction schemes. All 3D-reconstructions were compared with the surgical findings. The diagnoses included 10 benign skull base lesions and nine malignant lesions of the anterior and middle skull base. Gd-DTPA proved helpful in 82% of the cases

  4. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for skull-base tumors. This innovative surgical procedure uses the nose as a natural orifice to remove ... approach through the nose traditionally, but with the use of the endoscope, we're able to push ...

  5. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... natural orifice to remove skull-base tumors. It's brain surgery without the surgical incisions required to remove ... quicker recovery with less blood loss than traditional brain surgery. OR-Live makes it easy for you ...

  6. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Reinard

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons.

  7. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there is less disruption of tissues. It keeps anatomy close to normal on the way in and ... because the CT can show us the bony anatomy, which -- which is critical for skull-base surgery. ...

  8. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a natural orifice to remove skull-base tumors. It's brain surgery without the surgical incisions required to ... loss than traditional brain surgery. OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click ...

  9. Minimally invasive surgery of the anterior skull base: transorbital approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner, Holger G.; Schwan, Franziska; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches are becoming increasingly popular to access the anterior skull base. With interdisciplinary cooperation, in particular endonasal endoscopic approaches have seen an impressive expansion of indications over the past decades. The more recently described transorbital approaches represent minimally invasive alternatives with a differing spectrum of access corridors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss transorbital approaches to the anterior skull base in the light of the current literature. The transorbital approaches allow excellent exposure of areas that are difficult to reach like the anterior and posterior wall of the frontal sinus; working angles may be more favorable and the paranasal sinus system can be preserved while exposing the skull base. Because of their minimal morbidity and the cosmetically excellent results, the transorbital approaches represent an important addition to established endonasal endoscopic and open approaches to the anterior skull base. Their execution requires an interdisciplinary team approach. PMID:27453759

  10. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... go back to the video. So could you explain to us again what we're seeing there, ... opening in the base of the skull. Just making sure all the bleeding, all that venous oozing, ...

  11. Osseointegrated Implant Applications in Cosmetic and Functional Skull Base Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Benscoter, Brent J.; Jaber, James J.; Kircher, Matthew L.; Marzo, Sam J.; Leonetti, John P.

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses the indications, outcomes, and complications in patients that underwent osseointegrated implantation for skull base rehabilitation. We conducted a retrospective review of eight patients with skull base defects who had undergone implantation of a facial prosthetic retention device ± bone-anchored hearing aid at a tertiary academic referral center. Descriptive analysis of applications, techniques, outcomes, and complications were reviewed. The majority of patients were male...

  12. Meningioma of the Posterior Skull Base

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, Michael Thomas; Fagan, Paul A.; Sheehy, John P.R.; Bentivoglio, Peter J.; Doust, Bruce D.; Tonkin, John

    1991-01-01

    Combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas are rejatively rare. There are unsolved problems with the stability of the skull and spine and the lower cranial nerves and there is a marked tendency for the tumor to involve the spinal cord. This article reports on five cases of combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas.

  13. Central skull base lymphoma in children: MR and CT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hei-Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One; Youn, Byung Jae; Jung, Ah Young; Shin, Su-Mi; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, SNUMRC (Seoul National University Medical Research Center), Seoul (Korea)

    2008-08-15

    Central skull base tumours are rare in children. To characterize the imaging features of central skull base lymphoma in children to aid its diagnosis. The authors reviewed the CT findings (available in three patients) and MR findings (available in four patients) in four patients (three boys, one girl; age 2-12 years) with pathologically proven lymphoma (two with Burkitt lymphoma, two with B-cell lymphoma) involving the central skull base. Tumour location and extent, MRI signal intensities, noncontrast CT attenuation, patterns of enhancement, and changes in adjacent structures were evaluated. All four tumours involved the sphenoid bone. In three patients, the tumour extended to the ethmoid sinus and both cavernous sinuses. All lesions were isointense solid masses on T2-weighted images and showed avid enhancement, except for one lesion with a focal necrosis. All tumours were associated with adjacent dural thickening. Non-contrast CT showed highly attenuating masses and permeative bone destruction in the central skull base. Lymphoma involving the central skull base in children is visualized as an isointense mass on T2-weighted MRI with marked contrast enhancement and adjacent dural thickening, and as a highly attenuating mass on noncontrast CT with permeative or erosive bone destruction patterns. (orig.)

  14. CT of the base of the skull in bacterial meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT examinations of 42 cases of bacterial meningitis revealed in 38.1% of the cases relevant inflammatory processes at the base of the skull which were of significant importance for a transmitted infection. Such infections were: Sinusitis frontalis, ethmoidalis, maxillaris and sphenoidalis, mastoiditis or petrositis, suppurating mucocele, impression fracture, and an intracranially penetrated foreign body. Excepting the identification of fine fractures, conventional X-ray films were diagnostically superior. Hence, especially in the acute stages, special projections can be omitted, if CT is effected in the region of the osseous base of the skull. CT performed in inflammatory diseases of the brain must include the base of the skull, since this will yield reliable pointers to original focus of the inflammation requiring appropriate treatment and elimination. (orig.)

  15. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Praveen; Jaganthan, Sriram; Patnecha, Manish; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Gurupad; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2011-09-15

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A {sup 99mT}c MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  16. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A 99mTc MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  17. Radiologic assessment of maxillofacial, mandibular, and skull base trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranio-maxillofacial injuries affect a significant proportion of trauma patients either in isolation or concurring with other serious injuries. Contrary to maxillofacial injuries that result from a direct impact, central skull base and lateral skull base (petrous bone) fractures usually are caused by a lateral or sagittal directed force to the skull and therefore are indirect fractures. The traditional strong role of conventional images in patients with isolated trauma to the viscerocranium is decreasing. Spiral multislice CT is progressively replacing the panoramic radiograph, Waters view, and axial films for maxillofacial trauma, and is increasingly being performed in addition to conventional films to detail and classify trauma to the mandible as well. Imaging thus contributes to accurately categorizing mandibular fractures based on location, into alveolar, mandibular proper, and condylar fractures - the last are subdivided into intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. In the midface, CT facilitates attribution of trauma to the categories central, lateral, or combined centrolateral fractures. The last frequently encompass orbital trauma as well. CT is the imaging technique of choice to display the multiplicity of fragments, the degree of dislocation and rotation, or skull base involvement. Transsphenoid skull base fractures are classified into transverse and oblique types; lateral base (temporal bone) trauma is subdivided into longitudinal and transverse fractures. Supplementary MR examinations are required when a cranial nerve palsy occurs in order to recognize neural compression. Early and late complications of trauma related to the orbit, anterior cranial fossa, or lateral skull base due to infection, brain concussion, or herniation require CT to visualize the osseous prerequisites of complications, and MR to define the adjacent brain and soft tissue involvement. (orig.)

  18. Skull-base Ewing sarcoma with multifocal extracranial metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Thakar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial occurrence of Ewing sarcoma (ES is unusual, with a skull-base location being anecdotal. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with rapidly progressive ophthalmoplegia, and was found to be harboring an infiltrative lesion involving the sphenoid sinus, sella, and clivus. He underwent trans-sphenoidal decompression of the lesion which was histologically suggestive of ES. He developed paraparesis 2 weeks after commencing adjuvant therapy. Imaging revealed two thoracic extradural lesions and florid vertebral and pulmonary metastases. This is the first report in indexed literature of a primary intracranial ES on the skull-base with disseminated extracranial disease.

  19. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Ponce, Francisco A; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  20. Use of sodium fluorescein in skull base tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo da Silva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The authors present this study using sodium fluorescein (SF to enhance skull base tumors by performing a quantitative digital analysis of tumor enhancement. The purpose of this study is to observe the grade of SF enhancement by the tumors.Methods: A prospective experiment within-subjects study design was performed which included six patients with skull base lesions. Digital pictures were taken before and after the SF systemic injection, using the same light source of the microsurgical field. The pictures were analyzed by computer software which calculated the wavelength (WL of the SF pre- and post-injection.Results: The group of tumors was as follows: one vestibular schwannoma, three meningiomas, one craniopharyngioma and one pituitary adenoma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strongly positive. The digital analysis of the pictures, considering the SF WL pre- and post-injection, presented P = 0.028 (Wilcoxon T test.Conclusions: The enhancement of the tumors by SF was consistent and evident. The introductory results suggest the possibility of using SF as an adjuvant tool for the skull base surgery. Further studies should test the clinical application of the SF in skull base tumors.

  1. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opinion and was referred to our skull-base team. The next slide describes what we're doing ... exposure for our patients or the O.R. team. So we've fast-forwarded here a bit, ...

  2. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of the males was significantly superior to that of the female patients (p=0.002). Of the patients with benign tumors, 1 patient (giant cell tumor) had local failure at 10 months. The other 8 patients continued to have local tumor control; all 9 patients were alive at last follow-up (actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate of 89% and 100%, respectively). Severe late effects (motor weakness and sensory deficits) were observed in 2 (7%) of 29 patients. Conclusion: Proton RT for children with aggressively recurring tumors after major skull base surgery can offer a considerable prospect of tumor control and survival. Longer follow-up is necessary to assess the real value of protons, in particular with regard to bone growth and cosmetic outcome

  3. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  4. Atypical radiographic features of skull base cholesterol granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Christine T; Goncalves, Stefania; Bhatia, Rita; Truong, Kim; Telischi, Fred; Angeli, Simon; Morcos, Jacques; Eshraghi, Adrien A

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol granulomas (CGs) are the most common benign lesions of the petrous apex (PA) and have distinct computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics. On CT, CGs of the PA (PACG) present as expansile lesions with erosion of bony trabeculae. MRI shows a hyperintense lesion on T1-and T2-weighted images and do not enhance with gadolinium. The objective is to describe the radiographic features of CGs of the skull base that do not arise from the PA. This study is a retrospective review. Three patients were operated on for suspected recurrent endolymphatic sac tumor, intracranial cholesteatoma, and recurrent sphenoid wing meningioma based on CT and MRI findings. Pathology results were consistent with CG in all three cases. All patients had bone erosion on CT. These skull base CGs did not demonstrate similar MRI features. These lesions were hyperintense, iso-to-hyperintense, and hypointense on T1-weighted MRI, respectively. These CGs were hyperintense in two cases and iso-to-hyperintense in one case on T2-weighted MRI. These lesions either demonstrated central or rim enhancement after gadolinium administration. Skull base CGs that do not arise from the PA demonstrate a broad spectrum of radiographic characteristics on MRI that are not typical of PACG. PMID:26164292

  5. Intraoperative Monitoring of Motor Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Jan; Pelster, H.; Amedee, Ronald G.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiologic monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of four cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was used during 102 skull base operations. Of these, 44 operations we...

  6. Surgeon's view of the skull base from the lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, R A

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents the surgical anatomy of the skull base and infratemporal fossa. The information has been derived from the author's own experience in surgical and cadaver dissection, standard anatomical references, and selected experience of other skull base surgeons. Because the lateral approach has become the utilitarian method of exposure, the intricate detailed anatomy is demonstrated from this view at five levels of dissection, so the surgeon may gain a practical understanding of the surgical relationship of critical structures. Consistent anatomical landmarks can be used by the surgeon in the location of these critical structures. The styloid process, sphenoidal spine, and middle meningeal artery identify the internal carotid artery as it enters the carotid canal. The bony or fibrous septum that divides the jugular foramen into neural and vascular compartments may be used to better identify nerves IX, X, and XI. The zygomatic root is useful for location of the middle fossa dura. The lateral pterygoid plate leads directly to the foramen ovale. The increased precision of dissection permitted by use of the microscope requires an increased level of knowledge of anatomical structures in this area. It is hoped that the information presented in this paper will assist surgeons in the meticulous and thorough removal of skull base tumors and in the preservation of neural and vascular structures that are presently being sacrificed. PMID:6503585

  7. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  8. Skull Base Osteomyelitis in the Emergency Department: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Burak Sayhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO is a rare clinical presentation and usually occurs as a complication of trauma or sinusitis. A 5-year-old child presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of fever associated with drowsiness and left parietal headache, and a week's history of swelling on the left frontoparietal soft tissue. He had suffered a penetrating scalp injury four month ago. On physical examination, there was a tender swelling with purulent stream on the lateral half of his scalp. His vital signs are within normal limits. Plain X-ray of the skull showed a lytic lesion on the left frontoparietal bone. A cranial computed tomography (CT scan demonstrated a large subgaleal abscess at the left frontoparietal region. SBO possesses a high morbidity and mortality; therefore, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory to prevent further complications and to reduce morbidity and mortality significantly.

  9. Endovascular treatment for arterial injuries of skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of endovascular techniques in treatment for arterial injuries of skull base. Methods: A total of 53 consecutive cases suffered from skull base arterial injuries were enrolled in our hospital from Oct 2004 to May 2007, including 44 male and 9 female cases with average age of 23.3 years. Thirty-nine cases presented with pulsatile exophthalmos and intracranial vascular murmur, cerchnus and dysphagia in another 9, epistaxis in the remaining 5 cases. Diagnosis of 39 carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF)and 14 carotid pseudoaneurysm were performed by angiography (DSA). Alternative endovascular procedures were performed depending on lesions characteristics and follow-up was done by telephone and outpatient work up. Results: Procedures were performed involving 56 carotid arteries in all 53 cases including 34 CCF with embolization of detachable balloon(33 cases), 3 with balloon and coils, and 3 by stent-graft placement. 8 carotid pseudoaneurysms were cured by parent artery occlusion with balloon, 2 experienced endovascular isolation with balloon and coils, and 4 with stent-graft. Follow-up for mean 9.5 months (range from 2 to 25 months) revealed that the chief symptoms of 45 cases (85%) were relieved within 6 months after the procedure but ocular movement and visual disorder remained in 8 cases (15%)till 12 months. Six pseudoaneurysms and 3 residual leak were found in reexamination, of which 2 cases underwent intervention again 2 and 3 months later due to dural arterial-venous fistula in cavernous sinus, respectively. Conclusions: Endovascular treatment is safe and effective therapeutic option with minimal invasion for skull base arterial injuries. Detachable balloon embolization is the first choice for CCF and carotid pseudoaneurysm. Spring coil packing and stent-graft implantation should be in alternation as combination for special cases. (authors)

  10. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for large benign skull base meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to assess the safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for large skull base meningiomas. Fifty-two patients with large skull base meningiomas aged 34-74 years (median age 56 years) were treated with FSRT between June 2004 and August 2009. All patients received FSRT for residual or progressive meningiomas more than 4 centimeters in greatest dimension. The median GTV was 35.4 cm3 (range 24.1-94.9 cm3), and the median PTV was 47.6 cm3 (range 33.5-142.7 cm3). Treatment volumes were achieved with 5-8 noncoplanar beams shaped using a micromultileaf collimator (MLC). Treatment was delivered in 30 daily fractions over 6 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. At a median follow-up of 42 months (range 9-72 months) the 3-year and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 96% and 93%, respectively, and survival was 100%. Three patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease. Hypopituitarism was the most commonly reported late complication, with a new hormone pituitary deficit occurring in 10 (19%) of patients. Clinically significant late neurological toxicity was observed in 3 (5.5%) patients consisting of worsening of pre-existing cranial deficits. FSRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of large skull base meningiomas. The local control is comparable to that reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction of treatment-related late toxicity

  11. A checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Edward R; Wong, Judith M; Smith, Timothy R; de Los Reyes, Kenneth; Aglio, Linda S; Thorne, Alison J; Cote, David J; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Gawande, Atul

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Approximately 250 million surgical procedures are performed annually worldwide, and data suggest that major complications occur in 3%-17% of them. Many of these complications can be classified as avoidable, and previous studies have demonstrated that preoperative checklists improve operating room teamwork and decrease complication rates. Although the authors' institution has instituted a general preoperative "time-out" designed to streamline communication, flatten vertical authority gradients, and decrease procedural errors, there is no specific checklist for transnasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery, with or without endoscopy. Such minimally invasive cranial surgery uses a completely different conceptual approach, set-up, instrumentation, and operative procedure. Therefore, it can be associated with different types of complications as compared with open cranial surgery. The authors hypothesized that a detailed, procedure-specific, preoperative checklist would be useful to reduce errors, improve outcomes, decrease delays, and maximize both teambuilding and operational efficiency. Thus, the object of this study was to develop such a checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery. METHODS An expert panel was convened that consisted of all members of the typical surgical team for transsphenoidal endoscopic cases: neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, circulating nurses, scrub technicians, surgical operations managers, and technical assistants. Beginning with a general checklist, procedure-specific items were added and categorized into 4 pauses: Anesthesia Pause, Surgical Pause, Equipment Pause, and Closure Pause. RESULTS The final endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery checklist is composed of the following 4 pauses. The Anesthesia Pause consists of patient identification, diagnosis, pertinent laboratory studies, medications, surgical preparation, patient positioning, intravenous/arterial access, fluid management

  12. A Case of Multiple Primary Tumors of the Anterior Skull Base

    OpenAIRE

    Lenarz, Minoo; Durisin, Martin; Becker, Hartmut; Brandis, Almuth; Lenarz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of synchronous olfactory bulb meningioma and undifferentiated carcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses that involved and destroyed the anterior skull base and mimicked intracranial invasion by a carcinoma. The heterogeneity of tissue types in the skull base gives rise to a diverse variety of benign and malignant neoplasms which have totally different prognoses. Synchronous development of benign and malignant primary tumors both originating from and involving the skull base...

  13. Plasmacytoma of the Skull Base: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na'ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Gil, Ziv; Billan, Salem

    2016-02-01

    Objective Extramedullary plasmacytomas are rare tumors. In the current study we aim to characterize its clinical course at the skull base and define the most appropriate therapeutic protocol. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of articles in the English language that included data on the treatment and outcome of plasmacytoma of the base of skull. Results The study cohort consisted of 47 patients. The tumor originated from the clivus and sphenoclival region in 28 patients (59.5%), the nasopharynx in 10 patients (21.2%), the petrous apex in 5 patients (10.6%), and the orbital roof in 4 patients (8.5%). The chief complaints at presentation included recurrent epistaxis and cranial nerve palsy, according to the site of tumor. Twenty-two patients (46.8%) had surgical treatment; 25 (53.2%) received radiation therapy. Adjuvant therapy was administered in 11 cases (50%) with concurrent multiple myeloma. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 78% and 59%, respectively. Clear margin resection was achieved in a similar proportion of patients who underwent endoscopic surgery and open surgery (p = 0.83). A multivariate analysis of outcome showed a similar survival rate of patients treated surgically or with radiotherapy. Conclusions The mainstay of treatment for plasmacytoma is based on radiation therapy, but when total resection is feasible, endoscopic resection is a valid option. PMID:26949590

  14. Radiotherapy and radiosurgery for benign skull base meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull are difficult to access. Complex combined surgical approaches are more likely to achieve complete tumor removal, but frequently at a cost of treatment related high morbidity. Local control following subtotal excision of benign meningiomas can be improved with conventional fractionated external beam radiation therapy with a reported 5-year progression-free survival up to 95%. New radiation techniques, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have been developed as a more accurate technique of irradiation with more precise tumor localization, and consequently a reduction in the volume of normal brain irradiated to high radiation doses. SRS achieves a high tumour control rate in the range of 85-97% at 5 years, although it should be recommended only for tumors less than 3 cm away more than 3 mm from the optic pathway because of high risk of long-term neurological deficits. Fractionated RT delivered as FSRT, IMRT and protons is useful for larger and irregularly or complex-shaped skull base meningiomas close to critical structures not suitable for single-fraction SRS. The reported results indicate a high tumour control rate in the range of 85-100% at 5 years with a low risk of significant incidence of long-term toxicity. Because of the long natural history of benign meningiomas, larger series and longer follow-up are necessary to compare results and toxicity of different techniques

  15. 3-D-conformal radiation therapy for pediatric giant cell tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E.B. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States). Section of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, M.W.; Vries, A. de [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Adams, J.A.; Munzenrider, J.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Rosenberg, A.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-05-01

    Background: Giant cell tumors (GCT) of the base of skull are rare neoplasms. This report reviews the treatment of four pediatric patients presenting with aggressive giant cell tumor, using fractionated and combined, conformal proton and photon radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Patients and Methods: Three female patients and one adolescent male, ages 10-15 years, had undergone prior, extensive surgical resection(s) and were treated for either primary (two patients) or recurrent (two patients) disease. Gross residual tumor was evident in three patients and microscopic disease suspected in one patient. Combined proton and photon radiation theory was based on three-dimensional (3-D) planning, consisting of fractionated treatment, one fraction per day at 1.8 CGE (cobalt-gray equivalent) to total target doses of 57.6, 57.6, 59.4, and 61.2 Gy/CGE. Results: With observation times of 3.1 years, 3.3, 5.3, and 5.8 years, all four patients were alive and well and remained locally controlled without evidence of recurrent disease. Except for one patient with partial pituitary insufficiency following radiotherapy for sellar recurrent disease, thus far no late effects attributable to radiation therapy have been observed. Conclusions: 3-D conformal radiation therapy offers a realistic chance of tumor control for aggressive giant cell tumor in the skull base, either postoperatively or at time of recurrence. Conformal treatment techniques allow the safe delivery of relatively high radiation doses in the pediatric patient without apparent increase of side effects. (orig.)

  16. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma presenting as skull base metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Bo; LIU Dian-gang; L(U) Hai-li; ZHANG Qiu-hang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of well-differentiated thyroid cancer and is considered to be a relatively indolent tumor in which distant metastasis and death are rare.1 The metastasis of PTC is usually to regional lymph nodes, especially the cervical and mediastinal nodes. Metastases to the brain are rare, and constitute 0.1%-5.0% of distant metastases of papillary carcinoma.2 Skull metastasis is uncommon,and is found in 2.5%-5.8% of cases of thyroid cancer.3 Skull base metastasis of PTC is extremely rare, with only eight reported cases in the literature involving the clivus,cavernous sinus, sella turcica, and the petrous apex and ridge.4 A metastatic lesion can arise from histologically benign and silent thyroid neoplasms,5 and differential diagnosis between ectopic and metastatic thyroid cancer can be difficult,6 therefore, the management of thyroid cancer is controversial after removal of metastatic disease.Here we reported a case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) that was manifested as a solitary clivus metastasis and discussed the diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. The 73-year-old patient presented with visual impairment in the right eye,and epistaxis. The patient subsequently underwent complete total thyroidectomy after a diagnosis of papillary microcarcinoma. This finding emphasizes that clinically significant metastases can arise from thyroid papillary microcarcinoma. Total thyroidectomy and careful review of the histology are necessary to prevent delay in proper diagnosis.

  17. The cranial base and calvaria index methods applied to Australian aborigine skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göthlin, J H; Gadeholt, G

    1988-11-01

    Cranial base and calvaria indices were calculated on lateral skull radiographs of Australian aborigines, and compared with the values of one mummy, 4 prehistoric (fossil), and modern Scandinavian skulls. The aborigines had thicker calvarian bone and a lower forehead profile than the mummy and the modern skulls, but a higher frontal calvarium than the fossils. The aborigines may developmentally represent a link between prehistoric and modern man (including the mummy). PMID:3234401

  18. Clinicopathological and Molecular Histochemical Review of Skull Base Metastasis from Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma including follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a rare clinical entity. Eighteen FTC cases and 10 PTC cases showing skull base metastasis have been reported. The most common symptom of skull base metastasis from FTC and PTC is cranial nerve dysfunction. Bone destruction and local invasion to the surrounding soft tissues are common on radiological imaging. Skull base metastases can be the initial clinical presentation of FTC and PTC in the presence of silent primary sites. The possibility of skull base metastasis from FTC and PTC should be considered in patients with the clinical symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction and radiological findings of bone destruction. A variety of genetic alterations in thyroid tumors have been identified to have a fundamental role in their tumorigenesis. Molecular histochemical studies are useful for elucidating the histopathological features of thyroid carcinoma. Recent molecular findings may provide novel molecular-based treatment strategies for thyroid carcinoma

  19. Skull base chordomas: analysis of dose-response characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To extract dose-response characteristics from dose-volume histograms and corresponding actuarial survival statistics for 115 patients with skull base chordomas. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data for 115 patients with skull base chordoma treated with combined photon and proton conformal radiotherapy to doses in the range 66.6Gy - 79.2Gy. Data set for each patient included gender, histology, age, tumor volume, prescribed dose, overall treatment time, time to recurrence or time to last observation, target dose-volume histogram, and several dosimetric parameters (minimum/mean/median/maximum target dose, percent of the target volume receiving the prescribed dose, dose to 90% of the target volume, and the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survivor function estimate, the proportional hazards (Cox) model, and parametric modeling of the actuarial probability of recurrence. Parameters of dose-response characteristics were obtained using the maximum likelihood method. Results: Local failure developed in 42 (36%) of patients, with actuarial local control rates at 5 years of 59.2%. The proportional hazards model revealed significant dependence of gender on the probability of recurrence, with female patients having significantly poorer prognosis (hazard ratio of 2.3 with the p value of 0.008). The Wilcoxon and the log-rank tests of the corresponding Kaplan-Meier recurrence-free survival curves confirmed statistical significance of this effect. The Cox model with stratification by gender showed significance of tumor volume (p=0.01), the minimum target dose (p=0.02), and the EUD (p=0.02). Other parameters were not significant at the α level of significance of 0.05, including the prescribed dose (p=0.21). Parametric analysis using a combined model of tumor control probability (to account for non-uniformity of target dose distribution) and the Weibull failure time model (to account for censoring) allowed us to estimate

  20. Quality of life following endonasal skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Harshita; Bhatki, Amol M; Snyderman, Carl H; Vescan, Allan D; Carrau, Ricardo L; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Kassam, Amin B

    2010-01-01

    The importance of quality of life (QOL) outcomes following treatments for head and neck tumors are now increasingly appreciated and measured to improve medical and surgical care for these patients. An understanding of the definitions in the setting of health care and the use of appropriate QOL instruments and measures are critical to obtain meaningful information that guides decision making in various aspects of patient health care. QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery is only recently being defined. In this article, we describe the current published data on QOL outcomes following cranial base surgery and provide preliminary prospective data on QOL outcomes and sinonasal morbidity in patients who underwent endonasal cranial base surgery for management of various skull base tumors at our institution. We used a disease-specific multidimensional instrument to measure QOL outcomes in these patients. Our results show that although sinonasal morbidity is increased, this is temporary, and the vast majority of patients have a very good QOL by 4 to 6 months after endonasal approach to the cranial base. PMID:20592856

  1. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... face or skull. The minimally invasive technique allows patients a quicker recovery with less blood loss than ... the slides here, we'll talk about our patient history for a few moments. Our patient today ...

  2. CT and MRI of the skull base, including the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some considerations about nuclear magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, essential for examining skull base lesions are treated here, including the cranial nerves. Neoplasms such as meningiomas, adenomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and others tumors are also cited, mentioning some commentaries. (author)

  3. Transmastoid Repair of Minor Skull Base Defects with Flexible Hydroxyapatite Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Zanetti, Diego; Nassif, Nader

    2003-01-01

    This prospective open pilot study was designed to assess the suitability of flexible composite sheets of polymer and hydroxyapatite (HA) for the reconstruction of limited lateral skull base defects through a conservative transmastoid approach.

  4. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with skull base invasion : intratumoral direct puncture embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the utility and efficacy of percutaneous direct glue embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with skull base invasion. In nine cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with invasion of the skull base, embolization under general anethesia was performed. Using an 18G spinal needle, direct puncture were made via the transnasal or mandibular sciatic notch. A glue-lipiodol mixture (1:1 -1:3) was injected slowly for 15 to 30 seconds under fluoroscopic control; the number of post-embolization angiography and the distribution of embolic materials was assessed on CT within 1-3 days. The mass was surgically removed 3 to 7 days after embolization. Direct glue embolization of juvenile angiofibroma with skull base invasion appears to be a simple and safe procedure. The technique could be used for other hypervascular lesions in the base of the skull or parapharyngeal space. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  5. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer: a treatment planning comparison with fixed Beam IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mok, E; Wang, L; Chen, C; Le, Q-T

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the dose distribution, monitor units (MUs) and radiation delivery time between volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) and fix-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (FB-IMRT) in skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer (HNC). CT datasets of 8 skull-base and 7 non-skull-base HNC were identified. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated. The prescription dose ranged 45-70 Gy (1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction). The VMAT delivery time was measured when these plans were delivered to the patients. The FB-IMRT delivery time was generated on a phantom. Comparison of dose-volume histogram data, MUs, and delivery times was performed using T-test. Our results show that both plans yield similar target volume coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. In skull-base cases, compared to FB-IMRT, VMAT generated significantly smaller hot-spot inside PTV (2.0% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.031), lower maximum chiasm dose (32 ± 11 Gy vs. 41 ± 15 Gy, p = 0.026), lower ipsilateral temporal-mandibular joint dose (D33: 41.4 Gy vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.016), lower mean ipsilateral middle ear dose (43 ± 9 Gy vs. 38 ± 10 Gy, p = 0.020) and a trend for lower optic nerve, temporal lobe, parotid, and oral cavity dose. In non-skull-base cases, doses to normal tissues were similar between the two plans. There was a reduction of 70% in MUs (486 ± 95 vs. 1614 ± 493, p VMAT. We conclude that VMAT appears to spare more normal tissues from high radiation dose for the tested skull-base tumors. Dosimetrically, both approaches were equivalent for non-skull-base tumor with VMAT using fewer MUs and shorter delivery time. PMID:22905805

  6. Particle Beam Therapy for Cancer of the Skull Base, Nasal Cavity, and Paranasal Sinus

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Particle beam therapy has been rapidly developed in these several decades. Proton and carbon ion beams are most frequently used in particle beam therapy. Proton and carbon ion beam radiotherapy have physical and biological advantage to the conventional photon radiotherapy. Cancers of the skull base, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinus are rare; however these diseases can receive the benefits of particle beam radiotherapy. This paper describes the clinical review of the cancer of the skull base,...

  7. Quality-of-Life after Anterior Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Borg, Anouk; Al-Mousa, Alaa; Haliasos, Nikolaos; Choi, David

    2014-04-01

    Background Improved treatment and survival of patients with skull base tumors has made the assessment of quality-of-life (QoL) in this population increasingly important. This article provides a comprehensive systematic review pertaining to QoL assessment in adults undergoing anterior skull base surgery. Methods We performed a literature search using the electronic databases of Ovid Medline and Embase. Additional articles were identified through a search using the phrase anterior skull base. Further articles were sought through hand-searching relevant journals and reference lists of identified articles. Results Our search strategy identified 29 articles for inclusion in our systematic review, with considerable variation between studies in population characteristics, methodological design and quality, follow-up length, and outcome assessment. The most commonly used QoL tools were the Karnofsky Performance Status and the Anterior Skull Base Questionnaire. QoL following anterior skull base surgery appears to improve beyond preoperative levels in the months after surgery. For patients undergoing endoscopic skull base surgery, the gain in QoL appears to be greater and may manifest earlier, with no clear long-term deleterious effect on sinonasal outcomes compared with open surgery. Conclusions QoL after anterior skull base surgery in adults appears to improve within several months of surgery, but earlier and to a larger extent if the endoscopic approach is used. Given the relative paucity and heterogeneity of anterior skull base tumors, large-scale prospective multicentre studies utilizing valid and reliable multidimensional QoL tools are required. This may result in improved patient care, by understanding patients' needs better and facilitating the provision of reliable outcome data for clinical trials. PMID:24719794

  8. Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the anterior skull base

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Jie Wang, MD, PhD; Bing Zhou, MD

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), especially in the anterior skull base, is an extremely rare condition. A 5-year-old boy presented with a large space-occupying lesion in the anterior skull base along with a left sided-epistaxis, proptosis and decreased vision. Radical excision of the lesion was performed by an endoscopic transnasal and transethmoidal approach. The patient recovered without any recurrence during a follow-up period of up to 28 months. Here, we review t...

  9. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Sun K [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong O [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Human Tissue Restoration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam H [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Young Beom [Department of Information and Telecommunication Engineering, Sangmyung University, Cheoan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee-Deog [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Yeon [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-21

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice.

  10. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice

  11. Endoscopic skull base training using 3D printed models with pre-existing pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vairavan; Narayanan, Prepageran; Rajagopalan, Raman; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Wormald, Peter-John; Van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic base of skull surgery has been growing in acceptance in the recent past due to improvements in visualisation and micro instrumentation as well as the surgical maturing of early endoscopic skull base practitioners. Unfortunately, these demanding procedures have a steep learning curve. A physical simulation that is able to reproduce the complex anatomy of the anterior skull base provides very useful means of learning the necessary skills in a safe and effective environment. This paper aims to assess the ease of learning endoscopic skull base exposure and drilling techniques using an anatomically accurate physical model with a pre-existing pathology (i.e., basilar invagination) created from actual patient data. Five models of a patient with platy-basia and basilar invagination were created from the original MRI and CT imaging data of a patient. The models were used as part of a training workshop for ENT surgeons with varying degrees of experience in endoscopic base of skull surgery, from trainees to experienced consultants. The surgeons were given a list of key steps to achieve in exposing and drilling the skull base using the simulation model. They were then asked to list the level of difficulty of learning these steps using the model. The participants found the models suitable for learning registration, navigation and skull base drilling techniques. All participants also found the deep structures to be accurately represented spatially as confirmed by the navigation system. These models allow structured simulation to be conducted in a workshop environment where surgeons and trainees can practice to perform complex procedures in a controlled fashion under the supervision of experts. PMID:25294050

  12. Perioperative management of complex skull base surgery: the anesthesiologist's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W Scott; Murdoch, John; Leonetti, John P

    2002-05-15

    The anesthetic management of complex skull base surgical procedures provides unique problems and concerns for the neuroanesthesiologist. Positioning to access the skull base could put the patient at risk for peripheral nerve injury and some of the positions may increase the risk for air emboli. In addition, tumor pathology and involvement with vital structures could increase the chances for substantive blood loss, destruction of associated nerves or vessels, and may require temporary occlusion of the carotid artery necessitating intraoperative neuroprotection. Neurophysiological monitors may also be used to safeguard nerve function and anesthetic techniques must be adjusted to accommodate their use. Finally, postoperative morbidity may be affected by surgical approach to the skull base and the anesthesiologist should be aware of which approach may produce a greater incidence of pain, nausea, and vomiting in the postoperative period. The authors discuss the anesthetic concerns and management for complex cranial base surgery. Different approaches will be discussed and comparisons of perioperative parameters between these approaches will be made with data provided by retrospective chart review of more than 600 skull base procedures performed at the authors' institution over the last 10 years. This information should help guide decision making concerning anesthetic management for these skull base procedures. PMID:16119903

  13. Esthetic Craniofacial Bony and Skull Base Reconstruction Using Flap Wrapping Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Suesada, Nobuko; Usami, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    For a safe and esthetic skull base reconstruction combined with repair of craniofacial bone defects, the authors introduce the flap wrapping technique in this study. This technique consists of skull base reconstruction using the vastus lateralis muscle of an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap, and structural craniofacial bony reconstruction using an autologous calvarial bone graft. The key to this technique is that all of the grafted autologous bone is wrapped with the vascularized fascia of the ALT free flap to protect the grafted bone from infection and exposure. Two anterior skull base tumors combined with craniofacial bony defects were included in this study. The subjects were a man and a woman, aged 18 and 64. Both patients had preoperative proton beam therapy. First, the skull base defect was filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction was performed with an autologous bone graft and a fabricated inner layer of calvarial bone, and then the grafted bone was completely wrapped in the vascularized fascia of the ALT free flap. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or grafted bone exposure in these 2 patients postoperatively, even though both patients had preoperative proton beam therapy. Additionally, the vascularized fascia wrapped bone graft could provide a natural contour and prevent collapse of the craniofacial region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:27300454

  14. Development of skull fracture criterion based on real-world head trauma simulations using finite element head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance an existing finite element (FE) head model with composite modeling and a new constitutive law for the skull. The response of the state-of-the-art FE head model was validated in the time domain using data from 15 temporo-parietal impact experiments, conducted with postmortem human surrogates. The new model predicted skull fractures observed in these tests. Further, 70 well-documented head trauma cases were reconstructed. The 15 experiments and 70 real-world head trauma cases were combined to derive skull fracture injury risk curves. The skull internal energy was found to be the best candidate to predict skull failure based on an in depth statistical analysis of different mechanical parameters (force, skull internal energy), head kinematic-based parameter, the head injury criterion (HIC), and skull fracture correlate (SFC). The proposed tolerance limit for 50% risk of skull fracture was associated with 453mJ of internal energy. Statistical analyses were extended for individual impact locations (frontal, occipital and temporo-parietal) and separate injury risk curves were obtained. The 50% risk of skull fracture for each location: frontal: 481mJ, occipital: 457mJ, temporo-parietal: 456mJ of skull internal energy. PMID:26703363

  15. 3-D-CT reconstructions in fractures of the skull base and facial skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-D reconstructions of the skull base, temporal bone, and skull fractures were compared to 2-D CT to evaluate the diagnostic value in traumatized patients. 38 patients with 22 fractures of the facial skeleton (orbita, zygomatic, Le Fort), 12 temporal bone, and 4 skull fractures were investigated. Subjective grading was perfomed by two physicians (ENT/RAD) in respect of quality diagnostic validity and estimated clinical impact. The average image validity and quality were graded good. In the temporal bone the average information supplied by 3-D was of inferior value; here, the lack of information regarding the inner ear structures was responsible for the lack of clinical impact. In fractures of the facial skeleton and the skull base of good to very good image quality was seen and clinical relevance was high. 3-D CT is capable of demonstrating fractures, which is of little value in the temporal bone, but of high value in the skull base and the facial skeleton, especially if surfaces are involved or fragments are displaced. (orig.)

  16. Eosinophilic granuloma of the skull base: patient with unique clinical moreover, radiographic presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Dalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents an eight-year-old girl having periauricular swelling and severe pain during mouth opening on the right-side temporomandibular joint (TMJ. CBCT showed extensive destruction of the base of the skull and the roof of the glenoid fossa on the right side. The findings based on CT and MRI images with and without contrast are discussed herein. This report highlights a skull base eosinophilic granuloma that mimics TMJ disorder and the importance of proper evaluation of CBCT images to make an early diagnosis.

  17. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.)

  18. Endoscopic endonasal skull base approach for parasellar lesions: Initial experiences, results, efficacy, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetoshi Yano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endoscopic surgery is suitable for the transsphenoidal approach; it is minimally invasive and provides a well-lit operative field. The endoscopic skull base approach through the large opening of the sphenoid sinus through both nostrils has extended the surgical indication for various skull base lesions. In this study, we describe the efficacy and complications associated with the endoscopic skull base approach for extra- or intradural parasellar lesions based on our experiences. Methods: Seventy-four cases were treated by an endoscopic skull base approach. The indications for these procedures included 55 anterior extended approaches, 10 clival approaches, and 9 cavernous approaches. The operations were performed through both the nostrils using a rigid endoscope. After tumor removal, the skull base was reconstructed by a multilayered method using a polyglactin acid (PGA sheet. Results: Gross total resection was achieved in 82% of pituitary adenomas, 68.8% of meningiomas, and 60% of craniopharyngiomas in anterior extended approach and in 83.3% of chordomas in clival approach, but only in 50% of the tumors in cavernous approach. Tumor consistency, adhesion, and/or extension were significant limitations. Visual function improvements were achieved in 37 of 41 (90.2% cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage (9.5%, infections (5.4%, neural injuries (4.1%, and vascular injuries (2.7% were the major complications. Conclusions: Our experiences show that the endoscopic skull base approach is a safe and effective procedure for various parasellar lesions. Selection of patients who are unlikely to develop complications seems to be an important factor for procedure efficacy and good outcome.

  19. Skull-base Osteomyelitis: a Dreaded Complication after Trivial Fall and Inadequate Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundan Mittal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Skull-based osteomyelitis is bony infection which generally originates from inadequately treated chronic infection, adjoining tissue infection or after trauma.Case: 11 month female child had a trivial fall while standing near a bucket. The child developed fracture of right clavicle and left orbital swelling which was inadequately treated. This resulted in in spread of infection to adjoining tissues, skull bones, sinuses and brain.Conclusion: Cranial base osteomyelitis is rare but dreaded condition which requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment to avoid mortality and morbidity in form of neurological deficits and permanent disability

  20. Fibromyxoma of the Lateral Skull Base in a Child: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Klimo, Paul; Jha, Tushar; Choudhri, Asim F.; Joyner, Royce; Michael, L. Madison

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Fibromyxomas and myxomas are benign tumors of mesenchymal origin usually found outside the nervous system, most commonly in the atrium of the heart. They can also arise in the mandible or maxilla, but it is exceedingly rare to find them within the skull base. The history, histologic features, and the literature, with emphasis on other pediatric cases, are reviewed for this uncommon skull base neoplasm. Methods We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with a 1-year hist...

  1. Surgical anatomy and utility of pedicled vascularized tissue flaps for multilayered repair of skull base defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Komune, Noritaka; Archer, Jacob B; Sun, Hai; Theodore, Nicholas; James, Jeffrey; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter; Sughrue, Michael E; Rhoton, Albert L; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to describe the surgical anatomy and technical nuances of various vascularized tissue flaps. METHODS The surgical anatomy of various tissue flaps and their vascular pedicles was studied in 5 colored silicone-injected anatomical specimens. Medical records were reviewed of 11 consecutive patients who underwent repair of extensive skull base defects with a combination of various vascularized flaps. RESULTS The supraorbital, supratrochlear, superficial temporal, greater auricular, and occipital arteries contribute to the vascular supply of the pericranium. The pericranial flap can be designed based on an axial blood supply. Laterally, various flaps are supplied by the deep or superficial temporal arteries. The nasoseptal flap is a vascular pedicled flap based on the nasoseptal artery. Patients with extensive skull base defects can undergo effective repair with dual flaps or triple flaps using these pedicled vascularized flaps. CONCLUSIONS Multiple pedicled flaps are available for reconstitution of the skull base. Knowledge of the surgical anatomy of these flaps is crucial for the skull base surgeon. These vascularized tissue flaps can be used effectively as single or combination flaps. Multilayered closure of cranial base defects with vascularized tissue can be used safely and may lead to excellent repair outcomes. PMID:26613175

  2. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-01-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves.

  3. Cranial nerve palsies in metastatic prostate cancer--results of base of skull radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the rate of response to palliative external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy/5 or 30 Gy/10 fractions) to the base of skull in 32 prostate cancer patients with cranial nerve dysfunction. Sixteen patients (50%; 95% CI, 34-66%) had a useful response to therapy. The median survival post-therapy was 3 months

  4. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  5. Large and giant skull base meningiomas: The role of radical surgical removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Freitas, Paulo Eduardo Peixoto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The large and giant skull base meningiomas are challenging lesions, and the involvement of crucial neurovascular structures needs the surgical removal as the primordial treatment. The authors report on a series of patients with large and giant skull base meningiomas who were treated with the goal of radical removal. Methods: A retrospective study including 49 patients with large and giant skull base meningiomas was carried out. Tumors presenting 3 cm or larger were included. Results: The meningiomas in the sample included the following types: 10 olfactory groove, 8 sphenoorbital, 8 petroclival, 8 tentorial, 4 clinoidal, 4 cavernous sinus, 3 temporal floor, 2 tuberculum sellae and 2 foramen magnum. The average age was 53 years, the mean follow-up period was 52 months, Simpson Grades I and II were obtained in 75.5%. The overall mortality was 5%. Transient cranial nerve deficits occurred in 32% with definite cranial nerve lesion in 18%. Cerebrospinal fluid leak occurred in 14%. Conclusions: The surgical treatment is a mandatory option for large and giant skull base meningiomas. The radical removal is achievable and should be considered an alternative with a good outcome and an acceptable morbidity for such challenge lesions. PMID:26167365

  6. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  7. Postnatal development of the anterior skull base and nasal septum: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To know the normal CT appearance of the anterior skull base and nasal septum after birth. Coronal CT scans with a helical mode were performed from the nasal bone to the sphenoid sinus in 99 children whose ages ranged from 27 days to 14 years. We investigated the CT appearance of the developing anterior skull base and nasal septum with particular attention to the anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base and the ossification patterns of the cribriform plate, perpendicular plate, crista galli, and vomer. The anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base statistically significantly increased with age. The cribriform plate showed partial or complete ossification in at least one segment at more than 3 months of age and in all three segments at more than 6 months of age. Ossification of the cribriform plate occurred earlier in the middle segment than in the anterior and posterior segments. It began exclusively in the region of the lateral mass of the ethmoid and proceeded medially toward the crista galli. Partial ossification of the perpendicular plate was noted as early as 9 months of age, and complete ossification as early as 13 months of age. All children at 18 months and older showed at least partial ossification of the perpendicular plate. Partial ossification of the crista galli was noted as early as 27 days of age, and complete ossification as early as 3 months of age. CT showed complete ossification of the crista galli in all but two children at 6 months and older. The superior aspect of the vomer exhibited a V- or Y-shape on all CT scans in 66%(65/99) of children at any age. It appeared as an undivided single lump anteriorly and a V or Y posteriorly in 34%(34/99). Knowledge of the normal developing patterns of ossification of the anterior skull base and nasal septum could help prevent errors in interpreting CT scans in this region, especially in infants and young children

  8. The Flap Sandwich Technique for a Safe and Aesthetic Skull Base Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Tanaka, Kentarou; Iida, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    For safe and reliable skull base reconstruction combined with repair of cranial bone defects, we introduce the flap sandwich technique in this study. A titanium mesh is often used to repair structural cranial bone defects because it has less donor site morbidity and is easy to handle. However, titanium mesh has disadvantages of exposure and infection postoperatively. To improve surgical outcomes, we applied the flap sandwich technique to 3 cases of skull base reconstruction combined with cranial bone defect repair. Two anterior skull base defects and 1 middle skull base defect were included in this study. The subjects were all women, aged 30, 58, and 62 years. One patient had former multiple craniotomies and another patient had preoperative radiotherapy. The flap sandwich technique involves structural cranial bone reconstruction with a titanium mesh and soft tissue reconstruction with a chimeric anterolateral thigh free flap. First, the dead space between the repaired dura and the titanium mesh is filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction is performed with a titanium mesh. Finally, the titanium mesh is totally covered with the adiposal flap of the anterolateral thigh free flap. The muscle flap protects the dead space from infection, and the adiposal flap covers the titanium mesh to reduce mechanical stress on the covered skin and thus prevent the exposure of the titanium mesh through the scalp. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or titanium mesh exposure in these 3 cases postoperatively, even though 2 patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Additionally, the adiposal flap could provide a soft and natural contour to the scalp and forehead region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:25954846

  9. Evaluation of Three Cases Using a Novel Titanium Mesh System-Skull-Fit with Orbital Wall (Skull-Fit WOW)-For Cranial Base Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tamada, Ikkei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Cranial base reconstructions associated with tumor resections around the orbital wall often require that both the upper and lateral orbital walls be reconstructed during a single procedure. Previously, we used titanium mesh plates that were preoperatively fabricated based on three-dimensional models. Although these plates are precise and do not increase the probability of infection, we still had to use autologous bones to reconstruct the orbital walls. Recently, we developed a new titanium mesh plate-called Skull-Fit(®)-with orbital wall (Skull-Fit WOW(®)), enabling us to reconstruct the cranial base and orbital walls without bone grafts. Here, we report on three reconstruction cases in which the novel titanium mesh-orbital wall system was used. In all three cases, the customized titanium mesh system performed satisfactorily with little, if any, complications. PMID:22451827

  10. Radiological assessment of skull base changes in children with syndromic craniosynostosis: role of ''minor'' sutures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrelli, Rosalinda; D' Apolito, Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Stefanetti, Mariangela; Colosimo, Cesare [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Massimi, Luca; Di Rocco, Concezio [Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Institute of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    This study aims to identify the premature synostosis of ''major'' and ''minor'' sutures of the four ''sutural arches'' of the skull and to perform a morphometric analysis in children with syndromic craniosynostosis in order to evaluate changes in the skull base linked with premature suture synostosis. We reviewed multiplanar high-resolution CT images, implemented with 3D reconstructions, from 18 patients with complex syndromic craniosynostosis and compared them with 18 age-matched healthy subjects. We assessed the calvarial sutures and their extension to the skull base, and then we correlated specific types of synostosis with the size, shape and symmetry of the cranial fossae. We found a marked asymmetry of the skull base growth in all patients. The synostotic involvement around the coronal ring caused a reduction in the growth of the anterior and middle fossae. The size of the posterior cranial fossa was related not only to ''major'' but also to ''minor'' suture synostosis of the lambdoid and parieto-squamosal arches. Changes in the skull base and craniofacial axis symmetry are due to structural and functional relationships between ''major'' and ''minor'' skull sutures, suggesting a structural and functional relationship between the neurocranium and basicranium. The early recognition of prematurely closed skull base sutures may help clinicians and neurosurgeons to establish correct therapeutic approaches. (orig.)

  11. Skull Base Allergic Fungal Sinusitis with Abducens Palsy in the Third Trimester

    OpenAIRE

    Rassekh, Christopher H.; Kinsella, John B.; Calhoun, Karen H.; Maggio, William W.; Chaljub, Gregory; Gourley, William K.

    1996-01-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) usually follows a slow course, but bone erosion including that of the skull base can be seen. Patients may present with intracranial extension mimicking a cranial base neoplasm. We describe a 21-year-old pregnant female initially seen at 27 weeks gestation with a complete right sixth nerve paralysis. MR imaging showed an apparent nasopharyngeal neoplasm invading both temporal lobes. Further evaluation revealed typical findings of fungal sinusitis on both CT and...

  12. Orbito-Rhino-Antro Access Osteotomy For Anterior Skull Base Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramaneni, Sumanth K; Kattimani, Vivekanand. S

    2014-01-01

    Even with advent of endoscopic assisted surgeries the access osteotomy plays an important role for accessing the pathological lesions of anterior skull base since beginning of the era of surgery. This report introduces the orbito–rhino–antral access osteotomy for the removal of juvenile nasio angio fiboma extending in to the cranial base. This osteotomy provides good access to the lesion with lesser morbidity and without hampering the occlusion as in lefort osteotomies. It is safe, easy and f...

  13. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  14. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  15. Natural history of chondroid skull base lesions - case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term follow-up reports on chondroid lesions of the skull base are rarely presented in the literature. There are virtually no data on natural growth rates of these tumors based on MRI obtained over a period of 10 years or longer. We followed a patient who has had such a lesion for more than 12 years. A non-progressive, slight abducens palsy has been the only associated symptom so far. Even though the patient was operated on for an additional intracranial arterio-venous malformation, clinical features and chromosomal testing excluded Maffucci's syndrome. The MRI follow-up in this case provides an extraordinary perspective on the natural history of chondroid skull base tumors. (orig.)

  16. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptman, Jason S., E-mail: jhauptman@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F. [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  17. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  18. A giant vagal schwannoma with unusual extension from skull base to the mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy S Vijendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical vagal schwannoma is an extremely rare neoplasm. Middle aged people are usually affected. These tumors usually present as asymptomatic masses. These tumors are almost always benign. Preoperative diagnosis of these lesions is important due to the morbidity associated with its excision. Preoperative tissue diagnosis is not accurate. The imaging modality can be done to assess the extent and for planning the treatment. Surgical excision with preservation of neural origin is the treatment option. Giant vagal schwannomas are extremely rare. Only one case has been reported in the literature till date. There has no reported case of extensive vagal schwannoma from skull base to the mediastinum. Here, we describe the asymptomatic presentation of an unusual appearing giant cervical vagal schwannoma with an extension from skull base to the mediastinum.

  19. Automatic segmentation of the internal carotid arteries through the skull base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2007-03-01

    An automatic method is presented to segment the internal carotid arteries through the difficult part of the skull base in CT angiography. The method uses the entropy per slice to select a cross sectional plane below the skull base. In this plane 2D circular structures are detected by the Hough transform. The center points are used to initialize a level set which evolves with a prior shape constraint on its topology. In contrast with some related vessel segmentation methods, our approach does not require the acquisition of an additional CT scan for bone masking. Experiments on twenty internal carotids in ten patients show that 19 seed points are correctly identified (95%) and 18 carotids (90%) are successfully segmented without any human interaction.

  20. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Ohlhues, Lars; Roed, Henrik; Juhler, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    meningiomas and 100, 98.2 and 94.9% for pituitary adenomas, respectively. Patients with an impaired visual field function pre-FSRT were more likely to experience worsened function (p = 0.016). We found that RION, was a relatively uncommon event, in a large prospective cohort of patients that were......To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...... skull base meningiomas and 55 patients treated with FSRT for pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and December 2009 with at least 2 years follow-up were included. Patients were followed up prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging scans, visual acuity and visual field examinations. RION was found...

  1. Extended Distance-based Phylogenetic Analyses Applied to 3D Homo Fossil Skull Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Waddell, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    This article shows how 3D geometric morphometric data can be analyzed using newly developed distance-based evolutionary tree inference methods, with extensions to planar graphs. Application of these methods to 3D representations of the skullcap (calvaria) of 13 diverse skulls in the genus Homo, ranging from Homo erectus (ergaster) at about 1.6 mya, all the way forward to modern humans, yields a remarkably clear phylogenetic tree. Various evolutionary hypotheses are tested. Results of these te...

  2. A tomographic study of the skull base in primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Alexandre Varella [Hospital das Clinicas, Service of Neurosurgery, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Guimaraes, Roberto Eustaquio S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Otorhinolaryngology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Santiago, Ana Paula M.S. [Hospital das Clinicas, Services Radiology, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Perpetuo, Francisco Otaviano L.; Machado, Marco Antonio O. [Computed Tomography Center of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    This study aims to evaluate the existence of anatomic abnormalities in the skull base that could contribute to the origin of primary spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks (PSL). Twenty PSL patients were compared with 20 healthy individuals. The following features were measured through an analysis of computed tomography scans: the angles of the petrosal bones and skull base in both the sagittal and coronal planes; the anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the anterior skull base, sella, and sphenoid sinus; the depth of the olfactory fossa; the pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus; the position of the crista galli; and the state of the dorsum sellae. Body mass index (BMI) was compared. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to the angles and diameters of the anterior cranial fossa and the sphenoid sinus or the depth of the olfactory fossa. Pneumatization of the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was more frequent in the PSL group (55%) than in the control group (25%, p = 0.053). The dorsum sellae were eroded in 30% of the PSL patients but intact in all healthy subjects. PSL subjects showed higher sellae (1.0 versus 0.8 cm, p = 0.002). The average BMI of PSL patients was higher than that of the control group. Global alterations in the skull base of PSL patients were not found. The increase in the height of sellae and the erosion of its dorsum suggest intracranial hypertension. The higher BMI in the case group confirms the relation between obesity and PSL. (orig.)

  3. Normal age-related conversion of bone marrow in the skull base. Assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the normal age-related sequence of conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base by means of MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed T1-weighted MR images of the skull base for the distribution of hematopoietic and fatty marrow. The subjects consisted of 169 MR examinations that were performed with the spin-echo technique. The age of the subjects ranged from 0 months to 20 years old. Patients with known marrow abnormalities were excluded from this study. Marrow conversion was assessed in the presphenoid, postsphenoid, basiocciput, petrous apex, clivus, zygomatic bone, and condyle of the mandible. The signal intensity was visually graded, and the signal intensity ratio was determined on the basis of the intensities of the subcutaneous fat and air. The signal intensity of all observed regions was as low as that of muscles until 3 months of age. Conversion of hematopoietic to fatty marrow first occurred in the zygomatic bone until 6 months of age. The presphenoid increased in signal intensity from 5 months to 2 years of age, and the sphenoid sinus began to be pneumatic at this age. Marrow conversion of the postsphenoid and basiocciput was later than that of the presphenoid. Most of the bone marrow of the skull base appeared as fatty conversion until 3 years of age, although some mandibular condyles appeared hematopoietic at 3 years of age. The normal age-related conversion from hematopoietic to fatty marrow in the skull base followed a well-defined sequence. Knowledge of the normal bone marrow conversion by MR imaging is essential for the recognition of pathologic marrow processes. (author)

  4. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  5. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  6. Scedosporium apiospermum as a rare cause of central skull base osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava-Karvinen, Päivi; Nyman, Mikko; Gardberg, Maria; Harju, Inka; Hohenthal, Ulla; Oksi, Jarmo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiospermum mold causing ear infection, central skull base osteomyelitis and finally, occlusion of carotid artery in a 48-year-old diabetic man. The exact diagnosis was established and the severity of the disease understood several months after the onset of symptoms. Despite of appropriate antifungal therapy, and repeated surgical and otological procedures, the infection progressed to fatal cerebral infarction. PMID:27134821

  7. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chaney, Mark A.; Jellish, W Scott; Leonetti, John P.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertai...

  8. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Teflon Granuloma of the Skull Base: A Complication of Endonasal Brain Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Soose, Ryan J.; Snyderman, Carl H.; Amin B Kassam

    2007-01-01

    Teflon granuloma is an inflammatory giant-cell foreign-body reaction to polytetrafluoroethylene fibers or injection. Tissue augmentation with Teflon has dramatically declined over the past two decades because of its implication in granuloma formation. Nevertheless, Teflon felt is still commonly used in neurosurgical dissection and microvascular decompression. We report a patient with a Teflon granuloma of the skull base discovered 1.5 years after endonasal resection of an olfactory groove men...

  10. Teamwork in skull base surgery: An avenue for improvement in patient care

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Ricardo L. Carrau; Daniel F. Kelly; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Kassam, Amin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: During the past several decades, numerous centers have acquired significant expertise in the treatment of skull base pathologies. Favorable outcomes are not only due to meticulous surgical planning and execution, but they are also related to the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines. We review the impact of teamwork on patient care, elaborate on the key processes for successful teamwork, and discuss its challenges. Methods: Pubmed and Medline databases were searched for pu...

  11. Fat suppression and dynamic MR imaging for postoperative evaluation of the skull base surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative T1-weighted spin echo imaging often demonstrate high signal intensities in the surgical area. In tumor cases, it is crucial to determine the nature of high signal intensities because the potentially residual tumor also appears as a high signal area with Gd-DTPA injection. To evaluate the high signal intensity area on postoperative T1-weighted spin echo images, postoperative fat suppression MR imaging and dynamic MR imaging were examined in 53 cases of radically resected skull base tumors. The diagnosis was pituitary adenoma in 29 cases, meningioma in 13 cases, acoustic neurinoma in 10 cases, and ependymoma in one case. In all cases, abdominal fat tissue was placed into dead spaces produces by tumor resection or drilling of the skull base, and into opened air sinus to prevent postoperative cerebro-spinal fluid leakage and postoperative infections. The nature of high signal intensities, such as fat tissues and postoperative hematomas, could be clarified more easily by fat suppression MR imaging than by T1-weighted spin-echo imaging. In five cases, the tumor was not totally resected. The residual tumor could be demonstrated clearly on paramagnetic contrast-enhanced fat suppression MR imagings. On dynamic MR imagings, the time-intensity pattern of residual tumor showed no changes between pre- and postoperative imagings. In conclusion, fat suppression MR imaging and dynamic MR imaging are useful in determining the nature of postoperative high signal intensities after the skull base surgery. (author)

  12. Neurotization of oculomotor, trochlear and abducent nerves in skull base surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世亭; 潘庆刚; 刘宁涛; 刘忠; 沈峰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To anatomically reconstruct the oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve, and abducent nerve by skull base surgery. Methods Seventeen cranial nerves (three oculomotor nerves, eight trochlear nerves and six abducent nerves) were injured and anatomically reconstructed in thirteen skull base operations during a period from 1994 to 2000. Repair techniques included end-to-end neurosuture or fibrin glue adhesion, graft neurosuture or fibrin glue adhesion. The relationships between repair techniques and functional recovery and the related factors were analyzed.Results Functional recovery began from 3 to 8 months after surgery. During a follow-up period of 4 months to 6 years, complete recovery of function was observed in 6 trochlear nerves (75%) and 4 abducent nerves (67%), while partial functional recovery was observed in the other cranial nerves including 2 trochlear nerves, 2 abducent nerves, and 3 oculomotor nerves.Conclusions Complete or partial functional recovery could be expected after anatomical neurotization of an injured oculomotor, trochlear or abducent nerve. Our study demonstrated that, in terms of functional recovery, trochlear and abducent nerves are more responsive than oculomotor nerves, and that end-to-end reconstruction is more efficient than graft reconstruction. These results encourage us to perform reconstruction for a separated cranial nerve as often as possible during skull base surgery.

  13. [Endovascular management of skull base tumors. A practical review on literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Balderrama, Jorge; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee, Angel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Generally speaking, skull base tumors are very difficult-to-reach lesions. More or less, two thirds of those tumors correspond to meningiomas, which are highly vascular tumors. Tumors that are able to an embolization are juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, hemangiopericytomas, hemangioblastomas, meningiomas, metastatic lesions, paragangliomas, glomus tumors and other paragangliomas. Pre-operatory embolization of tumors arising in the skull base is a surgical strategy which allows to control probable hemorrhages secondary to the surgical resection of the tumor. The benefits of this sort of embolization have been partially demonstrated. However, there are concrete and objective results, as reduction in bleeding, time of surgery, post-operative hospital stay, and the use of blood transfusion; besides, another benefit reported is the lower morbimortality related to the surgical management of neural tissue and vascular structures. The aim of this article was to bring up to date the available information up to this moment, describe briefly the background of the pre-operative embolization of skull base tumors, and emphasize the knowledge related with the variables of this therapy, such as the types of hypervascular tumors, vascular anatomy related to this (according to type and position of the tumor), the types of embolization therapy in hypervascular tumors, as well as the materials that must be used. PMID:25078745

  14. The Brachyury Gly177Asp SNP Is not Associated with a Risk of Skull Base Chordoma in the Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent chordoma cancer genotyping study reveals that the rs2305089, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located in brachyury gene and a key gene in the development of notochord, is significantly associated with chordoma risk. The brachyury gene is believed to be one of the key genes involved in the pathogenesis of chordoma, a rare primary bone tumor originating along the spinal column or at the base of the skull. The association between the brachyury Gly177Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and the risk of skull base chordoma in Chinese populations is currently unknown. We investigated the genotype distribution of this SNP in 65 skull-base chordoma cases and 120 healthy subjects. Comparisons of the genotype distributions and allele frequencies did not reveal any significant difference between the groups. Our data suggest that the brachyury Gly177Asp SNP is not involved in the risks of skull-base chordoma, at least in the Chinese population.

  15. Quality assurance of multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau-Hermes, Maria; Schmitt, Robert; Becker, Meike; El-Hakimi, Wissam; Hansen, Stefan; Klenzner, Thomas; Schipper, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    For multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base a quality management is necessary to avoid the damage of closely spaced critical neurovascular structures. So far there is no standardized method applicable independently from the surgery. Therefore, we adapt a quality management method, the quality gates (QG), which is well established in, for example, the automotive industry and apply it to multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery. QG divide a process into different sections. Passing between sections can only be achieved if previously defined requirements are fulfilled which secures the process chain. An interdisciplinary team of otosurgeons, computer scientists, and engineers has worked together to define the quality gates and the corresponding criteria that need to be fulfilled before passing each quality gate. In order to evaluate the defined QG and their criteria, the new surgery method was applied with a first prototype at a human skull cadaver model. We show that the QG method can ensure a safe multiport minimally invasive surgical process at the lateral skull base. Therewith, we present an approach towards the standardization of quality assurance of surgical processes. PMID:25105146

  16. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  17. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are in the middle of a live endoscopic pituitary tumor surgery. I'm joined by my colleagues Dr. ... Neurosurgical Specialist based here in Norfolk, Virginia. The pituitary tumor surgery historically has been done using both specialties, ...

  18. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are in the middle of a live endoscopic pituitary tumor surgery. I'm joined by my colleagues Dr. ... Neurosurgical Specialist based here in Norfolk, Virginia. The pituitary tumor surgery historically has been done using both specialties, ...

  19. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  20. State-of-the-art treatment alternatives for base of skull meningiomas: complementing and controversial indications for neurosurgery, stereotactic and robotic based radiosurgery or modern fractionated radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For skull base meningiomas, several treatment paradigms are available: Observation with serial imaging, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, radiation therapy or some combination of both. The choice depends on several factors. In this review we evaluate different treatment options, the outcome of modern irradiation techniques as well as the clinical results available, and establish recommendations for the treatment of patients with skull-base meningiomas

  1. The Effects of Clonidine Premedication and Scalp Infiltration of Lidocaine on Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Skull Pin Head-Holder Insertion During Skull Base Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Jellish, W Scott; Theard, M. Angele; Cheng, Mary Ann; Leonetti, John P.; Crowder, C. Michael; Tempelhoff, Rene

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a p...

  2. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  3. Influence of the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base on brain kinematics due to sagittal plane head rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P

    2002-08-01

    Two-dimensional physical models of the human head were used to investigate how the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base influence kinematics in the medial brain during sagittal angular head dynamics. Silicone gel simulated the brain and was separatedfrom the surrounding skull vessel by paraffin that provided a slip interface between the gel and vessel. A humanlike skull base model (HSB) included a surrogate skull base mimicking the irregular geometry of the human. An HSBV model added an elliptical inclusion filled with liquid paraffin simulating the lateral ventricles to the HSB model. A simplified skull base model (SSBV) included ventricle substitute but approximated the anterior and middle cranial fossae by a flat and slightly angled surface. The models were exposed to 7600 rad/s2 peak angular acceleration with 6 ms pulse duration and 5 deg forced rotation. After 90 deg free rotation, the models were decelerated during 30 ms. Rigid body displacement, shear strain and principal strains were determined from high-speed video recorded trajectories of grid markers in the surrogate brains. Peak values of inferior brain surface displacement and strains were up to 10.9X (times) and 3.3X higher in SSBV than in HSBV. Peak strain was up to 2.7X higher in HSB than in HSBV. The results indicate that the irregular skull base protects nerves and vessels passing through the cranial floor by reducing brain displacement and that the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid relieves strain in regions inferior and superior to the ventricles. The ventricles and irregular skull base are necessary in modeling head impact and understanding brain injury mechanisms. PMID:12188208

  4. Resection of giant ethmoid osteoma with orbital and skull base extension followed by duraplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferekidou Eliza

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteomas of ethmoid sinus are rare, especially when they involve anterior skull base and orbit, and lead to ophthalmologic and neurological symptoms. Case presentation The present case describes a giant ethmoid osteoma. Patient symptoms and signs were exophthalmos and proptosis of the left eye, with progressive visual acuity impairment and visual fields defects. CT/MRI scanning demonstrated a huge osseous lesion of the left ethmoid sinus (6.5 cm × 5 cm × 2.2 cm, extending laterally in to the orbit and cranially up to the anterior skull base. Bilateral extensive polyposis was also found. Endoscopic and external techniques were combined to remove the lesion. Bilateral endoscopic polypectomy, anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy and middle meatus antrostomy were performed. Finally, the remaining part of the tumor was reached and dissected from the surrounding tissue via a minimally invasive Lynch incision around the left middle canthus. During surgery, CSF rhinorrhea was observed and leakage was grafted with fascia lata and coated with bio-glu. Postoperatively, symptoms disappeared. Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is still free of symptoms. Conclusion Before management of ethmoid osteomas with intraorbital and skull base extension, a thorough neurological, ophthalmological and imaging evaluation is required, in order to define the bounders of the tumor, carefully survey the severity of symptoms and signs, and precisely plan the optimal treatment. The endoscopic procedure can constitute an important part of surgery undertaken for giant ethmoidal osteomas. In addition, surgeons always have to take into account a possible CSF leak and they have to be prepared to resolve it.

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients with skull base tumours.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, M O

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the investigation was to report on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients diagnosed with skull base tumours using the Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36). Those patients suffering with vestibular schwannoma were examined to determine the effect facial nerve function had on their quality of life. It took place at the tertiary referral centre at the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. A prospective study of 70 consecutive patients was taken, who harboured the following tumours: 54 vestibular schwannomas, 13 meningiomas, two haemangioblastomas and one hypoglossal schwannoma. Patients were interviewed using the short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Facial nerve function was assessed in those patients who had vestibular schwannomas. The entire cohort of live skull base patients were assessed after a median follow-up time of 38.4 months. Patients with vestibular schwannoma treated conservatively with interval MRI had a quality of life similar to t he normal population. Those who underwent surgery had a significant difference in two of the SF-36 domains. No statistically significant correlation was found at final assessment between the degree of facial nerve functioning and any of the domains of SF-36. Patients with non-vestibular tumours had an impaired HRQoL in seven of the eight domains. Patients with skull base tumours have a significant impairment of their HRQoL. A conservative policy of follow up with interval MRI for patients with small vestibular schwannomas may therefore be more appropriate to preserve their HRQoL. Facial nerve outcome has little influence on quality of life in vestibular schwannoma patients.

  6. Robust Skull-Stripping Segmentation Based on Irrational Mask for Magnetic Resonance Brain Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Moraru, Luminița; Biswas, Anjan

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a new method for simple, efficient, and robust removal of the non-brain tissues in MR images based on an irrational mask for filtration within a binary morphological operation framework. The proposed skull-stripping segmentation is based on two irrational 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 masks, having the sum of its weights equal to the transcendental number π value provided by the Gregory-Leibniz infinite series. It allows maintaining a lower rate of useful pixel loss. The proposed method has been tested in two ways. First, it has been validated as a binary method by comparing and contrasting with Otsu's, Sauvola's, Niblack's, and Bernsen's binary methods. Secondly, its accuracy has been verified against three state-of-the-art skull-stripping methods: the graph cuts method, the method based on Chan-Vese active contour model, and the simplex mesh and histogram analysis skull stripping. The performance of the proposed method has been assessed using the Dice scores, overlap and extra fractions, and sensitivity and specificity as statistical methods. The gold standard has been provided by two neurologist experts. The proposed method has been tested and validated on 26 image series which contain 216 images from two publicly available databases: the Whole Brain Atlas and the Internet Brain Segmentation Repository that include a highly variable sample population (with reference to age, sex, healthy/diseased). The approach performs accurately on both standardized databases. The main advantage of the proposed method is its robustness and speed. PMID:25733013

  7. Perioperative Management of a Jehovah's Witness Presenting for Skull Base Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, M A; Jellish, W S; Leonetti, J P

    1996-01-01

    A 22-year-old, otherwise healthy, female Jehovah's Witness underwent resection of a midline skull base chondrosarcoma which had been detected after a work-up for headache and diplopia. After bilateral maxillectomies, ethmoidectomies, and a sphenoidectomy, the patient's chondrosarcoma was resected. Despite proper anesthetic management and meticulous hemostasis, significant intraoperative blood loss occurred. The initial postoperative hemoglobin level was 2.3 gm/dL. The clinical concerns pertaining to the perioperative management of the Jehovah's Witness are discussed along with the patient's course and management. PMID:17170989

  8. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Martin J; Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2016-07-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  9. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  10. MRI signal changes in the skull base bone after endoscopic nasopharyngectomy for recurrent NPC: A serial study of 9 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was focused on the serial changes in magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the skull-base bone that occur after endoscopic nasopharyngectomy in patients with local recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC). Materials and methods: Nine patients with histologically proven rNPC were enrolled in this study. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed all presurgical and postsurgical MR images for each patient. Results: At 36 sites on the skull base, the MRI signal underwent a change after surgery, which took the form of a heterogeneous pattern of hypointense regions with moderate contrast enhancement on T1WI. The onset of changes ranged between 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. For 21 of the sites, the changes subsided over the course of follow-up, while in 6 they remained stable. At 9 sites, the alteration MRI signal became more pronounced with time. Changes were more common on the homolateral side of the skull base with respect to the recurrent tumor (P < 0.05). The skull-base bone adjacent to the resection boundary had a higher incidence of signal change than nonadjacent areas (P < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI changes in the skull base bone, having a number of distinguishing characteristics, appear to be a common sequel to endoscopic nasopharyngectomy for rNPC

  11. Risk factors for brain injury after carbon ion radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study aimed to determine the risk factors for radiation-induced brain injury (RIBI) after carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for treating skull base tumors. Materials and methods: Between April 1997 and January 2009, CIRT at a total dose of 48.0–60.8 Gy equivalent (GyE) was administered in 16 fractions to 47 patients with skull base tumors. Of these patients, 39 who were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for more than 24 months were analyzed. RIBI was assessed according to the MRI findings based on the Late Effects of Normal Tissue-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic criteria; clinical symptoms were assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer tables. The correlations of clinical and dosimetric parameters with incidence of ⩾grade 2 RIBI were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The median follow-up period was 67 months. The 5-year actuarial likelihoods of ⩾grade 2 RIBI and ⩾grade 2 clinical symptoms were 24.5% and 7.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the brain volume receiving more than 50 GyE (V50) was a significant risk factor for the development of ⩾grade 2 RIBI (p = 0.004). Conclusion: V50 was a significant risk factor for ⩾grade 2 RIBI after CIRT using a 16-fraction regimen

  12. CT evaluation of Chamberlain's, McGregor's, and McRae's skull-base lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the mean distance from the odontoid process of C2 to the standard skull-base lines (Chamberlain's, McGregor's, and McRae's lines) on computed tomography (CT) imaging. To compare these measurements to previously documented plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Materials and methods: Reformatted midline sagittal CT images of 150 adults were retrospectively evaluated. The shortest perpendicular distance was measured from the Chamberlain's, McGregor's and McRae's baselines for each subject to the odontoid tip. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the CT data with the previously obtained MRI and plain film data. Results: The mean position of the odontoid process was 1.4 mm below Chamberlain's line (median 1.2 mm, SD 2.4 mm), 0.8 mm (median 0.9 mm, SD 3 mm) below McGregor's line and 5 mm (median 5 mm, SD 1.8 mm) below McRae's line. There is no significant difference between male and female results (p > 0.05) or between these CT and previous MRI measurements (p > 0.05). Conclusion: These results provide the mean and range of normal distance from the odontoid process to the most frequently used skull-base lines on the current population on CT

  13. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during skull-base neurosurgeries: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khajavi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR has been studied as a phenomenon including; bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea and gastric hypermotility during manipulation of the peripheral or central parts of the trigeminal nerve.Case presentation: We report a case of a 26-year-old man undergoing surgery for a skull base extra axial tumor in right petrous bone suspected to metastasis of a previous renal cell carcinoma which had been treated four years ago. The patient presented with continuous and unilateral headache and difficulty in swallowing, sensory neural hearing loss, nasal speech and tongue deviation to left side. He underwent general anesthesia with standard monitoring and total intravenous anesthetic technique. The first episode of sudden onset bradycardia and hypotension related to surgical manipulation was detected intraoperatively in which the heart rate spontaneously returned to normal level once the surgical manipulation stopped. However, it repeated several times by beginning of tumor resection and manipulation in the region of trigeminal nerve. The intensity of bradycardia in subsequent episodes of TCR was relatively crescendo and had no fatigability. Finally, it was treated by administration of a single dose of atropine (0.5mg/IV and did not happen again.Conclusion: The risk of TCR should be considered in any neurosurgical intervention involving trigeminal nerve and its branches, especially at the skull base surgeries. The vigilance of the medical team and continuous intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring alerts the surgeons to interrupt surgical maneuvers upon the TCR occurrence, immediately.

  14. Optimization of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivery technique for base-of-skull meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda G; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe. PMID:18674690

  15. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p 3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p 3, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe

  16. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  17. Role of MR imaging in evaluation of neoplastic lesions of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with known neoplasms and clinical evidence of involvement of the skull base were evaluated by CT (General Electric 9800) and MR imaging (General Electric Signa, 1.5 T). The studies were evaluated independently for evidence and extent of the disease. Fourteen lesions were considered to be extensive and these were equally well demonstrated by both MR imaging and CT. MR imaging offered superior visualization of the relationship of the tumor mass to the vascular structures. In six patients, the CT scan was considered to show the extent of bone disease better than the MR image did. In five equivocal cases, all located with the sphenoid bone, MR images showed abnormal signal arising from the clivus. This was evident on T1-weighted images as decreased intensity of the clivus on the sagittal view indicating replacement of bone marrow. The authors' experience indicates that the majority of the lesions of the skull base are equally well evaluated by both modalities. However, MR imaging is superior in assessment of the lesions arising from the sphenoid bone

  18. Proton radiation therapy for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E B; Slater, J D

    2000-10-01

    Most patients with conventional radiotherapy after surgery die with local disease progression. The superior local tumor control and overall survival achieved with fractionated proton RT can be attributed to improved dose localization characteristics of protons, resulting in higher doses delivered. Patients with base of skull neoplasms are increasingly considered for stereotactic radiosurgery. Recently, Muthukumar et al reported for the University of Pittsburgh group on cobalt-60 Gamma Knife (Elekta Instruments, Atlanta, GA) therapy for 15 patients with chordomas or chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. With tumor volumes ranging between 0.98 and 10.3 mL (mean, 4.6 mL), doses to the tumor margin varying from 12 to 20 Gy (median, 18 Gy) were delivered. Two patients were treated without histologic tumor confirmation. After a median follow-up time of 40 months, 2 patients had died of disease, 2 patients had succumbed to intercurrent disease, and 1 patient surviving at the time of analysis had developed tumor progression. Neither actuarial local control nor actuarial survival data were presented. In the LLUMC series, most tumors exceeded sizes reportedly suitable for radiosurgery or were of a highly irregular configuration. Nevertheless, in 11 patients, tumors less than 15 mL in size remained locally controlled as did tumors sized between 15 and 25 mL in 11 additional patients; these patients were thus potential candidates for stereotactic radiosurgery. At present, too few reports on radiosurgery contain sufficient patient numbers and statistical analyses to permit one to draw conclusions about the feasibility of radiosurgery for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. A principal difference between proton RT and radiosurgery as currently practiced in most centers concerns target definition. In proton RT, the GTV is treated. In addition, a clinical volume is defined, which is distinctly different from the GTV in size and shape, to include the

  19. Atlas and feature based 3D pathway visualization enhancement for skull base pre-operative fast planning from head CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdasi, Nava; Li, Yangming; Berens, Angelique; Moe, Kris S.; Bly, Randall A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery provides an alternative to open craniotomy for many skull base lesions. These techniques provides a great benefit to the patient through shorter ICU stays, decreased post-operative pain and quicker return to baseline function. However, density of critical neurovascular structures at the skull base makes planning for these procedures highly complex. Furthermore, additional surgical portals are often used to improve visualization and instrument access, which adds to the complexity of pre-operative planning. Surgical approach planning is currently limited and typically involves review of 2D axial, coronal, and sagittal CT and MRI images. In addition, skull base surgeons manually change the visualization effect to review all possible approaches to the target lesion and achieve an optimal surgical plan. This cumbersome process relies heavily on surgeon experience and it does not allow for 3D visualization. In this paper, we describe a rapid pre-operative planning system for skull base surgery using the following two novel concepts: importance-based highlight and mobile portal. With this innovation, critical areas in the 3D CT model are highlighted based on segmentation results. Mobile portals allow surgeons to review multiple potential entry portals in real-time with improved visualization of critical structures located inside the pathway. To achieve this we used the following methods: (1) novel bone-only atlases were manually generated, (2) orbits and the center of the skull serve as features to quickly pre-align the patient's scan with the atlas, (3) deformable registration technique was used for fine alignment, (4) surgical importance was assigned to each voxel according to a surgical dictionary, and (5) pre-defined transfer function was applied to the processed data to highlight important structures. The proposed idea was fully implemented as independent planning software and additional data are used for verification and

  20. Evaluation of normal and pathologic appearance in skull base and brain stem with metrizamide CT cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrizamide CT cisternography was performed in accordance with prone 600 head-down method, to study the normal anatomy of the skull base and brain stem. Cases of empty sellae, Rathke's cleft cyst, mucocele trigeminal neurinoma, pons glioma, acoustic neurinoma and jugular foramen tumor were studied together. As side effects of MCTC there were headache, vomiting and appearance of slow waves on EEG, but no convulsion. Transient encephalopathy was noted when 250 mgI/ml, 12 ml, was used. Using MCTC, it is possible to identify the vertebral artery, posterior inferior cerebellar artery, basillar artery, vessels forming Willis ring as well as II, III, V, VII and VIII cranial nerves. Further, by measuring the brain stem parts on various levels, it may become possible to detect early changes of degenerative disease. (author)

  1. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Lower Cranial Nerves in Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to Skull Base Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D.; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J.; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits.

  2. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the base of the skull in a 4-month-old infant - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unusual case of giant cell reparative granuloma of the base of the skull of a 4-month-old infant is described. Computerized tomography was useful in defining extent of the lesion and soft tissue abnormalities. Differential diagnosis with other giant cell lesions is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  4. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  5. Active raster scanning with carbon ions. Reirradiation in patients with recurrent skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Welzel, Thomas; Oelmann, Jan; Habl, Gregor; Hauswald, Henrik; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reirradiation with carbon ions in patients with relapse of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Reirradiation with carbon ions was performed on 25 patients with locally recurrent skull base chordoma (n = 20) or chondrosarcoma (n = 5). The median time between the last radiation exposure and the reirradiation with carbon ions was 7 years. In the past, 23 patients had been irradiated once, two patients twice. Reirradiation was delivered using the active raster scanning method. The total median dose was 51.0 GyE carbon ions in a weekly regimen of five to six fractions of 3 GyE. Local progression-free survival (LPFS) was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method; toxicity was evaluated using the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v.4.03). The treatment could be finished in all patients without interruption. In 80 % of patients, symptom control was achieved after therapy. The 2-year-LPFS probability was 79.3 %. A PTV volume of < 100 ml or a total dose of > 51 GyE was associated with a superior local control rate. The therapy was associated with low acute toxicity. One patient developed grade 2 mucositis during therapy. Furthermore, 12 % of patients had tympanic effusion with mild hypacusis (grade 2), while 20 % developed an asymptomatic temporal lobe reaction after treatment (grade 1). Only one patient showed a grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Reirradiation with carbon ions is a safe and effective method in patients with relapsed chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Sicherheit und Wirksamkeit einer Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen bei Patienten mit Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms und Chondrosarkoms der Schaedelbasis. Bei 25 Patienten mit einem Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms (n = 20) oder Chondrosarkoms (n = 5) der Schaedelbasis erfolgte eine Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen. Die mediane Zeit zwischen letzter Bestrahlung und Re-Bestrahlung mit Kohlenstoffionen

  6. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  7. Radiation-Induced Middle Ear and Mastoid Opacification in Skull Base Tumors Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahmed, Salmaan [Department of Radiology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gidley, Paul W. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of middle ear (ME) pathology in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 61 patients treated with RT between 2003 and 2008 for skull base tumors was conducted. Clinical outcomes and demographics were reviewed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed on the eustachian canal (EC), ME, mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea, internal auditory canal, lateral and posterior nasopharynx, and temporal lobes to relate doses to symptoms and radiographic change. Otomastoid opacification was rated 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe) by a neuroradiologist blinded to clinical outcomes and doses. Results: The median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 14-74 Gy). The ME mean dose was 14 Gy and 34 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3 opacification, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean mastoid dose was 10 Gy and 26 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean EC dose was 17 Gy and 32 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p = 0.0001). Otomastoid opacification resolved in 17 of 40 patients (42.5%), at a mean of 17 months after RT (range, 2-45 months). Otomastoid opacification persisted in 23 of 40 patients (57.5%), with a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 2-55 months). Multivariate analysis showed that mastoid dose >30 Gy (odds ratio = 28.0, p < 0.001) and posterior nasopharynx dose of >30 Gy (odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.009) were associated with Grade 2-3 effusions, whereas other factors including dose to EC and ME were not significant. Conclusions: A mean RT dose >30 Gy to the mastoid air cells or posterior nasopharynx is associated with increased risk of moderate to severe otomastoid opacification, which persisted in more than half of patients at 2-year follow-up.

  8. Radiosurgery for skull base meningiomas: a study on 230 cases in Iranian Gamma Knife Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bitara M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Meningiomas are among the most common tumors of the brain. Skull base meningiomas comprise s major part of brain meningiomas. They are difficult to treat because of proximity to major vital neuro-vascular structures which makes their surgical resection hazardous and fraught with a high rate of complications. Radiosurgery is considered as an alternative efficient way to treat them, which targets the tumor and its supplying vasculature. The standard treatment consists of tumor eradication and its supplying vessels through homogeneous dose of 201 rays of cobalt 60 source."n"nMethods: In a case-series study, we report 230 meningiomas referred to Iraninan Gamma Knife Center, treated by radiosurgery with type C Gamma Knife. Radio-surgery was performed at a mean dose of 15 Gy and 50% isodose."n"nResults: Two hundred and thirty of all meningioma cases refered to our institute were skull base lesions. Eighty (35% were new case and the rest were previously treated microsurgically one or more times. None of the patients died after treatment and the most common post-operative complications were headache (30 patients and peri-tumoral edema (12 patients."n"nConclusion: Tumoral control is defined as reduced tumor volume

  9. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm3, or aV70 > 1.7 cm3. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm3 or aV70 > 1.7 cm3. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving higher dose. The EC50

  10. The effects of clonidine premedication and scalp infiltration of lidocaine on hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and skull pin head-holder insertion during skull base procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W S; Theard, M A; Cheng, M A; Leonetti, J P; Crowder, C M; Tempelhoff, R

    2001-08-01

    This study was designed to determine if oral clonidine or lidocaine, injected into the scalp before head-holder (H-H) insertion, would attenuate the hemodynamic effects associated with intubation and H-H placement. Thirty-four patients undergoing skull base procedures were randomized to four groups. Group 1 received clonidine 5 mcg/kg po before surgery with 10 to 15 ml of 1% lidocaine infiltrated at pin insertion sites; Group 2 received clonidine with saline infiltration; Group 3 received a placebo preoperatively and had lidocaine infiltrated at pin sites; and Group 4 received a placebo with saline infiltrated. All patients had a standard anesthetic titrated to a 10 to 14 Hz EEG endpoint during laryngoscopy and H-H placement. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between groups during intubation, but heart rate (HR) increased in patients who did not receive clonidine. H-H application increased HR and MAP in Group 4. HR also increased after H-H placement in patients who received oral clonidine, while patients receiving scalp lidocaine or both clonidine and scalp lidocaine had little change in either value. Clonidine attenuated HR increases after laryngoscopy but not after H-H placement. Lidocaine injected at the pin sites reduced HR, and MAP increased after H-H insertion. The combination of oral clonidine and scalp lidocaine blunted hemodynamic responses to both intubation and H-H placement. PMID:17167618

  11. Comparison of Scientific Calipers and Computer-Enabled CT Review for the Measurement of Skull Base and Craniomaxillofacial Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Citardi, Martin J; Herrmann, Brian; Hollenbeak, Chris S.; Stack, Brendan C.; Cooper, Margaret; Bucholz, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, cadaveric studies and plain-film cephalometrics provided information about craniomaxillofacial proportions and measurements; however, advances in computer technology now permit software-based review of computed tomography (CT)-based models. Distances between standardized anatomic points were measured on five dried human skulls with standard scientific calipers (Geneva Gauge, Albany, NY) and through computer workstation (StealthStation 2.6.4, Medtronic Surgical Navigation Techno...

  12. A prospective evaluation of short-term health-related quality of life in patients undergoing anterior skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Abraham; Fliss, Dan M; Margalit, Nevo; Gil, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing anterior skull base tumor resection. The Anterior Skull Base Surgery QOL questionnaire, a disease-specific multidimensional instrument dedicated to this population, was used to collect and prospectively analyze demographic, medical, and QOL data on 48 patients. Thirty-nine patients completed the questionnaire preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Seventeen patients (44%) had malignant histology and 22 (56%) had benign tumors. The overall QOL score decreased significantly at 6 months postoperatively (p base tumor resection returns to baseline by 1 year after surgery. Histology and radiotherapy are significant predictors of health-related QOL in this population. PMID:20592855

  13. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbel, William H; Rak, Yoel

    2010-10-27

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarensis (3.7-3.0 Ma) is the earliest known species of the australopith grade in which the adult cranial base can be assessed comprehensively. This region of the adult skull was known from fragments in the 1970s, but renewed fieldwork beginning in the 1990s at the Hadar site, Ethiopia (3.4-3.0 Ma), recovered two nearly complete crania and major portions of a third, each associated with a mandible. These new specimens confirm that in small-brained, bipedal Australopithecus the foramen magnum and occipital condyles were anteriorly sited, as in humans, but without the foramen's forward inclination. In the large male A.L. 444-2 this is associated with a short basal axis, a bilateral expansion of the base, and an inferiorly rotated, flexed occipital squama--all derived characters shared by later australopiths and humans. However, in A.L. 822-1 (a female) a more primitive morphology is present: although the foramen and condyles reside anteriorly on a short base, the nuchal lines are very high, the nuchal plane is very steep, and the base is as relatively narrow centrally. A.L. 822-1 illuminates fragmentary specimens in the 1970s Hadar collection that hint at aspects of this primitive suite, suggesting that it is a common pattern in the A. afarensis hypodigm. We explore the implications of these specimens for sexual dimorphism and evolutionary scenarios of functional integration in the hominin cranial base. PMID:20855310

  14. [Skull base fractures in childhood. The role of CT in the accuracy of diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sült, T P; Szever, Z; Mona, T; Kerényi, I; Harmat, G

    1999-03-28

    The authors treated 51 patients suffering from basilar skull fractures between January 1995 and June 1997 following a newly initiated protocol. The effectiveness of recognizing these fractures increased to twice and a half after applying a complex (neurologic, otolaryngologic, ophthalmologic, X-ray and cranial CT) diagnostic examination. CT scans were performed at the slightest suspicion of basilar skull fracture since they provide far more information than the native skull X-ray. A close coherence was observed concerning clinical symptoms, potential complications and the manifested fractures, which helped to draw an exact therapeutical strategy and to prevent potential complications. The authors found X-ray gave satisfactory information only about fractures starting on the vault. In the studied period CT proved the basilar skull fracture in 40 (78%) cases out of the total 51. X-ray did it in only 4 (8%) cases and raised the suspicion of the vault fracture spreading to the cranial floor in 20 (39%) cases. CT did not prove the clinically supposed basilar skull fractures in only 11 (22%) cases compared to 27 (53%) by X-ray. After having consultation with radiologists examination methods were always determined by the clinical picture and the available technical conditions (helical technique, multiplan or 3D-reconstruction). PMID:10349317

  15. Primary step for endoscopic sinonasal tract and anterior skull base robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crampette Louis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgeons have evolved a lot their surgical procedures in sinus surgery and are now able to resect malignant tumors. These progresses are now leading new difficulties like impairing vision (bleeding and LCR flow and necessity of multiple simultaneous tasks. With the aim of designing a new endoscope-holder, primary step was to characterize the surgeon gesture, the kinematics, and the type of man-machine interface acceptable by the surgeon. Methods: We worked on thirteen sinonasal tracts of cadaver heads. Surgical procedures were: opening all the sinuses, the carotid, the sella turcica, the lamina papyracea and the anterior skull base. We used conventional instruments which were instrumented with a force-torque sensor and a navigation system. Then we have experimentally evaluated robots with three different kinematics and two types of man-machine interfaces. Results: We collected enough position and force data as well as kinematics constraints and interface requirements to specify a robot for endoscopic sinus surgery.

  16. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  17. MR Imaging with Gadolinium-DTPA in skull-base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients were investigated by MR imaging in order to evaluate the diagnostic value of Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA in skull-base tumors. The patients were studied with standard acquisition techniques (T1, mixed and T2-weighted images) without contrast medium. The images obtained after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. The contrastographic results in the different types of acquisition were evaluated. Thanks to the extra-ordinary increase in contrast resolution it provides, Gd-DTPA allowed the precise evaluation of the lesion and of its perfect spatial definition in all cases. Our experience demonstrated that Gd-DTPA considerably increases the sensitivity of the technique in this anatomical region. On the contrary, as regards the nature of the lesion, the signal did not significantly very after the iv injection of Gd-DTPA in the various kinds of lesion. In addition to the important diagnostic advantages of Gd-DTPA, its excellent tollerability and the absence of side-effects must be stressed

  18. Radiosurgery with photons or protons for benign and malignant tumours of the skull base: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amichetti Maurizio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS is an important treatment option for intracranial lesions. Many studies have shown the effectiveness of photon-SRS for the treatment of skull base (SB tumours; however, limited data are available for proton-SRS. Several photon-SRS techniques, including Gamma Knife, modified linear accelerators (Linac and CyberKnife, have been developed and several studies have compared treatment plan characteristics between protons and photons. The principles of classical radiobiology are similar for protons and photons even though they differ in terms of physical properties and interaction with matter resulting in different dose distributions. Protons have special characteristics that allow normal tissues to be spared better than with the use of photons, although their potential clinical superiority remains to be demonstrated. A critical analysis of the fundamental radiobiological principles, dosimetric characteristics, clinical results, and toxicity of proton- and photon-SRS for SB tumours is provided and discussed with an attempt of defining the advantages and limits of each radiosurgical technique.

  19. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  20. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Mahoney, Eric; Burke, Peter [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT

  2. Detection of brain lesions at the skull base using diffusion-weighted imaging with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging and generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Er Wei; Wen-Bin Li; Ming-Hua Li; Yue-Hua Li; Dan Wang; Yu-Zhen Zhang; Li-Xin Jin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the value of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) with parallel imaging and a two-dimensional (2D) navigator-based reacquisition technique in the detection of brain lesions at the skull base. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients (male 37, female 17) with suspected skull-base intracranial lesions underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including pre-T1 weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR), standard singl...

  3. Base of the skull morphology and Class III malocclusion in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Maciel Tinano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the morphological differences in the base of the skull of individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion in comparison to control groups with Class I and Class III malocclusion. METHODS: A total of 89 individuals (males and females aged between 5 and 27 years old (Class I, n = 32; Class III, n = 29; and Class III individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate, n = 28 attending PUC-MG Dental Center and Cleft Lip/Palate Care Center of Baleia Hospital and PUC-MG (CENTRARE were selected. Linear and angular measurements of the base of the skull, maxilla and mandible were performed and assessed by a single calibrated examiner by means of cephalometric radiographs. Statistical analysis involved ANCOVA and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: No significant differences with regard to the base of the skull were found between the control group (Class I and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P > 0.017. The cleft lip/palate group differed from the Class III group only with regard to CI.Sp.Ba (P = 0.015. Individuals with cleft lip and palate had a significantly shorter maxillary length (Co-A in comparison to the control group (P < 0.001. No significant differences were found in the mandible (Co-Gn of the control group and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P = 1.000. CONCLUSION: The present findings suggest that there are no significant differences in the base of the skull of individuals Class I or Class III and individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion.

  4. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally-Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mann Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally-advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC, progression-free survival rate (PFS, overall survival rate (OS and toxicities were reported.Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6-67.2 months. The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4-205 cm3. All patients received prior EBRT with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24-75.6 Gy delivered in 12 to 42 fractions. 20 patients had surgeries prior to SABR. 19 patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, 8 patients received concurrent cetuximab (ErbituxTM with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP was 3.3 months (range: 0-16.9 months. For the 29 patients (93.5% who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5-41.4 months. The estimated 1-year overall survival (OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities.Conclusions: SABR has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally-advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base.

  5. Efficacy of Navigation in Skull Base Surgery using Composite Computer Graphics of Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Images

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images,...

  6. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Shin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. Method The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Results Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET.

  7. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; Guduk, Mustafa; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Smith, Christian A; Northcott, Paul; Shih, David; Berisha, Fitim; Flanagan, Adrienne; Munoz, David G; Cusimano, Michael D; Pamir, M Necmettin; Rutka, James T

    2012-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22%) than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%), we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm. PMID:23019410

  8. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jose Diaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22% than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%, we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm.

  9. High-resolution whole-genome analysis of skull base chordomas implicates FHIT loss in chordoma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; Guduk, Mustafa; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Smith, Christian A; Northcott, Paul; Shih, David; Berisha, Fitim; Flanagan, Adrienne; Munoz, David G; Cusimano, Michael D; Pamir, M Necmettin; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22%) than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%), we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm. PMID:23019410

  10. Advanced therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced osteosarcoma in the skull base: a case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of patients with skull base osteosarcoma secondary to radiation (radiation-induced osteosarcoma: RIOS) of the pituitary tumor shows the mean survival of approximately 7 months (2 weeks – 16 months). This warning prognosis seems to stem from two factors, 1) the anatomical complexity of the skull base for total resection of the tumor, and 2) standard adjuvant therapies for the tumor yet to be established. Contrary to the general belief, the authors report an unusually long survival of a 75-year-old woman with a history of osteosarcoma that developed in the same sequence 20 years after pituitary tumor radiation. On her recent admission, she complained of frontal headaches and MRI studies showed a tumor in the sphenoid sinus. Endoscopic trans-nasal tumor removal allowed for histological diagnosis of an osteosarcoma. However, further rapid tumor growth necessitated a radical tumor resection followed by a combined chemotherapy with ifosfamide, cisplatin, and etoposide (ICE). Despite temporary suppression of the tumor growth, the chemotherapy was discontinued due to severe pancytopenia that occurred after three courses of treatment. Shortly after the discontinuation of ICE therapy, the tumor size increased again rapidly, requiring a novel radiation therapy, Cyber-knife treatment. Following this radiation, the tumor growth was arrested, and the patient remains healthy without neurological symptoms over 24 months. The outcome of Cyber-knife in this case suggests that this specific therapy must be considered for the unresectable skull base RIOS

  11. Clinical role of the skull base with increased uptake of 99mTc-MDP on SPECT/CT fused imaging with patients of nasopharyngeal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical role of the fused skull single photon emission computed tomographic and computed tomographic images (SPECT/CT) when there was 'hot' in the skull base of patients with NPC. Methods: 99mTc-MDP SPECT/ CT and MRI were performed in a week in 44 patients (30 with first-visited cases and 14 with return-visited, 38 cases of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and 6 cases of undifferentiated cancer, 14 with headache). Region of interests (ROI) were drawn on the area of the suspected skull base and the upper cervical vertebral body on the same slice. A lesion-to-spine (L/S) ratio was interpreted on SPECT/CT as normal, benign, or malignant. L/S>1 indicated malignant skull base bone involvement (SBBI). Ten patients were studied as controls. Results: (1)Of the 44 study patients, 24 had SBBI (55%) based on SPECT/CT detecting skull base bone lesions with L/S =1.83±0.69. Twenty patients had normal or benign bone lesions on SPECT/CT with L/S =0.68±0.13. There was statistic significance compared SBBI with no SBBI subgroups (P 0.05). The numbers of SBBI had no relationship with positive rate of SPECT/CT (P >0.05). (3)There was no obviously increased uptake in the skull base in the 10 control patients (L/S<1). Conclusion: The skull SPECT/CT was recommended as one of clinical diagnosis tool for SBBI from NPC. Patients with headache should be highly suspected whether tumor cells involved the skull base bone or not. Further accumulation of other clinical factors would clarify the values of SPECT/CT. (authors)

  12. Influence of MRI abnormality in skull base bone on prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To evaluate the influence of skull base bone (SBB) abnormality showed by MRI on prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and methods. From March 1993 to December 1998, 122 NPC patients received prime radiotherapy treatment. All of them were proved pathologically and checked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Every patient received radiation through conjoint facio-cervical field and conventional dose-fractionation schedules. The total dose to the primary tumor was 60 5 Gy (median, 70 Gy). The Kaplan Meier method, the Log-rank test and the Cox regression model were used to evaluate the significance of prognostic factors on NPC patient survival. Results. The overall median survival period was 50 (6 2) months, and the 1, 3 and 5 year-survival rates were, respectively, 99.2%, 87.9%, and 73.3%. The 1, 3, and 5 year-survival rates of abnormality and normality of the SBB on MRI were 98.9%, 87.2%, 71.9%, and 100.0%, 89.8%, 77.0%, respectively (P 0.4233). Gender, age, head pain, SBB abnormality, cranial nerve palsy, cervical lymphadenopathy and primary tumor extent were analyzed with the Cox regression model and SBB abnormality on MRI did not prove to have statistical significance (P = 0.6934). According to the analysis of regrouping, patients with SBB abnormalities ≥ sites have a worse prognosis (P = 0.0427). Then. the above seven factors are analyzed by Cox regression model and the result had statistical significance (P = 0.0385). Conclusion. The SBB abnormality on MRI is of no obvious influence on prognosis of NPC. However, when SBB abnormality sites were ≥ 2, there is obvious statistical significance on the prognosis. (author)

  13. Importance of precise positioning for proton beam therapy in the base of skull and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuzaki, H; Urie, M M

    1991-08-01

    Using proton beam therapy, high doses have been delivered to chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of skull and cervical spine. Dose inhomogeneity to the tumors has been accepted in order to maintain normal tissue tolerances, and detailed attention to patient immobilization and to precise positioning has minimized the margins necessary to ensure these dose constraints. This study examined the contribution of precise positioning to the better dose localization achieved in these treatments. Three patients whose tumors represented different anatomic geometries were studied. Treatment plans were developed which treated as much of the tumor as possible to 74 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) while maintaining the central brain stem and central spinal cord at less than or equal to 48 CGE, the surface of the brain stem, surface of the spinal cord, and optic structures at less than or equal to 60 CGE, and the temporal lobes at less than or equal to 5% likelihood of complication using a biophysical model of normal tissue complication probability. Two positioning accuracies were assumed: 3 mm and 10 mm. Both proton beam plans and 10 MV X ray beam plans were developed with these assumptions and dose constraints. In all cases with the same positioning uncertainties, the proton beam plans delivered more dose to a larger percentage of the tumor volume and the estimated tumor control probability was higher than with the X ray plans. However, without precise positioning both the proton plans and the X ray plans deteriorated, with a 12% to 25% decrease in estimated tumor control probability. In all but one case, the difference between protons with good positioning and poor positioning was greater than the difference between protons and X rays, both with good positioning. Hence in treating these tumors, which are in close proximity to critical normal tissues, attention to immobilization and precise positioning is essential. With good positioning, proton beam therapy permits higher

  14. Diseases of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  15. Applied Anatomy of the Neurovascular Structures of the Base of the Skull

    OpenAIRE

    Rosso, María Victoria; Pawluk, Gustavo; Pappolla, Agustin; Ferraro, Fernando Martin; Dorman, Matías; Bakken, Sofía María

    2011-01-01

    Variations of the anatomy of the vascular system or various pathological processes like intracranial aneurysms could cause neurological symptoms, due to their proximity to cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to describe the link between vessels and cranial nerves, to associate with neurological clinic.24 anatomical pieces were used, 10 of them with repletion of the vascular tree with coloured latex and 12 skulls, observed with magnifying glasses, and through surgical microscope. Images d...

  16. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the tumor control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway. We have analyzed 34 patients (23 females and 11 males, median age 59 years) who underwent multi-fraction SRS for a skull base metastasis compressing or in close proximity of optic nerves and chiasm. All metastases were treated with frameless LINAC-based multi-fraction SRS in 5 daily fractions of 5 Gy each. Local control, distant failure, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. At a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–36.5 months), twenty-five patients had died and 9 were alive. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 89% and 72%, and respective actuarial survival rates were 63% and 30%. Four patients recurred with a median time to progression of 12 months (range, 6–27 months), and 17 patients had new brain metastases at distant brain sites. The 1-year and 2-year distant failure rates were 50% and 77%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70 and the absence of extracranial metastases were prognostic factors associated with lower distant failure rates and longer survival. After multi-fraction SRS, 15 (51%) out of 29 patients had a clinical improvement of their preexisting cranial deficits. No patients developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy during the follow-up. Multi-fraction SRS (5 x 5 Gy) is a safe treatment option associated with good local control and improved cranial nerve symptoms for patients with a skull base metastasis involving the anterior visual pathway

  17. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.)

  18. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging; Anatomie der Schaedelbasis und Hirnnerven in der Schnittbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F. [Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis sind sowohl die Computertomographie (CT) als auch Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) geeignet. Waehrend mittels CT vorzugsweise die exakte knoecherne Ausbreitung von Pathologien z. B. zur operativen Therapieplanung erfasst werden, dient die MRT sowohl der Darstellung von Pathologien bzgl. ihrer Ausbreitung im Weichteilgewebe als auch dem Nachweis knoecherner Infiltration. Bei der Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis wird eine hochaufloesende Darstellung mit geringer Schichtdicke fuer beide Modalitaeten angestrebt. Die genaue Kenntnis der Anatomie ist bereits bei der Untersuchungsplanung notwendig. Sie ist zudem Voraussetzung fuer das Erkennen und die korrekte Interpretation von Pathologien. Die MRT ist die bildgebende Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung von Pathologien der Hirnnerven. Dabei ist es durch gezielte Sequenzauswahl, die sich nach den die Hirnnerven umgebenen Strukturen richtet, moeglich, den gesamten Verlauf der Hirnnerven zu beurteilen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis

  19. A clinical pilot study of a modular video-CT augmentation system for image-guided skull base surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen P.; Mirota, Daniel J.; Uneri, Ali; Otake, Yoshito; Hager, Gregory; Reh, Douglas D.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Augmentation of endoscopic video with preoperative or intraoperative image data [e.g., planning data and/or anatomical segmentations defined in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], can improve navigation, spatial orientation, confidence, and tissue resection in skull base surgery, especially with respect to critical neurovascular structures that may be difficult to visualize in the video scene. This paper presents the engineering and evaluation of a video augmentation system for endoscopic skull base surgery translated to use in a clinical study. Extension of previous research yielded a practical system with a modular design that can be applied to other endoscopic surgeries, including orthopedic, abdominal, and thoracic procedures. A clinical pilot study is underway to assess feasibility and benefit to surgical performance by overlaying CT or MR planning data in realtime, high-definition endoscopic video. Preoperative planning included segmentation of the carotid arteries, optic nerves, and surgical target volume (e.g., tumor). An automated camera calibration process was developed that demonstrates mean re-projection accuracy (0.7+/-0.3) pixels and mean target registration error of (2.3+/-1.5) mm. An IRB-approved clinical study involving fifteen patients undergoing skull base tumor surgery is underway in which each surgery includes the experimental video-CT system deployed in parallel to the standard-of-care (unaugmented) video display. Questionnaires distributed to one neurosurgeon and two otolaryngologists are used to assess primary outcome measures regarding the benefit to surgical confidence in localizing critical structures and targets by means of video overlay during surgical approach, resection, and reconstruction.

  20. Radiosurgery of small skull-base lesions. No advantage for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery versus conformal arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O.; Fahlbusch, R. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has shown the ability to conform the dose to concavities and to better avoid critical organs for large tumors. Given the availability of an electronically driven micro-multileaf collimator, both intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS) and dynamic conformal arc (DCA) technique (DCA) can be performed at the Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, since 12/2002. This study evaluates both techniques in small skull-base tumors treated with radiosurgery. Material and methods: between 12/2002 and 04/2004, a total of 109 radiosurgical procedures were performed in 77 patients, equally distributed between patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), pituitary adenoma (PA) and meningeoma (M). Six index patients (n = 2 AN, n = 1 PA, n = 3 M) routinely planned for dynamic arc stereotactic radiosurgery were replanned using the IMSRS approach (BrainScan, BrainLAB, Heimstetten, Germany). The RTOG radiosurgery quality assurance guidelines, isodose volumes, doses to organs at risk (OAR), and dose delivery criteria were compared. Results: DCA was superior to IMSRS for homogeneity and coverage. IMSRS could keep the high-dose-irradiated volumes (90% isodose volume) lower than DCA in the PA and AN with very small volumes, but all other lower dose volumes were larger for IMSRS. Dose maxima to OAR were higher for IMSRS. Treatment delivery time for IMSRS would clearly exceed treatment time for DCA by a factor of 2-3. The integral absorbed dose to the brain was much higher in the IMSRS than in the DCA approach (factor 2-3). Conclusion: RTOG radiosurgery guidelines were best met by the DCA rather than IMSRS approach for the treatment of small skull-base lesions. The IMSRS approach will increase the time for planning, dose delivery and integral dose to the brain. Thus, IMSRT techniques are recommended for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to larger volumes rather

  1. Feasibility of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated brachytherapy of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strege, R.J.; Eichmann, T.; Mehdorn, H.M. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kovacs, G.; Niehoff, P. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Interdisciplinary Brachytherapy Center; Maune, S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology; Holland, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical feasibility and toxicity of combined operation and perioperative intensity-modulated fractionated interstitial brachytherapy (IMBT) in advanced-stage malignancies involving the skull base with the goal of preserving the patients' senses of sight. Patients and Methods: This series consisted of 18 consecutive cases: ten patients with paranasal sinus carcinomas, five with sarcomas, two with primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), and one with parotid gland carcinoma. After, in most cases, subtotal surgical resection (R1-R2: carried out so that the patients' senses of sight were preserved), two to twelve (mean five) afterloading plastic tubes were placed into the tumor bed. IMBT was performed with an iridium-192 stepping source in pulsed-dose-rate/high-dose-rate (PDR/HDR) afterloading technique. The total IMBT dose, ranging from 10 to 30 Gy, was administered in a fractionated manner (3-5 Gy/day, 5 days/week). Results: Perioperative fractionated IMBT was performed in 15 out of 18 patients and was well tolerated. Complications that partially prevented or delayed IMBT in some cases included cerebrospinal fluid leakage (twice), meningitis (twice), frontal brain syndrome (twice), afterloading tube displacement (twice), seizure (once), and general morbidity (once). No surgery- or radiation-induced injuries to the cranial nerves or eyes occurred. Median survival times were 33 months after diagnosis and 16 months after combined operation and IMBT. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated IMBT after extensive but vision-preserving tumor resection seems to be a safe and well-tolerated treatment of advanced/recurrent malignancies involving the skull base. These preliminary state suggest that combined operation and perioperative fractionated IMBT is a palliative therapeutic option in the management of fatal malignancies involving the base of the skull, a strategy which leaves the patients' visual acuity intact. (orig.)

  2. Physical Aggression in the Family and Preschoolers' Use of the Mother as a Secure Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, German; Pratt, Dawn Marie

    2008-01-01

    The quality of child-mother attachment relationships is context sensitive. Conflict and aggression in the marital relationship as well as aggressive discipline practices may diminish a child's confidence in her or his mother as a secure base. We investigated whether physical aggression against the mother, exposure of the child to it, and use of…

  3. Preteens Talking to Parents: Perceived Communication and School-Based Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simone F.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to combat escalating aggression and violence in schools, it is important to understand the relationship between intrafamilial communication and aggressive behaviors. In this study, the authors examined the link between preadolescents' perceptions of parent-child communication and their levels of school-based aggressive behavior. The…

  4. A Multi-Systemic School-Based Approach for Addressing Childhood Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runions, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    School-based approaches to addressing aggression in the early grades have focused on explicit curriculum addressing social and emotional processes. The current study reviews research on the distinct modes of aggression, the status of current research on social and emotional processing relevant to problems of aggression amongst young children, as…

  5. Three-dimensional fracture visualisation of multidetector CT of the skull base in trauma patients: comparison of three reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the detection rate of skull-base fractures for three different three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction methods of cranial CT examinations in trauma patients. A total of 130 cranial CT examinations of patients with previous head trauma were subjected to 3D reconstruction of the skull base, using solid (SVR) and transparent (TVR) volume-rendering technique and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Three radiologists independently evaluated all reconstructions as well as standard high-resolution multiplanar reformations (HR-MPRs). Mean fracture detection rates for all readers reading rotating reconstructions were 39, 36, 61 and 64% for SVR, TVR, MIP and HR-MPR respectively. Although not significantly different from HR-MPR with respect to sensitivity (P = 0.9), MIP visualised 18% of fractures that were not reported in HR-MPR. Because of the relatively low detection rate using HR-MPRs alone, we recommend reading MIP reconstructions in addition to the obligatory HR-MPRs to improve fracture detection. (orig.)

  6. Analytical study of the artifacts appeared in the base of skull on the Artronix 1110 Neuro CAT System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many kind of artifacts in the CT images of the skull base views. The streaking is one of the artifacts which radiate from the tip of sharp edged bone as pyramidal bone. But there are some different type of artifacts in the skull base region. Among these the radiated artifacts in the infratentorial region are usually demonstrated in the picture with Artronix Neuro-CT-1110. However in some pictures there are few of these artifacts. The difference of these two type of the pictures is due to the volume of air filled nasal cavity. The images which contained very small spaces of nasal cavity were looked beautiful with very few artifacts. So those artifacts might be due to the effects of the airfilled nasal cavity. The phantome was made to investigate the effects of the longitudinal distance of the airfilled cavity. The artifact begins to appear from the distance of 4 cm, and within 4 cm there are very few artifacts. The air gaps of nasopharynx and mastoid cells are all the causes of this kind of artifacts. In order to avoid these artifacts it is needed to make the adequate angle of the O-M line to eliminate the nasal cavity before taking the position for CT images. (author)

  7. Neuropsychological outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for base of skull meningiomas: a prospective 1-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cognitive outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with base of skull meningiomas. Methods and material: A total of 40 patients with base of skull meningiomas were neuro psychologically evaluated before, after the first fraction (1.8 Gy), at the end of FSRT (n=37), 6 weeks (n=24), 6 (n=18) and 12 months (n=14) after FSRT. A comprehensive test battery including assessment of general intelligence, attention and memory functions was used. Alternate forms were used and current mood state was controlled. Results: After the first fraction a transient decline in memory function and simultaneous improvements in attention functions were observed. No cognitive deteriorations were seen during further follow-up, but increases in attention and memory functions were observed. Mood state improved after the first fraction, at the end of radiotherapy and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Conclusion: The present data support the conclusion that the probability for the development of permanent cognitive dysfunctions appears to be very low after FSRT. The transient memory impairments on day 1 are interpreted as most likely related to an increase of a preexisting peritumoral edema, whereas the significant acute improvements in attention functions are interpreted as practice effects. An analysis of localization specific effects of radiation failed to show clear hemisphere specific cognitive changes

  8. Operative management of skull base malignant tumors arising from the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus. Recent strategies used in 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity are the most common malignant tumors of the anterior and anterolateral skull base. The treatment of these tumors affecting the skull base is complex due to the significant anatomical features. We examined 25 patients, 17 males and 8 females with mean age 61±2 years. En bloc resections using anterior skull base resection, orbital resection, middle fossa resection, and combined procedures of these three resections were performed. Using a combination of adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy, we have achieved a 2-year disease-free survival rate of 90% in these cases. However, potential complications include cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, abscess formation, pneumocephalus, frontal brain contusion, trismus, and dysphagia as a functional complication. We believe that the optimal management of such malignant tumors involves a multimodal and multidisciplinary team approach. Here we present our recent institutional experience and treatment policy employed during the past 3 years. (author)

  9. Analysis of the relationship between tumor dose inhomogeneity and local control in patients with skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: When irradiating a tumor that abuts or displaces any normal structures, the dose constraints to those structures (if lower than the prescribed dose) may cause dose inhomogeneity in the tumor volume at the tumor-critical structure interface. The low-dose region in the tumor volume may be one of the reasons for local failure. The aim of this study is to quantitate the effect of tumor dose inhomogeneity on local control and recurrence-free survival in patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and Materials: 132 patients with skull base chordoma were treated with combined photon and proton irradiation between 1978 and 1993. This study reviews 115 patients whose dose-volume data and follow-up data are available. The prescribed doses ranged from 66.6 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) to 79.2 CGE (median of 68.9 CGE). The dose to the optic structures (optic nerves and chiasma), the brain stem surface, and the brain stem center was limited to 60, 64, and 53 CGE, respectively. We used the dose-volume histogram data derived with the three-dimensional treatment planning system to evaluate several dose-volume parameters including the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). We also analyzed several other patient and treatment factors in relation to local control and recurrence-free survival. Results: Local failure developed in 42 of 115 patients, with the actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years being 59% and 44%. Gender was a significant predictor for local control with the prognosis in males being significantly better than that in females (P 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.3). In a Cox univariate analysis, with stratification by gender, the significant predictors for local control (at the probability level of 0.05) were EUD, the target volume, the minimum dose, and the D5cc dose. The prescribed dose, histology, age, the maximum dose, the mean dose, the median dose, the D90% dose, and the overall treatment time were not significant factors. In a Cox multivariate analysis, the

  10. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  11. A dual resolution measurement based Monte Carlo simulation technique for detailed dose analysis of small volume organs in the skull base region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chi-Yuan; Tung, Chuan-Jung; Chao, Tsi-Chain; Lin, Mu-Han; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dose distribution of a skull base tumor and surrounding critical structures in response to high dose intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a dual resolution sandwich phantom. The measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method (Lin et al., 2009) was adopted for the study. The major components of the MBMC technique involve (1) the BEAMnrc code for beam transport through the treatment head of a Varian 21EX linear accelerator, (2) the DOSXYZnrc code for patient dose simulation and (3) an EPID-measured efficiency map which describes non-uniform fluence distribution of the IMRS treatment beam. For the simulated case, five isocentric 6 MV photon beams were designed to deliver a total dose of 1200 cGy in two fractions to the skull base tumor. A sandwich phantom for the MBMC simulation was created based on the patient's CT scan of a skull base tumor [gross tumor volume (GTV)=8.4 cm3] near the right 8th cranial nerve. The phantom, consisted of a 1.2-cm thick skull base region, had a voxel resolution of 0.05×0.05×0.1 cm3 and was sandwiched in between 0.05×0.05×0.3 cm3 slices of a head phantom. A coarser 0.2×0.2×0.3 cm3 single resolution (SR) phantom was also created for comparison with the sandwich phantom. A particle history of 3×108 for each beam was used for simulations of both the SR and the sandwich phantoms to achieve a statistical uncertainty of <2%. Our study showed that the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (VPTV95) was 96.9%, 96.7% and 99.9% for the TPS, SR, and sandwich phantom, respectively. The maximum and mean doses to large organs such as the PTV, brain stem, and parotid gland for the TPS, SR and sandwich MC simulations did not show any significant difference; however, significant dose differences were observed for very small structures like the right 8th cranial nerve, right cochlea, right malleus and right semicircular canal. Dose

  12. A Bullet Entered through the Open Mouth and Ended Up in the Parapharyngeal Space and Skull Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saileswar Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shot from a revolver from a close range, a bullet pierced the chest of a policeman and entered through the open mouth of a young male person standing behind. The entry wound was found in the cheek mucosa adjacent to the left lower third molar. After hitting and fracturing the body and the ramus of the mandible, the bullet was deflected and was finally lodged in the parapharyngeal space and skull base, anterolateral to the transverse process of the atlas. The great vessels of the neck were not injured. The patient’s condition was very critical but his life could be saved. The bullet was approached through a modified Blair’s incision and was found to be lying over the carotid sheath. It was removed safely and the patient recovered completely.

  13. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Christopher S; Dietrich, August R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D; Golfinos, John G; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations. PMID:24014055

  14. Applied Anatomy of the Neurovascular Structures of the Base of the Skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso, María Victoria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the anatomy of the vascular system or various pathological processes like intracranial aneurysms could cause neurological symptoms, due to their proximity to cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to describe the link between vessels and cranial nerves, to associate with neurological clinic.24 anatomical pieces were used, 10 of them with repletion of the vascular tree with coloured latex and 12 skulls, observed with magnifying glasses, and through surgical microscope. Images database was used to elaborate this study. The neurovascular relations observed during the dissection including, in cephalocaudal sense, the followings:a. Optic nerve [II] with internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery.b. Oculomotor nerve [III] with posterior cerebral artery, superior cerebellar artery and posterior communicating artery.c. Trochlear nerve [IV] with superior cerebellar artery.d. Trigeminal nerve [V] with superior cerebellar arterye. Facial nerve [VII] with anterior- inferior cerebellar artery.f. Glossopharyngeal nerve [IX] with posterior- inferior cerebellar artery.The close neurovascular links can explain various neurological manifestations and understand different neurosurgical approaches.The knowledge of the neurovascular relations provides students a useful tool to understand the clinic. In addition, it improves physicians’ daily practice.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INDUCTION SKULL MELTING PROCESS FOR TITANIUM-ALUMINIUM BASE ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Y. Chen; L.J. Xu; F.T. Kong; Q. Shu; Y.Y. Chen

    2004-01-01

    The mathematics model for temperature field of water-cooling copper crucible induction skull melting process was established. The program for simulating temperature field of melting process was developed with finite element method. The temperature field of the melting process for Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was calculated. During melting period, the temperature is raised gradually along radius augmentation direction. The elements of the charge near the crucible wall are molten first. The center elements of the charge are molten last. The melting time of the center element is just that of all the charge melting. The melting time of Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy is 15min. In which, the charge was heated by low power 80kW for 9min and by high power 300kW for 6min. When melting Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy,the loading power is nearly direct proportion to melt temperature. Increasing loading power may raise melt temperature. The best melting power of Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy is 305-310kW. This is identical with the melting test and has guidance sense to the melting process of actual titanium alloy.

  16. Detecting plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA to diagnose postradiation nasopharyngeal skull base lesions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: a prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Ya Liang; Wei Sun; Ping Han; Xing Lu; Ying-Ni Lian; Xiao-Ming Huang

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of postradiation nasopharyngeal skull base lesions in petients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is still a tough problem in clinical practice.An early and accurate diagnosis is important for subsequent management.We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic value of plasma Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in detecting postradiation nasopharyngeal skull base lesions in NPC patients.From July 2006 to September 2010,90 patients with postradiation NPC (34 women and 56 men; median age:42years) met the selection criteria and were recruited in this study.All postradiation nasopharyngeal skull base lesions were found in the latest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations before endoscopic surgery,and the nasopharyngeal cavity was normal under flexible nasopharyngoscopy.Plasma EBV DNA detection was performed within 2 weeks before endoscopic surgery.A total of 90 endoscopic operations were successfully performed without any postoperative complications. Recurrences confirmed by postoperative pathology were found in 30 patients.The specificity,positive and negative predictive values of plasma EBV DNA detection were better than those of MRI.In addition,combining plasma EBV DNA detection with MRI improved the specificity and positive predictive values of MRI.Plasma EBV DNA detection followed by MRI would help to diagnose recurrence whereas MRI was unable.These results indicate that plasma EBV DNA is an effective and feasible biomarker for detecting postradiation nasopharyngeal skull base lesions in NPC patients.

  17. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  18. Mindfulness-based program for management of aggression among youth: A follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Youth have shown indulgence in various high-risk behaviors and violent activities. Yoga-based approaches have been used for the management of psychological problems. The present work explores the role of mindfulness-based program in the management of aggression among youth. Materials and Methods: Sociodemographic information schedule, Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, and World Health Organization quality of life were administered on 50 subjects in the age range of 18-25 years at pre- and post-mindfulness-based program level. Results: It revealed the presence of feeling of well-being and ability to relax themselves; changes in score of anger, hostility, physical, and verbal aggression; and enhancement of quality of life in the physical and environment domains at 1 month follow-up. Conclusions: Mindfulness-based program has shown changes in aggression expression/control and implies integration of it in available program for the management of aggression among youth.

  19. Assessing Teachers' Perceptions for School-Based Aggression Prevention Programs: Applying a Cognitive-Ecological Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Paul; Musher-Eizenman, Dara; Dubow, Eric F.; Danner, Stephanie; Heretick, Donna M. L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes qualitative and quantitative assessment based on responses of 221 teachers from nine elementary schools in two districts (urban and suburban) to inform plans for reducing and preventing student aggression. Teachers' perceptions of students' aggressive behavior and beliefs were validated against students' self-reports and…

  20. Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome Can Use a Mindfulness-Based Strategy to Control Their Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Angela D. A.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome occasionally exhibit aggressive behavior against peers and parents. In a multiple baseline design across subjects, three adolescents with Asperger syndrome were taught to use a mindfulness-based procedure called "Meditation on the Soles of the Feet" to control their physical aggression in the family…

  1. Effect of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT on reducing aggression in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Faramarzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students’ aggression at schoolshas attracted the attention of many professionals and researchers. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on the reduction of male secondary students' aggression in Kermanshah. Methods: In this experimental study, a pretest-posttest control group design was used. A total of 400 students were randomly selected from among the high school male students in Kermanshah using multistage sampling. Of these, 40 students who had a higher mean score were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent with mindfulness-based cognitive therapy once a week for eight sessions. The subjects completed Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire (1992 twice, one before treatment and another after treatment. The data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results of multivariate analysis of covariance showed that after removing the effect of pretest, the experimental group indicated a significant reduction compared to the control group in the total aggression scale (F=1059.531; P<0.001. Also, after removing the effect of the pretest, the experimental group experienced a significant decrease compared to the control group at the micro scales of aggressive feeling (F=639.936; P<0.001, the subscales of aggressive thoughts (F=154.240; P<0.001, and aggressive behaviors (F=502.836; P<0.001,. Conclusion: This study showed that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy reduced aggression in all three components of aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts and aggressive feelings in the students.

  2. Patterns of change in family-based aggression prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanish, L D; Tolan, P H

    2001-04-01

    Patterns of change on three intervention targets were examined in 151 families that participated in a family intervention designed to reduce and prevent children's aggressive behavior. Measures of parents' alliance and parenting skills and children's aggressive behavior were obtained at five times during the intervention. Three cluster analyses were conducted to identify patterns of change on each target. Linear and nonlinear patterns of improvement as well as two distinct patterns of no change were obtained. The patterns were differentiated by net improvement, overall level of skill, and trajectory of change. Family characteristics also differentiated the patterns and relations were found among patterns across intervention targets. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:11314554

  3. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with chordoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study HIT-1-Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordomas of the skull base are relative rare lesions of the bones. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard, though complete resection is nearly impossible due to close proximity to critical and hence also dose limiting organs for radiation therapy. Level of recurrence after surgery alone is comparatively high, so adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chordomas. However, high-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumors. This clinical study is a prospective randomised phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie centre (HIT) and is a monocentric study. Patients with skull base chordoma will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV in carbon ion treatment (accelerated dose) will be 63 Gy E ± 5% and 72 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. Local-progression free survival (LPFS) will be analysed as primary end point. Toxicity and overall survival are the secondary end points. Additional examined parameters are patterns of recurrence, prognostic factors and plan quality analysis. Up until now it was impossible to compare two different particle therapies, i.e. protons and carbon ions directly at the same facility. The aim of this study is to find out, whether the biological advantages of carbon ion therapy can also be clinically confirmed and translated into the better local control rates in the treatment of skull base chordomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01182779

  4. A dual resolution measurement based Monte Carlo simulation technique for detailed dose analysis of small volume organs in the skull base region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine dose distribution of a skull base tumor and surrounding critical structures in response to high dose intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a dual resolution sandwich phantom. The measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method (Lin et al., 2009) was adopted for the study. The major components of the MBMC technique involve (1) the BEAMnrc code for beam transport through the treatment head of a Varian 21EX linear accelerator, (2) the DOSXYZnrc code for patient dose simulation and (3) an EPID-measured efficiency map which describes non-uniform fluence distribution of the IMRS treatment beam. For the simulated case, five isocentric 6 MV photon beams were designed to deliver a total dose of 1200 cGy in two fractions to the skull base tumor. A sandwich phantom for the MBMC simulation was created based on the patient's CT scan of a skull base tumor [gross tumor volume (GTV)=8.4 cm3] near the right 8th cranial nerve. The phantom, consisted of a 1.2-cm thick skull base region, had a voxel resolution of 0.05×0.05×0.1 cm3 and was sandwiched in between 0.05×0.05×0.3 cm3 slices of a head phantom. A coarser 0.2×0.2×0.3 cm3 single resolution (SR) phantom was also created for comparison with the sandwich phantom. A particle history of 3×108 for each beam was used for simulations of both the SR and the sandwich phantoms to achieve a statistical uncertainty of <2%. Our study showed that the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (VPTV95) was 96.9%, 96.7% and 99.9% for the TPS, SR, and sandwich phantom, respectively. The maximum and mean doses to large organs such as the PTV, brain stem, and parotid gland for the TPS, SR and sandwich MC simulations did not show any significant difference; however, significant dose differences were observed for very small structures like the right 8th cranial nerve, right cochlea, right malleus and right semicircular canal

  5. Assessment of tumor blood flow and its correlation with histopathologic features in skull base meningiomas and schwannomas by using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya, E-mail: yamatatu_01eik@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Takeuchi, Hiroaki, E-mail: takeu@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kinoshita, Kazuyuki, E-mail: kkino@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kosaka, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nkosaka@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Kimura, Hirohiko, E-mail: kimura@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: We aimed to investigate whether pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL)-MRI can adequately evaluate tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region and evaluate the correlation between tumor blood flow (TBF) and the histopathologic features of skull base meningiomas and schwannomas. Materials and methods: We enrolled 31 patients with skull base meningioma (n = 14) and schwannoma (n = 17) who underwent surgical resection. TBF was calculated from pcASL. Tissue sections were stained with CD34 to evaluate microvessel area (MVA). TBF and MVA ratio were compared between meningiomas and schwannomas using Mann–Whitney U-test. The correlations between MVA ratio and TBF were evaluated in each tumor by using single linear regression analysis and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r{sub s}). Results: MVA ratio and TBF were significantly higher in meningioma than in schwannoma (both p < 0.01). Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between MVA ratio and both mean and max TBF for meningiomas (r{sub s} = 0.89, 0.81, both p < 0.01). There was a weak positive correlation between MVA ratio and mean TBF for schwannomas (r{sub s} = 0.43, p = 0.04). However, no significant correlation was found between MVA ratio and max TBF for schwannoma. Conclusions: pcASL-MRI is useful for evaluating tumor perfusion even if the tumors are located in the skull base region. Moreover, pcASL-TBF was significantly higher in most meningiomas compared to schwannomas, which can help in the differential diagnosis of the 2 tumor types even without the use of contrast material.

  6. Surgical Simulation of Extradural Anterior Clinoidectomy through the Trans-superior Orbital Fissure Approach Using a Dissectable Three-dimensional Skull Base Model with Artificial Cavernous Sinus

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; NAKAO, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2010-01-01

    Extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach can provide extensive exposure of the anterior clinoid process and safe drilling under direct view. This technique requires peeling of the dura propria of the temporal lobe from the lateral wall of the SOF. Therefore, cadaveric dissection is mandatory to acquire surgical technique. However, chances for cadaveric dissection are limited. We propose modification of our three-dimensional (3-D) skull base model...

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Fanny; Magnier, Florian; Berger, Lucie; Miroir, Jessica; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre; Lapeyre, Michel; Biau, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Methods Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three m...

  8. CT and MRI of intrinsic space-occupying lesions of the bony skull base; CT und MRT bei intrinsischen raumfordernden Laesionen der knoechernen Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Brandt, S. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Halle (Germany); Neumann, K. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Intrinsic bony lesions of the skull base are diseases which arise within the bones forming the skull base. Mainly they are bone tumours and tumour-like lesions. With the exception of osteomas of the paranasal sinuses and exostoses of the external auditory canal, these lesions occur rarely. This article gives an overview of the appearance of the most common primary bony skull base masses in CT and MRI. From the authors' point of view these are fibrous dysplasia, chordomas, chondrosarcomas, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and multiple myelomas, which must be differentiated from pseudolesions. The possibilities of CT and MRI in making a specific diagnosis, differential diagnosis and the kind of making the final diagnosis are described. (orig.) [German] Unter intrinsischen Laesionen der knoechernen Schaedelbasis versteht man Erkrankungen, die von den die Schaedelbasis bildenden Knochen ausgehen. In erster Linie handelt es sich um Knochentumoren und tumoraehnliche Laesionen. Mit wenigen Ausnahmen (Nasennebenhoehlenosteome, Exostosen des aeusseren Gehoergangs) sind sie selten. Dieser Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber das CT- und MRT-Erscheinungsbild der aus Sicht der Autoren unter diesem Aspekt noch am haeufigsten anzutreffenden raumfordernden Laesionen. Dazu zaehlen die fibroese Dysplasie, Chordome, Chondrosarkome, die Langerhans-Zell-Histiozytose und das multiple Myelom. Abgrenzt werden muessen Pseudotumoren. Artdiagnostische Zuordnungsmoeglichkeiten durch CT und/oder MRT, Differenzialdiagnosen und Diagnosesicherung werden dargelegt. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) using fixed beams or an ion gantry for the treatment of patients with skull base meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the potential improvement in treatment planning for patients with skull base meningioma using IMRT compared to carbon ion or proton beams with and without a gantry. Five patients originally treated with photon IMRT were selected for the study. Ion beams were chosen using a horizontal beam or an ion gantry. Intensity controlled raster scanning and the intensity modulated particle therapy mode were used for plan optimization. The evaluation included analysis of dose-volume histograms of the target volumes and organs at risk. In comparison with carbon and proton beams only with horizontal beams, carbon ion treatment plans could spare the OARs more and concentrated on the target volumes more than proton and photon IMRT treatment plans. Using only a horizontal fixed beam, satisfactory plans could be achieved for skull base tumors. The results of the case studies showed that using IMPT has the potential to overcome the lack of a gantry for skull base tumors. Carbon ion plans offered slightly better dose distributions than proton plans, but the differences were not clinically significant with established dose prescription concepts

  10. Skull base osteomyelitis in otitis externa: The utility of triphasic and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO) refers to infection that has spread beyond the external auditory canal to the base of the skull in advanced stages of otitis externa. Clinically, it may be difficult to differentiate SBO from severe otitis externa without bony involvement. This study was performed to determine the role of three phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) and single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in detecting SBO. We retrospectively analyzed records of 20 patients (14 M, 6 F) with otitis externa and suspected SBO. TPBS and SPECT/CT of the skull were performed. Findings were correlated with clinical, laboratory and diagnostic CT scan findings. All patients were diabetic with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A total of 18 patients had bilateral and two unilateral symptoms. Cranial nerves were involved in eight patients and microbiological culture of ear discharge fluid positive in seven. Early images showed increased temporal vascularity in nine patients and increased soft-tissue uptake in 10, while delayed images showed increased bone uptake in 19/20 patients. Localized abnormal tracer uptake was shown by SPECT/CT in the mastoid temporal (15), petrous (11), sphenoid (3) and zygomatic (1) and showed destructive changes in five. Thus, TPBS was found positive for SBO in 10/20 patients and changed the management in four. Our study suggests that TPBS with SPECT/CT is a useful non-invasive investigation for detection of SBO in otitis externa

  11. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. Methods/Design The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Discussion Up

  12. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer) beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT) centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume) in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS) rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Up to now it was impossible to compare two different

  13. Association of Aggression and Non-Suicidal Self Injury: A School-Based Sample of Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jie; Ma, Ying; Guo, Yong; Ahmed, Niman Isse; Yu, Yizhen; Wang, Jiaji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescent has drawn increasing attention because it is associated with subsequent depression, drug abuse, anxiety disorders, and suicide. In the present study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a school-based sample of Chinese adolescents and to explore the association between aggression and NSSI. Methods This study was part of a nationwide study on aggression among adolescents in urban areas of China. A sampl...

  14. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification, based on clinical and morphometric disease features

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Tereshchenko; Yu. A. Belyy; I. G. Trifanenkova; M. S. Tereshchenkova

    2014-01-01

    Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes) with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In ag- gressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early clinical appeara...

  15. MRI-detected skull-base invasion. Prognostic value and therapeutic implication in intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yi-Kan; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Dan; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Li; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Li-Zhi [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in imaging and radiotherapy, the prognostic value of skull-base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) needs to be reassessed. We aimed to define a classification system and evaluate the prognostic value of the classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected skull-base invasion in NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed 749 patients who underwent MRI and were subsequently histologically diagnosed with nondisseminated NPC and treated with IMRT. MRI-detected skull-base invasion was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), or disease-free survival (DFS; p > 0.05 for all). Skull-base invasion was classified according to the incidence of each site (type I sites inside pharyngobasilar fascia and clivus vs. type II sites outside pharyngobasilar fascia). The 5-year OS, DMFS, LRFS, and DFS rates in the classification of skull-base invasion in NPC were 83 vs. 67 %, 85 vs.75 %, 95 vs. 88 %, and 76 vs. 62 %, respectively (p < 0.05 for all). Multivariate analysis indicated the classification of skull-base invasion was an independent prognostic factor. MRI-detected skull-base invasion is not an independent prognostic factor in patients with NPC treated with IMRT. However, classification according to the site of invasion has prognostic value. Therefore, patients with various subclassifications of stage T3 disease may receive treatment with different intensities; however, further studies are warranted to prove this. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund der Fortschritte der bildgebenden Verfahren und der Strahlentherapie muss der prognostische Wert der Invasion des nasopharyngealen Karzinoms (NPC) in die Schaedelbasis erneut bewertet werden. Unser Ziel ist die Definition eines Klassifikationssystems und die Untersuchung des prognostischen Werts der Klassifikation der MRT-ermittelten Invasion des mit

  16. Management of the Facial Nerve in Lateral Skull Base Surgery Analytic Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    El Shazly, Mohamed A.; Mahmoud A.M. Mokbel; Amr A. Elbadry; Hatem S. Badran

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surgical approaches to the jugular foramen are often complex and lengthy procedures associated with significant morbidity based on the anatomic and tumor characteristics. In addition to the risk of intra-operative hemorrhage from vascular tumors, lower cranial nerves deficits are frequently increased after intra-operative manipulation. Accordingly, modifications in the surgical techniques have been developed to minimize these risks. Preoperative embolization and intra-operative li...

  17. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull

    OpenAIRE

    Kimbel, William H.; Rak, Yoel

    2010-01-01

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarens...

  18. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  19. First nimravid skull from Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Averianov, Alexander; Obraztsova, Ekaterina; Danilov, Igor; Skutschas, Pavel; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Maofelis cantonensis gen. and sp. nov. is described based on a complete cranium from the middle-upper Eocene Youganwo Formation of Maoming Basin, Guangdong Province, China. The new taxon has characters diagnostic for Nimravidae such as a short cat-like skull, short palate, ventral surface of petrosal dorsal to that of basioccipital, serrations on the distal carina of canine, reduced anterior premolars, and absence of posterior molars (M2-3). It is plesiomorphic nimravid taxon similar to Nimra...

  20. Cyberbullying or Cyber Aggression?: A Review of Existing Definitions of Cyber-Based Peer-to-Peer Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Corcoran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ongoing debate regarding the definitions and measurement of cyberbullying, the present article critically appraises the existing literature and offers direction regarding the question of how best to conceptualise peer-to-peer abuse in a cyber context. Variations across definitions are problematic as it has been argued that inconsistencies with regard to definitions result in researchers examining different phenomena, whilst the absence of an agreed conceptualisation of the behaviour(s involved hinders the development of reliable and valid measures. Existing definitions of cyberbullying often incorporate the criteria of traditional bullying such as intent to harm, repetition, and imbalance of power. However, due to the unique nature of cyber-based communication, it can be difficult to identify such criteria in relation to cyber-based abuse. Thus, for these reasons cyberbullying may not be the most appropriate term. Rather than attempting to “shoe-horn” this abusive behaviour into the preconceived conceptual framework that provides an understanding of traditional bullying, it is timely to take an alternative approach. We argue that it is now time to turn our attention to the broader issue of cyber aggression, rather than persist with the narrow focus that is cyberbullying.

  1. Detection of brain lesions at the skull base using diffusion-weighted imaging with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging and generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Er Wei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the value of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI with parallel imaging and a two-dimensional (2D navigator-based reacquisition technique in the detection of brain lesions at the skull base. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients (male 37, female 17 with suspected skull-base intracranial lesions underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, including pre-T1 weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR, standard single shot echo-planar imaging diffusion weighted imaging (ss-EPI DWI and rs-EPI DWI, post-contrast T1-weighted. The total number of lesions and the number of lesions at different sites on all MRI sequences were used as reference measures. Then differences in detecting lesions and image quality between standard ss-EPI DWI and rs-EPI DWI were analyzed. Results: There was a significant difference in the total number of lesions detected by rs-EPI DWI and standard ss-EPI DWI (P = 0.01. But this difference was mainly due to an improved ability of rs-EPI DWI to detect lesions located in the anterior cranial fossa, compared to ss-EPI DWI (P=0.02; the ability of ss-EPI and rs-EPI DWI to detect lesions in the middle cranial fossa and posterior cranial fossa was not significantly different (P = 0.471, P = 0.486, respectively. For image quality, rs-EPI images were significantly better than standard ss-EPI DWI images (P<0.001. Conclusion: The rs-EPI DWI technique is a useful tool for the detection and evaluation of lesions located at the skull base.

  2. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  3. Adaptation of proton total dose with respect to dosimetric parameters within the frame of treatment of skull base or upper cervical spine chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a photon-proton irradiation protocol with a dose adaptation with respect to dosimetric factors for patients suffering form a skull base and upper cervical spine chordoma. Sixty patients have been treated between May 2006 and June 2008 with a combination of high energy photons and protons. As five tumours have locally relapsed and one at distance, the authors comment the local control rates, the number of attained cranial nerves, the value of the macroscopic tumour volume, the survival rate without relapse in terms of multifactorial of uni-factorial analysis. Short communication

  4. The ''lamellar skull''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skull in homozygous β-thalassemia (Cooley's anemia) may present with several abnormalities, such as osteopenia, widening of the diploic space, and a ''hair on end'' appearance. In some cases it present also a paticular stratified aspect owing to a variable number of osseous lamellae, arranged so as to be parallel to the inner table. This ''lamelled skull'' was observed in 16 patients, selected from 150 patients with Cooley's anemia (10.6%). The possible mechanisms are discussed. The pluristratified lamellar osseous production could be brought about by repeated periosteal osteoblastic reaction to the sinusoidal neovascularization associated with marrow hyperplasia in poorly or not at all transfused patients

  5. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification, based on clinical and morphometric disease features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Tereshchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In ag- gressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early clinical appearances stage, manifesta- tion stage, developed, advanced and terminal stages. the peculiarity of early clinical appearances stage and manifestation stage is thepresence of types: favourable and unfavourable.

  6. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of ...

  7. Young Adolescents' Gender-, Ethnicity-, and Popularity-Based Social Schemas of Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans, Katherine H.; Graber, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Social schemas can influence the perception and recollection of others' behavior and may create biases in the reporting of social events. This study investigated young adolescents' (N = 317) gender-, ethnicity-, and popularity-based social schemas of overtly and relationally aggressive behavior. Results indicated that participants associated overt…

  8. Interparietal bones in Nigerian skulls.

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, S. K.; Chowdhary, D S; Jain, S P

    1986-01-01

    The study was conducted on 40 adult Nigerian skulls which were examined for the presence of interparietal and pre-interparietal bones. Only one interparietal bone was found (2.5% of the present series) while a single pre-interparietal bone was found in four skulls (10%) and multiple pre-interparietal bones in one skull (2.5%).

  9. MSCT versus CBCT: evaluation of high-resolution acquisition modes for dento-maxillary and skull-base imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillenseger, Jean-Philippe; Goetz, Christian [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Matern, Jean-Francois [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Gros, Catherine-Isabelle; Bornert, Fabien [Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Faculte de Chirurgie Dentaire, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Institut d' Anatomie Normale, Strasbourg (France); Constantinesco, Andre [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Choquet, Philippe [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Imagerie Preclinique-UF6237, Pole d' imagerie, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Icube, equipe MMB, CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Universite de Strasbourg, Federation de Medecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Hopital de Hautepierre, Imagerie Preclinique, Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2014-09-24

    Our aim was to conduct a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of high-resolution skull-bone imaging for dentistry and otolaryngology using different architectures of recent X-ray computed tomography systems. Three multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) systems and one Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system were used in this study. All apparatuses were tested with installed acquisition modes and proprietary reconstruction software enabling high-resolution bone imaging. Quantitative analyses were performed with small fields of view with the preclinical vmCT phantom, which permits to measure spatial resolution, geometrical accuracy, linearity and homogeneity. Ten operators performed visual qualitative analyses on the vmCT phantom images, and on dry human skull images. Quantitative analysis showed no significant differences between protocols in terms of linearity and geometric accuracy. All MSCT systems present a better homogeneity than the CBCT. Both quantitative and visual analyses demonstrate that CBCT acquisitions are not better than the collimated helical MSCT mode. Our results demonstrate that current high-resolution MSCT protocols could exceed the performance of a previous generation CBCT system for spatial resolution and image homogeneity. (orig.)

  10. Testing Effectiveness of a Community-Based Aggression Management Program for Children 7 to 11 Years Old and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Ellen L.; Boyle, Michael H.; Cunningham, Charles; Kenny, Meghan; Sniderman, Carrie; Duku, Eric; Mills, Brenda; Evans, Peter; Waymouth, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: There are few well-evaluated uncomplicated community-based interventions for childhood aggression. The authors assess the impact of a community-based anger management group on child aggressive behaviors, using a randomized, controlled trial (RCT). Method: Families with children 7 to 11 years old were recruited through advertisements and…

  11. Using Narrated Literacy-Based Behavioural Interventions to Decrease Episodes of Physical Aggression in Elementary Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shelley; Bucholz, Jessica L.; Hazelkorn, Michael; Cooper, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of literacy-based behavioural interventions (Bucholz et al., 2008) to decrease acts of physical aggression with kindergarten and first grade students. The study used a multiple baseline design across three participants. The results showed a decrease in acts of physical aggression by students with…

  12. Cave crawling in zebra Finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh;

    2014-01-01

    The middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal, often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube. It allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing by interaction with the...... by anatomical adaptations during evolution. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is IAC trabeculated and irregularly shaped but it also communicates with a set of highly complex, air-filled canals in the skull extending to the base of the beak...

  13. [Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomil'sky, M R; Polunin, M M; Zelikovich, E I; Soldatsky, Yu L; Burova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. However, this approach is associated with the high risk of disability arising from the potential injury to the craniocerebral nerves. PMID:26977573

  14. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, Hamid, E-mail: hamid.mammar@unice.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Antoine Lacassagne Center, Nice (France); CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Pontvert, Dominique [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Clemenceau, Stephane [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Lot, Guillaume [Department of Neurosurgery, Adolph De Rothschild Foundation, Paris (France); George, Bernard [Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Polivka, Marc [Department of Pathology, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Mokhtari, Karima [Department of Pathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie [CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Talbot, Jean-Noeel [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  15. Patterns of Physical and Relational Aggression in a School-Based Sample of Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapanzano, Ann Marie; Frick, Paul J.; Terranova, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the patterns of aggressive behavior displayed in a sample of 282 students in the 4th through 7th grades (M age = 11.28; SD = 1.82). Using cluster analyses, two distinct patterns of physical aggression emerged for both boys and girls with one aggressive cluster showing mild levels of reactive aggression and one group…

  16. Reducing aggression and impulsivity through school-based prevention programs: a gene by intervention interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musci, Rashelle J; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Maher, Brion; Uhl, George R; Kellam, Sheppard G; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2014-12-01

    A variety of school-based, universal preventive interventions have been developed to address behavioral and mental health problems. Unfortunately, few have been evaluated within the context of randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up. Even fewer still have examined the potential genetic factors that may drive differential impact of the intervention. In the present analysis, we examine the extent to which the longitudinal effects of two elementary school-based interventions were moderated by the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, which has been linked with aggression and impulsive behaviors. The sample included 678 urban, primarily African American children who were randomly assigned along with their teachers to one of three first grade classroom conditions: classroom-centered (CC) intervention, Family School Partnership (FSP), or a control condition. The teacher ratings of the youth's aggressive and impulsive behavior were obtained at baseline and in grades 6-12. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the BDNF gene were extracted from the genome-wide data. Longitudinal latent trait-state-error models indicated a significant interaction between a particular profile of the BDNF SNP cluster (46 % of sample) and CC intervention on impulsivity (β = -.27, p < .05). A similar interaction was observed for the BDNF SNP cluster and the CC intervention on aggression (β = -.14, p < .05). The results suggest that the impacts of preventive interventions in early elementary school on late adolescent outcomes of impulsivity and aggression can be potentially modified by genetic factors, such as BDNF. However, replication of these results is necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:24178584

  17. The skull in renal osteodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull X-ray of 60 patients with chronic renal failure were examined. Alterations included diminished or increased bone density, radiolucent areas, pepper pot skull and the disappearance of vascular grooves and sutures. It is suggested that the radiological aspect of the skull is of very little diagnostic use in the assessment of uremic osteopathy since specific alterations are rare and tardive and show no correlation with clinical and laboratory findings. Skull X-ray can be usefull in assessing the effects of treatment (vitamin D derivaties, parathyroidectomy) and for the identification of focal lesions (brown tumors)

  18. Childhood hyperactivity, physical aggression and criminality: a 19-year prospective population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Pingault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research shows that children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder are at elevated risk of criminality. However, several issues still need to be addressed in order to verify whether hyperactivity in itself plays a role in the prediction of criminality. In particular, co-occurrence with other behaviors as well as the internal heterogeneity in ADHD symptoms (hyperactivity and inattention should be taken into account. The aim of this study was to assess the unique and interactive contributions of hyperactivity to the development of criminality, whilst considering inattention, physical aggression and family adversity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We monitored the development of a population-based sample of kindergarten children (N = 2,741. Hyperactivity, inattention, and physical aggression were assessed annually between the ages of 6 and 12 years by mothers and teachers. Information on the presence, the age at first charge and the type of criminal charge was obtained from official records when the participants were aged 25 years. We used survival analysis models to predict the development of criminality in adolescence and adulthood: high childhood hyperactivity was highly predictive when bivariate analyses were used; however, with multivariate analyses, high hyperactivity was only marginally significant (Hazard Ratio: 1.38; 95% CI: 0.94-2.02. Sensitivity analyses revealed that hyperactivity was not a consistent predictor. High physical aggression was strongly predictive (Hazard Ratio: 3.44; 95% CI: 2.43-4.87 and its role was consistent in sensitivity analyses and for different types of crime. Inattention was not predictive of later criminality. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although the contribution of childhood hyperactivity to criminality may be detected in large samples using multi-informant longitudinal designs, our results show that it is not a strong predictor of later criminality. Crime prevention should instead target

  19. The plastered skulls from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Yiftahel (Israel)--a computed tomography-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slon, Viviane; Sarig, Rachel; Hershkovitz, Israel; Khalaily, Hamoudi; Milevski, Ianir

    2014-01-01

    Three plastered skulls, dating to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B, were found at the site of Yiftahel, in the Lower Galilee (Israel). The skulls underwent refitting and restoration processes, details of which are described herein. All three belong to adults, of which two appear to be males and one appears to be a female. Virtual cross-sections were studied and a density analysis of the plaster was performed using computed tomography scans. These were utilized to yield information regarding the modeling process. Similarities and differences between the Yiftahel and other plastered skulls from the Levant are examined. The possible role of skull plastering within a society undergoing a shift from a hunting-gathering way of life to a food producing strategy is discussed. PMID:24586625

  20. [The skull of Combe Capelle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Almut; Wegner, Dietrich

    2002-12-01

    Since the end of World War II two of the most important anthropological artefacts of the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte in Berlin, the skulls and skeletons of Le Moustier and Combe Capelle, were believed to be missing or destroyed, respectively. The postcrania were severely damaged during a fire after the museum was bombed in February 1945, while the skulls were brought to the Soviet Union in 1945. In 1965, the skull of the Neanderthal man from Le Moustier and the chain of the grave of Combe Capelle were found amongst the art objects returned by the Soviet Union into the German Democratic Republic in 1958. However, the Combe Capelle skull was still missing. In the end of 2001 this skull could be found and identified in a store-house of the museum. Now, one the oldest known representatives of Homo sapiens sapiens is again available for scientific research and public exhibitions. PMID:12529957

  1. Hostility, Physical Aggression and Trait Anger as Predictors for Suicidal Behavior in Chinese Adolescents: A School-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ping; Roberts, Robert E.; Liu, Zhuoya; Meng, Xian; Tang, Jie; Sun, Lin; Yu, Yizhen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study explored the extent to which trait aggression is associated with suicidal behavior in a nationwide school-based sample of adolescents. Methods A nationwide sample of 14,537 high school students in urban areas of China was recruited. Information concerning suicide ideation, plans, attempts, trait aggression and other risk factors was collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariate regression analyses were employed to predict suicidal behavior. Results Approximately ...

  2. Temporal lobe (TL) damage following surgery and high-dose photon and proton irradiation in 96 patients affected by chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the temporal lobe (TL) damage rate in 96 patients treated with high-dose proton and photon irradiation for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 consecutive patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (HCL) between June 1984 and 1993, for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull were reviewed. All the patients had undergone some degree of resection of the tumor prior to radiation therapy. Seventy-five patients were classified as 'primary tumors' and 21 as recurrent or regrowing tumors after one or more surgical procedures. All the patients were randomized to receive 66.6 or 72 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) on a prospective dose-searching study by proton and photon irradiation (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group no. 85-26) with conventional fractionation (1.8 CGE/day, 5 fractions/week). All treatments were planned using the three-dimensional (3D) planning system developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the dose was delivered using opposed lateral fields for the photon component and a noncoplanar isocentric technique for the proton component. Clinical symptoms of TL damage were classified into 4 grades. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated for white matter changes. Abnormalities associated with persistent or recurrent tumor were distinguished from radiation-induced changes. TLs were delineated on the original scans of the 10 patients with damage and those of a group of 33 patients with no clinical or MRI evidence of injury. Dose distributions were calculated and dose-volume histograms were obtained for these patients. Results: Of the patients, 10 developed TL damage, with bilateral injury in 2 and unilateral injury in 8. The cumulative TL damage incidence at 2 and 5 years was 7.6 and 13.2%, respectively. The MRI areas suggestive of TL damage were always separated from

  3. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of benign skull-base tumors: a dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with Rapidarc® versus non-coplanar dynamic arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign tumors of the skull base are a challenge when delivering radiotherapy. An appropriate choice of radiation technique may significantly improve the patient’s outcomes. Our study aimed to compare the dosimetric results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between non-coplanar dynamic arcs and coplanar volumetric modulated arctherapy (Rapidarc®). Thirteen patients treated with Novalis TX® were analysed: six vestibular schwannomas, four pituitary adenomas and three meningioma. Two treatment plans were created for each case: dynamic arcs (4–5 non coplanar arcs) and Rapidarc® (2 coplanar arcs). All tumors were >3 cm and accessible to both techniques. Patients had a stereotactic facemask (Brainlab) and were daily repositioned by Exactrac®. GTV and CTV were contoured according to tumor type. A 1-mm margin was added to the CTV to obtain PTV. Radiation doses were 52.2–54 Gy, using 1.8 Gy per fraction. Treatment time was faster with Rapidarc®. The mean PTV V95 % was 98.8 for Rapidarc® and 95.9 % for DA (p = 0.09). Homogeneity index was better with Rapidarc®: 0.06 vs. 0.09 (p = 0.01). Higher conformity index values were obtained with Rapidarc®: 75.2 vs. 67.9 % (p = 0.04). The volume of healthy brain that received a high dose (V90 %) was 0.7 % using Rapidarc® vs. 1.4 % with dynamic arcs (p = 0.05). Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs gave, respectively, a mean D40 % of 10.5 vs. 18.1 Gy (p = 0.005) for the hippocampus and a Dmean of 25.4 vs. 35.3 Gy (p = 0.008) for the ipsilateral cochlea. Low-dose delivery with Rapidarc® and dynamic arcs were, respectively, 184 vs. 166 cm3 for V20 Gy (p = 0.14) and 1265 vs. 1056 cm3 for V5 Gy (p = 0.67). Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using Rapidarc® for large benign tumors of the skull base provided target volume coverage that was at least equal to that of dynamics arcs, with better conformity and homogeneity and faster treatment time. Rapidarc® also offered better sparing of the ipsilateral cochlea and hippocampus

  4. Predicting and Preventing Skull Overheating in Non Invasive Brain HIFU Treatment Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound brain therapy is currently limited by the strong phase and amplitude aberrations induced by the heterogeneities of the skull. However the development of aberration correction techniques has made it possible to correct the beam distortion induced by the skull and to produce a sharp focus in the brain. Moreover, using the density of the skull bone that can be obtained with high-resolution CT scans, the corrections needed to produce this sharp focus can be calculated using ultrasound propagation models. We propose here a model for computing the temperature elevation in the skull during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) transcranial therapy. Based on CT scans, the wave propagation through the skull is computed with 3D finite differences wave propagation software. The acoustic simulation is combined with a 3D thermal diffusion code and the temperature elevation inside the skull is computed. Finally, the simulation is validated experimentally by measuring the temperature elevation in several locations of the skull

  5. Endoscopic combined “transseptal/transnasal” approach for pituitary adenoma: reconstruction of skull base using pedicled nasoseptal flap in 91 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Fujimoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the endoscopic combined “transseptal/transnasal” approach with a pedicled nasoseptal flap for pituitary adenoma and skull base reconstruction, especially with respect to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula.Method Ninety-one consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent the endoscopic combined “transseptal/transnasal” approach by the single team including the otorhinolaryngologists and neurosurgeons. Postoperative complications related to the flap were analyzed.Results Intra- and postoperative CSF fistulae were observed in 36 (40% and 4 (4.4% patients, respectively. Among the 4 patients, lumbar drainage and bed rest healed the CSF fistula in 3 patients and reoperation for revision was necessary in one patient. Other flap-related complications included nasal bleeding in 3 patients (3.3%.Conclusion The endoscopic combined “transseptal/transnasal” approach is most suitable for a two-surgeon technique and a pedicled nasoseptal flap is a reliable technique for preventing postoperative CSF fistula in pituitary surgery.

  6. Quadcopter Aggressive Maneuvers along Singular Configurations: An Energy-Quaternion Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A. El-Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic aggressive maneuvers with quadcopters are regarded as a highly challenging control problem. The aim is to tackle the singularities that exist in a vertical looping maneuver. Modeling singularities are resolved by writing the equations-of-motion of the quadcopter in quaternion form. Physical singularities due to underactuation are resolved by using an energy-based control. Energy-based control is utilized to overcome the uncontrollability of the quadcopter at physical singular configurations, for instance, when commanding the quadcopter to gain altitude while pitched at 90∘. Three looping strategies (circular, clothoidal, and newly developed constant thrust are implemented on a nonlinear model of the quadcopter. The three looping strategies are discussed along with their advantages and limitations.

  7. Development of induction skull melting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARC had developed and indigenized cold crucible induction melter technology for high temperature glass melting applications. In order to extend this technology for metal melting applications, development of Induction Skull Melting was undertaken. As a part of the indigenous development of the ISM technology, a systematic numerical simulation was carried out initially to arrive at the design parameters of the segmented crucible. Based on the model-based design, an induction skull melting facility comprising of a water-cooled segmented copper crucible with in-situ casting module, induction heating power supply system, cooling water recirculation systems, vacuum chamber with vacuum delivery system and associated instrumentation and control units was built. The ISM facility was successfully tested for melting and homogenizing different metals and alloys. The ISM technology is the most preferred technology when highly refractory and extremely reactive metals and their alloys are to be processed with ultra high purity. (author)

  8. The diagnostic value of high resolution spiral CT in fracture of the skull base%高分辨率螺旋 CT 对颅底骨折的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐柱荣

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨高分辨率螺旋CT扫描对颅底骨折的诊断价值。方法对57例临床疑有颅底骨折的患者先行常规CT扫描,然后行高分辨率螺旋CT扫描,并对结果进行对比分析。结果57例患者中高分辨率螺旋CT扫描检出颅底骨折45例,常规CT扫描检出10例,两者比较差异具有统计学意义( P<0.01)。结论螺旋CT高分辨率检查技术显著提高颅底骨折的检出率,对临床治疗有重要的指导意义,应作为常规检查方法。%Objective To explore the diagnosis value of high resolution spiral CT scan in fracture of the skull base .Methods Fifty-seven patients with clinically suspected skull base fracture received conventional CT scan -ning first, then received high resolution spiral CT scanning , and the result analysis were compared .Results In 57 patients, 45 cases of fracture of the skull base were detected by high resolution spiral CT scan , 10 cases were detec-ted by conventional CT scanning , showing significant difference between two methods ( P<0.01 ) .Conclusion Spi-ral CT high-resolution technique significantly increase the detection rate of the fracture of the skull base , and has im-portant guiding significance to the clinical treatment , should be used as a routine examination method .

  9. Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes ... type of behavior? The best way to prevent aggressive behavior is to give your child a stable, secure ...

  10. Quaternion-based control for aggressive trajectory tracking with a micro-quadrotor UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlenbeck, Andrew

    With potential missions for quadrotor micro-air vehicles (MAVs) calling for smaller, more agile vehicles, it is important to implement attitude controllers that allow the vehicle to reach any desired attitude without encountering computational singularities, as is the case when using an Euler angle representation. A computationally efficient quaternion-based state estimator is presented that enables the Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) 100-gram micro-quadrotor to determine its attitude during agile maneuvers using only an on-board gyroscope and accelerometer and a low-power processor. Inner and outer loop attitude and position controllers are also discussed that use the quaternion attitude representation to control the vehicle along aggressive trajectories with the assistance of an outside motion capture system. A trajectory generation algorithm is then described that leverages the quadrotor's inherent dynamics to allow it to reach extreme attitudes for applications such as perching on walls or ceilings and flying through small openings.

  11. Thallium-201 brain SPECT to diagnose aggressiveness of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation was conducted to determine the ability of 201Tl brain SPECT with respect to pre-operative prediction of lesional aggressiveness of meningioma. Fifty-nine lesions in 42 patients were examined. Early (15 min) and late (3 h) SPECT were obtained. Early uptake ratio (ER; lesion to normal brain average count ratio), late uptake ratio (LR) and the ratio of LR to ER (L/E ratio) were calculated. Twenty-three lesions exhibited malignant features based on histologic or clinical course such as recurrence or skull invasion. Both ER and LR of malignant meningiomas were significantly higher than those in thirty-six benign lesions. Benign lesions were classified into two groups for further analysis: meningotheliomatous type, which is the most common histology, and benign lesions other than the meningotheliomatous (other benign) type. ER in other benign type was lower than the meningotheliomatous and the malignant type. LR afforded differentiation of the malignant type from the two benign types. These two benign types could be distinguished on the basis of the L/E ratio. These results indicate that high pre-operative ER and LR values in patients with meningioma are indicators of the aggressiveness of lesions, i.e., malignant meningioma, recurrence or skull invasion. (author)

  12. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours; Volume tumoral macroscopique (GTV) et volume-cible anatomoclinique (CTV) dans la radiotherapie des tumeurs benignes de la base du crane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, J.P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Hopital Saint Andre, Service d' Oncologie Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Neurochirurgie A, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  13. Effectiveness of an Afterschool-Based Aggression Management Program for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staecker, Emma; Puett, Eli; Afrassiab, Shayda; Ketcherside, Miranda; Azim, Sabiya; Rhodes, Darson; Wang, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A school-community partnership team implemented an aggression management curriculum in an afterschool program as an early-intervention strategy at the upper elementary level. Although statistically significant differences in physical or psychological aggression were not found, the partnership team gained a better understanding of evidence-based…

  14. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: Qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  15. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm and 3.9 ± 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  16. Hostility, physical aggression and trait anger as predictors for suicidal behavior in Chinese adolescents: a school-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study explored the extent to which trait aggression is associated with suicidal behavior in a nationwide school-based sample of adolescents. METHODS: A nationwide sample of 14,537 high school students in urban areas of China was recruited. Information concerning suicide ideation, plans, attempts, trait aggression and other risk factors was collected by a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariate regression analyses were employed to predict suicidal behavior. RESULTS: Approximately 18.5% of students reported suicide ideation, 8.7% reported suicide plans, and 4.1% reported attempts during the past one year. Hostility and trait anger had a significant positive association with suicidal ideation. Hostility and physical aggression were positively related to suicide plans. Hostility had a positive correlation with suicide attempts, while trait anger was inversely associated with suicide attempts. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that hostility, physical aggression and trait anger may be able to be used to predict suicidal behavior among adolescents. Suicide prevention programs should target at attenuating the severity of hostility, anger and physical aggression. But teachers and parents should also give close attention to students with low trait anger.

  17. Insular Carcinoma of Thyroid Presenting as a Giant Skull Lesion: A Dilemma in Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid surgeons are becoming increasingly more aware of a histologically distinct subset of thyroid carcinoma whose classification falls between well-differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas with respect to both cell differentiation and clinical behavior. This subtype of tumors has been categorized as poorly differentiated or insular carcinoma, based on its characteristic cell groupings. Although the differentiation of insular carcinoma from other thyroid carcinomas has important prognostic and therapeutic significance, relatively little about insular carcinoma has been published in the otolaryngology literature. In this article, we discuss a case of insular carcinoma of thyroid presenting with concurrent distant metastasis to skull, lung, ribs, and inguinal region with review of the literature. We conclude that insular thyroid carcinoma warrants aggressive management with total thyroidectomy and excision of accessible giant lesion followed by radioactive iodine ablation of any remaining thyroid tissue.

  18. Mastoid emissary in Indian skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, K; Wysocki, J

    1998-01-01

    Two hundred and eleven Indian skulls originating from medieval times, South of Peru, were studied in respect to variability of the mastoid emissary. Occurrence and localisation of the external orifice of the mastoid emissary were studied in three distinct and well-separated populations, living in the three different places: Villa el Salvador, Tablada de Lurin and Paracas. Most of the skulls presented considerable degree of artificial deformation. External orifice of the mastoid emissary was multiple in most of the skulls, especially in Villa el Salvador and Paracas populations. Mastoid emissaries in Indian were situated generally higher than in European, especially regarding the Paracas population. Significant sex differences were present in this material, regarded as a whole (summarized results for the three populations), what is in agreement with previous observations on European skulls. It indicates that even in cases of relatively deep deformation, some characteristic features of sex dimorphism of the human skull are noticeable. Additionally, the three studied populations, which were well separated from each other and lived alone, differed significantly regarding localization of the mastoid emissaries. PMID:9857576

  19. Virtual Human Skull Model: A Three Dimensional Reconstruction Method Based on CT Serial Images%基于CT断层影像的颅骨解剖结构三维重建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴辉群; 吴兴; 严培培; 耿兴云; 张远鹏; 蒋葵; 韩笑; 吕广明; 董建成

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To make three dimensional reconstruction of skull with Mimics8. 01 based on CT cranial serial images to provide models for anatomical study and research. Methods : Mimics software was used to make automated threshold segmentation of hone tissue in CT cranial images. After skull reconstruction, the hyoid bone was split automatically. While to other skull bones, in three different panels of CT images under Mimics, locating line comhined with anatomical knowledge of skull bone relations were used to detect the locating point between two neighboring bones. Then, the separate region of bones was manually marked in different colors designed before. The main neurocranium and facial cranium structures were reconstructed and observed in computer. Results:The skull composed bones such as frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal, sphenoid, ethmoid, nasal, lacrimal, maxilla, mandible, jaw, hyoid bones were successfully segmented with different colors and constructed, which could be observed arbitrarily in computer in single or combination form. Conclusions :Virtual skull model can be reconstructed based on CT cranial serial images, which provides basis for digital skull anatomy teaching and cranial surgical navigation.%目的:基于CT颅脑断面连续影像,利用Mimics 8.01软件对颅骨进行三维重建,为解剖学教学和研究提供模型.方法:利用Mimics软件对CT颅脑影像中的骨组织进行自动阈值分割后,对重建出的颅骨进行自动分割,分割出舌骨结构.对于其他颅骨结构,在Mimics软件中的三个方位CT图像中,利用定位线结合解剖学中的颅骨毗邻关系,找出区分毗邻颅骨之间的定位点.然后,根据事先规划的不同结构的分割颜色,人工描出相应的颅骨所在区域.随后,对分割出的各个颜色区域进行三维重建,重建出主要的脑颅骨和面颅骨结构,并分别在计算机上对上述结构进行观察.结果:成功对颅骨的结构分别以不同颜色进行分

  20. Validation of a motivation-based typology of angry aggression among antisocial youths in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnebekk, Gunnar; Howard, Rick

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the validation of the Angry Aggression Scales (AAS), the Behavior Inhibition System and the Behavior Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales, the reactive aggression and proactive power scales in relation to a Norwegian sample of 101 antisocial youths with conduct problems (64 boys, 37 girls, mean age 15 ± 1.3 years) and 101 prosocial controls matched on age, gender, education, ethnicity, and school district. Maximum likelihood exploratory factor analyses with oblique rotation were performed on AAS, BIS/BAS, reactive aggression and proactive power scales as well as computation of Cronbach's alpha and McDonald's omega. Tests for normality and homogeneity of variance were acceptable. Factor analyses of AAS and the proactive/reactive aggression scales suggested a hierarchical structure comprising a single higher-order angry aggression (AA) factor and four and two lower-order factors, respectively. Moreover, results suggested one BIS factor and a single higher-order BAS factor with three lower-order factors related to drive, fun-seeking and reward responsiveness. To compare scores of antisocial youths with controls, t-tests on the mean scale scores were computed. Results confirmed that antisocial youths were different from controls on the above-mentioned scales. Consistent with the idea that anger is associated with approach motivation, AAS scores correlated with behavioral activation, but only explosive/reactive and vengeful/ruminative AA correlated with behavioral inhibition. Results generally validated the quadruple typology of aggression and violence proposed by Howard (2009). PMID:22388964

  1. CT of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the middle ear only the crus longus incudis and the stapedius still requires conventional tomography. This substitution of CT for classical tomography, welcome in itself is limited by financial considerations. However, when CT is necessary it should be done before tomography thus possibly limiting both expense and radiation dose. (orig./AJ)

  2. Aggressive Angiomyxoma

    OpenAIRE

    Padmavathy, L.; L Lakshmana Rao; M Dhana Lakshmi; N Sylvester

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid tumors are a heterogeneous group of lesions characterized by a marked abundance of extra cellular mucoid (myxoid) matrix. [1] The term aggressive emphasizes the often infiltrative nature of the tumor and its frequent association with recurrence. [2] A case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising from the vagina in a 55-year-old woman is reported for its rarity.

  3. Aggressive angiomyxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Lakshmi, M Dhana; Sylvester, N

    2014-04-01

    Myxoid tumors are a heterogeneous group of lesions characterized by a marked abundance of extra cellular mucoid (myxoid) matrix.[1] The term aggressive emphasizes the often infiltrative nature of the tumor and its frequent association with recurrence.[2] A case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising from the vagina in a 55-year-old woman is reported for its rarity. PMID:24860748

  4. Aggressive Angiomyxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Padmavathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxoid tumors are a heterogeneous group of lesions characterized by a marked abundance of extra cellular mucoid (myxoid matrix. [1] The term aggressive emphasizes the often infiltrative nature of the tumor and its frequent association with recurrence. [2] A case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising from the vagina in a 55-year-old woman is reported for its rarity.

  5. Skull development in the muscular dystrophic mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, H; Kirkeby, S; Moss, M L

    1989-01-01

    Roentgencephalometric tracings of skulls of 7-week-old normal and muscular dystrophic mice were compared. A marked size reduction of the dystrophic skulls relative to the normal ones was observed. However, the visceral parts of the dystrophic skull were more reduced in size than the neural parts....

  6. Cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is reported. The authors believe that bone dysplasia associated with cloverleaf is neither identical with thanatophoric dysplasia nor achondroplasia. Until identity of thanatophoric dysplasia and cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is proved the diseases should be looked upon as separate entities and the wording ''thanatophoric dysplasia with cloverleaf skull'' should be abolished. (orig.)

  7. Pitfalls of voxel-based amyloid PET analyses for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Artifacts due to non-specific uptake in the white matter and the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are commonly used in brain image voxel-based analyses widely used for dementia work-ups: 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The methods calculate the Z-scores of the cortical voxels that represent the significance of differences compared to a database of brain images with normal findings, and visualize them as surface brain maps. The methods are considered useful in amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) analyses to detect small amounts of amyloid-β deposits in early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), but are not fully validated. We analyzed the 11C-labeled 2-(2-[2-dimethylaminothiazol-5-yl]ethenyl)-6-(2-[fluoro]ethoxy)benzoxazole (BF-227) amyloid PET imaging of 56 subjects (20 individuals with mild cognitive impairment [MCl], 19 AD patients, and 17 non-demented [ND] volunteers) with 3D-SSP and the easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) that is an SPM-based method. To clarify these methods' limitations, we visually compared Z-score maps output from the two methods and investigated the causes of discrepancies between them. Discrepancies were found in 27 subjects (9 MCl, 13 AD, and 5 ND). Relatively high white matter uptake was considered to cause higher Z-scores on 3D-SSP in 4 subjects (1 MCl and 3 ND). Meanwhile, in 17 subjects (6 MCl, 9 AD, and 2 ND), Z-score overestimation on eZIS corresponded with high skull uptake and disappeared after removing the skull uptake ('scalping'). Our results suggest that non-specific uptakes in the white matter and skull account for errors in voxel-based amyloid PET analyses. Thus, diagnoses based on 3D-SSP data require checking white matter uptake, and 'scalping' is recommended before eZIS analysis. (author)

  8. Infantile myofibromatosis of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infantile myofibromatosis is a rare benign tumor of childhood characterized by a myofibroblastic tumor in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, bones, and, occasionally, the viscera. The tumor may be solitary or multicentric. A solitary skeletal lesion most commonly occurs in the craniofacial region. We report a case of solitary infantile myofibromatosis of the skull, confirmed by excisional biopsy. (author)

  9. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, R., E-mail: ruth.harding2@wales.nhs.uk [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Centre for Proton Therapy, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Short, S. C. [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oncology and Clinical Research, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Loughrey, C. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  10. The hot skull: Malignant or feminine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusely increased uptake in the calvarium on bone scintigraphy (a hot skull) is often present in patients with bone metastases and metabolic diseases. Excluding these known facts the prevalence of the hot skull and its relation with malignancy and, more specifically, with breast carcinoma have been studied in 673 patients. In women, the hot skull is clearly related to malignancy and to a lesser extent to breast carcinoma. However, another remarkable feature of the hot skull is its predominance in women in general (compared to men) and, therefore, the data suggest that the hot skull can also represent a normal variant of the female skull. We conclude that the hot skull has no clinical value in screening protocols. (orig.)

  11. Effect of skull flexural properties on brain response during dynamic head loading - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, T P; Roberts, J C; Ward, E E; Carneal, C M; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    impact loading are lower than frequencies based on pressure wave propagation across the skull. This indicates that skull flexure has a local effect on intracranial pressures but that the integrated effect of a dome-like structure under load is a significant part of load transfer in the skull in blunt trauma. PMID:23686199

  12. Conflict Solution According to "Aggressiveness" of Agents in Floor-Field-Based Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabák, Pavel; Bukáček, M.

    Springer International Publishing, 2016, s. 507-516. (9574). ISBN 978-3-319-32151-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Floor * Field model * Conflict solution * Aggressiveness Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/hrabak-0458459.pdf

  13. A Sex-Based Examination of Violence and Aggression Perceptions among Adolescents: An Interactive Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tammy Jordan

    2010-01-01

    In this study I examine the critical factors and themes that are identified as salient influencers of overt and relational aggression among youth. Sex differences and similarities associated with such adolescent perceptions are assessed. Forty-eight ethnically diverse youth between the ages of 14 and 16 years participated in sex-specific focus…

  14. Osteoradionecrosis of the skull after radiation therapy for invasive carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michaela T; Billington, Alicia; Habal, Mutaz B

    2011-09-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the skull is a rare but fatal complication of radiation therapy for the treatment of head and neck malignancies. The pathogenesis of ORN follows the "3Hs Theory" proposed by Marx (J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1983;41:283-288) in which radiation induces tissue injury by causing vessel thrombosis (hypovascularity), which leads to hypoxia, and results in cell death of the skin and the underlying structure of the bony element (hypocellularity) including the deep visceral structures. This note details a patient with severe and extensive ORN of the parietooccipital region of the skull because of a large dose of radiation therapy for the treatment of an invasive basal cell carcinoma of the scalp. The patient's condition was further complicated by an extensive infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which leads to meningitis and cerebral edema as well as cerebritis. The patient was successfully treated with interdisciplinary medical and surgical aggressive therapy and radical procedures involving 4 separate trips to the operating room for an 18-month period. Success was achieved because of early clinical diagnosis of ORN, aggressive eradication of infected and necrotic tissues including the brain, and restoration of functioning and viable tissues through the use of local flaps to change an open wound to a closed wound. PMID:21959411

  15. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for genomic-wide screening of DNA copy number alterations in aggressive bone tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanamori Masahiko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic pathways of aggressive changes of bone tumors are still poorly understood. It is very important to analyze DNA copy number alterations (DCNAs, to identify the molecular events in the step of progression to the aggressive change of bone tissue. Methods Genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH was used to investigate DCNAs of 14 samples from 13 aggressive bone tumors, such as giant cell tumors (GCTs and osteosarcoma (OS, etc. Results Primary aggressive bone tumors had copy number gains of 17.8±12.7% in the genome, and losses of 17.3±11.4% in 287 target clones (threshold for each DCNA: ≦085, 1.15≦. Genetic unstable cases, which were defined by the total DCNAs aberration ≧30%, were identified in 9 of 13 patients (3 of 7 GCTs and all malignant tumors. High-level amplification of TGFβ2, CCND3, WI-6509, SHGC-5557, TCL1A, CREBBP, HIC1, THRA, AFM217YD10, LAMA3, RUNX1 and D22S543, were commonly observed in aggressive bone tumors. On the other hand, NRAS, D2S447, RAF1, ROBO1, MYB, MOS, FGFR2, HRAS, D13S319, D13S327, D18S552, YES1 and DCC, were commonly low. We compared genetic instability between a primary OS and its metastatic site in Case #13. Metastatic lesion showed increased 9 DCNAs of remarkable change (m/p ratio ≧1.3 folds, compared to a primary lesion. D1S214, D1S1635, EXT1, AFM137XA11, 8 M16/SP6, CCND2, IGH, 282 M15/SP6, HIC1 and LAMA3, were overexpressed. We gave attention to HIC1 (17p13.3, which was common high amplification in this series. Conclusion Our results may provide several entry points for the identification of candidate genes associated with aggressive change of bone tumors. Especially, the locus 17p11-13 including HIC1 close to p53 was common high amplification in this series and review of the literature.

  16. Hallazgos en el macizo facial y la base del cráneo de pacientes pediátricos con histiocitosis de células de Langerhans Craniofacial and skull base findings in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Forlino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La histiocitosis de células de Langerhans (HCL es una entidad poco frecuente, con una incidencia anual de 2,6 a 5,4 por millón de niños en la población general. Tiene manifestaciones óseas (lesiones osteolíticas solitarias o múltiples en huesos planos, largos e irregulares o multisistémicas. Se describen los hallazgos imagenológicos de una serie retrospectiva de 17 pacientes pediátricos, de 1 a 12 años de edad, con histiocitosis de células de Langerhans en el macizo facial y la base del cráneo. Las manifestaciones incluyeron lesiones osteolíticas y masa de partes blandas, que ocupaban las cavidades adyacentes, como la órbita, los senos paranasales, la caja timpánica y la mastoides. En el maxilar inferior puede provocar reabsorción del reborde alveolar con apariencia de dientes flotantes. La complejidad anatómica del área de estudio requiere su valoración mediante tomografía computada (TC y resonancia magnética (RM con contraste. La histiocitosis de células de Langerhans debe considerarse dentro de los diagnósticos diferenciales de las lesiones del macizo facial y la base del cráneo, especialmente en pacientes pediátricos.Langerhans cell histiocytosis (CLH is an uncommon entity, of unknown etiology, with an incidence of 2.6 at 5.4 per 1,000,000 children/year in the general population. It may have bone manifestations (solitary or multiple osteolytic lesions in flat, long and irregular bones or multiorgan manifestations. We report the radiological findings in retrospective series of 17 pediatric patients aged 1 to 12 years old, with CLH in craniofacial and skull base. Radiological findings included osteolytic and soft tissue lesions occupying the orbit, sinuses, tympanic cavity and mastoid. In the mandible, reabsorption of the alveolar ridge with the appearance of floating teeth was observed. The anatomical complexity of the area studied required evaluation by CT and MRI with contrast. LCH disease should be considered in

  17. Comparative histology of some craniofacial sutures and skull-base synchondroses in non-avian dinosaurs and their extant phylogenetic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Horner, John R

    2016-08-01

    Sutures and synchondroses, the fibrous and cartilaginous articulations found in the skulls of vertebrates, have been studied for many biological applications at the morphological scale. However, little is known about these articulations at the microscopic scale in non-mammalian vertebrates, including extant archosaurs (birds and crocodilians). The major goals of this paper were to: (i) document the microstructure of some sutures and synchondroses through ontogeny in archosaurs; (ii) compare these microstructures with previously published sutural histology (i.e. that of mammals); and (iii) document how these articulations with different morphological degrees of closure (open or obliterated) appear histologically. This was performed with histological analyses of skulls of emus, American alligators, a fossil crocodilian and ornithischian dinosaurs (hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and ceratopsids). Emus and mammals possess a sutural periosteum until sutural fusion, but it disappears rapidly during ontogeny in American alligators. This study identified seven types of sutural mineralized tissues in extant and extinct archosaurs and grouped them into four categories: periosteal tissues; acellular tissues; fibrous tissues; and intratendinous tissues. Due to the presence of a periosteum in their sutures, emus and mammals possess periosteal tissues at their sutural borders. The mineralized sutural tissues of crocodilians and ornithischian dinosaurs are more variable and can also develop via a form of necrosis for acellular tissues and metaplasia for fibrous and intratendinous tissues. It was hypothesized that non-avian dinosaurs, like the American alligator, lacked a sutural periosteum and that their primary mode of ossification involved the direct mineralization of craniofacial sutures (instead of intramembranous ossification found in mammals and birds). However, we keep in mind that a bird-like sutural microstructure might have arisen within non-avian saurichians. While

  18. The interactive effects of emotion regulation and alcohol intoxication on lab-based intimate partner aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laura E; DiLillo, David; Maldonado, Rosalita C

    2015-09-01

    This study draws on Finkel and Eckhardt's (2013) I³ framework to examine the interactive effects of 2 emotion regulation strategies-anger rumination (an impellance factor) and reappraisal (an inhibition factor), and alcohol intoxication (a disinhibition factor)-on intimate partner aggression (IPA) perpetration as measured with an analogue aggression task. Participants were 69 couples recruited from a large Midwestern university (total N = 138). Participants' trait rumination and reappraisal were measured by self-report. Participants were randomized individually to an alcohol or placebo condition, then recalled an anger event while using 1 of 3 randomly assigned emotion regulation conditions (rumination, reappraisal, or uninstructed). Following this, participants completed an analogue aggression task involving ostensibly assigning white noise blasts to their partner. Participants in the alcohol condition displayed greater IPA than participants in the placebo condition for provoked IPA, but not unprovoked IPA. Results also revealed interactions such that for those in the alcohol and rumination group, higher trait reappraisal was related to lower unprovoked IPA. For provoked IPA, higher trait rumination was related to greater IPA among those in the alcohol and rumination condition and those in the placebo and uninstructed condition. In general, results were consistent with I³ theory, suggesting that alcohol disinhibits, rumination impels, and trait reappraisal inhibits IPA. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed in the context of current knowledge about the influence of alcohol intoxication and emotion regulation strategies on IPA perpetration. PMID:25844831

  19. Cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Warren, P.S.; Fisher, C.C.

    1985-09-01

    A case of cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is reported. The authors believe that bone dysplasia associated with cloverleaf is neither identical with thanatophoric dysplasia nor achondroplasia. Until identity of thanatophoric dysplasia and cloverleaf skull with generalised bone dysplasia is proved the diseases should be looked upon as separate entities and the wording ''thanatophoric dysplasia with cloverleaf skull'' should be abolished.

  20. Aspergillus Osteomyelitis of the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon; King, Richard; Chumas, Paul; Russell, John; Liddington, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis of the craniofacial skeleton is rare, with fungal pathogens least commonly implicated. The authors present 2 patients of osteomyelitis of the skull caused by Aspergillus spp. and discuss the diagnosis, clinicopathological course, and management strategies.Late recurrence seen in this type of infection warrants long-term follow-up and a high index of suspicion for the clinical signs associated with recurrence.Such patients would benefit from their surgical debridement being planned and managed via a specialist craniofacial unit, so as to utilize the most aesthetically sensitive approach and the experience of specialists from several surgical disciplines. PMID:27391523

  1. Skull melting of synthetic minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.D.; Hull, D.E.; Herrick, C.C.

    1977-12-01

    Direct high-frequency induction melting of dielectric materials in a water-cooled cage has been developed in the LASL synthetic minerals program. Molten material is contained in a skull, i.e., sintered shell, of its own composition so the traditional problems associated with refractory melt contamination are essentially eliminated. Preliminary analyses of power input, cage design, and coil geometry are discussed. Initial experimental results on the preparation of polycrystalline ingots, single crystals, and glasses are presented along with possible applications of this technique.

  2. Applied anatomy of repairing skull base defect by temporal fascia (muscles) flaps%颞筋膜(肌)瓣转位重建颅底的应用解剖及修复组织缺损的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫长祥; 于春江; 王忠诚; 刘海; 张忠

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To illustrate anatomical property, blood supply and nerve distribution of temporal fascia(muscles) flaps and explore their effects in repairing tissue defect, so as to provide an anatomical basis for skull base rebuilding.METHODS: Totally 20 wet skull samples from 10 patients were fixed with latex mixed of red and blue dyestuff into veins and arteries. After making frontal-temporal-crest incision, anatomy of each layer was photographed and measured.RESULTS: The layers from the surface to the deep were skin, hypodermic tissue, superficial temporal fascia(STF), deep temporal fascia(DTF), temporal muscle(TM) and periosteum. STF, DTF and TM had their own blood supplies.CONCLUSION: Different types of temporal fascia flaps, temporal muscle flaps and temporal fascia muscle flaps can be made for skull base rebuilding and tissue defect repair according to blood supplies.%目的:分析说明颞筋膜(肌)瓣的解剖位置、血供及神经分布,探讨其在修复组织缺损中的作用,并为进行颅底重建提供解剖学依据.方法:应用10例(20侧)成人头部湿标本,动、静脉系统分别灌注混有红、蓝色染料的乳胶;额颞顶联合切口,逐层解剖、拍照、测量.结果:该区层次由浅入深为:皮肤、皮下组织、颞浅筋膜、颞深筋膜、颞肌和骨膜.颞浅筋膜、颞深筋膜和颞肌均有各自的血液供应.结论:根据其血供可制成不同类型的颞筋膜瓣、颞肌瓣、颞筋膜肌瓣进行颅底重建及组织缺损的修复.

  3. Estimation of the skull insertion loss using an optoacoustic point source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Kneipp, Moritz; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The acoustically-mismatched skull bone poses significant challenges for the application of ultrasonic and optical techniques in neuroimaging, still typically requiring invasive approaches using craniotomy or skull thinning. Optoacoustic imaging partially circumvents the acoustic distortions due to the skull because the induced wave is transmitted only once as opposed to the round trip in pulse-echo ultrasonography. To this end, the mouse brain has been successfully imaged transcranially by optoacoustic scanning microscopy. Yet, the skull may adversely affect the lateral and axial resolution of transcranial brain images. In order to accurately characterize the complex behavior of the optoacoustic signal as it traverses through the skull, one needs to consider the ultrawideband nature of the optoacoustic signals. Here the insertion loss of murine skull has been measured by means of a hybrid optoacoustic-ultrasound scanning microscope having a spherically focused PVDF transducer and pulsed laser excitation at 532 nm of a 20 μm diameter absorbing microsphere acting as an optoacoustic point source. Accurate modeling of the acoustic transmission through the skull is further performed using a Fourier-domain expansion of a solid-plate model, based on the simultaneously acquired pulse-echo ultrasound image providing precise information about the skull's position and its orientation relative to the optoacoustic source. Good qualitative agreement has been found between the a solid-plate model and experimental measurements. The presented strategy might pave the way for modeling skull effects and deriving efficient correction schemes to account for acoustic distortions introduced by an adult murine skull, thus improving the spatial resolution, effective penetration depth and overall image quality of transcranial optoacoustic brain microscopy.

  4. Identity Development and Aggressive Lexicon

    OpenAIRE

    Khomyk, Volodymyr; Filippova, Inessa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The paper is an attempt to explain the aggressive lexicon of adolescents. This explanation was based on the constructive-developmental theory of R. Kegan. Comparison of empirical data meaning-making evolution of identity predisposed to aggression youths with displays of their aggressive lexicon in intense interpersonal interactions indicate that the lexicon spokesmen of the Imperial stage of development a common with others reality is not shared, meaning the voice of his «...

  5. Skull thickness in patients with clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, T; Kjaer, I; Sonnesen, L;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP).......The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP)....

  6. The evolutionary significance of the Wajak skulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm, P.

    1995-01-01

    Ever since their description by Dubois (1920, 1922) the Wajak skulls Java) have played an important role in the discussions on the evolution of modern humans in Australasia. Because of the robust morphology of the skull, Wajak Man was seen as a link between Pleistocene hominids from Java (Solo) and

  7. 鼻咽癌颅底侵犯冠状位CT扫描应用价值分析%Analysis on value of CT coronal scan in diagnosis of invasion of skull base in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆忠华

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To discuss the clinical value of CT coronal scan in diagnosis of invasion of skull base in nasopharyn-geal carcinoma (NPC). METHODS 233 patients with NPC were given CT coronal and axial scan, then compared the results of the two positions. RESULTS In the 233 cases of NPC, CT coronal scan showed bone invasion in 4 cases in 16 cases that had not been recognized by axial scan. By CT coronal scan, the invasion of skull base was confirmed in 4 and excluded in 6 of 10 cases in which the invasion was uncertain by axial scan. Wider and deeper invasions were recognized in 23 cases (12.3%) by coronal scan, though obvious invasion had been diagnosed after axial scan. Accordant invasion was displayed in 35 cases (18.8%) by CT coronal and axial scan. By CT coronal scan, the invasion of skull base was in 21 patients witch had not been showed destruction of bone. And there was destruction of bone in 21 cases by axial scan, only 12 cases could be recognized in coronal scan, and with different locations. CONCLUSION CT scan is valuable for invasion of skull base in NPC, combining CT axial with coronal scan can improve diagnostic accuracy.%目的 探讨冠状位CT扫描在鼻咽癌颅底侵犯诊断中的应用价值.方法 对233例鼻咽癌患者进行轴位及冠状位CT扫描,比较两种体位对鼻咽癌颅底侵犯的检出情况.结果 轴位扫描所见肿瘤侵袭、转移灶中173例经冠状位扫描证实;轴位扫描无骨质侵袭及转移者16例中,经冠状位扫描见4例骨质破坏;轴位扫描所见10例难以确定是否骨质破坏者,经冠状位扫描证实4例骨质破坏,6例正常;另外,冠状位扫描显示了21例轴位扫描未发现的骨质破坏;同时有21例患者轴位扫描可见骨质破坏,但冠状位仅显示12例,且位置不同.结论 CT扫描在鼻咽癌颅底侵犯影像诊断中具有重要意义,但单纯轴位扫描具有一定局限性,联合应用轴位与冠状位的扫描,可提高诊断准确率.

  8. The conductivity of neonatal piglet skulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first measured values of conductivities for neonatal mammalian skull samples. We measured the average radial (normal to the skull surface) conductivity of fresh neonatal piglet skull samples at 1 kHz and found it to be around 30 mS m−1 at ambient room temperatures of about 23 °C. Measurements were made on samples of either frontal or parietal cranial bone, using a saline-filled cell technique. The conductivity value we observed was approximately twice the values reported for adult skulls (Oostendorp et al 2000 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 47 1487–92) using a similar technique, but at a frequency of around 5 Hz. Further, we found that the conductivity of skull fragments increased linearly with thickness. We found evidence that this was related to differences in composition between the frontal and parietal bone samples tested, which we believe is because frontal bones contained a larger fraction of higher conductivity cancellous bone material

  9. An accessory skull suture mimicking a skull fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedijk, J E F; Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, V; Maat, G J R; Maes, A; van Rijn, R R; de Boer, H H

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the sudden and unexpected death of a five-and-a-half-month-old boy. As in every Dutch case of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), a multidisciplinary diagnostic approach was used. This included post-mortem radiography, showing a linear discontinuity of the parietal bone. Originally this was interpreted as a skull fracture, but autopsy indicated no signs of mechanical trauma. Instead the defect was defined as a unilateral accessory suture of the parietal bone. The initial erroneous diagnosis had severe adverse consequences and thus every health care professional or forensic specialist dealing with paediatric mechanical traumas should be cautious of this rare anomaly. PMID:26860068

  10. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  11. Statistical skull models from 3D X-ray images

    CERN Document Server

    Berar, M; Bailly, G; Payan, Y; Berar, Maxime; Desvignes, Michel; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 statistical models of the skull and mandible built upon an elastic registration method of 3D meshes. The aim of this work is to relate degrees of freedom of skull anatomy, as static relations are of main interest for anthropology and legal medicine. Statistical models can effectively provide reconstructions together with statistical precision. In our applications, patient-specific meshes of the skull and the mandible are high-density meshes, extracted from 3D CT scans. All our patient-specific meshes are registrated in a subject-shared reference system using our 3D-to-3D elastic matching algorithm. Registration is based upon the minimization of a distance between the high density mesh and a shared low density mesh, defined on the vertexes, in a multi resolution approach. A Principal Component analysis is performed on the normalised registrated data to build a statistical linear model of the skull and mandible shape variation. The accuracy of the reconstruction is under the millimetre in the shape...

  12. Electronic Aggression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Aggression is no longer limited to the school yard. New forms of electronic media, such as blogs, instant messaging, chat rooms, email, text messaging, and the internet are providing new arenas for youth violence to occur.  Created: 11/20/2007 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention.   Date Released: 11/28/2007.

  13. Performance of Cement-Based Materials in Aggressive Aqueous Environments State-of-the-Art Report, RILEM TC 211 - PAE

    CERN Document Server

    Bertron, Alexandra; Belie, Nele

    2013-01-01

    Concrete and cement-based materials must operate in increasingly aggressive aqueous environments, which may be either natural or industrial.  These materials may suffer degradation in which ion addition and/or ion exchange reactions occur, leading to a breakdown of the matrix microstructure and consequent weakening.  Sometimes this degradation can be extremely rapid and serious such as in acidic environments, while in other cases degradation occurs over long periods.  Consequences of material failure are usually severe – adversely affecting the health and well-being of human communities and disturbing ecological balances. There are also large direct costs of maintaining and replacing deteriorated infrastructure and indirect costs from loss of production during maintenance work, which place a great burden on society. The focus of this book is on addressing issues concerning performance of cement-based materials in aggressive aqueous environments , by way of this State-of-the-Art Report. The book represe...

  14. Characteristics of gunshot wounds in the skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrehomme, G; Işcan, M Y

    1999-05-01

    The analysis of trauma to the skeleton is an important aspect of forensic case work, but most pathology references devote limited attention to this topic. This paper describes various aspects of gunshot wounds, including entrance and exit patterns, angle and path, range of fire and velocity, and caliber of the bullet, based on observations of a series of known cases. Skeletal remains of 21 victims of gunshot wounds were studied. In most cases, there was documentation of the investigation, autopsy, and victim's identity. Each case was analyzed in terms of wound location, shape, size and exit/entry surface area ratio, beveling, and direction of shooting Skull entry wounds were most often round or oval. Unusual shapes were observed in bones like the mandible and mastoid process, but were also found to be triangular, nearly rectangular or irregular. Tunneling was observed in the mastoid process. The expected internal beveling was obvious in all but one skull. External beveling of an entry wound was only observed in one case (parietal bone). Exit wounds were roughly round, oval, square, and rectangular and were always more irregular than entry wounds. External beveling of exit wounds was observed in most vault bones, but there was none in the orbit, maxilla, greater wing of the sphenoid, temporal, or left occipital bone. Tangential gunshot wounds were seen in a mastoid process, zygomatic process, mandibular ramus and condyle, and occipital condyle. Most of the exit to entry surface area ratios (cm2) varied from 1.4 to 2.0. In four cases the ratio indicated that entrances were larger than exists. In conclusion, understanding of gunshot wound characteristics is an important matter to interpret distance, velocity, direction and sometimes caliber size. Assessment of this nature of gunshot wounds helps reconstruct events surrounding the death. PMID:10408112

  15. A small skull from Flores dated to the 20th century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Chiara; Persson, Liselott; Alexandersen, Verner;

    2012-01-01

    National Museum in Copenhagen. The "Copenhagen Flores" (CF) male skull is radiocarbon-dated and of modern age. The cranium is small, but larger than e.g. Liang Bua skull (LB1) in every measurement. The (CT-scan based) cranial capacity of 1258 ml is normal for modern humans, but somewhat lower than values...... from the middle or upper Palaeolithics. The metric cranial data analysed in FORDISC, characterize the skull as a male Vietnamese rather than a Chinese or White individual. Tooth morphology shows the sundadont pattern and tooth size corresponds to that of teeth from Bali, Java and Malayan Orang Asli...

  16. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  17. The Nondestructive Determination of the Aluminum Content in Pressed Skulls of Aluminum Dross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varuzan; Škapin, Srečo Davor; Kovačec, Uroš

    2013-02-01

    prediction of the amount of free aluminum in pressed skulls w Al, based on nondestructive measurement of the density ρ of the pressed skulls. The pressed skulls density is measured by a fully automatic gas displacement pyknometer with a working volume large enough to enable the insertion of the whole pressed skull sample. An additional integral part of this methodology is the set of experimentally determined linear graphs w Al- ρ, plotted in advance for all classes of pressed skulls existing in the plant, from the experimentally collected data on pressed skulls density and aluminum recovery by melting. After selecting the proper graph w Al- ρ, which is usually performed on an aluminum alloy basis, the pyknometric measured density of the pressed skulls can be routinely related to the aluminum content sought, within a relative error of ±5%.

  18. Contribution of skull roentgenograms to pediatric diagnoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The place of roentgenograms of the skull has changed substantially over the last tow decades. Skull roentgenograms remain valuable for studying deformities involving all or part of the cranial vault, particularly plagiocephaly and craniosynostosis. They provide little information on the contents of the skull, which can be investigated noninvasively using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and, in infants, ultrasonography. The 1990 consensus panel concluded that patients with head injury should be evaluated mainly on the basis of clinical criteria and that the contribution of roentgenograms is minimal in this setting. In some central nervous system disorders, roentgenograms of the skull can be of use secondarily to look for calcifications or osteolysis. (authors). 10 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  19. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field properties unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoaco...

  20. Skull fracture and the diagnosis of abuse.

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, C J

    1984-01-01

    Eighty nine children under 2 years of age with skull fracture were studied retrospectively--29 children with definite non-accidental injury serially recorded by the Departments of Paediatrics and Forensic Medicine, and 60 children consecutively admitted to hospital with skull fractures after accidents. There were 20 deaths including 19 among abused children. Multiple injuries and an inadequate history assisted in diagnosing abuse. Fracture characteristics found considerably more often in abus...

  1. The 'lamellated' skull in β-thalassaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skull in homozygous β-thalassaemia may present several abnormalities, such as osteopenia, widening of the diploic space, and a 'hair-on-end' appearance. In some cases it presents also a particular stratified appearance caused by a variable number of osseous lamellae, parallel with the inner table. This 'lamellated skull' was observed in 16 out of 150 patients affected by the disease (10.6%). (orig./GDG)

  2. 导航技术在颅底-颞下区肿瘤手术中的应用%Application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉兴; 彭歆; 刘筱菁; 张雷; 俞光岩; 郭传殡

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the application of computer-aided design and navigation technology in skull base and infratemporal fossa tumor surgery and to analyze its advantages and disadvantages.Methods Twenty-nine cases with tumor of skull base and infratemporal fossa were treated with computer-aided design and navigation surgery.The Parameters of age,gender,primary or recurrent tumor,tumor nature and surgical approach were recorded.Results En bloc resection was performed in 20 cases and subtotal resection in 9 cases.The margin status was negative margin in 8 cases,near-tumor margin in 17 cases and positive resection margin in 4 cases.Postoperative complication rate was 14% (4/29).During the follow-up period,2 benign cases recurred.In the malignant group,there were 7 cases of recurrence,2 cases of metastasis and 3 deaths.The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rate were 69% and 40% respectively.Conclusions Navigation technology can enhance the confidence of the surgeons and operation safety in handling malignant tumors in skull base and infratemporal fossa.%目的 评价计算机辅助设计导航技术在颅底-颞下区肿瘤手术中的应用价值.方法 对29例颅底-颞下区肿瘤患者行计算机辅助手术方案设计及术中导航.记录患者的年龄、性别、肿瘤原发或复发、肿瘤性质及手术入路.应用SPSS 13.0软件计算生存率.结果 肿瘤完全切除20例、近全切除7例、次全切除2例;切除方式:整块切除20例、分块切除9例;切缘状态:阴性切缘8例、近肿瘤切除17例、阳性切缘4例.术后并发症发生率为14%(4/29).随访期内良性肿瘤复发2例.恶性肿瘤复发7例、转移2例、死亡3例,恶性肿瘤5年总生存率和无进展生存率分别为69%和40%.结论 计算机辅助设计导航技术可提高颅底-颞下区外科操作的手术安全性.

  3. Impact of involved field radiotherapy in partial response after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Whether salvage therapy in patients with advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in partial remission (PR) should consist of radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is debatable. We evaluated the impact of radiotherapy on outcome in PR patients treated in four successive European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trials for aggressive NHL. Patients and Methods: Records of 974 patients (1980-1999) were reviewed regarding initial response, final outcome, and type and timing of salvage treatment. After 8 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, 227 NHL patients were in PR and treated: 114 received involved field radiotherapy, 16 ASCT, 93 second-line chemotherapy, and 4 were operated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after radiotherapy were estimated (Kaplan-Meier method) and compared with other treatments (log-rank). Impact on survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: The median PFS in PR patients was 4.2 years and 48% remained progression-free at 5 years. Half of the PR patients converted to a complete remission. After conversion, survival was comparable to patients directly in complete remission. Radiotherapy resulted in better OS and PFS compared with other treatments, especially in patients with low to intermediate International Prognostic Index score, bulky disease, or nodal disease only. Correction by multivariate analysis for prognostic factors such as stage, bulky disease, and number of extranodal locations showed that radiotherapy was clearly the most significant factor affecting both OS and PFS. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that radiotherapy can be effective for patients in PR after fully dosed chemotherapy; assessment in a randomized trial (radiotherapy vs. ASCT) is justified

  4. Imaging basilar skull fractures in the horse: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the complex nature of the anatomy of the equine head, superimposition of numerous structures, and poor soft tissue differentiation, radiography may be of limited value in the diagnosis of basilar skull fractures. However, in many horses radiographic changes such as soft tissue opacification of the guttural pouch region, irregular bone margination at the sphenooccipital line, attenuation of the nasopharynx, ventral displacement of the dorsal pharyngeal wall and the presence of irregularly shaped bone fragments in the region of the guttural pouches are suggestive of a fracture of the skull base. These findings in conjunction with physical examination findings and historical information may lead to a presumptive diagnosis of a fracture. When available and when the patient will accommodate the equipment, computed tomography may give a definitive diagnosis owing to its superior resolution and differentiation of soft tissue structures

  5. Dental development of the Taung skull from computerized tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, G C; Vannier, M W

    Just over 60 years ago, Dart's description and analysis of the Taung child's skull triggered an intellectual revolution about human origins. Recently, several authors have suggested that one of the most significant hominid-like traits of australopithecines, delayed maturation, may not after all be valid. This is a radical departure from Mann's classic study of australopithecine maturation and palaeodemography based on dental eruption patterns. The resolution of this debate has important implications for the history of the biological and social evolution of the human species. In view of the controversies generated by recent studies, and particularly because the Taung skull is the type specimen of Australopithecus africanus, we have investigated the relevant anatomy of the Taung 'child' using computerized tomography. We conclude that the Taung 'child' shows some important dental maturational affinities with great apes, although as Dart noted, other hominid-like features are clearly present. PMID:3116435

  6. Age and gender differences in aggression of Slovene elementary and secondary school students

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Kozina

    2012-01-01

    The study examined age and gender differences in aggression using three representative samples for Slovenia: 4th grade elementary school students; 8th grade elementary school students; 4th grade secondary school students in Matura programs. The results were based on the LA aggression scale that measures general aggression and four specific types of aggression: physical aggression (TA), verbal aggression (BA), internal aggression (NA) and aggression towards authority (AA). Based on the results...

  7. Human skulls with turquoise inlays: pre hispanic origin or replicas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of archaeological context determining if the manufacture of two human skulls adorned with turquoise inlays have pre-Columbian origin or not (replicas), led to perform other studies. Under these conditions, besides orthodox methodology commonly used to assign chronology and cultural aspects as form, style, decoration, iconography, etc., it was necessary to obtain more results based on the use of characterization techniques. The techniques employed were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), in order to determine the manufacture techniques and chemical composition of the materials used for the cementant. SEM analysis showed the presence of zones composed by Ca, O, C and Al. In some cases Mg, Cl, Fe and Pb were identified. High concentration of Cu was present in all samples, due to residues of turquoise inlays (CuAI6(PO4)4(OH)8(H2O)4) with which the skulls were decorated. In the cementant was identified the Ca as base element of the cementant, as well as particles < 100 nm with irregular morphology and other amorphous zones. FTIR spectrums indicated the presence of organic substances that could be used as agglutinating in the cementant. The current work shows a progress identifying involved techniques in the manufacturing of two human skulls with turquoise inlays. (Author)

  8. Imaging of cerebellopontine angle lesions: an update. Part 2: intra-axial lesions, skull base lesions that may invade the CPA region, and non-enhancing extra-axial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, Fabrice; Chiras, Jacques [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Savatovsky, Julien [Adolphe de Rothschild Foundation, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2007-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reliably demonstrate typical features of vestibular schwannomas or meningiomas in the vast majority of mass lesions responsible for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) syndrome. However, a large variety of unusual lesions can also be encountered in the CPA. Covering the entire spectrum of lesions potentially found in the CPA, these articles explain the pertinent neuroimaging features that radiologists need to know to make clinically relevant diagnoses in these cases, including data from diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging or MR spectroscopy, when available. A diagnostic algorithm based on the lesion's site of origin, shape and margins, density, signal intensity and contrast material uptake is also proposed. Non-enhancing extra-axial CPA masses are cystic (epidermoid cyst, arachnoid cyst, neurenteric cyst) or contain fat (dermoid cyst, lipoma). Tumours can also extend into the CPA by extension from the skull base (paraganglioma, chondromatous tumours, chordoma, cholesterol granuloma, endolymphatic sac tumour). Finally, brain stem or ventricular tumours can present with a significant exophytic component in the CPA that may be difficult to differentiate from an extra-axial lesion (lymphoma, hemangioblastoma, choroid plexus papilloma, ependymoma, glioma, medulloblastoma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour). (orig.)

  9. All the Information the Neonate and Infant Skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bajoghli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The art of skull interpretation slowly being lost and trainees in radiology see few plane film of skull. However, skull radiography still provides significant information that is helpful in finding pathologic conditions. Abnormality of skull may be reflected as variation in density, size and shape of the skull, as well as skull defect. Skull dysplasia may manifest as decreased calvarial density (hypophosphatasia, osteogenesis imferfecta, or increased calvarial density (osteopetrosis, or facial increase in density (frontometaphyseal dysplasia. Diffusely decreased or increased clavarial density is more associated with process that affects entire skull. Decrease density of cranial vault at birth seen more in torch and fetal alcoholic. Macrocephaly may be due to skeletal sysplasia, or hydrocephalus. The aim of this review is to evaluate plane film of skull in neonate and infants.

  10. Protection of Conductive and Non-conductive Advanced Polymer-based Paints from Highly Aggressive Oxidative Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimenko, Y.; Ng, R.; Iskanderova, Z.; Kleiman, J.; Grigorevsky, A.; Kiseleva, L.; Finckenor, M.; Edwards, D.

    2005-01-01

    Research has been continued to further improve the space durability of conductive and non-conductive polymer-based paints and of conductive thermal control paints for space applications. Efforts have been made to enhance the space durability and stability of functional Characteristics in ground-based space environment imitating conditions, using specially developed surface modification treatment. The results of surface modification of new conductive paints, including the ground-based testing in aggressive oxidative environments, such as atomic oxygen/UV and oxygen plasma, and performance evaluation are presented. Functional properties and performance characteristics, such as thermal optical properties (differential solar absorptance and thermal emittance representing the thermal optical performance of thermal control paints) and surface resistivity characteristics of pristine, surface modified, and tested materials were verified. Extensive surface analysis studies have been performed using complementary surface analyses including SEM/EDS and XPS. Test results revealed that the successfully treated materials exhibit reduced mass loss and no surface morphology change, thus indicating good protection from the severe oxidative environment. It was demonstrated that the developed surface modification treatment could be applied successfully to charge dissipative and conductive paints.

  11. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Curtis

    Full Text Available The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically "over-designed" and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles, a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance.

  12. Solitary skull metastasis as the first symptom of hepatocellular carcinoma: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo X

    2014-04-01

    in the calvaria site were more frequent than those that occurred in the skull base and facial skeleton. This may be worthy of further investigation in the future.Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, skull metastasis, bone metastasis, positron emission tomography

  13. Skull shapes of the Lissodelphininae: radiation, adaptation and asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatius, Anders; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2016-06-01

    Within Delphinidae, the sub-family Lissodelphininae consists of 8 Southern Ocean species and 2 North Pacific species. Lissodelphininae is a result of recent phylogenetic revisions based on molecular methods. Thus, morphological radiation within the taxon has not been investigated previously. The sub-family consists of ecologically diverse groups such as (1) the Cephalorhynchus genus of 4 small species inhabiting coastal and shelf waters, (2) the robust species in the Lagenorhynchus genus with the coastal La. australis, the offshore La. cruciger, the pelagic species La. obscurus and La. obliquidens, and (3) the morphologically aberrant genus Lissodelphis. Here, the shapes of 164 skulls from adults of all 10 species were compared using 3-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The Lissodelphininae skulls were supplemented by samples of Lagenorhynchus albirostris and Delphinus delphis to obtain a context for the variation found within the subfamily. Principal components analysis was used to map the most important components of shape variation on phylogeny. The first component of shape variation described an elongation of the rostrum, lateral and dorsoventral compression of the neurocranium and smaller temporal fossa. The two Lissodelphis species were on the high extreme of this spectrum, while Lagenorhynchus australis, La. cruciger and Cephalorhynchus heavisidii were at the low extreme. Along the second component, La. cruciger was isolated from the other species by its expanded neurocranium and concave facial profile. Shape variation supports the gross phylogenetic relationships proposed by recent molecular studies. However, despite the great diversity of ecology and external morphology within the subfamily, shape variation of the feeding apparatus was modest, indicating a similar mode of feeding across the subfamily. All 10 species were similar in their pattern of skull asymmetry, but interestingly, two species using narrowband high frequency clicks (La. cruciger and C

  14. Design and Manufacturing of a Custom Skull Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F.I. Saldarriaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Cranioplasty is defined as a neurosurgical procedure to cover an injured bone in the skull. This procedure is carried out in order to protect and restore intracranial structures and to restore the appearance and psychological stability of the patient. Advances in medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, have allowed the 3D reconstruction of anatomical structures for several medical applications, including the design of custom-made implants. This study describes the methodology used to design a custom-made cranial implant for a 13-year-old patient who suffered a lesion in the left frontoparietal region of the skull caused by a fall. Approach: The design of the implant was based on the 3D reconstruction of the skull of the patient, obtained by a CT scan, using Rapid Form® 2006. Once the preliminary design was completed, 3D models of the injured region of the skull and of the implant were fabricated in a Rapid Prototyping (RP machine using Fused Deposition Modeling Technology (FDM with the purpose of functionally and dimensionally validating the implant. Subsequently, the implant was fabricated using a 1.2-mm-thick Titanium Alloy (Ti6Al4V plate. Results: The prosthesis was successfully implanted. The surgical time was 85% shorter than that for the same type of surgery in which standard commercial implants and titanium meshes are used. This decrease in surgery time is primarily the result of eliminating the need for trial and error procedures to achieve a good fit for the implant. Finally, the appearance of the patient was restored, allowing the patient to safely perform daily activities. Conclusion: The use of 3D reconstruction techniques from medical images reduces the possibility of errors during surgery, improves fit and provides better implant stability. The use of 3D models designed in RP proved to be an effective practice in the design process.

  15. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  16. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  17. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI

  18. Prospective study of screening for blunt intracranial carotid arterial injuries following basilar skull fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt intracranial carotid arterial injuries (BCIs) are considered rare, but have the potential for a devastating outcome. Early diagnosis of intracranial vascular injuries is extremely difficult, owing to the preferential use of computed tomographic (CT) scanning on its own as a method for the evaluation of head trauma cases. Patients are commonly referred for angiographies only when their clinical conditions become obvious. To diagnose BCIs at an early stage, we performed cerebral angiographies aggressively when initial head CT scanning revealed basilar skull fractures in the proximity to the carotid artery. From November 2000 to September 2002, 202 patients with blunt head trauma were admitted to the Nakakawachi Medical Center of Acute Medicine, a certified Level I trauma center. We investigated a total of 16 blunt head trauma patients with basilar skull fractures to determine the existence of BCIs. A total of 16 patients were angiographically examined, with 7 patients (44%) being identified as having BCIs. Five patients had unilateral BCIs, while 2 patients were found to have bilateral BCIs. We observed various types of BCIs, including 3 stenotic lesions of stenosis due to dissection, 3 cases of carotid-cavernous fistulas, 3 aneurysmal dilatation lesions and one case of occlusion, which were found at initial angiography. Two patients underwent endovascular surgery. One patient underwent craniotomy (wrapping). Both endovascular surgery and craniotomy (trapping with anastomosis) were performed on one patient. The other 3 patients managed conservatively. After the performance of initial angiographies, neurologically deteriorated patients were not observed. BCI is rare, but lethal, particularly when the diagnosis is delayed, thus aggressive screening is necessary to prevent deterioration. Basilar skull fractures near the carotid artery are the most important risk factor for BCI. When initial head CT scanning reveals basilar skull fracture near the carotid artery in

  19. Radiological and acetomorphine analysis of the symmetry and direction of evolution of skulls from some historic populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Asymmetry is a common phenomenon in nature. It is typical for the human body and for the skull as its part. Knowledge of asymmetry and normal anatomy, especially of variability which does not represent pathology but distinguishes individuals is the basis for correct interpretation of radiological findings concerning the skull both in research and diagnostic examinations widely performed in surgery, neurology, neurosurgery, internal medicine, or pediatrics. Analysis of fluctuating asymmetry reveals the influence of stress factors on human development and the ability of the organism to defend itself against stress.The aim of this work was to analyse the asymmetry of skulls from some historic populations and to describe changes in their anatomy over the ages. Material and methods: The material consisted of three skull groups: one contemporary with 82 skulls and two mediaeval (52 skulls from Cedynia and 77 skulls from Grodek on Bug). Direct measurements were done and the skull was X-rayed in the Posterior-Anterior and skull-base projections. Images were scanned and calibrated with MicroStation 95 Academic Edition software. Helmert's transformation with first-order polynomial was done to attain a suitable geometry. Vectorisation of axes and areas was performed on reference material. Using tools for measurement of vector elements, the distance between bilateral points of both sides of the skull were obtained. Data were analysed statistically. Results: The results of measurements were used to study the directional and fluctuating asymmetry. It was found that asymmetry of the skull was present in both historic populations. The following conclusions were drawn: changes in the distribution of directional and fluctuating asymmetry for individual dimensions have taken place over the ages. A high level of directional asymmetry in the facial part and fluctuating asymmetry in the calvaria is typical for contemporary skulls. The reverse is true for relations in the

  20. School-Based Prevention of Bullying and Relational Aggression in Adolescence: The Fairplayer.manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Herbert; Hess, Markus; Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Bull, Heike Dele

    2012-01-01

    The fairplayer.manual is a school-based program to prevent bullying. The program consists of fifteen to seventeen consecutive ninety-minute lessons using cognitive-behavioral methods, methods targeting group norms and group dynamics, and discussions on moral dilemmas. Following a two-day training session, teachers, together with skilled…

  1. Cloverleaf skull associated with unusual skeletal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A male infant which cloverleaf skull and multiple other birth defects born to unrelated, healthy, young parents is presented. Radiologic findings in addition to the cloverleaf skull configuration included short, wide clavicles, winged scapulae, unusual shapes of ribs with abnormal spacing between them and with prominent costovertebral junctions, and widely separated ischia. Ulnae appeared angular with probable fusion to the midportion of the radial bones bilaterally. There was polydactyly of the hands and feet with grossly abnormal metacarpal and metatarsal bones. Skeletal maturation was normal. Computed tomography of the skull showed dilated lateral and third ventricles as well as agenesis of the corpus callosum. The mother denies any teratogenic exposure during the pregnancy. The findings in this infant do not seem to fit into any previously described syndrome. (orig.)

  2. [Injury by skull osteolytic secundary syphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandro, Lucas; Camporro, Julieta Piar; Arakaki, Naomi; Orellana, Nora; Mora, Claudia Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Bone involvement of syphilis can be observed in tertiary and congenital syphilis. It is infrequent during the secondary stage. The skull is the most affected bone in secondary syphilis, and its most frequent form of presentation is proliferative osteitis. If the skull is affected, headache is usual and can be as intense as in meningitis. Osteolyitic lesions may be seen in complimentary imaging studies, with a moth eaten aspect. These lesions raise concern over a number of differential diagnoses, among which are infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. The definitive diagnosis is made by bone biopsy of the compromised bone. Molecular techniques in the affected tissues increases diagnostic performance. There is no standardized treatment protocol for syphilis since there are no guidelines available. We report a case of a 19 year old female, presenting with a unique osteolytic lesion in the skull due to secondary syphilis. PMID:27315003

  3. Synthesis of Planar Microwave Circuits based on Metamaterial Concepts through Aggressive Space Mapping.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Pérez, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    RF and microwave applications represent one of the fastest-growing segments of the high performance electronics market, where ongoing innovation is critical. Manufacturers compete intensively to meet market needs with reduced cost, size, weight and many other performance criteria demands. Under this scenario, transmission lines based on metamaterial concepts can be considered a very interesting alternative to the conventional transmission lines. They are more compact (compat...

  4. Adaptation of proton total dose with respect to dosimetric parameters within the frame of treatment of skull base or upper cervical spine chordomas; Adaptation de la dose totale de protons en fonction des parametres dosimetriques dans le cadre du traitement des chordomes de la base du crane et du rachis cervical haut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, C.G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), 75 - Paris (France); Calugaru, V.; Bolle, S.; Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J.; Alapetite, C.; Dendale, R.; Feuvret, L. [Institut Curie-Centre de protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Noel, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a photon-proton irradiation protocol with a dose adaptation with respect to dosimetric factors for patients suffering form a skull base and upper cervical spine chordoma. Sixty patients have been treated between May 2006 and June 2008 with a combination of high energy photons and protons. As five tumours have locally relapsed and one at distance, the authors comment the local control rates, the number of attained cranial nerves, the value of the macroscopic tumour volume, the survival rate without relapse in terms of multifactorial of uni-factorial analysis. Short communication

  5. Social Likeability, Subtypes of Aggression, and the Attributional Style of Aggressive Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Blier, Heather K.

    2001-01-01

    Recent efforts to understand and predict the onset and maintenance of aggression have considered the heterogeneity of this behavior. Dodge (1980) and others, have suggested a distinction in aggression based on two primary subtypes: reactive and proactive aggression. The form, severity and persistence of these aggressive subtypes may depend on an on-going interaction between individual characteristics and environmental characteristics that elicit varying antecedents and consequences (Frick,...

  6. Behavioural strategies of aggressive and non-aggressive male mice in active shock avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Benus, R. F.; Bohus, B; Koolhaas, J.M.; van Oortmerssen, G.A

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis, partly based on findings in social interactions, that aggressive mice generally adopt an active behavioural strategy (cf. fight-flight) in threatening situations, while non-aggressive ones generally assume a passive strategy (cf. conservation-withdrawal) was tested using a two-way active shock avoidance paradigm. Overall, aggressive mice were found to be better active shock avoiders than non-aggressive animals, a finding that is consistent with our hypothesis. However, within ...

  7. Adolescent Aggression: The Role of Peer Group Status Motives, Peer Aggression, and Group Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Faris, Robert; Ennett, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of youth aggression have emphasized the role of network-based peer influence processes. Other scholars have suggested that aggression is often motivated by status concerns. We integrate these two veins of research by considering the effects of peer status motivations on subsequent adolescent aggression, net of their own status motivations, prior aggression, and peer behavior. We also explore different levels at which peer effects may occur, considering the effects of reciprocat...

  8. Aggressive and Nonaggressive Children's Moral Judgments and Moral Emotion Attributions in Situations Involving Retaliation and Unprovoked Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina; Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated 7- and 9-year-old children's moral understanding of retaliation as compared to unprovoked aggression with regard to their aggressive behavior status. Based on peer ratings, 48 children were selected as overtly aggressive and 91 as nonaggressive. Their moral understanding of retaliation and unprovoked aggression was…

  9. Skull X-Rays for Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of abolishing skull X-rays on the rate of admission, use of computer tomography (CT, radiation dose per head injury, and detection of intracranial injuries was determined in patients, aged 1 to 14 years, presenting to the ED at Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK.

  10. Skull X-Rays for Head Injury

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    The effect of abolishing skull X-rays on the rate of admission, use of computer tomography (CT), radiation dose per head injury, and detection of intracranial injuries was determined in patients, aged 1 to 14 years, presenting to the ED at Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK.

  11. Sex-diagnosis of human skulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looze, de Ellen M.A.

    1996-01-01

    For 41 human skulls from the 19th century in the collection of the Zoological Museum Amsterdam the discriminant function score was calculated using a set of twelve variables in order to arrive at a best-as-possible sex-diagnosis. The function used was developed by Van Vark & Pasveer (1994). This led

  12. The effects of a classroom-based social skills training program on the levels of assertiveness and aggressiveness of fourth-grade elementary school students

    OpenAIRE

    Aslı Uz Baş

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is examine the effects of an classroom-based social skills training program on assertiveness and aggressiveness of fourth-grade elementary students. Subjects of the study are composed of 51 fourth-grade students. Twenty five of these students are assigned to experimental group and 26 of them are assigned to control group. Social skills training program was implemented to the experimental group for 10 weeks. However, no procedure was applied to the control group. The ...

  13. The oldest anatomical handmade skull of the world c. 1508: 'the ugliness of growing old' attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Stefaan J

    2014-06-01

    The author discusses a previously unknown early sixteenth-century renaissance handmade anatomical miniature skull. The small, naturalistic skull made from an agate (calcedonia) stone mixture (mistioni) shows remarkable osteologic details. Dr. Saban was the first to link the skull to Leonardo. The three-dimensional perspective of and the search for the senso comune are discussed. Anatomical errors both in the drawings of Leonardo and this skull are presented. The article ends with the issue of physiognomy, his grotesque faces, the Perspective Communis and his experimenting c. 1508 with the stone mixture and the human skull. Evidence, including the Italian scale based on Crazie and Braccia, chemical analysis leading to a mine in Volterra and Leonardo's search for the soul in the skull are presented. Written references in the inventory of Salai (1524), the inventory of the Villa Riposo (Raffaello Borghini 1584) and Don Ambrogio Mazenta (1635) are reviewed. The author attributes the skull c. 1508 to Leonardo da Vinci. PMID:24853982

  14. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  15. Functional structure of the skull in hominoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuschoft, H; Witzel, U

    2004-01-01

    Finite elements stress analysis (FESA) was used to investigate the flow of compressive forces which occur if a homogenous, three-dimensional body representing the skull is loaded by simulated bite forces against the tooth row. Model 1 represents the snout alone. Bite forces are applied simultaneously, but increase rearward. Stresses in the model concentrate along the anterior contour and the lower surface of the model, leaving unstressed a nasal opening and a wide naso-oral connection. Model 2 represents the facial region, as far as the temporomandibular joint. The orbits and the nasal cavity are assumed to be present a priori. Model 3 applies reactions to the bite forces in the temporal fossa, corresponding to the origins of the masticatory muscles. Regions of the model under compressive stress correspond closely to the arrangement of bony material in a hominoid skull. If only the stress-bearing finite elements on each section are combined, and the stress-free parts neglected, the resulting three-dimensional shape is surprisingly similar to a hominoid skull. If bite forces are applied to parts of the tooth row only, the stress patterns are lower, asymmetrical and do not spread into all regions that are stress-bearing in simultaneous biting on all teeth. In model 2, the highest stresses occur at the tooth roots and along the forehead on top of the nasal roof. There are no marked stress concentrations on top of the orbits. The resulting shape resembles that of an orang-utan. In model 3, the highest stresses also occur at the tooth roots, but the circles of force mostly close below the brain case, so that the stress concentration in the forehead region remains much less marked. In this model, however, the stress concentrations are very similar to hollow brow ridges. The entire resulting shape resembles that of gorilla or chimpanzee skulls. A typical gracile australopithecine skull (STS-5) also shows clear similarities to the patterns of stress flow in our models

  16. Aggressive commercial practicies

    OpenAIRE

    Tomanová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Diploma thesis evaluates the effectiveness of legal instruments to prevent the use of aggressive commercial practices. Thesis is divided into two main chapters, the first is the protection against aggressive commercial practices in business to consumer market and the second part is dedicated to the protection against aggressive practices in the business to business market. Each section compares the European protection of aggressive commercial practices (and also through European legislation i...

  17. Aggressive Fibromatosis in Neck.

    OpenAIRE

    Namita Kabdwal; Sanjeev Bhagat; Saurabh Varshney; Sampan Singh Bist; Sarita Mishra; Bhavna Singh

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a locally aggressive infiltrative low-grade benign tumor that accounts for approximately less than 3% of all soft tissue tumors. In the head and neck region this tumor tends to be more aggressive and associated with significant morbidity. Aggressive surgery is a viable management option and may be successfully used as a single modality treatment, or in combination with radiotherapy. We report a rare case of AF in a 38 year old female, who presented with a painl...

  18. Aggression on Roadways

    OpenAIRE

    Novaco, Raymond W.

    1989-01-01

    Aggression and the automobile have had a long standing association, yet research on aggressive behavior has neglected the roadway context. This chapter reviews existing work which has included archival analysis, field interview studies, personality research, and field experiments. Among the recurrent themes have been the relationship between aggressivity in driving to accident liability and to violence in the larger social context. Validity issues in road aggression research are discussed, an...

  19. Rituximab, bendamustine and lenalidomide in patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma not eligible for anthracycline-based therapy or intensive salvage chemotherapy - SAKK 38/08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Felicitas; Zucca, Emanuele; Pabst, Thomas; Fischer, Natalie; Cairoli, Anne; Samaras, Panagiotis; Caspar, Clemens B; Mach, Nicolas; Krasniqi, Fatime; Schmidt, Adrian; Rothermundt, Christian; Enoiu, Milica; Eckhardt, Katrin; Berardi Vilei, Simona; Rondeau, Stephanie; Mey, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of older patients are suffering from aggressive lymphoma. Effective and more tolerable treatment regimens are urgently needed for this growing patient population. Patients with aggressive lymphoma not eligible for anthracycline-based first-line therapy or intensive salvage regimens were treated with the rituximab-bendamustine-lenalidomide (R-BL) regimen (rituximab 375 mg/m(2)  day 1, bendamustine 70 mg/m(2)  d 1, 2, lenalidomide 10 mg d 1-21) for six cycles every 4 weeks. Forty-one patients with a median age of 75 (range 40-94) years were enrolled: 33 patients had substantial co-morbidities. 13 patients were not eligible for anthracycline-based first-line chemotherapy, 28 patients had relapsed/refractory disease. The primary endpoint, overall response, was achieved by 25 (61%) patients (95% confidence interval 45-76%). Grade ≥ 3 toxicity comprised haematological (59%), skin (15%), constitutional (15%) and neurological (12%) events. 9 patients died during trial treatment: 5 from lymphoma progression, 2 from toxicity, 2 with sudden death. After a median follow-up of 25·9 (interquartile range 20·4-31·6) months, 13 patients were still alive. Median overall survival was 14·5 months. In conclusion, R-BL can be considered a treatment option for elderly patients with treatment naïve or relapsed/refractory aggressive lymphoma not eligible for standard aggressive regimens. PMID:27018242

  20. The Role of Skull Modeling in EEG Source Imaging for Patients with Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Restrepo, Victoria; Carrette, Evelien; Strobbe, Gregor; Gadeyne, Stefanie; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Mierlo, Pieter van

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the influence of different skull modeling approaches on EEG source imaging (ESI), using data of six patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy who later underwent successful epilepsy surgery. Four realistic head models with different skull compartments, based on finite difference methods, were constructed for each patient: (i) Three models had skulls with compact and spongy bone compartments as well as air-filled cavities, segmented from either computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a CT-template and (ii) one model included a MRI-based skull with a single compact bone compartment. In all patients we performed ESI of single and averaged spikes marked in the clinical 27-channel EEG by the epileptologist. To analyze at which time point the dipole estimations were closer to the resected zone, ESI was performed at two time instants: the half-rising phase and peak of the spike. The estimated sources for each model were validated against the resected area, as indicated by the postoperative MRI. Our results showed that single spike analysis was highly influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), yielding estimations with smaller distances to the resected volume at the peak of the spike. Although averaging reduced the SNR effects, it did not always result in dipole estimations lying closer to the resection. The proposed skull modeling approaches did not lead to significant differences in the localization of the irritative zone from clinical EEG data with low spatial sampling density. Furthermore, we showed that a simple skull model (MRI-based) resulted in similar accuracy in dipole estimation compared to more complex head models (based on CT- or CT-template). Therefore, all the considered head models can be used in the presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy to localize the irritative zone from low-density clinical EEG recordings. PMID:26936594

  1. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification

    OpenAIRE

    A.V. Tereshchenko,; Yu. A. Belyy; M. S. Tereshchenkova; I. G. Trifanenkova

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes) with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In aggressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early ...

  2. Affective Dependence and Aggression: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Filippo Petruccelli; Pierluigi Diotaiuti; Valeria Verrastro; Irene Petruccelli; Roberta Federico; Giovanni Martinotti; Andrea Fossati; Massimo Di Giannantonio; Luigi Janiri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner's autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject's own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. Objective. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual d...

  3. Research Paradigm of Displaced Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Tanno, Syota

    2013-01-01

    A review of research paradigm of displaced aggression is presented. The author arranged the Japanese wording of displaced aggression, summarized the historical transition of research on displaced aggression, and reviewed research paradigm of displaced aggression.

  4. Geographic variation and sexual dimorphism in the skull of the dusky dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obscurus (Gray, 1828)

    OpenAIRE

    Van Waerebeek, K.

    1993-01-01

    Variation in skulls of 415 dusky dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obscures, was studied based on 37 standard cranial measurements and meristic variables and 28 nonmetrical characters (NMC) by using both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Geographic variation was analysed in mature skulls from central Peru (N=189), Chile (N=22), New Zealand (N=47) and southwestern Africa (N=40). Advanced fusion in the frontal-supraoccipital suture is the most reliable (95% efficiency) cranial criterion of sexual mat...

  5. Neonatal skull depression unassociated with birth trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With few exceptions, a depression of the calvaria in a neonate is caused by birth trauma and often is associated with fracture. Localized depression of the skull without trauma is rare, and such a case is reported here. The cause, complications, and treatment of this condition are briefly discussed. Computed tomography (CT) was useful in clinical management. Although sizable, the depression was not associated with neurologic features and disappeared spontaneously

  6. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach. PMID:19776004

  7. Periorbital skull fractures in five horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periorbital skull fractures were diagnosed in 5 horses, and were associated with ophthalmic complications including corneal ulceration, uveitis, and entrapment of the eye by retrobulbar bone fragments. Physical examination was of greater diagnostic use than radiography. Surgical repair was performed on all horses and was associated with a more favorable postoperative appearance in horses treated acutely; however, the cosmetic results were considered acceptable in all horses. Major postoperative complications were not observed

  8. Skull removal in MR images using a modified artificial bee colony optimization algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherdangkoo, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Removal of the skull from brain Magnetic Resonance (MR) images is an important preprocessing step required for other image analysis techniques such as brain tissue segmentation. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm based on the Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) optimization algorithm to remove the skull region from brain MR images. We modify the ABC algorithm using a different strategy for initializing the coordinates of scout bees and their direction of search. Moreover, we impose an additional constraint to the ABC algorithm to avoid the creation of discontinuous regions. We found that our algorithm successfully removed all bony skull from a sample of de-identified MR brain images acquired from different model scanners. The obtained results of the proposed algorithm compared with those of previously introduced well known optimization algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) demonstrate the superior results and computational performance of our algorithm, suggesting its potential for clinical applications. PMID:25059256

  9. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field properties unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  10. The Link Between Community-Based Violence and Intimate Partner Violence: the Effect of Crime and Male Aggression on Intimate Partner Violence Against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ligia; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Hossain, Mazeda; Watts, Charlotte; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Both intimate partner violence (IPV) and community violence are prevalent globally, and each is associated with serious health consequences. However, little is known about their potential links or the possible benefits of coordinated prevention strategies. Using aggregated data on community violence from the São Paulo State Security Department (INFOCRIM) merged with WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence data, random intercept models were created to assess the effect of crime on women's probability of experiencing IPV. The association between IPV and male aggression (measured by women's reports of their partner's fights with other men) was examined using logistic regression models. We found little variation in the likelihood of male IPV perpetration related to neighborhood crime level but did find an increased likelihood of IPV experiences among women whose partners were involved in male-to-male violence. Emerging evidence on violence prevention has suggested some promising avenues for primary prevention that address common risk factors for both perpetration of IPV and male interpersonal violence. Strategies such as early identification and effective treatment of emotional disorders, alcohol abuse prevention and treatment, complex community-based interventions to change gender social norms and social marketing campaigns designed to modify social and cultural norms that support violence may work to prevent simultaneously male-on-male aggression and IPV. Future evaluations of these prevention strategies should simultaneously assess the impact of interventions on IPV and male interpersonal aggression. PMID:26004379

  11. AUTONOMOUS CT REPLACEMENT METHOD FOR THE SKULL PROSTHESIS MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rudek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The geometric modeling of prosthesis is a complex task from medical and engineering viewpoint. A method based on CT replacement is proposed in order to circumvent the related problems with the missing information to modeling. The method is based on digital image processing and swarm intelligence algorithm. In this approach, a missing region on the defective skull is represented by curvature descriptors. The main function of the descriptors is to simplify the skull’s contour geometry; and they are defined from the Cubic Bezier Curves using a meta-heuristic process for parameter’s estimation. The Artificial Bee Colony (ABC optimization technique is applied in order to evaluate the best solution. The descriptors from a defective CT slice image are the searching parameters in medical image databases, and a similar image, i.e. with similar descriptors, can be retrieval and used to replace the defective slice. Thus, a prosthesis piece is automatically modeled with information extracted from distinct skulls with similar anatomical characteristics.

  12. Novel Simulation Framework of Three-Dimensional Skull Bio-Metric Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihab A. Hameed

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Previously, most of the researcher was suffering from simulate any three dimension applications for biometrics application, likewise, various applications of forensics and cosmetology has not been easy to be simulated. Three dimensional figures have approved the fact that, it has been more reliable than two dimensional figures in most of the applications used to be implemented for the purposes above. The reason behind this reliability was the features that extract from the three dimensional applications more close to the reality. The goal of this paper is to study and evaluate how far three-dimensional skull biometric is reliable in term of the accurate measurements, capability and applicability. As it mentions above, it was hard to evaluate or simulate an application use three-dimensional skull in biometric, however, Canfield Imaging Systems provide a new suitable environment to simulate a new three-dimensional skull biometric. The second goal of this paper is to assess how good the new threedimensional image system is. This paper will also go through the recognition and verification based on a different biometric application. Subsequently this paper will study the reliability and dependability of using skull biometric. The simulation based on the three-dimensional Skull recognition using threedimensional matching technique. The feature of the simulate system shows the capability of using three-dimensional matching system as an efficient way to identify the person through his or her skull by match it with database, this technique grantee fast processing with optimizing the false positive and negative as well .

  13. Students' Attitude to Aggression in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettenborn, Harry; Lautsch, Erwin

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of 2,553 students' attitudes toward aggression in schools. Finds differentiated results based on demographic data and with the students' personal involvement in the aggressive acts as either the perpetrator or victim. Discusses practical consequences of the study for schools. (CFR)

  14. Involvement in Internet Aggression during Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Nicole E.; Bumpus, Matthew F.; Rock, Daquarii

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal predictors of early adolescents' involvement in Internet aggression. Cross-sectional results (N = 330; 57% female) showed that the likelihood of reporting Internet aggression was higher among youth who spent more time using Internet-based technologies to communicate with friends and who were…

  15. Glottic and skull indices in canine brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R. Caccamo; P. Buracco; De La Rosa, G; M. Cantatore; S.Romussi

    2014-01-01

    Background Forty dogs presented for brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome with laryngeal collapse not over 1st degree (saccule eversion) underwent glottis endoscopic and radiographic skull measurements before surgery. Fifteen Pugs, fifteen French and ten English Bulldogs were included. The goals were prospectively to compare three common brachycephalic breeds for anatomical differences regarding glottis and skull measurements, and to assess if any correlation between glottis and skull me...

  16. A study on evaluation of skull base bone involvement of nasopharyngeal cancer with 99Tcm-MDP SPECT combined localizable CT%99Tcm-MDP SPECT结合定位CT评价鼻咽癌颅底骨侵犯

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚红霞; 刘生; 蒋宁一; 张弘; 陈少雄; 刘幸光; 卢献平; 梁九根; 张金山

    2009-01-01

    目的 用99Tcm-亚甲基二膦酸盐(MDP)SPECT结合定位CT.评价鼻咽癌(NPC)颅底骨侵犯(SBBI).方法 NPC患者44例,1周内行头颅Tcm-MDP SPECT、定位CT、全身骨显像(WBI)和MRI检查,对照组10例其他部位肿瘤患者行头颅99Tcm-MDP SPECT结合定位CT显像.于SPECT图像矢状面,颅底放射性浓聚程度最高(L)层面与高位颈椎体(C1-C3,S)处勾画相同大小的感兴趣区(ROI),L/S>1提示SBBI.对计数资料行X2检验或Fisher精确概率检验.结果 (1)对照组10例L/S=0.66±0.13.(2)根据MRI结果,SPELL结合定位CT、WBI和单独SPECT诊断SBBI的灵敏度、特异性、准确性分别为83.3%(20/24)、80.0%(16/20)、81.8%(36/44),70.8%(17/24)、70.0%(14/20)、70.4%(31/44)和77.3%(17/22)、72.7%(16/22)、75.0%(33/44),差异无统计学意义(X2=2.00,P=0.37);SPECT结合定位CT与MRI相关[X2=17.65,相依系数(CC)=0.535,P<0.05].(3)头痛组与无头痛组SBBI阳性率分别为92.9%(13/14)与36.7%(11/30),差异有统计学意义(X2=12 16,P<0.05),低分化鳞癌组与未分化癌组SBBI阳性率分别为50.O%(19/38)与83.3%(5/6),差异无统计学意义(X2=2.69,P=0.19).(4)SPECT结合定位CT图像除能提供准确的定位外,还能检测部分颅底骨破坏.结论 SPECT结合定位CT能有效地检测鼻咽癌SBBI.%Objective Whole body planar bone imaging(WBI)could not accurately evaluate skull base bone involvement(SBBI)due to complex structure of the nasopharynx.The purpose of this study was to preliminarily evaluate the role of SPECT combined localizable CT for diagnosing SBBI of nasopharyngeal cancer(NPC).Methods Forty-four patients with NPC underwent the skull 99Tcm-methylene diphosphonate (MDP)SPECT combined localizable CT,WBI and MRI within a week.Ten patients with non NPC were controls.The region of interest(ROI)of the suspected SBBI(L)was drawn and the same ROI was copied to the upper cervical vertebrae C1 to C3(S)on the 99Tcm-MDP sagittal SPECT imping.The uptake ratio of L and S(L/S)was calculated and

  17. Early childhood aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Alink, Lenneke Rosalie Agnes

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the development, stability, and correlates of early childhood aggression were investigated. The normative development was examined in a general population sample using questionnaires completed by the parents of 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children and again one year later. Results showed an early childhood aggression curve, with increasing rates of aggression in the second year of life and decreasing rates in the fourth year. One-year stabilities were moderate for 12-month-olds ...

  18. Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh;

    Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark The middle ears of birds are...... gains and delays in the IAC can produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how interaural transmission gain and delay can be shaped by evolution by anatomical adaptations. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is...

  19. Aggressive and foraging behavioral interactions among ruffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Kostich, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    The ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus, is a nonindigenous percid in the Great Lakes. Ruffe are aggressive benthivores and forage over soft substrates. Laboratory studies in pools (100 cm in diameter, 15 cm water depth) were conducted to determine whether fish density (low = 2, medium = 4, high = 6 ruffe per pool) changed foraging and aggressive behaviors with a limited food supply of chironomid larvae. All fish densities demonstrated a hierarchy based on aggressive interactions, but ruffe were most aggressive at low and high fish densities. Time spent in foraging was lowest at the low fish density. The best forager at the low fish density was the most aggressive individual, but the second most aggressive fish at the medium and high fish density was the best forager and also the one chased most frequently. A medium fish density offered the best energetic benefits to ruffe by providing the lowest ratio of time spent in aggression to that spent foraging. Based on our results, ruffe should grow best at an intermediate density. With high ruffe densities, we would also expect disparity in size as the more aggressive fish are able to garner a disproportionate amount of the resources. Alternatively, as the Great Lakes are a fairly open system, ruffe could migrate out of one area to colonize another as populations exceed optimal densities.

  20. Adolescent Aggression: The Role of Peer Group Status Motives, Peer Aggression, and Group Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Robert; Ennett, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies of youth aggression have emphasized the role of network-based peer influence processes. Other scholars have suggested that aggression is often motivated by status concerns. We integrate these two veins of research by considering the effects of peer status motivations on subsequent adolescent aggression, net of their own status motivations, prior aggression, and peer behavior. We also explore different levels at which peer effects may occur, considering the effects of reciprocated and unreciprocated friendships as well as larger, meso-level peer groups. We anticipate that peer group effects are magnified by both size and boundedness as measured by Freeman's (1972) Segregation Index. We find that, net of the adolescent's aggression at time 1, both the aggressive behaviors and the status valuations of friends independently increase the likelihood of aggression at time 2, six months later. The aggressive behavior of friends who do not reciprocate the adolescent's friendship nomination has particular impact. The average status valuation of peer groups increases their members' likelihood of aggression, even after controlling for their own attitudes about status, their friends' attitudes, and their friends' aggressive behavior. This effect is magnified in large groups and groups with high Freeman segregation scores. PMID:25152562

  1. Dog behavior co-varies with height, bodyweight and skull shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D McGreevy

    Full Text Available Dogs offer unique opportunities to study correlations between morphology and behavior because skull shapes and body shape are so diverse among breeds. Several studies have shown relationships between canine cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length and neural architecture. Data on the CI of adult, show-quality dogs (six males and six females were sourced in Australia along with existing data on the breeds' height, bodyweight and related to data on 36 behavioral traits of companion dogs (n = 8,301 of various common breeds (n = 49 collected internationally using the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ. Stepwise backward elimination regressions revealed that, across the breeds, 33 behavioral traits all but one of which are undesirable in companion animals correlated with either height alone (n = 14, bodyweight alone (n = 5, CI alone (n = 3, bodyweight-and-skull shape combined (n = 2, height-and-skull shape combined (n = 3 or height-and-bodyweight combined (n = 6. For example, breed average height showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001 with mounting persons or objects, touch sensitivity, urination when left alone, dog-directed fear, separation-related problems, non-social fear, defecation when left alone, owner-directed aggression, begging for food, urine marking and attachment/attention-seeking, while bodyweight showed strongly significant inverse relationships (p<0.001 with excitability and being reported as hyperactive. Apart from trainability, all regression coefficients with height were negative indicating that, across the breeds, behavior becomes more problematic as height decreases. Allogrooming increased strongly (p<0.001 with CI and inversely with height. CI alone showed a strong significant positive relationship with self-grooming (p<0.001 but a negative relationship with chasing (p = 0.020. The current study demonstrates how aspects of CI (and therefore brain shape

  2. Low pH cements based on CAC for underground repositories of HLW: long-term hydration and resistance against ground water aggression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials play an important role in the structural stability and integrity of a purpose built repository for the geological disposal of high level waste. However, the expected generation of an alkaline plume from the concrete by the ingress of groundwater would have detrimental effects on the intended use of a bentonite buffer. To limit this risk, low-pH cementitious materials are being developed to have a target pH < 11 corresponding to the upper stability limit of bentonite. This paper deals with the modifications generated in the chemical composition of the pore solutions of low-pH cement pastes based on Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC) and in their solid phases after 2 years of hydration. The results show a high stability of the solid phases formed in short-term (90 days). The main modifications in the pore solution composition and in the solid phases occur before 90 days of hydration and, after that, their properties keep quite stable. This paper also deals with the resistance of these low-pH cementitious materials to long-term groundwater aggression using two types of aggressive agents: deionized water and groundwater from the real site of Aespoe (Sweden). Low-pH concretes based on CAC plus silica fume have been evaluated. It appears that their behaviour depends on the leaching agent composition but, with the 2 agents tested in this work, the produced low-pH concretes show a good resistance

  3. Cases of Trephination in Ancient Greek Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Ζafiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trephination, or trepanning, is considered to be one of the most ancient surgical operations with an especially extensive geographical incidence, both in the New World and in the Old. In Europe, more than 200 finds of trephination have been found, from Scandinavia to the Balkans. The technique of trephination or trepanning covers overall the last 10,000 years and exhibits great versatility and adjustability in the knowledge, technical means, therapeutic needs, prejudices and social standards of each period and of each population group. Hippocrates was the one to classify for the first time the kinds of cranial fractures and define the conditions and circumstances for carrying out a trepanning.Aim: The present research aims to investigate the Greek cranial trephinations on sculls from the collection of the Anthropological Museum of the Medical School of Athens that come from archaeological excavations.Method: Skulls were examined by macroscopic observation with reflective light. Furthermore, radiographic representation of the skulls was used.Results: The anthropological researches and the studies of anthropological skeleton remains that came out during archaeological excavations from different eras and areas have given information about the medical practices in the very important geographic area of Greece and in particular, we referred to cases of Greek trephinations.

  4. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  5. The perception of aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Dassen, T; Moorer, P

    1997-01-01

    Several academic and clinical disciplines are involved in clarifying the concept of aggression by formulating operational and descriptive definitions. In the present paper the validity of the definitions of aggression, reported by nurses in an earlier qualitative study, is examined, using a survey a

  6. Sagittal synostosis: I. Preoperative morphology of the skull

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes-Ferreira, J.; Gewalli, F.; David, L.; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, N.V.; Kreiborg, S.; Friede, H.; Lauritzen, C.G.K.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the preoperative morphology of the skull in sagittal synostosis in an objective and quantified way. The shapes of the skulls of 105 patients with isolated premature synostosis of the sagittal suture ( SS group) were studied and compared with those of a co...

  7. Intrauterine skull depression and intracranial hemorrhage in a premature infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a case of a premature infant born with a parietal skull depression who suffered an intraventricular hemorrhage and an ipsilateral intracerebral injury. At 21 months of life the infant's gross motor milestones were delayed and he had moderate spastic hemiplegia. Although skull depressions at birth are usually benign, they may be associated with long-term neurologic sequelae. (orig.)

  8. Parents’ Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    OpenAIRE

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents’ responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents’ actual marital aggression. The study included 118 9−10 year old children, and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with same-sex parents’ actual marital aggression. For children with mothers who exhibit low actual marital aggression, mothers’ aggressive solutions to hypothetical...

  9. Aggression and Peer Rejection among Children with Conduct Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Somaieh Salehi; Sidek Mohd Noah; Maznah Baba; Wan Marzuki Wan Jaafar

    2013-01-01

    Children with Conduct Disorder suffer from aggression and peer difficulties. This study provides an overview of aggression and peer rejection among children with Conduct Disorder worldwide and in Iran. This study is based on researches from library archives specially focused on studies have been done in Iran. First Conduct Disorder, its’ prevalence, subtypes, and other comorbid disorders are explained. Next, studies regarding aggression among aggressive children and children with conduct prob...

  10. Skull-stripping for Tumor-bearing Brain Images

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Stefan; Reyes, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Skull-stripping separates the skull region of the head from the soft brain tissues. In many cases of brain image analysis, this is an essential preprocessing step in order to improve the final result. This is true for both registration and segmentation tasks. In fact, skull-stripping of magnetic resonance images (MRI) is a well-studied problem with numerous publications in recent years. Many different algorithms have been proposed, a summary and comparison of which can be found in [Fennema-Notestine, 2006]. Despite the abundance of approaches, we discovered that the algorithms which had been suggested so far, perform poorly when dealing with tumor-bearing brain images. This is mostly due to additional difficulties in separating the brain from the skull in this case, especially when the lesion is located very close to the skull border. Additionally, images acquired according to standard clinical protocols, often exhibit anisotropic resolution and only partial coverage, which further complicates the task. There...

  11. Analysis of Associations between Behavioral Traits and Four Types of Aggression in Shiba Inu

    OpenAIRE

    KANEKO, FUMIHIRO; Arata, Sayaka; TAKEUCHI, Yukari; MORI, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Canine aggression is one of the behavioral problems for which veterinary behaviorists are most frequently consulted. Despite this, the classification of canine aggression is controversial, and there are several classification methodologies. While the etiology of canine aggression differs among the types of aggression, the behavioral background underlying aggression is not well understood. Behavior trait-based evaluation of canine aggression would improve the effectiveness and efficie...

  12. Aspects of achondroplasia in the skulls of dwarf transgenic mice: a cephalometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Melissa Wadler; Murakami, Shunichi; Cody, Dianna; Montufar-Solis, Dina; Duke, Pauline Jackie

    2006-03-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common short-limbed dwarfism in humans, results from a single nucleotide substitution in the gene for fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). FGFR3 regulates bone growth in part via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (MAPK). To examine the role of this pathway in chondrocyte differentiation, a transgenic mouse was generated that expresses a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes and exhibits dwarfing characteristics typical of human achondroplasia, i.e., shortened axial and appendicular skeletons, mid-facial hypoplasia, and dome-shaped cranium. In this study, cephalometrics of the MEK1 mutant skulls were assessed to determine if the MEK1 mice are a good model of achondroplasia. Skull length, arc of the cranial vault, and area, maximum and minimum diameters of the brain case were measured on digitized radiographs of skulls of MEK1 and control mice. Cranial base and nasal bone length and foramen magnum diameter were measured on midsagittal micro-CT sections. Data were normalized by dividing by the cube root of each animal's weight. Transgenic mice exhibited a domed skull, deficient midface, and (relatively) prognathic mandible and had a shorter cranial base and nasal bone than the wild-type. Skull length was significantly less in transgenic mice, but cranial arc was significantly greater. The brain case was larger and more circular and minimum diameter of the brain case was significantly greater in transgenic mice. The foramen magnum was displaced anteriorly but not narrowed. MEK1 mouse cephalometrics confirm these mice as a model for achondroplasia, demonstrating that the MAP kinase signaling pathway is involved in FGF signaling in skeletal development. PMID:16463380

  13. Skull fracture and hemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims - a critical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrabhal Tripathi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial hemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial hemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. METHODS: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. RESULTS: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases.

  14. The Curious History of the Talgai Skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Allen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Australian winter of 1886 William Naish, a shearer in summer and a fencing contractor in the winter, erected a farm fence along Dalrymple Creek on East Talgai Station, c.125 km southwest of Brisbane. Work was interrupted by six days of torrential rain. On returning to the site Naish found that the rain had extended an erosion channel which he now had to cross walking to work, and from the extended section he retrieved a skull, heavily encrusted in carbonate, but clearly of human origin. Although it would take three decades to recognise and a further five to confirm, Naish had discovered the first direct proof of the Pleistocene antiquity of humans in Australia. Details of this history of Talgai are taken principally and extensively from Macintosh (1963, 1965, 1967a, 1967b, 1969, Elkin (1978, Gill (1978 and Langham (1978.

  15. Digital modelling of a human skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Etxaniz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper describes the first step of a project that aims to improve the design and placement of dental prostheses through an in-depth analysis of jaw movement. This analysis requires prior obtaining quality digital models of all elements involved in the movement. The paper describes the process to obtain the digital models through Reverse Engineering techniques, and evaluates their quality.Design/methodology/approach: The process of digitalization of a human skull by means of a hand-held 3D laser scanner has been evaluated to see the suitability of this technique. A skull has been chosen as test element as it has several characteristics that make its digitisation by optical techniques difficult, such as a non-uniform surface and a complex geometry. The surfaces obtained by the scanner have been edited by point cloud edition software.Findings: Reverse Engineering optical hardware has several limitations to correctly digitize complex geometries, but these deficiencies can be solved using the Reverse Engineering software properly.Research limitations/implications: The same analysis should be performed by point clouds obtained through other Reverse Engineering technologies, such as structured light scanners. These technologies can achieve best values of accuracy and resolution, so that both results should be compared.Practical implications: This paper gives the chance to apply Reverse Engineering techniques to achieve high quality digital models of free form complex geometries. The constraints presented by optical digitization technologies can be solved through powerful point cloud edition software.Originality/value: This paper describes the process of digitalization of complex free form geometries and the subsequent point cloud edition.

  16. Repair of large frontal temporal parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh: a report of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical effect and surgical technique of the repair of large defect involving frontal, temporal, and parietal regions using digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Methods Twenty patients with large frontal, temporal, and parietal skull defect hospitalized in Air Force General Hospital from November 2006 to May 2012 were involved in this study. In these 20 patients, there were 13 males and 7 females, aged 18-58 years (mean 39 years, and the defect size measured from 7.0cm×9.0cm to 11.5cm×14.0cm (mean 8.5cm×12.0cm. Spiral CT head scan and digital three-dimensional reconstruction of skull were performed in all the patients. The shape and geometric size of skull defect was traced based on the symmetry principle, and then the data were transferred into digital precision lathe to reconstruct a titanium mesh slightly larger (1.0-1.5cm than the skull defect, and the finally the prosthesis was perfected after pruning the border. Cranioplasty was performed 6-12 months after craniotomy using the digitally reconstructed titanium mesh. Results The digitally reconstructed titanium mesh was used in 20 patients with large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect. The surgical technique was relatively simple, and the surgical duration was shorter than before. The titanium mesh fit to the defect of skull accurately with satisfactory molding effect, good appearance and symmetrical in shape. No related complication was found in all the patients. Conclusion Repair of large frontal, temporal, parietal skull defect with digitally reconstructed titanium mesh is more advantageous than traditional manual reconstruction, and it can improve the life quality of patients.

  17. SKIN SEGMENTATION AND SKULL SEGMENTATION FOR MEDICAL IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Yogi Tjandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper aims we present tools for medical imaging applications to do skin and skull segmentation in a short time. The desired output for skin segmentation is a 3D visualization of the facial skin without any cavities or holes inside the head, while skull segmentation aims to create a 3D visualization of the skull bones. The algorithm used for skin segmentation is thresholding the image, extracting the largest connected component, and holefilling to fill the unnecessary holes. As for the skull segmentation, the process is done by removing the spines which is connected to the skull, and then extracting the largest connected component. Afterwards, mesh generation is done to produce the 3D objects from the processed images. This mesh generation process is done using the marching cubes algorithm. The testing results show that the skin and skull segmentation process will work well when there are no other objects that are connected to the skin or the skull. Skin segmentation process takes a significant amount of time, primarily caused by the holefilling process.

  18. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Tereshchenko,

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In aggressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early clinical appearances stage, manifestation stage, advanced, far-advanced and terminal stages. The peculiarity of early clinical appearances stage and manifestation stage is the presence of such course types: favorable and unfavorable.

  19. Aggression Norms in the Classroom Social Network: Contexts of Aggressive Behavior and Social Preference in Middle Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daisy R; Cappella, Elise; Neal, Jennifer Watling

    2015-12-01

    In a cross-sectional sample of African-American 2nd-4th grade students (N = 681), we examine the moderating effects of classroom overt and relational aggression norms on peers' social acceptance of classmates who exhibit overt and relational aggression in urban schools. Extending theory and research on classroom norms, we integrate social network data to adjust aggression norms based on children's direct and indirect connections in the classroom. Results of multilevel models indicate that network-based classroom aggression norms moderated relations between children's aggressive behavior and their social preference. Specifically, children benefited socially when their form of aggressive behavior fit with what was normative in the classroom social context. The moderating effect of classroom aggression norms was stronger for the association between overt aggression and social preference than relational aggression and social preference. Relationally aggressive youth were socially preferred by peers regardless of the classroom norm, although this positive association was magnified in classrooms with higher levels of relational aggression. Future research focused on aggression norms within classroom social networks are discussed and implications for school prevention efforts are considered. PMID:26415598

  20. Aggressive Attitudes Predict Aggressive Behavior in Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConville, David W.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study found that self-reported attitudes toward peer aggression among 403 middle school students were both internally consistent and stable over time (7 months). Aggressive attitudes were correlated with four outcome criteria for aggressive behavior: student self-report of peer aggression; peer and teacher nominations of bullying;…

  1. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  2. 综合护理干预对颅底肿瘤切除术后患者吞咽障碍的作用%Comprehensive nursing intervention on effect of swallowing disorder in patients with after tumor resection of skull base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪卫萍

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the comprehensive nursing intervention for patients with swallowing disorder after the tumor resection of the skull base.Methods:from March 2012 -March 2013 in our hospital 120 cases of swallowing disorder after the tumor resection of the skull base, had been randomly divided into observation group and control group.Observation group adopts comprehensive nursing inter-vention, the control group using conventional care method, compared two groups of patients discharged from hospital when swallowing function recovery.Results:the observation group total effective rate (100%) patients with swallowing functional recovery significantly higher than that of control group (75%) (P <0.05).Conclusion: comprehensive nursing intervention could effectively improve the swallowing disorder after the tumor resection of the skull base, might be worth promoting.%目的:探讨综合护理干预对颅底肿瘤切除术后患者吞咽障碍的作用。方法:选取了2012年3月~2013年3月于我院收治的120例颅底肿瘤切除术后吞咽障碍患者,将其随机分成观察组与对照组。观察组采用综合护理干预,对照组采用常规护理方法,对比分析2组患者出院时吞咽功能的恢复状况。结果:观察组患者吞咽功能恢复的总有效率(100%)要明显高于对照组(75%)(P<0.05)。结论:综合护理干预能够有效改善颅底肿瘤切除术后吞咽障碍,值得推广。

  3. Correlation of petrous bone convergence angle and slope of its walls with dimensional skull characteristics of human craniotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossoshanskiy D.N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim. The purpose of this paper is to study the correlation between the angles of convergence and slope of the pyramids of the temporal bone and linear and angular parameters of the cranial depending on the basilar angle. Materials and Methods. Material study is based on 100 skulls of adult humans, divided into three craniotypes. The method of measurement were made craniotopometric these parameters with further calculation of average values of the calculated and the drafting of the correlation model. The results. Study of features of the correlation angle of convergence and the slope of the pyramids of the temporal bone and linear and angular parameters of the cranial showed varying in strength and direction of the relationship of each craniotypes. Conclusion. During the study, flexibasilar craniotypes installed close inverse relationship between: tilt the front surface of the pyramids and the long base of the skull; convergence angle of the pyramids and the length of posterior skull base, the long base of the skull to the posterior edge of the large aperture. In mediobasilar craniotypes study parameters showed mostly moderate and weak degree of multidirectional nature. For platibasilar craniotypes characterized by a close direct correlation between the convergence angle of the pyramids and the length of posterior skull base. Other dimensions of the pyramid of the temporal bone are subject to greater variability can be explained by complex, multi-directional factors shaping the internal structures of the skull base.

  4. Affective Dependence and Aggression: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Petruccelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner’s autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject’s own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. Objective. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual differences as predisposing factors for aggressive behaviour and emotional dependency. Methods. The Spouse-Specific Dependency Scale (SSDS and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ were administered to a sample of 3375 subjects. Results. In the whole sample, a positive correlation between emotional dependency and proactive aggression was identified. Differences with regard to sex, age group, and geographical distribution were evidenced for the scores of the different scales. Conclusion. A fundamental distinction between reactive and proactive aggression was observed, anchoring proactive aggression more strictly to emotional dependency. Sociocultural and demographical variables, together with the previous structuring of attachment styles, help to determine the scope, frequency, and intensity of the demands made to the partner, as well as to feed the fears of loss, abandonment, or betrayal.

  5. AN ATYPICAL PRESENTATION OF GROWING SKULL FRACTURE: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing skull fracture (GSF or craniocerebral erosion or leptomeningeal cyst, is characterized by progressive diastatic enlargement of fracture line. Growing skull fracture is a rare neurological complication and ac counts for 1.2 - 1.6% of the head injury patients. GSF is generally seen in children less than 3 year of age. Authors present an atypical case of growing skull fracture in comminuted type of skull fracture which was timely and successfully managed with very good outcome. Atypical presentation, risk factors, etiopathogenesis, management and outcome in GSF is discussed along with review of literature. Delayed diagnosis and improper treatment could worsen this condition while timely surgical intervention can hav e excellent outcome.

  6. Surgical treatment and results in growing skull fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batuk Diyora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing skull fracture is a rare complication of skull fracture and remains almost undetected in the first few years of life. Here, we report a series of 11 patients with growing skull fracture treated at our institute over a period of five years and discuss their clinical features, radiological findings, and principles of management. Of the 11 patients, six were females and five males, with the age ranging between 9 months and 12 years (mean, 3 years. Progressive scalp swelling was the most common presenting feature. Other clinical features included generalised tonic clonic seizures, eyelid swelling, and proptosis. Computed tomography scan of the head defined the growing skull fracture in all 11 patients and detected the underlying parenchymal injury. Postoperatively, all patients had a complete resolution of the scalp swelling. Two patients had postoperative seizures and one had cerebrospinal fluid leak. Early recognition and surgical repair is essential to prevent the development of neurological complications and cranial asymmetry.

  7. Larval development and evolutionary origin of the anuran skull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roček, Zbyněk

    Vol. 7. Chipping Norton : Surrey Beatty & Sons, 2003 - (Heatwole, H.; Davies, M.), s. 1877-1995 ISBN 0-949324-94-9 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : Amphibia * Anura * skull Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  8. Costs and benefits of skull radiography for head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a period of 10 weeks, nine accident-and-emergency units in England, Wales, and Scotland took part in an investigation into the use of skull radiography in the management of patients with head injury. The yield of potentially important radiological findings in 4829 patients with uncomplicated head injury was 2 basal, 1 frontal, and 64 vault fractures. In 4 of these patients intracranial haematomas developed, of which 3 would have been suspected clinically and the patients admitted for observation even if skull radiography had not been available. At best, skull radiography could have contributed to the detection of only 1 of the 4 intracranial haematomas. The incidence of unsuspected intracranial haematoma with skull fracture among patients with uncomplicated head injury currently radiographed in the United Kingdom is therefore 1 in 4800. The radiological cost of identifying this 1 patient in our series was Pound43,200. (author)

  9. Narcissism, Perceived Social Status, and Social Cognition and Their Influence on Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpel, Thomas P.; Wiesenthal, Vered; Söderberg, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    This study had three primary goals: to explore the relationship between narcissism, participant roles, and aggression; to examine the role of gender as a moderating influence on narcissism-based aggression; and to examine how these variables work together to influence aggressive outcomes in a sample of aggressive middle and high school students.…

  10. Morphological Study of Wormian Bones in Dried Human Skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Divyesh Patel; Ketan Chauhan; Dhananjay Patil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wormian bones may be defined as a those accidental bones found in the cranium having no regular relation to their normal ossification centre. They are assocated with cranial and central nervous system abnormalities. Knowledge of these bones is important for anthropo-logists, forensic experts, radiologists, orthopedic and neurosurgeons to avoid misleading for multiple fractures of the skull. Materials and Methods: Adult dry human skulls (n= 27) of unknown age and sex availablei...

  11. Growing skull fractures: occipital intradiploic extension of the leptomeningeal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing skull fractures are very rare complications of childhood head injuries. Their early detection is essential in the attempt to prevent secondary cerebral atrophy. the most common site is the parietal or frontoparietal region. We present a case of growing skull fracture extending into the occipital diploid, space, an uncommon finding and unusual presentation of lesions of this type. In our patient, computed tomography provided the key to the diagnosis. (Author) 10 refs

  12. The 'lamellated' skull in. beta. -thalassaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orzincolo, C. (St. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy). Dept. of Radiology); Castaldi, G. (St. Maria delle Croci Hospital, Ravenna (Italy). Dept. of Medicine); Scutellari, P.N. (Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Inst. of Radiology); Franceschini, F. (Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Inst. of Medical Semeiotica)

    1989-08-01

    The skull in homozygous {beta}-thalassaemia may present several abnormalities, such as osteopenia, widening of the diploic space, and a 'hair-on-end' appearance. In some cases it presents also a particular stratified appearance caused by a variable number of osseous lamellae, parallel with the inner table. This 'lamellated skull' was observed in 16 out of 150 patients affected by the disease (10.6%). (orig./GDG).

  13. Historical evidence of the 1936 Mojokerto skull discovery, East Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, O Frank; Shipman, Pat; Hertler, Christine; de Vos, John; Aziz, Fachroel

    2005-04-01

    To resolve ambiguities in the literature, we detail the discovery history of the Mojokerto child's skull (Perning 1), employing letters, maps, photographs, reports, and newspaper accounts not previously used for this purpose. Andoyo, an experienced vertebrate-fossil collector with the Geological Survey of the Netherlands Indies, found the skull on February 13, 1936, while collecting for Johan Duyfjes, who had mapped the field area geologically. On February 18-19 Andoyo sent the fossil and a 1:25,000-topographic map showing the discovery point to Survey headquarters. The locality lies between Perning and Sumbertengu villages, approximately 10km northeast of Mojokerto city, East Java. G.H. Ralph von Koenigswald, Survey paleontologist, identified the specimen as Pithecanthropus and then named it Homo modjokertensis (it is now accepted as Homo erectus). Unfortunately he confused the discovery record in a March 28 newspaper article by characterizing the skull as a "surface find" [Dutch: oppervlaktevondst] while also attributing it to ancient beds. von Koenigswald probably had insufficient basis for either assertion, having not yet talked to Andoyo or Duyfjes. Eugene Dubois challenged von Koenigswald on the "surface-find" issue, Andoyo was consulted, and Duyfjes went to the site. Duyfjes and von Koenigswald then published scientific papers stating that the skull was unearthed 1m deep from a hill-slope outcrop of conglomeratic sandstone in Duyfjes' Pucangan formation. A cross section by Andoyo, which may show the Mojokerto site, also indicates a skull at 1m depth in conglomeratic sandstone. Photographs taken in 1936-1938 show a shallow pit at a single field location that fits Duyfjes' site description and is identified as the Mojokerto-skull site in 1940-1943 publications. By WWII the scientific community accepted the skull as an early hominid. Although von Koenigswald's "surface-find" comment remains a source of doubt in the record, we consider in situ discovery for the

  14. The furnace for crystal growth by directional solidification in skull crucible

    OpenAIRE

    Таранюк, Владимир Иванович; Гектин, Александр Вульфович; Колесников, Александр Владимирович

    2014-01-01

    The furnace, based on the skull method for obtaining laboratory samples of halide crystals (40 mmin diameter and15 mmhigh) with the melting temperature of900 °C, is considered in the paper. This technological solution allows growing crystals without using expensive platinum crucibles and moving or rotating design elements. The process control system and the thermal unit design are designed for determining and controlling temperature and a thermal gradient for carrying out crystal growth and m...

  15. Analysis of Induction Skull Melting Furnace by Edge Finite Element Method excited from Voltage Source

    OpenAIRE

    Cingoski, Vlatko; Yamashita, Hideo

    1994-01-01

    To optimize the production of high-efficiency induction skull melting furnace, we analyzed magnetic flux density, eddy current and electromagnetic flux density, eddy current and electromagnetic force distributions using 3-D edge- based finite element method excited from a voltage source. Changing the number of copper rods and, therefore the distance between them, we analyzed both the intensity and direction of the electromagnetic forces and the amount of power consumed by the molten alloy and...

  16. Stature and gender determination and their correlation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Gupta; Kiran Kumar; Devi Charan Shetty; Vijay Wadhwan; Anshi Jain; Kaveri Surya Khanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: When the body has been mutilated, it is common to have the extremities or head amputated from the trunk. In concern with forensic odontology, an estimate must have been made based on the correlation of osteometry along with odontometry in determining sex, race and stature. Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate and correlate height and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of...

  17. Simulation of bone-conducted sound transmission in a three-dimensional finite-element model of a human skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, You; Kim, Namkeun; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Bone conduction (BC) is the transmission of sound to the inner ear through the bones of the skull. This type of transmission is used in humans fitted with BC hearing aids as well as to classify between conductive and sensorineural hearing losses. The objective of the present study is to develop a finite-element (FE) model of the human skull based on cryosectional images of a female cadaver head in order to gain better understanding of the sound transmission. Further, the BC behavior was validated in terms of sound transmission against experimental data published in the literature. Results showed the responses of the simulated skull FE model were consistent with the experimentally reported data.

  18. Alterations of the skull Usher's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher's syndrome is relatively often met. It is cited that it comprehends 2/3 of the recessive hereditary diseases in otology. Sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction and hemeralopia are not so rarely met in our country, but their connection to this syndrome are scarcely cited in the newer specialized literature. In it we didn't find description of the characteristic, as we consider them, osteolytic focuses in the flat bones. The cases presented by us were monitored clinically and roentrgenographically for long years. Periodically were performed roentgenograms, CT and MRI of the skull, where the changes are most often met. We analyzed the imaging information that was found in our patients and compared it with the citations in world literature, which are not too many. It is analysed the course of the clinical signs and the algorithm of the imaging techniques to be evaluated the progress of the disease and the results of the applied therapy. We consider that the diagnostic and differential-diagnostic analysis of the cases will be helpful for the popularisation and the more precise diagnose of this serious disease

  19. Individual strategies of aggressive and non-aggressive male mice in encounters with trained aggressive residents

    OpenAIRE

    Benus, Rensina F.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Oortmerssen, Geert A. van

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether individual differences in offensive behaviour are related to differences in defensive behaviour, the responses of male wild house mice, Mus domesticus, of an aggressive and a non-aggressive line to defeat by physically stronger residents were analysed. Individuals of the aggressive line engaged in more flight behaviour, whereas the males of the non-aggressive line predominantly showed immobility. The higher flight tendency of the aggressive intruders provoked more attacks...

  20. An experimental test of the role of structural blue and melanin-based chestnut coloration in aggressive contests in male eastern bluebirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin eMercadante

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Male eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis have feathers with either structurally based blue coloration or melanin-based chestnut coloration, and they hold territories during the breeding season that they defend vigorously. We tested whether the melanin pigmentation or structural coloration of feathers serve as signals during intrasexual aggressive encounters by placing color-modified stuffed bluebirds in male territories. We recorded the time to attack and the intensity of attacks on each model, and we then compared the response to color-enhanced versus color-reduced models. Male bluebirds attacked models with brighter and more chromatic blue coloration significantly more often than they attacked models with darker and less chromatic blue coloration. In contrast, the darkness of the chestnut breast coloration did not have a significant effect on the rate at which models were attacked. We conclude that territorial male bluebirds perceive intruding males with brighter blue coloration as a greater threat than males with drabber blue coloration, presumably because blue coloration is a signal of fighting ability. In contrast, the chestnut coloration of breast feathers appears to be a signal of gender and sexual maturity and not a graded signal of social status.

  1. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  2. Early childhood aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, Lenneke Rosalie Agnes

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the development, stability, and correlates of early childhood aggression were investigated. The normative development was examined in a general population sample using questionnaires completed by the parents of 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children and again one year later. Results show

  3. Anonymity, Deindividuation and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Robert S.

    Several writers suggest that reducing one's sense of individuality reduces social restraints. The author suggests that the effect of uniformity of appearance on aggression is unclear when anonymity is held constant. This poses a problem of interpretation given that a distinction must be made between lack of individuality and anonymity. One must…

  4. Relational Aggression among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  5. Witz, Lust und Aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med forholdet mellem vits, lyst og aggression med udgangspunkt i lysten ved aggressiv litterær humor, eksemplificeret ved tekststeder fra Shakespeares Hamlet. Der argumenteres for, at aggressionen eller angrebet er et fælles centralt aspekt ved Sigmund Freuds og Friedrich...

  6. Nutrition, neurotoxicants & aggressive behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaalberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition, neurotoxicants and aggressive behaviour Antisocial behaviour, such as violence, is explained not only by the social environment, as was long believed. Also nutrients and neurotoxicants might play a role. Whether this is the case was studied in this thesis. In two empirical studies possibl

  7. An exploratory study of female partner aggression: The role of relationship dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Penn, Carrie E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine differences between female and male aggression; to examine the effect various aggression, dominance, and couple variables have on female physical aggression; to identify which combination of these variables bests explains female aggression in a sample of couples seeking therapy for domestic violence/anger management; and to identify the influence of male physical aggression on the predictor variables. Overall, based on women's reports, 74....

  8. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  9. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  10. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  11. Influence of head mass on temporo-parietal skull impact using finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2015-09-01

    The effect of head mass on its biomechanical response during lateral impact to the head is investigated in this computational study. The mass of the head of a state-of-the-art validated finite element head model is altered by ± 10 % from the base value of 4.7 kg. Numerical simulations of lateral head impacts for 30 cases (representing 15 human cadaver experiments × 2 mass configurations) are performed using the LS-DYNA solver at different velocities ranging from 2.4 to 6.5 m/s and three impacting conditions representing different stiffness and shapes of the contact/impact surfaces. Results are compared with the original model using the baseline head mass, thus resulting in a total of 45 simulations. Present findings show that the head mass has greater influence for peak interaction forces and the force has a greater dependency on stiffness of contact surface than the shape. Mass variations have also influence on skull strain energy. Regardless of increase/decrease in skull strain energy influenced by head mass variations used in the computational study, the 50 % fracture tolerance limit was unaltered, which was 544 mJ. The present study gives a better understanding of the mechanism of temporo-parietal skull impact. PMID:25863692

  12. Chronology of the stratum containing the skull of the Dali Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The field investigations of geomorphology and Quaternary sediment sequences show that the sediment stratigraphic profile containing the skull of the Homo sapiens Daliensis (Dali Man) at Tianshuigou trench, Jiefang Village (109°44′E, 34°52′N ), Dali County, Shaanxi Province, is composed of the loess-paleosol sequence, 17.3 m thick, in the upper part, and the alluvial silts, fine sands and sandy gravels interbedded, 15.4 m thick, in the lower part. There are the well developed layers L1, S1, L2 and S2 in the loess-paleosol sequence of the profile, which are comparable to those of the Luochuan loess section on the basis of magnetic succeptibility measurements and IRSL dating of the loess samples. An alluvial gravel layer, where the skull of the Dali Man was discovered, is in 13 m beneath the bottom of paleosol S2, implying that, the age of the Dali Man must be older than about 247 kaBP when the paleosol S2 began to be developed. The samples of mammal animal tooth and shell fossils from the gravel layer containing the skull of the Dali Man have been dated by uranium series and ESR methods respectively. Based on the multiple dating results and the stratigraphic chronology, the age of the Dali Man, therefore, would be estimated as older than 250 kaBP and younger than 350 kaBP, and reasonably estimated as 260-300 kaBP.

  13. Characterizations and hot corrosion resistance of Cr3C2-NiCr coating on Ni-base superalloys in an aggressive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    In the current study, Cr3C2-NiCr coating was deposited on the Ni-base superalloys by using high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) process for high temperature corrosive environment applications. Optical microscopy (OM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX), microhardness tester, and electro probe microanalyzer (EMPA) techniques were used to characterize the coating with regard to coating thickness, porosity, microhardness, and microstructure. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. The hot corrosion behaviors of the bare and Cr3C2-NiCr coated superalloys were studied after exposure to aggressive environment of Na2SO4-60% V2O5 salt mixture at 900 °C under cyclic conditions. The structure of the as-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr coating mainly consisted of γ-nickel solid solution along with minor phases of Cr7C3 and Cr2O3. Coating has porosity less than 1.5% and microhardness in the range of 850-900 Hv (Vickers hardness). Some inclusions, unmelted and semimelted powder particles were observed in the structure of the coatings. The Cr3C2-NiCr coating has imparted necessary resistance to hot corrosion, which has been attributed to the formation of oxides of nickel and chromium, and spinel of nickel-chromium.

  14. Geographical variation of the skull of the lesser mouse deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hideki; Fukuta, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Junpei; Sasaki, Motoki; Stafford, Brian J

    2004-10-01

    We examined the geographical variation of the skull size and shape of the lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) from Laos, Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Langkawi and some Islands of Tenasserim in Myanmar. Although the influence of the climatic condition on skull size was not confirmed in the mainland populations, the skull became rostro-caudally longer in the populations of Tenasserim and Sumatra because of island isolation effect. The skull size was classified into the following three clusters of localities from the matrix of Q-mode correlation coefficients: 1) Langkawi and Tenasserim, 2) Laos and Thailand, 3) Sumatra and Borneo. The skulls in the population of Java belong to the cluster of Langkawi and Tenasserim in male, however were morphologically similar to those in the cluster of Borneo and Sumatra. The canonical discriminant analysis pointed out that the Laos and Tenasserim populations were separated from the other ones and that the populations of Sumatra, Java and Borneo were intermingled each other. PMID:15528854

  15. MORPHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF FORAMEN MAGNUM IN DRY HUMAN SKULLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The foramen magnum is an important landmark in the posterior part of the cranial base, which is largely formed by the occipital bone. The dimensions of the foramen magnum are clinically important because of the vital structures passing through it. We studied thirty six dry human skulls of known sex and measured antero-posterior and transverse diameters with the help of Vernier caliper. Additionally surface area and Index of foramen magnum were also calculated. Oval shape is the main type of morphological variant found in this study. The transverse diameter of the foramen magnum was in a range of 25.75-34.25mm in males, whereas it was between 26-31.75mm in females. The anteroposterior diameter was in a range of 35 to 39.75mm in males while it was 29.5 to 34.75mm in females. The mean area of foramen magnum in males was 876.88±88.83mm whereas it was 776.87±68.51mm in females. In contrast to the area, the mean foramen magnum index was higher in females (89.01±6.84mm compared to males (81.75±5.99mm and this difference was also statistically significant (p<0.01. The prospective study will help surgeon for reference value for determining feasibility of transcondylar surgical approach, which are being done in an increasing trend in recent times for brain stem lesion.

  16. Probabilistic Assessment of Reinforcing Steel Depassivation in Concrete under Aggressive Chloride Environments Based on Natural Exposure Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaogang; ZHAO Yangang; LU Zhaohui

    2011-01-01

    The probability distributions of the critical threshold chloride concentration Ccr, the chloride diffusion coefficient D, and the surface chloride concentration Cs are determined based on the collected natural exposure data, and the probability estimation of reinforcement depassivation in concrete is presented using Monte-Carlo simulation. From sensitivity analysis of mean value for Ccr, Cs, and D on the depassivation probability of reinforcement, it is found that Ccr, Cs, and D respectively has the greatest, smaller, and the lowest effect on the probability of depassivation. Finally the effect of stress state of concrete on the reinforcement depassivation probability is analyzed. It is found that the influence of stress state becomes apparent as exposure time increases.

  17. Political skill: A proactive inhibitor of workplace aggression exposure and an active buffer of the aggression-strain relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiqing E; Yang, Liu-Qin; Spector, Paul E

    2015-10-01

    In the current study we examined the role of 4 dimensions of political skill (social astuteness, interpersonal influence, networking ability, and apparent sincerity) in predicting subsequent workplace aggression exposure based on the proactive coping framework. Further, we investigated their buffering effects on the negative outcomes of experienced workplace aggression based on the transactional stress model. Data were collected from nurses at 3 time points: before graduation (Time 1, n = 346), approximately 6 months after graduation (Time 2, n = 214), and approximately 12 months after graduation (Time 3, n = 161). Results showed that Time 1 interpersonal influence and apparent sincerity predicted subsequent physical aggression exposure. Exposure to physical and/or psychological workplace aggression was related to increased anger and musculoskeletal injury, and decreased job satisfaction and career commitment. Further, all dimensions of political skill but networking ability buffered some negative effects of physical aggression, and all dimensions but social astuteness buffered some negative effects of psychological aggression. PMID:25798720

  18. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  19. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Chaput

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Yves Chaput1, Lucie Beaulieu2, Michel Paradis3, Edith Labonté41Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (presently in private practice; 2Department of Psychiatry, Haut Richelieu Hospital, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal; 4Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Quebec, CanadaIntroduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification.Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior, both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression.Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%. Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male, marital status (single/separated, education (high school or less, employment (none, judicial history (any type, substance abuse (prior or active, medication compliance (poor, type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord, reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol, diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders, and outcome (more frequently placed under

  20. [Two cases of tuberculosis of the skull cap (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memin, Y; Zurbach, J; Mafart, Y; Lesobre, B; Piéron, R; Hercend, T

    The authors report two cases of tuberculosis of the skull cap. The first in a Black African with heterozygous sickle cell disease also presenting with: tuberculosis of the cervical lymph nodes, subcutaneous frontal tumefactions bacteriologically confirmed to be of tuberculous origin, multiple lacunae of the vault from the same origin; the second case is an Asian woman having a multifocal tuberculous osteitis involving the skull, spine, pelvis and probably the same affection in the spleen. These cases are a reminder that the principal features of tuberculosis of the skull vault are very often associated with other tuberculous lesions, and to the problems of diagnosis it entails; the existence of a subcutaneous tumefaction of the vault or of any accessible site one can aspirate and/or perform biopsy constitutes a diagnostic aid. PMID:6244640

  1. Radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate local control with radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed aggressive fibromatosis were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Florida between March 1975 and June 1992. The minimum length of follow-up was 2 years; 88% of patients had follow-up for at least 5 years. Thirty-nine patients had lesions in an extremity and 14 patients had lesions in the trunk. Twenty-nine patients were treated for gross disease. Patients were treated with total doses between 35 Gy and 70 Gy; 83% of patients received 50 Gy to 60 Gy. Results: Local control was achieved in 23 of 29 patients (79%) treated for postoperative microscopic residual disease. Local control was achieved in 21 of 24 patients (88%) treated for gross disease; gross disease was controlled in 8 of 8 patients with previously untreated lesions, and in 13 of 16 patients treated for postoperative gross residual and recurrent disease. Overall, aggressive fibromatosis was locally controlled in 83% of treated patients. All 9 treatment failures occurred with extremity lesions 4 to 68 months after initiation of treatment. Of the 9 recurrences, 4 were out-of-field, 3 were in-field, and 4 occurred at the margin of the irradiated field. Salvage was successful in 8 of 9 patients in whom salvage was attempted with surgery alone or combined with postoperative radiotherapy. A functional limb was maintained in 38 of 39 patients with extremity or limb girdle lesions. The most serious complication of treatment was pathologic fracture, which occurred in 3 of 53 treated patients; all 3 fractures healed with conservative management. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a valuable adjunct to surgery in the management of aggressive fibromatosis and can be used alone in patients with unresectable or inoperable disease

  2. Nutrition, neurotoxicants & aggressive behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Zaalberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition, neurotoxicants and aggressive behaviour Antisocial behaviour, such as violence, is explained not only by the social environment, as was long believed. Also nutrients and neurotoxicants might play a role. Whether this is the case was studied in this thesis. In two empirical studies possible relations between nutrients and behaviour were investigated. In the first study, levels of nutrients in blood samples of forensic psychiatric patients were measured. Low levels of omega-3 fatty a...

  3. Individual strategies of aggressive and non-aggressive male mice in encounters with trained aggressive residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benus, Rensina F.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Oortmerssen, Geert A. van

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether individual differences in offensive behaviour are related to differences in defensive behaviour, the responses of male wild house mice, Mus domesticus, of an aggressive and a non-aggressive line to defeat by physically stronger residents were analysed. Individuals of the aggress

  4. The relationship between skull asymmetry and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the relationship between brain damage and skull asymmetry or supine head position preference, we classified CT findings of 330 cases with cerebral palsy or risk of motor disturbance into 6 groups according to skull shape. Those were severe (I, n = 37) and mild (II, n = 114) grades in the right occipital flatness, severe (III, n = 34) and mild (IV, n = 58) grades in the left occipital flatness, long skull with temporal flatness (V, n = 33) and symmetric round skull (control, n = 54). It was considered that the asymmetry of cortical atrophy in appearance was formed physicaly by skull asymmetry but that the asymmetric dilatation in appearance of lateral ventricle was related to the asymmetry of brain damage. The severity and the asymmetry of brain damage were tend to increase the grade of skull asymmetry. The incidence of cases with the right occipital flatness was 1.6 times more frequently than the left sided. The incidence of cases whose left (lateral) ventricle was larger than the right was 4.1 times more than the cases whose right ventricle was larger than the left. The cases with occipital flatness in the contralateral side of the larger lateral ventricle were found more than the cases with occipital flatness in the ipsilateral side of the larger ventricle, that is to say, the direction of supine head position preference during early infant was suspected to be the more severely disturbed side of body. These results suggest that the supine head position preference to the right in newborn babies and infants with scoliosis or cerebral palsy might be the result of transient or permanent asymmetric (left > right) brain dysfunction. (author)

  5. Occipital Emissary Foramina in South Indian Modern Human Skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Suruchi; Ravindranath, Roopa

    2013-01-01

    An occipital emissary foramen has been traditionally described as a foramen present in the squamous part of the occipital bone at the occipital protuberance transmitting a vein that connects the confluence of sinuses with the occipital vein. The present study was done on 221 South Indian adult modern human skulls of unknown sex in the Department of Anatomy, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India. The foramen was observed in 21/221 (9.50%) skulls, 6/21 (28.57%) to the right of, 10/21 (47....

  6. [A skull of Mesopithecus with bite marks (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapfe, H

    1981-01-01

    A skull of Mesopithecus pentelicus (Roth and Wagner) from the Turolian (Upper Miocene) of Pikermi (Greece) shows hole-shaped bitemarks. Considering the behavior and the character of the dentition of the groups of carnivores represented in Pikermi, it is supposed that these bitemarks have been caused by a felid of the size of a leopard. In the fauna of Pikermi only Metailurus parvulus (Hensel) can be taken into consideration. By the defects on a skull of a juvenile Australopithecine, interpreted by Brain in 1970 as bitemarks of a leopard, the above explanation gets a very essential support. PMID:6792015

  7. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  8. Long-term outcome of extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone in Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, K E; Gendler, E; Squier, C A

    1997-05-01

    The successful use of cortical demineralized perforated bone in the treatment of extensive skeletal defects in children is exemplified by this case involving Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex. Four years following extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone, an examination revealed successful calvarial reconstruction in one twin. The other twin required additional implants of demineralized perforated bone to fill in defects. However, a histologic examination taken following this additional procedure revealed that these implants neither caused tissue reaction over a 4-year period, nor showed signs of resorption. Bony remodeling and new bone formation were in progress. Compared with other bone substitutes, demineralized perforated bone has proven to be effective in the treatment of large skull defects in children. PMID:9145145

  9. Analysis of associations between behavioral traits and four types of aggression in Shiba Inu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Fumihiro; Arata, Sayaka; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Canine aggression is one of the behavioral problems for which veterinary behaviorists are most frequently consulted. Despite this, the classification of canine aggression is controversial, and there are several classification methodologies. While the etiology of canine aggression differs among the types of aggression, the behavioral background underlying aggression is not well understood. Behavior trait-based evaluation of canine aggression would improve the effectiveness and efficiency of managing canine aggression problems. We developed a questionnaire addressing 14 behavioral items and items related to four types of canine aggression (owner-, child-, stranger- and dog-directed aggression) in order to examine the associations between behavioral traits and aggression in Shiba Inu. A total of 400 Shiba Inu owners recruited through dog events (n=134) and veterinary hospitals (n=266) completed the questionnaire. Factor analysis sorted the behavioral items from both the event and clinic samples into four factors: "sociability with humans," "reactivity to stimuli," "chase proneness" and "fear of sounds." While "reactivity to stimuli" correlated significantly positively with all of the four types of aggression (P=0.007 to aggression (Pcanine aggression differ among the types of aggression and that specific behavioral traits are frequently simultaneously involved in several types of aggression. PMID:23719752

  10. STUDY ON THE OCCURRENCE OF WORMIAN BONES AMONG THE MALE AND FEMALE SKULLS OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mary Antony Praba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wormian bones, also known as intra sutural bones are extra bone pieces that occur within a suture in the cranium. These are irregular isolated bones which appear in addition to the usual centers of ossification of the cranium and, although unusual, are not rare. The number of sutural bones varies considerably because different individuals and different population have different numbers of sutural bones. They occur mostly along the sutures and meeting point of the cranial sutures. They occur most frequently in the course of the lambdoid suture. They are also occasionally seen within the sagittal and coronal sutures. Materials and Methods: In this present study we analyzed the occurrence of sutural bones among 50 male and female skulls in Tamil Nadu region and we compared the results along with the studies of Indian skulls. Result and Conclusion: Based on the study we concluded that sutural bones are more among male skulls than in females among the skulls of Tamil Nadu and this is exactly the opposite of the results given in Indian population.

  11. Evolutionary patterns of shape and functional diversification in the skull and jaw musculature of triggerfishes (Teleostei: Balistidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Charlene L; Westneat, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    The robust skull and highly subdivided adductor mandibulae muscles of triggerfishes provide an excellent system within which to analyze the evolutionary processes underlying phenotypic diversification. We surveyed the anatomical diversity of balistid jaws using Procrustes-based geometric morphometric analyses and a phylomorphospace approach to quantifying morphological transformation through evolution. We hypothesized that metrics of interspecific cranial shape would reveal patterns of phylogenetic diversification that are congruent with functional and ecological transformation. Morphological landmarks outlining skull and adductor mandibulae muscle shape were collected from 27 triggerfish species. Procrustes-transformed skull shape configurations revealed significant phylogenetic and size-influenced structure. Phylomorphospace plots of cranial shape diversity reveal groupings of shape between different species of triggerfish that are mostly consistent with phylogenetic relatedness. Repeated instances of convergence upon similar cranial shape by genetically disparate taxa are likely due to the functional demands of shared specialized dietary habits. This study shows that the diversification of triggerfish skulls occurs via modifications of cranial silhouette and the positioning of subdivided jaw adductor muscles. Using the morphometric data collected here as input to a biomechanical model of triggerfish jaw function, we find that subdivided jaw adductors, in conjunction with a unique cranial skeleton, have direct biomechanical consequences that are not always congruent with phylomorphospace patterns in the triggerfish lineage. The integration of geometric morphometrics with biomechanical modeling in a phylogenetic context provides novel insight into the evolutionary patterns and ecological role of muscle subdivisions in triggerfishes. J. Morphol. 277:737-752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26997352

  12. Nonmetric Skull Divergence in the Otter - Assessing Genetic Insulation of Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbe, M; Ansorge, H.

    1995-01-01

    The craniometric variation and non-metric skull divergence between populations of the otter Lutra lutra (Linné, 1758) were studied using more than 430 skulls from different regions of Eastern Germany. No direct regional differences in skull measurements could be established for this area. The comparison of the morphological variation by non-metric skull characters adduces not or unimportant differentiations for most regions. Otter populations with greater geographic distances have partly high...

  13. Reducing Aggressive Male Behavior in Elementary School: Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Barbara; Gibson, Jamel; Morrison-Danner, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Student aggression and violent behavior, especially among males, is pervasive and problematic in the classroom. When incorporated in the lesson design, promising practices (music, movement, and visual stimulation) are evidence-based strategies that may reduce male aggression in the classroom.

  14. Aggression detection in speech using sensor and semantic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefter, I.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Burghouts, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing a multimodal (audio-visual) database with aggressive incidents in trains, we have observed that there are no trivial fusion algorithms to successfully predict multimodal aggression based on unimodal sensor inputs. We proposed a fusion framework that contains a set of intermediate level

  15. Registration of aggressive incidents in an adolescent forensic psychiatric unit and implications for further practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremmery, S; Danckaerts, M; Bruckers, L; Molenberghs, G; De Hert, M; Wampers, M; De Varé, J; de Decker, A

    2014-09-01

    Although aggression is part of daily life in psychiatric units for adolescents, empirical data on its prevalence are sparse. Only few studies have described prevalence of aggressive incidents in adolescent psychiatric wards, and data in forensic psychiatric care are even more limited. Available studies reported high prevalence rates of aggression, ranging from 0.4 to 2.4 incidents of aggression per day across (forensic) child and adolescent psychiatric units. Between 27 and 78 % of all admitted youth committed an aggressive act. In this study, we collected systematically registered data of all aggressive incidents from the first 2 years (2010-2012) on a newly established forensic adolescent psychiatric unit, which used a formal aggression management program embedded in the social competence model, which is based on early intervention in the 'chain of behavior' to prevent any further escalation. The inclusion of also minor aggressive incidents is unique in the literature and the clinical relevance is highlighted. A mean of one incident a day took place, with each adolescent involved in at least one incident. Notably, 1.7 aggressive incidents per month made seclusion of restraint use necessary. Based on the social competence theory, the aggression management model suggests intervening early in the cascade of aggression, in order to prevent further escalation and reduce the need for intrusive interventions. Evidence supported that aggression is a contextual event, as external factors clearly influence the incidence of aggression. Aggression management should be built on both relational and structural security. PMID:24682593

  16. Country of my skull/Skull of my country: Krog and Zagajewski, South Africa and Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. van Schalkwyk

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the ninth poem of the cycle “land van genade en verdriet” (“country of grace and sorrow” in the collection “Kleur kom nooit alleen nie” (“Colour never comes on its own”, Antjie Krog contends that the old is “stinking along” ever so cheerfully/ robustly in the new South African dispensation. This could also hold true for the new democratic Poland. Krog and the Polish poet Adam Zagajewksi could, in fact, be described as “intimate strangers”, specifically with regard to the mirrored imagery of “country of my skull”/“skull of my country” present in their work. The notion of “intimate strangers” may be seen as pointing toward the feminine dimension of subjectivity, which could be elaborated along the lines of Bracha Ettinger’s concept of “matrixial borderlinking”. Ettinger has made a significant contribution to the field of psychoanalysis, building on Freud and Lacan. She investigates the subject’s relation to the m/Other, and the intimate matrixial sharing of “phantasm”, “jouissance” and trauma among several entities. Critical of the conventional “phallic” paradigm, Ettinger turns to the womb in exploring the “borderlinking” of the I and the non-I within the matrix (the psychic creative “borderspace”. With these considerations as point of departure, and with specific reference to the closing poem in Krog’s “Country of my skull” and Zagajewski’s “Fire” (both exploring “weaning” experiences in recent personal and public history, I intend to show how the public/political is connected to the personal/psychological, and vice versa, and how committed literary works like those of Krog and Zagajewski can be clarified further from a psychoanalytical perspective. The image of the skull in the texts under scrutiny is investigated with recourse to the Lacanian notion of the “cavity”, as adopted and adapted by Ettinger. True to the mirror experience as described within

  17. Unprovoked aggression: effects of psychopathic traits and sadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Dennis E; Zeichner, Amos; Seibert, L Alana

    2011-02-01

    Psychopathic individuals engage in the most violent and cold-blooded acts of aggression. In the laboratory, psychopathy traits have been linked to the commission of unprovoked aggression. The purpose of this study was to assess affective motives that may underlie the relationship between psychopathy and unprovoked aggression. One hundred thirty-seven men viewed a series of photographs depicting violent imagery, completed a lexical decision task designed to assess state affect, and competed in a laboratory-based aggression paradigm. Results indicated that participants who responded faster to happiness words after viewing violent imagery (i.e., sadistic) were significantly more likely to engage in unprovoked aggression. Additionally, Factor 1 psychopathy (emotional detachment) predicted increased probability of unprovoked aggression; however, this relationship was not mediated by sadism. Rather, Factor 1 and sadism each independently predicted unprovoked aggression. The implications of the present data suggest that the type of violence evinced may inform the risk for perpetration of future acts. That is, the individual who demonstrates unprovoked violence may be more likely to employ aggressive tactics across situational contexts than the individual who demonstrates only impulsive acts of hostile/reactive aggression. PMID:21223265

  18. Predicting Aggression among Male Adolescents: an Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    ZinatMotlagh, Fazel; Ataee, Mari; Jalilian, Farzad; MirzaeiAlavijeh, Mehdi; Aghaei, Abbas; Karimzadeh Shirazi, Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aggressive behaviorin adolescencecan be expressed asa predictorfor crime, substanceabuse, depression and academic failure. The purpose of this study was to determine the prediction of aggression among Iranian adolescent based on theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework.

  19. Five Forms of Childhood Trauma: Relationships With Aggressive Behavior in Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Leung, Justin S.; Wiederman, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between 5 types of childhood trauma (witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, and sexual abuse) and an aggression score based on 21 self-reported aggressive behaviors in adulthood.

  20. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions. PMID:24763233

  1. Intraosseous cystic cavernous angioma with occipital skull osteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyo Hirai, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous cavernous angiomas (CAs of the skull are rare, and those cases that appear are commonly localized in the frontal bone. Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI typically show a well-defined intradiploic lytic mass with homogeneous enhancement. We describe an intraosseous cystic CA of the occipital skull in a 46-year-old man who presented with transient right-sided deafness and posterior cervical pain. MRI revealed a large (3.7 cm × 3.2 cm × 4.1 cm extra-axial tumor, compressing the right cerebellar hemisphere, with heterogeneous peripheral enhancement. A CT scan showed osteolytic change of the occipital skull. The tumor was totally resected via a suboccipital approach. Intraoperatively, we found a mainly cystic tumor containing xanthochromic fluid. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a cavernous angioma. This is the first reported case of an intraosseous CA of the skull with cyst formation. The characteristic radiological imaging of the presented case mimicked a malignant tumor with peripheral enhancement and prominent osteolytic change.

  2. Reliability of Craniofacial Superimposition Using Three-Dimension Skull Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, Daniel; Olivieri, Lara; De Angelis, Danilo; Poppa, Pasquale; Galassi, Andrea; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial superimposition is a technique potentially useful for the identification of unidentified human remains if a photo of the missing person is available. We have tested the reliability of the 2D-3D computer-aided nonautomatic superimposition techniques. Three-dimension laser scans of five skulls and ten photographs were overlaid with an imaging software. The resulting superimpositions were evaluated using three methods: craniofacial landmarks, morphological features, and a combination of the two. A 3D model of each skull without its mandible was tested for superimposition; we also evaluated whether separating skulls by sex would increase correct identifications. Results show that the landmark method employing the entire skull is the more reliable one (5/5 correct identifications, 40% false positives [FP]), regardless of sex. However, the persistence of a high percentage of FP in all the methods evaluated indicates that these methods are unreliable for positive identification although the landmark-only method could be useful for exclusion. PMID:26335587

  3. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. PMID:27283387

  4. Reduced skull sexual dimorphism in a local sheep breed

    OpenAIRE

    Parés Casanova, Pere-Miquel

    2014-01-01

    This study estimated the magnitude of sexual dimorphism in a relict sheep from Catalunya (NE Spain), called Fardasca, using geometric morphometric techniques. For these analyses, a total of 18 skull specimens (2 adult males and 16 females) were studied. Our results suggest that the breed is not cranially dimorphic, so sex determination using landmarks described here as criteria is likely to yield poor results.

  5. Morphological Study of Wormian Bones in Dried Human Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Patel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wormian bones may be defined as a those accidental bones found in the cranium having no regular relation to their normal ossification centre. They are assocated with cranial and central nervous system abnormalities. Knowledge of these bones is important for anthropo-logists, forensic experts, radiologists, orthopedic and neurosurgeons to avoid misleading for multiple fractures of the skull. Materials and Methods: Adult dry human skulls (n= 27 of unknown age and sex availablein the Department of Anatomy, Govt. Medical College, Surat were included in the study. Result: Overall incidence of wormian bone was 44.4%. They occurred more frequently at lambdoid suture (48.14%.Wormian bones were also presentat asterion (18.5%, along the coronal suture (0.03%, along the parito-temporal suture (0.07%, along the occipito-mastoid suture (0.03%,andat pterion (0.03 %. Wormain bones were found 48.1% on left half of skull and 37.03% on right half of skull. Conclusion: The Wormian bones were more frequent at the lambdoid suture. The clinical importances of these variant bones were emphasized with relevant review of literature. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(3.000: 222-225

  6. Aggressive HIV-1?

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hoek Lia; de Ronde Anthony; Berkhout Ben

    2005-01-01

    Abstract New York City health officials announced on February 11, 2005 that a patient rapidly developed full-blown AIDS shortly after being diagnosed with a rare, drug-resistant strain of HIV-1. The New York City Department of Health issued an alert to all hospitals and doctors and a press conference was held to announce the emergence of an aggressive HIV-1 strain that may be difficult to treat and that appears to trigger rapid progression to AIDS. Is the panic justified?

  7. The nature of human aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making. PMID:19411108

  8. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

    2010-02-03

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

  9. Introduction to "Conflict and Aggression"

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Camilla; Farnicka, Marzanna; Liberska, Hanna; Ramirez, J. Martin

    2014-01-01

    During the XXXVII CICA we will be talking about Developmental and Social Conditions of Conflict and Aggression. All participants will have the opportunity to listen to two keynote speakers, eight sessions of scientific presentations, one poster session and two panel discussions. All these kinds of activities will be focused on a variety of types of conditionings of aggression and violence, on methods to measure readiness for aggression and on the practical implications of this knowledge to be...

  10. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Devi C; Aadithya B Urs; Puneet Ahuja; Seema Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, ...

  11. Automobile Driving and Aggressive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Novaco, Raymond W.

    1991-01-01

    Automobile driving and aggressive behavior have had an extensive association. Themes of dominance and territoriality have long been part of automobile driving, which has also involved flagrant assaultive actions. Recent episodes of roadway violence in metropolitan areas have raised community concern about aggressive behavior in driving, although common beliefs about why such violence occurs can be seen as pseudoexplanations. Various themes in the psychology of aggression are presented as they...

  12. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi C Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, but with more variable cellularity in different tumor sections.

  13. From hitting to tattling to gossip: an evolutionary rationale for the development of indirect aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Gordon P D

    2014-01-01

    Adult humans are characterized by low rates of intra-group physical aggression. Since children tend to be more physically aggressive, an evolutionary developmental account shows promise for explaining how physical aggression is suppressed in adults. I argue that this is achieved partly through extended dominance hierarchies, based on indirect reciprocity and linguistic transmission of reputational information, mediated by indirectly aggressive competition. Reviewing the literature on indirect and related forms of aggression provides three pieces of evidence for the claim that evolutionarily old impulses towards physical aggression are socialized into indirect aggression in humans: (i) physical aggression falls in early childhood over the same age range at which indirect aggression increases; (ii) the same individuals engage in both direct and indirect aggression; and (iii) socially dominant individuals practice indirect aggression more frequently. Consideration of the developmental course of indirect aggression is complemented by analysis of similar developments in verbal behaviors that are not always thought of as aggressive, namely tattling and gossip. An important puzzle concerns why indirect aggression becomes more covert, and tattling more derogated, in preadolescence and adolescence. This may be due to the development of new strategies aimed at renegotiating social identity and friendship alliances in the peer group. PMID:25299883

  14. Individualizing management of aggressive fibromatoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine prognostic indicators in aggressive fibromatoses that may be used to optimize case-specific management strategy. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seven fibromatoses presenting between 1971 and 1992 were analyzed. The following treatment modalities were utilized: (a) surgery alone for 51 tumors; (b) radiation alone for 15 tumors; and (c) radiation and surgery (combined modality) for 41 tumors. Outcome analysis was based on 5-year actuarial local control rates. Results: Control rates among surgery, radiation therapy, and combined modality groups were 69%, 93%, and 72%. Multivariate analysis identified age 60 Gy was seen in patients with unresected or gross residual disease. Of the patients, 23 with disease involving the plantar region had a control rate of 62%, with significantly worse outcomes in children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with those found in the relevent literature. They support primary resection with negative margins when feasible. Radiation is a highly effective alternative in situations where surgery would result in major functional or cosmetic defects. When negative surgical margins are not achieved in recurrent tumors, radiation is recommended. Perioperative radiation should be considered in other high-risk groups (recurrent disease, positive margins, and plantar tumors in young patients). Doses of 60-65 Gy for gross disease and 50-60 Gy for microscopic residual are recommended. Observation may be considered for primary tumors with disease remaining in situ when they are located such that progression would not cause significant morbidity. Although plantar lesions in children may represent a group at high risk for recurrence or aggressive behavior, the greater potential for radiation-induced morbidity in this group must also temper its use. Given the inconsistent nature and treatment response of this tumor, it is fundamental that treatment recommendations should be made based on the risk:benefit analysis for

  15. Studies of Several New Modifications of Aggressive Packet Combining to Achieve Higher Throughput, Based on Correction Capability of Disjoint Error Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Swarnendu Kumar; Goswami, Rajat Subhra; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak; Bhunia, Abhinandan

    2016-06-01

    Aggressive packet combining (APC) scheme is well-established in literature. Several modifications were studied earlier for improving throughput. In this paper, three new modifications of APC are proposed. The performance of proposed modified APC is studied by simulation and is reported here. A hybrid scheme is proposed here for getting higher throughput and also the disjoint factor is compared among conventional APC with proposed schemes for getting higher throughput.

  16. Targeting of cancer stem/progenitor cells plus stem cell-based therapies: the ultimate hope for treating and curing aggressive and recurrent cancers

    OpenAIRE

    MIMEAULT, M.; Batra, S K

    2008-01-01

    The rapid progression from aggressive primary cancers into locally advanced and invasive and/or metastatic diseases remains a big obstacle for an early diagnosis and curative therapeutic intervention for cancer patients. The late-stage leukemias and disseminated and metastatic sarcomas, melanomas, brain tumors and epithelial cancers are the devastating diseases associated with a high rate of recurrence after treatment with the conventional clinical therapies including surgery, ionizing radiat...

  17. Do Personality Traits Such as Impulsivity and Hostility-Aggressiveness Predict Severity of Intent in Attempted Suicide? Findings From a Record Based Study in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Menon; Siddharth Sarkar; Shivanand Kattimani; Kaliaperumal Mathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the association of personality traits with intent in attempted suicide. Aims: Our objectives were to assess the levels of selected personality factors among suicide attempters and to examine their association with suicide intent. Materials and Methods: A chart review of 156 consecutive suicide attempters was carried out. All participants were administered the Beck Suicide Intent Scale, Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11, Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, and Pas...

  18. Do personality traits such as impulsivity and hostility-aggressiveness predict severity of intent in attempted suicide? Findings from a record based study in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the association of personality traits with intent in attempted suicide. Aims: Our objectives were to assess the levels of selected personality factors among suicide attempters and to examine their association with suicide intent. Materials and Methods: A chart review of 156 consecutive suicide attempters was carried out. All participants were administered the Beck Suicide Intent Scale, Barratt Impulsivity Scale-11, Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, and Past Feelings and Acts of Violence Scale to assess suicide intent, trait impulsivity, hostility-aggression, and violence, respectively. Pearson′s product moment correlation was the used as the test of association. Stepwise linear regression was used to identify predictors of suicide intent. Results: Suicide intent was significantly correlated with verbal aggression (Pearson r = 0.90, P = 0.030, hostility (Pearson r = 0.316, P < 0.001, and nonplanning impulsivity (r = -0.174, P = 0.049. High hostility and low motor impulsivity emerged as significant predictors of suicide intent. Conclusion: Personality traits such as hostility and to an extent, impulsivity are accurate predictors of intentionality in attempted suicide. Clinicians should focus on these personality attributes during a routine evaluation of suicide attempters. They can also be considered as potential targets for suicide prevention programs.

  19. Aggressive angiomyxoma in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Goyal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive angiomyxoma (AA is a rare, slow-growing mesenchymal neoplasm of vulvo-perineal region. Although AA is common in females of reproductive age, only a few cases during pregnancy have been documented in the English literature. It carries a high risk of local recurrence but rarely metastasizes. The high recurrence rate can partially be due to inadequate excision, which may be due to an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. We present a case of 25-year-old pregnant female presenting with a painless and soft mass attached to left labia majora by a stalk. This mass was clinically thought to be a lipoma. It was completely excised and was diagnosed as AA on histopathology. Gynecologists should consider the diagnosis of AA when a young female especially during her pregnancy presents with a vulvo-perineal mass. Incorrect diagnosis may lead to incomplete excision and recurrence.

  20. Aggression, suicidality, and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnoila, V M; Virkkunen, M

    1992-10-01

    Studies from several countries, representing diverse cultures, have reported an association between violent suicide attempts by patients with unipolar depression and personality disorders and low concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Related investigations have documented a similar inverse correlation between impulsive, externally directed aggressive behavior and CSF 5-HIAA in a subgroup of violent offenders. In these individuals, low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations are also associated with a predisposition to mild hypoglycemia, a history of early-onset alcohol and substance abuse, a family history of type II alcoholism, and disturbances in diurnal activity rhythm. These data are discussed in the context of a proposed model for the pathophysiology of a postulated "low serotonin syndrome." PMID:1385390

  1. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  2. Subtypes of Aggressive Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Barker, Edward D.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behaviors in children and adolescents have undergone important conceptual and definitional modifications in the past two decades. In particular, subtypes of aggression have been proposed that separate the form and the function of the aggressive behaviors (i.e., social vs. physical aggression; reactive vs. proactive aggression).…

  3. Aggression in children and youth towards crime.

    OpenAIRE

    ŠTEFFLOVÁ, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with aggressive children and youth, which leads to crime. It deals with the causes of aggression, factors that influence aggression, but also the type of aggression. The practical part contains specific case studies of individuals whose aggression was one of the causes of crime.

  4. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  5. Age and gender differences in aggression of Slovene elementary and secondary school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kozina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study examined age and gender differences in aggression using three representative samples for Slovenia: 4th grade elementary school students; 8th grade elementary school students; 4th grade secondary school students in Matura programs. The results were based on the LA aggression scale that measures general aggression and four specific types of aggression: physical aggression (TA, verbal aggression (BA, internal aggression (NA and aggression towards authority (AA. Based on the results of two-way ANOVA we found important effects of age, gender and their interaction. The gender differences were significant in the groups of elementary school students but not in secondary school students. Male elementary school students, 4th and 8th grade, were more aggressive compared to female elementary school students. 8th grade elementary school students were more physically, verbally, internally aggressive and more aggressive towards authority when compared to 4th grade elementary school students. Secondary school students were significantly less physically and verbally aggressive, and on the other hand more internally aggressive when compared to both groups of elementary school students. Secondary school students reported higher level of aggression towards authority than 4th grade elementary students, and lower level then 8th grade elementary students. The results were congruent with the findings of the research literature indicating higher aggression of males when compared to females and different developmental paths for different types of aggression in question. The study introduced important findings regarding age and gender differences in representative school samples in Slovenia and proposed future research mostly in direction of including measures of indirect aggression that is linked to female gender and older students.

  6. The development of the skull of the Egyptian Cobra Naja h. haje (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraqi R Khannoon

    Full Text Available The study of craniofacial development is important in understanding the ontogenetic processes behind morphological diversity. A complete morphological description of the embryonic skull development of the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje, is lacking and there has been little comparative discussion of skull development either among elapid snakes or between them and other snakes.We present a description of skull development through a full sequence of developmental stages of the Egyptian cobra, and compare it to other snakes. Associated soft tissues of the head are noted where relevant. The first visible ossification centres are in the supratemporal, prearticular and surangular, with slight ossification visible in parts of the maxilla, prefrontal, and dentary. Epiotic centres of ossification are present in the supraoccipital, and the body of the supraoccipital forms from the tectum posterior not the tectum synoticum. The venom glands are visible as distinct bodies as early at stage 5 and enlarge later to extend from the otic capsule to the maxilla level with the anterior margin of the eye. The gland becomes more prominent shortly before hatching, concomitant with the development of the fangs. The tongue shows incipient forking at stage 5, and becomes fully bifid at stage 6.We present the first detailed staging series of cranial development for the Egyptian cobra, Naja h. haje. This is one of the first studies since the classical works of G. de Beer and W. Parker that provides a detailed description of cranial development in an advanced snake species. It allows us to correct errors and misinterpretations in previous accounts which were based on a small sample of specimens of uncertain age. Our results highlight potentially significant variation in supraoccipital formation among squamates and the need for further research in this area.

  7. Executive Functions in Preschool Children with Aggressive Behavior : Impairments in Inhibitory Control

    OpenAIRE

    Raaijmakers, M.A.J.; Smidts, D.P.; Sergeant, J.A.; Maassen, G.H.; Posthumus, J.A.; Matthys, W.C.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The question whether executive function (EF) deficits in children are associated with conduct problems remains controversial. Although the origins of aggressive behavior are to be found in early childhood, findings from EF studies in preschool children with aggressive behavior are inconsistent. The current study aimed to investigate whether preschool children with aggressive behavior show impairments in EF. From a population-based sample, 82 preschool children who were showing aggressive beha...

  8. A new skull of early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekua, Abesalom; Lordkipanidze, David; Rightmire, G Philip; Agusti, Jordi; Ferring, Reid; Maisuradze, Givi; Mouskhelishvili, Alexander; Nioradze, Medea; De Leon, Marcia Ponce; Tappen, Martha; Tvalchrelidze, Merab; Zollikofer, Christoph

    2002-07-01

    Another hominid skull has been recovered at Dmanisi (Republic of Georgia) from the same strata in which hominid remains have been reported previously. The Dmanisi site dated to approximately 1.75 million years ago has now produced craniofacial portions of several hominid individuals, along with many well-preserved animal fossils and quantities of stone artifacts. Although there are certain anatomical differences among the Dmanisi specimens, the hominids do not clearly represent more than one taxon. We assign the new skull provisionally to Homo erectus (=ergaster). The Dmanisi specimens are the most primitive and small-brained fossils to be grouped with this species or any taxon linked unequivocally with genus Homo and also the ones most similar to the presumed habilis-like stem. We suggest that the ancestors of the Dmanisi population dispersed from Africa before the emergence of humans identified broadly with the H. erectus grade. PMID:12098694

  9. Reconstruction of skull defects in the middle ages and renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Currà, Antonio; Paris, Harry S; Peschillo, Simone; Fattapposta, Francesco; Paolini, Sergio; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    In Egyptian, Greco-Roman, and Arabic medicine, the closure of a skull defect was not provided at the end of a therapeutic trepanation or in cases of bone removal. The literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance disclosed some striking and forgotten practices. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1180 to c. 1250) cites the use of a piece of a cup made from wooden bowl (ciphum or mazer) or a gold sheet to cover the gap and protect the brain in these patients; this citation probably reflected a widely known folk practice. Pietro d'Argellata introduced the use of a fixed piece of dried gourd for brain protection to reconstruct a skull defect. In the late Renaissance, the negative folklore describing this outlandish practice likely led to the use of silver and lead sheets. Nevertheless, for centuries, large numbers of surgeons preferred to leave the dura mater uncovered after bone removal, and failed to apply any brain protection. PMID:25403799

  10. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  11. Study of Interparietal (Inca) bone in dry human skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Janki Jadav; Vaishakhi Gonsai; Ashok Nirvan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Squamous part of occipital bone consists of two parts, supraoccipital and interparietal. Interparietal portion may remain separated from the supraoccipital by a suture, it is then called the interparietal bone. Inca population has common manifestation of Interparietal bones, that’s why it is also called ‘Os Inca’ which suggest their ethnic correlation and genetic inheritance. Presence of Inca bone in a skull is great importance to Neurosurgeons, Orthopedic surgeons, Radiologist...

  12. Morphometric Study on Foramen Magnum of Human Skulls

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We utilized 100 human skulls to study the morphology and morphometric parameters of the foramen magnum in south Indian population. The anteroposterior diameter and transverse diameter of the foramen magnum were measured by using Vernier calliper to the nearest millimetre. All measurements were tabulated followed by student t” test and descriptive statistics were done in SPSS version to know the p” value for the significance. The mean anteroposterior diameter of foramen magnum in males was...

  13. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Naftulin

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT collect three-dimensional data (3D that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM images to stereolithography (STL files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min. Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  14. Variation of BMP3 Contributes to Dog Breed Skull Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J.; Hutchinson, Sarah A.; Byers, Alexandra; Beale, Holly C; Carrington, Blake; Faden, Daniel L.; Rimbault, Maud; Decker, Brennan; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sood, Raman; Boyko, Adam R.; John W Fondon; Wayne, Robert K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Ciruna, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary As a result of selective breeding practices, modern dogs display a multitude of head shapes. Breeds such as the Pug and Bulldog popularize one of these morphologies, termed “brachycephaly.” A short, upward-pointing snout, a massive and rounded head, and an underbite typify brachycephalic breeds. Here, we have coupled the phenotypes collected from museum skulls with the genotypes collected from dogs and identified five regions of the dog genome that are associated with canine br...

  15. NMR imaging of the facial skull and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR imaging has proved a superior method for the diagnosis of pathological processes in the soft parts of the facial skull and neck, but it is less efficient in the imaging of alterations in the bone tissue as compared to CT. By the use of gadolinium-DTPA, additional information can be obtained on perifocal edemas and irrigation conditions in the area of pathological processes. (orig.)

  16. Directional and fluctuating asymmetries in domestic sheep skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Parés Casanova, Pere-Miquel; Bravi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Morphological symmetry and asymmetry of three different sheep geographical populations (n=39), managed under semi-extensive conditions, were decomposed using geometric morphometric methods, on dorsal aspect of skulls. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was used as an indicator of environmental stress, and directional asymmetry (DA) as biomechanical constraints. The two-dimensional coordinates of 21 landmarks were digitized and analyzed using geometric morphometrics. Multivariate analyses show ed the ...

  17. Directional and fluctuating asymmetries in domestic pig skulls

    OpenAIRE

    Parés Casanova, Pere-Miquel; Esteve-Puig, C.

    2014-01-01

    Morphological symmetry and asymmetry of skulls of domestic pig (n=29) were studied using geometric morphometric (GM) methods on the ventral aspect. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was used as an indicator of environmental stress, and directional asymmetry as a biomechanical constraint. The two-dimensional coordinates of 27 landmarks were digitized and analysed using GM. Multivariate analyses showed the presence of subtle but significant FA in the entire sample, and distinctive differences were det...

  18. Correlation of petrous bone convergence angle and slope of its walls with dimensional skull characteristics of human craniotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Rossoshanskiy D.N.; Hurchak U.A.; Anisimov A.N.; Aleshkina О. U.

    2012-01-01

    The aim. The purpose of this paper is to study the correlation between the angles of convergence and slope of the pyramids of the temporal bone and linear and angular parameters of the cranial depending on the basilar angle. Materials and Methods. Material study is based on 100 skulls of adult humans, divided into three craniotypes. The method of measurement were made craniotopometric these parameters with further calculation of average value...

  19. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  20. Preliminary report: The Little Skull Mountain earthquake, June 29, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Little Skull Mountain earthquake occurred about 20 km from the potential high level nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain. The magnitude was 5.6, and the focal mechanism indicates normal faulting on a northeast trending structure. There is evidence that the earthquake was triggered by the magnitude MS = 7.5 earthquake in Landers, California, which occurred less than 24 hours earlier. Preliminary locations of the hypocenter and several aftershocks define an L shaped pattern near the southern boundary of the Nevada Test Site. One arm trends to the northeast beneath Little Skull Mountain, and a shorter, more diffuse zone trends to the southeast. The aftershocks are mostly located at depths between 7 km and 11 km, and may suggest a southeast dipping plane. There is no clear correlation with previously mapped surface faulting. The strongest recorded acceleration is about 0.21 g at Lathrop Wells, Nevada, 15 km from the epicenter. An extensive network of aftershock recorders was installed by the Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, by the US Geological Survey, Golden, Colorado, and by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California. Aftershock experiments are ongoing as of November, 1992, and include experiments to improve location, depth, focal mechanism, and stress drop, study basin and ridge response near the epicenter and at Midway Valley, and study response of a tunnel at Little Skull Mountain. Analysis of this data, which includes thousands of aftershocks, has only begun

  1. A theoretical framework for antigay aggression: review of established and hypothesized effects within the context of the general aggression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Dominic J

    2008-07-01

    Theory and research on antigay aggression has identified different motives that facilitate aggression based on sexual orientation. However, the individual and situational determinants of antigay aggression associated with these motivations have yet to be organized within a single theoretical framework. This limits researchers' ability to organize existing knowledge, link that knowledge with related aggression theory, and guide the application of new findings. To address these limitations, this article argues for the use of an existing conceptual framework to guide thinking and generate new research in this area of study. Contemporary theories of antigay aggression, and empirical support for these theories, are reviewed and interpreted within the unifying framework of the general aggression model [Anderson, C.A. & Bushman, B.J. (2002). Human aggression. Annual Review of Psychology, 53, 27-51.]. It is concluded that this conceptual framework will facilitate investigation of individual and situational risk factors that may contribute to antigay aggression and guide development of individual-level intervention. PMID:18355952

  2. The influence of serotonin- and other genes on impulsive behavioral aggression and cognitive impulsivity in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD: Findings from a family-based association test (FBAT analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Michael

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low serotonergic (5-HT activity correlates with increased impulsive-aggressive behavior, while the opposite association may apply to cognitive impulsiveness. Both types of impulsivity are associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and genes of functional significance for the 5-HT system are implicated in this disorder. Here we demonstrate the separation of aggressive and cognitive components of impulsivity from symptom ratings and test their association with 5-HT and functionally related genes using a family-based association test (FBAT-PC. Methods Our sample consisted of 1180 offspring from 607 families from the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics (IMAGE study. Impulsive symptoms were assessed using the long forms of the Conners and the Strengths and Difficulties parent and teacher questionnaires. Factor analysis showed that the symptoms aggregated into parent- and teacher-rated behavioral and cognitive impulsivity. We then selected 582 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 14 genes directly or indirectly related to 5-HT function. Associations between these SNPs and the behavioral/cognitive groupings of impulsive symptoms were evaluated using the FBAT-PC approach. Results In the FBAT-PC analysis for cognitive impulsivity 2 SNPs from the gene encoding phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT, the rate-limiting enzyme for adrenalin synthesis attained corrected gene-wide significance. Nominal significance was shown for 12 SNPs from BDNF, DRD1, HTR1E, HTR2A, HTR3B, DAT1/SLC6A3, and TPH2 genes replicating reported associations with ADHD. For overt aggressive impulsivity nominal significance was shown for 6 SNPs from BDNF, DRD4, HTR1E, PNMT, and TPH2 genes that have also been reported to be associated with ADHD. Associations for cognitive impulsivity with a SERT/SLC6A4 variant (STin2: 12 repeats and aggressive behavioral impulsivity with a DRD4 variant (exon 3: 3 repeats are also described

  3. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroldi, Roberto; Ambrosi, Claudia; Farina, Davide [University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia, BS (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  4. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of inverse methods and head models for EEG source localization using a human skull phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used a real-skull phantom head to investigate the performances of representative methods for EEG source localization when considering various head models. We describe several experiments using a montage with current sources located at multiple positions and orientations inside a human skull filled with a conductive medium. The robustness of selected methods based on distributed source models is evaluated as various solutions to the forward problem (from the sphere to the finite element method) are considered. Experimental results indicate that inverse methods using appropriate cortex-based source models are almost always able to locate the active source with excellent precision, with little or no spurious activity in close or distant regions, even when two sources are simultaneously active. Superior regularization schemes for solving the inverse problem can dramatically help the estimation of sparse and focal active zones, despite significant approximation of the head geometry and the conductivity properties of the head tissues. Realistic head models are necessary, though, to fit the data with a reasonable level of residual variance. (author)

  6. Mechanical characterization of bone anchors used with a bone-attached, parallel robot for skull surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Jan-Philipp; Prielozny, Lenka; Lexow, G Jakob; Rau, Thomas S; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Bone-attached robots and microstereotactic frames, intended for deep brain stimulation and minimally invasive cochlear implantation, typically attach to a patient's skull via bone anchors. A rigid and reliable link between such devices and the skull is mandatory in order to fulfill the high accuracy demands of minimally invasive procedures while maintaining patient safety. In this paper, a method is presented to experimentally characterize the mechanical properties of the anchor-bone linkage. A custom-built universal testing machine is used to measure the pullout strength as well as the spring constants of bone anchors seated in four different bone substitutes as well as in human cranial bone. Furthermore, the angles at which forces act on the bone anchors are varied to simulate realistic conditions. Based on the experimental results, a substitute material that has mechanical properties similar to those of cranial bone is identified. The results further reveal that the pullout strength of the investigated anchor design is sufficient with respect to the proposed application. However, both the measured load capacity as well as the spring constants vary depending on the load angles. Based on these findings, an alternative bone anchor design is presented and experimentally validated. Furthermore, the results serve as a basis for stiffness simulation and optimization of bone-attached microstereotactic frames. PMID:25771430

  7. Spontaneous extradural hemorrhage due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the skull in a child: A rare presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G.; Alghamdi, Fahad A.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) represents a local form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that occurs mostly in children. It usually presents with a gradually enlarging painless skull mass, and rarely presents a rapid clinical deterioration. This 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with EG, based on a magnetic resonance imaging scan, after presenting with a painless right parietal swelling of 7-week duration. Three weeks prior his scheduled surgery, he presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of sudden increased of the subcutaneous swelling associated with a headache, vomiting, and decreased the level of consciousness; there was no history of trauma. Brain computed tomography revealed a right parietal bone defect with large subgaleal and extradural hematoma. He underwent emergent surgical excision of the skull lesion and evacuation of the hematoma. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of EG. We aim to raise the awareness of physicians of this rare spontaneous hemorrhagic complication of EG and review the literature. PMID:27195034

  8. Spontaneous extradural hemorrhage due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the skull in a child: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G; Alghamdi, Fahad A; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) represents a local form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that occurs mostly in children. It usually presents with a gradually enlarging painless skull mass, and rarely presents a rapid clinical deterioration. This 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with EG, based on a magnetic resonance imaging scan, after presenting with a painless right parietal swelling of 7-week duration. Three weeks prior his scheduled surgery, he presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of sudden increased of the subcutaneous swelling associated with a headache, vomiting, and decreased the level of consciousness; there was no history of trauma. Brain computed tomography revealed a right parietal bone defect with large subgaleal and extradural hematoma. He underwent emergent surgical excision of the skull lesion and evacuation of the hematoma. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of EG. We aim to raise the awareness of physicians of this rare spontaneous hemorrhagic complication of EG and review the literature. PMID:27195034

  9. Experimental Study of the Protrusion of the Dura Mater at Skull-base Defects%颅底骨缺损硬脑膜膨出的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冬雷; 丁祖荣; 周良辅; 李士其

    2001-01-01

    目的:建立颅底缺损硬脑膜膨出量评估公式,为临床颅底缺损重建提供科学实验依据。方法:通过力学蠕变挠度分析,得到预计硬脑膜膨出量的力学计算公式,设计相应的力学模拟实验和动物实验加以验证。结果:力学模拟实验及动物实验证明通过力学分析得到的公式是基本正确的。结论:我们建立的颅底骨缺损硬脑膜膨出量评估公式,可以用来预测硬脑膜及其替代物膨出量的动态变化。%Aim:To establish the biomechanical assessment formula that predicts protrusion ofthe dura mater at the cranial base bone defect, and provide scientific experimental basis for cranial base defect reconstruction. Methods: The biomeehanical formula is established by using the creep reflecton analysis and validated by the simulated test and animal expeximents. Results: The simulated test and animal experiments reveal that biomechanical formula is right. Conclusion: The biomechanical formula can be used to predict the dynamic change of protrusion of the dura mater as well as its substitutes at different sizes of cranial base bone defects.

  10. Human skulls with turquoise inlays: pre hispanic origin or replicas?; Craneos humanos con teselas de turquesa: origen prehispanico o replicas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva V, Y. [FIME-UANL, Pedro A. del Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Castillo M, M.T.; Bautista M, J.P. [DRPMZA/INAH. Direccion de Registro Publico de Monumentos y Zonas Arqueologicas, Victoria 110, Copilco El Bajo, 04340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arenas A, J. [IFUNAM, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: ysilva@fisica.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    The lack of archaeological context determining if the manufacture of two human skulls adorned with turquoise inlays have pre-Columbian origin or not (replicas), led to perform other studies. Under these conditions, besides orthodox methodology commonly used to assign chronology and cultural aspects as form, style, decoration, iconography, etc., it was necessary to obtain more results based on the use of characterization techniques. The techniques employed were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), in order to determine the manufacture techniques and chemical composition of the materials used for the cementant. SEM analysis showed the presence of zones composed by Ca, O, C and Al. In some cases Mg, Cl, Fe and Pb were identified. High concentration of Cu was present in all samples, due to residues of turquoise inlays (CuAI{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}) with which the skulls were decorated. In the cementant was identified the Ca as base element of the cementant, as well as particles < 100 nm with irregular morphology and other amorphous zones. FTIR spectrums indicated the presence of organic substances that could be used as agglutinating in the cementant. The current work shows a progress identifying involved techniques in the manufacturing of two human skulls with turquoise inlays. (Author)

  11. Demonstration of skull bones mobility using optical methods: practical importance in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Alexander V.; Okushko, Vladimir R.; Vturin, Sergey A.; Moseychuk, Vladimir V.; Petrov, Aleksey A.; Suetenkov, Dmitry E.

    2014-01-01

    Unprompted skull bones mobility not related to breathing, heart beating and other physiological reactions, using installation of original construction with control of physiological parameters by biofeedback hardware-software complex BOS-lab and BOS-pulse appliance (COMSIB, Novosibirsk, Russia) has been confirmed. Teeth eruption occurs through odontiasis canals, emerging from the funiculus. The main driving force for promoting a tooth into odontiasis canal during eruption is the unprompted skull bones mobility. A simple optical installation was made for the visualization of skull bones mobility during the investigation of the median palatine and incisors sutures. Early detection of failures of unprompted skull bones mobility and its normalization can lead to prevention of impact teeth, malocclusion, extrudocclusion and other anomalies and deformations of teeth, teeth rows, TMJ and skull. The skull bones mobility should be considered during the early preventive treatment and therapy of the consequences of injuries and malfunction of the maxillofacial area.

  12. Through Skull Fluorescence Imaging of the Brain in a New Near-Infrared Window

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Chang, Junlei; Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Su; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Andreasson, Katrin I; Kuo, Calvin J; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    To date, brain imaging has largely relied on X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography with limited spatial resolution and long scanning times. Fluorescence-based brain imaging in the visible and traditional near-infrared regions (400-900 nm) is an alternative but currently requires craniotomy, cranial windows and skull thinning techniques, and the penetration depth is limited to 1-2 mm due to light scattering. Here, we report through-scalp and through-skull fluorescence imaging of mouse cerebral vasculature without craniotomy utilizing the intrinsic photoluminescence of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the 1.3-1.4 micrometre near-infrared window. Reduced photon scattering in this spectral region allows fluorescence imaging reaching a depth of >2 mm in mouse brain with sub-10 micrometre resolution. An imaging rate of ~5.3 frames/s allows for dynamic recording of blood perfusion in the cerebral vessels with sufficient temporal resolution, providing real-time assessment of blood flow anomaly...

  13. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  14. ''Aggressive'' renal angiomyolipoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the US and CT examinations of 4 patients with renal angiomyolipoma with an 'aggressive' appearance, and review the literature. The imaging findings in 4 patients with benign renal angiomyolipomas associated with thrombosis of the renal vein and/or inferior vena cava are presented. CT demonstrated fat densities within both tumor and thrombus. In one patient, small lymph nodes with low density internal areas were detected in the para-aortic region. When considering our patients together with those reported in the literature, we found that most angiomyolipomas with venous invasion were large and centrally located within the kidney. Venous thrombosis was observed in 9 lesions of the right kidney, and in only 4 of the left one. One patient only had symptoms due to the thrombus; 10 had problems due to the tumor; and 3 were asymptomatic. Only 4 patients with pararenal enlarged lymph nodes have been reported on in the imaging literature. Fat-containing nodes were detected by CT in one case only; the others had enlarged nodes of soft-tissue density. In one patient the diagnosis of hamartomatous lymph node invasion was established by angiography. In patients with renal angiomyolipoma, demonstration of both fatty thrombus and the fatty infiltration of lymph nodes of the renal hilum cannot be regarded as an indication of malignancy, but only of local aggessive behavior. Conservative treatment seems possible. Detection of enlarged lymph nodes of soft tissue density may cause difficult diagnostic problems, with the diagnosis addressed only by the presence of associated lesions. (orig./MG)

  15. ``Aggressive`` renal angiomyolipoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cittadini, G. Jr. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Pozzi Mucelli, F. [Univ. of Trieste (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Danza, F.M. [Catholic Sacro Cuore Univ., Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Derchi, L.E. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Univ. of Trieste (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-11-01

    We describe the US and CT examinations of 4 patients with renal angiomyolipoma with an `aggressive` appearance, and review the literature. The imaging findings in 4 patients with benign renal angiomyolipomas associated with thrombosis of the renal vein and/or inferior vena cava are presented. CT demonstrated fat densities within both tumor and thrombus. In one patient, small lymph nodes with low density internal areas were detected in the para-aortic region. When considering our patients together with those reported in the literature, we found that most angiomyolipomas with venous invasion were large and centrally located within the kidney. Venous thrombosis was observed in 9 lesions of the right kidney, and in only 4 of the left one. One patient only had symptoms due to the thrombus; 10 had problems due to the tumor; and 3 were asymptomatic. Only 4 patients with pararenal enlarged lymph nodes have been reported on in the imaging literature. Fat-containing nodes were detected by CT in one case only; the others had enlarged nodes of soft-tissue density. In one patient the diagnosis of hamartomatous lymph node invasion was established by angiography. In patients with renal angiomyolipoma, demonstration of both fatty thrombus and the fatty infiltration of lymph nodes of the renal hilum cannot be regarded as an indication of malignancy, but only of local aggessive behavior. Conservative treatment seems possible. Detection of enlarged lymph nodes of soft tissue density may cause difficult diagnostic problems, with the diagnosis addressed only by the presence of associated lesions. (orig./MG).

  16. Vacuum extraction as a treatment modality of neonatal skull depression in twin infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of depressed skull fractures in the newborn infant can be controversial. In this article, we report a case of twin pregnancy wherein one of the fetuses had depressed skull fractures that was not associated with any known trauma during the pregnancy or at delivery. This ping-pong skull depression was treated by elevation with an obstetrical vacuum extractor. No complications occurred. The possible etiologies and treatment modalities for neonatal depressed fractures, being conservative or operative, are discussed. (author)

  17. Mathematical Model of Age Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Golovinski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a mathematical model of competition for resources between representatives of different age groups. A nonlinear kinetic integral-differential equation of the age aggression describes the process of redistribution of resources. It is shown that the equation of the age aggression has a stationary solution, in the absence of age-dependency in the interaction of different age groups. A numerical simulation of the evolution of resources for different initial distributions has done. It ...

  18. Aggression, Pleasure, and Cognitive Dissonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado Izquierdo, Jesús María; J. Martín Ramírez

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between aggression, pleasure and decision-making is analyzed applying a mediation model of structural equation modeling (SEM). The study explored it in two samples of similar age: young offenders and university students. A close relationship between aggression and pleasure was found in both populations. But, whereas in the case of university students, this congruence leads to a normal or adjusted behavior, in the case of young offenders, however, a mismatched evaluation of c...

  19. The psychobiology of aggressive behaviour.

    OpenAIRE

    Träskman Bendz, Lil; Westling, Sofie

    2005-01-01

    Among psychiatric illnesses, genetically determined disorders usually have an early onset and a severe and complicated course. Gene-environmental interaction is of importance for aggressive impulsive behaviour. For example, alcoholism type II has a high family loading, a severe course, and is often associated with antisocial behaviour. In order to gain further understanding of aggressive and impulsive behaviour, genes determining serotonin metabolism, neurosteroids and carbohydrate metabolism...

  20. Why are small males aggressive?

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell, Lesley J.; Lindström, Jan; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2005-01-01

    Aggression is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, whenever the interests of individuals conflict. In contests between animals, the larger opponent is often victorious. However, counter intuitively, an individual that has little chance of winning (generally smaller individuals) sometimes initiates contests. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain this behaviour, including the ‘desperado effect’ according to which, the likely losers initiate aggression due to lack of alternative o...