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Sample records for ages experiment case

  1. [Thyroid carcinoma:Experience 57 cases. Is there a different bio-development in pediatric age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, P; Martínez Ibáñez, V; Galofré, P; Lloret, J; Boix-Ochoa, J

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested a different biodevelopment in the differentiated thyroid cancer in pediatric age. General and pediatric surgeons from different centres has coincided to operate this kind of pediatric pathology that finally conclude the treatment in the nuclear medicine department from the reference hospital. The objectives of this revision is, to confirm de difference in thyroid cancer in pediatric age and to know few factors implicated. A review of 57 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, medullary and anaplastic were excluded, treated in the nuclear medicine department during the last 20 years. 28% were 10 years old (41 cases). This 57 young patients were operated in 22 hospitals and 79% by a general surgeon and 21% by pediatric surgeon. The analysis was performed with SPSS MS Windows 6.0 (chi cuadrado, t-Student-Fisher). There are more reinterventions in patients operated by a general surgeon. There aren't differences between the number of total neck dissections between both groups of surgeons, but when is performed, the incidence of complications is significantly high. In patients < 10 years old, there are more metastasis and more surgical complications. In spite of, all patients still alive. Children < 10 years old, the illness is more local aggressive and the recurrence and lung metastasis is high, more surgical complications. We recommend to concentrate this pathology in a few hospitals to achieve more experience and to avoid complications.

  2. Age Differences in Mystical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    Examined age differences in mystical experiences. According to 1988 General Social Survey (n=1,481) mystical experiences were somewhat more common in 1988 than in 1973, and deja vu, clairvoyance, and composite mysticism scores had increased with successively younger age cohorts. Private and subjective religiosity were positively related to overall…

  3. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  4. Age trajectories of stroke case fatality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2011-01-01

    Mortality rates level off at older ages. Age trajectories of stroke case-fatality rates were studied with the aim of investigating prevalence of this phenomenon, specifically in case-fatality rates at older ages....

  5. Work Experience, Age, and Gender Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, John; Wissmann, David A.

    1983-01-01

    Age is a determinant of the gap between U.S. men's and women's work wages; young men are paid more as they age because of age; young women are not. Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of the Labor Market Experience were analyzed for 5,225 men and 5,159 women. (KC)

  6. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  7. Experience-based attenuation of age-related differences in music cognition tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinz, E J

    2000-06-01

    Pianists of a wide experience and age range were tested on measures of musical memory and musical perceptual speed to better understand the effects of experience on age-cognition relations. Experience-related attenuation might be in the form of an Age x Experience interaction or in the form of a "confounding" of age and experience such that positive age-experience relations offset negative age-cognition relations. It was predicted that the former, considered evidence for disuse interpretations of aging, would be likely to emerge in tasks with strong experience effects and strong age-related declines among inexperienced individuals. However, in no case were the interactions of age and experience on the memory or perceptual speed variables significant. There was, however, evidence that high levels of experience in the older participants partially attenuated the negative effects of age on the memory and perceptual speed tasks.

  8. Using Case Studies to Enrich Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Ruane, Susan; Clark, Christopher M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of field experience in teacher education and how it can be augmented by phenomenological case studies. It summarizes a particular case study involving three teacher education classes, noting that reflective analysis of cases can prepare students to observe in the field. (SM)

  9. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2012-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  10. Laparoscopic nephrectomy: initial experience with 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheema, I A

    2010-02-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy for both benign and malignant diseases of kidney is increasingly being performed. We report our experience with the first 120 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomy performed in our hospital. It is the retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 4 years period. The parameters examined included age, gender, indications, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and post operative complications. Mean age of surgery was 59 years (rang 19-84years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses (71 patients), non-functioning kidneys (43), and collecting system tumours (6). The mean operating time was 132 minutes (range 75-270), average blood loss was 209 ml (range 0-1090) and average hospital stay was 4.7days (range 2-20). Bleeding, bowel injury and poor progression of laparoscopic procedure were the reasons in 7 (5.8%) cases converted to open surgery. There was 1 (0.8%) perioperative mortality. Eight (6.6%) patients developed post operative complications. Laparoscopic nephrectomy has inherent benefits and may be considered an alternate therapeutic option for kidney diseases with acceptable morbidity

  11. Aging and experience in the recognition of musical transpositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, A R; Bartlett, J C; Dowling, W J

    1995-09-01

    The authors examined the effects of age, musical experience, and characteristics of musical stimuli on a melodic short-term memory task in which participants had to recognize whether a tune was an exact transposition of another tune recently presented. Participants were musicians and nonmusicians between ages 18 and 30 or 60 and 80. In 4 experiments, the authors found that age and experience affected different aspects of the task, with experience becoming more influential when interference was provided during the task. Age and experience interacted only weakly, and neither age nor experience influenced the superiority of tonal over atonal materials. Recognition memory for the sequences did not reflect the same pattern of results as the transposition task. The implications of these results for theories of aging, experience, and music cognition are discussed.

  12. Digital inequalities and different experiences of ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Cecilie

    of such - actually means to different people. My research is based on the assumption that people’s access to (and use of) media is integral to the power relations of current social and cultural transformations. In order to contribute to user-centered and practice-based understandings of why and how media matters......The complexity of the emerging digital media environment inevitably raises questions about digital literacy and social inequality. However, a major shortcoming of the existing research on digital inequality in later life is that it tells us little to nothing about how and why media actually matters...... to different older people and how this intersects with dis- or empowerment in later life and social segmentation. The way people use (digital) media in everyday life therefore constitutes a critical access-point to the study of differences in ageing as well as to the study of what literacy - or the lack...

  13. Ageing management experience at NUR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melllal, Sabrina; Rezig, Mohamed; Zamoun, Rachid; Ameur, Azeddin [Nuclear Research Center of Draria, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    NUR is a 1 MW, open pool reactor moderated and cooled by light water. It was commissioned in 1989. NUR is used for education and training in Nuclear Engineering and related topics for COMENA and National Scientific Community. It is also used to perform R and D works and services at national and regional levels. In this presentation, we describe the methodology and the main development activities related to the ageing management at NUR reactor. These activities include inspection actions and development actions to introduce modifications, to solve obsolescence issues in view to implement the required preventive and curative maintenance programs and to improve the performances of the installation. These actions involved mainly the Operation Assistance System of the Reactor (OAS), the secondary cooling loop, the cooling tower. A new OAS using a new technology and having more possibilities than the older one was introduced in the control system of the reactor. The OAS hardware structure, software structure and the main functions performed are presented. The second loop is entirely refurbished. Two new cooling towers are installed and connected to the main heat exchanger with new piping and valves. The architecture of this new installation is described and the performance assessed. Other actions which involve auxiliary systems like emergency electrical system, air pneumatic system and automatic fire extinguishing are presented.

  14. Continuity and Discontinuity: The Case of Second Couplehood in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Continuity and discontinuity are controversial concepts in social theories on aging. The aim of this article is to explore these concepts using the experiences of older persons living in second couplehood in old age as a case in point. Design and Method: Based on a larger qualitative study on second couplehood in old age, following the…

  15. Experience based ageing analysis of NPP protection automation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes three successive studies on ageing of protection automation of nuclear power plants. These studies were aimed at developing a methodology for an experience based ageing analysis, and applying it to identify the most critical components from ageing and safety points of view. The analyses resulted also to suggestions for improvement of data collection systems for the purpose of further ageing analyses. (author)

  16. [Life Experience following Suicide Attempt among Middle-aged Men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eun Young; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to identify the meaning of life experience following suicide attempt among middle-aged men. A qualitative research design was adopted using van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The participants were six middle-aged men who had attempted suicide at least one time. Data were collected in 2013 through in-depth interviews. Individual interviews were recorded; and literary, art works and phenomenological literature were searched to identify the meaning of the experience. The five essential themes of the life experience of middle-aged men who attempted suicide were 'Bitter reality confronted again', 'Anger buried deep inside', 'Broken family, inescapable fetters', 'Blocked relationships, closed world' and 'A step towards a new life'. The meaning of lived experience found in this study provides deep insight into the experience following suicide attempt in middle-aged men and crucial information to give directions to appropriate support and nursing interventions.

  17. Feminizing adrenal tumors: Our experience about three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chentli Farida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Feminizing adrenal tumors (FATs are very rare as they account for less than 2% of all the adrenal neoplasms. Their prognosis is deemed to be very poor. We aimed to present a mono centre (adult and pediatric experience over a long period of time (January 1980 to Jun 2012. During the study period, we observed only three cases in men aged 22 (2 cases and 45 (1 case. They all consulted for a painful gynecomastia, decreased libido and impotency. Estradiol was high in two cases at presentation, and after a relapsing tumor in the third one. All had big adrenal tumors (5.9, 6, and 17 cm, and a mixed secretion composed by high estradiol and cortisol. The pathological study argued for malignancy in two cases. But, only one had diffuse metastasis and died 4 years after diagnosis; the others diagnosed one and three years ago are still alive without any metastasis or relapsing.

  18. Maxillofacial fracture experiences: a review of 152 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Osman Enver; Tan, Onder; Algan, Said; Kuduban, Selma Denktas; Barin, Ensar Zafer; Cinal, Hakan; Sarici, Murat; Avsar, Umit

    2012-12-01

    The fractures of facial structures lead to great morbidity. Cross-sectional studies are needed to evaluate the current state of maxillofacial traumas. Thus, this study aims to evaluate these experiences and to compare these results with the current literature. The medical records of the maxillofacial fracture cases hospitalized between January 2004 and November 2011 were examined. The age, sex, etiology, fracture localization and treatment method for each case were documented. The affected facial bones were grouped as mandible, maxilla, zygoma, naso-orbitoethmoid complex (NOEC) and blow-out. Nasal fractures were excluded. The cases were assigned to 3 groups with respect to age (below 16, above 65 and between 17 and 64). The chi Square test was used to assess the significance of the difference in mandibular fracture rates in the pediatric population compared to others. The total number of cases was 152. The total number of fractures was 185. Of the 152 cases, 117 were male and 35 were female. The average age was 31.4 (±18.3), ranging between 2 and 81. Thirty-one cases were 16 years old or less. Nine cases were 65 years old or more. Mandibular and zygomatic fractures were the most prevalent fractures in the adult group. Mandibular fractures were significantly more common in the pediatric age group compared to rest of the population (X(2), pOpen reduction and internal fixation was the most frequently conducted treatment modality in all age groups. Retrospective studies are important for the projection of future prospects. In summary, our results indicate that pediatric fractures are mostly in the lower face and usually affect the condylar region, which is consistent with the literature.

  19. [Case management process identified from experience of nurse case managers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jun; Kim, Chunmi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory of case management (CM) practice by investigating the experience of nurse case managers caring for Medical Aid enrollees in Korea. A total of 12 nurses were interviewed regarding their own experience in CM practice. Data were recorded and analyzed using grounded theory. Empowerment was the core category of CM for Medical Aid enrollees. The case managers engaged in five phases as follows, phase of inquiring in advance, building a relationship with the client, giving the client critical mind, facilitating positive changes in the client's use of healthcare services, and maintaining relationship bonds. These phases moved gradually and were circular if necessary. Also, they were accelerated or slowed depending on factors including clients' characteristics, case managers' competency level, families' support level, and availability of community resources. This study helps understand what CM practice is and how nurses are performing this innovative CM role. It is recommended that nurse leaders and policy makers integrate empowerment as a core category and the five critical CM phases into future CM programs.

  20. Effects of RN Age and Experience on Transformational Leadership Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth; Herman, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study reported the evolution of transformational leadership (TL) practices and behaviors across years of age, management experience, and professional nursing practice within a professional nursing leadership organization. Recent studies of CNO TL found valuations peak near age 60 years. This study reported on a wider range of management positions, correlating years of RN practice and management experience and age to TL metrics. This study used Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-Assessment (LPI-S) to survey a nursing leadership organization, the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL). Anonymous responses were analyzed to identify leadership trends in age and years of professional service. On average, LPI-S metrics of leadership skills advance through years of management, RN experience, and age. The TL scores are statistically higher in most LPI-S categories for those with more than 30 years of RN or management experience. Decade-averaged LPI-S TL metrics in the ACNL survey evolve linearly throughout age before peaking in the decade from age 60 to 69 years. A similar evolution of TL metrics is seen in decades of either years of management experience or years of RN experience. Transformational leadership increased with nursing maturity particularly for LPI-S categories of "inspire a shared vision," "challenge the process," and "enable others to act." In the ACNL population studied, decade-averaged leadership metrics advanced. Leadership evolution with age in the broader RN population peaked in age bracket 60 to 69 years. The LPI-S averages declined when older than 70 years, coinciding with a shift from full-time work toward retirement and part-time employment.

  1. Brain abscess: surgical experiences of 162 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forhad Hossain Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Brain abscess still poses a public health challenge in spite of the advent of modern neurosurgical techniques and antibiotics. Here, we present our surgical experiences and ultimate outcome in the management of brain abscess. Methods: Totally, 162 patients with proved brain abscess who underwent surgical treatment were included in this study. The prospectively recorded data of surgical management of brain abscess and the ultimate outcome (by Glasgow outcome scale were studied retrospectively. Results: Total number of cases was 162, of which 113 were acute pyogenic abscess while 49 were chronic abscess. Among the chronic abscess, 29 were chronic pyogenic abscess, 14 were tubercular, 3 aspergillus, and 3 abscesses were in malignant brain metastases. In acute cases, common clinical features were headache, fever, vomiting, focal deficit and seizure. In chronic abscesses, common clinical features were mild to moderate headache and progressive focal deficit. Seventy-three (45.06% patients had adjacent localized sinus, middle ear or cranial infection. The common predisposing factors included postneurosurgery, postpenetrating injury to brain, chronic suppurative otitis media, and congenital heart disease, infective endocarditis, sinusitis and sub optimum immuno-status. Frontal lobe involved in 30.2% cases, temporal lobe is next to involved. Single time burr hole aspiration in 111 (68.5% cases, two or more times burr hole aspiration were done in 34 (21% cases. Pus culture was negative in 129 (79.62% cases. Total number of death was 22 (13.58% cases. Complete resolution of abscess with complete recovery of preoperative neuro-deficit was seen in 80.86% cases and recovery with major neuro-deficit was observed in 5.55% cases. There is a significant association between Glasgow coma scale (GCS on admission and mortality in brain abscess. Conclusion: In most of the cases, pus culture did not yield growth of any causative organism. Mortality was not

  2. Model experiments for {sup 14}C water-age determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, I; Stahl, W; Geyh, M; Fauth, F [Bundesanstalt fuer Bodenforschung, Hannover (Germany)

    1967-05-15

    The {sup 14}C age of water samples is calculated by assuming that fossil carbonate is dissolved by biogenic CO{sub 2} according to the equation x{sub 1} {center_dot} CaCO{sub 3} + (x{sub 1}+y{sub 1}) {center_dot} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O = 2x{sub 1} {center_dot} HCO{sub 3} + y{sub 1} {center_dot} CO{sub 2} where x and y are the number of moles of the two carbon components before and after the dissolution process. In a closed system the relation y{sub 1} = K(T) (x{sub 1}){sup 3} must be satisfied additionally. The equilibrium constant K(T), which depends on the temperature, controls the concentrations of free CO{sub 2} and HCO{sub 3}. To investigate the mechanism of the dissolution, laboratory experiments under controlled conditions were carried out. Non-radioactive CaCO{sub 3}, which had a {delta}{sup 13}C-value of +30 per mille, and radioactive CO{sub 2} with {delta}{sup 13}C = -22 per mille were used. The purpose of these investigations was to check the validity of theoretical assumptions regarding the average {sup 14}C-activity and the {delta}{sup 13}C-value of the total carbon which is dissolved as CO{sub 2} and HCO{sub 3}. Furthermore, it was investigated whether, within the duration of the experiment, a possible exchange takes place between the undissolved carbon present in the CaCO{sub 3} and that present in the HCO{sub 3}. The importance of this lies in the fact that the method of {sup 14}C age determination is based on the assumption that such an exchange does not take place. The experiments which have been performed up to now show that in case of the simple CaCO{sub 3} - CO{sub 2} system, which has been considered first, this assumption is not justified even for a constant water temperature. If variations in the water temperature occur during the history of the water sample, precipitation and redissolution processes influence the {sup 14}C- and {delta}{sup 13}C -values differently. This is due to isotopic fractionation processes between the HCO{sub 3} and CO

  3. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: A Retrospective Study of 1198 Cases to Assess Indications for Surgical Removal, and Correlation with Age, Sex and Type of Impaction-A Single Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shital; Mansuri, Saloni; Shaikh, Faizan; Shah, Taksh

    2017-03-01

    To study the incidence of mandibular third molar impaction in relation to type and side of impaction, age and sex of patients and indications for its surgical removal through data collected from a single institute over a period of 3 and half years. The records of 1198 patients who underwent the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars were reviewed retrospectively. Records were divided into groups according to sex, age, type and side of impaction. Radiographs were studied to determine angular position of impacted mandible third molar. We found that there was a high incidence of mesioangular lower third molar impaction (33.97 %), highest number of patients were found in 15-30 years of age group (48.33 %), a left side (56.93 %) was more commonly involved, female predominance (63.44 %) was observed and recurrent pericoronitis (33.81 %) was the most common indication. Awareness of the indications for surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar to the patients will help to avoid future risk of complications and morbidity associated with the same. This will not only help in saving time and money but also prevents the psychological trauma associated with delayed treatment. Removal of only symptomatic IMTM seems to be the logical choice in view of financial constraint in developing countries like India but at the same time early removal offers freedom from future complications in selected cases. So surgeons should apply a meticulous approach in selecting the patients for SRIMTM.

  4. Epistaxis: an experience with over 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.; Ahmed, Z.; Ali, L.

    2007-01-01

    To review and analyze the incidence, causes, management and results of treatment in patients who were treated for nasal bleeding. This retrospective descriptive study was conducted on patients of epistaxis, admitted to Combined Military Hospital Multan during a two years period from January 2005 to December 2006. Incidence, sex, age, cause of bleeding, associated clinical features, treatment and results were noted. During the study period, 1366 patients were admitted to hospital with various ENT diseases. Out of these, 109 (7.98%) had epistaxis as one of presenting complaints. Incidence was more in winter and spring months. Out of 109 patients, 76 were males (69.72 %) and 33 females (30.28%). The mean age was 35.06+19 years (range =3-83 years). Mean hospital stay was 4.98+4 days (1-27 days). The most common causes of epistaxis were idiopathic (31.19%), trauma (15.6%), infections (14.68%), hypertension (12.84%), bleeding disorders and blood dyscasias (11.01%). Sixty-six patients (60.55%) had anterior and 25 (22.93%) had posterior bleeding, while in remaining bleeding site could not be determined. Eighty-nine (81.66%) patients responded to conservative treatment and in 20 (18.35%) patients some surgical procedures had to be performed. The common causes of epistaxis were idiopathic, trauma, infections, hypertension and bleeding disorders. Most of the cases responded to conservative measures but in some cases surgical treatment had to be done. Further research is required to know about the underlying causes and optimal management of epistaxis. (author)

  5. Ameloblastoma: Our clinical experience with 68 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Fomete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this environment, previous workers have reported on the challenges of managing large sized ameloblastoma of the jaws with less than adequate facilities. The aim of this review is to present the management of 68 cases of ameloblastoma with emphasis on surgical care. Materials and Methods: Retrospective survey of case notes of patients with histopathologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma (using the criteria of Barnes et al., 2005 seen between January 2006 and August 2010 at the Maxillofacial Unit, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika-Zaria, Nigeria was undertaken. Data collected includes histopathological diagnosis, age, gender, clinical information on site of lesion, form of intubation and surgical procedure performed. Results: Out of 94 patients, 68 with histological diagnosis of ameloblastoma (59 mandibular and 9 maxillary were operated within the study period. The remainder (26 was not treated in hospital. Among 68 patients treated, more were males (38 than females (30, giving a male to female ratio of 1.3:1. The age range was between 14 and 74 years (mean-standard deviation. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 7 months to 24 years, most were follicular ameloblastoma (n = 13 followed by acanthomatous type (n = 7. Endotracheal intubation was the most common (n = 55 followed by fiber optic laryngoscopy (n = 8. The surgical approach most used was extended Risdon with intraoral (n = 24 followed by extended Risdon with lip split and intraoral (n = 17. Segmental resection (en block formed the bulk of our procedures (n = 22 followed by subtotal mandibulectomy (n = 16. Conclusion: The treatment of ameloblastoma remains controversial. Its destructive nature has left patients with wide defects difficult to reconstruct.

  6. Active Ageing and Active Citizenship in Liguria: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Liguria has the oldest age structure in Europe because of a low birth rate and long lifespans and therefore is a very interesting laboratory region in which to experiment with active ageing policies. The generations that are now approaching retirement hold a high level of personal and professional resources; so the "new" elderly people…

  7. Operating experience and aging-seismic assessment of electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Burns, E.L.; Taylor, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify concerns related to the aging and service wear of equipment operating in nuclear power plants, to assess their possible impact on plant safety, to identify effective inspection surveillance and monitoring methods and to recommend suitable maintenance practices for mitigating aging related concerns and diminish the rate of degradation due to aging and service wear. Motor design and materials of construction are reviewed to identify age-sensitive components. Operational and accidental stressors are determined, and their effect on promoting aging degradation is assessed. Failure modes, mechanisms, and causes have been reviewed from operating experiences and existing data banks. The study has also included consideration for the seismic correlation of age-degraded motor components. The aforementioned reviews and assessments were assimilated to characterize the dielectric, rotational, and mechanical hazards on motor performance and operational readiness. The functional indicators which can be monitored to assess motor component deterioration due to aging or other accidental stressors are identified. Conforming with the NPAR strategy as outlined in the program plan, the study also includes a preliminary discussion of current standards and guides, maintenance programs, and research activities pertaining to nuclear power plant safety-related electric motors

  8. Prostate cancer: experience with definitive irradiation in the aged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Bodner, H.; Broth, E.

    1985-01-01

    When considering therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer, stage and grade of disease have been the most important determinants. In the elderly, the nominal age has assumed increasing importance in the final decision. A balanced judgment must be reached between the patient's normal life expectancy and the rapidity with which the cancer may be expected to express its malignant potential. By careful attention to patient selection and the details of treatment, definitive irradiation can improve quality of life and survival. Of 63 patients aged seventy-three to ninety years referred for irradiation, 56 were found medically suitable for definitive treatment. A review of the authors experience is presented

  9. Evaluation of aging and hydration in natural volcanic glass: magnetic property variations during artificial aging and hydration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, J. A.; Patiman, A.

    2017-12-01

    The recorded geomagnetic field intensity is a function of magnetic mineralogy, grain size, and mineral concentration as well as material stability in nature and during laboratory experiments. Fresh, unhydrated, volcanic glasses are recognized as a nearly ideal natural material for use in paleointensity experiments because they contain the requisite single domain to pseudo-single-domain magnetic particles. Although alteration of magnetic mineralogy can be monitored during the experiments, it is unclear how mineralogy and hence magnetization might change with age as the metastable glass structure relaxes and/or the glass becomes hydrated. Bulk magnetic properties as a function of age show no clear trend, even over hundreds of millions of years. This may be due to the fact that even in fresh, unhydrated glass, there are small-scale differences in magnetic properties due to variation cooling rate or composition variations. Therefore, in order to better understand how magnetic mineralogy evolves with time and hydration, we conducted artificial aging and hydration experiments on fresh, unhydrated rhyolitic (South Deadman Creek, California, 650-yr) and basaltic (Axial Seamount, 2011) end-member glasses. Here, we present the results of artificial aging and hydration experiments. Elevated temperatures accelerate the glass relaxation process in a way that relaxation time decreases with increasing temperature. Aged samples are dry-annealed at 200, 300 and 400 °C for up to 240 days. A second set of samples are hydrated under pressure at 300°C and 450°C. In all cases, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition is monitored to assess changes in the coercivity spectrum and saturation IRM. Preliminary aging results show that in basaltic and rhyolitic glass there is one main peak coercivity at 150 mT and 35 mT, respectively. An increasing sIRM and decreasing peak coercivity trend is observed in basaltic glass whereas no trend is shown in the rhyolitic glass in both

  10. Emotional experience improves with age : Evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carstensen, L.L.; Turan, B.; Scheibe, S.; Ram, N.; Ersner-Hershfield, H.; Samanez-Larkin, G.R.; Brooks, K.P.; Nesselroade, J.R.

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N =

  11. Do Qualification, Experience and Age Matter for Principals Leadership Styles?

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Javed Sawati; Saeed Anwar; Muhammad Iqbal Majoka

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of present study was to find out the prevalent leadership styles of principals in government schools of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and to find relationship of leadership styles with qualifications, age and experience of the principals. On the basis of analyzed data, four major leadership styles of the principals were identified as Eclectic, Democratic, Autocratic, and Free-rein. However, a small proportion of the principal had no dominant leadership style. This study shows that princip...

  12. Experience of a monographic tuberculosis unit: the first 500 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moreno, Juan; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Cifuentes Luna, Carmen; Mir Villadrich, Isabel; Pareja Bezares, Antonio; Navarro Fernández, Verónica; Serrano Bujalance, Araceli; Pérez Seco, M Cruz; Payeras Cifre, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a highly prevalent and potentially severe disease. However, since 2002 the annual incidence has been decreasing both worldwide and in Spain, where the incidence varies widely between regions. The main objective of this study is to describe the experience of a monographic TB unit in a second level hospital. A descriptive study was carried out which included all cases of TB diagnosed in a monographic unit of a secondary hospital between 2003 and 2011. Demographic, clinical, epidemiological and microbiological data were recorded. We analyzed 500 TB cases and found an increasing annual incidence in all subgroups, including native and immigrant populations. Most cases (63.8%) were male, with a median age of 36 years (range 8 months-90 years). In total, 39.8% of patients were foreign born. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus was found in 11% of cases. The pulmonary form was most frequently diagnosed (63.8%). Overall mortality was 5.8% with no significant differences between groups (including foreign born and human immunodeficiency virus positive patients). Although TB incidence is globally decreasing, in our study we found an increasing number of cases in recent years in all subgroups, which can be explained by this being a monographic unit with an intensive contact tracing program. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Age and the experience of strong self-conscious emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Nangle, Matthew R; Waters, Michele

    2018-04-01

    It remains unclear whether there are age-related changes in the experience of strong self-conscious emotion, such as shame, guilt, pride and embarrassment. Because shame and guilt figure prominently in the aetiology of depressive symptoms and other mental health problems, a better understanding of how age affects the strong experience of these two negative self-conscious emotions is of particular importance. Thirty younger, 30 middle-aged and 30 older adults were compared on standardised cognitive assessments, in addition to an interview-based measure that assessed whether there are age differences in the likelihood of strongly experiencing four different types of self-conscious emotion within the past five years (shame, guilt, embarrassment and pride). The three groups did not differ in their likelihood of reporting an event that strongly elicited the positive self-conscious emotion of pride. However, older adults were more likely to report sources of pride that were other (as opposed to self) focused. Older adults were also less likely to report experiencing events that elicited all three negative self-conscious emotions, in particular, shame. Strong negative self-conscious emotion, and in particular shame, appears to be experienced less by older than younger adults.

  14. Looking Very Old Age in the Eye: A Nuanced Approach to the Fourth Age in Contemporary Irish Fiction: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano Llena, Carmen

    2018-04-21

    Associations of young-old age with successful aging have contributed to relegating negatively perceived aspects of aging to very old age. This has prompted the formation of the social imaginary of the fourth age. Re-examinations of the fourth age foreground the diversity of aging experiences among the oldest old. In this sense, literature is in a privileged position to contribute individual narratives of aging to this field. The main aim of this article is to analyze Irish writer Jennifer Johnston's later fiction and how particularly two of her later fictional works contribute a nuanced re-examination of the fourth age through the narrativization of individual aging experiences of the oldest old in the contemporary Irish context. The work of sociologists and social theorists on re-examinations of the fourth age functions as the framework to analyze the selected fictional texts. The analysis of the oldest old characters in Truth or Fiction and Naming the Stars shows the contribution of literary texts to rethinking the fourth age as a time characterized by the inextricable combination of gains and losses, with emphasis on the diversity of the aging experiences of the oldest old and on the importance of sociocultural influence on individual aging. Combining longitudinal analyses with case studies, such as the ones suggested by these fictional texts, can provide a more accurate knowledge of the experience of advanced old age and the fourth age.

  15. Mentoring Experiences of Aging and Disability Rehabilitation Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Egan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore research mentoring experiences and perceived mentoring needs of aging and disability researchers at different career stages. Design. Focus group and individual interviews with rehabilitation researchers at various career stages based in hospitals, universities, and hospital-based research institutes in Ontario, Canada. Results. The overall theme was mentoring for transition. Participants across career stages referred to helpful mentoring experiences as those that assisted them to move from their previous stage into the present stage or from the present stage into their next career progression. Unhelpful mentoring experiences were characterized by mentor actions that were potentially detrimental to transition. Subsumed under this theme were three categories. The first, “hidden information” referred to practical information that was difficult to access. The second “delicate issues” referred to helping the participant work through issues related to sensitive matters, the discussion of which could put the participants or their colleagues in a vulnerable position. The third category was “special challenges of clinician-researchers”. Conclusions. Helpful mentoring for rehabilitation researchers working on concerns related to aging and disability appears to be characterized by interaction with more experienced individuals who aid the researcher work through issues related to career transition.

  16. [Mental anorexia in aging. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, J; Mure-Petitjean, C; Boiffin, A

    2000-04-01

    Elderly subjects who refuse to eat, and thus develop malnutrition, can be observed both in institutional and community settings. Causes include physiological changes related to the aging process, mental disorders and environmental factors. Most cases of anorexia nevrosa begin in adolescence but a sizeable number may develop at a later age. The term anorexia nevrosa in the elderly is proposed to describe this clinical entity observed in a woman who developed anorexia nevrosa at the age of 76 years. This entity is examined in comparison with prolonged earlier-onset anorexia nevrosa and late-onset anorexia.

  17. The PAUL Suit(©) : an experience of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Moore, Malcolm; Wenham, John

    2016-04-01

    An ageing population worldwide makes it increasingly important that health students understand issues that elderly people face and can provide empathic care to them. This teaching department in an isolated rural setting developed an interprofessional learning session to assist health students to understand issues of functional loss and social isolation that can affect elderly people. The Premature Ageing Unisex Leisure (PAUL) Suit(©) was developed as part of a 1-day learning session for undergraduate health students - including students of medicine, nursing and allied health - attending clinical placement in far-west New South Wales. The suit was developed locally and can be adjusted to simulate a wide range of functional losses in the wearer. Students undertake a range of daily tasks in the community while wearing the suit in the company of a student 'carer'. Over the past 4 years, approximately 140 students have participated in the simulation. Post-simulation evaluations report that students gain a greater understanding of some functional issues associated with ageing, and of the social isolation that can be associated with these. The experiential nature of the activity leads to some powerful insights. This activity is an innovative, experiential tool to deepen students understanding of issues related to ageing This activity is an innovative, experiential tool to deepen students understanding of issues relating to ageing. The interprofessional nature of the activity is an important factor in the success of the day, and produces a wide range of shared insights. The activity also enhances the partnerships between the university, the health service and the local community. Our experience supports the value of simulation in providing a deep learning opportunity in the area of ageing and disability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Survey of operating experience from LERs to identify aging trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Nuclear Operations Analysis Center computer files of operating experience reports [licensee event reports (LERs), abnormal occurrences, etc.] are summarized in this study, specific time-related degradation mechanisms are identified as possible causes of a reportable occurrence. Data collected on domestic commercial nuclear power plants covering 1969 to 1982 yielded over 5800 events attributable to possible age related failures. Of these events, 2795 were attributable to instrument drift and are addressed separately in the report. The remaining events (3098) were reviewed, and data were collected for each event, which identified the specific system, component, and subpart: the information included the age-related mechanism, severity of the failure, and method of detection of the failure. About two-thirds of the failures were judged to be degraded, with one-third listed as catastrophic

  19. Case series of Stargardt's disease: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abdul Wadud

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stargardt disease is the most common form of juvenile macular degeneration. Clinically, it is characterized by pisciform flecks at lhe level of the retinal pigment epithelium and a bull's-eye maculopathy. Inheritance is usually autosomal recessive, although dominantly inherited case have been described. Both sexes are affected equally. We reported here three cases of Stargardt's macular dystrophy, who are siblings and daughters of non consanguineous parents. In case-1,2 and 3 we found the typical presentation with almost same findings.

  20. Does Volunteering Experience Influence Advance Care Planning in Old Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Khosla, Nidhi

    2016-07-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood patients will receive end-of-life care that is congruent with their preferences and lowers stress among both patients and caregivers. Previous efforts to increase ACP have mainly focused on information provision in the very late stage of life. This study examines whether a relationship exists between volunteering and ACP, and whether this relationship is associated with social support. The sample comprises 877 individuals who were aged 55+ in 2008, and were deceased before 2010. The sample is derived from seven waves (1998-2010) of data from the Health and Retirement Study. Logistic regression results showed that overall ACP and durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC) were both higher (OR = 1.61 and 1.71, respectively) for older adults with volunteering experience in the past 10 years than those without such experience. Available social support (relatives and friends living nearby) was not associated with the relationship between volunteering and ACP. Other factors related to ACP included poorer health, death being expected, death due to cancer, older age, and being a racial minority. Involving older people in volunteer work may help to increase ACP. Future research is encouraged to identify reasons for the association between volunteering and ACP.

  1. Case for non-material specific thermal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessey, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The state-of-the-art model for accelerated thermal aging of components prior to seismic testing is the Arrhenius Model. The most pertinent independent variable in the equation is the minimum activation energy constant characterizing the component aging. With minor exceptions, existing measured values of the activation energy constant are inadequate as input to the model where a material specific aging acceleration factor is to be determined, for reasons described. The model itself is not very accurate. A case is made for a statistically justified minimum activation energy constant which is not material specific. The advantages of this are assessed. The major advantage is that this would provide the industry with a practical and uniform aging method that is consistent with the accuracy of the model

  2. OECD/NEA component operational experience, degradation and ageing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.; Nevander, O.; Riznic, J.; Lydell, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several OECD Member Countries have agreed to establish the OECD/NEA 'Component Operational Experience, Degradation and Ageing Programme' (CODAP) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data relating to degradation and failure of metallic piping and non-piping metallic passive components in commercial nuclear power plants. The scope of the data collection includes service-induced wall thinning, part through-wall cracks, through-wall cracks with and without active leakage, and instances of significant degradation of metallic passive components, including piping pressure boundary integrity. CODAP is the continuation of the 2002-2011 'OECD/NEA Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) and the Stress Corrosion Cracking Working Group of the 2006-2010 - OECD/NEA SCC and Cable Ageing project - (SCAP). OPDE was formally launched in May 2002. Upon completion of the 3. Term (May 2011), the OPDE project was officially closed to be succeeded by CODAP. In May 2011, 13 countries signed the CODAP first Term agreement. The first Term (2011-2014) work plan includes the development of a web-based relational event database on passive, metallic components in commercial nuclear power plants, a web-based knowledge base on material degradation, codes and standards relating to structural integrity and national practices for managing material degradation. The work plan also addresses the preparation of Topical Reports to foster technical cooperation and to deepen the understanding of national differences in ageing management. These Topical Reports are in the public domain and available for download on the NEA web site. Published in 2014, a first Topical Report addressed flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel and low alloy steel piping. A second Topical Report addresses operating experience with electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and instrument air (IA) system piping

  3. Ageing management of nuclear power plant - the Tarapur experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, K.R.; Das, P.K.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Ramamurty, U.

    2006-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station, the longest serving Nuclear Power Plant in the Asian continent has completed 36 years of successful operation and generated more than 70,000 million units of electric power. Built in late sixties, with the state-of-the-art safety features prevailing then, TAPS through the process of evolution has become safer plant due to efforts of upgradation, renovation and refurbishment prompted by the station's operating experience, feed back from overseas reactors, lessons learnt from nuclear incidents, accidents and fresh review of design basis and safety analysis of the plant. All components of a Nuclear power plant experience some degradation with time. The Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) designed for 40 effective full power years (EFPY) of operation have operated for less than 20 EFPY and the material condition is assessed to be fit for some more years of service. The condition of the containment and main plant buildings was assessed to be satisfactory. The Ageing Management Programme (AMP) involved identification of key systems, structures and components (SSCs) that may experience degradation due to ageing, and take corrective measures through maintenance, repair and/or replacement. The identified components were classified as major critical components, important systems and other critical components. For each component mode of degradation was identified, ageing assessment was done and action plan was finalized. Replacement of some important equipment like 3 x 50 % capacity Emergency Diesel Generators (EDG) with 3 x 100 % capacity EDG, Salt Service Water (SSW) pumps, Control rod drive (CRD) pumps, Emergency Condenser tube bundles, Station battery has been done on the basis of condition monitoring and to obviate common cause failure and enhance the system reliability. Samples of Safety related cables were subjected to residual life assessment (RLA) and replacement action firmed up on the basis of the RLA findings. Condition survey of Main

  4. Encountering aged care: a mixed methods investigation of medical students' clinical placement experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael J; Lea, Emma; Lo, Amanda; Tierney, Laura; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-02-04

    Residential aged care is an increasingly important health setting due to population ageing and the increase in age-related conditions, such as dementia. However, medical education has limited engagement with this fast-growing sector and undergraduate training remains primarily focussed on acute presentations in hospital settings. Additionally, concerns have been raised about the adequacy of dementia-related content in undergraduate medical curricula, while research has found mixed attitudes among students towards the care of older people. This study explores how medical students engage with the learning experiences accessible in clinical placements in residential aged care facilities (RACFs), particularly exposure to multiple comorbidity, cognitive impairment, and palliative care. Fifth-year medical students (N = 61) completed five-day clinical placements at two Australian aged care facilities in 2013 and 2014. The placements were supported by an iterative yet structured program and academic teaching staff to ensure appropriate educational experiences and oversight. Mixed methods data were collected before and after the clinical placement. Quantitative data included surveys of dementia knowledge and questions about attitudes to the aged care sector and working with older adults. Qualitative data were collected from focus group discussions concerning medical student expectations, learning opportunities, and challenges to engagement. Pre-placement surveys identified good dementia knowledge, but poor attitudes towards aged care and older adults. Negative placement experiences were associated with a struggle to discern case complexity and a perception of an aged care placement as an opportunity cost associated with reduced hospital training time. Irrespective of negative sentiment, post-placement survey data showed significant improvements in attitudes to working with older people and dementia knowledge. Positive student experiences were explained by in

  5. Emotional Experience Improves With Age: Evidence Based on Over 10 Years of Experience Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Laura L.; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Nesselroade, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory. PMID:20973600

  6. Transmedial Museum Experiences: the case of Moesgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajares Tosca, Susana

    2016-01-01

    This article’s aim is to elucidate the uncertain ontological status of the transmedial museum experience, which I define as the aesthetic encounter of a user with the complex object that is the conjunction of historical artefact, informative label and fictional stories on different media platform...

  7. Multiproteinopathy, neurodegeneration and old age: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Julio C; Stephens, Melanie L; Rabinovici, Gil D; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2018-02-01

    A complex spectrum of mixed brain pathologies is common in older people. This clinical pathologic conference case study illustrates the challenges of formulating clinicopathologic correlations in late-onset neurodegenerative diseases featuring cognitive-behavioral syndromes with underlying multiple proteinopathy. Studies on the co-existence and interactions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with neurodegenerative non-AD pathologies in the aging brain are needed to understand the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and to support the development of diagnostic biomarkers and therapies.

  8. Primary Teachers and ICT: Is gender, age or experience important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Morley

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research uses both qualitative and quantitative methodologies employing multiple sources of data collection. The data collection primarily used a questionnaire survey of primary schools in two English Local Authorities. The qualitative evidence of the teacher sample was through individual semi-structured interviews and a focus group interview of Local Authorities officers. There is an evidence trail which examines academic papers, HMI, QCA, Ofsted and DfES reports. The main findings from these reports indicate that teachers were becoming familiar with the use of computers. They understood the skills involved in using computers but were still uncertain as to a suitable pedagogy which made them lack confidence when using ICT in the classroom. Teachers’ major difficulty is finding time to keep pace or develop their ICT skills. The reports have a generic view of teachers, with no further analysis of gender, age or experience phenomena. The analysis of these variables concludes that teacher subject knowledge formed through teaching experience of the subject, informs teachers when computers aid teaching and learning.

  9. Chronic disease and independence in old age: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, Pauline J.

    2006-01-01

    This report uses case study methodology to examine the issue of long-term care of the elderly in the United Kingdom, including where that care should take place. The report will examine the difficulties inherent in maintaining independent living for the elderly (in particular the danger and cost of falls). The case study presented is that of an elderly female patient who had suffered from chronic rheumatoid arthritis for over 10 years. She was admitted to hospital several times from December 2003 to January 2004. The discussion of her case is set in the context of the sociology of ageing; long-term care of the elderly and the UK National Service Frameworks, of which standard six relates to falls in the elderly. The report will also consider the problems in deciding whether it is necessary to terminate independent living for an individual

  10. Spondyloarthropathy presenting at a young age: case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, Golda H.; Renaud, Deborah L.; Reed, Ann M.; Sundaram, Murali

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSA) is rarely entertained in young children who present with back and leg pain. We present a case of a 6-year-old male who presented with a 3-year history of severe back and leg pain and a positive Gower's sign, and was given a presumed diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. Presenting serologic evaluation included a mildly elevated sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP). Computed tomography of the pelvis demonstrated large erosions affecting both sacro-iliac joints. Despite the unusually young age of this patient, ankylosing spondylitis seemed the most plausible diagnosis. Following rheumatological evaluation and treatment for JSA, he showed significant clinical improvement. His disease, however, has not entirely remitted with signs of enthesitis at the Achilles tendon and knees. We present this case to illustrate that JSA could account for symptoms at an early age and not considering it could lead to multiple medical visits and diagnoses. To our knowledge, based on a search of the World literature, this would appear to be the youngest case of JSA reported with demonstrable severe sacroiliitis. (orig.)

  11. The Litvinenko polonium-210 case - German experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Gerald; Kroeger, Emily A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together the measurement results taken and the lessons learned by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection during the polonium-210 incident in Hamburg in late 2006. The incident was pivotal in confirming the importance of the defence against nuclear hazards in Germany and for highlighting the role of communication in the success of a deployment. The background of the case is reviewed and an overview of the German defence against nuclear hazards is given. The various measurement tasks, both at the scene and in the laboratory, and their results are summarized along with the communication challenges experienced. The main conclusions are that the traces of polonium-210 found at the sites were of little radiological consequence and the German defence against nuclear hazards in Germany delivered an excellent and measured response to the incident. However, communication challenges still exist and communication with the public and the emergency responders has to be given high priority during future deployments in order to ensure their success. (author)

  12. Percutaneous cholecystostome; 60 cases of experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Gwon; Song, Ho Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Lee, Young Suk; Ki, Won Woo; Sung, Gyu Bo [Ulsan Univ College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To review the effectiveness and complication of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PCCS). We performed PCCS in 60 patient who presented with acute cholecystitis. The causes of acute cholecystitis were as follows; acalculous cholecystitis(n=8), calculous cholecystitis(n=23), GB hydrops (n=3), GB empyema(n=15), septic cholangitis(n=11). Of 60 patients, 36 patients had high risk factor for cholecystectomy; underlying malignancy(n=13), severe trauma(n=6). Cholecystostomy was done under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guide. The cholecystostomy was successfully in 59 patients, and failed in 1 patient. 15 patients improved without other procedure. 16 patients underwent cholecystectomy after improvement of their general condition. Severe complications of PCCS are as follows; bile peritonitis(n=6), hemoperitoneum(n=1), subphrenic abscess(n=1). Mild complication, such as pain, occurred in most patients. Emergency operation was done in one patient who developed bile peritonitis. Cholecystostomy is effective and safe, especially in cases of inoperable patients who represent acute cholecystitis. Percutaneous cholecystostomy may substitute surgical cholecystostomy.

  13. Case managers' experiences of personal growth: learning from consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Catherine H; Craft, Scott A

    2007-04-01

    This study examines aspects of case managers' perceived personal growth in their work with consumers. Using a sample of 98 case managers, the psychometric properties of a brief self-report measure of personal growth of case managers were examined. The Case Manager Personal Growth Scale (CMPG) showed good reliability and construct validity as evidenced by negative correlations with scores on professional burnout and positive correlations with personal accomplishment and job satisfaction scores. CMPG scores were unrelated to social desirability scores or caseload size and positively related to age and tenure in the mental health system. Results suggest the strong relevance of the construct of personal growth for case managers.

  14. Dysphagia in a middle-aged female: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiq, Syed; B., Ramathilakam

    2013-01-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is characterized by a hypopharyngeal or postcricoid web causing progressive dysphagia and iron deficiency anemia. We report the case of a middle-aged female who presented to us with complaints of easy fatuigability and progressive dysphagia mainly to solids for six months.  The patient had marked pallor.  Her upper endoscopy showed hypopharyngeal web, which was confirmed by barium swallow study.  A diagnosis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome was made.  The patient was i...

  15. Aging, source memory, and the experience of "remembering".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Beatrice G; Boywitt, C Dennis

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, we found source memory for perceptual features to differentiate between younger but not older adults' reports of recollective ("remember"; R) and "know" (K) experiences. In two experiments with younger (17-30 years) and older (64-81 years) participants, we examined whether memory for meaningful speaker sources would accompany older adults' recollective experience. Indeed, memory for male and female speakers (but not partial memory for gender; Experiment 1) as well as bound memory for speakers and their facial expressions (Experiment 2) distinguished between both younger and older adults' RK reports. Thus, memory for some sources forms a common basis for younger and older adults' retrieval experience. Nonetheless, older adults still showed lower objective source memory and lower subjective source-attribution confidence than younger adults when reporting recollective experiences, suggesting that source memory is less relevant to their retrieval experience than for younger adults.

  16. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions....

  17. Structuring the Environmental Experience Design Research Framework through Selected Aged Care Facility Data Analyses in Victoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans relate to the living environment physically and psychologically. Environmental psychology has a rich developed history while experience design emerged recently in the industrial design domain. Nonetheless, these approaches have barely been merged, understood or implemented in architectural design practices. This study explored the correlation between experience design and environmental psychology. Moreover, it conducted literature reviews on theories about emotion, user experience design, experience design and environmental psychology, followed by the analyses of spatial settings and environmental quality data of a selected aged care facility in Victoria, Australia, as a case study. Accordingly, this study led to proposing a research framework on environmental experience design (EXD. It can be defined as a deliberate attempt that affiliates experience design and environmental psychology with creation of the built environment that should accommodate user needs and demands. The EXD research framework proposed in this study was tailored for transforming related design functions into the solutions that contribute to improving the built environment for user health and wellbeing.

  18. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2014 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Campleman, Sharan L; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry was queried for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. In 2014, 9172 cases were entered in the Registry across 47 active member sites. Females accounted for 51.1 % of cases. The majority (65.1 %) of cases were adults between the ages of 19 and 65. Caucasians made up the largest identified ethnic group (48.9 %). Most Registry cases originated from the inpatient setting (93.5 %), with a large majority of these consultations coming from the emergency department or inpatient admission services. Intentional and unintentional pharmaceutical exposures continued to be the most frequent reasons for consultation, accounting for 61.7 % of cases. Among cases of intentional pharmaceutical exposure, 62.4 % were associated with a self-harm attempt. Non-pharmaceutical exposures accounted for 14.1 % of Registry cases. Similar to the past years, non-opioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Clinical signs or symptoms were noted in 81.9 % of cases. There were 89 recorded fatalities (0.97 %). Medical treatment (e.g., antidotes, antivenom, chelators, supportive care) was rendered in 62.3 % of cases. Patient demographics and exposure characteristics in 2014 Registry cases remain similar to prior years. The majority of consultations arose in the acute care setting (emergency department or inpatient) and involved exposures to pharmaceutical products. Among exposures, non-opioid analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, and opioids were the most frequently

  19. Evolutionary experience design – the case of Otopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kenneth

    experiences with the case of “Otopia”. “Otopia” is a large scale, new media experiment, which combines the areas of computer games, sports and performance in to a spectator oriented concept; it was premiered in a dome tent at the Roskilde Festival in Denmark the summer 2005. This paper presents and discusses......The design of experiences is a complicated challenge. It might not even be possible to design such a “thing”, but only to design for it. If this is the case it could seem appropriate with an evolutionary approach. This paper introduces such an approach to the design of new public oriented...... used as a means of specifying the basic immaterial design form. This discussion leads to the suggestion of a rule-based evolutionary model for the design of situations as a practical option for designers of new spectator oriented experiences in the future The project of Otopia was supported...

  20. Use of Facebook: A Case Study of Singapore Students' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2012-01-01

    Facebook has become one of the most popular social network sites among many students. However, current research on Facebook use has focused mainly on Anglo-American students. Relatively little is known about Facebook use in Singapore. Data were collected from 83 students (ages ranged from 15 to 23). This study uses a naturalistic case study…

  1. Experiences in the TC IAEA MEX4/058 project: RCIC Ageing Management Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.; Mendoza, G.; Viais, J.; Arganis, C.; Contreras, A.; Fernandez, G.; Medina, G.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper, describes the experiences in the Technical Cooperation Project with the IAEA MEX 4/058 related with the Licensed Renewal Process, according with 10 CFR 54, NEI-95-10, NUREG 1800 and NUREG 1801. A domestic data base using Microsoft ACCESS was made following the methodology suggest by 10 CFR 54, and the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) System was selected like a pilot system. The mechanical components within the scope of license renewal and their intended functions were selected and the components subject to Aging Management Review (AMR) were identified. Commodities groups of similar material, environment and intended function were used and the main Ageing Mechanisms were identified. The results were compared with the NUREG 1801 rev. 2 experiences and the possible AMP was addressed. In the case of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP) U1, some of these programs are according with the Generic Aging Lesson Learned of NUREG 1801, while others AMP require modifications. It is important to mention that the application of this methodology will support activities related with long term operation in LVNPP. (author)

  2. Comparison of access, outcomes and experiences of older adults and working age adults in psychological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Robert; Farquharson, Lorna; Clapp, Melissa; Crawford, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the access, experiences and outcomes of older adults receiving psychological therapies in comparison with adults of working age Primary and secondary care providers of psychological therapy services participated in the National Audit of Psychological Therapies. The main standards of access, experience and outcomes were measured by retrospective case records audits of people who completed therapy and a service user questionnaire. Outcomes were measured pre-treatment and post-treatment on the PHQ-9 and GAD-7. A total of 220 services across 97 organisations took part, 137 (62%) in primary care. Service user questionnaires were received from 14 425 (20%) respondents. A total of 122 740 records were audited, of whom 7794 (6.4%) were older adults. They were under represented as 13% of the sample would have been expected to be over 65 years according to age adjusted psychiatric morbidity figures. People over 75 years had the third expected referral rate. Significantly, more older adults than working age adults completed therapy (59.6% vs 48.6%) and were assessed as having 'recovered' post-treatment (58.5% vs 45.5%). Older adults were more satisfied with waiting times and numbers of sessions, but there were no differences in self-reported experience of therapy. Although older adults are less likely to gain access to psychological therapies, they appear to have better outcomes than working age adults. Further work is needed to improve access for older people. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Experience with chemicals regulation - Lessons from the Danish LAS case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Pia Vestergaard; Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    the understanding of how chemicals regulation is being shaped through social and political processes, and which lessons can be drawn regarding the effectiveness of different regulatory measures. We outline briefly the history of the chemicals regulation as a background for the detailed discussion of the case study......Chemicals regulation is under pressure for change, and lessons from former experience are important to inform the process. This paper is based on a case study of the Danish measures towards regulating a specific substance, Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate (LAS), and the case is used to deepen...

  4. Penile constriction injury: An experience of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Somaji Sawant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile injury due to constriction by a foreign object is a rare known complication, commonly seen in pediatric age group. We report four cases of penile constriction injury in adults due to various foreign objects and different indications. Between October 2014 and March 2016, four patients (mean age 42.5 years presented with penile constriction injury with duration at presentation ranging from 18 h to 2 months. One patient had complete transection of the corpus and penile urethra. Three patients were managed successfully with daily dressings followed by split-skin grafting in one patient. One patient required delayed primary suturing after the resolution of local edema. The outcome was satisfactory in all patients with retained erectile function. Early medical attention and management is the key to success in penile constriction injury cases and to avoid complications and morbidity. Prompt removal can be challenging in cases of metal foreign bodies.

  5. Large block migration experiments: INTRAVAL phase 1, Test Case 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gureghian, A.B.; Noronha, C.J. (Battelle, Willowbrook, IL (USA). Office of Waste Technology Development); Vandergraaf, T.T. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1990-08-01

    The development of INTRAVAL Test Case 9, as presented in this report, was made possible by a past subsidiary agreement to the bilateral cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) encompassing various aspects of nuclear waste disposal research. The experimental aspect of this test case, which included a series of laboratory experiments designed to quantify the migration of tracers in a single, natural fracture, was undertaken by AECL. The numerical simulation of the results of these experiments was performed by the Battelle Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD) by calibrating an in-house analytical code, FRACFLO, which is capable of predicting radionuclide transport in an idealized fractured rock. Three tracer migration experiments were performed, using nonsorbing uranine dye for two of them and sorbing Cs-137 for the third. In addition, separate batch experiments were performed to determine the fracture surface and rock matrix sorption coefficients for Cs-137. The two uranine tracer migration experiment were used to calculate the average fracture aperture and to calibrate the model for the fracture dispersivity and matrix diffusion coefficient. The predictive capability of the model was then tested by simulating the third, Cs-137, tracer test without changing the parameter values determined from the other experiments. Breakthrough curves of both the experimental and numerical results obtained at the outlet face of the fracture are presented for each experiment. The reported spatial concentration profiles for the rock matrix are based solely on numerical predictions. 22 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Peritoneal dialysis in an ageing population: a 10-year experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent and there are increasing numbers of older patients with advanced CKD. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a potential treatment. This study aims to compare PD outcomes in age-defined populations in the largest PD centre in the Republic of Ireland over 10 years.

  7. The Case for Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Lilian G.; And Others

    In six brief chapters, mixed-age grouping of young children in schools and child care centers is explored and advocated. Chapter 1 defines mixed-age grouping, examines limitations of single-age grouping, and points out positive characteristics of mixed-age classes. Chapter 2 discusses social development as seen in children's interactions in…

  8. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  9. Complications after orthognathic surgery: our experience on 423 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friscia, Marco; Sbordone, Carolina; Petrocelli, Marzia; Vaira, Luigi Angelo; Attanasi, Federica; Cassandro, Francesco Maria; Paternoster, Mariano; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Orthognathic surgery is widely used to correct dentofacial discrepancies. However, this procedure presents numerous possible complications. The aim of our study is to review intraoperative and postoperative complications related to orthognathic surgery based upon a 10-year period in the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Federico II University of Naples. Medical records of 423 patients who undergone orthognathic surgery in a 10-year period were retrospectively analyzed and complications was noted. Statistical analysis was conduced in order to understand if the type of surgical procedure influenced complications rate. One hundred eighty-five complications in 143 (33.8%) of the 423 treated patients were reported. Complications detected were nerve injury (49 cases, 11.9%), infections (10 cases, 2.4%), complications related to fixation plates or screws (30 cases, 7.1%), bad split osteotomy (8 cases, 1.9%), secondary temporo-mandibular joint disorders (36 cases, 8.5%), dental injuries (21 cases, 5%), condilar resorption (2 cases, 0.5%), and necessity of a second-time surgery (24 cases, 5.7%). Serious complications seem to be quite rare in orthognathic surgery. Some of the surgical complications found are related to the surgeon experience and not strictly to the risks of the operation itself. Understanding potential complications allows the surgeon to guarantee safe care through early intervention and correctly inform the patient in the preoperative colloquy.

  10. The Subtlety of Age, Gender, and Race Barriers: A Case Study of Early Career African American Female Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2013-01-01

    While all educational leaders face challenges in achieving success, African American female principals often face a unique set of challenges associated with the complexity of their gender, race, and, as examined in this study, age. This case study investigates the experiences of two highly visible, early career African American female principals…

  11. Framatome ANP worldwide experience in ageing and plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daeuwel, W.; Kastner, B.; Nopper, H.

    2004-01-01

    The deregulation of the power generation industry has resulted in increased competitive pressure and is forcing operators to improve plant operating economy while maintaining high levels of plant safety. A key factor to meet this challenge is to apply a comprehensive plant life management (PLIM) approach which addresses all relevant ageing and degradation mechanisms regarding the safety concept, plant components and documentation, plant personnel, consumables, operations management system and administrative controls. For this reason, Framatome ANP has developed an integrated PLIM concept focussing on the safety concept, plant components and documentation. Representative examples for plant wide analyses are described in the following. The results of the analyses support the plant owner for taking the strategic decisions, involved in plant life extension (PLEX). (orig.)

  12. Rumination, Age, and Years of Experience: A Predictive Study of Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuffy, Moriel S.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a non-experimental design to examine whether job satisfaction, rumination, age and years of experience predict burnout among human service workers serving high-risk populations. The study also used a stepwise regression to assess whether job satisfaction, rumination, age, or years of experience predict burnout equally. Burnout was…

  13. Experience-Based Mitigation of Age-Related Performance Declines: Evidence from Air Traffic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ashley; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found age-related deficits in a variety of cognitive processes. However, some studies have demonstrated age-related sparing on tasks where individuals have substantial experience, often attained over many decades. Here, the authors examined whether decades of experience in a fast-paced demanding profession, air traffic…

  14. Using multilevel modeling to assess case-mix adjusters in consumer experience surveys in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Stubbe, Janine H; Hendriks, Michelle; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Delnoij, Diana M J; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2009-04-01

    Ratings on the quality of healthcare from the consumer's perspective need to be adjusted for consumer characteristics to ensure fair and accurate comparisons between healthcare providers or health plans. Although multilevel analysis is already considered an appropriate method for analyzing healthcare performance data, it has rarely been used to assess case-mix adjustment of such data. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether multilevel regression analysis is a useful tool to detect case-mix adjusters in consumer assessment of healthcare. We used data on 11,539 consumers from 27 Dutch health plans, which were collected using the Dutch Consumer Quality Index health plan instrument. We conducted multilevel regression analyses of consumers' responses nested within health plans to assess the effects of consumer characteristics on consumer experience. We compared our findings to the results of another methodology: the impact factor approach, which combines the predictive effect of each case-mix variable with its heterogeneity across health plans. Both multilevel regression and impact factor analyses showed that age and education were the most important case-mix adjusters for consumer experience and ratings of health plans. With the exception of age, case-mix adjustment had little impact on the ranking of health plans. On both theoretical and practical grounds, multilevel modeling is useful for adequate case-mix adjustment and analysis of performance ratings.

  15. Moving beyond resistance to restraint minimization: a case study of change management in aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan; Ostaszkiewicz, Joan; O'Connell, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes a quality initiative to minimize restraint in an Australian residential aged care facility. The process of improving practice is examined with reference to the literature on implementation of research into practice and change management. The differences between planned and emergent approaches to change management are discussed. The concepts of resistance and attractors are explored in relation to our experiences of managing the change process in this initiative. The importance of the interpersonal interactions that were involved in facilitating the change process is highlighted. Recommendations are offered for dealing with change management processes in clinical environments, particularly the need to move beyond an individual mind-set to a systems-based approach for quality initiatives in residential aged care.

  16. Successful Ageing and Multidimensional Poverty: The case of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Olivera Angulo, Javier; Tournier, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the determinants of Successful Ageing (SA) in a sample of 4,151 Peruvians aged between 65 and 80 years and living in poverty. A key contribution of this study is to combine the conceptual appeal of SA to measure well-being in old age with the multi-dimensional poverty counting approach developed in the economic literature. This setting allows for moving beyond the dichotomy of successful and usual ageing to take advantage of the full distribution of success along a set...

  17. Successful Ageing and Poverty: The case of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Olivera Angulo, Javier; Tournier, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the determinants of Successful Ageing (SA) in a sample of 4,151 Peruvians aged between 65 and 80 and living in poverty. The data correspond to the ESBAM survey, which is the baseline to evaluate the non-contributory public pension program Pension 65. A key contribution of this study is to combine the conceptual appealing of Successful Ageing to measure well-being in old-age with the multidimensional poverty counting approach developed in the economic literature. This s...

  18. First branchial cleft anomalies in children: Experience with 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanpeng; Zhao, Liming; Xu, Hongming; Li, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies (FBCA) are rare in the clinical setting, as they account for 1 to 8% of all branchial abnormalities. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between the fistula tract and facial nerve and the surgical method of FBCA. This retrospective study included 30 cases of FBCA in children managed from 2009 to 2016. All patients underwent surgery to remove the tract of the FBCA. We reviewed the clinical data of the patients to obtain their demographics and management. Thirty patients (11 male and 19 female) with anomalies of FBCA were diagnosed. The ages ranged from 1 to 13 years (median, 3 years). Twenty cases had a close relationship with the parotid gland. The facial nerve was identified in 20 of the 30 patients. The tract ran deep to the facial nerve in 3 cases, superficial to it in 21 cases, and passed between the branches of the nerve in 6 cases. The facial nerve was not identified in ten patients, as the tract was superficial to it. There were 2 cases of postoperative temporary facial paralysis (2/30, 6.7%). The symptoms gradually improved after one month, 1 case had permanent facial paralysis (1/30, 3.3%), and 1 case had postoperative recurrence. Complete excision of the tract is the only way to manage FBCA, and the course of the tracts vary and have different relationships with the facial nerve. There are 3 types: Superficial, deep to the facial nerve, and between the branches of the nerve. Therefore, surgical approaches differ among the various types, and careful preoperative planning and protecting the facial nerve during resection of the tract are essential.

  19. Learning from Experience: From Case-Based Teaching to Experience-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Martijn; Van Twist, Mark; Frissen, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Senior-level civil servants can learn a lot from methods such as theory-lectures and case-teaching, but there is another resource of knowledge and insight that can be utilized more for teaching public administration: the professional experience of participants in training programmes. This paper argues that it is possible to use the professional…

  20. Case-control analysis of paternal age and trisomic anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Souza, E; Morris, David Jackson; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether older paternal age increases the risk of fathering a pregnancy with Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), Klinefelter (XXY) or XYY syndrome.......To determine whether older paternal age increases the risk of fathering a pregnancy with Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), Klinefelter (XXY) or XYY syndrome....

  1. Interreligious transfers in the Middle Ages: the case of astrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Stuckrad, K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the discipline of astrology as an example of manifold interreligious contacts and transfers in the Middle Ages. Over against an image of the Middle Ages as being predominantly Christian and striving to violently suppress science, philosophy, and astrology, it is shown that in

  2. Appetite and falls: Old age and lived experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Mahler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Falling among older adults is a well-known public health problem but the association between falling and appetite is seldom studied although poor nutritional status is accepted as a risk factor for falls. On this background the aim of this study was to understand how older adults, who have fallen several times within a year, related their experiences of appetite as a phenomenon in everyday life. In narrative in-depth interviews, eight women and four men contributed with their stories. Using interpretative phenomenology the thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: appetite for food; appetite for social relations and appetite for influence. Eating was not trivial everyday routine and required self-regimentation. Meals were not an object of desire, but of discipline out of the wish to survive. Feelings, reflections and ambivalence were bound to the lack of appetite on food. The participants were oriented towards the forbidden, the delicious and to everyday food as a strengthener and as medicine. In their dependency on help, home was the framework for establishing social relations as means of social support. As well as family and neighbours, the significant others were persons on whom the participants were dependent. Personal relationships and mutual dependencies may ensure social security in lives characterised by contingency and maintain influence in daily life. Falling is both a dramatic and a trivial incident where life and death could be at stake. From this perspective, connectedness was prominent in all fall stories. The quest for influence and a sense of social connectedness was the incentive to re-enter local community arenas and to express solidarity. In health-care practice multi-factorial fall-prevention should be complemented with a multi-dimensional approach in order to balance the medical approach with humanistic and societal approaches towards fall-prevention.

  3. Synthesis of iron fertilization experiments : From the iron age in the age of enlightenment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, HJW; Boyd, PW; Coale, KH; Landry, MR; Tsuda, A; Assmy, P; Bakker, DCE; Bozec, Y; Barber, RT; Brzezinski, MA; Buesseler, KO; Boye, M; Croot, PL; Gervais, F; Gorbunov, MY; Harrison, PJ; Hiscock, WT; Laan, P; Lancelot, C; Law, CS; Levasseur, M; Marchetti, A; Millero, FJ; Nishioka, J; Nojiri, Y; van Oijen, T; Riebesell, U; Rijkenberg, MJA; Saito, H; Takeda, S; Timmermans, KR; Veldhuis, MJW; Waite, AM

    2005-01-01

    [1] Comparison of eight iron experiments shows that maximum Chl a, the maximum DIC removal, and the overall DIC/ Fe efficiency all scale inversely with depth of the wind mixed layer (WML) defining the light environment. Moreover, lateral patch dilution, sea surface irradiance, temperature, and

  4. Community Nurses' Experiences Regarding the Meaning and Promotion of Healthy Aging in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Choowattanapakorn, Tassana; Roxberg, Åsa; Asp, Margareta

    2018-03-01

    Describe community nurses' experiences regarding the meaning and promotion of healthy aging in northeastern Thailand. Data were collected through five focus group interviews with 36 community nurses in northeastern Thailand. Latent content analysis was conducted to analyze the data. Healthy aging was characterized by the interconnection of older persons, older persons' family members, and the community. Healthy aging was associated with two themes: "being strong" and "being a supporter and feeling supported." The nurses' experiences in promoting healthy aging were described by the themes "providing health assessment," "sharing knowledge," and "having limited resources." The findings of this study provide a deeper understanding of the meaning of healthy aging from a holistic viewpoint. Community nurses must pay attention to older persons and their surroundings when planning how to promote healthy aging. Person-centeredness should be applied in practice to promote healthy aging. The current findings contribute useful information that should help policy makers develop healthy aging strategies in Thailand.

  5. Terceira idade: nova identidade, reinvenção da velhice ou experiência geracional? Third age: new identity, reformulation of the old age or generational experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Rodrigues Freitas Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata das inovações acerca dos modos e das experiências de envelhecer que se vêm configurando nos últimos anos. Hábitos, imagens, crenças e condutas atreladas ao envelhecimento vêm-se alterando de forma significativa, determinando o surgimento do que se convenciona chamar de experiência da terceira idade. Mas, ainda que represente inovação e, sob muitos aspectos, seja descrita como uma reformulação extremamente positiva das possibilidades de envelhecer, o surgimento da terceira idade gera também questionamento e debate. Para compreender o estatuto desta experiência que surge no cenário contemporâneo, procederemos a um mapeamento da discussão acerca da terceira idade na literatura especializada, mais especificamente no que se refere a seu caráter de inovação em relação à identidade da velhice. Três hipóteses se destacam nesta análise: a primeira sugere que a terceira idade pode ser entendida como uma nova identidade, autônoma e diferenciada da identidade da velhice; a segunda, que seu surgimento pode ser compreendido como uma negação social da velhice propriamente dita; e, finalmente, a terceira hipótese supõe que as características da terceira idade são tributárias da experiência geracional de determinado grupo social. As principais hipóteses de entendimento da terceira idade são apresentadas e discutidas tendo em vista as possibilidades de criação, diversificação e inovação da experiência subjetiva.This paper deals with innovations on the ways and on the experience of aging set up in recent years. Habits, images, beliefs and behaviors related to aging have changed determining the emergence of what is usually called the third age experience. But although it represents innovation and, in many ways, is described as a very positive reformulation of the possibilities of aging, the emergence of the third age also generates questioning and debate. In order to understand the status of this

  6. Radiology changes in brucella spondylitis, experience with 26 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbassioun, K.; Amirjamshidi, A.; Taheri, B.

    2003-01-01

    Background/objective: brucellosis is an endemic zoonosis in the Middle East and despite all public health efforts it has not yet been eradicated in Iran. We aimed to highlight and categorize the imaging features of Brucella spondylitis. Material and method: twenty six cases of Brucella spondylitis were treated by the authors from 1982 up to 2003. The available imaging studies of all the cases are reviewed and include X-ray films, conventional myelography, computerized tomographic (CT Scan) and magnetic resonance imaging. Results: there were 21 male and 5 female patients with an age range of 5 to 62 years and the majority (60 %) in the 4 Th and 5 Th decades of life. Wright hemagglutination tests were positive in all cases. Plain x-ray films typically showed lysis of the end plates with osteophyte formation involving affected vertebrae, followed by narrowing of the inter spaces and destruction or collapse of the vertebral bodies in 7 cases. Myelography demonstrated various types of epidural filling defects and obstruction to the flow of contrast material in 10 cases. CT scan, available in 3 cases, showed erosion and cauliflower-like proliferation at the bony edges of the vertebral bodies and end plates. MRI findings varied depending upon the acute or chronic stages of the illness with hypo- or hyper-intense changes on T1 sequences, and primarily hyper-intense changes of T2 sequences in 8 cases. Conclusion: The findings in this series of patients suggest that imaging findings of Brucella spondylitis are scarcely specific. However when considering the medical history, place of origin of the patients, clinical presentation and laboratory findings, the early diagnosis of the illness may be possible before proceeding to surgical intervention

  7. Traumatic extradural haematomas in children: Experience with 62 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, C.; Pasqualin, A.; Feriotti, G.; Da Pian, R.

    1982-01-01

    Sixty-two children with traumatic extradural haematomas are considered. According to the clinical history presented - often atypical - and to the grade of neurological impairment, patients have divided into different clinical groups. Nearly 50% of patients sustained a minor injury, and 26% did not lose consciousness after trauma. Twenty-four per cent of patients did not show fractures on skull X-rays. Atypical location of haematoma was noted in 22 cases, mainly in the anterior fossa (19 cases). Sixty patients were operated on, while two patients were conservatively treated, owing to the limited size of the haematoamas and to the absence of neurological deficits. Associated brain lesions were discovered at surgery in 40% of cases. The overall mortality rate has been 17%, the operative mortality rate 14%. The morbidity rate has been 6%, with 3% of patients presenting severe disability. Morbidity and mortality have been shown to be affected by age - with better prognosis in patients under 10 years of age, by the clinical history presented, by the preoperative conditions, and, mainly, by the presence of a associated brain lesions. As regards location, frontal haematomas have shown a better prognosis and a slower course than convexity haematomas. Finally, prognosis of extradural haematomas in children has improved to some extent in the last years with the advent of the CT scan, possibly due to speed and accuracy of diagnosis. (Author)

  8. Damage in Creep Aging Process of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In creep age forming (CAF, large integral panel components of high-strength aluminum alloy can be shaped and strengthened under external elastic loading at an elevated temperature through creep deformation and age hardening, simultaneously. However, the high ribbed structure on panel may induce stress concentration, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and even damage evolution on the bending rib, leading to the difficulty in controlling forming precision and material properties. Therefore, the generation and evolution of damage are necessary to be considered in the design of CAF. Taking 7050 aluminum alloy as the case material, the continuous and interrupted creep aging tests at 165 °C and three stress levels (300, 325, and 350 MPa were conducted, and the corresponding material properties, precipitate, and damage microstructures were studied by mechanical properties tests, transmission electron microscope (TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM characterizations. With the increase of stress level, the creep deformation occurs easier, the precipitates grow up faster, the creep damage occurs earlier, the growth rate and the size of microvoids increase, the mechanical properties decrease more rapidly, and the dominant mechanism of creep fracture changes from shear to microvoid coalescence. To simulate creep aging behavior with damage, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM based model is calibrated and numerically implemented into ABAQUS solver via CREEP subroutine. The CAF of 7050 aluminum alloy panels with different height ribs were conducted by experiment and FE simulation. The forming process presents a typical stress relaxation phenomenon. The creep damage mainly occurs on the bending rib due to the severe stress concentration. With the increase of rib height, the creep strain and damage degree increase, but the springback decreases.

  9. First experiences with application of gadolinium-DTPA in infants and small children under two years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, R.; Lausch, N.; Buecheler, E.; Grzyska, U.

    1991-01-01

    The use of Gadolinium-DTPA as a paramagnetic contrast agent in MRI with adults and juveniles concerning brain and spinal cord pathology is well proven since years. In the FRG it is only introduced for children over two years of age. Therefore this report deales with the experience in four infants and small children under the age of two. They all were suffering from neurological tumors and got additional diagnostic information in three cases. Clinical side-effects like urticaria, vomiting or convulsions had not been observed nor had pathologic changes of the biochemical parameters been noticed. (orig./GDG) [de

  10. Casing drilling - first experience in Brazil; Casing drilling - primeira experiencia no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placido, Joao Carlos Ribeiro; Medeiros, Fernando; Lucena, Humberto; Medeiros, Joao Carlos Martins de; Costa, Vicente Abel Soares Rosa da; Silva, Paulo Roberto Correa da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Renato J.M. [Tesco, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the 'Casing Drilling' technology and its first experience in Brazil. This new process of casing while drilling was first developed to reduce costs. This system integrates the drilling process and casing running in one operation, promoting a more efficient well construction system, reducing trip time and costs of drill pipes and their transportation. Besides, this methodology intends to eliminate hole problems related to trouble zones with abnormal pressure with loss circulation, to overcome zones with wellbore instabilities, and to facilitate well control. Two companies have been identified using this technology: Tesco and Weatherford. However, there are differences between the techniques used by these companies, which are described in this paper. In the first experience in Brazil, it was decided to field test the technology developed by Tesco. This paper describes the preparation, the operation and the results of this first test. (author)

  11. The Relative Age Effect in Elite Sport: The French Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Nicolas; Boiche, Julie; Raspaud, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is considered a common phenomenon in elite sport. However, it has not been examined systematically in previous research, and the mechanisms likely to generate or to limit such an effect are little understood. This paper investigates the prevalence of the RAE in French professional championship-level players, taking…

  12. Population ageing and healthcare demand: The case of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovec, Jure; Tajnikar, Maks

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the consequences of demographic ageing on healthcare demand in Slovenia for primary care, secondary care, hospital day-care treatments, and hospitalisations. In the paper, we develop a model for making projections of the total number of treatments using the age-group projection method with the scenario approach. The model allows the number of treatments to be observed with respect to medical services, age groups and main disease groups. The results are presented for the cross-section years 2015, 2025 and 2035. The smallest increase in the number of treatments occurs in primary care, a larger one for secondary care, and the largest for hospital day-care services and hospitalisations (up to 29.9%). The structure of demand will also change. Demand for healthcare services for children and infants will decrease while demand for diseases associated with older age groups will increase, particularly for diseases of the circulatory system, eye and adnexa, and diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs. The results presented in this paper can help improve understanding of similar processes in other countries for total healthcare demand and for changes in the structure of demand. The results show that the healthcare system in Slovenia will face a major additional burden in the next 20 years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of age and experience on memory for visually presented music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinz, E J; Salthouse, T A

    1998-01-01

    Increased age is often associated with lower levels of performance in tests of memory for spatial information. The primary question in the current study was whether this relationship could be moderated as a function of one's relevant experience and/or knowledge. Stimulus materials consisted of short (7-11 note), visually presented musical melodies and structurally equivalent nonmusical stimuli. Participants (N = 128) were recruited from a wide range of age and experience levels. Although there were strong main effects of age and experience on memory for music, there was no evidence that the age-related differences in memory for these stimuli were smaller for individuals with moderate to large amounts of experience with music.

  14. Case-mix adjustment and the comparison of community health center performance on patient experience measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007-2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately.

  15. The Influence of Clinical Experience and Photographic Presentation on Age Assessment of Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Barbara Rubek; Linneberg, Allan; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    as the presentation of participants. OBJECTIVE: It is not known whether the clinical experience of the assessor or photographic presentation have an influence on the assessment of perceived age, which the present study aimed to investigate. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 460 women aged 25-93 years, 10...... body. Intra- and inter-assessor agreements between photographic presentations were similar among both assessor groups. The accuracy in age assessment was significantly influenced by the photographic presentation but not by the clinical experience of the assessor. The difference in the mean perceived...... both facial and whole-body photographs. A regression towards the mean age was seen. CONCLUSION: The assessment of perceived age was influenced by the photographic presentation but not by the clinical experience of the assessor....

  16. Older peoples experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home

    OpenAIRE

    Zamanzadeh Vahid; Pakpour Vahid; Rahmani Azad; Lorraine Chenoweth Lynnette; Mohammadi Eesa

    2016-01-01

    The decision to relocate to an aged care home can is important change in older adults live but little attention has been paid to their experiences of this decision. The study explored older people’s experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home. Data were obtained via semi-structured interviews with 17 participants, which were content analyzed. Results: Transition motives, ambiguity, participation in decision making and decision making meaning were four the...

  17. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.; Beebe, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that ionizing radiation accelerates natural aging has been under investigation at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission since 1959. Postmortem observations of morphologic and chemical changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, clinical laboratory tests, tissue changes, morbidity, and mortality have all been examined by ABCC investigators interested in this hypothesis. These studies have been beset with conceptual difficulties centered on the definition and measurement of aging. An empirical approach early led to the calculation of an index of physiologic age as a linear combination of age-related tests of various organ systems. Most studies have been negative but have not involved the large numbers that might be required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Mortality, however, has been examined on the basis of a large sample and over the period 1950-1972 had provided no support for the hypothesis of radiation-accelerated aging. Ionizing radiation dose, of course shorten human life, but its life-shortening effect appears to be the result of specific radiation-induced disease, especially neoplasms. The hypothesis is now much less attractive than it was 10-20 years ago but still has some value in stimulating research on aging. The experience of the A-bomb survivors provides an unusual opportunity for a definitive test of the hypothesis. (auth.)

  18. Nurse Case Managers' Experiences on Case Management for Long-term Hospitalization in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjoo Oh, Ph.D., RN, GNP

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The implementation of case management for long-term hospitalization use has been approved for controlling medical cost increases in other countries. But, introduction of the case management in Korea has created issues that hinder its effective operation. This qualitative study aimed to obtain further understanding of the issues surrounding the management of Medical Aid beneficiaries' use of long-term hospitalization from the case managers' perspectives and to provide suggestions for successful case management. Methods: Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Medical Aid case managers with 3 or more years of case management experience were recruited from urban, suburban, and rural regions. Data were collected through in-depth interviews: 12 nurse case managers participated in focus group interviews and 11 participated in individual one-on-one interviews. Results: Four major themes emerged: on-site obstacles that hinder work progress; going in an opposite direction; ambiguous position of case managers; and work-related emotions. Eleven subthemes were discovered: chasing potential candidates; becoming an enemy; discharging patients who have nowhere to go; welfare-centered national policies increasing medical costs; Medical Aid Program that encourages hospitalization; misuse of hospitalization; feeling limited; working without authority; fulfilling the expected role; fretting about social criticism; and feeling neglected and unprotected. Conclusion: The findings highlight the complexity and ambiguity of the issues faced by case managers. Successful management of Medical Aid resources requires the orchestrated efforts and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. More systematized support and resources for nurse case managers are essential to fully implement this nursing innovation in Korea. Keywords: case management, focus groups, hospitalization, qualitative research, vulnerable populations

  19. Gender, religion, and the experience of suffering: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K

    2013-12-01

    This article explores how gender and religious belief come together in an elderly woman's experience of suffering. It is based on qualitative research that explored experiences of suffering in a group of community-dwelling elders (80+) living in a North American city. We use the case study method to introduce themes that show suffering's uniqueness to the individual whose narrative we report, as well as similarity to themes that emerged in other participants' narratives. In this case, an elderly woman's gender and religious identities merge in her stories of suffering, which include the memory of a childhood disability and an incident of clergy abuse that occurred 70 years previously. A key finding in this paper is that key themes in her story of suffering, which are disablement and clergy abuse, resonate to the general themes of suffering found in our study, which are (1) threats to personal identity; (2) loss of a valued item, quality, or relationship; and (3) a lack of control over self or the circumstances of life.

  20. Tourist experiences of genocide sites: The case of Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpley Richard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dark tourism is not a new phenomenon. As long as people have been able to travel they have visited places associated with death, disaster and suffering. However, not only has the provision and consumption of dark tourism experiences become increasingly evident in recent years; so too has the academic study of the phenomenon. Nevertheless, despite the increasing attention paid to the subject, understanding of dark tourism remains relatively limited and theoretically fragile whilst, specifically, the significance of the consumption of or demand for dark tourism has enjoyed limited academic scrutiny. This is particularly the case with socalled 'genocide tourism' (visiting places of, or associated with, genocide, a form of dark tourism that is increasingly in evidence but the consumption of which is often misunderstood and, typically, considered to display voyeuristic tendencies on the part of tourists. Focusing on the Rwandan genocide, this paper addresses this issue. Locating genocide tourism within the context of dark tourism more generally, it reviews briefly how the Rwandan genocide is presented / memorialised before considering research into how tourists experience genocide memorial sites in Rwanda. Specifically, build­ing on an earlier study that explored visitor experiences of genocide sites in Rwanda as described in travel blogs, it considers the results of an exploratory survey into tourists' experiences of the Kigali Genocide Memorial, the country's principal memorial site. The results indicate unequivocally that tourists undertake their visits with positive, meaningful intent (albeit with trepidation and that, almost without exception, find it a challenging, powerfully emotional yet, ultimately, rewarding experience in that they begin to grasp the horror and suffering of the genocide and, indeed, leave with the desire to learn more about it.

  1. Do age-related increases in tip-of-the-tongue experiences signify episodic memory impairments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthouse, Timothy A; Mandell, Arielle R

    2013-12-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TOTs across different types of materials, and additional analyses suggested that these relations between age and TOT frequency were not attributable to the use of different response criteria or to different amounts of knowledge. Because statistical control of a measure of episodic memory had little effect on the relation between age and TOT frequency, age-related increases in TOTs and age-related decreases in episodic memory appear to be at least partially independent phenomena.

  2. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators

  3. Strategy in the Robotic Age: A Case for Autonomous Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    enabling technology that augments human performance, such as exoskeleton suits, and other complementary fields that make robotics function...philosophy of maneuver warfare with new technologies from the Robotic Age, such as unmanned systems and exoskeleton suits, to present a new warfighting...and Brimley, “20YY,” 12. 49 the exoskeleton suit, but rather that the full benefit of autonomous warfare will be achieved by leveraging mass and

  4. Ageing degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plants: lessons learned from operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, M.; Zerger, B.; Duchac, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents main results of a comprehensive study performed by the European Clearinghouse on Operating Experience Feedback of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with the support of IRSN (Institut de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection) and GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH). Physical ageing mechanisms of Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) that eventually lead to ageing related systems and components failures at nuclear power plants were the main focus of this study. The analysis of ageing related events involved operating experience reported by NPP operators in France, Germany, USA and to the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System on operating experience for the past 20 years. A list of relevant ageing related events was populated. Each ageing related event contained in the list was analyzed and results of analysis were summarized for each ageing degradation mechanism which appeared to be the dominant contributor or direct cause. This paper provides insights into ageing related operating experience as well as recommendations to deal with the physical ageing of nuclear power plant SSC important to safety. (authors)

  5. Burnout Levels of Handball Players with Respect to Age, Gender and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toros, Turhan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate burnout levels of handball players in terms of age, gender and experience. In this study, 116 female and 128 male, totally 244 handball players with the mean age 22.39 ± 1.98 year participated voluntarily. Maslach Burnout Inventory that originally developed by Maslach and Jackson (1981) and adapted to…

  6. Adolescents' Definitions of Bullying: The Contribution of Age, Gender, and Experience of Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Hollie; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda; Dolphin, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to examine adolescents' definitions of bullying in a nationally representative sample of adolescents in Ireland. Definitions of bullying were examined according to age, gender, and bullying experiences. A sample of 4358 adolescents aged 12-19 years (M = 14.99 years, SD = 1.63) provided their definitions of…

  7. Age differences in volunteering experiences: an examination of generativity and meaning in life

    OpenAIRE

    Fyffe, Ian Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine differences in volunteering experiences between middle-aged and older aged persons participating in the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Erik Erikson’s (1959/1994) concept of generativity is applied in order to test hypotheses pertaining to age-related associations between a pre-existing community volunteer role and meaning, self-esteem and meaning as well as sense of belonging and meaning. Data were utilized from the Older Olympic Volunteer Project ...

  8. Case detection rates of impetigo by gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriakis, Kyriakos P; Tadros, Aline; Dimou, Anastasia; Karamanou, Marianna; Banaka, Fotini; Alexoudi, Iliana

    2012-06-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out (impetigo cases n=265, relative prevalence 5.3%, among 50,237 outpatients). Males predominated in childhood, adulthood and overall (OR 2.0) and exhibited a more protracted susceptibility. Impetigo was more prevalent in summer months. Lesions were located on the head and neck (65.4%), followed by 19.6% on an upper extremity and by 7.5% each on the trunk and a lower extremity.

  9. Nurse Case Managers' Experiences on Case Management for Long-term Hospitalization in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jinjoo; Oh, Seieun

    2017-12-01

    The implementation of case management for long-term hospitalization use has been approved for controlling medical cost increases in other countries. But, introduction of the case management in Korea has created issues that hinder its effective operation. This qualitative study aimed to obtain further understanding of the issues surrounding the management of Medical Aid beneficiaries' use of long-term hospitalization from the case managers' perspectives and to provide suggestions for successful case management. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Medical Aid case managers with 3 or more years of case management experience were recruited from urban, suburban, and rural regions. Data were collected through in-depth interviews: 12 nurse case managers participated in focus group interviews and 11 participated in individual one-on-one interviews. Four major themes emerged: on-site obstacles that hinder work progress; going in an opposite direction; ambiguous position of case managers; and work-related emotions. Eleven subthemes were discovered: chasing potential candidates; becoming an enemy; discharging patients who have nowhere to go; welfare-centered national policies increasing medical costs; Medical Aid Program that encourages hospitalization; misuse of hospitalization; feeling limited; working without authority; fulfilling the expected role; fretting about social criticism; and feeling neglected and unprotected. The findings highlight the complexity and ambiguity of the issues faced by case managers. Successful management of Medical Aid resources requires the orchestrated efforts and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. More systematized support and resources for nurse case managers are essential to fully implement this nursing innovation in Korea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Bypass iliac-mesenteric-cava inpatients under two years of age. Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva López Noé

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the treatment of portal hypertension in pediatric patients, some type of porto-systemic shunt is indicated, which is an unusual surgical procedure in patients under two years of age, due to the low incidence of this disease at this age and the increase in the number of complications. Objective: We present our experience and results with this procedure in patients under two years of age seen in the Hepatobiliopancreatic general surgery service at Instituto Nacional de PediatríaDiscussion: The causes of portal hypertension in children are varied. Among the extrahepatic causes, the most common is cavernomatous portal degeneration. Children with portal hypertension under two years have severe symptoms such as recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding or anemia; others have hypersplenism data. In many cases medical management is useless and a surgical procedure require such as a portosystemic shunt in order to decrease the size of varicose esophageal veins and prevent bleeding that threatens the patient’s life. Conclusion: The iliac-mesenteric-caval shunt in patients under two years is a feasible alternative that improves the clinical status of the patient, reducing the risk of bleeding. However long-term studies are needed to determine the outcome of these patients. Keywords: Iliac-mesenteric-caval shunt, portal hypertension.

  11. ‘The engine just started coughing!’ – Exploring endurance athletes’ experience of aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora; Ryba, Tatiana; Nesti, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This research examines male endurance athletes’ experience of aging and/or reaching the limits of athletic development. More specifically, the current study aimed to explore how meanings attached to these experiences are connected with athletes’ career decision-making and possible athletic...... retirement. Within athletic career research, aging is conceptualized as a normative factor of athletic retirement and it is related to the discontinuation of competitive sport involvement. The dominant cultural narrative of aging in most Western societies is one of decline and loss of control over...

  12. Evaluation of Cases Admitted for Age Estimation to Forensic Medicine Department Between 2006 and 2010 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yildirim

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion age determination continues to be one of the important issues of forensic medicine. In cases of age determination, more accurate estimates can be accomplished when radiologically determined age is considered in conjunction with clinical findings such as dental, mental, and psychologic development. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 56-61

  13. A middle aged man with Caroli's disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Sarker

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Caroli's disease (CD is a rare congenital abnormality characterized by non-obstructive dilatation of intra hepatic bile ducts, which may be complicated by stone formation, recurrent cholangitis, biliary abscess and higher risk for biliary malignancy. We report a 37-year-old man with recurrent bouts of upper abdominal pain, high grade pyrexia, mild icterus with normal liver function tests who was diagnosed as a case of Caroli's disease. The laboratory studies confirmed Caroli' s disease with a SOL in liver suggestive of liver abscess and the patient received broad spectrum antibiotics with anaerobic and amoebicidal coverage. With 14 days course of antibiotics, he gradually recovered from his symptoms.

  14. Surgical treatment of traumatic tricuspid insufficiency: experience in 13 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Luo, Guo-Hua; Sun, Han-Song; Xu, Jian-Ping; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2010-12-01

    Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency (TTI) is uncommon and surgical experience is limited. We report our surgical experience with TTI in 13 patients. From January 2000 through March 2008, we operated on 13 patients with TTI (10 men 3 women; mean age, 39.8 ± 10.5 years). The intervals from trauma to diagnosis and from trauma to surgery averaged 37.4 and 54.4 months, respectively. At operation, the mechanism of TTI was due to anterior chordal rupture in 8, anterior papillary muscle rupture in 3, rupture of anterior papillary muscle and chordae in 1, and anterior leaflet defect in 1. In 7 patients the annulus was dilated. Valve repair was successful in 13 patients. No early or late deaths occurred. Severe hemolysis occurred in 1 patient after tricuspid and mitral valve repairs. At follow-up extending to 9.5 years, 9 patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I, and 4 were in class II. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated no or trivial residual regurgitation in 7 patients, mild regurgitation in 4, and mild-to-moderate regurgitation in 2. A significant decrease of the right ventricular end-diastolic dimension (37.7 ± 9.7 vs 20.7 ± 4.6 mm; p tricuspid valve repair. Early surgical intervention should be emphasized to achieve good functional results and preserve the right ventricular function. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Age-related change in emotional experience in a sample of Chinese adults: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhanbiao; Wang, Li; Li, Huanhuan

    2009-08-01

    Age-related change in emotional experience was explored in a Chinese community sample. 968 healthy adults (483 women, 485 men) ranging in age from 18 to 66 years (M = 37.5, SD = 12.3) took part. The frequency of experiencing negative and positive emotion was self-reported on the general dimension scales of Positive and Negative Affect Scale-Expanded Form (PANAS-X). Regression analyses indicated that the frequency of negative affect decreased with age, and the frequency of positive affect was not significantly associated with age. These findings are similar to those found in Western samples, as discussed in relation to socioemotional selectivity theory.

  16. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Marta C.; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A.; Collett, Jacquelene M.; Offiah, Amaka C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  17. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Marta C.; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A.; Collett, Jacquelene M.; Offiah, Amaka C. [Western Bank, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  18. Caries Experience in Children with and without Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Juliana de Aguiar; Cabral, Renata Nunes; Leal, Soraya Coelho

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the caries experience of children with and without molar-incisor hypomineralisation (MIH). A case-control study was designed in which 130 children aged between 7 and 13 years with MIH (cases) were matched with 130 children without the condition (controls) according to age, sex, and school. Dental caries and MIH were assessed using the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST) and European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) criteria, respectively, by three examiners. CAST was converted into DMFT/dmft; the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to analyse whether dmft/DMFT was influenced by the severity of MIH. Associations between MIH and dental caries were analysed at child and tooth levels: between and within subjects, respectively. To correlate MIH severity and the occurrence of dental caries, the Cochran-Armitage test was used. The mean age of the children was 9.63 ± 1.29 years. The mean dmft for cases was 1.23 ± 1.99 and for controls 1.71 ± 2.22 (p > 0.05). For the DMFT, the mean scores for cases and controls were 0.45 ± 0.90 and 0.07 ± 0.25, respectively (p MIH than in those without the condition. The same pattern was seen for the within-subject analysis. It was observed that the increase in MIH severity resulted in more teeth being affected by dentine carious lesions (p = 0.0003). Children with MIH presented a higher experience of caries in the permanent dentition than those without the condition. MIH was considered a risk factor for caries development. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Context Influences on the Subjective Experience of Aging: The Impact of Culture and Domains of Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Erica L; Hess, Thomas M; Kornadt, Anna E; Rothermund, Klaus; Fung, Helene; Voss, Peggy

    2017-08-01

    Attitudes about aging influence how people feel about their aging and affect psychological and health outcomes in later life. Given cross-cultural variability in such attitudes, the subjective experience of aging (e.g., subjective age [SA]) may also vary, potentially accounting for culture-specific patterns of aging-related outcomes. Our study explored cultural variation in SA and its determinants. American (N = 569), Chinese (N = 492), and German (N = 827) adults aged 30-95 years completed a questionnaire that included instruments measuring basic demographic information, SA, beliefs about thresholds of old age, control over life changes, and age dependency of changes in eight different life domains (i.e., family, work). Analyses revealed consistency across cultures in the domain-specificity of SA, but differences in the amount of shared variance across domains (e.g., Chinese adults exhibited greater homogeneity across domains than did Americans and Germans). Cultural differences were also observed in levels of SA in some domains, which were attenuated by domain-specific beliefs (e.g., control). Interestingly, beliefs about aging accounted for more cultural variation in SA than did sociodemographic factors (e.g., education). Our results demonstrate that subjective perceptions of aging and everyday functioning may be best understood from a perspective focused on context (i.e., culture, life domain). Given its important relation to functioning, examination of cross-cultural differences in the subjective experience of aging may highlight factors that determine variations in aging-related outcomes that then could serve as targets of culture-specific interventions promoting well-being in later life. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Laryngeal Schwannoma: A Case Presentation and Review of the Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romak, Jonathan J; Neel, H Bryan; Ekbom, Dale C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the nature of laryngeal schwannomas through review of the experience of a single institution during a 104-year period. This is a retrospective case series. The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota clinical and surgical pathology database was reviewed for the years 1985-2011. Four cases of laryngeal schwannoma were identified. These cases were pooled with a previously published series of laryngeal schwannomas treated at our institution between 1907 and 1986. The characteristics of all 11 cases were studied, and relevant literature was reviewed. A total of 11 cases of schwannoma of the larynx were identified. The mean age at presentation was 48 years (range 12-73 years). The most common presenting symptoms were dysphonia and dysphagia. The most frequently involved primary site was the false vocal fold (six patients), followed by the aryepiglottic fold (three), epiglottis (two), subglottis (two), ventricle (one), true vocal fold (one) and postcricoid region (one). The mean maximal tumor diameter was 2.5 cm. In all but one case, surgical excision was curative with no recurrence during recorded follow up ranging from 1 to 17 years. Laryngeal schwannomas, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngeal tumors. They occur most frequently in the false vocal fold and present most commonly with dysphonia and/or dysphagia. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cancer patient experience, hospital performance and case mix: evidence from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gary A; Saunders, Catherine L; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

      This study aims to explore differences between crude and case mix-adjusted estimates of hospital performance with respect to the experience of cancer patients. This study analyzed the English 2011/2012 Cancer Patient Experience Survey covering all English National Health Service hospitals providing cancer treatment (n = 160). Logistic regression analysis was used to predict hospital performance for each of the 64 evaluative questions, adjusting for age, gender, ethnic group and cancer diagnosis. The degree of reclassification was explored across three categories (bottom 20%, middle 60% and top 20% of hospitals). There was high concordance between crude and adjusted ranks of hospitals (median Kendall's τ = 0.84; interquartile range: 0.82-0.88). Across all questions, a median of 5.0% (eight) of hospitals (interquartile range: 3.8-6.4%; six to ten hospitals) moved out of the extreme performance categories after case mix adjustment. In this context, patient case mix has only a small impact on measured hospital performance for cancer patient experience.

  2. Construction of Spectral Discoloration Model for Red Lead Pigment by Aging Test and Simulating Degradation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of spectral discoloration model, based on aging test and simulating degradation experiment, was proposed to detect the aging degree of red lead pigment in ancient murals and to reproduce the spectral data supporting digital restoration of the ancient murals. The degradation process of red lead pigment under the aging test conditions was revealed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrophotometer. The simulating degradation experiment was carried out by proportionally mixing red lead and lead dioxide with referring to the results of aging test. The experimental result indicated that the pure red lead was gradually turned into black lead dioxide, and the amount of tiny particles of the aging sample increased faced with aging process. Both the chroma and lightness of red lead pigment decreased with discoloration, and its hue essentially remains unchanged. In addition, the spectral reflectance curves of the aging samples almost started rising at about 550 nm with the inflection moving slightly from about 570 nm to 550 nm. The spectral reflectance of samples in long- and in short-wavelength regions was fitted well with the logarithmic and linear function. The spectral discoloration model was established, and the real aging red lead pigment in Dunhuang murals was measured and verified the effectiveness of the model.

  3. Project Experiences in Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment. Report of a Technical Meeting on Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-08-01

    Research reactors have played an important role in several scientific fields for around 60 years: in the development of nuclear science and technology; in the valuable generation of radioisotopes for various applications; and in the development of human resources and skills. Moreover, research reactors have been effectively utilized to support sustainable development in more than 60 countries worldwide. More than half of all operating research reactors are now over 40 years old, with many exceeding their originally conceived design life. The majority of operating research reactors face challenges due to the negative impacts of component and system ageing, which manifest in a number of forms. This situation was highlighted by a serious medical isotope supply crisis which peaked in mid-2010, when several major producing reactors underwent prolonged shutdowns due to extensive necessary overhauls of various systems. Several facilities have established a proactive systematic approach to managing ageing or mitigating its impact on safety and availability of isotopes. Others have tried to prevent or remedy the drawbacks of ageing on a case by case basis. Overall, a large body of knowledge related to ageing issues exists in many Member States. Collecting and sharing this information within the research reactor community can provide a solid foundation to develop a more systematic approach — that is, an ageing management programme to prevent negative consequences of ageing on the safety, and the operability and lifetime of operating, or even future, reactors. It may also help organizations to manage research reactors that have been in an extended shutdown state by ensuring that any required systems are operated and maintained in a safe manner prior to final decommissioning and disposal of fuel to safe storage facilities. Sharing experiences from projects undertaken to refurbish or replace equipment and systems, satisfy safety and regulatory requirements, improve

  4. Project Experiences in Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment. Report of a Technical Meeting on Research Reactor Ageing Management, Modernization and Refurbishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    Research reactors have played an important role in several scientific fields for around 60 years: in the development of nuclear science and technology; in the valuable generation of radioisotopes for various applications; and in the development of human resources and skills. Moreover, research reactors have been effectively utilized to support sustainable development in more than 60 countries worldwide. More than half of all operating research reactors are now over 40 years old, with many exceeding their originally conceived design life. The majority of operating research reactors face challenges due to the negative impacts of component and system ageing, which manifest in a number of forms. This situation was highlighted by a serious medical isotope supply crisis which peaked in mid-2010, when several major producing reactors underwent prolonged shutdowns due to extensive necessary overhauls of various systems. Several facilities have established a proactive systematic approach to managing ageing or mitigating its impact on safety and availability of isotopes. Others have tried to prevent or remedy the drawbacks of ageing on a case by case basis. Overall, a large body of knowledge related to ageing issues exists in many Member States. Collecting and sharing this information within the research reactor community can provide a solid foundation to develop a more systematic approach — that is, an ageing management programme to prevent negative consequences of ageing on the safety, and the operability and lifetime of operating, or even future, reactors. It may also help organizations to manage research reactors that have been in an extended shutdown state by ensuring that any required systems are operated and maintained in a safe manner prior to final decommissioning and disposal of fuel to safe storage facilities. Sharing experiences from projects undertaken to refurbish or replace equipment and systems, satisfy safety and regulatory requirements, improve

  5. Do Age-Related Increases in Tip-of-the-Tongue Experiences Signify Episodic Memory Impairments?

    OpenAIRE

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Mandell, Arielle R.

    2013-01-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TO...

  6. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernias: Experience after 200 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Repair of hiatal hernias has been performed traditionally via open laparotomy or thoracotomy. Since first laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair in 1992, this method had a growing popularity and today it is the standard approach in experienced centers specialized for minimally invasive surgery. Objective. In the current study we present our experience after 200 consecutive laparoscopic hiatal hernia repairs. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 200 patients who underwent elective laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Clinic for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2004 to December 2013. Results. Hiatal hernia types included 108 (54% patients with type I, 30 (15% with type III, 62 (31% with giant paraesophageal hernia, while 27 (13.5% patients presented with a chronic gastric volvulus. There were a total of 154 (77% Nissen fundoplications. In 26 (13% cases Nissen procedure was combined with esophageal lengthening procedure (Collis-Nissen, and in 17 (8.5% Toupet fundoplications was performed. Primary retroesophageal crural repair was performed in 164 (82% cases, Cleveland Clinic Foundation suture modification in 27 (13.5%, 4 (2% patients underwent synthetic mesh hiatoplasty, 1 (0.5% primary repair reinforced with pledgets, and 4 (2% autologous fascia lata graft reinforcement. Poor result with anatomic and symptomatic recurrence (indication for revisional surgery was detected in 5 patients (2.7%. Conclusion. Based on the result analysis, we found that laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair was a technically challenging but feasible technique, associated with good to excellent postoperative outcomes comparable to the best open surgery series.

  7. Musical Experience and the Aging Auditory System: Implications for Cognitive Abilities and Hearing Speech in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Strait, Dana L.; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Much of our daily communication occurs in the presence of background noise, compromising our ability to hear. While understanding speech in noise is a challenge for everyone, it becomes increasingly difficult as we age. Although aging is generally accompanied by hearing loss, this perceptual decline cannot fully account for the difficulties experienced by older adults for hearing in noise. Decreased cognitive skills concurrent with reduced perceptual acuity are thought to contribute to the difficulty older adults experience understanding speech in noise. Given that musical experience positively impacts speech perception in noise in young adults (ages 18–30), we asked whether musical experience benefits an older cohort of musicians (ages 45–65), potentially offsetting the age-related decline in speech-in-noise perceptual abilities and associated cognitive function (i.e., working memory). Consistent with performance in young adults, older musicians demonstrated enhanced speech-in-noise perception relative to nonmusicians along with greater auditory, but not visual, working memory capacity. By demonstrating that speech-in-noise perception and related cognitive function are enhanced in older musicians, our results imply that musical training may reduce the impact of age-related auditory decline. PMID:21589653

  8. Musical experience and the aging auditory system: implications for cognitive abilities and hearing speech in noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Parbery-Clark

    Full Text Available Much of our daily communication occurs in the presence of background noise, compromising our ability to hear. While understanding speech in noise is a challenge for everyone, it becomes increasingly difficult as we age. Although aging is generally accompanied by hearing loss, this perceptual decline cannot fully account for the difficulties experienced by older adults for hearing in noise. Decreased cognitive skills concurrent with reduced perceptual acuity are thought to contribute to the difficulty older adults experience understanding speech in noise. Given that musical experience positively impacts speech perception in noise in young adults (ages 18-30, we asked whether musical experience benefits an older cohort of musicians (ages 45-65, potentially offsetting the age-related decline in speech-in-noise perceptual abilities and associated cognitive function (i.e., working memory. Consistent with performance in young adults, older musicians demonstrated enhanced speech-in-noise perception relative to nonmusicians along with greater auditory, but not visual, working memory capacity. By demonstrating that speech-in-noise perception and related cognitive function are enhanced in older musicians, our results imply that musical training may reduce the impact of age-related auditory decline.

  9. Musical experience and the aging auditory system: implications for cognitive abilities and hearing speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Strait, Dana L; Anderson, Samira; Hittner, Emily; Kraus, Nina

    2011-05-11

    Much of our daily communication occurs in the presence of background noise, compromising our ability to hear. While understanding speech in noise is a challenge for everyone, it becomes increasingly difficult as we age. Although aging is generally accompanied by hearing loss, this perceptual decline cannot fully account for the difficulties experienced by older adults for hearing in noise. Decreased cognitive skills concurrent with reduced perceptual acuity are thought to contribute to the difficulty older adults experience understanding speech in noise. Given that musical experience positively impacts speech perception in noise in young adults (ages 18-30), we asked whether musical experience benefits an older cohort of musicians (ages 45-65), potentially offsetting the age-related decline in speech-in-noise perceptual abilities and associated cognitive function (i.e., working memory). Consistent with performance in young adults, older musicians demonstrated enhanced speech-in-noise perception relative to nonmusicians along with greater auditory, but not visual, working memory capacity. By demonstrating that speech-in-noise perception and related cognitive function are enhanced in older musicians, our results imply that musical training may reduce the impact of age-related auditory decline.

  10. Oviposition preference hierarchy in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera, Tephritidae): influence of female age and experience

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim-Bravo, Iara S.; Fernandes, Odair A.; Bortoli, Sérgio A.; Zucoloto, Fernando S.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of two factors, age and previous experience, on the oviposition hierarchy preference of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824) females was studied. Two populations were analyzed: one reared in laboratory during 17 years and the other captured in nature. In the first experiment the oviposition preference for four fruits, papaya, orange, banana and apple was tested at the beginning of oviposition period and 20 days past. The results showed that the wild females as much the laborator...

  11. Repair of pectus deformities: Experience and outcome in 317 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geric, O.; Gurkok, S.; Gozubuyuk, A.; Dakak, M.; Caytak, H.; Yucels, O.

    2006-01-01

    The most common congenital chest wall reformatories are pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum. Various techniques have been described for correction of pectus deformities. We describe our experience with surgical repair of pectus deformity (PD) in adults, including our new techniques, which uses a restorable plaque for fixation of the sternum. We reviewed the records of 317 patients who underwent surgical correction of PD between October 1997 and December 2005. All of the patients were male and the median age was 21.3 years (range 16-32 years). Of 317 patients, the type of deformity was a pectus excavatum in 230 patients and a pectus carination in 87 of the patients. Four different operative techniques were used. There were no intraoperative deaths or major perioperative morbidity. The complications rate was 17%. Overall mean hospital stay was 14.25 days. In 208 patients who underwent a mid-term outpatient follow up (mean, 8 months), there was no recurrence. Patient satisfaction was excellent in 234 patients, good in 79 patients and fair in 4 patients. The majority of patients with pectus deformity have been operated on during childhood; therefore there is limited published information about the correction of pectus cranium deformation in adults. The most important point in pectus correction is to achieve proper and long term stability of the sternum following osteotomy. Various techniques can be used for this purpose. (author)

  12. Age at placement, adoption experience and adult adopted people's contact with their adoptive and birth mothers: an attachment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, D

    2001-09-01

    Adoption holds particular interest for attachment researchers. Although children adopted as babies experience almost continuous care by their adoptive parents, older placed children experience at least one major change of caregiver when they join their adoptive family. Moreover, in the majority of cases, older placed children have generally suffered a pre-adoption history of abuse, neglect and/or rejection. It is now being recognized that older placed children's attachment histories and internal working models (IWMs) established in relationship with their initial carers remain active in relationship with their new carers. Transactional models have helped both researchers and practitioners to understand the dynamics of parent-child relationships in cases where insecure children with histories of neglect, abuse and rejection find themselves in new caregiving environments. The present study examines the childhood experiences of adult adopted people and their current levels of contact with their adoptive mothers, and in cases where people had searched for and found a birth relative, current levels of contact with their birth mother. Although no information was collected on the adopted adult's pre-placement history, age at placement was used as a proxy measure to examine whether older placed children reported different adoption experiences and what their current levels of contact were with their adoptive and birth mothers. The findings show that age at placement was associated with adopted people's reported experiences of being adopted and current rates of contact with their adoptive and birth mothers, with those placed at older ages most likely to report that they (1) did not feel they belonged in their adoptive families while growing up, (2) did not feel loved by their adoptive mother, (3) were least likely to remain in high-frequency contact with their adoptive mother, and (4) were least likely to remain in high-frequency contact with their birth mother. An

  13. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system

  14. Nurses aged over 50 years and their experiences of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendon, Jill; Walker, Leonie

    2013-10-01

    The Late Career Nurse project examined views and characteristics of nurses working in New Zealand who were born before 1960. This paper focuses on the experiences of such nurses who undertake shift work. The mean age of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged 50 years or over. While there is substantial literature on the phenomenon and consequences of the ageing nursing workforce, little is known of the particular experiences of nurses aged over 50 years who work shifts. An anonymous online survey was emailed to eligible nurse New Zealand Nurses Organisation members aged over 50 years in February 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3273 responses received were undertaken. Over 45% of respondents worked shifts or flexible hours. While shift work suited many, others noted deleterious effects on family and social relationships, physical and mental health (notably sleep patterns and fatigue), and decreasing tolerance for shift work as they age. Poor scheduling practices were particularly detrimental. Worldwide, workforce ageing means strategies are required to retain older nurses in the workforce. Improved scheduling practices including increasing access to flexible and part time work hours, and development of resources on coping with shift work are recommended. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Toward Reducing Ageism: PEACE (Positive Education about Aging and Contact Experiences) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sheri R

    2018-03-19

    The population of older adults is growing worldwide. Negative ageism (negative attitudes and behavior toward older adults) is a serious international concern that negatively influences not only older adults but also individuals across the age continuum. This article proposes and examines the application of an integrative theoretical model across empirical evidence in the literature on ageism in psychology, medicine, social work, and sociology. The proposed Positive Education about Aging and Contact Experiences (PEACE) model focuses on 2 key contributing factors expected to reduce negative ageism: (a) education about aging including facts on aging along with positive older role models that dispel negative and inaccurate images of older adulthood; and (b) positive contact experiences with older adults that are individualized, provide or promote equal status, are cooperative, involve sharing of personal information, and are sanctioned within the setting. These 2 key contributing factors have the potential to be interconnected and work together to reduce negative stereotypes, aging anxiety, prejudice, and discrimination associated with older adults and aging. This model has implications for policies and programs that can improve the health and well-being of individuals, as well as expand the residential, educational, and career options of individuals across the age continuum.

  16. Exploring the Experiences of Deportation and Reintegration of Aging Deported Men in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodram, Cheryl-Ann Sarita

    2018-01-01

    Older deported men in Trinidad and Tobago face unique challenges in reintegrating into life after deportation. This qualitative study examined the intersection of aging and deportation to identify factors that affect the reintegration experiences of aging deported men. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 deported men over the age of 50 and were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Findings show that reintegration was influenced by complex intrapersonal, subsistence, and social challenges. The findings in this study point to the need to expand social support networks available to aging deported men and provide greater opportunities for them to meet their economic and subsistence needs, and the need to strengthen strategies to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with aging deported populations.

  17. Experimenting from a Distance in the Case of Rutherford Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grober, S.; Vetter, M.; Eckert, B.; Jodl, H. -J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rutherford scattering experiment plays a central role in working out atomic models in physics and chemistry. Nevertheless, the experiment is rarely performed at school or in introductory physics courses at university. Therefore, we realized this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL), i.e. the experiment is set up in reality and…

  18. Software Engineering Researchers' Attitudes on Case Studies and Experiments: an Exploratory Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Tofan, Dan; Galster, Matthias; Avgeriou, Paris; Weyns, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Case studies and experiments are research methods frequently applied in empirical software engineering. Experiments are well-­understood and their value as an empirical method is recognized. On the other hand, there seem to be different opinions on what constitutes a case study, and about the value of case studies as a thorough research method. Aim: We aim at exploring the attitudes of software engineering researchers on case studies and experiments. Furthermore, we investigate ho...

  19. Improving the applicant experience in the summer recruitment process of a case company

    OpenAIRE

    Rantanen, Inka

    2015-01-01

    This case study was based on the need to improve the case company’s summer recruitment process as an applicant experience. The research and develop aims were creating a framework for research by combining experience management to recruitment and selection in theory, analysing the current state of the applicant experience, and generating grounded development suggestions for enhancing it. Qualitative case study was used as the research method to meet the need to research experiences related to ...

  20. False Memories in Children and Adults: Age, Distinctiveness, and Subjective Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Simona; Qin, Jianjian; Goodman, Gail S.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated developmental trends associated with the Deese/Roediger-McDermott false-memory effect, the role of distinctive information, and subjective experience of true/false memories. Found that 5-year-olds recalled more false memories than adults but no age differences in recognition of critical lures. Distinctive information reduced false…

  1. Impact of Vocational Interests, Previous Academic Experience, Gender and Age on Situational Judgement Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schripsema, Nienke R.; van Trigt, Anke M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-01-01

    Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) are increasingly implemented in medical school admissions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of vocational interests, previous academic experience, gender and age on SJT performance. The SJT was part of the selection process for the Bachelor's degree programme in Medicine at University of Groningen, the…

  2. Impact of vocational interests, previous academic experience, gender and age on Situational Judgement Test performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schripsema, Nienke R.; Trigt, van Anke M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) are increasingly implemented in medical school admissions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of vocational interests, previous academic experience, gender and age on SJT performance. The SJT was part of the selection process for the Bachelor's degree

  3. The Advocacy Experiences of Parents of Elementary Age, Twice-Exceptional Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnoy, Kevin D.; Swoszowski, Nicole C.; Newman, Jane L.; Floyd, Amanda; Jones, Parrish; Byrne, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    For many parents, successfully advocating for their twice-exceptional child can be intimidating and overwhelming. Using grounded theory, we conducted a study with parents (n = 8) of elementary age, twice-exceptional children to learn about their advocacy experiences. Findings revealed that parents simultaneously advocated for their child's…

  4. Ethics and Retail Management Professionals: An Examination of Age, Education, and Experience Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Cavico, Frank J.; McCartney, Timothy O.; DiPaolo, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical maturity and behavior are of great concern to all educators, firms, and investors, and even more so in a recession. This research surveyed managers and employees in the retail environment to measure their Personal Business Ethics Scores (PBES) to see if age, education, and management experience makes a difference in making more ethical…

  5. How Do People with Learning Disabilities Experience and Make Sense of the Ageing Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Gayle; Martin, Carol; Robbins, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Not enough is currently known about how people with learning disabilities experience and understand the ageing process. This is particularly important as the population of older people with learning disabilities is growing due to increased life expectancy. This article draws on the first author's doctoral research study, which aimed to…

  6. Age vs. experience : evaluation of a video feedback intervention for newly licensed teen drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    This project examines the effects of age, experience, and video-based feedback on the rate and type of safety-relevant events captured on video event : recorders in the vehicles of three groups of newly licensed young drivers: : 1. 14.5- to 15.5-year...

  7. [Emotional experience and regulation across the adult lifespan: comparative analysis in three age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-González, María; Izal Fernández de Trocóniz, María; Montorio Cerrato, Ignacio; Losada Baltar, Andrés

    2008-11-01

    The studies focused on age-related differences in emotional experience are still scarce, and most of them have been conducted with North-American samples. This study explores the presence of age-related differences in some facets of emotional experience (subjective well-being and emotional intensity), as well as in variables related to emotion regulation (subjective emotional control and three emotion-regulation mechanisms: situation selection, emotion suppression, rumination) in the Spanish population. One hundred and sixty people from three age groups (younger, middle-aged and older adults) participated in the study. Older participants reported lower levels of life satisfaction and positive emotional intensity than younger ones, as well as higher levels of perceived emotional control, emotional maturity and leveling of positive affect, and more use of emotion suppression. The results partially support the emotional maturity hypothesis of emotional functioning in old age, but also suggest that older adults' emotional regulation may present important peculiarities which have not yet been addressed in the extant literature, such as the moderation or limitation of emotional experience, especially positive emotions.

  8. Melody recognition at fast and slow tempos: effects of age, experience, and familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, W Jay; Bartlett, James C; Halpern, Andrea R; Andrews, W Melinda

    2008-04-01

    Eighty-one listeners defined by three age ranges (18-30, 31-59, and over 60 years) and three levels of musical experience performed an immediate recognition task requiring the detection of alterations in melodies. On each trial, a brief melody was presented, followed 5 sec later by a test stimulus that either was identical to the target or had two pitches changed, for a same-different judgment. Each melody pair was presented at 0.6 note/sec, 3.0 notes/sec, or 6.0 notes/sec. Performance was better with familiar melodies than with unfamiliar melodies. Overall performance declined slightly with age and improved substantially with increasing experience, in agreement with earlier results in an identification task. Tempo affected performance on familiar tunes (moderate was best), but not on unfamiliar tunes. We discuss these results in terms of theories of dynamic attending, cognitive slowing, and working memory in aging.

  9. Categorizing experience-based foraging plasticity in mites: age dependency, primacy effects and memory persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schausberger, Peter; Davaasambuu, Undarmaa; Saussure, Stéphanie; Christiansen, Inga C

    2018-04-01

    Behavioural plasticity can be categorized into activational (also termed contextual) and developmental plasticity. Activational plasticity allows immediate contextual behavioural changes, whereas developmental plasticity is characterized by time-lagged changes based on memory of previous experiences (learning). Behavioural plasticity tends to decline with age but whether this holds true for both plasticity categories and the effects of first-in-life experiences is poorly understood. We tackled this issue by assessing the foraging plasticity of plant-inhabiting predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii , on thrips and spider mites following age-dependent prey experience, i.e. after hatching or after reaching maturity. Juvenile and young adult predator females were alternately presented thrips and spider mites, for establishing 1st and 2nd prey-in-life experiences, and tested, as gravid females, for their foraging plasticity when offered both prey species. Prey experience by juvenile predators resulted in clear learning effects, which were evident in likelier and earlier attacks on familiar prey, and higher proportional inclusion of familiar prey in total diet. First prey-in-life experience by juvenile but not adult predators resulted in primacy effects regarding attack latency. Prey experience by adult predators resulted mainly in prey-unspecific physiological changes, with easy-to-grasp spider mites providing higher net energy gains than difficult-to-grasp thrips. Prey experience by juvenile, but not adult, predators was adaptive, which was evident in a negative correlation between attack latencies and egg production. Overall, our study provides key evidence that similar experiences by juvenile and adult predators, including first-in-life experiences, may be associated with different types of behavioural plasticity, i.e. developmental and activational plasticity.

  10. Categorizing experience-based foraging plasticity in mites: age dependency, primacy effects and memory persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaasambuu, Undarmaa; Saussure, Stéphanie; Christiansen, Inga C.

    2018-01-01

    Behavioural plasticity can be categorized into activational (also termed contextual) and developmental plasticity. Activational plasticity allows immediate contextual behavioural changes, whereas developmental plasticity is characterized by time-lagged changes based on memory of previous experiences (learning). Behavioural plasticity tends to decline with age but whether this holds true for both plasticity categories and the effects of first-in-life experiences is poorly understood. We tackled this issue by assessing the foraging plasticity of plant-inhabiting predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii, on thrips and spider mites following age-dependent prey experience, i.e. after hatching or after reaching maturity. Juvenile and young adult predator females were alternately presented thrips and spider mites, for establishing 1st and 2nd prey-in-life experiences, and tested, as gravid females, for their foraging plasticity when offered both prey species. Prey experience by juvenile predators resulted in clear learning effects, which were evident in likelier and earlier attacks on familiar prey, and higher proportional inclusion of familiar prey in total diet. First prey-in-life experience by juvenile but not adult predators resulted in primacy effects regarding attack latency. Prey experience by adult predators resulted mainly in prey-unspecific physiological changes, with easy-to-grasp spider mites providing higher net energy gains than difficult-to-grasp thrips. Prey experience by juvenile, but not adult, predators was adaptive, which was evident in a negative correlation between attack latencies and egg production. Overall, our study provides key evidence that similar experiences by juvenile and adult predators, including first-in-life experiences, may be associated with different types of behavioural plasticity, i.e. developmental and activational plasticity. PMID:29765663

  11. Biosphere reserves in action: Case studies of the American experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-06-26

    For nearly 20 years, biosphere reserves have offered a unique framework for building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems. The 12 case studies in this volume chronicle many of the cooperative efforts to implement the biosphere reserve concept in the United States. Considered together, these efforts involve more than 20 types of protected areas, and the participation of all levels of government, and many private organizations, academic institutions, citizens groups, and individuals. Biosphere reserves are multi-purpose areas that are nominated by the national committee of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) and designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to serve as demonstration areas for cooperation in building harmonious relationships between human activities and the conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity. Each biosphere reserve exemplifies the characteristic ecosystems of one of the worlds biogeographical regions. It is a land or coas%arine area involving human communities as integral components and including resources managed for objectives ranging from complete protection to intensive, yet sustainable development. A biosphere reserve is envisioned as a regional ''landscape for learning'' in which monitoring, research, education, and training are encouraged to support sustainable conservation of natural and managed ecosystems. It is a framework for regional cooperation involving government decisionmakers, scientists, resource managers, private organizations and local people (i.e., the biosphere reserve ''stakeholders''). Finally, each biosphere reserve is part of a global network for sharing information and experience to help address complex problems of conservation and development. The 12 case studies presented in this report represent only a few of the possible evolutions of a biosphere reserve in

  12. Older peoples experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanzadeh Vahid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The decision to relocate to an aged care home can is important change in older adults live but little attention has been paid to their experiences of this decision. The study explored older people’s experiences involving the decision to transition to an aged care home. Data were obtained via semi-structured interviews with 17 participants, which were content analyzed. Results: Transition motives, ambiguity, participation in decision making and decision making meaning were four themes extracted through data analysis. Conclusions: In the main, the decision to transition to an aged care home had been made without the older person’s participation. In addition, due to inadequate information about aged care home services, participants experienced a great deal of ambiguity in the decision-making process. Moreover, transition into aged care homes had different meaning for the participants. The findings suggest that far greater emphasis must be placed on having older people involved in the decision to move into residential aged care, providing them with more information about service offerings and making psychological support accessible to them prior to and following transition to the home

  13. In Situ Surgery: Is It Safe ? (Experience with 60 cases)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xp

    potentiality of line disconnection or endotracheal tube dislodgement. ... insertion of intrapertioneal drain in one case ,the ... closure with intraperitoneal drainage , this case needed later ... conservative measures were undertaken till complete.

  14. Pediatric gastric volvulus--experience with 7 cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, W. H.; Choi, S. O.; Suh, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Gastric volvulus, organoaxial or mesenterioaxial, is a rare condition in infancy and childhood. We experienced 7 cases of pediatric gastric volvulus, consisting of 3 cases of secondary gastric volvulus due to left diaphragmatic eventration or paraesophageal hernia and 4 cases of idiopathic gastric volvulus. Of 7 cases, five were organoaxial in type and two were mesenterioaxial. The main symptoms of secondary gastric volvulus were vomiting and respiratory difficulty whereas those of idiopathic...

  15. The Influence of Clinical Experience and Photographic Presentation on Age Assessment of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Barbara Rubek; Linneberg, Allan; Christensen, Kaare; Forman, Julie Lyng; Schwarz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that a higher perceived age is associated with poor health and higher mortality. However, the method used for the assessment of perceived age differs between studies with regard to age, gender, the number and occupation of assessors as well as the presentation of participants. It is not known whether the clinical experience of the assessor or photographic presentation have an influence on the assessment of perceived age, which the present study aimed to investigate. In a cross-sectional study of 460 women aged 25-93 years, 10 consultants and 10 residents were asked to estimate the age of each participant using three different photographic presentations: facial photograph, whole-body photograph, and combined facial and whole-body photographs. Data were analyzed by means of summary statistics and linear mixed models. The inter-class correlation coefficient within each assessor group and photographic presentation varied from 0.66 to 0.75. Limits of agreement were in a broad range but were similar in the two assessor groups. The best inter-assessor agreement was obtained from photographs of both the face and the whole body. Intra- and inter-assessor agreements between photographic presentations were similar among both assessor groups. The accuracy in age assessment was significantly influenced by the photographic presentation but not by the clinical experience of the assessor. The difference in the mean perceived age of a participant of average age was estimated as +0.40 years (95% CI: -1.80; 2.59) for consultants versus residents, -2.05 years (95% CI: -2.90; -1.19) for facial photographs versus both facial and whole-body photographs, and -1.44 years (95% CI: -2.30; -0.58) for whole-body photographs versus both facial and whole-body photographs. A regression towards the mean age was seen. The assessment of perceived age was influenced by the photographic presentation but not by the clinical experience of the assessor. © 2015 S

  16. Determinants of resilience for people ageing in remote places: a case study in northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Gibb

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate how people managed to stay resilient as they aged in remote places. In Western developed countries, 'successful ageing' is associated with older people's right to age in their chosen place. To remain resilient, older people require support to supplement diminishing self-reliance associated with increasing frailty. Such support services do not extend to remote communities, making it difficult to age in place. This article reports on a case study of ageing in remote places, from the perspective of seniors within a small community in remote northern Australia. The study found how older people attempt through volunteer efforts, to supplement the gaps in aged support services. This collective effort to achieve ageing in place demonstrated greater integration with place and social resilience within the community. However, seniors' social resilience was seen as tenuous, given collective self-reliance is based on volunteer efforts of older people.

  17. Exploring Experiences and Perceptions of Aging and Cognitive Decline Across Diverse Racial and Ethnic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Roberts DrPH, MSN, FNP-BC

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore how older adults from three prominent ethnoracial groups experience cognitive decline and aging. Method: Semistructured key informant interviews (KIIs and focus groups (FGs were conducted with caregivers, experts, and older adults. Results: ( N = 75. Fifteen KIIs regarding cognitive aging issues were conducted among health care professionals and community-based agencies serving older adults. Eight FGs included family caregivers and physicians, and six FGs with Latino, African American, and White older adult community members. Major themes included (a personal expectations about aging, (b societal value of older adults, (c model of care preferred, and (d community concerns. An overarching theme was a sense of loss associated with aging; however, how this loss was experienced and dealt with varied. Discussion: Distinct patterns of concerns and views are important to understand for the development of programs aimed at meeting the needs of diverse older adult community members to improve health outcomes.

  18. On and Off the Mat: Yoga Experiences of Middle-Aged and Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertman, Annette; Wister, Andrew V; Mitchell, Barbara A

    2016-06-01

    This article explores potential differences in yoga practice between middle-and older-aged adults. A health belief - life course model frames this research, and a mixed-methods analytic strategy is employed to examine life course pathways into yoga and motivations to practice, as well as perceived barriers and health benefits. For the quantitative analyses, a convenience sample of 452 participants was collected using an online questionnaire. For the qualitative analyses, face-to-face interviews were conducted with a sub-set of 20 participants. Unique differences between the age groups (both current age and age when started yoga) as well as by gender were found for selected pathways, reasons/motivations, and barriers to engage in yoga as well as for perceived health benefits. In addition, results underscore the importance of informational cues and social linkages that affect how individuals adopt and experience yoga. Implications for health promotion programs that target older adults are discussed.

  19. Narcolepsy in pediatric ageExperience of a tertiary pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Dias Costa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep–wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between 6.8 and 10.5 years of age. Diagnostic delay ranged from 4 months to 2 years. One child had H1N1 flu vaccination eight months before the clinical onset. The first multiple sleep latency test was positive in 6 of 8 cases. All cases were treated with methylphenidate, and venlafaxine was associated in 4 of them. In one case the initial therapy was exclusively behavioral. In all cases, symptomatic improvement, better school performance and social integration were achieved after therapeutic adjustment.

  20. Narcolepsy in pediatric ageExperience of a tertiary pediatric hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Barreto, Maria Inês; Clemente, Vanda; Vasconcelos, Mónica; Estêvão, Maria Helena; Madureira, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep–wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between 6.8 and 10.5 years of age. Diagnostic delay ranged from 4 months to 2 years. One child had H1N1 flu vaccination eight months before the clinical onset. The first multiple sleep latency test was positive in 6 of 8 cases. All cases were treated with methylphenidate, and venlafaxine was associated in 4 of them. In one case the initial therapy was exclusively behavioral. In all cases, symptomatic improvement, better school performance and social integration were achieved after therapeutic adjustment. PMID:26483902

  1. The illness experience of middle-aged men with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Hui; Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Lin, Yu-Ping; Lin, Hung-Ru; Hu, Wen-Yu; Wung, Shin-Huey; Liang, Shu-Yuan

    2013-12-01

    To explore the essence of the illness experiences of middle-aged men with oral cancer. Having oral cancer creates great challenges in the lives of middle-aged men and their families. Understanding patients' experiences provides a sound basis for patient-centred and individualised care. Research is limited regarding the illness experience of middle-aged men with oral cancer with regard to facing both the invasion of disease and the responsibilities of middle age. A phenomenology approach was used. Nine men diagnosed with oral cancer within one year were recruited during 2009 and 2010. Data were collected through individual in-depth interviews and analysed using Colaizzi's phenomenological analysis procedures. The following five themes emerged from the patterns of categorised interview data: the psychological journey in facing oral cancer, the question of how patients can control their disease as well as the sequelae of cancer treatment, the continuous disturbance and turmoil resulting from the disease, the appreciation of the support from family and friends, and the ability to learn to actively face the future. Patients with oral cancer experienced tremendous physical, psychosocial and financial challenges. Although burdened with multiple stressors, these middle-aged men were able to learn from their experiences and exhibit positive growth in life. Patients with oral cancer have to constantly adjust to the impact of their disease. The study results may serve as a reference for improving clinical practice and the quality of care among patients with oral cancer. Cancer care is multidimensional and holistic. Healthcare professionals should develop a set of plans by which patients receive complete medical care and support, as well as assistance from professionals and family members, as their treatment progresses to help patients face the challenges of cancer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of Thermal Effects During Blade-Casing Contact Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Millecamps , Antoine; Brunel , Jean-François; Dufrenoy , Philippe; Garcin , François; Nucci , Marco

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In rotating machinery, notably in modern high efficiency compressors, a critical requirement for optimal performance consists in minimizing radial clearances between the rotating bladed disk and the casing. This solution significantly increases the risks of contact between rotating bladed disk and casing and may lead in specific conditions to catastrophic behavior (component failure, etc.). The physical phenomena and mechanisms involved in blade-casing contact interact...

  3. Case studies on age-management in organisations: report on organisational case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punte, E.; Conen, W.S.; Schippers, J.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of case studies was thwarted by the economic crisis and the feeling of being ‘over-researched’ by potential organisations. Although organisations in some sectors (e.g. chemical manufacturing) reported the worst part of the economic crisis was behind, many organisations indicated

  4. A study of aging effects of barrel Time-Of-Flight system in the BESIII experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan-Huan; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Fang, Shuang-Shi; Wu, Zhi; Dai, Hong-Liang; Heng, Yue-Kun; Zhou, Ming; Deng, Zi-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min

    2018-02-01

    The Time-Of-Flight system consisting of plastic scintillation counters plays an important role for particle identification in the BESIII experiment at the BEPCII double ring e+e- collider. Degradation of the detection efficiency of the barrel TOF system has been observed since the start of physical data taking and this effect has triggered intensive and systematic studies about aging effects of the detector. The aging rates of the attenuation lengths and relative gains are obtained based on the data acquired in past several years. This study is essential for ensuring an extended operation of the barrel TOF system in optimal conditions.

  5. Travel experiences and aspirations: a case study from Chinese youth

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Feifei; Brown, Lorraine; Long, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cultural values is vital in tourism as these influence an individual’s travel experiences and expectations. Students represent an important segment of the international tourist population, and Chinese student tourists are an increasingly significant part of that segment. It is therefore important to understand how cultural values influence Chinese students’experiences and aspirations. Will their past travel experiences influence future aspirations? Using data collected from a fr...

  6. Language development of internationally adopted children: Adverse early experiences outweigh the age of acquisition effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhlin, Natalia; Hein, Sascha; Doyle, Niamh; Hart, Lesley; Macomber, Donna; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Tan, Mei; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2015-01-01

    We compared English language and cognitive skills between internationally adopted children (IA; mean age at adoption=2.24, SD=1.8) and their non-adopted peers from the US reared in biological families (BF) at two time points. We also examined the relationships between outcome measures and age at initial institutionalization, length of institutionalization, and age at adoption. On measures of general language, early literacy, and non-verbal IQ, the IA group performed significantly below their age-peers reared in biological families at both time points, but the group differences disappeared on receptive vocabulary and kindergarten concept knowledge at the second time point. Furthermore, the majority of children reached normative age expectations between 1 and 2 years post-adoption on all standardized measures. Although the age at adoption, age of institutionalization, length of institutionalization, and time in the adoptive family all demonstrated significant correlations with one or more outcome measures, the negative relationship between length of institutionalization and child outcomes remained most robust after controlling for the other variables. Results point to much flexibility and resilience in children's capacity for language acquisition as well as the potential primacy of length of institutionalization in explaining individual variation in IA children's outcomes. (1) Readers will be able to understand the importance of pre-adoption environment on language and early literacy development in internationally adopted children. (2) Readers will be able to compare the strength of the association between the length of institutionalization and language outcomes with the strength of the association between the latter and the age at adoption. (3) Readers will be able to understand that internationally adopted children are able to reach age expectations on expressive and receptive language measures despite adverse early experiences and a replacement of their first

  7. Safe Day Case Adenotonsillectomy: Experience from a Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hypertrophy. Conclusion: Day case tonsillectomies in private hospitals settings are safe with few complications that are often not life threatening. It should be encouraged in our environment in private hospitals where the facilities are available. Key Words Day case tonsillectomy, adenotonsillectomy, otolaryngology ...

  8. CLINICAL AND LIQUOR DIFFERENCES IN CASES OF SEROUS AND PURULENT MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN OF DIFFERENT AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Mazayeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents features of clinical course and composition of cerebrospinal liquid in cases of purulent and serous meningitis depending on the age of the patients and the disease etiology. 40 children with bacterial purulent meningitis of meningococcal, hemophilic and unknown aetiology and 40 children with serous meningitis predominantly of enteroviral etiology were examined. The differences in duration and intensity of clinical symptoms, total protein concentration, and liquor cytosis were detected. The highest liquor indicators were revealed in the case of hemophilic meningitis in children of early age and in the case of meningococcal meningitis in children over seven years old. This fact can be explained by various pathogenic features of the causative agent and different compensatory reactions in children of different age

  9. Ageing in an inconvenient paradise: the immigrant experiences of older Korean people in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jae; Kim, Chang Gi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the immigrant experiences of older Korean people and their intergenerational family relationships in the New Zealand context. Data were collected from qualitative interviews with older people, community leaders and professionals in Christchurch and Auckland. Data analysis was conducted using concept mapping techniques in the cross-cultural context where two languages were simultaneously used. The findings of the study show that older Korean people in New Zealand were likely to face multiple challenges due to the combined effects of immigration and ageing in a new country. Some older people experienced difficulties in managing their immigrant lives and intergenerational relationships in the transnational family context in which their family members were dispersed across two or more nations. The immigrant experiences of older migrants might be affected by an 'invisible' source of isolation and exclusion at familial, community, societal and transnational levels. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2013 ACOTA.

  10. Variability in microbiological degradation experiments, analysis and case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard

    1997-01-01

    and describes analysis techniques for testing the reproducibility of a given experiment. The parameter estimation method employed for the experiments in this study is based on an iterative maximum likelihood method and the test statistic is an approximated likelihood ratio test. The estimations were carried out...

  11. Assessing users' experience of shared sanitation facilities: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the academic literature, users' feedback and experiences of technologies in the post-implementation phase have received scarce attention. The purpose of this study is to investigate users' experience of sanitation technologies in the early post-implementation phase, when opportunities for remedial intervention are still ...

  12. Safety significance of component ageing, exemplary for MOV, based on French and German operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlent, O. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Michel, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    An outline is given of how IPSN and GRS assess the effects of physical ageing on the safety of French and German Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) on the basis of the available knowledge and how investigations are carried out. The presentation is focused exemplary on a preliminary study illustrating approaches for the evaluation of the ageing behaviour of active components, the motor-operated valves (MOV). The results so far seems to demonstrate that the developed methodological approaches are suitable to obtain qualitative evidence with regard to the ageing behaviour of technical facilities such as MOV. The evaluation of the operating experience with French 900 MWe plants seems to reveal, for MOV of one system, a trend similar to some international findings about ageing-related events with increasing operating time; this trend will have to be confirmed. For the German NPPs so far, there appears to be no significant increase of ageing-related events concerning MOV as the plants get older. Future work on ageing scheduled at IPSN and GRS includes further cooperation on this issue, too; a deep analysis is necessary to explain the reasons of such apparent differences before any conclusion. (authors)

  13. Safety significance of component ageing, exemplary for MOV, based on French and German operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlent, O.

    2001-01-01

    An outline is given of how IPSN and GRS assess the effects of physical ageing on the safety of French and German Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) on the basis of the available knowledge and how investigations are carried out. The presentation is focused exemplary on a preliminary study illustrating approaches for the evaluation of the ageing behaviour of active components, the motor-operated valves (MOV). The results so far seems to demonstrate that the developed methodological approaches are suitable to obtain qualitative evidence with regard to the ageing behaviour of technical facilities such as MOV. The evaluation of the operating experience with French 900 MWe plants seems to reveal, for MOV of one system, a trend similar to some international findings about ageing-related events with increasing operating time; this trend will have to be confirmed. For the German NPPs so far, there appears to be no significant increase of ageing-related events concerning MOV as the plants get older. Future work on ageing scheduled at IPSN and GRS includes further cooperation on this issue, too; a deep analysis is necessary to explain the reasons of such apparent differences before any conclusion. (authors)

  14. Understanding the experience of adult daughters caring for an ageing parent, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Anthierens, Sibyl; Van Assche, Elisa; Welvaert, Joanna; Verhoeven, Véronique; Wens, Johan; Remmen, Roy

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to describe how adult daughters experience caring for a frail older parent at home. In the near future the ageing of the population will have a major impact on the demand for formal and informal long-term care. Relatives, especially spouses and adult children are the main providers of informal care. Qualitative research methodology was used to study the experience of adult daughters caring for their frail older parents. A phenomenological research perspective was used to better understand the daily experiences of caring for an ageing parent. Data were collected using open-ended interviews. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were subject to thematic analysis. Eleven women between 40-70 years of age participated in this study. Inductive coding of the interview data led to four main themes: being a caregiver as a natural process in life, the perception and consequences of caregiving activities, sharing care and finding a good balance between caring for an ageing parent and other responsibilities. Caregiving activities could be divided into visible and invisible activities and generated different feelings. The visible activities were more easily shared with other family members and professionals than the invisible ones. The women who struggled the most and tended to have a higher level of burden were those who experienced less support from their family. This study provided more insight into the experiences women have when caring for a parent. Supporting family networks that help in both visible and invisible activities may prevent overburden. Consumer-led care and the active participation of the informal caregiver in the decision-making process for building the care plan need to become more prominent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hippocampal Sclerosis of Aging Can Be Segmental: Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighodaro, Eseosa T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Neltner, Janna H.; Abner, Erin L.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Smith, Charles D.; Duplessis, Taylor; Anderson, Sonya; Patel, Ela; Bachstetter, Adam; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a neurodegenerative disease that mimics Alzheimer disease (AD) clinically and has a prevalence rivaling AD in advanced age. Whereas clinical biomarkers are not yet optimized, HS-Aging has distinctive pathological features that distinguish it from other diseases with “hippocampal sclerosis” pathology, such as epilepsy, cerebrovascular perturbations, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. By definition, HS-Aging brains show neuronal cell loss and gliosis in the hippocampal formation out of proportion to AD-type pathology; it is strongly associated with aberrant TDP-43 pathology and arteriolosclerosis. Here, we describe 2 cases of “segmental” HS-Aging in which “sclerosis” in the hippocampus was evident only in a subset of brain sections by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. In these cases, TDP-43 pathology was more widespread on immunostained sections than the neuronal cell loss and gliosis seen in H&E stains. The 2 patients were cognitively intact at baseline and were tracked longitudinally over a decade using cognitive studies with at least 1 neuroimaging scan. We discuss the relevant HS-Aging literature, which indicates the need for a clearer consensus-based delineation of “hippocampal sclerosis” and TDP-43 pathologies in aged subjects. PMID:26083567

  16. Conventional X-ray examination of hiatus hernia in aged people (31 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoyuan; Xie Zirong; Liao Chengyang; Xiong Bo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate methods and features of X-ray examination in aged people with hiatus hernia. Methods: Imaging features of chest film, fluoroscopy and barium meal examination of 31 cases with hiatus hernia diagnosed by barium meal examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results Sac shadows behind the heart were showed in all 23 cases, including chest film (14/23 cases) and fluoroscopy (9/23 cases), 20 cases of which were irreducible hiatus hernia diagnosed by barium meal immediately. 3 cases were misdiagnosed by the chest film, with occupying lesions of the left lower lung (2/3 cases) or aneurysm of descending aorta (1/3 cases). Gastric mucosa was showed in thorax above the left hemidiaphragm in another 8 cases with hiatus hernia evaluated by barium meal, including 5 cases irreducible hiatus hernia and 3 cases sliding hiatus hernia. Conclusion: Chest film, fluoroscopy and barium meal play different roles in the diagnosis of hiatus hernia. Though chest film and fluoroscopy could detect easily, barium meal is of the most importance in evaluation of hiatus hernia due to its characteristics. (authors)

  17. Clinical experience with MRI in head trauma cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Goto, Yasunobu; Kinuta, Yuji; Tashiro, Yuzuru; Nishihara, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Minamikawa, Jun; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Imataka, Kiyoharu.

    1988-01-01

    The ability to identify lesions after head trauma using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was tested in 199 cases. A resistive-type MRI scanner operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla was utilized in inversion-recovery (IR) and saturation-recovery (SR) radiofrequency-pulse sequences. Of the total number of cases, 54 were examined within 4 days after injury. An intracranial hematoma was removed in 47 cases. The MRI findings were normal in the cases of cerebral concussion, even in the presence of skull fracture. High intensity areas were seen in the SR images in 12 cases which were normal on X-ray CT. Both acute and subacute non-hemorrhagic contusion sites were visible as low intensity areas on the T 1 -weighted images and as high intensity areas on the SR images. Acute hemorrhagic contusion sites were visible as isointense and low intensity areas in the T 1 -weighted images and as high intensity areas in the SR images. Subacute sites appeared as high intensity areas in the T 1 -weighted, SR, and T 2 -weighted images. Direct coronal and sagittal views were adequate for the recognition of the three-dimensional brain structure. MRI was useful in the identification of brain contusion, in postoperative follow-ups, and in the detection of complications in the chronic stage. In the follow-up of 48 brain contusion cases, 13 cases showed normalized MRI findings and 9 cases showed improved findings. The recovery of cerebral function in these cases was good. The lesions demonstrated by MRI were considered to be contusional hematoma, petechiae, brain edema, shear injury, and non-hemorrhagic contusion. When they persist, such lesions are thought to change into such conditions as scar, gliosis, porencephaly, and brain atrophy. (author)

  18. ¿Eternal beauty? The experience of aging between old erotic dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Bispo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the aging experience of old erotic dancers of Brazilian television, the chacretes, stage assistants of Abelardo Barbosa (Chacrinha during the early 1970. First, I explore in this text their world views about being considered "old women". Then, I regard to their activities of controlling their bodies and the erase of marks that indicates the passage of time. I intend to demonstrate in this article that old age for many women considered "beautiful" and "sexy" is not a "major problem" than it is for any of us. What I could confirm alongside the chacretes was that we all still face aging with some concern and distance, but, at the same time, with placid manner and humor.

  19. Age-related Decline in Case-Marker Processing and its Relation to Working Memory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jee Eun

    2017-09-01

    Purposes of the current study were to investigate whether age-related decline emerged in a case-marker assignment task (CMAT) and to explore the relationship between working-memory (WM) capacity and case-marker processing. A total of 121 individuals participated in the study with 62 younger adults and 59 elderly adults. All were administered a CMAT that consisted of active and passive constructions with canonical and noncanonical word-order conditions. A composite measure of WM tasks served as an index of participants' WM capacity. The older group performed worse than the younger group, and the noncanonical word order elicited worse performance than the canonical condition. The older group demonstrated greater difficulty in case-marker processing under the canonical condition and passive construction. Regression results revealed that age, education, and sentence type were the best predictors to account for performance on the CMAT. The canonicity of word order and passive construction were critical factors related to decline in abilities in a case-marker assignment. The combination of age, education, and sentence type factors accounted for overall performance on case-marker processing. Results indicated the crucial necessity to find a cognitively and linguistically demanding condition that elicits aging effects most efficiently, considering language-specific syntactic features. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shaona; Wang Xiaojun; Xiao Hua; Han Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Peng Liangyu; Bao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  1. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shaona; Wang Xiaojun; Xiao Hua [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Han Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Peng Liangyu; Bao Lei, E-mail: xiaoh@scnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lbao@mps.ohio-state.edu [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  2. Penile lesion from gunshot wound: a 43-case experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcanti Andre G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the main aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of 43 patients with gunshot wounds to the penis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The location of the lesion, the presence of associated lesions, the performance of complementary exams, surgical treatment, postoperative complications and long term follow-up of 43 patients with penile lesions from gunshot wounds were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Of 43 cases assessed, 41 were submitted to surgical exploration (95.3% and 2 were submitted to conservative treatment (4.7%. We found penile lesions involving the corpus cavernosum in 37 cases; the remaining 4 patients presented no lesions involving the corpus cavernosum, urethra or testicles but did in the superficial structures. Ten cases presented an association with testicular lesions and 14 cases association with anterior urethral lesions. CONCLUSION: Penile lesions from gunshot wounds should be treated with immediate surgical intervention. In exceptional situations featuring superficial lesions only conservative treatment may be applied.

  3. The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaiska, Aurélia; Clarys, David; Jarry, Caroline; Taconnat, Laurence; Tapia, Géraldine; Vanneste, Sandrine; Isingrini, Michel

    2007-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of aging on consciousness in recognition memory, using the Remember/Know/Guess procedure (Gardiner, J. M., & Richarson-Klavehn, A. (2000). Remembering and Knowing. In E. Tulving & F. I. M. Craik (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press.). In recognition memory, older participants report fewer occasions on which recognition is accompanied by recollection of the original encoding context. Two main hypotheses were tested: the speed mediation hypothesis (Salthouse, T. A. (1996). The processing-speed theory of adult age differences in cognition. Psychological Review, 3, 403-428) and the executive-aging hypothesis (West, R. L. (1996). An application of prefrontal cortex function theory to cognitive aging. Psychological Bulletin, 120, 272-292). A group of young and a group of older adults took a recognition test in which they classified their responses according to Gardiner, J. M., & Richarson-Klavehn, A. (2000). Remembering and Knowing. In E. Tulving & F. I. M. Craik (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press. remember-know-guess paradigm. Subsequently, participants completed processing speed and executive function tests. The results showed that among the older participants, R responses decreased, but K responses did not. Moreover, a hierarchical regression analysis supported the view that the effect of age in recollection experience is determined by frontal lobe integrity and not by diminution of processing speed.

  4. INEQUITY ISSUES AND MOTHERS' PREGNANCY, DELIVERY AND EARLY-AGE SURVIVAL EXPERIENCES IN ENDE DISTRICT, INDONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardosi, Jerico Franciscus; Parr, Nick; Muhidin, Salut

    2015-11-01

    Indonesia's infant mortality rates are among the highest in South-East Asia, and there are substantial variations between its sub-national regions. This qualitative study aims to explore early mortality-related health service provision and gender inequity issues based on mothers' pregnancy, delivery and early-age survival experience in Ende district, Nusa Tenggara Timur province. Thirty-two mothers aged 18-45 years with at least one birth in the previous five years were interviewed in depth in May 2013. The results show most mothers have little knowledge about the danger signs for a child's illness. Mothers with early-age deaths generally did not know the cause of death. Very few mothers had received adequate information on maternal and child health during their antenatal and postnatal visits to the health facility. Some mothers expressed a preference for using a traditional birth attendant, because of their ready availability and the more extensive range of support services they provide, compared with local midwives. Unprofessional attitudes displayed by midwives were reported by several mothers. As elsewhere in Indonesia, the power of health decision-making lies with the husband. Policies aimed at elevating mothers' roles in health care decision-making are discussed as measures that would help to improve early-age survival outcomes. Widening the public health insurance distribution, especially among poorer mothers, and equalizing the geographical distribution of midwives and health facilities are recommended to tackle geographical inequities and to increase early-age survival in Ende district.

  5. Clinical experience for radiolucent stones; A report of 27 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Jee; Lee, Gil Ho [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    The cause of radiolucent filling defects in the upper urinary tract are malignant tumor, radiolucent stones, blood clots, air bubbles, congenital deformities of renal parenchyme, and various specific and non-specific infection and their sequence. So the differential diagnosis between malignancy and radiolucent stones is very important, and the exact and fast diagnosis of radiolucent stones is useful in excluding the possibility of malignancy. 27 cases with radiolucent stones were evaluated retrospectively for exact diagnosis and appropriate treatment method. Intravenous urography was done in all cases, and retrograde pyelography, ultrasonography, computed tomography and/or ureterorenoscopy were performed for diagnosis, if needed. Size of stones were measured below 10mm by transverse length in 19 cases (70.4%) with a range of 3 to 30mm. The locations of stones were pelvicalyceal system in 8 cases (29.6%) and ureter in 19 cases (70.4%). Among the diagnostic methods, computed tomography was used most frequency. ESWL with retrograde pyelography was most frequent used method of treatment, also simple hydration to small stone was effective. (author).

  6. Clinical experience for radiolucent stones; A report of 27 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Jee; Lee, Gil Ho

    1997-01-01

    The cause of radiolucent filling defects in the upper urinary tract are malignant tumor, radiolucent stones, blood clots, air bubbles, congenital deformities of renal parenchyme, and various specific and non-specific infection and their sequence. So the differential diagnosis between malignancy and radiolucent stones is very important, and the exact and fast diagnosis of radiolucent stones is useful in excluding the possibility of malignancy. 27 cases with radiolucent stones were evaluated retrospectively for exact diagnosis and appropriate treatment method. Intravenous urography was done in all cases, and retrograde pyelography, ultrasonography, computed tomography and/or ureterorenoscopy were performed for diagnosis, if needed. Size of stones were measured below 10mm by transverse length in 19 cases (70.4%) with a range of 3 to 30mm. The locations of stones were pelvicalyceal system in 8 cases (29.6%) and ureter in 19 cases (70.4%). Among the diagnostic methods, computed tomography was used most frequency. ESWL with retrograde pyelography was most frequent used method of treatment, also simple hydration to small stone was effective. (author)

  7. Smart tourism destination triggers consumer experience: the case of Porto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Liberato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the increasing importance of information and communication technologies (ICTs in smart tourism destinations, in their integration in the activity of the tourism companies, and in their interaction with visitors/tourists. In summary, it is intended to evaluate in the city of Porto how the use of technology before, during and after the visit influences the tourist experience. Design/methodology/approach - The authors empirically investigate the importance of using ICTs during tourism experience, assess the access/availability of ICT at the destination and its importance in tourist’s decisions. It is analyzed if the applications and/or information available on the internet are important and positively influence the tourism experience in Porto, that is, the degree of tourist satisfaction. The empirical evidence is based on a quantitative analysis, using a data set involving 423 tourists in the city of Porto. Findings - The importance of the internet access at the destination, especially in places like airports and hotels, since most tourists are primarily using their mobile devices and computers during the trip, and the existing information technologies available in the destination (internet, smartphones or other mobile devices and applications are considered very important in explaining tourists’ experience. Originality/value - This study identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the technological strategies, providing useful information for destination management, discussing innovation in tourism, and proposing a framework that empirically evaluates how technological components used in smart tourism destinations can improve tourists’ experiences.

  8. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  9. Software Engineering Researchers' Attitudes on Case Studies and Experiments : an Exploratory Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tofan, Dan; Galster, Matthias; Avgeriou, Paris; Weyns, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Case studies and experiments are research methods frequently applied in empirical software engineering. Experiments are well-­understood and their value as an empirical method is recognized. On the other hand, there seem to be different opinions on what constitutes a case study, and

  10. Imaging spectrum in sclerotic myelomas: an experience of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Dhar, A.

    2000-01-01

    The classic radiographic presentation of multiple myeloma is lytic skeletal lesions. Primary sclerotic manifestations are rare and occur only in 3 % of cases. The imaging spectrum in three cases of multiple myeloma with primary osteosclerosis is described. The first patient had spiculated sclerosis of the orbit, which is an uncommon site for myeloma. The second patient with POEMS syndrome had multiple, scattered, skeletal lesions with sclerotic margins. The third patient presented with a chest wall mass and had an expansile thick spiculated sclerosis in the rib. The wide imaging spectrum possible in sclerotic myelomas and their relevant differential diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  11. Malaria with Acute Renal Failure in a Middle Aged Man: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case of a middle aged(39 years) man admitted with severe malaria in the male ward of the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria is reported. The infecting species was Plasmodium falciparum and the patient was febrile, developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia and hepatic failure. Treatment ...

  12. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  13. Depression and Dementia in Aging Adults with Down Syndrome: A Case Study Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyunsook; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A case study of three adults (ages 46-47) with Down syndrome investigated the patterns of symptoms associated with depression and dementia. Characteristics that distinguish between dementia and depression in adults with Down syndrome are described. Periodic comprehensive assessment of adults with Down syndrome to detect functioning changes is…

  14. A Case Series of Marijuana Exposures in Pediatric Patients Less than 5 Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George Sam; Narang, Sandeep K.; Wells, Kathryn; Chuang, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In Colorado, there has been a large increase in medical marijuana dispensaries and licenses for the use of medical marijuana over the past year. This is a retrospective case series of marijuana exposures that have presented to the emergency department (ED) in children less than 5 years of age. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart…

  15. Aging in Saudi Arabia: An Exploratory Study of Contemporary Older Persons' Views About Daily Life, Health, and the Experience of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Nancy J; Weil, Joyce; Felmban, Wejdan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory study sought to measure current self-reported experiences of older Saudi adults. Method: Self-reported aging perceptions and demographic data from semistructured questions were obtained from 52 community-dwelling older Saudi adults aged 50 or older. A thematic content analysis was completed around issues of family life/social support, daily/weekly activities, health and health programs, and older adults' own thoughts about aging and the experience and future of personal aging. Results: Several key themes emerged from the interviews. The majority of respondents in this preliminary study acknowledge a preference for family care. Formal programs in Saudi Arabia are attended with relative infrequency while older adults recognize family support as the preferred method of support. Older Saudi interviewees hold a positive view of aging, but physical functioning, varying financial resources, and other daily obligations are a concern for those in this study. Discussion: Data suggest as the Saudi population ages, more research is needed on the aging experience with particiular emphasis on issues relevant to older adults . Future research must work to clarify the aging experience as cultural context changes.

  16. Gigantism of the foot: our experience in seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, S; Santini, S; Cagnoni, G; Jacopetti, T

    1998-01-01

    We report our experience in seven patients with congenital gigantism of the foot with the following diagnoses: neurofibromatosis (two), fibrolipomatosis (two), Proteus syndrome (two), and idiopathic localized gigantism (one). Our purpose is to introduce a new classification of foot gigantism, based on the concept of "neuroinduction." In our experience, intraoperative examination and subsequent histologic examination show consistently pathologic findings in the plantar nerve and its terminal branches in the foot affected by gigantism. Limited surgical treatment was used in five patients. To prevent forefoot enlargement and recurrence of deformity, we suggest complete ray resection. We evaluated our results using radiographs, functional status, and cosmetic considerations.

  17. Experiencias de envejecimiento en el México rural Aging experiences in rural Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Treviño-Siller

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Explorar la experiencia de envejecimiento de hombres y mujeres mayores de 60 años, que viven en contextos rurales de pobreza en los estados de Guerrero y Morelos, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se diseñó un estudio cualitativo basado en entrevistas semiestructuradas. Se trabajó en comunidades con menos de 2 500 habitantes, pobres y de alta marginación. RESULTADOS: La experiencia de envejecimiento es radicalmente diferente según la condición de género; esta vivencia resulta ser más positiva para las mujeres. La soledad es un factor que configura la experiencia diferencial del envejecimiento, así como las redes sociales y el estado de salud-enfermedad. Los principales temores asociados a la vejez fueron la soledad, la enfermedad, la pobreza y la pérdida de independencia. CONCLUSIONES: La identidad de género desempeña un papel fundamental en la configuración de la experiencia diferencial del proceso de envejecimiento, debido a que las oportunidades de desarrollo y las responsabilidades que se derivan de ella, promueven la desigualdad entre los sexos. Es necesario hacer más eficiente la respuesta institucional, de manera que responda a las necesidades específicas de esta población.OBJECTIVE: To explore the aging experience among men and women older than 60 years, living in rural areas from the states of Guerrero and Morelos, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A qualitative study was conducted in poverty-stricken, underserved communities with less than 2 500 inhabitants. Semi-structured interviews were applied to collect data. RESULTS: The aging experience is different according to gender, being more positive for women. Loneliness, together with social networks and the health-illness process, make the difference in the aging experiences. The main fears associated with aging are loneliness, illness, poverty, and loss of independence. CONCLUSIONS: Gender identity plays a central role in different aging experiences because the

  18. Adverse Childhood Experiences Are Linked to Age of Onset and Reading Recognition in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Shaw

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAdverse childhood experiences (ACEs exert a psychological and physiological toll that increases risk of chronic conditions, poorer social functioning, and cognitive impairment in adulthood.ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between childhood adversity and clinical disease features in multiple sclerosis (MS.MethodsSixty-seven participants with MS completed the ACE assessment and neuropsychological assessments as part of a larger clinical trial of cognitive remediation.ResultsAdverse childhood experience scores, a measure of exposure to adverse events in childhood, significantly predicted age of MS onset (r = –0.30, p = 0.04. ACEs were also linked to reading recognition (a proxy for premorbid IQ (r = –0.25, p = 0.04. ACE scores were not related to age, current disability, or current level of cognitive impairment measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT.ConclusionChildhood adversity may increase the likelihood of earlier age of onset and poorer estimated premorbid IQ in MS.

  19. Drivers’ Age, Gender, Driving Experience, and Aggressiveness as Predictors of Aggressive Driving Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepjolkina Viktorija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in the problem of aggressive driving. In the presentstudy two demographic variables (gender and age, two non-psychological driving-experiencerelated variables (annual mileage and legal driving experience in years and aggressiveness asa personality trait (including behavioural and affective components as psychological variableof individual differences were examined as potential predictors of aggressive driving. The aimof the study was to find out the best predictors of aggressive driving behaviour. The study wasbased on an online survey, and 228 vehicle drivers in Latvia participated in it. The questionnaireincluded eight-item Aggressive Driving Scale (Bone & Mowen, 2006, short Latvian versionof the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ; Buss & Perry, 1992, and questions gainingdemographic and driving experience information. Gender, age and annual mileage predictedaggressive driving: being male, young and with higher annual driving exposure were associatedwith higher scores on aggressive driving. Dispositional aggressiveness due to anger componentwas a significant predictor of aggressive diving score. Physical aggression and hostility wereunrelated to aggressive driving. Altogether, the predictors explained a total of 28% of thevariance in aggressive driving behaviour. Findings show that dispositional aggressiveness,especially the anger component, as well as male gender, young age and higher annual mileagehas a predictive validity in relation to aggressive driving. There is a need to extend the scope ofpotential dispositional predictors pertinent to driving aggression.

  20. Primary care patients' expectations regarding medical appointments and their experiences during a visit: does age matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mariusz Jaworski,1 Marta Rzadkiewicz,1 Miroslawa Adamus,1 Joanna Chylinska,1 Magdalena Lazarewicz,1 Gørill Haugan,2 Monica Lillefjell,3 Geir Arild Espnes,2 Dorota Wlodarczyk1 1Department of Medical Psychology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Public Health and Nursing, 3Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Introduction: There is evidence that meeting patients’ expectations toward health care correlates with involvement in the treatment they receive. The most important patient expectations concern certain types of information: explanation of disease and treatment, health promotion, and improvement in quality of life. Other demands include proper rapport and emotional support. The aim of this paper was to examine different patient groups over the age of 50 years and their expectations toward medical visits, evaluated before a visit and after the visit.Patients and methods: The study group consisted of 4,921 primary health-care patients. The patients received self-administered questionnaires that they filled in before and after the appointment with the doctor. Interviews with patients were conducted individually by specially trained interviewers. The PRACTA Patient Expectations Scale was used to measure the appointment-related expectations of the patients.Results: We observed differences related to age in patients’ expectations before medical visits regarding the following factors: disease explanation, treatment explanation, quality of life, rapport, and emotional support. The same differences were not observed on health promotion. Evaluation of patients’ appointment-related experiences after the visit showed that there were significant differences between the age-groups regarding all types of expectations included in the study. Differences between previsit and

  1. Pediatric day case surgery: Experience from a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical service is in great demand in developing countries, and in-patient beds and surgical supplies are insufficient. Method: A ..... Day Case Surgery in Children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria-An Audit. ... as a clinical indicator for quality assurance.

  2. Organizing moral case deliberation experiences in two Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Dam, S.; Abma, T.A.; Molewijk, A.C.; Kardol, M.J.M.; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a specific form of clinical ethics, aiming to stimulate ethical reflection in daily practice in order to improve the quality of care. This article focuses on the implementation of MCD in nursing homes and the questions how and where to organize MCD. The purpose of

  3. An employer's experience with infertility coverage: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Kaylen; Meletiche, Dennis; Del Rosario, Gina

    2009-12-01

    A case study of Southwest Airlines, a Fortune 500 company, demonstrates that a well-designed infertility coverage plan can control resource use. This successful model could be used by employers who wish to ensure that their employees have access to high-quality, cost-effective infertility services in a managed-care environment.

  4. Older Adults' Experiences of Sexual Difficulties: Qualitative Findings From the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliff, Sharron; Tetley, Josie; Lee, David; Nazroo, James

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that sexual activity is important to the quality of life of older adults, and that it can be influenced by physical, psychological, and social factors. However, older adults' experiences of sexual difficulties remain relatively unexplored. This article draws on qualitative data collected as part of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Participants answered a Sexual Relationships and Activities Questionnaire (SRA-Q), which included an open comment box for further details, 1,084 (1/7) of which were completed. These data were analyzed using Template Analysis, and findings on the experiences of sexual difficulties are presented in this article. Sexual difficulties were contextualized within the couple relationship and could be detrimental to the relationship, particularly if the partner would not seek professional help. Participants reported that sexual difficulties could also have a negative impact on psychological well-being, described mainly as frustration, depression, and sadness. For some participants the supportive nature of their relationship buffered these impacts. Few had sought professional help; those who had reported helpful and unhelpful experiences. These findings add to the limited evidence base and have implications for health care in the context of global aging and a growing recognition of older adults' sexual rights.

  5. Impact of vocational interests, previous academic experience, gender and age on Situational Judgement Test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schripsema, Nienke R; van Trigt, Anke M; Borleffs, Jan C C; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-05-01

    Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) are increasingly implemented in medical school admissions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of vocational interests, previous academic experience, gender and age on SJT performance. The SJT was part of the selection process for the Bachelor's degree programme in Medicine at University of Groningen, the Netherlands. All applicants for the academic year 2015-2016 were included and had to choose between learning communities Global Health (n = 126), Sustainable Care (n = 149), Intramural Care (n = 225), or Molecular Medicine (n = 116). This choice was used as a proxy for vocational interest. In addition, all graduate-entry applicants for academic year 2015-2016 (n = 213) were included to examine the effect of previous academic experience on performance. We used MANCOVA analyses with Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons tests for applicant performance on a six-scenario SJT. The MANCOVA analyses showed that for all scenarios, the independent variables were significantly related to performance (Pillai's Trace: 0.02-0.47, p performance on three scenarios (p performance on two scenarios (p performance, as was previous academic experience. Gender and age were related to performance on SJT scenarios in different settings. Especially the first effect might be helpful in selecting appropriate candidates for areas of health care in which more professionals are needed.

  6. Sentinel lymphnode in breast cancer: an experience with 53 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Benedita Andrade Leal de; Melo, Nayana Alves de Brito; Abreu, Evandro Leal de; Vieira, Carlos Sabas; Abreu, Everardo Leal de; Universidade Federal do Piaui, Maranhao, PI

    2007-01-01

    The value of sentinel lymphnode biopsy or selective linfadenectomy in assessing axillary status in breast carcinoma is well established in medical literature. This work presents a brief study from our preliminary experience with 53 patients submitted to pre-surgical lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperatory detection of sentinel lymphnode and compares our records with those of current medical literature. (author)

  7. Sentinel lymphnode in breast cancer: an experience with 53 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Benedita Andrade Leal de; Melo, Nayana Alves de Brito; Abreu, Evandro Leal de; Vieira, Carlos Sabas; Abreu, Everardo Leal de [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Maranhao, PI (Brazil). Centro Bionuclear de Diagnostico; Universidade Federal do Piaui, Maranhao, PI (Brazil). Hospital Sao Marco; E-mail: bionuclear@uol.com.br

    2007-09-15

    The value of sentinel lymphnode biopsy or selective linfadenectomy in assessing axillary status in breast carcinoma is well established in medical literature. This work presents a brief study from our preliminary experience with 53 patients submitted to pre-surgical lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperatory detection of sentinel lymphnode and compares our records with those of current medical literature. (author)

  8. Improving Learning Experiences through Gamification: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelan, Benjamin; de Salas, Kristy; Lewis, Ian; King, Carolyn; Edwards, Dale; O'Mara, Aidan

    2015-01-01

    Gamified learning systems are becoming increasingly common within educational institutions, however there is a lack of understanding on the elements of gamification that influence, either positively or negatively, the learning experiences of students using these systems. This study examines an existing gamified learning tool implemented within an…

  9. The Mortality Penalty of Incarceration: Evidence from a Population-based Case-control Study of Working-age Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridemore, William Alex

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing body of research on the effects of incarceration on health, though there are few studies in the sociological literature of the association between incarceration and premature mortality. This study examined the risk of male premature mortality associated with incarceration. Data came from the Izhevsk (Russia) Family Study, a large-scale population-based case-control design. Cases (n = 1,750) were male deaths aged 25 to 54 in Izhevsk between October 2003 and October 2005. Controls (n = 1,750) were selected at random from a city population register. The key independent variable was lifetime prevalence of incarceration. I used logistic regression to estimate mortality odds ratios, controlling for age, hazardous drinking, smoking status, marital status, and education. Seventeen percent of cases and 5 percent of controls had been incarcerated. Men who had been incarcerated were more than twice as likely as those who had not to experience premature mortality (odds ratio = 2.2, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.6-3.0). Relative to cases with no prior incarceration, cases who had been incarcerated were more likely to die from infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, non-alcohol-related accidental poisonings, and homicide. Taken together with other recent research, these results from a rigorous case-control design reveal not only that incarceration has durable effects on illness, but that its consequences extend to a greater risk of early death. I draw on the sociology of health literature on exposure, stress, and social integration to speculate about the reasons for this mortality penalty of incarceration. © American Sociological Association 2014.

  10. Clinical characteristics of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Tung, Yi-Ching; Liu, Shih-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Ting; Tsai, Wen-Yu

    2017-05-01

    Cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children aged younger than 6 years in Taiwan has increased in the past 10 years. This retrospective study aimed to review the management experience of such patients in a single center. From January 2004 to June 2015, 52 newly diagnosed diabetic children younger than 6 years who had regular follow-up for > 1 year were enrolled, as well as 94 older diabetic children for comparison. Their medical records were thoroughly reviewed. The most common symptoms and signs were polyuria, polydipsia, dry lips, weight loss, and nocturia. Among the children younger than 6 years, 87% had ketoacidosis upon diagnosis-significantly higher than that of the older age group-and 88% had at least one islet cell autoantibody detected. Their serum C-peptide levels were significantly lower and the frequency of insulin autoantibodies detected was significantly higher compared with the older age group (37% vs. 10%). The remission rate of the young diabetic patients was significantly lower than that of the older age group (40% vs. 59%), but there was no difference in time of onset and duration of remission between the two groups. Autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is an important cause of type 1 diabetes mellitus in Taiwanese children aged younger than 6 years. These patients usually have a low insulin reserve and severe ketoacidosis upon diagnosis. A high index of suspicion in the presence of classic symptoms of diabetes in young children is important to prevent complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The stepping behavior analysis of pedestrians from different age groups via a single-file experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuchao; Zhang, Jun; Song, Weiguo; Shi, Chang'an; Zhang, Ruifang

    2018-03-01

    The stepping behavior of pedestrians with different age compositions in single-file experiment is investigated in this paper. The relation between step length, step width and stepping time are analyzed by using the step measurement method based on the calculation of curvature of the trajectory. The relations of velocity-step width, velocity-step length and velocity-stepping time for different age groups are discussed and compared with previous studies. Finally effects of pedestrian gender and height on stepping laws and fundamental diagrams are analyzed. The study is helpful for understanding pedestrian dynamics of movement. Meanwhile, it offers experimental data to develop a microscopic model of pedestrian movement by considering stepping behavior.

  12. The experience of parents implementing authoritarian parenting for their school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga Olla, Marice; Catharina Daulima, Novy Helena; Eka Putri, Yossie Susanti

    2018-02-01

    To explore families' experiences who use an authoritarian parenting style in caring for school-age children. This was a qualitative study employing a phenomenological approach. The sampling method was to interview parents of school-age children living in the Central Maluku district in Indonesia. The findings of this study generated the following themes: (1) parents strictly controlled their children to achieve the parental values and expectations, (2) children failed to meet the parental values and expectations, and (3) problems experienced by the children were the results of the parenting style. This study suggested nursing professionals provide adequate information for parents with respect to parenting styles that may facilitate the optimal growth and development of the children. Future studies pertinent to cultural factors associated with authoritarian parenting were also suggested to better understand the cultural context of this parenting style. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. False memories in children and adults: age, distinctiveness, and subjective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Simona; Qin, Jianjian; Goodman, Gail S

    2002-09-01

    This study investigated developmental trends associated with the Deese/Roediger-McDermott false-memory effect, the role of distinctive information in false-memory formation, and participants' subjective experience of true and false memories. Children (5- and 7-year-olds) and adults studied lists of semantically associated words. Half of the participants studied words alone, and half studied words accompanied by pictures. There were significant age differences in recall (5-year-olds evinced more false memories than did adults) but not in recognition of critical lures. Distinctive information reduced false memory for all age groups. Younger children provided with distinctive information, and older children and adults regardless of whether they viewed distinctive information, expressed higher levels of confidence in true than in false memories. Source attributions did not significantly differ between true and false memories. Implications for theories of false memory and memory development are discussed.

  14. Ageing tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2000-01-01

    The effects of thermally accelerated ageing in irradiated and unirradiated 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers and InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes are presented. 40 lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C. Periodic measurements were made of laser threshold and efficiency, and p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (19 refs).

  15. Transient splenial lesion: Further experience with two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Paramjeet; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Vyas, Sameer; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2010-01-01

    Transient splenial lesions (TSL) of the corpus callosum are uncommon radiologic findings that are seen in a number of clinical conditions with varied etiologies. They were first described a decade earlier in patients with epilepsy and hence were thought to be seizure or seizure therapy related. Subsequently, more cases were described by different observers in diseases with different etiologies, and the list is still increasing. Awareness of these lesions is necessary as they are an uncommon finding and have to be differentiated from other infective/noninfective causes. MRI is the imaging modality of choice as these lesions are not seen on routine noncontrast CT scan. The authors here describe two cases which showed TSL, with complete/partial resolution on follow-up scans. The authors also present a review of the literature

  16. Cognitive therapy for punishment paranoia: a single case experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, P; Trower, P

    1996-04-01

    There is growing agreement that at least certain kinds of delusions defend against negative self-evaluation, and in consequence that cognitive therapy for delusions needs to address issues of self-evaluation more explicitly. However, in practice it can be difficult to enable clients to see the connection between delusions and self-esteem. The present single-case study exemplifies the conceptual and practical application of cognitive therapy for individuals who are both paranoid and have strong negative self-evaluative beliefs. A multiple-baseline approach is used, whereby one man's negative self-evaluative belief and two paranoid delusions are challenged sequentially. Conviction in two of the three beliefs changes at the point of intervention; conviction in the third changes prior to intervention. We discuss the details of the case, as well as the wider implications for cognitive approaches to delusions.

  17. Transient splenial lesion: Further experience with two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Paramjeet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient splenial lesions (TSL of the corpus callosum are uncommon radiologic findings that are seen in a number of clinical conditions with varied etiologies. They were first described a decade earlier in patients with epilepsy and hence were thought to be seizure or seizure therapy related. Subsequently, more cases were described by different observers in diseases with different etiologies, and the list is still increasing. Awareness of these lesions is necessary as they are an uncommon finding and have to be differentiated from other infective/noninfective causes. MRI is the imaging modality of choice as these lesions are not seen on routine noncontrast CT scan. The authors here describe two cases which showed TSL, with complete/partial resolution on follow-up scans. The authors also present a review of the literature.

  18. Postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Qian Wen; Taylor, Beverley; Liam, Joanne Lw; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Wang, Wenru; He, Hong-Gu

    2013-04-01

    To explore postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children. Ineffective postoperative pain management among children has been commonly reported. School-aged children are able to evaluate how their pain is managed and what their preferred strategies are. Most studies in pain management have adopted quantitative methods and have overlooked children's pain management experiences. This is a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews. Data were collected from 15 school-aged children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Singapore by in-depth interviews conducted between November 2010 and January 2011. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: children's self-directed actions to relieve their postoperative pain (e.g. using cognitive-behavioural methods of distraction and imagery, physical method of positioning, sleeping and drinking, seeking other people's help by informing parents and crying and using pain medications); children's perceptions of actions parents take for their postoperative pain relief (assessing pain, administering pain medications, using various cognitive-behavioural, physical methods and emotional support strategies, assisting in activities and alerting health professionals); children's perception of actions nurses take for their postoperative pain relief (administering medication, using cognitive-behavioural methods, emotional support strategies and helping with activities of daily living) and suggestions for parents (using distraction and presence) and nurses (administering medications, distraction and positioning) for their postoperative pain relief improvement. This study contributed to the existing knowledge about children's postoperative pain management based on their own experiences. Children, their parents and nurses used various strategies, including pain medication and non-pharmacological methods, especially distraction, for children's postoperative pain relief. This study provides evidence

  19. A PUBS Case in a Palliative Care Unit Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Restuccia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS is a rare condition in which purple discoloration of the collecting bag and its associated tubing occurs. It is considered a benign condition. PUBS is usually associated with urinary tract infection occurring in elderly bedridden women, with chronic urinary catheterization. This syndrome is usually reported to occur in alkaline urine, but here we describe a rare case of PUBS involving acidic urine.

  20. A PUBS Case in a Palliative Care Unit Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Restuccia, M. R.; Blasi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS) is a rare condition in which purple discoloration of the collecting bag and its associated tubing occurs. It is considered a benign condition. PUBS is usually associated with urinary tract infection occurring in elderly bedridden women, with chronic urinary catheterization. This syndrome is usually reported to occur in alkaline urine, but here we describe a rare case of PUBS involving acidic urine.

  1. Humanitarian logistics: Review and case study of Zimbabwean experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mbohwa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews and presents findings on mini-case studies done on the difficulties and problems faced by humanitarian organisations in running logistics systems in Zimbabwe. Document analysis was done and this was complemented by mini-case studies and semi-structured interviews and site visits. Mini-case studies of the operations of the World Food Programme, the International Red Cross Society and the Zimbabwe Red Cross Society, the World Health Organisation, the United Nations Children's Fund and the Zimbabwean Civil Protection Organisation in Zimbabwe are discussed. These clarify the difficulties and problems faced such as the lack of trained logistics personnel, lack of access to specialised humanitarian logistics courses and research information, the difficulty in using and adapting existing logistics systems in attending to humanitarian logistics and the lack of collaborative efforts that address the area specifically. This study seeks to use primary and secondary information to inform decision-making in humanitarian logistics with possible lessons for neighbouring countries, other regions in Africa and beyond. Activities on collaborative networks that are beneficial to humanitarian logistics are also suggested.

  2. Ageing midface: The impact of surgeon's experience on the consistency in the assessment and proposed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Ali; Izadpanah, Ali; Zadeh, Teanoosh; Gosman, Amanda; Chao, James J; Dobke, Marek K

    2011-02-01

    An individual's face undergoes numerous changes throughout life. Since mid-face aesthetic units are key areas for rejuvenation procedures, their comprehensive assessment is essential for the development of any aesthetic management plan. Despite the availability of many evaluation criteria for treatment of mid-face ageing, there are discrepancies existing in both assessment and management approaches. The goal of this study was to determine if there are any identifiable profiles of clinical judgements and approaches related to the level of surgeon's experience. Forty seven standardised non-digital and not altered natural size photographic images of patients' faces (front and profile) were presented to eight senior board certified plastic surgeons, eight junior non-board certified plastic surgeons and eight plastic surgery residents from an independent program. Surveyed physicians were 'blinded' from each other and asked to assess five different major features characterising ageing mid-face. An interclass correlation data analysis was performed and the Cronbach coefficient alpha values were computed for each category. Responses obtained from senior plastic surgeons were consistently characterised by higher Cronbach coefficient alpha values indicating higher concordance. The highest agreement levels were obtained for the assessment of rhytids and jowls across all groups and the lowest agreement levels were obtained for the assessment and recommendation of upper lip management. This study illustrated that discrepancies in clinical assessments and surgical management exist among surgeons involved in the aesthetic surgery of the mid-face ageing. It appears that the level of surgeon's experience significantly impacts the inter-rater reliability and consensus in assessment and treatment of mid-face ageing. The most senior plastic surgeons' assessment and recommendations had the highest level of concordance while the junior non-board certified plastic surgeons and the

  3. Tourist experiences of genocide sites: The case of Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpley Richard; Gahigana Innocent

    2014-01-01

    Dark tourism is not a new phenomenon. As long as people have been able to travel they have visited places associated with death, disaster and suffering. However, not only has the provision and consumption of dark tourism experiences become increasingly evident in recent years; so too has the academic study of the phenomenon. Nevertheless, despite the increasing attention paid to the subject, understanding of dark tourism remains relatively limited and theoretically fragile whilst, specificall...

  4. Social Networking Sites' Influence on Travelers' Authentic Experience a Case Study of Couch Surfing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    This study explored travelers' experiences in the era of network hospitality 2.0 using CouchSurfing.org as a case study. The following research questions guided this study: 1) what experience does CouchSurfing create for travelers before, during and after their travel? 2) how does couch surfers' experience relate to authenticity in context of…

  5. Case study on perspicacity of collaborative learning experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fadzidah; Majid, Noor Hanita Abdul; Numen, Ibrahim; Kesuma Azmin, Aida; Abd. Rahim, Zaiton; Denan, Zuraini; Emin Sisman, Muhammet

    2017-12-01

    In the attempt to relate to the architectural practice, architectural education today has augmented the development of collaborative learning environment in the campus scenario. Presently, collaborative work among students from the same program and university is considered common. Hence, attempts of collaboration is extended into having learning and teaching collaboration by means of inter-universities. The School of Architecture, at the International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) has explored into having collaboration across the continent with Fatih Sultan Mehmet Waqf University (FSMWU), among faculty members and students of the two (2) universities This paper explicates the empirical study on students’ perspicacity of their collaborative learning experiences; in term of effectiveness, generative behaviour, and teamwork. Survey with three (3) open-ended questions are distributed to students to express their opinions on learning collaboration that they have had during the execution of the Joint Summer School Program (JSSP). Feedback on their perspicacity is obtained and organised into numerical and understandable data display, using qualitative data processing software. Albeit the relevancy of collaborative learning, students gave both positive and negative feedbacks on their experiences. Suggestions are given to enhance the quality of collaborative learning experience for future development

  6. Oviposition preference hierarchy in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera, Tephritidae: influence of female age and experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim-Bravo Iara S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of two factors, age and previous experience, on the oviposition hierarchy preference of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824 females was studied. Two populations were analyzed: one reared in laboratory during 17 years and the other captured in nature. In the first experiment the oviposition preference for four fruits, papaya, orange, banana and apple was tested at the beginning of oviposition period and 20 days past. The results showed that the wild females as much the laboratory ones had an oviposition preference hierarchy at the beginning of peak period of oviposition. However this hierarchic preference disappeared in a later phase of life. In the second experiment the females were previously exposed to fruits of different hierarchic positions and afterwards their choice was tested in respect to the oviposition preference for those fruits. The results showed that there was an influence of the previous experience on the posterior choice of fruits to oviposition when the females were exposed to fruits of lower hierarchic position.

  7. Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults? How can you reduce anesthesia risks in older patients? Age Age may bring wisdom but it also brings ... Ask your physician to conduct a pre-surgery cognitive test — an assessment of your mental function. The physician can use the results as a ...

  8. Adverse childhood or adult experiences and risk of bilateral oophorectomy: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzuola Rocca, Liliana; Smith, Carin Y; Grossardt, Brandon R; Faubion, Stephanie S; Shuster, Lynne T; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Rocca, Walter A

    2017-06-07

    Bilateral oophorectomy has commonly been performed in conjunction with hysterectomy even in women without a clear ovarian indication; however, oophorectomy may have long-term deleterious consequences. To better understand this surgical practice from the woman's perspective, we studied the possible association of adverse childhood or adult experiences with the subsequent occurrence of bilateral oophorectomy. Population-based case-control study. Olmsted County, Minnesota (USA). From an established population-based cohort study, we sampled 128 women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 46 years for a non-cancerous condition in 1988-2007 (cases) and 128 age-matched controls (±1 year). Information about adverse experiences was abstracted from the medical records dating back to age 15 years or earlier archived in the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) records-linkage system. Adverse childhood experiences were summarised using the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) score. We observed an association of bilateral oophorectomy performed before age 46 years with verbal or emotional abuse, physical abuse, any abuse, substance abuse in the household, and with an ACE score ≥1 experienced before age 19 years (OR=3.23; 95% CI 1.73 to 6.02; padult abuse are at increased risk of undergoing bilateral oophorectomy before menopause. We suggest that the association may be explained by a series of biological, emotional, and psychodynamic mechanisms. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Elements of experience in a restaurant. Case: Restaurant Havis

    OpenAIRE

    Lindholm, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to find out what kind of elements of experience can be found in a Finnish fish and seafood restaurant and what elements the customers find important. The thesis also attempts to examine the service delivery process and the importance of different touchpoints in the service delivery. The thesis goes through culinary trends and if these have a deep affect on visitors of the restaurant. The focus is put on three aspects of the restaurant, which are the food, the atmosph...

  10. Cooling tower drift: experiment design for comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    A drift experiment program to develop a data base which can be used for validation of drift deposition models has been formulated. The first field effort is designed for a suitable mechanical-draft cooling tower to be selected after site visits have been conducted. The discussion here demonstrates the importance of characterizing the droplet size spectrum emitted from the tower and to accurately account for droplet evaporation, because the downwind droplet deposition patterns and near-surface airborne concentrations are extremely sensitive to these parameters

  11. The experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrighi, Juliane Dias; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Souza, Silvana Regina Rossi Kissula; Cancela, Franciane Zabloski Vieira

    2016-01-01

    To identify in the literature how the experiences of women age 35 or above are described in terms of pregnancy. Integrative review based on MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, and SciELO databases, with no time period constraint. Eighteen studies that dealt with the experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age were selected and analyzed. The studies evidenced four theme categories: the search for information, which pointed to a deficit of information supplied by health care professionals; perceiving the risks, which pointed to women's concerns about their own health and their children's; the ideal moment for motherhood, with different reasons for postponing it; and adjusting to a new routine, showing a concern regarding changes in daily life. From the results, it was possible to understand that other factors, in addition to those that include risks, are present in the experiences of older pregnant women and point to a need to involve such aspects in nursing care to create comprehensive strategies that are aligned with these women's needs. Identificar na literatura como são descritas as experiências das mulheres com idade igual ou superior a 35 anos na gestação. Revisão integrativa realizada nas bases de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS e SciELO, sem restrição de período. Foram selecionados e analisados 18 estudos que tratavam das experiências das mulheres na gestação em idade avançada. Os estudos evidenciaram quatro categorias temáticas: A busca por informações, que mostrou aspectos como deficit de informações fornecidas pelos profissionais da saúde;Percebendo os riscos, que apontou uma preocupação da mulher com a própria saúde e a do filho;Momento ideal para a maternidade, com diferentes motivos para o adiamento; e Adaptação à nova rotina, com a preocupação em relação às mudanças no cotidiano. A partir dos resultados, foi possível compreender que outros fatores, além dos que incluem os riscos, permeiam as experi

  12. [Experience with Dohlman-Doane keratoprosthesis: case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Andressa Prestes; Kwitko, Sérgio; Dal Pizzol, Melissa Manfroi; Marinho, Diane; Rymer, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    To describe 9 eyes in 8 patients who received Dohlman-Doane type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro) with a mean follow-up of 11.2 months (2 to 25 months). A retrospective, non-comparative interventional case series. Previous corneal disease was alcaline burn in 4 eyes, multiple graft failure in 3 eyes, Stevens-Johnson syndrome in 1 eye and thermal injury in 1 eye. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motions or worse in all patients. Glaucoma was present preoperatively in 3 eyes and received Ahmed valve implantation. 88,9% eyes achieved BCVA of better than or equal to 20/100, and 44,4% better than or equal to 20/40. In the postoperative period, 3 eyes developed posterior capsule opacity treated with YAG laser capsulotomy; 3 retroprosthetic membrane treated with tPA injection or steroids; 2 glaucoma in clinical treatment; 1 corneal melting, treated with donor cornea bottom exchange; and 1 fungic endophthalmitis, treated with corneal transplant, anterior vitrectomy, KPro and intraocular lens explantation, and specific intravitreal and endovenous treatment. Dohlman-Doane K-Pro seems to be a good option for cases of corneal blindness with poor prognosis for traditional penetrating keratoplasty. Its main advantage is not requesting systemic immunossuppression. Best results were achieved in non-immune diseases.

  13. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Batistoni, P.

    2014-01-01

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1

  14. Very old Swedish women's experiences of mobility devices in everyday occupation: a longitudinal case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfqvist, Charlotte; Nygren, Carita; Brandt, Ase; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2009-09-01

    The use of mobility devices, such as walking sticks and rollators, increases during the ageing process. Our aim was to explore how very old single-living Swedish women experience the use of mobility devices over time, in relation to everyday occupation. A multiple case study strategy involving quantitative and qualitative data was used. The findings indicate that the use of mobility devices, rollators in particular, starts off as support for walking but over time becomes more involved in occupational performance, resulting in complex transactions between personal, environmental, and task components. Personal factors such as ability to adjust and adapt to different situations seem to be crucial for optimal mobility device use. Strategies and adaptive behavior were developed over the years while striving for maintained independence and participation. The use of mobility devices was described as something one has to accept, but also a constant reminder of your limitations, or as a possibility to remain active and to manage everyday occupation. The findings stress the need to adopt a comprehensive view when trying to facilitate everyday occupations in very old age. Physical, social, psychological aspects, combinations among assistive devices, and home modification all need to be reflected on and monitored over time.

  15. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  16. [Our experience in the cases with penetrating colonic injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Derici, Hayrullah; Cin, Necat; Tatar, Fatma; Peker, Yasin; Genç, Hüdai; Deniz, Vedat; Reyhan, Enver

    2006-07-01

    In this study, the factors that effect the morbidity and mortality in patients with penetrating colonic injuries were evaluated. Fourty-two patients (37 males, 5 females; mean age 30,1; range 14 to 63 years) with penetrating colonic trauma were evaluated according to age, gender, type of penetrating trauma, location and severity of the colonic injury, associated injury, interval between the trauma and the definitive operation, hemodynamic status, blood transfusion requirement, fecal contamination, surgical procedure, postoperative complication and mortality. Type of the penetrating trauma was stab injury in twenty-eight (67%) patients, and gunshot injury in fourteen (33%) patients. The mean Colon Injury Severity Score was 2,1. The mean Abdominal Trauma Index (ATI) was 17,2 and it was over than 25 in eight (19%) patients. The symptoms of shock were present in eleven (26%) patients at admission. Blood transfusions were applied in sixteen (38%) patients. In twenty-one patients intraabdominal bleeding was observed and it was more than 500 mL in eleven (26%) patients. Primary repair was performed in 36 (86%) of the 42 patients and colostomy was performed in six (14%) patients. Morbidity and mortality rates were 41% and 10% respectively. It was found that morbidity rates were increased in patients with ATI score higher than 25, and mortality rates were increased in patients presenting shock at admission, with the amount of intraabdominal blood more than 500 mL, and who needed three or more units of blood transfusion. The primary repair of the penetrating colon trauma can be performed confidently in the hemodynamically stable patients with ATI score less than 25.

  17. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Presentation of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis at a young age: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Priyanka; Setia, Ankur

    2016-11-01

    Abdominal pain is a very common symptom in all age groups but retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare differential diagnosis suspected in young patients presenting with nonspecific abdominal pain and symptoms of obstructive uropathy. Presented here is a case of a 16-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of persistent abdominal pain and a previous history of swelling in the left leg. A computed tomography (CT) scan suggested retroperitoneal fibrosis and an exploratory laparotomy and histopathological examination were performed for definitive diagnosis. This case report is intended to promote awareness of retroperitoneal fibrosis in young patients among health care providers.

  19. The planning of a passive seismic experiment: the Ketzin case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, G.; Petronio, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the last years, it has been recognized the importance of using microseismic activity data to gain information on the state and dynamics of a reservoir, notwithstanding the difficulties of recording, localizing the events, interpret them correctly, in terms of developing fractures, or thermal effects. The increasing number of CO2 storage experiments, with the necessity of providing efficient, economic, and long-term monitoring methods, both in the injection and post-injection phases, further encourage the development and improvement of recording and processing techniques. Microseismic signals are typically recorded with downhole sensors. Monitoring with surface sensors is problematic due to increased noise levels and signal attenuation particularly in the near surface. The actual detection distance depends on background noise conditions, seismic attenuation and the microseismic source strength. In the frame of the European project Co2ReMoVe and of the European Network of Excellence Co2GeoNet, a passive seismic experiment was planned in the Ketzin site for geological storage of CO2, a former gas store near Potsdam, object of the CO2SINK European project and inserted also in the European project Co2ReMoVe. Aim of the survey is to complement the CO2-SINK active seismic downhole experiments, adding precious information on the microseismicity induced by stress field changes at the reservoir level and in the overburden, due to the CO2 injection. The baseline survey was done in May 2008 by the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale-OGS (Italy), with the support of the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum-GFZ (Germany) and the collaboration of the Institut für Geowissenschaftliche Gemeinschaftsaufgaben-GGA (Germany), shortly before the starting of the CO2 injection (June 30th 2008). A continuous monitoring (about 5 days) was performed by 2 downhole 3C geophones, and 3 surface 3C geophones located around the wells. This paper, based on the analysis of

  20. Relationship Contracting: The South Australian Experience - A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry has long been accusedof poor performance. The confrontational attitudeof its members and the resultant adversarial atmosphere has been identified as a major factor responsible for this poor performance. A cultural change is required to remove these barriers and to promote optimum project outcomes. Relationship contracting is promoted as a way to support the shift from the adversarial culture to the co-operative and collaborative culture within the industry and the project team.The Adelaide Convention Centre Extensions project was the first in South Australia to be procure und r the principles of relationship contract1ng. Usmg the case study approach, this paper reviews the form of relationship contracting used in this milestone project. The paper documents the lessons learned from this project and makes recommendations that can lead to improvements for future projects.

  1. Experiences of case management with chronic illnesses: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, J Y; Liu, M F

    2018-03-01

    This qualitative systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize recent qualitative studies to improve understanding of the experiences and perceptions of case management interventions that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have. Case management has been shown to be effective at improving quality of care and lowering costs for individuals with chronic illnesses. However, no qualitative review has been synthesized with recent qualitative studies about case management experiences by individual with chronic illnesses. This qualitative systematic review uses a thematic synthesis method to review 10 qualitative studies published within the last 10 years, from 2007 to 2016, thereby identifying and discussing the understandings that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have about case management. From this synthesis, three themes were identified as facilitators of case management (access to healthcare resources, health status supports and emotional aid) and two themes were identified as barriers to it (low information about case management and time constraints). This is the first qualitative systematic review of the perceptions and experiences that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have about case management. The facilitators of case management can be employed to inform patients about the benefits of case management and to improve population health. The findings about barriers to case management can be used to reform case management for populations with chronic illnesses. These factors should be considered by nursing researchers and healthcare policymakers when implementing case management. © 2018 International Council of Nurses.

  2. A case study about the experience with high blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Canesqui, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Aborda-se a experiência com a "pressão alta" e enfermidades associadas postas como sofrimentos físicos e morais na totalidade da pessoa que vive, reflete e atua em meio às circunstâncias de vida que a afetam. Trata-se de estudo de caso integrante de uma investigação qualitativa sobre narrativas e significação da "pressão alta", feita com 17 homens e 20 mulheres diagnosticados há mais de um ano com hipertensão arterial, usuários de uma unidade de Saúde da Família de uma cidade interiorana paul...

  3. Ageing studies of wavelength shifter fibers for the TILECAL/ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.; Maio, A.; Pina, J.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Natural and accelerated ageing studies for the different components of the TILECAL calorimeter, of the ATLAS experiment, play a central role in forecasting the evolution of the detector's performance throughout its operating life. It is possible that the operation of ATLAS will be extended by 5 years in an upgraded LHC scenario. Such prospect makes these studies even more important, in order to assess the contribution of the natural ageing in relation to the other processes inducing performance loss in the optical components. Among other activities in this LHC/CERN collaboration, the Lisbon calorimetry group is involved in studying the impact of radiation damage and natural ageing in optical characteristics of the TILECAL wavelength shifter (WLS) optical fibers and scintillators, and to reevaluate the light budget of the tile/fiber system. The light yield and the attenuation length of the WLS and scintillating optical fibers are measured using an X-Y table. Results are presented for several sets of WLS optical fibers (Kuraray Y11(200)MSJ) whose characteristics have been monitored since 1999. Most of those 338 fibers are from the mass production for the TILECAL detector: 208 non-aluminized 200 cm fibers, from several production batches, and 128 batch no. 6 aluminized fibers, with lengths ranging from 114 to 207 cm

  4. Burnup calculations for cadmium. A case study for HFR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Sciolla, C.M

    2000-09-11

    This report describes the pre-design burnup calculations performed for a cadmium shielded high fluence irradiation experiment in the HFR. The very high absorption cross section in cadmium causes problems in the calculations for two different reasons. Firstly, because of the large reaction rates the assumption that the flux and the cross sections remain piecewise constant is no longer true. Therefore the correct solution can only be obtained when using extremely small time steps which leads to excessive computing times. Secondly, the self-shielding in the cadmium becomes complete (black absorber) causing the depletion to progress in a shell-wise manner. As a consequence the depletion evolves nearly linear instead of exponential with time. Because of this the depletion codes are used in a regime for which these have not been designed leading to a systematic error. The analysis shows however that a good estimate for the burnup time can be obtained by extrapolation from calculations with practically sized time steps and a correction is derived to compensate the systematic error. The calculations were done using the OCTOPUS burnup code system, including the 3-D Monte-Carlo spectrum code MCNP-4B and the depletion code FISPACT-4.2. Verifications were performed with the WIMS code system. The first part of the report describes the study of the cadmium burnup calculations for a shielded steel sample with the emphasis on analyzing the requirements for obtaining the correct solution. The second part describes the time-dependent power production calculations with the steel replaced by lithium containing ceramic material such as to be used in the 'High Fluence Irradiation of Ceramics for Fusion' (HICU) experiment. 12 refs.

  5. Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yamada, Michiko

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that exposure to ionizing radiation accelerates the aging process has been actively investigated at ABCC-RERF since 1958, when longitudinal cohort studies of the Adult Health Study (AHS) and the Life Span Study (LSS) were initiated. In their 1975 overall review of aging studies related to the atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, Finch and Beebe concluded that while most studies had shown no correlation between aging and radiation exposure, they had not involved the large numbers of subjects required to provide strong evidence for or against the hypothesis. Extending LSS mortality data up to 1978 did not alter the earlier conclusion that any observed life-shortening was associated primarily with cancer induction rather than with any nonspecific cause. The results of aging studies conducted during the intervening 15 years using data from the same populations are reviewed in the present paper. Using clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory techniques, a broad spectrum of aging parameters have been studied, such as postmortem morphological changes, tests of functional capacity, physical tests and measurements, laboratory tests, tissue changes, and morbidity. With respect to the aging process, the overall results have not been consistent and are generally thought to show no relation to radiation exposure. Although some preliminary results suggest a possible radiation-induced increase in atherosclerotic diseases and acceleration of aging in the T-cell-related immune system, further study is necessary to confirm these findings. In the future, applying the latest gerontological study techniques to data collected from subjects exposed 45 years ago to A-bomb radiation at relatively young ages will present a new body of data relevant to the study of late radiation effects. (author) 103 refs

  6. Nurse Case Managers' Experiences on Case Management for Long-term Hospitalization in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jinjoo Oh, Ph.D., RN, GNP; Seieun Oh, Ph.D., RN

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of case management for long-term hospitalization use has been approved for controlling medical cost increases in other countries. But, introduction of the case management in Korea has created issues that hinder its effective operation. This qualitative study aimed to obtain further understanding of the issues surrounding the management of Medical Aid beneficiaries' use of long-term hospitalization from the case managers' perspectives and to provide suggestions for ...

  7. Statistic analyses of the color experience according to the age of the observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunjet, Anica; Parac-Osterman, Durdica; Vucaj, Edita

    2013-04-01

    Psychological experience of color is a real state of the communication between the environment and color, and it will depend on the source of the light, angle of the view, and particular on the observer and his health condition. Hering's theory or a theory of the opponent processes supposes that cones, which are situated in the retina of the eye, are not sensible on the three chromatic domains (areas, fields, zones) (red, green and purple-blue), but they produce a signal based on the principle of the opposed pairs of colors. A reason of this theory depends on the fact that certain disorders of the color eyesight, which include blindness to certain colors, cause blindness to pairs of opponent colors. This paper presents a demonstration of the experience of blue and yellow tone according to the age of the observer. For the testing of the statistically significant differences in the omission in the color experience according to the color of the background we use following statistical tests: Mann-Whitnney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Median test. It was proven that the differences are statistically significant in the elderly persons (older than 35 years).

  8. Data Registry on Experiences of Aging, Menopause, and Sexuality (DREAMS): A cohort profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Kapoor, Ekta; Kling, Juliana M; Kuhle, Carol L; Sood, Richa; Rullo, Jordan E; Thielen, Jacqueline M; Shuster, Lynne T; Rocca, Walter A; Hilsaca, Karla S Frohmader; Mara, Kristin C; Schroeder, Darrell R; Miller, Virginia M

    2018-01-01

    The Women's Health Clinic (WHC) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, has provided consultative care to women with menopausal and sexual health concerns since 2005. Clinical information on the 8688 women seen in the WHC through May 2017 who gave consent for the use of their medical records in research is contained in the Data Registry on Experiences of Aging, Menopause, and Sexuality (DREAMS). Initially, DREAMS was created to improve the clinical care of women, but it has become a valuable research tool. About 25% of the DREAMS women have been seen in the WHC 2 or more times, allowing for passive longitudinal follow-up. Additionally, about 25% of the DREAMS women live in the 27-county region included in the expanded Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system, providing additional information on those women. The cohort has been used to investigate associations between: caffeine intake and vasomotor symptom bother; recent abuse (physical, sexual, verbal, and emotional) and menopausal symptoms; specific menopausal symptoms and self-reported view of menopause; and obstructive sleep apnea risk and vasomotor symptom severity and the experience of vasomotor symptoms in women older than 60 years. A study nearing completion describes a clinical series of over 3500 women presenting for sexual health consultation by sexual function domain and by decade of life. Other studies under way are determining correlates with sexual health and dysfunction. Planned studies will investigate associations between the experience with menopause and the risk of disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Age, training, and previous experience predict race performance in long-distance inline skaters, not anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-02-01

    The association of characteristics of anthropometry, training, and previous experience with race time in 84 recreational, long-distance, inline skaters at the longest inline marathon in Europe (111 km), the Inline One-eleven in Switzerland, was investigated to identify predictor variables for performance. Age, duration per training unit, and personal best time were the only three variables related to race time in a multiple regression, while none of the 16 anthropometric variables were related. Anthropometric characteristics seem to be of no importance for a fast race time in a long-distance inline skating race in contrast to training volume and previous experience, when controlled with covariates. Improving performance in a long-distance inline skating race might be related to a high training volume and previous race experience. Also, doing such a race requires a parallel psychological effort, mental stamina, focus, and persistence. This may be reflected in the preparation and training for the event. Future studies should investigate what motivates these athletes to train and compete.

  10. "White shoes to a football match!": Female experiences of football's golden age in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Pope

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although many British historians claim that English football in the post–World War II period was substantially the passion of working-class men, oral history accounts also reveal a largely hidden history of active female sports fans, women who keenly followed football. These female fans often faced opposition from fellow supporters and from other women. In many ways, academic research on sports fandom has worked to omit serious discussion of the role of women. Taken from a wider project aimed at making more visible the historical experiences of female spectators in sport in Britain, this paper draws on interviews with 16 older female fans of the Leicester City football club based in the East Midlands in England. It explores their experiences in the so-called golden age of the game with regard to the football stadium, styles of female support, and relationships with and perceptions of football players. Via oral history research, the paper offers a wider context for understanding the sporting experiences of female fans. But it also analyzes and explicates the meaning of sport in the lives of female fans during a period when football players were paradoxically glamorous and unobtainable local figures, but also, in some contexts, still accessible, ordinary members of local communities.

  11. Trends in new injuries, prevalent cases, and aging with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVivo, Michael J; Chen, Yuying

    2011-03-01

    To determine the characteristics of the newly injured and prevalent population with spinal cord injury (SCI) and assess trends over time. Prospective cohort study. SCI Model Systems and Shriners Hospital SCI units. The study population included people whose injuries occurred from 1935 to 2008 (N=45,442). The prevalent population was estimated based on those who were still alive in 2008. Losses to follow-up (approximately 10%) were excluded from the prevalent population. Not applicable. Demographic and injury characteristics, mortality, self-reported health, rehospitalization, FIM, Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and the Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale. Mean age at injury increased 9 years since the 1970s. Injuries caused by falls and injuries resulting in high-level tetraplegia and ventilator dependency are increasing, while neurologically complete injuries are decreasing. Discharge to a nursing home is increasing. The mean age of the prevalent population is slightly higher than that of newly injured individuals, and the percentage of incident and prevalent cases older than 60 years is the same (13%). Prevalent cases tend to be less severely injured than incident cases, and less than 5% of prevalent cases reside in nursing homes. Within the prevalent population, life satisfaction and community participation are greater among persons who are at least 30 years postinjury. These findings are a result of very high mortality rates observed after 60 years of age. Within the prevalent population, the percentage of elderly persons will not increase meaningfully. Those who reach older ages will typically have incomplete and/or lower-level injuries and will have relatively high degrees of independence and overall good health. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  13. Four foot septifoil cooling experiment unrestricted inlet/outlet case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foti, D.J.; Randolph, H.W.; Geiger, G.T.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The ability to predict the behavior of reactor components to varying coolant flow scenarios constitutes a necessary skill for assessing reactor safety. One tool for performing these calculations is the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested the Equipment Engineering Section (EES) of SRL to conduct a series of experiments to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor components. The configuration selected consisted of a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an open-quotes unseatedclose quotes configuration. Varying power levels were to be supplied to the rods with 3.5 kilowatts per foot the value targeted for modelling during the computer runs. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, water flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs. heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. This report documents testing done with unimpeded flow into and out of the septifoil in order to assess basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling and pressure rise. Previous tests have evaluated water flow rate and the ratio of axial to azimuthal heat transfer

  14. MOD-AGE - an algorithm for age-depth model construction; U-series dated speleothems case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercman, H.; Pawlak, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present MOD-AGE - a new system for chronology construction. MOD-AGE can be used for profiles that have been dated by different methods. As input data, the system uses the following basic measurements: activities, atomic ratios or age, as well as depth measurement. Based on probability distributions describing the measurement results, MOD-AGE estimates the age~depth relation and its confidence bands. To avoid the use of difficult-to-meet assumptions, MOD-AGE uses nonparametric methods. We applied a Monte Carlo simulation to model age and depth values based on the real distribution of counted data (activities, atomic ratios, depths etc.). Several fitting methods could be applied for estimating the relationships; based on several tests, we decide to use LOESS method (locally weighted scatterplot smoothing). The stratigraphic correction procedure applied in the MOD-AGE program uses a probability calculus, which assumes that the ages of all the samples are correctly estimated. Information about the probability distribution of the samples' ages is used to estimate the most probable sequence that is concordant according to the superposition rule. MOD-AGE is presented as a tool for the chronology construction of speleothems that have been analyzed by the U-series method, and it is compared to the StalAge algorithm presented by D. Scholtz and D.L Hoffmann (2011). Scholtz, D., Hoffmann, D. L., 2011. StalAge - An algorithm designed for construction of speleothem age models. Quaternary Geochronology 6, 369-382.

  15. Transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty: Brazilian initial experience with 55 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco T. C. Lasmar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate prospectively the results obtained in 55 patients undergoing laparoscopic pyeloplasty through transperitoneal access. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 2005 to July 2009, fifty-five patients between 13 and 64 years old, were treated for ureteropelvic junction (UPJ stenosis via a transperitoneal laparoscopy. All patients had clinical symptoms of high urinary obstruction and hydronephrosis confirmed by imaging methods. Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty was performed in 51 patients and Fenger technique in the other 4 cases. Patients were clinically and imaging evaluated in the postoperative period at 3 and 6 months and then followed-up annually. RESULTS: The operative time ranged from 95 to 270 min. The mean hospital stay was 2 days. The average blood loss was 170 mL. The time to return to normal activities ranged from 10 to 28 days. Anomalous vessels were identified in 27 patients, intrinsic stenosis in 23 patients and 5 patients had high implantation of the ureter. Laparoscopic pyelolithotomy was successfully performed in 6 patients with associated renal stones. That series monitoring ranged from 1 to 55 months. One patient had longer urinary fistula (11 days, 3 patients had portal infection and 6 patients had prolonged ileus. There was one conversion due to technical difficulties. From the later postoperative complications, 2 patients had re-stenosis, one determined by Anderson-Hynes technique and the other by Fenger technique. The success rate was 95.65%. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has functional results comparable to conventional open technique. It offers less morbidity, with aesthetic and post-operative convalescence benefits and lower complication rates.

  16. The temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences: A follow-up from birth to age 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Kleinepier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing attention being paid to the temporal dynamics of childhood disadvantage, children's neighborhood characteristics are still frequently measured at a single point in time. Whether such cross-sectional measures serve as reliable proxies for children's long-run neighborhood conditions depends on the stability in children's neighborhood experiences over time. Objective: We investigate stability in children's neighborhood environment over time, focusing on two of the most commonly studied neighborhood socioeconomic conditions: The ethnic composition and mean income of the neighborhood. Methods: Drawing on data from the Dutch population registers, an entire cohort of children born in the Netherlands in 1999 (n=179,166 is followed from birth up until age 15. We use year-to-year correlations in the percentage of non-Western ethnic minorities and the mean logged income in the neighborhood to evaluate the temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences. Results: Results indicate that children's neighborhood characteristics are more stable over time with regard to ethnic composition than with regard to the mean income. Children who had moved at least once had less stability in neighborhood characteristics than children who never moved. Finally, neighborhood experiences were found to be more stable over time for ethnic minority children, although differences were small with regard to mean income in the neighborhood. Conclusions: We conclude that single point-in-time measurements of neighborhood characteristics are reasonable proxies for the long-run ethnic composition of children's neighborhood environment, but rather noisy proxies for the long-run income status of their neighborhood, particularly for those who moved. Contribution: We examine the temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences over almost the entire childhood life course in the European context.

  17. Refeeding syndrome in Southeastern Taiwan: our experience with 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ju; Chen, Huan-Lin; Bair, Ming-Jong; Wu, Chia-Hsien; Lin, I-Tsung; Lee, Yuan-Kai; Chu, Cheng-Hsin

    2014-08-14

    To present our experience with refeeding syndrome in southeastern Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective study during a 2-year period at the Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taitung Branch. We enrolled patients with very little or no nutrition intake for more than 10 d, a high risk group of refeeding syndrome, including those suffering from alcohol abuse, cancerous cachexia, chronic malnutrition, and prolonged starvation. A total of 11 patients (7 males, 4 females) with nasogastric feeding were included as having refeeding syndrome. Most of them had the symptoms of diarrhea, lethargy, and leg edema. The initial nutritional supplement was found to be relatively high in calories (1355.1 ± 296.2 kcal/d), high in protein (47.3 ± 10.4 gm/d), low in vitamin B1 (2.0 ± 0.5 mg/d), low in potassium (1260.4 ± 297.7 mg/d), and low in phosphorus (660.1 ± 151.8 mg/d). Furthermore, hypophosphatemia (2.4 ± 0.9 mg/dL) was noted during follow-up. Based on the suggestions of a dietician and a gastroenterologist, the clinical disorders of diarrhea, malaise and leg edema were significantly improved. The level of phosphate was also increased (3.3 ± 0.6 mg/dL). Refeeding syndrome is an overlooked and risky disorder that has some potentially fatal complications. Nasogastric feeding in nursing homes is an important risk factor for patients and deserves greater attention based on the initial results of this study.

  18. Experience with simulation education at the University of the Third Age at JFM CU in Martin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Zanovitová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering current demographic trends in society, education of seniors has become real needs and a challenge for the field of education and training institutions. Universities of the Third Age (UTA represent one option for senior education allowing them to study various fields at university level. Within UTA studies, the seniors are interested in studying mainly the issues of health and disease, aging and the social and legal issues. Seniors represent a group of students with specific educational needs. In teaching them it is therefore important to choose teaching methods that take account of developmental changes of the period, contain elements of clearness, and provide the space for communication and activity with the use of previous experiences of seniors. In the framework of elderly education at the UTA at Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin (JFM CU the simulation methods are also used that bring elements of clarity and attractiveness into the teaching and serve to bridge theoretical education and practical training. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the UTA senior students’ views on the use of simulation models and simulations in education and to find out what is their satisfaction with the training in the Simulation Center at JFM CU in Martin. Methods: Questionnaire of own construction was used to gather empirical data. The study involved 30 senior students of the third year of studies in the program “Elderly Care”, out of which 25 were women and 5 men. The average age of respondents was 67.3 years (SD 5.6. Results: Within education and training in Simulation Center, the seniors most positively evaluated preparedness, presentation and interpretation of the lecturer (4.96 and the way in which information were administered (4.76. They had the opportunity of hands-on work with the simulation models and practical training of their skills and such experience was evaluated as excellent (4.70. Seniors also

  19. Managers' views on and experiences with moral case deliberation in nursing teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidema, F.C.; Molewijk, A.C.; Kamsteeg, F.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Providing management insights regarding moral case deliberation (MCD) from the experiential perspective of nursing managers. Background: MCD concerns systematic group-wise reflection on ethical issues. Attention to implementing MCD in health care is increasing, and managers' experiences

  20. Making a Case for E - learning: Experiences in E-learning at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Making a Case for E - learning: Experiences in E-learning at Langston University ... performances can surpass those of students in traditional learning settings. ... The research method was qualitative based mainly on participatory and ...

  1. Demonstration of statistical approaches to identify component's ageing by operational data analysis-A case study for the ageing PSA network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Andrei; Atwood, Corwin L.; Kirchsteiger, Christian; Patrik, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents some results of a case study on 'Demonstration of statistical approaches to identify the component's ageing by operational data analysis', which was done in the frame of the EC JRC Ageing PSA Network. Several techniques: visual evaluation, nonparametric and parametric hypothesis tests, were proposed and applied in order to demonstrate the capacity, advantages and limitations of statistical approaches to identify the component's ageing by operational data analysis. Engineering considerations are out of the scope of the present study

  2. Challenging cisgenderism in the ageing and aged care sector: Meeting the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansara, Y Gavriel

    2015-10-01

    Recent Australian legislative and policy changes can benefit people of trans and/or non-binary experience (e.g. men assigned female with stereotypically 'female' bodies, women assigned male with stereotypically 'male' bodies, and people who identify as genderqueer, agender [having no gender], bi-gender [having two genders] or another gender option). These populations often experience cisgenderism, which previous research defined as 'the ideology that invalidates people's own understanding of their genders and bodies'. Some documented forms of cisgenderism include pathologising (treating people's genders and bodies as disordered) and misgendering (disregarding people's own understanding and classifications of their genders and bodies). This system of classifying people's lived experiences of gender and body invalidation is called the cisgenderism framework. Applying the cisgenderism framework in the ageing and aged care sector can enhance service providers' ability to meet the needs of older people of trans and/or non-binary experience. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  3. Risk factors associated with deforming oral habits in children aged 5 to 11: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Enrique Reyes Romagosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dental and maxillofacial anomalies have multiple and complex causes. Most frequent among these are poor oral habits. A large number of children present with oral malocclusions, most of which are caused by deforming oral habits. It is important to learn about risk factors for this condition in order to institute preventive measures, early detection and treatment, and identification of low- and high-risk groups. Objectives To identify risk factors associated with deforming oral habits, which, if maintained over time, are responsible for occlusion defects, speech disorders, and can affect physical and emotional child development. Methods A case-control study of children presenting with deforming oral habits in the municipality of Manzanillo in Granma province was conducted between January and August 2013. 540 children aged 5 to 11 were included of which 180 had deforming oral habits and were asked to fill out a survey to identify specific type of habits leading to malocclusion. The case group was composed of children with deforming habits, and the remaining 360 children without poor oral habits were the control group. Each case was randomly matched to two control cases. The children’s mothers were also surveyed to gather supplemental information. Results Children with deforming oral habits were mostly female. At age 10, onychophagia was the predominant oral deforming habit. Risk factors detected for these habits were sociobiological maternal and child variables such as low and high birth weight, maternal breastfeeding inexperience, and discord in the family. Conclusions The study identified likely risk factors associated with deforming oral habits. These are discord in the family, birth weight, and lack of breastfeeding experience.

  4. [Case managers experience improved trajectories for cancer patients after implementation of the case manager function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Karina Rahbek; Nafei, Hanne; Jakobsen, Stine Finne; Gandrup, Per; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2015-06-08

    Case managers are increasingly used to optimize trajectories for patients. This study is based on a questionnaire among case managers in cancer care, aiming at the clarification of the func­tion and its impact on especially patient safety, when handing over the responsibility. The results show a major variation in how the function is organized, the level of competence and the task to be handled. The responsibility has in general been nar­rowed to department level. Overall, the case managers believe that the function has optimized pathways for cancer patients and improved safety, but barriers persist.

  5. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities.

  6. Bangladeshi school-age children's experiences and perceptions on child maltreatment: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiqul Haque, M; Janson, S; Moniruzzaman, S; Rahman, A K M F; Mashreky, S R; Eriksson, U-B

    2017-11-01

    Child maltreatment (CM) is a public health problem and is recognized as a huge barrier for child development. Most of the research and definitions on CM are from the perspective of high-income western countries. Because no major studies have been conducted on CM in Bangladesh, the aim of the current study was to explore the experiences of and perceptions on CM in school-age children in rural and urban Bangladesh in order to understand maltreatment in a local context and from a child perspective. Semistructured individual interviews with 24 children (13 boys and 11 girls), between the ages of 9 and 13 years of which 11 were schoolgoing and 13 non-schoolgoing, were conducted during July 2013 and analysed according to qualitative content analysis. CM was a common and painful experience with serious physical and emotional consequences but highly accepted by the society. Vulnerable groups were especially young children, girls, and poor children. The children's voices were not heard due to their low status and low position in their families, schools, and working places. The main theme that emerged in the analysis was children's subordination, which permeated the five categories: (a) perception of children's situation in society, (b) understanding children's development and needs, (c) CM associated to school achievement, (d) negative impact of CM, and (e) emotional responses. Different kinds of abuse are obviously common in Bangladesh, and the schools do not follow the law from 2011 prohibiting corporal punishment at school. The society has to take further steps to live up to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which was ratified already in 1990, to protect the Bangladeshi children from CM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Life Brought at a Tender Age: The Lived Experiences of Filipino Teenage Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTOPHER R. PARUNGAO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Unintended teenage pregnancy is an ever-present issue in developing countries such as the Philippines. The impact of teenage pregnancy affects the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual well being of the adolescents. Teen pregnancies carry extra health risks to both the mother and the baby. Nurses play a crucial role in supporting young people as trusted practitioners in a range of settings. This study aimed to explore the lived experiences of the teenage pregnant women. Six adolescent female aged 12-19 years old who were pregnant with their first child agreed to participate. A qualitative inquiry, specifically Husserlian descriptive phenomenology was employed. Semi-structured in depth face-to-face interviews were undertaken, audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using Colaizzi’s method. The richness of the experiences shared by the selections provided the necessary information to understand and describe the essence of the phenomenon understudy. Cool and warm analyses captured the following emergent themes of Trends toward issues, Fortified faith, and Optimistic outlook. For the selections in this study, being pregnant at a young age did not mean that their life and future were all over. The women were optimistic about their futures. The findings of the study have vital implications in offering specific programs and services and in developing educational materials that focus on preventing teen pregnancy. While health nurse practitioners primarily provide services and education to teens and parents in various health care facilities, they also can be significant participants in prevention activities and coalitions that are based in a community. The outcomes of the study have possible contributions to the nursing practice, to policies that facilitate the promotion of the health of the teenage mothers and the prevention of teenage pregnancies, and in building future researches especially in the education of the teens about the consequences of

  8. Age and choice in health insurance: evidence from a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karolin; Zweifel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    experiment was developed using six attributes (deductibles, co-payment, access to alternative medicines, medication choice, access to innovation, and monthly premium) that are currently in debate within the context of Swiss health insurance. These attributes have been shown to be important in the choice of insurance contract. Using statistical design optimization procedures, the number of choice sets was reduced to 27 and randomly split into three groups. One choice was included twice to test for consistency. Two random effects probit models were developed: a simple model where marginal utilities and WTP values were not allowed to vary according to socioeconomic characteristics, and a more complex model where the values were permitted to depend on socioeconomic variables.A representative telephone survey of 1000 people aged >24 years living in the German- and French-speaking parts of Switzerland was conducted. Participants were asked to compare the status quo (i.e. their current insurance contract) with ten hypothetical alternatives. In addition, participants were asked questions concerning utilization of healthcare services; overall satisfaction with the healthcare system, insurer and insurance policy; and a general preference for new elements in the insurance package. Socioeconomic variables surveyed were age, sex, total household income, education (seven categories ranging from primary school to university degree), place of residence, occupation, and marital status. All chosen elements proved relevant for choice in the simple model. Accounting for socioeconomic characteristics in the comprehensive model reveals preference heterogeneity for contract attributes, but also for the propensity to consider deviating from the status quo and choosing an alternative health insurance contract. The findings suggest that while the elderly do exhibit a stronger status quo bias than younger age groups, they require less rather than more specific compensation for selected cutbacks

  9. The AGING Initiative experience: a call for sustained support for team science networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tullika; Anzuoni, Kathryn; Landyn, Valentina; Hajduk, Alexandra; Waring, Stephen; Hanson, Leah R; Whitson, Heather E

    2018-05-18

    Team science, defined as collaborative research efforts that leverage the expertise of diverse disciplines, is recognised as a critical means to address complex healthcare challenges, but the practical implementation of team science can be difficult. Our objective is to describe the barriers, solutions and lessons learned from our team science experience as applied to the complex and growing challenge of multiple chronic conditions (MCC). MCC is the presence of two or more chronic conditions that have a collective adverse effect on health status, function or quality of life, and that require complex healthcare management, decision-making or coordination. Due to the increasing impact on the United States society, MCC research has been identified as a high priority research area by multiple federal agencies. In response to this need, two national research entities, the Healthcare Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAIC), formed the Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth (AGING) Initiative to build nationwide capacity for MCC team science. This article describes the structure, lessons learned and initial outcomes of the AGING Initiative. We call for funding mechanisms to sustain infrastructures that have demonstrated success in fostering team science and innovation in translating findings to policy change necessary to solve complex problems in healthcare.

  10. Ageing under mechanical stress: first experiments for a silver based multilayer mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Arnaud; Ravel, Guillaume; Ignat, Michel; Cousin, Bernard; Swain, Michael V.

    2017-11-01

    Improving materials and devices reliability is a major concern to the spatial industry. Results are reported for satellite mirrors-like specimens consisting in oxide-protected metal systems. Optical coatings were deposited by electron beam evaporation. Mechanical stress fields in multi-layered materials play an important role. The stress state can have far-reaching implications both in kinetics and thermodynamics. Therefore an integrated apparatus with four-point bending equipment was designed. The technique allowed us to exert stress into a film or a system of films on a substrate concurrently with thermal treatment. In order to achieve the first tests performed with the help of the apparatus, various preliminary characterizations were required. The article reports the preliminary micro-mechanical testing of the materials (ultra micro-indentation to evaluate the elastic modulus of the samples materials and wafer curvature technique to determine the specimen residual stress) and the first ageing experiment. Experimental evidence of accelerated ageing under stress is successfully reported.

  11. Masculinity and preventing falls: insights from the fall experiences of men aged 70 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, J L M; Lovarini, Meryl; Clemson, Lindy M; Jang, Haeyoung; Lord, Stephen R; Sherrington, Catherine; Willis, Karen

    2018-01-11

    To explore men's fall experiences through the lens of masculine identities so as to assist health professionals better engage men in fall prevention programs. Twenty-five men, aged 70-93 years who had experienced a recent fall, participated in a qualitative semi-structured interview. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs taking account of individual contexts and expressions of masculinity, were conceptualised using constant comparative methods. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs was related to their perceptions of the preventability of falls; personal relevance of falls; and age, health, and capability as well as problem-solving styles to prevent falls. Fall prevention advice was rarely given when men accessed the health system at the time of a fall. Contrary to dominant expectations about masculine identity, many men acknowledged fall vulnerability indicating they would attend or consider attending, a fall prevention program. Health professionals can better engage men by providing consistent messages that falls can be prevented; tailoring advice, understanding men are at different stages in their awareness of fall risk and preferences for action; and by being aware of their own assumptions that can act as barriers to speaking with men about fall prevention. Implications for rehabilitation Men accessing the health system at the time of the fall, and during rehabilitation following a fall represent prime opportunities for health professionals to speak with men about preventing falls and make appropriate referrals to community programs. Tailored advice will take account of individual men's perceptions of preventability; personal relevance; perceptions of age, health and capability; and problem-solving styles.

  12. Changes in experiences with discrimination across pregnancy and postpartum: age differences and consequences for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Lisa; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Lewis, Tené T; Reid, Allecia E; Lewis, Jessica B; Stasko, Emily C; Tobin, Jonathan N; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to contribute to growing research and theory suggesting the importance of examining patterns of change over time and critical life periods to fully understand the effects of discrimination on health, with a focus on the period of pregnancy and postpartum and mental health outcomes. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine changes across pregnancy and postpartum in everyday discrimination and the resulting consequences for mental health among predominantly Black and Latina, socioeconomically disadvantaged young women who were receiving prenatal care in New York City. Patterns of change in experiences with discrimination varied according to age. Among the youngest participants, discrimination increased from the second to third trimesters and then decreased to lower than the baseline level by 1 year postpartum; among the oldest participants, discrimination decreased from the second trimester to 6 months postpartum and then returned to the baseline level by 1 year postpartum. Within-subjects changes in discrimination over time predicted changes in depressive and anxiety symptoms at subsequent points. Discrimination more strongly predicted anxiety symptoms among participants reporting food insecurity. Our results support a life course approach to understanding the impact of experiences with discrimination on health and when to intervene.

  13. Dance Experience and Associations with Cortical Gray Matter Thickness in the Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Shai; Goukasian, Naira; Hwang, Kristy S; Zanto, Theodore; Do, Triet; Pierce, Jonathan; Joshi, Shantanu; Woo, Ellen; Apostolova, Liana G

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect dance experience may have on cortical gray matter thickness and cognitive performance in elderly participants with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). 39 cognitively normal and 48 MCI elderly participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifetime experience with music, dance, and song. Participants identified themselves as either dancers or nondancers. All participants received structural 1.5-tesla MRI scans and detailed clinical and neuropsychological evaluations. An advanced 3D cortical mapping technique was then applied to calculate cortical thickness. Despite having a trend-level significantly thinner cortex, dancers performed better in cognitive tasks involving learning and memory, such as the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) short delay free recall (p = 0.004), the CVLT-II long delay free recall (p = 0.003), and the CVLT-II learning over trials 1-5 (p = 0.001). Together, these results suggest that dance may result in an enhancement of cognitive reserve in aging, which may help avert or delay MCI.

  14. Dance Experience and Associations with Cortical Gray Matter Thickness in the Aging Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Porat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We investigated the effect dance experience may have on cortical gray matter thickness and cognitive performance in elderly participants with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Methods: 39 cognitively normal and 48 MCI elderly participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifetime experience with music, dance, and song. Participants identified themselves as either dancers or nondancers. All participants received structural 1.5-tesla MRI scans and detailed clinical and neuropsychological evaluations. An advanced 3D cortical mapping technique was then applied to calculate cortical thickness. Results: Despite having a trend-level significantly thinner cortex, dancers performed better in cognitive tasks involving learning and memory, such as the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II short delay free recall (p = 0.004, the CVLT-II long delay free recall (p = 0.003, and the CVLT-II learning over trials 1-5 (p = 0.001. Discussion: Together, these results suggest that dance may result in an enhancement of cognitive reserve in aging, which may help avert or delay MCI.

  15. Organizational Change in Academic Programs: A Case Study of Doctoral Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Christina Coffee

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the experiences of doctoral students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as they transitioned from a fairly stable academic department experiencing significant changes. To achieve the purpose of the study, I investigated the experiences of doctoral students through an organizational development…

  16. The prevalence of lacunar infarct decreases with aging in the elderly: a case-controlled analysis

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    Cai Z

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhiyou Cai,1 Wenbo He,1 Chuan-yong Peng,2 Jin Zhou,2 Qi-lan Xu,2 Zong-shan Wu2 1Department of Neurology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan Renmin Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province, 2The Examination Center of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, the Lu’an Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Lu’an People’s Hospital, Lu’an, Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: Lacunar infarct (LI is well known as a heterogeneous primary disorder of cerebral small vessel. Compelling results have demonstrated that age is a risk factor to the prevalence of LI. However, the relationship between age and the prevalence of LI remains obscure. It is essential to note the relationship between age and the prevalence of LI through more clinical data. Methods: A total of 3,500 patients were included in the case-controlled study. All data were collected from the Examination Center of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Lu’an People’s Hospital from January 2014 to December 2015. A primary discharge diagnosis of LI was done, and all subjects were evaluated as retrospective data. The relationship between the risk factors and the prevalence of diabetes and the relationship between age and the prevalence of diabetes was analyzed. A chi-square test was used to analyze the associations between different variables. A one-way analysis of variance was used to test the equality of three or more means at one time by using variances. Statistical significance was defined as a P-value of <0.05. Results: The one-way analysis of variance demonstrated that the prevalence of LI increased with age before 60 years and decreased with age after 69 years. The same results were found in both the male and the female subjects. These results showed that the age-related risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, cerebral infarct, cardiovascular diseases, smoking, and drinking have no relationship with the prevalence of LI on the basis of age. There is

  17. Distribution of Age and Location of Chordoma in 39 Cases and Review of Treatment Options

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    Shahab Kamali Ardekani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: notochord. Although histologically benign, these tumors are locally aggressiveand present significant managment challenges . There arew some studies onevaluated the location, age and gender of the patients with Chordoma in tworeferral centers in Tehran.chordoma cases but there was no study about Iranian cases. In this study weSkull base chordomas are rare neoplasms arising from theMethods: (Shariati and Imam Hospitals, Tehran from 2001 to 2011 was retrospectivelyreviewed.A database of patients with chordoma tumors referred to two centersResults: women, and they are most commonly diagnosed in middle-aged (mean age was50.6. Tumors typically occur in the axial skeleton and have a tendency for thespheno-occipital region of the skull base and sacral region. In adults 33.3% ofchordomas involve the sacrococcygeal region, 53% occured at the base of theskull near the spheno-occipital area, and near 14% were found in the vertebralcolumn. The cranial nerves mostly affected were abducens, oculomotor andtrochlear, with some overlaps. All patients were treated with surgery and somecases referred for gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKS.In our subjects tumors affect men nearly twice as frequently asDiscussion: to females that is different from other studies, however, few studies reportedmore male to female ratio. Despite the progress in current surgical techniquesand some encouraging results with the use of targeted therapy, disease controland long-term prognosis of patients are still poor.Findings of this study showed more involvement of males compare

  18. Early onset polymyalgia rheumatica: two rare cases under age of 50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinyoung; Sung, Duk Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is almost an exclusive disease of adults over the age of 50, and only a few cases have been reported. Two 46-year-old females visited our locomotor pain clinic with multiple joint pain with increased acute phase reactants. Rheumatologic markers, and HLA-B27 were checked. Serum protein electrophoresis and serum immunofixation electrophoresis, imaging studies including plane image, sonography, and magnetic resonance image was done. "1"8F-Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) showed characteristic findings of PMR, without evidences of sacroiliitis. Since PMR can develop in mid 40s, a high index of suspicion is necessary in younger patients presenting the bilateral pain in shoulders, hips, and back, with elevated acute phase reactants. Furthermore, in addition to the previous case reports, FDG-PET/CT is helpful in making early differential diagnosis of PMR in patients under the age of 50. Here we present two cases of PMR onset in the mid-40s emphasizing the importance of diagnostic imaging for early differential diagnosis in PMR. (orig.)

  19. Early onset polymyalgia rheumatica: two rare cases under age of 50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinyoung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Rehabilitation Institute of Neuromuscular Disease, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Duk Hyun [Samsung Medical Center, Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is almost an exclusive disease of adults over the age of 50, and only a few cases have been reported. Two 46-year-old females visited our locomotor pain clinic with multiple joint pain with increased acute phase reactants. Rheumatologic markers, and HLA-B27 were checked. Serum protein electrophoresis and serum immunofixation electrophoresis, imaging studies including plane image, sonography, and magnetic resonance image was done. {sup 18}F-Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) showed characteristic findings of PMR, without evidences of sacroiliitis. Since PMR can develop in mid 40s, a high index of suspicion is necessary in younger patients presenting the bilateral pain in shoulders, hips, and back, with elevated acute phase reactants. Furthermore, in addition to the previous case reports, FDG-PET/CT is helpful in making early differential diagnosis of PMR in patients under the age of 50. Here we present two cases of PMR onset in the mid-40s emphasizing the importance of diagnostic imaging for early differential diagnosis in PMR. (orig.)

  20. Lower extremity revascularization without preoperative contrast arteriography: experience with duplex ultrasound arterial mapping in 485 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, Enrico; Hingorani, Anil; Markevich, Natalia; Costa, Tatiana; Kallakuri, Shreedhar; Khanimoy, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This study reviews our experience with duplex ultrasound arterial mapping (DUAM) for preoperative evaluation in 466 patients (262 men) who underwent 485 lower extremity revascularization procedures from January 1, 1998 to May 30, 2001. Preoperative imaging consisted of DUAM alone in 449 procedures and DUAM and contrast angiography (CA) in 36. An attempt to image from the distal aorta to the pedal arteries was made in all the patients. The selection of optimal inflow and outflow bypasses anastomotic sites was based on a schematic drawing following DUAM examination. Inflow disease was also assessed by intraoperative pressure gradient (IPG) between the distal anastomosis and radial arteries, and completion arteriography of the runoff vessels was obtained, which was correlated with the preoperative findings. Indications for surgery were severe claudication in 91 (19%) limbs, tissue loss in 197 (40%), rest pain in 113 (23%), acute ischemia in 46 (10%), popliteal aneurysm in 18 (4%), superficial femoral artery aneurysm in 1, abdominal aortic aneurysm with claudication in 1, and failing graft in 18 (4%). Age ranged from 30 to 97 years (mean 72 +/- 12 (SD) years) and risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, use of tobacco, coronary artery disease, and end-stage renal disease were present in 45%, 45%, 44%, 44%, and 13% of the patients, respectively. One hundred twenty-one (25%) limbs had at least 1 previous ipsilateral revascularization. The mean DUAM time was 66 +/- 20 (SD) min (30-150 min). Additional preoperative imaging was deemed necessary in 36 cases due to extensive ulcers, edema, severe arterial wall calcification, and very poor runoff. The distal anastomosis was to the popliteal artery in 173 cases and to the tibial and pedal arteries in 255. Inflow procedures to the femoral arteries, embolectomy, thrombectomy, balloon angioplasty, and patch angioplasty accounted for the remaining 57 cases. Overall, 6-, 12-, and -24- month secondary patency rates were 86%, 80

  1. Initial experience with robotic pancreatic surgery in Singapore: single institution experience with 30 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Low, Tze-Yi; Lee, Ser-Yee; Chan, Chung-Yip; Chung, Alexander Y F; Ooi, London L P J

    2018-05-24

    Presently, the worldwide experience with robotic pancreatic surgery (RPS) is increasing although widespread adoption remains limited. In this study, we report our initial experience with RPS. This is a retrospective review of a single institution prospective database of 72 consecutive robotic hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries performed between 2013 and 2017. Of these, 30 patients who underwent RPS were included in this study of which 25 were performed by a single surgeon. The most common procedure was robotic distal pancreatectomy (RDP) which was performed in 20 patients. This included eight subtotal pancreatectomies, two extended pancreatecto-splenectomies (en bloc gastric resection) and 10 spleen-saving-RDP. Splenic preservation was successful in 10/11 attempted spleen-saving-RDP. Eight patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomies (five hybrid with open reconstruction), one patient underwent a modified Puestow procedure and one enucleation of uncinate tumour. Four patients had extended resections including two RDP with gastric resection and two pancreaticoduodenectomies with vascular resection. There was one (3.3%) open conversion and seven (23.3%) major (>Grade II) morbidities. Overall, there were four (13.3%) clinically significant (Grade B) pancreatic fistulas of which three required percutaneous drainage. These occurred after three RDP and one robotic enucleation. There was one reoperation for port-site hernia and no 30-day/in-hospital mortalities. The median post-operative stay was 6.5 (range: 3-36) days and there were six (20%) 30-day readmissions. Our initial experience showed that RPS can be adopted safely with a low open conversion rate for a wide variety of procedures including pancreaticoduodenectomy. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. CANDU steam generator aging management: Some perspectives after 20 years in-service experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.I.; Nickerson, J.; Subash, N.; Roy, S.

    2002-01-01

    assessment of the future field data. Subtle changes to plant operation and also the unique plant-specific details of materials and design often can have a significant impact on the life capability of this complicated equipment. From the plant-specific assessments, and from the experience from our R and D program and utility interaction, AECL has developed a detailed proactive SG aging management strategy for long and reliable life capability (to 50 years). This proactive strategy has a number of important elements that are recommended to be incorporated into current plant programs. With CANDU plants continuing operation with aging equipment, such as steam generators, AECL is continuing to undertake comprehensive programs to support operations and provide enhanced technologies for performance attainment and improvement in inspection, surveillance and performance/safety analysis methodologies. These technologies are also continuously improved by programs that are targeted to important in-service degradation mechanisms, understanding of the system/equipment tolerance to this degradation, and to measures that can be applied to both new reactors and back fitted to existing plants. Systematic and continuous feedback of experience from operations to the performance programs is another important part of the approach. This paper will outline the results of several CANDU SG condition assessments, and place the recommendations from these assessments in context with effective aging Management programs that need to be followed to achieve economic life. For CANDU 6 utilities, which have had a very good steam generator service record with little or no significant active degradation to date, the paper will outline the approach to proactive aging Management that will see equipment through to long and reliable extended life. Also mentioned will be examples of AECL performance improvement and operations support programs for steam generators. (author)

  3. Ethnic Residential Segregation in the United Kingdom by Age Group: the Case of Bradford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David McEvoy

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a long running debate on the significance of ethnic residential segregation levels in Britain. These phenomena have been related to the extent of community cohesion in British cities, and particularly to the riots of 2001 in the north of England. Further light is cast on these issues by examining ethnic segregation by age in the case of Bradford, the location of the largest riot. Both the dissimilarity index and the exposure index are used to consider relations between the White British and the largest minorities at ward level and at census output area level. The level of segregation is shown to vary with age, usually in a consistent direction. The direction varies between ethnic groups however.

  4. Evaluation of cases with Fasciola hepatica infection: experience in 6 children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Tezer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate 6 pediatric cases diagnosed as fascioliasis. Methods: Patients diagnosed as fascioliasis are retrospectively interpreted. Results: Herein 6 pediatric cases having a mean age of (12.7±3.1 years with different complaints including fever, weakness, paleness, sweating, cough, headache, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and abdominal distension admitting to our hospital are evaluated. Conclusions: Diagnosis of fascioliasis needs a high index of suspicion supported by stool microscopy, serology, imaging procedures, and in difficult cases even liver biopsy. Triclabendazole resistance should be kept in mind in unresponsive cases.

  5. Experiential health from an ageing and migration perspective: the case of older Finland-Swedes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Gunilla; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Sarvimäki, Anneli

    2010-02-01

    Research has shown that immigrants and minority groups tend to have a lower health status compared to the majority population. The Finnish immigrants in Sweden are no exception. The Finland-Swedes, i.e., persons living in Finland who have Swedish as their mother language, seem to be an exception, however. They have been found to have better health and longer life expectancy compared to the Finnish majority. Research on health among migrated Finland-Swedes is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe and deepen the understanding of how older Finland-Swedes living as immigrants in Sweden, as well as re-migrants in Finland, experienced their health. Data was collected through 39 qualitative interviews with 29 older Finland-Swedes aged 65 or more. Data was analysed through qualitative thematic content analysis. The analysis resulted in five themes: Ageing means becoming frail and closer to death; Despite frailty and old age it is possible to feel well and experience peace; Being grateful for health as a source of life; Health comes from inner strength and external sources; Migration meant a mental and physical burden to health. Overall, both ageing and migration were experienced as jeopardising health.

  6. Adolescent-parent conflict in the age of social media: Case reports from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ruchita; Chauhan, Nidhi; Gupta, Anoop Krishna; Sen, Mahadev Singh

    2016-10-01

    Social media activities have gained popularity amongst children and adolescents as a means of communication; giving them the opportunity for independence and social development as well as rendering them vulnerable to negative influences. In traditionally collectivistic societies like India, moving rapidly towards modernisation, not only is there a divide between parents and adolescents over the endorsement of these sites, but also regarding value systems related to autonomy and dating that are facilitated by such activities. We present cases of two adolescent girls to highlight adolescent parent conflict that arises in the age of social media in a cultural context. Further, the cases underscore that value systems and culture play an important role in resolution of such conflict. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hypnobehavioral approaches for school-age children with dysphagia and food aversion: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, T P; Kajander, R L; Kohen, D P; Reaney, J B

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe hypnobehavioral treatment of five school-age children with maladaptive eating behaviors, including functional dysphagia, food aversion, globus hystericus, and conditioned fear of eating (phagophobia). The unique treatment approach described emphasizes the successful use of self-management techniques, particularly hypnosis, by all five children. Common etiological factors, treatment strategies, and proposed mechanisms of change are discussed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case series in the mainstream pediatric literature describing the use of a hypnobehavioral approach for children with these maladaptive eating problems.

  8. Adverse childhood experiences predict earlier age of drinking onset: results from a representative US sample of current or former drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Emily F; Edwards, Erika M; Heeren, Timothy; Hingson, Ralph W

    2008-08-01

    Our goal was to determine whether adverse childhood experiences predicted the age at which drinking was initiated and drinking motives in a representative sample of current or former drinkers in the United States. In 2006, a probability sample of 3592 US current or former drinkers aged 18 to 39 were surveyed. Multinomial logistic regression examined whether each of 10 adverse childhood experiences was associated with earlier ages of drinking onset, controlling for demographics, parental alcohol use, parental attitudes toward drinking, and peers' drinking in adolescence. We also examined whether there was a graded relationship between the number of adverse childhood experiences and age of drinking onset and whether adverse childhood experiences were related to self-reported motives for drinking during the first year that respondents drank. Sixty-six percent of respondents reported >or=1 adverse childhood experiences, and 19% reported experiencing >or=4. The most commonly reported adverse childhood experiences were parental separation/divorce (41.3%), living with a household member who was a problem drinker (28.7%), mental illness of a household member (24.8%), and sexual abuse (19.1%). Of the 10 specific adverse childhood experiences assessed, 5 were significantly associated with initiating drinking at or=21 years of age) after adjustment for confounders, including physical abuse, sexual abuse, having a mentally ill household member, substance abuse in the home, and parental discord or divorce. Compared with those without adverse childhood experiences, respondents with adverse childhood experiences were substantially more likely to report that they drank to cope during the first year that they used alcohol. Results suggest that children with particular adverse childhood experiences may initiate drinking earlier than their peers and that they may be more likely to drink to cope with problems (rather than for pleasure or to be social).

  9. Non-nutritive sucking habits after three years of age: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Barbosa Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-nutritive sucking habits can result in negative consequences on the development of orofacial structures and occlusion. Aim: Assess factors associated with non-nutritive sucking habits in children after 3 years old. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 638 children aged 3-6 years. In the second stage, a case-control study (1:2 was conducted. The case group included all children who presented some non-nutritive sucking habits in the first stage of the study (n = 110. The control group (n = 220 was made up of children who had never presented non-nutritive sucking habits, matched to the case group for gender and age. The data were collected during the national poliomyelitis vaccination campaign, through a questionnaire applied to parents/guardians with questions related to the presence of sucking habits, sociodemographic aspects, birth aspects, and early life of the child. Statistical analysis involved descriptive analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test, and conditional logistic regression. Results: Reduction in maternal education was a protective factor for the development of non-nutritive sucking habits (education ≤8 years OR = 0.38, CI 95%: 0.16, 0.89, P = 0.025. Prematurity (OR = 3.30, CI 95%: 1.13, 9.69, P = 0.030 and a longer period using a baby bottle (OR = 1.03, CI 95%: 1.01, 1.05, P = 0.006 remained associated with a greater possibility of the occurrence of sucking habits, regardless of monthly family income. Conclusion: Non-nutritive sucking habits were associated with maternal education, premature birth, and greater time of bottle feeding in children after 3 years old.

  10. A qualitative case study of ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2018-06-01

    eHealth's many forms are benchmarked by the World Health Organization. Scotland is considered an advanced adopter of ehealth. The third global survey on ehealth includes pharmacy-related ehealth indicators. Advances in ehealth place an obligation on pharmacy staff to demonstrate proficiency, or digital literacy, in using ehealth technologies. The aim of this study was to provide an indepth exploration of the ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff in the North East of Scotland. A qualitative local case study approach was adopted for observational and interview activities in community and hospital pharmacies. Interview and observational data were collated and analysed using a framework approach. This study gained management approval from the local health board following ethical review by the sponsor university. Nineteen pharmacies and staff (n = 94) participated including two hospitals. Most participants were female (n = 82), aged 29 years and younger (n = 34) with less than 5 years pharmacy experience (n = 49). Participants identified their own digital literacy as basic. Most of the pharmacies had minimum levels of technology implemented (n = 15). Four themes (technology, training, usability, processes) were inducted from the data, coded and modelled with illustrative quotes. Scotland is aspirational in seeking to support the developing role of pharmacy practice with ehealth, however, evidence to date shows most pharmacy staff work with minimum levels of technology. The self-reported lack of digital literacy and often mentioned lack of confidence in using IT suggest pharmacy staff need support and training. Informal work based digital literacy development of the pharmacy team is self-limiting. Usability of ehealth technology could be a key element of its' acceptability. There is potential to better engage with ehealth process efficiencies in both hospital and community pharmacy. As Scotland increasingly invests in ehealth pharmacy

  11. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment – 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hildebrandt

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aged organic aerosol (OA was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008, which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1, and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with source region, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm−3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  12. The clinical experience and efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency with fractional photothermolysis for aged Asian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Hirotaka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Negishi, Kei; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-10-01

    Bipolar radiofrequency (RF) technology is developed based on fractional thermolysis, and the literature concerning the efficacy of the rejuvenation and treatment of acne scars has been reported in Europe and the United States of America. Therefore, we examined bipolar RF treatment using fractional thermolysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of Asian photo-aging skin, particularly 'wrinkles' and 'sagging.' Ten Japanese women (mean age: 58.6, skin type III-IV) received three fractional bipolar RF treatments every 4-6 weeks. For the objective evaluation, we evaluated the improvement of the wrinkles on the forehead, lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid, and the sagging of the nasolabial fold using digital photographs captured using Visia(™) . For the subjective evaluation, the participants were asked to describe the improvements observed in the wrinkles on the forehead, lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid, and sagging nasolabial fold and to evaluate the level pain experienced using a 10-point VAS score. The objective evaluation in each category showed significant improvements in the wrinkles on the lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid. As for the nasolabial fold, 60% of the subjects showed improvements, scoring from good to excellent (51-100% improvement), although there was a little improvement of the wrinkle on the forehead. Similar improvements were observed in the subjective evaluation. During each treatment, oedema and erythema were observed in all participants, but the oedema disappeared the following day in all cases. However, mild erythema persisted for an average of 3.1 days. Micro debris disappeared after an average of 5.2 days. The participants were satisfied, as we allowed them to apply make-up the next day. There were no other severe adverse reactions observed during the treatment. The 10-point VAS score was 3.8, and no participants dropped out due to discomfort. Little improvement was observed in

  13. Emotional Experience in the Mornings and the Evenings: Consideration of Age Differences in Specific Emotions by Time of Day

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    Tammy eEnglish

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence points to age-related improvements in emotional well-being with age. In order to gain a more nuanced understanding of the nature of these apparent shifts in experience, we examined age differences in a range of emotional states in the mornings and evenings in a sample of 135 community-residing participants across 10 consecutive days. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 93 years. Each participant completed a diary in the morning and again in the evening every day for the study period. During each of the assessments, participants reported the degree to which they experienced emotions sampled from all four quadrants of the affective circumplex. Overall, participants felt less positive and more negative in the evenings than in the mornings. As expected, older adults reported a relatively more positive emotional experience than younger adults at both times of day. Importantly, however, age effects varied based on emotion type and time of day. Older adults reported experiencing more positive emotion than relatively younger adults across a range of different positive states (although age differences emerged most consistently for low arousal positive states. Age-related reductions in negative experience were observed only for reports of low arousal negative emotions. There were no age differences in anger, anxiety, or sadness. For some emotions, age differences were stronger in the mornings (e.g., relaxed whereas for other emotions age differences were more pronounced in the evenings (e.g., enthusiastic. Findings are discussed in the context of adulthood changes in motivation and emotional experience.

  14. Emotional experience in the mornings and the evenings: consideration of age differences in specific emotions by time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence points to age-related improvements in emotional well-being with age. In order to gain a more nuanced understanding of the nature of these apparent shifts in experience, we examined age differences in a range of emotional states in the mornings and evenings in a sample of 135 community-residing participants across 10 consecutive days. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 93 years. Each participant completed a diary in the morning and again in the evening every day for the study period. During each of the assessments, participants reported the degree to which they experienced emotions sampled from all four quadrants of the affective circumplex. Overall, participants felt less positive and more negative in the evenings than in the mornings. As expected, older adults reported a relatively more positive emotional experience than younger adults at both times of day. Importantly, however, age effects varied based on emotion type and time of day. Older adults reported experiencing more positive emotion than relatively younger adults across a range of different positive states (although age differences emerged most consistently for low arousal positive states). Age-related reductions in negative experience were observed only for reports of low arousal negative emotions. There were no age differences in anger, anxiety, or sadness. For some emotions, age differences were stronger in the mornings (e.g., relaxed) whereas for other emotions age differences were more pronounced in the evenings (e.g., enthusiastic). Findings are discussed in the context of adulthood changes in motivation and emotional experience.

  15. The Component Operational Experience Degradation and Ageing Program (CODAP). Review and lessons learned (2011-2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragea, Tudor; Riznic, Jovica R.

    2015-01-01

    The structural integrity of piping systems is crucial to continuous and safe operation of nuclear power plants. Across all designs, the pressure boundary and its related piping and components, form one of the many levels of defense in the continuous and safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It is therefore necessary to identify, understand, evaluate and catalogue all of the various degradation mechanisms and failures that affect various piping systems and components across all nuclear power plants (NPP's). This need was first recognized in 1994 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) which launched a five-year Research and Development (R and D) project to explore the viability of creating an international pipe failure database (SKI-PIPE) (Riznic, 2007). The project was considered to be very successful and in 2002, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Pipe Failure Data Exchange (OPDE) was created. OPDE was operated under the umbrella of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and was created in order to produce an international database on the piping service experience applicable to commercial nuclear power plants. After the successful completion of OPDE, the OECD, as well as other international members, agreed to participate in OPDE's successor: the Component Operational Experience Degradation and Ageing Program (CODAP). The objective of CODAP is to collect information on all possible events related to the failure and degradation of passive metallic components in NPP's. With CODAP winding down to the completion of its first phase in December 2014, this report will focus on the conclusions and the lessons learned throughout the many years of CODAP's implementation. There are currently 14 countries participating in CODAP, many of whom are industry leaders (France, Canada, U.S.A., Germany, Japan, Korea etc.). This cooperation on an international scale provides a library of OPerational EXperience (OPEX) for all participating NPP

  16. Experiments with a musical instrument. The continuator and young children aged between 3-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Addessi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between technology and learning is becoming increasingly important in the field of musical education. However there are few studies regarding the interaction between children and musical instruments. This article looks at a study carried out with children aged between 3 and 5, and a particular interactive musical system: the Continuator, which was created by the SONY-Computer Science Laboratory in Paris. An analysis of the studies shows that the Continuator is capable of developing interesting interaction between children and the machine and creative musical processes in early childhood. It is possible to observe an evolution in interaction and microprocesses similar to those seen in adult/child interaction. The abilty of the system ton to attract and maintain attention in the children as been interpreted through Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow Theory . This article gives an overview of literature regarding musical education and new technologies, a description of the interactive system used in our experimental project, the pilot protocol and the analysis of the two case studies. We also draw certain conclusions regarding the psychological and pedagogical implications of the results.

  17. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moehner Sabine

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0 and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3 for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD. While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and

  18. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  19. Ageing Management Programme: An Experience of In-Service Inspection of the Kartini Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitiswati, S., E-mail: nitis@batan.go.id [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia); Syarip,; Tjiptono, T.; Wantana, [Centre for Accelerator and Material Process Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-08-15

    This paper discusses an experience on ISI of the Kartini reactor heat exchanger, as part of the implementation of an ageing management programme. Kartini reactor is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The heat exchanger was constructed for 250 kW capacity. The type of heat exchanger is shell with tube recirculation. Tube material is stainless steel 304, and the shell and baffle plate materials are carbon steel. The heat exchanger has 72 tubes, its outer and inner diameters respectively are 19 and 16 mm, and tube thickness is 1.5 mm. The aim of ISI was to obtain and evaluate the heat exchanger’s condition including the detection of any possible local tube thinning, pitting corrosion or gradual thinning, and determine whether any degradation or deterioration of the heat exchanger could have a significant impact to safety. The heat exchanger was inspected utilizing eddy current equipment in 2003 and 2006. Inspection results in 2003 determined that 12 heat exchanger tubes have a thinning degradation level ranging from 10% up to 60% of the outer diameter due to pitting corrosion. Deterioration of baffle plates has been linked to general corrosion attack. Inspection results in 2006 showed a consistent thinning degradation level with the previous inspection in 2003. So far heat exchanger performance is still satisfactory, as defined by the transfer of primary heat for a 2°C difference between inlet and outlet as required. (author)

  20. Possible cases of leprosy from the Late Copper Age (3780-3650 cal BC) in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Kitti; Marcsik, Antónia; Zádori, Péter; Biro, Gergely; Szeniczey, Tamás; Fábián, Szilvia; Serlegi, Gábor; Marton, Tibor; Donoghue, Helen D; Hajdu, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    At the Abony-Turjányos dűlő site, located in Central Hungary, a rescue excavation was carried out. More than 400 features were excavated and dated to the Protoboleráz horizon, at the beginning of the Late Copper Age in the Carpathian Basin, between 3780-3650 cal BC. Besides the domestic and economic units, there were two special areas, with nine-nine pits that differed from the other archaeological features of the site. In the northern pit group seven pits contained human remains belonging to 48 individuals. Some of them were buried carefully, while others were thrown into the pits. The aim of this study is to present the results of the paleopathological and molecular analysis of human remains from this Late Copper Age site. The ratio of neonates to adults was high, 33.3%. Examination of the skeletons revealed a large number of pathological cases, enabling reconstruction of the health profile of the buried individuals. Based on the appearance and frequency of healed ante- and peri mortem trauma, inter-personal (intra-group) violence was characteristic in the Abony Late Copper Age population. However other traces of paleopathology were observed on the bones that appear not to have been caused by warfare or inter-group violence. The remains of one individual demonstrated a rare set of bone lesions that indicate the possible presence of leprosy (Hansen's disease). The most characteristic lesions occurred on the bones of the face, including erosion of the nasal aperture, atrophy of the anterior nasal spine, inflammation of the nasal bone and porosity on both the maxilla and the bones of the lower legs. In a further four cases, leprosy infection is suspected but other infections cannot be excluded. The morphologically diagnosed possible leprosy case significantly modifies our knowledge about the timescale and geographic spread of this specific infectious disease. However, it is not possible to determine the potential connections between the cases of possible leprosy

  1. Functional Aspects of Gait in Essential Tremor: A Comparison with Age-Matched Parkinson's Disease Cases, Dystonia Cases, and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Rao, Ashwini K

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the functional aspects of gait and balance has wide ramifications. Individuals with balance disorders often restrict physical activity, travel, and social commitments to avoid falling, and loss of balance confidence, itself, is a source of disability. We studied the functional aspects of gait in patients with essential tremor (ET), placing their findings within the context of two other neurological disorders (Parkinson's disease [PD] and dystonia) and comparing them with age-matched controls. We administered the six-item Activities of Balance Confidence (ABC-6) Scale and collected data on number of falls and near-falls, and use of walking aids in 422 participants (126 ET, 77 PD, 46 dystonia, 173 controls). Balance confidence was lowest in PD, intermediate in ET, and relatively preserved in dystonia compared with controls. This ordering reoccurred for each of the six ABC-6 items. The number of near-falls and falls followed a similar ordering. Use of canes, walkers, and wheelchairs was elevated in ET and even greater in PD. Several measures of balance confidence (ABC-6 items 1, 4, 5, and 6) were lower in torticollis cases than in those with blepharospasm, although the two groups did not differ with respect to falls or use of walking aids. Lower balance confidence, increased falls, and greater need for walking aids are variably features of a range of movement disorder patients compared to age-matched controls. While most marked among PD patients, these issues affected ET patients as well and, to a small degree, some patients with dystonia.

  2. The Gerontologist as a case manager: simulation of experiences in distinct and specific studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Piovezan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In Case Management are identified the characteristics that involve elderly and their families by providing adequate planning to meet their needs. Case studies of three subjects were prepared containing relevant information to the preparation of action plans that have been divided into categories. The actions aim to promote quality of life of the aged, as well as of their families and caregivers. The work highlighted the possibility and need of insertion of the method to the Gerontologist performance.

  3. Brain training for silver gamers: effects of age and game form on effectiveness, efficiency, self-assessment, and gameplay experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Lennart E; Nacke, Anne; Lindley, Craig A

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, an aging demographic majority in the Western world has come to the attention of the game industry. The recently released "brain-training" games target this population, and research investigating gameplay experience of the elderly using this game form is lacking. This study employs a 2 x 2 mixed factorial design (age group: young and old x game form: paper and Nintendo DS) to investigate effects of age and game form on usability, self-assessment, and gameplay experience in a supervised field study. Effectiveness was evaluated in task completion time, efficiency as error rate, together with self-assessment measures (arousal, pleasure, dominance) and game experience (challenge, flow, competence, tension, positive and negative affect). Results indicate players, regardless of age, are more effective and efficient using pen-and-paper than using a Nintendo DS console. However, the game is more arousing and induces a heightened sense of flow in digital form for gamers of all ages. Logic problem-solving challenges within digital games may be associated with positive feelings for the elderly but with negative feelings for the young. Thus, digital logic-training games may provide positive gameplay experience for an aging Western civilization.

  4. Continuously revised assurance cases with stakeholders’ cross-validation: a DEOS experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimio Kuramitsu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, assurance cases have received much attention in the field of software-based computer systems and IT services. However, software changes very often, and there are no strong regulations for software. These facts are two main challenges to be addressed in the development of software assurance cases. We propose a method of developing assurance cases by means of continuous revision at every stage of the system life cycle, including in operation and service recovery in failure cases. Instead of a regulator, dependability arguments are validated by multiple stakeholders competing with each other. This paper reported our experience with the proposed method in the case of Aspen education service. The case study demonstrates that continuous revisions enable stakeholders to share dependability problems across software life cycle stages, which will lead to the long-term improvement of service dependability.

  5. An Anesthetist’s Experience and the Incidence of Critical Cases in Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Bolshedvorov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of experience on the quality of anesthesia in ambulatory surgery. Materials and methods. The authors undertook a study of the role of experience and specialization on the occurrence of complications in ambulatory anesthesia care. By using the internal audit and calculating the frequency of critical cases, they examined the results of the work of two groups of anesthetists: 1 medical beginners after 2-year adjunct practice and 2 one-day hospital specialists having an at least 7-year practice length. Results. In the beginner group, the number of critical cases per operation was twice higher than that in the experienced specialists. The paper shows the detrimental pattern of the residual principle in selecting anesthetists for work at a one-day hospital and provides evidence that specialization is required in the area under discussion. Key words: ambulatory anesthesiology, role of an anesthetist’s experience, critical cases.

  6. Scleroderma of geriatric age and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome – description of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Marek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (Ssc is an autoimmune connective tissue disease of unknown origin, characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Immune reactions taking part in Ssc pathogenesis may contribute to cancer development; therefore patients with risk factors for this disease require observation for a neoplastic process. On the other hand, symptoms of Ssc may be a mask of various cancers. Differentiating between the idiopathic form of Ssc and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome often causes a lot of difficulties. The article presents two cases of Ssc at the beginning of the disease after 60 years of age. The first case was diagnosed as Ssc, whereas in the second case the defined diagnosis was scleroderma-like syndrome in the course of colorectal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of differential diagnostic procedures which were performed and led to the final diagnosis, mentions types of cancers co-occurring with Ssc and suggests a screening scheme for cancer development in patients with a diagnosis of Ssc.

  7. Atypical presentation of a middle age male with severe hypertriglyceridaemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albahrani Ali I

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG is uncommon but most prevalent in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and excess ethanol intake. Case presentation We describe a case of a middle age male (53 y presenting to the emergency room with acute atypical central chest pain and severe HTG in the absence of evidence of overt ischaemic heart disease (IHD. Admission ECG and EET (exercise tolerance test were negative for reversible ischaemic changes. His admission glucose was 12.2 mmol/l, triglycerides (TG were 103 mmol/l, total cholesterol 37 mmol/l. Cardiac Troponin T could not be measured on three occasions but CK MB mass was normal at 3 μg/l. The patient was started on Bezafibrate 400 mg OD, Simvastatin 20 mg nocte, Omacor (Omega-3 fish oil 1 gm bd and Metformin 500 mg tds. Four weeks after admission, lipid and liver profiles showed remarkable improvement, TG 2.9 mmol/l, Tchol 6.3 mmol/l and HDLc 1.5 mmol/l, ALAT and GGT were normal. Conclusion A case report of severe hypertriglyceridaemia with atypical presentation demonstrate the role of combined lipid modifying agents in lowering triglycerides and cholesterol as well as improving liver enzymes.

  8. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years' experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-04-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome in Children: Experience With Four Cases of Acute Ischaemia and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settembre, N; Bouziane, Z; Bartoli, M A; Nabokov, V; Venermo, M; Feugier, P; Malikov, S

    2017-04-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is an uncommon anatomical anomaly, frequently described in adults. The most common symptom is claudication. Acute limb ischaemia (ALI) in children is rare, but it may evolve and lead to limb loss or lifelong complications. Clinical and surgical experience of PAES in children is reported. Data from the literature are analysed in order to assess the severity of this disease and to identify the factors characterising the diagnosis and the outcome of treatment in paediatric patients. Four children (aged 7-16 years) were referred with ALI due to PAES. Among the 439 articles reporting cases of PAES, 55 patients under 18 years of age were the focus. The PAES cases were classified according to the Love and Whelan classification modified by Rich. Data from 79 children (106 limbs, 27 bilateral PAES) were collected and analysed. Type I PAES was present in 41 (39%), Type II in 23 (22%), Type III in 24 (23%), Type IV in 12 (11%), and Type V in two (2%) limbs. A functional PAES was present in one patient bilaterally. In two cases, the type of PAES was not reported. Claudication occurred in 68 cases (64%), and ALI in 19 (18%). In 60 cases (57%), revascularisation with or without myotomy was required; myotomy alone was performed in 41 cases (39%). Symptomatic PAES in children should be considered a severe condition requiring urgent investigation in order to avoid any delays in the treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent serious complications. The long-term outcomes of surgical treatment with the correction of the anatomical anomaly and vascular reconstruction are satisfactory with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Age, overtime, and employee health, safety and productivity outcomes: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Harris; Woock, Christopher; Barrington, Linda; Bunn, William

    2008-08-01

    To expand a study of the impact of overtime on employee health, safety, and productivity outcomes, previously reported in this journal, with tests comparing older versus younger workers on these relationships. Secondary analyses of a longitudinal panel (n = 2746) representing workers at US sites for a heavy manufacturer during 2001 to 2002. Structural equation techniques were used to assess two hypotheses in the context of multiple group models positing the prediction of a broad set of employee outcomes using a three-step causal sequence. One set of models compared overtime impact for three age groups (increases were largely confined to hourly employees working extended overtime (averaging 60+ hours per week) and occurred on only four of the nine study outcomes. With respect to moderate overtime (48.01 to 59.99 hours) and to variables reflecting the possible impact of past overtime (eg, prior disability episodes), increases in age among hourly employees did not lead to stronger associations between overtime and adverse outcomes on most tests and in fact in many cases were linked to decrements in these associations (hypothesis #2). Salaried employees recorded no greater linkages between overtime and adverse outcomes with advancing age across all tests involving hypothesized overtime effects or "possibly a function of overtime" effects. The results support the proposition that, when employees work overtime, adverse outcomes--and indirect costs--do not increase with advancing age in any kind of wholesale fashion. Where rates of adverse outcomes do increase, they are confined to certain subgroups of employees doing certain types of work and occur on certain dimensions at certain levels of longer work hours. It is argued that carefully calibrated approaches vis-à-vis older workers are needed to maximize employer capacity to address the unique challenges posed by this increasingly important portion of the workforce.

  11. Forensic Emergency Medicine - Six-Year Experience of 13823 Cases in a University Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİRCAN, Ahmet; KELEŞ, Ayfer; GÜRBÜZ, Neslihan; BİLDİK, Fikret

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Clinical forensic medicine deals with cases involving both the legal and medical aspects of patient care, such as motor vehicle trauma or poisoning. In this study, we aimed to draw attention to the forensic issues by retrospective investigation of 13823 emergency cases and to share our experiences on this topic. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in a university Emergency Department (ED) in Ankara, Turkey. The data were collected from official hospital polic...

  12. Pegaptanib sodium treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: clinical experience in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Feucht

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaus Feucht, Huebner Matthias, Chris P Lohmann, Mathias MaierAugenklinik rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, GermanyBackground: The VEGF Inhibition Study In Ocular Neovascularisation (VISION reported the efficacy of intravitreal (ITV vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibition with pegaptanib sodium (Macugen® for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. This paper reports clinical experience with pegaptanib sodium for the treatment of occult or minimally classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to AMD.Material and methods: The study included 50 eyes (in 49 patients with either occult CNV or minimally classic CNV secondary to neovascular AMD who were not eligible for photodynamic therapy (PDT. Study data were analyzed retrospectively. During the 6-month study, patients were administered an average 2.74 injections of 0.3 mg ITV pegaptanib sodium. Angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT examinations were carried out and intraocular pressure (IOP and visual acuity (VA were measured at baseline, at 3 months and at 6 months. An eye examination was performed and VA was measured the 2 days following treatment and then again at weeks 4–6, and at 3 and 6 months. OCT, VA, and IOP were also assessed at 1 month.Results: ITV pegaptanib sodium was well tolerated and no treatment complications arose. Mean VA was measured as: 0.37 ± 0.24 at baseline; 0.37 ± 0.25 at 1 month; 0.37 ± 0.25 at 3 months and 0.40 ± 0.26 at 6 months. VA was stabilized in approximately 90% of eyes treated with pegaptanib sodium. OCT examination showed a minimal change in central retinal thickness (CRT during the course of the study, from 251.19 µm at baseline to 251.63 µm at 6 months. No elevation in IOP was measured during treatment at 4–6 months in patients receiving pegaptanib sodium.Conclusions: ITV therapy with pegaptanib sodium for occult and minimally classic CNV secondary to neovascular AMD offered good

  13. Age-Sensitive Effect of Adolescent Dating Experience on Delinquency and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryang Hui

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a developmental perspective and focuses on examining whether the impact of adolescent dating is age-sensitive. Dating at earlier ages is hypothesized to have a stronger effect on adolescent criminal behavior or substance use, but the effect would be weaker as one ages. The data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of…

  14. Congenital hypothyroidism - An usual suspect at an unusual age: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja P Sukumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menorrhagia is the most common menstrual irregularity in hypothyroid women. However, it is an uncommon presentation of congenital hypothyroidism (CH. In the era of newborn screening across the world, when CH is extremely rare, we came across four cases of CH due to delayed diagnosis, presenting in adulthood with severe menorrhagia. Aims: To signify the atypical presentation of CH in late adulthood due to delayed diagnosis and its sequelae; and to increase the awareness about this treatable condition. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional analysis of consecutive patients with CH presenting after 18 years between 2010 and 2012 from the CH registry of Department of Endocrinology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER, India. Subjects and Methods: Four patients of CH presenting late (>18 years with atypical presentations out of total 16 cases of CH within a period of 3 years were analyzed for clinical, hormonal, and imaging findings. Results: Between the years 2010 and 2012, 16 cases of CH were registered at our center out of which four cases presented in late adolescence and adulthood with menorrhagia. Age range of these patients was 18-30 years. All four patients were females presenting with anemia secondary to menorrhagia and upon evaluation were found to have CH. All of them showed improvement after starting treatment and are currently doing well with regular menstrual cycles. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the importance of thyroid evaluation in a patient presenting with menorrhagia along with short stature. There is need for awareness among clinicians regarding the clinical features of CH and nationwide screening for CH in our country.

  15. Exploratory Study of Rural Physicians' Self-Directed Learning Experiences in a Digital Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; Simmons, Karla; Ravalia, Mohamed; Snow, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of self-directed learning (SDL) by physicians has been transformed with the growth in digital, social, and mobile technologies (DSMTs). Although these technologies present opportunities for greater "just-in-time" information seeking, there are issues for ensuring effective and efficient usage to compliment one's repertoire for continuous learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the SDL experiences of rural physicians and the potential of DSMTs for supporting their continuing professional development (CPD). Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of rural physicians. Interview data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using NVivo analytical software and thematic analysis. Fourteen (N = 14) interviews were conducted and key thematic categories that emerged included key triggers, methods of undertaking SDL, barriers, and supports. Methods and resources for undertaking SDL have evolved considerably, and rural physicians report greater usage of mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers for updating their knowledge and skills and in responding to patient questions/problems. Mobile technologies, and some social media, can serve as "triggers" in instigating SDL and a greater usage of DSMTs, particularly at "point of care," may result in higher levels of SDL. Social media is met with some scrutiny and ambivalence, mainly because of the "credibility" of information and risks associated with digital professionalism. DSMTs are growing in popularity as a key resource to support SDL for rural physicians. Mobile technologies are enabling greater "point-of-care" learning and more efficient information seeking. Effective use of DSMTs for SDL has implications for enhancing just-in-time learning and quality of care. Increasing use of DSMTs and their new effect on SDL raises the need for reflection on conceptualizations of the SDL process. The "digital age" has implications for our CPD credit systems and the roles

  16. Early initial clinical experience with intravitreal aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Philip J; Anwar, Farihah; Naysan, Jonathan; Chaudhary, Khurram; Fastenberg, David; Graham, Kenneth; Deramo, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative process that leads to severe vision loss. Wet AMD is defined by choroidal neovascularisation, leading to the accumulation of subretinal fluid (SRF), macular oedema (ME), and pigment epithelium detachments (PED). Purpose To evaluate the initial clinical experience of conversion from bevacizumab or ranibizumab to aflibercept in wet AMD patients. Records of 250 consecutive wet AMD patients were retrospectively reviewed. Of 250 patients, 29 were naive (with no previous treatment), and 221 were previously treated with bevacizumab (1/3) or ranibizumab (2/3). On average, converted patients received 14 injections every 6 weeks on a treat-and-extend regimen with Avastin or Lucentis before being converted to aflibercept every 7 weeks on average (no loading dose) for three doses. For the purposes of this study, we concentrated on the patients converted to aflibercept since the number of naive patients was too small to draw any conclusion from. Snellen (as logMar) visual acuities, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were compared predrug and postdrug conversion. Converted patients did not show a significant difference in visual acuity or average OCT thickness from preconversion values; however, small improvements in ME (p=0.0001), SRF (p=0.0001), and PED (p=0.008) grading were noted on average after conversion to aflibercept. No significant difference in visual outcome or average OCT thickness was observed when switched from bevacizumab or ranibizumab q6 week to aflibercept 7-week dosing, on average. Mild anatomic improvements did occur in converted patients with regard to ME, SRF and PED improvement, on average, after conversion to aflibercept, and aflibercept was injected less frequently. No serious adverse reactions, including ocular infections or inflammation, as well as ocular and systemic effects were noted. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  17. Healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture--A phenomenographic study based on older persons' lived experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasatchakun, Pornpun; Chotiga, Pleumjit; Roxberg, Åsa; Asp, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Healthy ageing is a concept that concerns older persons' quality of life and is a key factor in promoting well-being. The older population in Thailand is growing. Isan (a region of north-eastern Thailand) has been reported as having one of the most rapidly increasing older populations in the country. In order to care for and promote the health of older people, healthcare providers should understand how healthy ageing is perceived by this target group. Although healthy ageing has been studied in different contexts as well as perspectives, no studies have previously focused on older persons' experiences of healthy ageing from a lifeworld perspective in Isan-Thai. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe older persons' qualitatively different conceptions of healthy ageing in Isan-Thai culture. A phenomenographic approach with an epistemological base in lifeworld theory was used to disclose the various ways to conceptualize healthy ageing. Individual, qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 people aged 60 and above who live in Isan-Thai. The findings of this study revealed three categories of descriptions: "being independent in dependence," "being at peace," and "being a valuable person." This study also found family members, friends, healthcare providers, and religion important to healthy ageing in the Isan-Thai culture. Understanding how older people conceptualize healthy ageing is valuable for healthcare providers. They can apply these findings regarding healthy ageing in their fieldwork when caring for older people.

  18. Employment Policies in an Aging Society: Review of the Experiences of the OECD Countries with Population Aging and Their Policy Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Heon Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review the experiences of OECD countries with population aging and their policy responses, and suggest directions and measures of medium and long-term employment policies to cope with population aging in a comprehensive perspective. Specifically, following the policy objective of sustainable economic growth, we systematically classify policy types to cope with population aging and review possibilities and limitations of each policy type, while also considering Korea-specific situations as well as the experiences of other OECD countries. There are two broad types of employment policies to sustain economic growth in an aging society. One is to increase the quantity of labor force and the other is to enhance the quality of labor force. Policies to increase the quantity of labor force include pro-natalist policies, immigration policies, and policies to fully mobilize the labor resources of women and older people. Policies to enhance the quality of labor force include human resource development and flexicurity policies in the labor market. Our review suggests that direct pro-natalist policies seem to be ineffective. Also immigration policies cannot fundamentally solve the problem caused by population aging. Policies to fully mobilize the labor resources of women and older people seem to be the most effective policy. However, labor productivity should be an engine of economic growth in the long run when labor input reaches the limit of its capacity. In conclusion, in the long run, it is most important to enhance the quality of human capital and improve the functioning of the labor market to cope with the challenges of population aging.

  19. Experiences of 23 patients ≥ 90 years of age treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshikazu; Shikama, Naoto; Ohata, Takeo; Okazaki, Youichi; Kiyono, Kunihiro; Sone, Shusuke

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present 23 patients ≥ 90 years old treated with radiotherapy, and to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiotherapy and tolerance in these patients. Methods and Materials: The clinical records of 27 patients over 90 years of age who were treated with radiotherapy at the Department of Radiology, Shinshu University Hospital, and eight affiliated general hospitals from 1990 until 1995 were reviewed. The strategy of radiotherapy was individually planned depending on the stage of the disease and performance status (PS) of the patient; however, it was not modified, based solely on chronologic age. The overall survival rate and disease-free survival rate were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring criteria of acute and late reactions of radiation therapy were used. Results: This group of patients accounted for 0.37% of all patients treated with radiotherapy in these hospitals. Of these, 23 patients in whom cancer was pathologically confirmed and whose follow-up data were available for retrospective analysis were included in the final evaluation of data. The age of the 23 patients ranged from 90 to 96 years (median 93). Tumor was untreated and in the early stage in five patients, locoregionally advanced in 13, recurrent in four, and systemic in one. Definitive radiation therapy was administered in 12 patients (13 sites), preoperative intent in one, and palliative intent in 10. The period of observation ranged from 2.5 to 6 years (median 18 months). Seven patients were alive for 15-67 months. Fourteen patients died because of intercurrent diseases or senility associated with active cancer, and two because of senility without evidence of cancer. The overall and relapse-free survival rates were 65% and 30% at 1 year and 30% and 21% at 2 years, respectively. Definitive radiation therapy was completed in 13 of 13 patients (100%), and local control was attained in 9 of 13 patients at 6 months (62%). Palliative

  20. School Experiences Influence Personal Health and Interpersonal Relationships of Adolescents: The Canadian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Canadian data from the 1998 Cross-National Survey on Health Behaviors in School-Aged Children were analyzed to examine the effects of school experiences on personal health (physical health, mental health, self-esteem, helplessness, and body image) and interpersonal relationships (number of close friends and making friends) among adolescents.…

  1. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students......' perceptions of psychiatric patients and students' reflections on meeting and communicating with psychiatric patients. METHODS: The authors conducted group interviews with 30 medical students who volunteered to participate in interviews and applied inductive thematic content analysis to the transcribed...

  2. Turnaround in an aged persons' mental health service in crisis: a case study of organisational renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafrace, Simon; Lilly, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This case study demonstrates how leadership was harnessed to turn around a decline in the performance of an aged persons' mental health service - the Namarra Nursing Home at Caulfield General Medical Centre in Melbourne, Australia. In 2000 the nursing home faced a crisis of public confidence due to failings in the management of quality, clinical risk and human resources within the service. These problems reflected structural and operational shortcomings in the clinical directorate and wider organisation. In this article, we detail the process of turnaround from the perspective of senior executive managers with professional and operational responsibility for the service. This turnaround required attention to local clinical accountability and transformation of the mental health program from a collocated but operationally isolated service to one integrated within the governance structures of the auspicing organisation.

  3. The general surgery chief resident operative experience: 23 years of national ACGME case logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D; Goldin, Adam B; Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-09-01

    The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989-1990 through 2011-2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves.

  4. Urological laparoscopic surgery: Our experience of first 100 cases in Dicle University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ali Sancaktutar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study the experience and results of first100 laparoscopic surgery is presented.Materials and methods: The laparoscopic surgical operationswere reviewed between July 2010 and October 2011,retrospectively.Results: During a year period we performed of 100 laparoscopicinterventions. The ratio of male to female and themean age was 57/43 and 48,65±8,94 years respectively.The kind of operation and total numbers were like this: simplenephrectomy 34, radical nephrektomy 22, renal cyst excision21, orchiectomy 7, ureterolitotomy 4, adrenalectomy 4,orchiopexy 3, pyeloplasti 2, nefroureterectomy+cystectomy1, nefroureterectomy+partial cystectomy 1 nefroureterectomy1 patient.Transperitoneal approach was used for 91 patients whileretroperitoneal approach was used to 9 patients. The operationwas completed by open surgical interventions foronly 6 of 100 patients. The reason for open proceduresduring laparoscopy was not reaching to renal pedicles forthree patients, adhesions to pararenal tissue and colonfor 2 patients and splenic artery injury for 1 patient. Threepatients needed blood transfusions. Except these patientsthere wasn’t any complications and mortalities. When performingright nephrectomy and adrenalectomy the fourthport was used to ecartate liver. Except these cases in alloperations 3 ports was used. The mean hospitalizationstay was 1,7(1-8 days. The operation times of mostlyperformed operations were like these minute (interval:simple nephrectomy 95 (70-135, radical nephrectomy 148(125-190, renal cyst excision 45 (20-80, orchiectomy 41(30-45, ureterolithotomy 104 (95-135, orchiopexy 85 (80-100, adrenalectomy 148 (110-180, pyeloplasty 170 (160-180 nefroureterectomy 150 minutes.Conclusions: The results, success and complication ratesof laparoscopic operations which are performed in our clinicswere found as similar to literature. The laparoscopicsurgery is alternative to open surgery that it can be usedsafely and effectively. J Clin

  5. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dolf; van der Hoek, Lucas; Rademakers, Jany; Delnoij, Diana; van den Berg, Michael

    2017-11-22

    Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called 'response tendency'. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients' global rating of care varies across patient groups. Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics - such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical - is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  6. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: the University of Leipzig experience of 1,300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Truss, Michael C; Burchardt, Martin; Herrmann, Thomas R; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    We herein review our experience with endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) as a first line therapy for localized prostate cancer. A series of 1,300 patients underwent EERPE ("wide excision", standard nervesparing technique (nsEERPE), or intrafascial nsEERPE). The mean age of the patients was 63.3 years. Preoperative PSA mean value was 10.1 ng/ml. A total of 415 patients had undergone previous surgical procedure in the lower abdomen (n = 336) and prior surgery of the prostate (n = 79), respectively. The EERPE was employed in all cases without any specific selection criteria. Mean operative time was 153 (50-320) min. including lymphadenectomy with no conversion to open surgery. Seven intraoperative, 91 early and 4 late complications occurred. The transfusion rate was 0.9%. Positive surgical margins were found in 83 patients with pT2 stage (9.8%) and in 154 patients in pT3 stage (34.3%). The mean catheterization time was 6.2 days. The 12 month follow up indicated continence rate of 91.9% and potency rates of 34% in the unilateral nerve sparing group and 69.8% in the bilateral group. In the intrafascial nsEERPE group potency rates were 33.3% (unilateral) and 79.1% (bilateral) after 12 months. Postoperative positive surgical margins rate were 6.1% for pT2 and 20% for pT3 and the complications rate 4%. The results of this large series of 1,300 patients are promising. The recently introduced intrafascial nsEERPE further ameliorates the outcome of the procedure.

  7. Do effects of common case-mix adjusters on patient experiences vary across patient groups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolf de Boer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many survey studies in health care adjust for demographic characteristics such as age, gender, educational attainment and general health when performing statistical analyses. Whether the effects of these demographic characteristics are consistent between patient groups remains to be determined. This is important as the rationale for adjustment is often that demographic sub-groups differ in their so-called ‘response tendency’. This rationale may be less convincing if the effects of response tendencies vary across patient groups. The present paper examines whether the impact of these characteristics on patients’ global rating of care varies across patient groups. Methods Secondary analyses using multi-level regression models were performed on a dataset including 32 different patient groups and 145,578 observations. For each demographic variable, the 95% expected range of case-mix coefficients across patient groups is presented. In addition, we report whether the variance of coefficients for demographic variables across patient groups is significant. Results Overall, men, elderly, lower educated people and people in good health tend to give higher global ratings. However, these effects varied significantly across patient groups and included the possibility of no effect or an opposite effect in some patient groups. Conclusion The response tendency attributed to demographic characteristics – such as older respondents being milder, or higher educated respondents being more critical – is not general or universal. As such, the mechanism linking demographic characteristics to survey results on patient experiences with quality of care is more complicated than a general response tendency. It is possible that the response tendency interacts with patient group, but it is also possible that other mechanisms are at play.

  8. The development of safety cases for healthcare services: Practical experiences, opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujan, Mark; Spurgeon, Peter; Cooke, Matthew; Weale, Andy; Debenham, Philip; Cross, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the concept of safety cases for medical devices and health information technology, but questions remain about how safety cases can be developed and used meaningfully in the safety management of healthcare services and processes. The paper presents two examples of the development and use of safety cases at a service level in healthcare. These first practical experiences at the service level suggest that safety cases might be a useful tool to support service improvement and communication of safety in healthcare. The paper argues that safety cases might be helpful in supporting healthcare organisations with the adoption of proactive and rigorous safety management practices. However, it is also important to consider the different level of maturity of safety management and regulatory oversight in healthcare. Adaptations to the purpose and use of safety cases might be required, complemented by the provision of education to both practitioners and regulators. - Highlights: • Empirical description of safety case development at service level in healthcare. • Safety cases can support adoption of proactive and rigorous safety management. • Adaptation to purpose and use of safety cases might be required in healthcare. • Education should be provided to practitioners and regulators

  9. LIFE QUALITY IN CASES WITH CHRONICAL DEGENERATIVE ILLNESS OF LOCOMOTIVE SYSTEM REGARDING SEX, AGE AND OVERWEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevera Bećarević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances of muscle and skeleton system are related to pain, functional damages and inability to work. Measure of life quality offers a sequence of data on illness influence on everyday functioning. The aim of this paper is evaluation of life quality in cases with degenerative illnesses of locomotive system and influence of sex, age, weist and BMI on life quality. Epidemiologic research was conducted on 71 tested subjects with diagnosis of chronical degenerative reumatical illness. Tested subject were measured weist values, BMI was determined and all of them fulfilled EQ5D questionnaire for life quality assessment. According to VAS scale their health condition was evaluated. Life quality of tested subjects was decreased especially in department of depression and increased concern (2.30 – 2.57 as well as pain and discomfort (2.11 – 2.31. We didn't determine statistically significant sex influence (p> 0,05, age, (p> 0,05 weist values (p> 0,05 or BMI (p> 0,05 our tested subjects life quality. According to VAS scale health condition of tested subjects is low (6, 76 ± 1,04.

  10. A case study of intended versus actual experience of adaptivity in a tangible storytelling system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, K.; Hatala, M.; Tanenbaum, J.; Wakkary, R.L.; Antle, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an adaptive, tangible storytelling system called "The Reading Glove". The research addresses a gap in the field of adaptivity for ubiquitous systems by taking a critical look at the notion of "adaptivity" and how users experience it. The Reading Glove is an

  11. Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perceptions of Departmentalized Instruction: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alecia; Schmertzing, Lorraine; Schmertzing, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This case study investigated elementary teachers' experiences and perceptions during a trial year of departmentalized instruction in a rural south Georgia elementary school. To inform their decision about whole-school departmentalization for the future, school administrators appointed twelve first through third grade teachers to pilot the…

  12. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  13. Behavioral Experiments in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Single Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Roger; Nordahl, Hans M.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of cognitive therapy of paranoid delusions appeared in the literature, the empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy in treating psychotic symptoms has been widely established. The aim of the present case study is to show how the behavioral experiment can be used as a powerful tool to change delusional thinking…

  14. Linking Reform-Oriented Experiences to Teacher Identity: The Case of an Elementary Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Novice teachers often have difficulty transferring what they learn in teacher education programs to classroom practice. This is especially true for elementary school teachers who are expected to teach mathematics with reform-oriented methods. The purpose of this longitudinal case study was to examine the experience of one novice elementary school…

  15. Experimenting with Commodities and Gifts: The Case of an Office Hotel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard Jensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    The article explores four different images of the relationship between market economy and gift economy drawn from economic sociology and anthropology. Second, it presents a case study of an office hotel, which experimented with the relationship between markets and gifting by urging the companies...

  16. The Cluster AgeS Experiment (CASE). Variable Stars in the Field of the Globular Cluster M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozyczka, M.; Thompson, I. B.; Pych, W.; Narloch, W.; Poleski, R.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2017-09-01

    The field of the globular cluster M22 (NGC 6656) was monitored between 2000 and 2008 in a search for variable stars. BV light curves were obtained for 359 periodic, likely periodic, and long-term variables, 238 of which are new detections. 39 newly detected variables, and 63 previously known ones are members or likely members of the cluster, including 20 SX Phe, 10 RRab and 16 RRc type pulsators, one BL Her type pulsator, 21 contact binaries, and 9 detached or semi-detached eclipsing binaries. The most interesting among the identified objects are V112 - a bright multimode SX Phe pulsator, V125 - a β Lyr type binary on the blue horizontal branch, V129 - a blue/yellow straggler with a W UMa-like light curve, located halfway between the extreme horizontal branch and red giant branch, and V134 - an extreme horizontal branch object with P=2.33 d and a nearly sinusoidal light curve. All four of them are proper motion members of the cluster. Among nonmembers, a P=2.83 d detached eclipsing binary hosting a δ Sct type pulsator was found, and a peculiar P=0.93 d binary with ellipsoidal modulation and narrow minimum in the middle of one of the descending shoulders of the sinusoid. We also collected substantial new data for previously known variables. In particular we revise the statistics of the occurrence of the Blazhko effect in RR Lyr type variables of M22.

  17. Understanding enhanced tourist experiences through technology: a brief approach to the Vilnius case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Beliatskaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research investigates the notion of enhanced tourist experiences through technology shedding light on co-creation practices and empowerment of customers. Neuhofer and Buhalis (2013 introduced a novel concept of technology-enhanced tourist experiences by generating a joint comprehension of new era of experiences which conjoin the elements of experiences, co-creation and technology. Being one of rather promoting cities in online environment Vilnius represents an interesting case of successive adoption of smart technologies in order to enhance tourist experiences and facilitate customer empowerment in Vilnius tourism domain. This study aims to determine technology-enhanced tourist experiences in order to measure factors of customer empowerment on the example of international incoming tourists to Vilnius (Lithuania. The mix-methods approach (qualitative online content and functionality analysis and quantitative survey was justified as being the most appropriate for the purpose of this research with intention to find a basis for applying of technology-enhanced tourist experiences in Vilnius tourism marketplace. The paper concludes with the definition of current level of ICTs application to enhance tourist experience co-creation and a discussion of practical implications of technology-enhanced tourist experiences development.

  18. [Mining analysis and experience summary for chronic atrophic gastritis cases treated by Professor LIU Feng-bin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zheng-kun; Liu, Feng-bin; Li, Pei-wu; Zhuang, Kun-hai

    2015-06-01

    To summarize Professor LIU Feng-bin's clinical experience and theoretical thoughts on chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), the study group designed a retrospective study on his case series and expert interview. First of all, the data of CAG patients treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine between 2009 and 2013, e. g. herbs, diseases, syndrome type, prescription amount and number of herbs, was collected and processed. The statistical description and binary logistic regression were used to determined the syndrome type, initial basic remedy and modification. During the statistics, a complete and sub-group analysis was performed simultaneously. After the expert interview, the syndrome type and medication were finalized. As a result, a total of 228 CAG patients aged at (50.30 ± 10.18) were collected, including 151 males (66.23%). Of them, the TCM diagnosis and syndrome type were extracted from the information of 157 patients, including 115 cases with gastric stuffiness, 23 cases with gastric pain, 19 missing cases, 2 cases with spleen-stomach weakness syndrome, 57 cases with spleen deficiency and dampness-heat syndrome, 18 cases with spleen-stomach disharmony syndrome, 23 cases with syndrome of liver depression syndrome, 21 cases with liver qi invading stomach syndrome and 26 qi and yin deficiency syndrome, respectively. All of the 228 patients used totally 104 herbs, while the subgroups with 157 patients used 94 herbs. The most frequently used 15 herbs used in each groups were analyzed to determine the initial basic remedy and modification. Subsequently, based on the information of the sub-groups with 157 patients, with the syndrome type as the dependent variable, the logistic regression analysis was made on the most frequently used 32 herbs, in order to determined the modification in herbs for different syndrome types. After experts reviewed and modified, they believed the main causes of CAG were dietary irregularities

  19. Differences in Chemical Engineering Student-Faculty Interactions by Student Age and Experience at a Large, Public, Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciston, Shannon; Sehgal, Sanya; Mikel, Tressa; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2018-01-01

    Adult undergraduate students aged 25+ in engineering disciplines are an important demographic bringing a wealth of life experience to the classroom. This study uses qualitative data drawn from semi-structured interviews with two groups of undergraduate chemical engineering students at a large, public research university: adult students with…

  20. Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media: Commentary on Bull et al. (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The recent editorial in this journal by Bull et al. ("Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media" Vol 8, Iss 2) discussed the challenges of bridging formal learning practices and informal learning opportunities within the context of today's Web-enhanced world. In this commentary, Christine…

  1. Investigation of Music Student Efficacy as Influenced by Age, Experience, Gender, Ethnicity, and Type of Instrument Played in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to quantitatively examine South Carolina high school instrumental music students' self-efficacy as measured by the Generalized Self-Efficacy (GSE) instrument (Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1993). The independent variables of age, experience, gender, ethnicity, and type of instrument played) were correlated with…

  2. The Kickstart of the Age of the Earth Race: Revisiting the Experiment of the Comte de Buffon at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincelli, M. M.; Prat, M. R.; Lescano, G. M.; Formichella, M. del C.; Brustle, M.; Otranto, S.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the first experiment ever done to determine the age of the Earth is revisited. The benefits of its application at primary and secondary school levels are presented and discussed. In particular, emphasis is placed on the advantage of facing students with the challenges that scientists have had to overcome during the past three…

  3. To Cut or Not to Cut: Cosmetic Surgery Usage and Women's Age-Related Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Shelley J.

    2012-01-01

    Part of the developmental trajectory of middle and late life presumes the adjustment to physical aging, an adjustment that is complicated for women for whom the prioritization of beauty is central to their social value in Western societies. A 60-item written questionnaire was distributed to a volunteer community sample of 202 women ages 19-86.…

  4. Correlation between donor age and organs transplanted per donor: our experience in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikari, J; Omiya, K; Konaka, S; Nomoto, K

    2014-05-01

    The shortage of available organs for transplantation is a worldwide issue. To maximize the number of transplantations, increasing the number of organs transplanted per donor (OTPD) is widely recognized as an important factor for improving the shortage. In Japan, we have had 211 donors, 1112 organs transplanted, and 924 recipients receiving the transplants, resulting in 4.4 ± 1.4 recipients receiving transplants per donor and 5.3 ± 1.6 OTPD as of February 2013. Because donor age is a well-recognized factor of donor suitability, we analyzed the correlation between donor age group and OTPD. Only the age group 60 to 69 years and the age group 70 to 79 years were significantly different (P donor under age 70 years has the potential to donate 4.6 to 6.7 organs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years′ experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). This is a study on changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology in a large series of cervical cancer treated in Sweden during a 90-year period. It also includes an historical review about the development of

  6. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years′ experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). This is a study on changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology in a large series of cervical cancer treated in Sweden during a 90-year period. It also includes an historical review about the development

  7. Development of a Gestational Age-Specific Case Definition for Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cheryl; Longford, Nick; Costeloe, Kate; Modi, Neena

    2017-03-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Preventive and therapeutic research, surveillance, and quality improvement initiatives are hindered by variations in case definitions. To develop a gestational age (GA)-specific case definition for NEC. We conducted a prospective 34-month population study using clinician-recorded findings from the UK National Neonatal Research Database between December 2011 and September 2014 across all 163 neonatal units in England. We split study data into model development and validation data sets and categorized GA into groups (group 1, less than 26 weeks' GA; group 2, 26 to less than 30 weeks' GA; group 3, 30 to less than 37 weeks' GA; group 4, 37 or more weeks' GA). We entered GA, birth weight z score, and clinical and abdominal radiography findings as candidate variables in a logistic regression model, performed model fitting 1000 times, averaged the predictions, and used estimates from the fitted model to develop an ordinal NEC score and cut points to develop a dichotomous case definition based on the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curves [AUCs] and positive predictive values [PPVs]. Abdominal radiography performed to investigate clinical concerns. Ordinal NEC likelihood score, dichotomous case definition, and GA-specific probability plots. Of the 3866 infants, the mean (SD) birth weight was 2049.1 (1941.7) g and mean (SD) GA was 32 (5) weeks; 2032 of 3663 (55.5%) were male. The total included 2978 infants (77.0%) without NEC and 888 (23.0%) with NEC. Infants with NEC in group 1 were less likely to present with pneumatosis (31.1% vs 47.2%; P = .01), blood in stool (11.8% vs 29.6%; P definition were 2 or greater for infants in groups 1 and 2, 3 or greater for infants in group 3, and 4 or greater for infants in group 4. The ordinal NEC score and dichotomous case definition discriminated well between infants with (AUC, 87%) and without (AUC, 80%) NEC. The case

  8. Types of Family Caregiving and Daily Experiences in Midlife and Late Adulthood: The Moderating Influences of Marital Status and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jen D; Shobo, Yetunde

    2017-07-01

    Guided by the life-course perspective, this study contributes to the family caregiving, aging, and disability literature by examining the daily experiences of three types of family caregivers in midlife and late adulthood. A sample of 162 caregivers from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States study completed interviews, questionnaires, and a Daily Diary Study. Multilevel models showed the patterns of daily time use did not differ by caregiver types. Caregivers of sons/daughters with developmental disabilities (DD) experienced more daily stressors than caregivers of parents with health conditions (HC) and caregivers of spouses with HC. Unmarried caregivers of sons/daughters with DD reported spending more time on daily leisure activities and exhibited greater daily stressor exposure than other family caregivers. Age did not moderate the associations between caregiver types and daily experiences. Findings highlight the important consideration of the caregivers' characteristics to better determine the quality of their daily experiences in midlife and late adulthood.

  9. Behavioral and neural plasticity caused by early social experiences: the case of the honeybee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés eArenas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive experiences during the early stages of life play an important role in shaping future behavior. Behavioral and neural long-term changes after early sensory and associative experiences have been recently reported in the honeybee. This invertebrate is an excellent model for assessing the role of precocious experiences on later behavior due to its extraordinarily tuned division of labor based on age polyethism. These studies are mainly focused on the role and importance of experiences occurred during the first days of the adult lifespan, their impact on foraging decisions and their contribution to coordinate food gathering. Odor-rewarded experiences during the first days of honeybee adulthood alter the responsiveness to sucrose, making young hive bees more sensitive to assess gustatory features about the nectar brought back to the hive and affecting the dynamic of the food transfers and the propagation of food-related information within the colony as well. Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages. Also they improve memorizing of new associative learning events later in life. The establishment of early memories promotes stable reorganization of the olfactory circuits inducing structural and functional changes in the antennal lobe. Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment. Here, we revised recent results in bees´ physiology, behavior and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits.

  10. Hemipelvectomia: experiência do Hospital Erasto Gaertner com 32 casos em 10 anos Hemipelvectomy: Erasto Gaertner Hospital's experiences with 32 cases in 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosyane Rena de Freitas

    2010-01-01

    age was 37.94 years. Eight cases showed involvement of the neurovascular bundle: 3 were located in the iliac and extended to the thigh, 2 were in the acetabulum and extended to the thigh and 3 were in the acetabulum and pubis. One involved the iliac-femoral vessels: one in the pubic ramus. Seven cases of chondrosarcoma and 4 cases of Ewing's sarcoma represented the majority. Eight underwent external hemipelvectomy and 24 underwent internal hemipelvectomy (11 were type I; 4 were type II; 2 were type II + III; 3 were type III and 4 were type IV. Of these 24 cases, 13 were without reconstruction, 10 were with a fibular graft and 1 was with an iliac-femoral vein and artery prosthesis. Twenty-six surgeries were curative and 6 palliative. There were 14 deaths. Survival of 2 and 5 years were seen in 11 and 10 cases, respectively. Six cases have less than 2 years of surgery. Three cases were lost during follow-up. CONCLUSION: The study shows the experiences of an exemplary oncology service, specializing in highly complex surgical treatment.

  11. [The battery of tests for behavioral phenotyping of aging animals in the experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Ya V; Komleva, Yu K; Lopatina, O L; Volkova, V V; Chernykh, A I; Shabalova, A A; Semenchukov, A A; Olovyannikova, R Ya; Salmina, A B

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a battery of tests to study social and cognitive impairments for behavioral phenotyping of aging experimental animals with physiological neurodegeneration. Object of the study were outbred CD1 mice in the following groups: 1st group - 12-month old male mice (physiological aging); 2nd group - 2-month old male mice (control group). Social recognition test, elevated plus maze test (EPM), open field test, light-dark box test, and Fear conditioning protocol were used to estimate the neurological status of experimental animals. We found that aging male mice in a contrast to young ones have demonstrated lower social interest to female mice in the social recognition task. EPM and light-dark box tests showed increased level of anxiety in the group of aged mice comparing to the control group. Fear conditioning protocol revealed impairment of associative learning and memory in the group of aged mice, particularly, fear memory consolidation was dramatically suppressed. Analysis of behavioral factors, social interactions and anxiety level in the experimental mice has confirmed age-related neurodegeneration in the 1st group. We found that the most informative approach to identifying neurological impairments in aging mice (social interaction deficit, limitation of interests, increased level of anxiety) should be based on the open field test light-dark box test, and Fear conditioning protocol. Such combination allows obtaining new data on behavioral alterations in the age-associated of neurodegeneration and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of age-related brain pathology.

  12. Accounting for age uncertainty in growth modeling, the case study of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares of the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dortel

    Full Text Available Age estimates, typically determined by counting periodic growth increments in calcified structures of vertebrates, are the basis of population dynamics models used for managing exploited or threatened species. In fisheries research, the use of otolith growth rings as an indicator of fish age has increased considerably in recent decades. However, otolith readings include various sources of uncertainty. Current ageing methods, which converts an average count of rings into age, only provide periodic age estimates in which the range of uncertainty is fully ignored. In this study, we describe a hierarchical model for estimating individual ages from repeated otolith readings. The model was developed within a Bayesian framework to explicitly represent the sources of uncertainty associated with age estimation, to allow for individual variations and to include knowledge on parameters from expertise. The performance of the proposed model was examined through simulations, and then it was coupled to a two-stanza somatic growth model to evaluate the impact of the age estimation method on the age composition of commercial fisheries catches. We illustrate our approach using the sagittal otoliths of yellowfin tuna of the Indian Ocean collected through large-scale mark-recapture experiments. The simulation performance suggested that the ageing error model was able to estimate the ageing biases and provide accurate age estimates, regardless of the age of the fish. Coupled with the growth model, this approach appeared suitable for modeling the growth of Indian Ocean yellowfin and is consistent with findings of previous studies. The simulations showed that the choice of the ageing method can strongly affect growth estimates with subsequent implications for age-structured data used as inputs for population models. Finally, our modeling approach revealed particularly useful to reflect uncertainty around age estimates into the process of growth estimation and it can

  13. Professor Nukem - communicating research in the age of the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Thorhauge, Anne Mette

    The experience economy, that is, the creative and communicative turn in today's social, cultural and economic structures implies, as explained by Pine and Gilmour (1999), that consume is embedded in a communicational format that conveys some kind of experience to the consumer. The consumer in tur...

  14. Age, wage, and job placement: older women's experiences entering the retail sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Miller, Ellen G; Lambert, Susan J; Henly, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    Older women seeking employment often find opportunities limited to low-wage jobs, such as those in retail. We report findings about job placement and starting wages for hourly workers hired at a women's apparel retailer from August 2006 to December 2009. We examine competing hypotheses regarding the role of age in explaining women's job placement and starting wages. Although newly hired women age 55+ earn higher wages and are placed in higher-quality jobs than the youngest women (ages 18-22), they are less likely to be placed in better-quality jobs than their midlife counterparts. Overall, wage differences are largely explained by job quality.

  15. Success and limitations in the prevention of violence: a case study of nine Brazilian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Gomes

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the success of Brazilian experiences engaged in prevention of violence as well as their limitations, and seeks to show ways for a solution of the problem. The investigation underlying this article consisted in a case study of nine experiences, using triangulation of methods. For this purpose, we used questionnaires and interviewed individuals and groups. Successful results were mainly: informed citizenship, work preparation, involvement of children and adolescents in recreating and educative activities, and increased self-esteem of the children and teens involved in the experiences. The greatest difficulties found were the lack of funds and of articulation of proposals with other groups and institutions. These experiences are not the only successful ones carried out in the country, but they point to a new horizon by innovating and creating a different practical approach to violence.

  16. Studies of Conservation with Yoruba Children of Differing Ages and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Barbara B.

    1971-01-01

    Questions concerning the effects of familiar and alien materials, age and culture, and the etiology of conservation are examined in number and continous quantity tasks assessing conservation in Yoruba children from traditional and educationally advantaged homes. (Author/AJ)

  17. Study of the experience feedback relating to ageing of electronic component and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, G.; Henry, J.Y.

    1992-11-01

    This study was conducted on electronic components and electrical cables taken from the Brennilis EL4 reactor, during dismantling, after 18 years of operation. Its aim was to examine the state of the equipment taken from the site and thus to check its characteristics and in particular for cables: to check, whenever possible, the suitability of the accelerated ageing methods by comparing the characteristics observed on the samples from EL4 with test samples held in storage and previously subjected to similar accelerated ageing: predicting medium and long-term ageing by extrapolation from the selected mathematical model. The result of this initial work confirmed the need for extreme caution regarding the accelerated ageing methods. Further work on cables and polymers is underway and will enable the laws currently used for qualification tests to be evaluated. (author) [fr

  18. Study of the experience feedback relating to ageing of electronic components and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, G.; Henry, J.Y.

    1992-11-01

    This study was conducted on electronic components and electrical cables taken from the Brennilis EL4 reactor, during dismantling, after 18 years of operation. Its aim was to examine the state of the equipment taken from the site and thus to check its characteristics and in particular for cables: to check, whenever possible, the suitability of the accelerated ageing methods by comparing the characteristics observed on the samples from EL4 with test samples held in storage and previously subjected to similar accelerated ageing: predicting medium and long-term ageing by extrapolation from the selected mathematical model. The result of this initial work confirmed the need for extreme caution regarding the accelerated ageing methods. Further work on cables and polymers is underway and will enable the laws currently used for qualification tests to be evaluated

  19. The utility of case formulation in treatment decision making; the effect of experience and expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Robert; Ingham, Barry; Sowerby, Katy; Freeston, Mark

    2015-09-01

    We examined whether case formulation guides the endorsement of appropriate treatment strategies. We also considered whether experience and training led to more effective treatment decisions. To examine these questions two related studies were conducted both of which used a novel paradigm using clinically relevant decision-making tasks with multiple sources of information. Study one examined how clinicians utilised a pre-constructed CBT case formulation to plan treatment. Study two utilised a clinician-generated formulation to further examine the process of formulation development and the impact on treatment planning. Both studies considered the effect of therapist experience. Both studies indicated that clinicians used the case formulation to select treatment choices that were highly matched to the case as described in the vignette. However, differences between experts and novice clinicians were only demonstrated when clinicians developed their own formulations of case material. When they developed their own formulations the experts' formulations were more parsimonious, internally consistent, and contained fewer errors and the experts were less swayed by irrelevant treatment options. The nature of the experimental task, involving ratings of suitability of possible treatment options suggested for the case, limits the interpretation that formulation directs the development or generation of the clinician's treatment plan. In study two the task may still have limited the capacity to demonstrate further differences between expert and novice therapists. Formulation helps guide certain aspects of effective treatment decision making. When asked to generate a formulation clinicians with greater experience and expertise do this more effectively. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Complications and Outcome of Pregnancy in Extremes of Reproductive Age Groups: Experience at Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Lata Verma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Pregnant women of extremes of reproductive age group at both ends ( 35 years age comprise high risk groups. Pregnant women up to 35 years get many complications like diabetes, spontaneous abortion, hypertensive disorders, autosomal trisomies, increased newborn and maternal morbidity and mortality and cesarean sections. Pregnancies of 35 year age group and to compare both the groups. Methods This retrospective study was done at department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Chatrapati Shahuji Maharaj Medical University, Lucknow, from January 2010 to December 2010. Data were collected from institutional logbook and various complications and outcome were studied. Statistical analyses were carried out by using the statistical package for SPSS-15. Results Present study showed that the definite increased risk of preeclampsia, eclampsia, obstetric cholestasis, twin gestation, anemia, preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, intrauterine fetal growth restriction, and intrauterine fetal death in adolescent pregnancies and increased risk of eclampsia, diabetes, and cesarean sections in advanced age pregnancies. Conclusions Both adolescent and advanced age groups are high risk pregnancy groups so for best reproductive outcome, pregnancies at these ages should be very carefully supervised with both good maternal and fetal surveillance to achieve best maternal and fetal results.

  1. CASE STUDIES OF USE OF DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS IN MATERIAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Kumar Roy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes principles of factorial and fractional factorial design of experiments. The various ways of analysing data obtained by these procedures are shown via four case studies. Yates method was followed in case 1 where the effect of anode type, carbon content of steel, temperature, and agitation on cathodic protection of steel in seawater, on current density, was studied. In case 2, a glass was formulated within 10 constituante melted, quantity water and tested for flow caracteristics, from the result the factor effect was calculated. In case 3, analysis of results is done in a very simple way. In this case, the effect of carbon content, surface condition, temperature, and agitation on the corrosion of steel in seawater was studied. In case 4, the effect of eleven constituents on acid resistance of a cast iron enamel has been studied through sixteen experimental compositions. This case gives a method to find out which of the sixteen experimental compositions is nearest to a target value.

  2. Epidemiological Study Of Burn Cases And Their Mortality Experiences Amongst Adults From A Tertiary Level Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: How to use hospital statistics in establishing epidemiology of burns amongst adults? Objectives: To identify epidemiological determinants for Ii Various burn injuries and ii their mortality experiences. Study design: Hospital based study carried out for a period of one year (1st January 1991 to 31st December 1991. Settings: Wards of department of Burn & Plastic Surgery, BJ Medical College, Ahmedabad. Participants: 386 adults (20 years and above admitted at the centre for burn injuries during 1991. Study variables: Epidemiological determinants (age, sex, temporal, place, etc. for various burn injuries and the determinants of mortality (type of burn, extent of burn, referral time lag etc. Outcome profile: Common profile of burn victims with relation to the epidemiological factors and other factors responsible for high mortality in burn cases. Statistical analysis: Chi- square and Z tests. Results:Burns occured more in females specially in the age group of 20-24 years. Eighty five percent were flame burns. Flame burns were more in females, while electric burns were more in males. Burns were less during monsoon (27.7% than winter (32.6% and summer (39.6%, but electric burns were twice more common during monsoon. Maximum burns (81.9% were domestic, occurring mainly either in kitchen or living room. They were seen more in late evening. Sixty two percent cases were severe as total burn surface area (TBSA was >40%. Case fatality correlated positively with TBSA and death was almost universal with TBSA >60%. Early referral reduced fatality significantly in less severe burns (TBSA<40% but failed to influence it in severe burns. Appraisal of alleged suicide cases (2.6% and of stove bursting (4.4% revealed that young females carry additional risk of burn injuries.

  3. Three Women’s Educational Doctoral Program Experiences: A Case Study of Performances and Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Goodykoontz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three academic women joined to write this piece to explore individual doctoral program experiences and to establish common understandings. They collectively analyzed their experiences using the conceptual approach of doctoral program performances and journeys. This case study shares their experiences within the conceptual approach through emerging themes. The common understandings developed herein about doctoral education based on these themes are also shared. The broader contributions of the three women’s work are two-fold. First, the entire case study provides a way to view, discuss, and consider women’s doctoral education pluralistically. Secondly, perhaps readers of this piece will recognize that individual and common understandings with others are a way to develop professional knowledge as academics. Further, readers of this piece might be able to relate more deeply to their own and others’ unique doctoral program experiences through the lens of performances or journeys. Some of these connections might be based on the overarching framework, while others might be specific to the shared women’s experiences.

  4. The Case for Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Childhood Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Lilian G.; And Others

    The seven brief chapters of this paper advocate mixed-age grouping in schools and child care centers. Discussion defines mixed-age grouping and examines some limitations of single-age grouping. Research findings on social and cognitive aspects of mixed-age grouping are reviewed. Social aspects are discussed by considering in turn the following…

  5. Adult age differences in predicting memory performance: the effects of normative information and task experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Miszczak, L; Hunter, M A; Hultsch, D F

    1994-03-01

    Two experiments addressed the effects of task information and experience on younger and older adults' ability to predict their memory for words. The first study examined the effects of normative task information on subjects' predictions for 30-word lists across three trials. The second study looked at the effects of making predictions and recalling either an easy (15) or a difficult (45) word list prior to making predictions and recalling a moderately difficult (30) word list. The results from both studies showed that task information and experience affected subjects' predictions and that elderly adults predicted their performance more accurately than younger adults.

  6. Case-control Studies on the Effectiveness of Breast Cancer Screening: Insights from the UK Age Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; Broeders, Mireille J M; Verbeek, André L M; Duffy, Stephen W; Moss, Sue M

    2015-07-01

    Ongoing breast cancer screening programs can only be evaluated using observational study designs. Most studies have observed a reduction in breast cancer mortality, but design differences appear to have resulted in different estimates. Direct comparison of case-control and trial analyses gives more insight into this variation. Here, we performed case-control analyses within the randomized UK Age Trial. The Age Trial assessed the effect of screening on breast cancer mortality in women ages 40-49 years. In our approach, case subjects were defined as breast cancer deaths between trial entry (1991-1997) and 2004. Women were ages 39-41 years at entry. For every case subject, five control subjects were selected. All case subjects were included in analyses of screening invitation (356 case subjects, 1,780 controls), whereas analyses of attendance were restricted to women invited to screening (105 case subjects, 525 age-matched controls). Odds ratios (OR) were estimated with conditional logistic regression. We used and compared two methods to correct for self-selection bias. Screening invitation resulted in a breast cancer mortality reduction of 17% (95% confidence interval [CI]: -36%, +6%), similar to trial results. Different exposure definitions and self-selection adjustments influenced the observed breast cancer mortality reduction. Depending on the method, "ever screened" appeared to be associated with a small reduction (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.89) or no reduction (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.48, 2.14) using the two methods of correction. Recent attendance resulted in an adjusted mortality reduction of 36% (95% CI: -69%, +31%) or 45% (95% CI: -71%, +5%). Observational studies, and particularly case-control studies, are an important monitoring tool for breast cancer screening programs. The focus should be on diminishing bias in observational studies and gaining a better understanding of the influence of study design on estimates of mortality reduction.

  7. Dance Experience and Associations with Cortical Gray Matter Thickness in the Aging Population

    OpenAIRE

    Porat, Shai; Goukasian, Naira; Hwang, Kristy S.; Zanto, Theodore; Do, Triet; Pierce, Jonathan; Joshi, Shantanu; Woo, Ellen; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the effect dance experience may have on cortical gray matter thickness and cognitive performance in elderly participants with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: 39 cognitively normal and 48 MCI elderly participants completed a questionnaire regarding their lifetime experience with music, dance, and song. Participants identified themselves as either dancers or nondancers. All participants received structural 1.5-tesla MRI scans and detailed clin...

  8. Transparency for Crisis Communication in the Digital AgeCases from Food Safety Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Sau-Lan Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many practitioners already noticed that fast reaction is more critical in the digital age. However, there is relatively rare discussion on the role of transparency. This paper is based on Murphy et al.’s (2007 model of marketing relationship to argue that transparency is very critical for crisis communication in the digital era. An organization has to put transparency as the central element of crisis communication. Five cases are discussed briefly on the role of transparency apart from other elements. An organization nearly cannot enclose any unfavorable information about an event. When unfavorable information is exploded by another source rather than the organization, the reputation is even more damaged. The best method is disclosing all information. In order to make transparency favorable to the organization, the organization must prevent wrong doings and faults in the very first beginning. The virtue ethics, notably integrity, respect, fair and empathy, are important elements for enhancing the possibility of positive effects from transparency.

  9. Aging of Indian women in India: the experience of older women in formal care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavar, Jyotsna M; Jamuna, D

    2011-01-01

    The feminization of aging is a process that has begun in India but is not occurring uniformly throughout India. Older women are more likely to be widowed, poor, and suffer vulnerability to adverse outcomes like poor health. With the changing social landscape of India, middle-income older women are increasingly opting for 'pay and stay homes', an emerging type of old age home in India. Majority of the 97 women residents of 'pay and stay' homes reported being widowed (68%), and 25% were childless. Childlessness and widowhood were important considerations in the decision to relocate to an old age home. Older women reported higher degrees of psychological closeness and contact with daughters than sons, and the overall social network size was small. High prevalence of diabetes rates among older women carries implications for potential functional disability. Strong advocacy measures for empowering older women in India should be a priority policy directive.

  10. Strategies for Aging in Place: The Experience of Language-Minority Seniors With Loss of Independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne; Gould, Odette N; Gibbons, Caroline; Simard, Majella; Éthier, Sophie; Villalon, Lita

    2015-01-01

    For healthy and independent older adults, aging in place can be seen as identical to any other adult living at home. Little is known about how frail seniors, particularly those who speak a minority language, manage the challenges of aging in place. The present qualitative descriptive study explores the strategies that Canadian French-speaking seniors have put in place to counter their loss of independence and promote their ability to stay in their home. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 39 older adults and transcribed, followed by content analysis to identify common themes related to study objectives. Six themes emerged in response to strategies described for aging in place. Findings reveal the limited extent to which language issues were perceived as a barrier by participants. In conclusion, the results of this study provide us with fruitful insights to guide community nursing practice, future research, and public policy.

  11. Effects of omalizumab in severe asthmatics across ages: A real life Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, B; Scalese, M; Latorre, M; Scichilone, N; Matucci, A; Milanese, M; Masieri, S; Rolla, G; Steinhilber, G; Rosati, Y; Vultaggio, A; Folletti, I; Baglioni, S; Bargagli, E; Di Tomassi, M; Pio, R; Pio, A; Maccari, U; Maggiorelli, C; Migliorini, M G; Vignale, L; Pulerà, N; Carpagnano, G E; Foschino Barbaro, M P; Perrella, A; Paggiaro, P L

    2016-10-01

    This retrospective study aimed at evaluating long-term effects of Omalizumab in elderly asthmatics in a real-life setting. 105 consecutive severe asthmatics (GINA step 4-5; mean FEV 1 % predicted:66 ± 15.7) treated with Omalizumab for at least 1 year (treatment mean duration 35.1 ± 21.7 months) were divided into 3 groups according to their age at Omalizumab treatment onset: 18-39, 40-64 and ≥ 65 years. Comorbidities, number of overweight/obese subjects and patients with late-onset asthma were more frequent among older people. A similar reduction of inhaled corticosteroids dosage and SABA on-demand therapy was observed in all groups during Omalizumab treatment; a similar FEV 1 increased was also observed. Asthma Control Test (ACT) improved significantly (p Omalizumab but the percentage of exacerbation-free patients was higher in younger people (76.9%) compared to middle aged patients (49.2%) and the elderly (29%) (p = 0.049). After Omalizumab treatment, the risk for exacerbations was lower in subjects aged 40-64 (OR = 0.284 [CI95% = 0.098-0.826], p = 0.021) and 18-39 (OR = 0.133 [CI95% = 0.026-0.678], p = 0.015), compared to elderly asthmatics. Also, a significantly reduced ACT improvement (β = -1.070; p = 0.046) passing from each age class was observed. Omalizumab improves all asthma outcomes independently of age, although the magnitude of the effects observed in the elderly seems to be lower than in the other age groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Should measures of patient experience in primary care be adjusted for case mix? Evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddison, Charlotte; Elliott, Marc; Parker, Richard; Staetsky, Laura; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Campbell, John L; Roland, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Uncertainties exist about when and how best to adjust performance measures for case mix. Our aims are to quantify the impact of case-mix adjustment on practice-level scores in a national survey of patient experience, to identify why and when it may be useful to adjust for case mix, and to discuss unresolved policy issues regarding the use of case-mix adjustment in performance measurement in health care. Secondary analysis of the 2009 English General Practice Patient Survey. Responses from 2 163 456 patients registered with 8267 primary care practices. Linear mixed effects models were used with practice included as a random effect and five case-mix variables (gender, age, race/ethnicity, deprivation, and self-reported health) as fixed effects. Primary outcome was the impact of case-mix adjustment on practice-level means (adjusted minus unadjusted) and changes in practice percentile ranks for questions measuring patient experience in three domains of primary care: access; interpersonal care; anticipatory care planning, and overall satisfaction with primary care services. Depending on the survey measure selected, case-mix adjustment changed the rank of between 0.4% and 29.8% of practices by more than 10 percentile points. Adjusting for case-mix resulted in large increases in score for a small number of practices and small decreases in score for a larger number of practices. Practices with younger patients, more ethnic minority patients and patients living in more socio-economically deprived areas were more likely to gain from case-mix adjustment. Age and race/ethnicity were the most influential adjustors. While its effect is modest for most practices, case-mix adjustment corrects significant underestimation of scores for a small proportion of practices serving vulnerable patients and may reduce the risk that providers would 'cream-skim' by not enrolling patients from vulnerable socio-demographic groups.

  13. The potential use of cuticular hydrocarbons and multivariate analysis to age empty puparial cases of Calliphora vicina and Lucilia sericata

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, HE; Pechal, JL; Benbow, ME; Drijfhout, FP

    2017-01-01

    Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) have been successfully used in the field of forensic entomology for identifying and ageing forensically important blowfly species, primarily in the larval stages. However in older scenes where all other entomological evidence is no longer present, Calliphoridae puparial cases can often be all that remains and therefore being able to establish the age could give an indication of the PMI. This paper examined ...

  14. The role of quality management in safety case development - Nagra's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Juerg W.; Zuidema, Piet

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of quality management (QM) in safety case development based on Nagra's experience from a broad range of projects. These include Project Gewahr (L/ILW and HLW, Nagra, 1985), the Wellenberg Project (L/ILW, Nagra, 1994), Project Opalinus Clay (HLW, Nagra, 2002a, 2002b), and recent project work needed in the context of the Swiss site selection process (L/ILW and HLW, Nagra, 2008a, 2008b, 2008c, 2010). Broadly speaking, Nagra's Quality Management policy is focused on ensuring: i) the quality of the disposal system (siting, design and implementation); ii) the quality of the underlying scientific understanding, which are seen as key elements of a credible safety case, along with the quality of the safety calculations themselves and of compiling the safety case, including the drawing of conclusions (Nagra, 2002a). All aspects of QM discussed in this paper should be seen in this context. (authors)

  15. Perspectives on ageing in place : Older adults' experiences of everyday life in urban neighbourhoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lager, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Ageing-in-place policies have been implemented by many Western governments in order to delay and decrease older adults’ reliance on expensive institutionalised care. Such policies stimulate older adults to remain in their own homes and neighbourhoods for as long as possible and stress that this is

  16. Simulator Sickness During Emergency Procedures Training in a Helicopter Simulator: Age, Flight Experience, and Amount Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    drivers are more susceptible than male drivers" (Hein, p. 610). Age. Walt Disney World’s "Mission: Space" thrill ride left some older riders gulping...to the state... Last December, Disney began placing barf bags in the ride... (Schneider, 2004, p. B2) Reviewers have reported that susceptibility to SS

  17. Work Experiences and Family Functioning among Employed Fathers with Children of School Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Ulla; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated how 657 fathers' job satisfaction and job stress were related to four domains: individual, parent-child, marital, and child. Results showed that the job affected all four domains. Job stress and job satisfaction were directly related to family functioning. Discusses implications for families with school-age children. (RJM)

  18. Academic Achievement, Employment, Age and Gender and Students' Experience of Alternative School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazli, Senel; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Meister, Denise G.; Forthun, Larry; Coatsworth, J. Doug; Grahame, Kamini Maraj

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to explore associations between academic achievement, employment, gender, and age in relation to students' sense of school membership and perception of adults in school. The sample consisted of 102 secondary, alternative school students. Results indicated that students with a more positive perception…

  19. Differential expression of social dominance as a function of age and maltreatment experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teisl, Michael; Rogosch, Fred A; Oshri, Assaf; Cicchetti, Dante

    2012-03-01

    Recent perspectives on social dominance in normative populations have suggested a developmental progression from using primarily coercive strategies to incorporation of more socially competent strategies to attain material and social resources. Parental influences on the resource control strategies children use have been proposed but not investigated empirically. The present study examined age- and gender-related differences in dominance strategies in 470 children from high-risk neighborhoods who were between 6 and 13 years of age, approximately half of whom had experienced maltreatment. A Q-sort measure of social dominance was developed and received preliminary support. Consistent with predictions from resource control theory, age-related differences in dominance-related behavior were demonstrated in both nonmaltreated and maltreated children. Maltreated children were more likely than nonmaltreated children to be identified as dominant bullies at any age. Dominance and bullying were not more likely to be associated for children who had experienced physical and sexual abuse relative to those who were neglected or emotionally maltreated. Results are discussed in terms of the influence of maltreatment on the social development of children, and intervention approaches for limiting these deleterious effects are recommended. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Experience in management of aging of research reactors in the Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes history, the current status and experimental possibilities of research reactors in the VINCA Institute, and summarises annual reports on their utilisation and maintenance. Operating problems as consequences of the ageing of the reactors' equipment and materials, including funding aspects and influence of changing of the nuclear programme in the country are discussed. (author)

  1. LHCb: Ageing Phenomena in the Straw Tube Tracker (Outer Tracker) of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Bachmann, S

    2009-01-01

    The outer tracking system of the LHCb spectrometer is built in the straw tube technology. In tota it consists of 53760 straw of 2.5m length. Thorough investigations have been performed to study the detector performance under long-term irradiations. Problems occuring caused by ageing are discussed and solutions are presented.

  2. Why Gender and Age Prediction from Tweets is Hard : Lessons from a Crowdsourcing Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D.; Trieschnigg, D.; Dogruöz, A. Seza; Gravel, Rilana; Theune, Mariët; Meder, Theo; de Jong, Franciska

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in automatically predicting the gender and age of authors from texts. However, most research so far ignores that language use is related to the social identity of speakers, which may be different from their biological identity. In this paper, we combine insights from

  3. Why Gender and Age Prediction from Tweets is Hard: Lessons from a Crowdsourcing Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Dong-Phuong; Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Dogruoz, A. Seza; Gravel, Rilana; Theune, Mariet; Meder, Theo; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in automatically predicting the gender and age of authors from texts. However, most research so far ignores that language use is related to the social identity of speakers, which may be different from their biological identity. In this paper, we combine insights from

  4. Assessing What Factors Are Driving the Army Civilian Acquisition Multigenerational Workforce Age/Experience Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-06

    45 viii ix Abstract Generation members are born , start school, enter the workforce, have children, and retire at about the...and Army acquisition workforce has evolved into a multigenerational workforce of young (Millennials, born 1980–2000), middle age (Generation X, 1965...younger workforce. Editors of TDn2K, a restaurant workforce data and analytics provider firm ( Restaurant Hospitality, 2014), quoting Sarah Atkinson

  5. The Experience of Anger and Sadness in Everyday Problems Impacts Age Differences in Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Fields, Fredda; Coats, Abby Heckman

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined regulation of the discrete emotions anger and sadness in adolescents through older adults in the context of describing everyday problem situations. The results support previous work; in comparison to younger age groups, older adults reported that they experienced less anger and reported that they used more passive and fewer…

  6. Revisiting the age-prospective memory-paradox: the role of planning and task experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hering, A.; Cortez, S.A.; Kliegel, M.; Altgassen, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating age-related differences in prospective memory performance using a paradigm with high ecological validity and experimental control. Thirty old and 30 young adults completed the Dresden Breakfast task; a meal preparation task in the lab that comprises several

  7. Early Experiences Matter: A Relationships-Based Curriculum for the Birth-to-Three Age Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Warrier, Sheela; Goh, Mandy

    2018-01-01

    The paper discusses some research findings in Singapore that investigated if a relationships-based curriculum extended the active involvement of the infants, toddlers, and young children (up to the age of three) in their learning. Using a relationships-based curriculum, a study conducted over a year involved the use of a well-tested, traditional…

  8. On the Brink of Education: Experiences of Refugees beyond the Age of Compulsory Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoska, Tatjana; Proyer, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    This paper offers first-hand accounts of refugees beyond the age of compulsory education having arrived in Austria during the last five years. Their accounts were collected using qualitative interviews and a visual method to allow for different approaches towards their educational biographies. Nine individual and two group interviews (altogether…

  9. Aging children of long-lived parents experience slower cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ambarish; Henley, William; Robine, Jean-Marie; Llewellyn, David; Langa, Kenneth M; Wallace, Robert B; Melzer, David

    2014-10-01

    Parental longevity confers lower risks for some age-related diseases in offspring. We tested the association between parental longevity and late-life cognitive decline or dementia. Data were from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a US national sample. Biennial cognitive assessment (Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status-Modified [TICS-m]) occurred for ages 64 years or older in 1996 through 2008 (maximum, 79 years), including physician-diagnosed memory disorder. Offspring were categorized into parental longevity groups based on gender-specific distributional cut points. Model covariates included race, respondents' education, and income status during childhood and adulthood. Offspring groups did not differ on TICS-m scores at baseline. During follow-up, offspring of two long-lived parents experienced 40% slower rates of TICS-m decline than those with no long-lived parents (95% confidence interval, 12-72; P=.003; n=4731). Increased parental longevity was also associated with lower risk of physician-diagnosed memory disorder. Estimates did not change after controlling for environmental variables. Parental longevity is associated inversely with cognitive decline and self-reported diagnosed memory disorders in aging offspring. Parental longevity may be a valuable trait for identifying early biomarkers for resistance to cognitive decline in aging. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Age and closeness of death as determinants of health and social care utilization: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forma, Leena; Rissanen, Pekka; Aaltonen, Mari; Raitanen, Jani; Jylhä, Marja

    2009-06-01

    We used case-control design to compare utilization of health and social services between older decedents and survivors, and to identify the respective impact of age and closeness of death on the utilization of services. Data were derived from multiple national registers. The sample consisted of 56,001 persons, who died during years 1998-2000 at the age of > or = 70, and their pairs matched on age, gender and municipality of residence, who were alive at least 2 years after their counterpart's death. Data include use of hospitals, long-term care and home care. Decedents' utilization within 2 years before death and survivors' utilization in the same period of time was assessed in three age groups (70-79, 80-89 and > or = 90 years) and by gender. Decedents used hospital and long-term care more than their surviving counterparts, but the time patterns were different. In hospital care the differences between decedents and survivors rose in the last months of the study period, whereas in long-term care there were clear differences during the whole 2-year period. The differences were smaller in the oldest age group than in younger age groups. Closeness of death is an important predictor of health and social service use in old age, but its influence varies between age groups. Not only the changing age structure, but also the higher average age at death affects the future need for services.

  11. Review of ageing management of NPPs - Experience feed back form research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, A.; Gujarathi, R.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Tikku, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Ageing of Systems, Structures and Components (SSCs) is a natural process and sets in along with the construction and commissioning of plants in spite of best design provisions and maintenance practices. Plant operators and maintainers need to plan and take measures against ageing degradation of SSCs to maintain the high standards of safety. As safety is a continuously evolving phenomenon, incorporating safety upgrades from time to time and carrying out ageing management towards improved safety for research and power reactors is very important. Cirus research reactor which was commissioned in 1960 and Tarapur Atomic power station which was commissioned in 1969 are two such examples of older generation nuclear plants in India which are presently undergoing extensive refurbishment towards implementation of ageing management programme. The 40 MWt Cirus Research Reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, is a vertical closed tank type reactor with natural uranium as fuel, demineralised light water as primary coolant, heavy water as moderator and graphite as reflector. The reflector and the thermal shields are cooled by reactor building ventilation system. Sea water is used as secondary coolant. The reactor vessel is made of aluminium and has 199 lattice tubes rolled into top and bottom tube sheets. It has an expansion joint between the top tube sheet and the shell to allow for thermal expansion. The reactor operated very efficiently till early nineties after which the ageing degradation of SSCs started affecting the reactor operation. Plant availability factor showed a declining trend due to frequent breakdown of equipment. Detailed performance review was carried out for various equipment and a list of equipment that needed replacement was prepared. Equipment, for which availability of spares was becoming difficult due to obsolescence, were also included in this list. Detailed ageing studies were then taken up on various SSCs. The SSCs were

  12. Prospects for cosmic neutrino detection in tritium experiments in the case of hierarchical neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blennow, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the effects of neutrino mixing and the neutrino mass hierarchy when considering the capture of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) on radioactive nuclei. The implications of mixing and hierarchy at future generations of tritium decay experiments are considered. We find that the CNB should be detectable at these experiments provided that the resolution for the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron can be pushed to a few 0.01 eV for the scenario with inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, about an order of magnitude better than that of the upcoming KATRIN experiment. Another order of magnitude improvement is needed in the case of normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also note that mixing effects generally make the prospects for CNB detection worse due to an increased maximum energy of the normal beta decay background

  13. O significado da velhice e da experiência de envelhecer para os idosos Significado de la vejez y de la experiencia de envejecer para los ancianos The meaning of old age and the aging experience of in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Célia de Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou conhecer e analisar o significado da velhice e da experiência de envelhecer para os idosos moradores da zona rural do Estado do Ceará. Pesquisa descritiva-exploratória, realizada com 48 idosos, homens e mulheres, cadastrados e atendidos na estratégia saúde da família da zona rural do Ceará, no primeiro semestre de 2005. Os discursos dos idosos revelaram que a velhice traz muitas perdas, principalmente quando acometidos pelo adoecimento. No entanto, relatam que, hoje, são felizes pelas conquistas pessoais e materiais, além da família que conseguiram formar. A experiência de envelhecer e a velhice para o grupo pesquisado revelam-se como acontecimento positivo, comparado aos mitos e preconceitos oriundos do meio urbano.El estudio tuvo como objetivo conocer y analizar el significado de la vejez y de la experiencia de envejecer para los ancianos habitantes de la zona rural del Estado de Ceará. Investigación descriptivo-exploratoria, realizada con 48 ancianos, hombres y mujeres, censados y atendidos en la estrategia Salud de la Familia de la zona rural de Ceará, durante el primer semestre de 2005. Las declaraciones de los ancianos revelaron que la vejez acarrea muchas pérdidas, principalmente cuando están afectados por alguna enfermedad. Aún así, relatan que hoy son felices por las conquistas personales y materiales, y también por la familia que consiguieron formar. La experiencia de envejecer y la vejez para el grupo investigado se manifiestan como acontecimientos positivos en comparación a los mitos y preconceptos originados en el medio urbano.The objective of the present study was to identify and analyze the meaning of old age and the experience of aging for elderly individuals living in the rural area of Ceará state. This descriptive, exploratory study was performed with 48 aged men and women, registered in the family health strategy of the rural zone of Ceara, in the first semester of 2005. The statements

  14. Age, stress, and emotional complexity: results from two studies of daily experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stacey B; Sliwinski, Martin J; Mogle, Jacqueline A; Almeida, David M

    2014-09-01

    Experiencing positive and negative emotions together (i.e., co-occurrence) has been described as a marker of positive adaptation during stress and a strength of socioemotional aging. Using data from daily diary (N = 2,022; ages 33-84) and ecological momentary assessment (N = 190; ages 20-80) studies, we evaluate the utility of a common operationalization of co-occurrence, the within-person correlation between positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA). Then we test competing predictions regarding when co-occurrence will be observed and whether age differences will be present. Results indicate that the correlation is not an informative indicator of co-occurrence. Although correlations were stronger and more negative when stressors occurred (typically interpreted as lower co-occurrence), objective counts of emotion reports indicated that positive and negative emotions were 3 to 4 times more likely to co-occur when stressors were reported. This suggests that co-occurrence reflects the extent to which negative emotions intrude on typically positive emotional states, rather than the extent to which people maintain positive emotions during stress. The variances of both PA and NA increased at stressor reports, indicating that individuals reported a broader not narrower range of emotion during stress. Finally, older age was associated with less variability in NA and a lower likelihood of co-occurring positive and negative emotions. In sum, these findings cast doubt on the utility of the PA-NA correlation as an index of emotional co-occurrence, and question notion that greater emotional co-occurrence represents either a typical or adaptive emotional state in adults. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Age, Stress, and Emotional Complexity: Results from Two Studies of Daily Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stacey B.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Mogle, Jacqueline A.; Almeida, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing positive and negative emotions together (i.e., co-occurrence) has been described as a marker of positive adaptation during stress and a strength of socio-emotional aging. Using data from daily diary (N=2,022; ages 33-84) and ecological momentary assessment (N=190; ages 20-80) studies, we evaluate the utility of a common operationalization of co-occurrence, the within-person correlation between positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA). Then we test competing predictions regarding when co-occurrence will be observed and whether age differences will be present. Results indicate that the correlation is not an informative indicator of co-occurrence. Although correlations were stronger and more negative when stressors occurred (typically interpreted as lower co-occurrence), objective counts of emotion reports indicated that positive and negative emotions were more 3 to 4 times likely to co-occur when stressors were reported. This suggests that co-occurrence reflects the extent to which negative emotions intrude on typically positive emotional states, rather than the extent to which people maintain positive emotions during stress. The variances of both PA and NA increased at stressor reports, indicating that individuals reported a broader not narrower range of emotion during stress. Finally, older age was associated with less variability in NA and a lower likelihood of co-occurring positive and negative emotions. In sum, these findings cast doubt on the utility of the PA-NA correlation as an index of emotional co-occurrence, and question notion that greater emotional cooccurrence represents either a typical or adaptive emotional state in adults. PMID:25244477

  16. Balance Screening of Vestibular Function in Subjects Aged 4 Years and Older: A Living Laboratory Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carolina Bermúdez Rey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the various individual factors that contribute to balance and the relation to fall risk, we performed the modified Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support, with 1,174 participants between 4 and 83 years of age. This research was conducted in the Living Laboratory® at the Museum of Science, Boston. We specifically focus on balance test condition 4, in which individuals stand on memory foam with eyes closed, and must rely on their vestibular system; therefore, performance in this balance test condition provides a proxy for vestibular function. We looked for balance variations associated with sex, race/ethnicity, health factors, and age. We found that balance test performance was stable between 10 and 39 years of age, with a slight increase in the failure rate for participants 4–9 years of age, suggesting a period of balance development in younger children. For participants 40 years and older, the balance test failure rate increased progressively with age. Diabetes and obesity are the two main health factors we found associated with poor balance, with test condition 4 failure rates of 57 and 19%, respectively. An increase in the odds of having fallen in the last year was associated with a decrease in the time to failure; once individuals dropped below a time to failure of 10 s, there was a significant 5.5-fold increase in the odds of having fallen in the last 12 months. These data alert us to screen for poor vestibular function in individuals 40 years and older or suffering from diabetes, in order to undertake the necessary diagnostic and rehabilitation measures, with a focus on reducing the morbidity and mortality of falls.

  17. Recruitment of aged donor heart with pharmacological stress echo. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombardini Tonino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heart transplant is a treatment of the heart failure, which is not responding to medications, and its efficiency is already proved: unfortunately, organ donation is a limiting step of this life-saving procedure. To counteract heart donor shortage, we should screen aged potential donor hearts for initial cardiomyopathy and functionally significant coronary artery disease. Donors with a history of cardiac disease are generally excluded. Coronary angiography is recommended for most male donors older than 45 years and female donors older than 50 years to evaluate coronary artery stenoses. A simpler way to screen aged potential donor hearts for initial cardiomyopathy and functionally significant coronary artery disease should be stress echocardiography. Case report A marginal donor (A 57 year old woman meeting legal requirements for brain death underwent a transesophageal (TE Dipyridamole stress echo (6 minutes accelerated protocol to rule out moderate or severe heart and coronary artery disease. Wall motion was normal at baseline and at peak stress (WMSI = 1 at baseline and peak stress, without signs of stress inducible ischemia. The pressure/volume ratio was 9.6 mmHg/ml/m2 at baseline, increasing to 14 mmHg/ml/m2 at peak stress, demonstrating absence of latent myocardial dysfunction. The marginal donor heart was transplanted to a recipient "marginal" for co-morbidity ( a 63 year old man with multiple myeloma and cardiac amyloidosis , chronic severe heart failure, NYHA class IV. Postoperative treatment and early immunosuppressant regimen were performed according to standard protocols. The transplanted heart was assessed normal for dimensions and ventricular function at transthoracic (TT echocardiography on post-transplant day 7. Coronary artery disease was ruled out at coronary angiography one month after transplant; left ventriculography showed normal global and segmental LV function of the transplanted heart. Conclusion For

  18. Case Report: Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment in Niemann-Pick disease type C; clinical experience in four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsesyan, Nina; Platt, Frances M.

    2017-01-01

    In this case series, we demonstrate that Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) improves liver dysfunction in Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) and may restore a suppressed cytochrome p450 system. NPC disease is a progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. Liver disease is a common feature presenting either acutely as cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period, or in later life as elevated liver enzymes indicative of liver dysfunction. Recently, an imbalance in bile acid synthesis in a mouse model of NPC disease was linked to suppression of the P450 detoxification system and was corrected by UDCA treatment. UDCA (3α, 7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid), a hydrophilic bile acid, is used to treat various cholestatic disorders. In this report we summarise the findings from four independent cases of NPC, three with abnormal liver enzyme levels at baseline, that were subsequently treated with UDCA. The patients differed in age and clinical features, they all tolerated the drug well, and in those with abnormal liver function, there were significant improvements in their liver enzyme parameters. PMID:29119141

  19. Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Grieco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominoplasty is one of the most popular body-contouring procedures. It is associated with a significant number of complications: the most common ones are seroma, hematoma, infection, wound-healing problems, and skin flap necrosis. From January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men (mean age: 51 years underwent abdominoplastic surgery at the Plastic Surgery Section, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Italy. All patients reported a weight loss between 15 kg and 47 kg. All of the of 25 patients were included in the study; minor and major complications were seen in 17 (68% and 8 (32% patients, respectively. The percentage of complications in our patients was as follows: 9 patients with seroma (36%; 4 patients with wound dehiscence with delayed wound healing (16%; 3 cases with hematoma (12%; 2 patients with postoperative bleeding (8%; 1 patient (4% with an umbilical necrosis; 1 patient (4% with a deep vein thrombosis; 3 patients with infected seroma (12%; and 2 patients with wound infection (8%. There were no cases of postoperative mortality. The aim of this study is to analyze our complications in postbariatric abdominoplasty.

  20. Case Study on the Unavailability of a Ship Propulsion System under Aging Effects and Maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Tadatsugi Okazaki

    2016-01-01

    Unavailability of a ship propulsion system under aging effects and proper maintenance is estimated using GO-FLOW. GO-FLOW is an effective software tool for the unavailability analysis of complex systems. Aging effects are incorporated into GO-FLOW using a time-dependent technique and assuming a linear aging model. The results show that the aging effects and improper maintenance can potentially increase the frequency of accidents due to a malfunction of the propulsion system by a factor of three.

  1. Comparison between hearing screening-detected cases and sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jingrong; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Yan; Li, Yun; Mei, Ling; Yao, Guoyin; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiaoming; Wu, Hao

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnosis and ages of intervention for cases of delayed-onset hearing loss identified sporadically or via a preschool hearing screening program. Retrospective study with the comparative analysis of two groups of children. Cases identified from screening were selected from 34 321 preschool children who underwent screening for delayed-onset hearing loss between October 2009 and May 2011. Sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss were selected from pediatric clinical records. Cases from the first group were excluded from the latter to avoid duplication. Two groups were given the same questionnaire to record risk indicators, diagnosis, and age at intervention. The average age of 26 children at the time of diagnosis in the screening group (52.81 ± 13.23 months) was significantly earlier than in the 33 cases identified in the sporadic group (62.03 ± 12.86 months; p children with bilateral moderate to severe hearing loss in the screening group (50.40 ± 10.76 months) was also earlier than in the sporadic group (62.73 ± 13.77 months; p hearing screening for preschool children with no significant symptoms of delayed-onset hearing loss.

  2. Case closed: research evidence on the positive public health impact of the age 21 minimum legal drinking age in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William; Blanchette, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the nonprofit organization Choose Responsibility called for repealing the 1984 National Minimum Drinking Age Act, which had led all 50 states to establish a minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) of 21 years, and allowing the states to lower their MLDA to 18 years. Two years later, the organization assembled a small group of college and university presidents (the Amethyst Initiative) to call publicly for a critical reexamination of the law. Public health and traffic safety experts responded to these efforts by generating new research on the age 21 MLDA, thus warranting an updated review of the literature. This review focuses primarily on research published since 2006, when Choose Responsibility began its public relations campaign to lower the MLDA. Recent research on the age 21 MLDA has reinforced the position that the current law has served the nation well by reducing alcohol-related traffic crashes and alcohol consumption among youths, while also protecting drinkers from long-term negative outcomes they might experience in adulthood, including alcohol and other drug dependence, adverse birth outcomes, and suicide and homicide. The age 21 law saves lives and is unlikely to be overturned. College and university leaders need to put into effect workable policies, stricter enforcement, and other evidence-based prevention efforts that have been demonstrated to reduce underage drinking and alcohol-related problems on campus and are being applied successfully at prominent academic institutions.

  3. Low-field MRI of the ankle joint-first experience in the pediatric age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herber, S.; Kreitner, K.F.; Kalden, P.; Loew, R.; Thelen, M.; Berger, S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic confidence of MRI with an open low field System (Magnetom open trademark , Siemens, Germany) in children with predominantly traumatic disorders. Material and methods: Conventional X-rays and MRI examinations have been evaluated in 55 children. MRI was performed at an open 0.2 T MR-unit. The study protocol comprised coronal STIR-sequence, an angulated T 2 weighted TSE-sequence and T 1 weighted SE-sequence. Results: MRI showed ligamental ruptur in 33/50 (60%) cases. Injuries of the ATFL were most frequent (27/33); osseous ligamental tears occurred in approx. 50% of all cases. Fractures of the distal tibia and fibula were diagnosed in 28/55 children. 15/28 cases showed an involvement of the epiphysis. We found occult fractures in 11/28 children. Fractures, diagnosed by conventional X-rays, were excluded in 6 cases. Therapy changed in 35/55 patients on the basis of MRI-findings. Conclusion: Low-field MRI of the ankle joint in children and adolescents is able to show numerous pathological conditions. We recommend low-field MRI of the ankle in children with persistent or unclear pain of the ankle joint and inconspicuous conventional X-ray. (orig.) [de

  4. Tor: Case Study of a Boy with Autism between the Age of Three and Eight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C Reuterskiold; Nettelbladt, U.

    2005-01-01

    Longitudinal data are presented on a boy between the ages of three and eight. At age three he received a diagnosis of language impairment and at age six a diagnosis of high-functioning autism. Results are presented from extensive assessments at four points in time, including interviews with his mother and teachers. The results indicate that the…

  5. The benefit of myomectomy in women aged 40 years and above: Experience in an urban teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, Jesse Y; Bako, Babagana; Kadas, Saidu; Usman, Joshua D; Kullima, Abubakar A; Moruppa, Joel Y

    2011-07-01

    Abdominal myomectomy remains the mainstay of surgical management of uterine fibroids in our environment. However, its benefit in women aged 40 years and above remains debatable. An 11-year prospective study was conducted involving 98 women, aged 40 years and above, who had abdominal myomectomy for the treatment of uterine fibroid at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri. They were followed up regularly for 1-6 years to detect conception, resolution of symptoms and obstetrics performance. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. The mean age of the patients was 42.6±2.9 years and 77 (78.6%) of them were nulliparous. Lower abdominal swelling was the commonest clinical presentation and the mean uterine size was 18.6±8.5 weeks. Infertility with uterine fibroids was the indication for myomectomy in majority of the cases [48 (48.9%)], while pregnancy complications accounted for 11.2% (11) of the cases Fertility restoration was 10.4% among the infertile patients. There was complete resolution of symptoms in 35.9% of those who required symptomatic relief, and term pregnancies were recorded in 72.7% of patients with pregnancy complications. Myomectomy is the recommended treatment of uterine fibroids in women aged 40 years and above with infertility and who wish to become pregnant. If there is no need for further fertility preservation, hysterectomy should be offered.

  6. Packaging development in an ageing society: a case study approach in the United Kingdom fast-moving consumer goods industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research demonstrating the effects of age-related changes on product usability and the value derived from consumption experiences. In particular, difficulties with packaging have been identified as a source of dissatisfaction and a key barrier to older people maintaining their independence. Despite this, marketing literature into older consumers’ packaging experiences is limited. Likewise, packaging development has been afforded scant attention in the new product...

  7. Results of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors: experience of 134 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle Ribeiro Junior

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study radiofrequency ablation of primary and metastatic livertumors. Methods: The authors present a series of 134 cases, 63 femalesand 71 males with a mean age of 61.2 years, in whom radiofrequencyablation was used either by laparotomy or percutaneously to treat 203lesions. The group was composed of 51 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma,four cases of cholangiocarcinoma, and cases of hepatic metastases, asfollows: 64 of colorectal cancer, 6 of neuroendocrine tumors, 5 of breastcancer, 1 case of pancreas cancer, 1 of kidney cancer, 1 of endometrialcancer and 1 of leiomyosarcoma. Results: Procedure-associatedmorbidity/mortality was 24.8 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrence wasobserved in 12.7% within a mean time of 10.5 months. Conclusions:Radiofrequency ablation is a safe procedure and can be used in patientswith impaired hepatic function. For metastatic diseases, it does notreplace surgery but it can be associated with other procedures, such assurgery and transarterial chemoembolization, or after recurrence, leadingto greater probability of remaining disease-free.

  8. Differences Across Age Groups in Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming People's Experiences of Health Care Discrimination, Harassment, and Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattari, Shanna K; Hasche, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    Given the increasing diversity among older adults and changes in health policy, knowledge is needed on potential barriers to health care for transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) individuals. Using the 2010 National Transgender Discrimination Survey (NTDS), logistic regression models test differences between age groups (below 35, 35-49, 50-64, and 65 and above) in lifetime experience of anti-transgender discrimination, harassment, and victimization within health care settings while considering the influences of insurance status, level of passing, time of transition, and other socio-demographic factors. Although more than one fifth of transgender and GNC individuals of all ages reported health discrimination, harassment, or victimization, significant age differences were found. Insurance status and level of passing were also influential. Medicare policy changes and this study's findings prompt further consideration for revising other health insurance policies. In addition, expanded cultural competency trainings that are specific to transgender and GNC individuals are crucial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. How do older adults experience and perceive socially assistive robots in aged care: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebroucke, Tijs; de Casterlé, Bernadette Dierckx; Gastmans, Chris

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to gain a better understanding of how older adults experience, perceive, think, and feel about the use of socially assistive robots (SARs) in aged care settings. We conducted a literature search for studies that used a qualitative or a mixed-method approach having a significant qualitative element. Pubmed, Cinahl, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science electronic databases were queried. Candidate articles published in journals and conference proceedings were considered for review. Two independent reviewers assessed the included studies for methodological quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program, after which data on subjects' self-reported opinions and perceptions were extracted and synthesized using thematic analyses. Seventeen studies producing 23 publications were included. Based on the opinions of older adults, four themes emerged in relation to the use of SARS: (1) roles of a SAR; (2) interaction between the older adult and the SAR, which could be further subdivided into (a) the technical aspect of the interaction and (b) the human aspect of the interaction; (3) appearance of the SAR; and (4) normative/ethical issues regarding the use of SARs in aged care. Older adults have clear positive and negative opinions about different aspects of SARs in aged care. Nonetheless, some opinions can be ambiguous and need more attention if SARs are to be considered for use in aged care. Understanding older adults' lived experiences with SARs creates the possibility of using an approach that embeds technological innovation into the care practice itself.

  10. Modernization, Aging and Coresidence of Older Persons: the Sri Lankan Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarasiri de Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of the modernization on the living arrangements of elderly people in six selected communities representing urban, semi-urban, estate, rural, colonized settlement and fishing villages in Sri Lanka. The paper concludes that the modernization of the economy and society has exacerbated an intergenerational rift leading to an intensification of tensions between elderly people and other family members, despite the fact that the percentage of older people living with their children remains high. Such coresidence or intergenerational living comprises many types of living arrangements, and leads to mixed results for care of the elderly. Many elderly people have developed mechanisms to counteract the negative effects of coresidence: seeking independence during old age, by earning their own income and living alone or living with the spouse, indulging in behaviors such as drinking, spending time outside the home with friends of similar age, or creating their own living space within coresidence.

  11. Differential Expression of Social Dominance as a Function of Age and Maltreatment Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Teisl, Michael; Rogosch, Fred A.; Oshri, Assaf; Cicchetti, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Recent perspectives on social dominance in normative populations suggest a developmental progression from using primarily coercive strategies to incorporation of more socially competent strategies to attain material and social resources. Parental influences on the resource control strategies children use have been proposed, but not investigated empirically. The present study examined age- and gender-related differences in dominance strategies in 470 children from high-risk neighborhoods who w...

  12. Lionfish string experiences of an inland poison center: a retrospective study of 23 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trestrail, J H; al-Mahasneh, Q M

    1989-04-01

    From January 1979 through March 1988, our regional poison center, located many hundreds of miles from the nearest coastal salt water, documented 23 cases of envenomation by "Lionfish" (members of genus Pterois). All cases involved specimens which were maintained in the homes of amateur aquarists. A study of patient epidemiology showed the following: patient's sex 91.3% male, 8.7% female; patients ages ranged from 17 to 50 years with an average age for males of 29.8 years and 35 years for females; the site of the envenomation accident was always in the home; the only part of the body envenomated was the hand or finger; and all of the patients were symptomatic. Symptoms noted included sharp pain, swelling, redness, bleeding, nausea, numbness, joint pain, anxiety, headache, disorientation, and dizziness. One patient had a complication of cellulitis. Treatment provided included immersion of the effected area in hot water at 40 C for 60 to 90 min, analgesics, tetanus toxoid, and antibiotics. There were no deaths noted and treatment proved effective in all cases. This paper also discusses the natural history, clinical effects, and current treatment for envenomations from these beautiful but dangerous venomous fish, which can cause poisoning exposures that are likely to be encountered by poison centers anywhere in the world.

  13. Declining Otolaryngology Resident Training Experience in Tracheostomies: Case Log Trends from 2005 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, David; Showmaker, Jason; Ukatu, Ceisha; Wu, Qiwei; Chang, C W David

    2017-06-01

    Objective To evaluate recent tracheostomy surgical experience among otolaryngology residents and general surgery residents. Study Design Retrospective database review. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology and general surgery programs. Subjects and Methods Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case log data from 2005 to 2015 for resident graduates in otolaryngology and general surgery were used to obtain mean graduate tracheostomy numbers, mean graduate composite case numbers, and number of graduating residents. Market share for each specialty was estimated through the derived metric of nationwide total tracheostomy graduate experience, calculated by multiplying the number of graduating residents by the mean number of graduate tracheostomies. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate trends. Multiple linear regression analysis was used for pairwise comparison of trends. Results From 2005 to 2015, mean graduate tracheostomy numbers for otolaryngology residents declined 2.3% per year, while those for general surgery residents increased 1.8% per year. Accounting for changes in number of resident graduates, market share of tracheostomy decreased 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and increased 3.0% per year for general surgery. Mean graduate composite case numbers increased significantly by 1.8% and 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and general surgery residents, respectively. Conclusion Tracheostomy case volume in otolaryngology residency has decreased steadily in comparison with general surgery residency. However, current otolaryngology graduates have more experience in tracheostomy when compared with general surgery graduates. While otolaryngology residents have excellent exposure to tracheostomy, otolaryngology programs should be made aware of this declining trend as well as changing procedural trends, which may affect training needs.

  14. Empowering patients of a mental rehabilitation center in a low-resource context: a Moroccan experience as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabbache, Hicham; Jebbar, Abdelhak; Rania, Nadia; Doucet, Marie-Chantal; Watfa, Ali Assad; Candau, Joël; Martini, Mariano; Siri, Anna; Brigo, Francesco; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Mental, neurological and substance use (MNS) disorders represent a major source of disability and premature mortality worldwide. However, in developing countries patients with MNS disorders are often poorly managed and treated, particularly in marginalized, impoverished areas where the mental health gap and the treatment gap can reach 90%. Efforts should be made in promoting help by making mental health care more accessible. In this article, we address the challenges that psychological and psychiatric services have to face in a low-resource context, taking our experience at a Moroccan rehabilitation center as a case study. A sample of 60 patients were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire during the period of 2014-2015. The questionnaire investigated the reactions and feelings of the patients to the rehabilitation program, and their perceived psychological status and mental improvement, if any. Interviews were then transcribed and processed using ATLAS.ti V.7.0 qualitative analysis software. Frequencies and co-occurrence analyses were carried out. Despite approximately 30 million inhabitants within the working age group, Morocco suffers from a shortage of specialized health workers. Our ethnographic observations show that psychiatric treatment can be ensured, notwithstanding these hurdles, if a public health perspective is assumed. In resource-limited settings, working in the field of mental health means putting oneself on the line, exposing oneself to new experiences, and reorganizing one's own skills and expertise. In the present article, we have used our clinical experience at a rehabilitation center in Fes as a case study and we have shown how to use peer therapy to overcome the drawbacks that we are encountered daily in a setting of limited resources.

  15. Qualitative case studies of five cochlear implant recipients' experience with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Lee R; Greenberg, Simon; Friesen, Lendra M; Ostroff, Jodi; Bodmer, Daniel; Shipp, David; Chen, Joseph M

    2011-02-01

    Cochlear implantation has revolutionized the management of those who suffer from severe-to-profound hearing loss because many patients now achieve excellent speech understanding with objective testing. Nevertheless, speech understanding in noisy conditions and music appreciation remain significant challenges to cochlear implant (CI) users. Music appreciation is an extremely complex experience that is difficult to quantify through a conventional outcome study. This paper aims at documenting the experience of five CI patients with regard to music appreciation using qualitative techniques. This information was obtained through a semi-structured interview process. The interviews were then transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method of qualitative description. The results together with medical case records were used to identify emerging themes. The common themes that evolved were: musical background, the experience of receiving the implant, current experience with music, attention, musical prediction ability, internal hearing, hedonic vs. critical listening, determination, and timbre perception. By documenting their experiences in this manner, novel insights into the patient perspective are provided that are unique to the literature. These descriptions will aid clinicians and researchers who work in the area of cochlear implantation to better understand the needs of their patients.

  16. Facilitators and inhibitors of health-promoting behaviors: The experience of Iranian women of reproductive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Baheiraei

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: In these women′s experience, factors influencing health-promoting behaviors were either facilitators or inhibitors; most were inhibitors. The findings of this study show that, in addition to personal factors, the pursuit of health-promoting behaviors is affected by socio-environmental factors. These results will be useful in designing interventions and plans for women′s health promotion that focus on the improvement of their environment and the modification of social factors.

  17. An exploration of the friendship experiences of working-age adults with aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Pound, Carole

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Aphasia impairs using and understanding language, and thus impacts on communication, identity and relationships. However, little research has investigated how people with aphasia understand friends and friendship. This Participatory Action Research (PAR) study explored how younger adults with aphasia experience friendship. Participants were 28 people with aphasia, some of whom were m...

  18. Life Brought at a Tender Age: The Lived Experiences of Filipino Teenage Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    CRISTOPHER R. PARUNGAO; LOWELL P. BAUTISTA; ROSLYN MARIANO; VILMA M. BONIFACIO; MARJORIE V. AGUINALDO

    2014-01-01

    Unintended teenage pregnancy is an ever-present issue in developing countries such as the Philippines. The impact of teenage pregnancy affects the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual well being of the adolescents. Teen pregnancies carry extra health risks to both the mother and the baby. Nurses play a crucial role in supporting young people as trusted practitioners in a range of settings. This study aimed to explore the lived experiences of the teenage pregnant women. Six adolescent fe...

  19. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    builds on current understanding of fault modes in composites. This paper investigates faults in laminated ply composites. Such structures mainly...experiments where intermittent ground truth and in-situ characteristics are collected. Growth patterns are analyzed for damage types typical of laminated ...2: [0/902/45/-45/90], and Layup 3: [902/45/-45]2. Torayca T700G uni-directional carbon- prepreg material was used for 15.24 cm x 25.4 cm coupons with

  20. Haptic and Olfactory Experiences of the Perth Foreshore: Case Studies in Sensory History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saren Reid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The liminal zone where a city meets ‘the water’s edge’ is a place of heightened sensory experiences. In Australia, these settings have been continually reshaped and experienced, individually and collectively, both before and after European settlement, and so they provide a physical domain for reinterpreting Australian history. In Perth, Western Australia, at the turn of the twentieth century, two recreational buildings on the foreshore, the Perth City Baths (1898–1914 and the Water Chute (1905–unknown, promoted new aquatic leisure practices that provided heightened sensory experiences of the Swan River and the city foreshore. These buildings are examined from the perspective of ‘sensory history’, an alternative form of cultural and environmental analysis that has been garnering interest from a range of disciplines over the past several decades (see, for example, the work of Constance Classen, Alain Corbin, David Howes and Mark M Smith. Sensory history seeks to reveal through historical inquiry the informative and exploratory nature of the senses in specific contexts. The potential value of sensory history to studies of built and natural environments lies in drawing attention away from the overweening and frequently generalising dominance of ‘the visual’ as a critical category in humanities research. The case studies explore how evolving swimming practices at the City Baths and ‘shooting the chutes’ at the Water Chute provided novel, exciting and sometimes unpleasant haptic and olfactory experiences and consider how changing forms of recreation allowed for broadly sensuous rather than primarily visual experiences of the foreshore and Swan River. These case studies are part of a larger body of research that seeks to ‘make sense’ of the Perth foreshore and, more broadly, Australian urban waterfronts as sites of varied and evolving sensory experience.

  1. Maternal age and Alzheimer's disease: a collaborative re-analysis of case-control studies. EURODEM Risk Factors Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Rocca; C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); D.G. Clayton (David); V. Chandra; L. Fratiglioni (Laura); A.B. Graves; A. Heyman; A.F. Jorm; E. Kokmen (Emre); K. Kondo; J.A. Mortimer; S.L. Shalat; H. Soininen; A. Hofman (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate the possible association between Alzheimer's disease and late maternal age at index birth, we conducted a collaborative re-analysis of existing case-control data sets. Of the 11 studies participating in the EURODEM project, four were included in the analyses regarding

  2. Intelligence in early adulthood and subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged men: the Vietnam Experience Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R; Deary, Ian J; Fowkes, F Gerald; Batty, G David

    2012-07-01

    People with higher intelligence in early life have a lower subsequent risk of coronary heart disease events, but the explanation for these observations is unclear. To examine whether intelligence in early adulthood is associated with risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in mid-life, as indicated by the ankle brachial index (ABI), and investigate its potential mediating role in the association between intelligence and mortality. Participants were 4286 male US veterans whose intelligence was measured on enlistment into military service at a mean age of 20.4 years and whose ABI was measured by Doppler as part of a detailed medical examination at a mean age of 38.3 years. Higher intelligence in early adulthood was associated with a higher ABI in mid-life. For an SD increase in intelligence, after adjusting for age, ABI (× 10) rose by 0.05 (0.02, 0.07), and the OR (95% CI) for having a low ABI (≤ 0.90) was 0.84 (0.72 to 0.98). Further adjustment for smoking, serum cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose concentrations, blood pressure, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, body mass index, alcohol intake, education and measures of socioeconomic position had little or no attenuating effect on these associations. Lower ABI was associated with increased mortality from all causes and cardiovascular disease but it did not account for the associations between IQ and mortality from these causes. Men of lower intelligence may be more susceptible to atherogenesis, though this mechanism does not appear to explain their increased risk of earlier death.

  3. Experience in Modelling Nuclear Energy Systems with MESSAGE: Country Case Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    Member States have recognized the increasing need to model future nuclear power scenarios in order to develop strategies for sustainable nuclear energy systems. The IAEA model for energy supply strategy alternatives and their general environmental impacts (MESSAGE) code is a tool that supports energy analysis and planning in Member States. This publication documents the experience gained on modelling and scenario analysis of nuclear energy systems (NES) using the MESSAGE code through various case studies performed by the participating Member States on evaluation and planning for nuclear energy sustainability at the regional or national level. The publication also elaborates on experience gained in modelling of global nuclear energy systems with a focus on specific aspects of collaboration among technology holder and technology user countries and the introduction of innovative nuclear technologies. It presents country case studies covering a variety of nuclear energy systems based on a once-through fuel cycle and a closed fuel cycle for thermal reactors, fast reactors and advanced systems. The feedback from case studies proves the analytical capabilities of the MESSAGE model and highlight the path forward for further advancements in the MESSAGE code and NES modelling.

  4. The Quadruple Helix-Based Innovation Model of Reference Sites for Active and Healthy Ageing in Europe: The Ageing@Coimbra Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malva, João O; Amado, Alda; Rodrigues, Alexandra; Mota-Pinto, Anabela; Cardoso, Ana F; Teixeira, Ana M; Todo-Bom, Ana; Devesa, António; Ambrósio, António F; Cunha, António L; Gomes, Bárbara; Dantas, Carina; Abreu, Cidalina; Santana, Isabel; Bousquet, Jean; Apóstolo, João; Santos, Lúcia; Meneses de Almeida, Lúcio; Illario, Maddalena; Veríssimo, Rafaela; Rodrigues, Vitor; Veríssimo, Manuel T

    2018-01-01

    Challenges posed by demographic changes and population aging are key priorities for the Horizon 2020 Program of the European Commission. Aligned with the vision of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA), the development, exchange, and large-scale adoption of innovative good practices is a key element of the responses required to ensure all European citizens remain as active and healthy as possible as they age. Urged by the need of developing scalable disruptive innovation across Europe, the European Commission and the EIP on AHA created the Reference Sites; local coalition of partners that develop good practices to support AHA. Ageing@Coimbra is an example of how this can be achieved at a regional level. The consortium comprises over 70 institutions that develop innovative practices to support AHA in Portugal. Ageing@Coimbra partners support a regional network of stakeholders that build a holistic ecosystem in health and social care, taking into consideration the specificities of the territories, living environments and cultural resources (2,243,934 inhabitants, 530,423 aged 65 or plus live in the Centre Region of Portugal). Good practices in reducing the burden of brain diseases that affect cognition and memory impairment in older people and tackling social isolation in urban and rural areas are among the top priorities of Ageing@Coimbra. Profiting from the collaborative work of academia, business companies, civil society, and authorities, the quadruple helix of Ageing@Coimbra supports: early diagnosis of frailty and disease; care and cure; and active, assisted, and independent living. This paper describes, as a Community Case Study, the creation of a Reference Site of the EIP on AHA, Ageing@Coimbra, and its impact in Portugal. This Reference Site can motivate other regions to develop innovative formulas to federate stakeholders and networks, building consortia at regional level. This growing movement, across Europe, is

  5. The Quadruple Helix-Based Innovation Model of Reference Sites for Active and Healthy Ageing in Europe: The Ageing@Coimbra Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João O. Malva

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Challenges posed by demographic changes and population aging are key priorities for the Horizon 2020 Program of the European Commission. Aligned with the vision of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA, the development, exchange, and large-scale adoption of innovative good practices is a key element of the responses required to ensure all European citizens remain as active and healthy as possible as they age. Urged by the need of developing scalable disruptive innovation across Europe, the European Commission and the EIP on AHA created the Reference Sites; local coalition of partners that develop good practices to support AHA. Ageing@Coimbra is an example of how this can be achieved at a regional level. The consortium comprises over 70 institutions that develop innovative practices to support AHA in Portugal. Ageing@Coimbra partners support a regional network of stakeholders that build a holistic ecosystem in health and social care, taking into consideration the specificities of the territories, living environments and cultural resources (2,243,934 inhabitants, 530,423 aged 65 or plus live in the Centre Region of Portugal. Good practices in reducing the burden of brain diseases that affect cognition and memory impairment in older people and tackling social isolation in urban and rural areas are among the top priorities of Ageing@Coimbra. Profiting from the collaborative work of academia, business companies, civil society, and authorities, the quadruple helix of Ageing@Coimbra supports: early diagnosis of frailty and disease; care and cure; and active, assisted, and independent living. This paper describes, as a Community Case Study, the creation of a Reference Site of the EIP on AHA, Ageing@Coimbra, and its impact in Portugal. This Reference Site can motivate other regions to develop innovative formulas to federate stakeholders and networks, building consortia at regional level. This growing movement

  6. Improvement of age estimation using amino acid racemization in a case of pink teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, I

    1998-03-01

    Age was estimated from pink teeth using racemization of dentinal aspartic acid. Materials for identification were two lower second premolars. The body was determined to be that of a 40-year-old man; however, the age of the decedent had been estimated to be 29 and 30 years by the conventional method and 30 years from findings in the oral cavity. To clarify the cause of this difference, the powdered teeth were further washed in 0.01 mol/L hydrochloric acid. The racemization ratio (D/L ratio) of ordinary white teeth from persons of known age was slightly lower than that before washing, whereas that of the teeth used for identification was higher than before washing. The calculated age of the decedent using the racemization ratio of his teeth was between 36 and 37 years. These results suggest that age estimated from pink teeth is probably underestimated, but a more accurate age estimate can be obtained after adequate washing.

  7. The Demographic and Biomedical Case for Late-Life Interventions in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Michael J.; Butler, Robert N.; Campisi, Judith; de Grey, Aubrey D. N. J.; Finch, Caleb E.; Gough, Michael; Martin, George M.; Vijg, Jan; Perrott, Kevin M.; Logan, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The social and medical costs of the biological aging process are high and will rise rapidly in coming decades, creating an enormous challenge to societies worldwide. In recent decades, researchers have expanded their understanding of the underlying deleterious structural and physiological changes (aging damage) that underlie the progressive functional impairments, declining health, and rising mortality of aging humans and other organisms and have been able to intervene in the process in model organisms, even late in life. To preempt a global aging crisis, we advocate an ambitious global initiative to translate these findings into interventions for aging humans, using three complementary approaches to retard, arrest, and even reverse aging damage, extending and even restoring the period of youthful health and functionality of older people. PMID:20630854

  8. Prioritising sewerage maintenance using inferred sewer age: a case study for Edinburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, S; Burkhard, R

    2010-01-01

    The reported research project focuses on using a database which contains details of customer contacts and CCTV data for a key Scottish catchment to construct a GIS based sewer condition model. Given the nature of the asset registry, a key research challenge was estimating the age of individual lengths of pipe. Within this context, asset age was inferred using the estimated age of surface developments-this involved overlaying the network in a GIS with historical digital maps. The paper illustrates that inferred asset age can reliably be used to highlight assets which are more likely to fail.

  9. Conversion of laproscopic cholecystectomy into open cholecystectomy: an experience in 300 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, T.; Farooq, U.; Naheed, A.; Iqbal, M.; Barkat, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is getting popularity in developing countries especially in Pakistan. Conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy is also common. This study intends to evaluate the causes of conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy and to establish the efficacy and safety of the procedure. Methods: This descriptive case series was conducted in the department of General Surgery at Social Security Teaching Hospital Islamabad from November 2012 to October 2015. Patients of more than 20 years of age presenting in OPD with symptomatic gallstones were included in the study. Patients with dilated CBD (>8 mm in diameter), jaundice, acute cholecystitis, mass at porta hepatis and positive hepatitis B or C virology were excluded. Results: A total of 300 patients were included in the study; 262 (87.33 percentage) were females and 38 (12.67 percentage) were males. Twenty-one (7 percentage) patients were converted to open cholecystectomy. Most common cause of conversion was dense adhesions followed by obscure anatomy at Calots triangle. Other common causes were bleeding, bile leakage, visceral injuries and instrument failure. In the first 100 cases, 10 percentage patients were converted to open cholecystectomy followed by 6 percentage in the next 100 cases. Only 5 percentage patients were converted to open cholecystectomy in the last 100 cases. Conclusion: Most common cause of conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy was dense adhesions followed by obscure anatomy at Calots triangle. (author)

  10. Transradial access for coronary angiography: a single operator's experience of 500 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, J.; Aziz, S.; Javed, A.; Kayani, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the feasibility, success, and safety of the transradial approach (TRA) for diagnostic coronary angiography. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology- National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD) over a period of ten months from June 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: We collected data of 500 consecutive patients who underwent coronary catheterization by the transradial approach. Transradial access was performed only if the Allen's test was normal (positive). Patients with previous CABG or requiring right heart catheterization were excluded from this study. Study endpoints included procedure success rate, vascular complications at access site, and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events during hospitalization. Results: Mean age of the patients was 52 years (range 33-77 yrs) and 72.8% (n= 364) were men and 27.2% (n=136) were females. The vast majority of cases (98.4%) were elective. The right radial artery was used in 98% of cases. Procedural success was achieved in 90.6% cases (453/500). No case of vascular complications such as major access site bleeding, vascular perforation, radial artery occlusion, forearm ischemia, compartment syndrome or MACE was observed. Conclusion: Transradial access for coronary angiography is a safe, effective and elegant alternative to trans femoral access. (author)

  11. Statistic Analyses of the Color Experience According to the Age of the Observer

    OpenAIRE

    Hunjet, Anica; Parac-Osterman, Đurđica; Vučaj, Edita

    2013-01-01

    Psychological experience of color is a real state of the communication between the environment and color, and it will depend on the source of the light, angle of the view, and particular on the observer and his health condition. Hering’s theory or a theory of the opponent processes supposes that cones, which are situated in the retina of the eye, are not sensible on the three chromatic domains (areas, fields, zones) (red, green and purple-blue), but they produce a signal based on the principl...

  12. Effects of early auditory experience on the spoken language of deaf children at 3 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Johanna Grant; Geers, Ann E

    2006-06-01

    By age 3, typically developing children have achieved extensive vocabulary and syntax skills that facilitate both cognitive and social development. Substantial delays in spoken language acquisition have been documented for children with severe to profound deafness, even those with auditory oral training and early hearing aid use. This study documents the spoken language skills achieved by orally educated 3-yr-olds whose profound hearing loss was identified and hearing aids fitted between 1 and 30 mo of age and who received a cochlear implant between 12 and 38 mo of age. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the effects of age, duration, and type of early auditory experience on spoken language competence at age 3.5 yr. The spoken language skills of 76 children who had used a cochlear implant for at least 7 mo were evaluated via standardized 30-minute language sample analysis, a parent-completed vocabulary checklist, and a teacher language-rating scale. The children were recruited from and enrolled in oral education programs or therapy practices across the United States. Inclusion criteria included presumed deaf since birth, English the primary language of the home, no other known conditions that interfere with speech/language development, enrolled in programs using oral education methods, and no known problems with the cochlear implant lasting more than 30 days. Strong correlations were obtained among all language measures. Therefore, principal components analysis was used to derive a single Language Factor score for each child. A number of possible predictors of language outcome were examined, including age at identification and intervention with a hearing aid, duration of use of a hearing aid, pre-implant pure-tone average (PTA) threshold with a hearing aid, PTA threshold with a cochlear implant, and duration of use of a cochlear implant/age at implantation (the last two variables were practically identical because all children were tested between 40 and 44

  13. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  14. Determinants of institutional delivery among childbearing age women in Western Ethiopia, 2013: unmatched case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Regassa Feyissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Place of delivery is a crucial factor which affects the health and wellbeing of the mother and newborn. Institutional delivery helps the women to access skilled assistance, drugs, equipment, and referral transport. Even though 34% of pregnant women received at least one antenatal care from a skilled provider in Ethiopia by 2013, institutional delivery was 10%. The main objective of the study was to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia. METHODS: Retrospective unmatched case control study design was used to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia from September to October 2013. A total of 320 respondents from six districts of East Wollega zone, West Ethiopia were included. Data were collected using pretested and structured questionnaires. Data were entered and cleaned by Epi-info then exported and analyzed using SPSS software. Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level. RESULTS: Education [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR (95% Confidence Interval (CI = 2.754(1.510-8.911], family size [AOR (95% CI = .454(.209-.984], residence [AOR (95% CI = 3.822 (1.766-8.272] were important predictors of place of delivery. Four or more antenatal care [(ANC (AOR (95% CI = 2.914(1.105-7.682], birth order [(AOR (95% CI = .136(.054-.344, age at last delivery [(AOR (95% CI = 9.995(2.101-47.556], birth preparedness [AOR (95% CI = 6.957(2.422-19.987], duration of labour [AOR (95% CI = 3.541(1.732-7.239] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. Moreover service related factors such as distance from health institutions [AOR (95% CI = .665(.173-.954], respondents' awareness of skill of health care professionals [AOR (95% CI = 2.454 (1.663-6.255], mode of transportations [AOR (95% CI = .258(.122-.549] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Policy makers, health service

  15. Determinants of institutional delivery among childbearing age women in Western Ethiopia, 2013: unmatched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Tesfaye Regassa; Genemo, Gebi Agero

    2014-01-01

    Place of delivery is a crucial factor which affects the health and wellbeing of the mother and newborn. Institutional delivery helps the women to access skilled assistance, drugs, equipment, and referral transport. Even though 34% of pregnant women received at least one antenatal care from a skilled provider in Ethiopia by 2013, institutional delivery was 10%. The main objective of the study was to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia. Retrospective unmatched case control study design was used to assess determinants of institutional delivery in Western Ethiopia from September to October 2013. A total of 320 respondents from six districts of East Wollega zone, West Ethiopia were included. Data were collected using pretested and structured questionnaires. Data were entered and cleaned by Epi-info then exported and analyzed using SPSS software. Statistical significance was determined through a 95% confidence level. Education [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) = 2.754(1.510-8.911)], family size [AOR (95% CI) = .454(.209-.984)], residence [AOR (95% CI) = 3.822 (1.766-8.272)] were important predictors of place of delivery. Four or more antenatal care [(ANC) (AOR (95% CI) = 2.914(1.105-7.682)], birth order [(AOR (95% CI) = .136(.054-.344), age at last delivery [(AOR (95% CI) = 9.995(2.101-47.556)], birth preparedness [AOR (95% CI) = 6.957(2.422-19.987)], duration of labour [AOR (95% CI) = 3.541(1.732-7.239)] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. Moreover service related factors such as distance from health institutions [AOR (95% CI) = .665(.173-.954)], respondents' awareness of skill of health care professionals [AOR (95% CI) = 2.454 (1.663-6.255)], mode of transportations [AOR (95% CI) = .258(.122-.549)] were significantly associated with institutional delivery. Policy makers, health service organizations, community leaders and other concerned bodies have

  16. Age- and size-related reference ranges: a case study of spirometry through childhood and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, T J; Stanojevic, S; Stocks, J; Coates, A L; Hankinson, J L; Wade, A M

    2009-02-28

    Age-related reference ranges are useful for assessing growth in children. The LMS method is a popular technique for constructing growth charts that model the age-changing distribution of the measurement in terms of the median, coefficient of variation and skewness. Here the methodology is extended to references that depend on body size as well as age, by exploiting the flexibility of the generalised additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) technique. GAMLSS offers general linear predictors for each moment parameter and a choice of error distributions, which can handle kurtosis as well as skewness. A key question with such references is the nature of the age-size adjustment, additive or multiplicative, which is explored by comparing the identity link and log link for the median predictor.There are several measurements whose reference ranges depend on both body size and age. As an example, models are developed here for the first four moments of the lung function variables forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV(1)/FVC in terms of height and age, in a data set of 3598 children and adults aged 4 to 80 years. The results show a strong multiplicative association between spirometry, height and age, with a large and nonlinear age effect across the age range. Variability also depends nonlinearly on age and to a lesser extent on height. FEV(1) and FVC are close to normally distributed, while FEV(1)/FVC is appreciably skew to the left. GAMLSS is a powerful technique for the construction of such references, which should be useful in clinical medicine. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Losing one twin in the NICU - A case study of parental experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Storm, Ida; Klitgaard, Jeannett

    2016-01-01

    and revealed tree overall themes. These themes indicate that besides struggling with grief related to the loss of one infant, the parents were challenged by the medical discourse, the lack of staff continuity and space to develop parenthood. This case study emphasizes how the loss of a premature twin......The aim of this case study was to generate a deeper understanding of parents’ experiences of losing one twin in the NICU. In an in-depth interview the parents told their story of giving birth to twins born extremely preterm and shortly after losing one of them. A thematic analysis was conducted...... reinforced the parents’ need of an understandable dialogue with a team of nurses. Furthermore the nurses have to offer a close partnership and create the necessary space for parents to develop parenthood while simultaneously dealing with the unexpected and traumatising circumstances related to the loss...

  18. Forensic age estimation in anti-piracy trials in Seychelles: Experiences and challenges faced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, S A; Liyanage, U A; Weeratna, J B; Mendis, N D N A; Perera, H J M; Jayasekara, R W; Fernando, R

    2017-01-01

    Forensic age estimation (FAE) was conducted using a multifactorial method on thirteen Somali detainees claiming juvenile status during the anti-piracy trials of the Seychelles Supreme Court in 2014/2015. A multidisciplinary team, comprising of four of the authors covering specialties in forensic medicine, forensic odontology and radiology, conducted the FAE using a five-stage protocol. Each detainee was interviewed with an interpreter and examined for disorders affecting dental/skeletal development and for assessment of genital development through Tanner staging. Dental maturity was assessed clinically and radiologically. Eruption stage was assessed using Olze et al. and mandibular third-molar maturity was assessed using Demirjian's classification. Skeletal maturity was assessed from hand-wrist X-rays according to Greulich & Pyle and from CT-clavicle according to Kellinghaus et al. and Schultz et al. Interpretation of findings was done using reference population data from similar ethnic and social backgrounds wherever possible. Final age-ranges were calculated by combining dental and clavicle maturity stages using the regression formula developed by Bassed et al. followed by a 10% correction factor. The team later testified on their findings under cross-examination. The protocol adopted by the authors increased the scientific validity of the findings and was useful in addressing cross-examination queries on exclusion of developmental disorders, ethnic/socioeconomic variability and maintaining chain of custody. Unforeseen jurisdictional and practical limitations were experienced but did not affect the outcome. Combining dental and clavicle developmental data provided the court with a much clearer picture on the likelihood of the detainees' juvenile status which emphasizes the importance of conducting more population studies using combinations of different developmental sites. The authors note that available reference data is mostly from affluent populations whereas

  19. Experiment.com's first $1M - case studies and trends in online scientific crowdfunding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, D.

    2014-12-01

    Experiment is an online platform for connecting scientists and communities of online donors. After funding nearly 200 projects in topic areas ranging from life science to social science, we've amassed some knowledge about how science is kickstarted. As online crowdfunding and science communication on the internet continues to grow, we'd like to share some historical data as well as forecast the future of science funding. We'd like to present several successful case studies of scientists conducting their research online and in the open. Successful projects include spin-off startups, undergraduate and graduate student projects, and some of AGU's own scientists and faculty. If this absract is accepted, interested parties can submit questions or requests for figures in advance to denny@experiment.com. Also, we hope this talk will be entertaining.

  20. Neophyte experiences of football (soccer) match analysis: a multiple case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mark; Cowan, Daryl Thomas; Stevenson, David; Baker, Julien Steven

    2018-03-05

    Performance analysis is extensively used in sport, but its pedagogical application is little understood. Given its expanding role across football, this study explored the experiences of neophyte performance analysts. Experiences of six analysis interns, across three professional football clubs, were investigated as multiple cases of new match analysis. Each intern was interviewed after their first season, with archival data providing background information. Four themes emerged from qualitative analysis: (1) "building of relationships" was important, along with trust and role clarity; (2) "establishing an analysis system" was difficult due to tacit coach knowledge, but analysis was established; (3) the quality of the "feedback process" hinged on coaching styles, with balance of feedback and athlete engagement considered essential; (4) "establishing effect" was complex with no statistical effects reported; yet enhanced relationships, role clarity, and improved performances were reported. Other emic accounts are required to further understand occupational culture within performance analysis.

  1. Structured storage in ATLAS Distributed Data Management: use cases and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassnig, Mario; Garonne, Vincent; Beermann, Thomas; Dimitrov, Gancho; Canali, Luca; Molfetas, Angelos; Zang Donal; Azzurra Chinzer, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The distributed data management system of the high-energy physics experiment ATLAS has a critical dependency on the Oracle Relational Database Management System. Recently however, the increased appearance of data warehouselike workload in the experiment has put considerable and increasing strain on the Oracle database. In particular, the analysis of archived data, and the aggregation of data for summary purposes has been especially demanding. For this reason, structured storage systems were evaluated to offload the Oracle database, and to handle processing of data in a non-transactional way. This includes distributed file systems like HDFS that support parallel execution of computational tasks on distributed data, as well as non-relational databases like HBase, Cassandra, or MongoDB. In this paper, the most important analysis and aggregation use cases of the data management system are presented, and how structured storage systems were established to process them.

  2. A case method for Sales and Operations Planning: a learning experience from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Scavarda

    Full Text Available Abstract Adequate preparation, learning, and training is required for Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP to aid organizations in achieving the full expected benefits from its implementation. This paper presents a case method for S&OP and the learning experience of its application at the University of Münster (Germany. The “constructive alignment principle” was applied with a “team teaching” approach, involving an executive from the case company. Students improved their knowledge on S&OP and their analytical skills by understanding the conceptual S&OP building blocks and by learning how to deal with them to provide a solution for a case based on a real-life situation. The learning results were evaluated positively during the discipline’s student evaluation of teaching (SET. The applied case method enhanced the student’s motivation and engagement (e.g., higher preparation effort and class attendance, which were considered higher than in other disciplines with the traditional lecture-based education.

  3. Applied dendroecology and environmental forensics. Characterizing and age dating environmental releases: fundamentals and case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Christophe Balouet; Gil Oudijk; Kevin T. Smith; Ioana Petrisor; Hakan Grudd; Bengt. Stocklassa

    2007-01-01

    Dendroecology, or the use of ring patterns to assess the age of trees and environmental factors controlling their growth, is a well-developed method in climatologic studies. This method holds great potential as a forensic tool for age dating, contamination assessment, and characterization of releases. Moreover, the method is independent of the physical presence of...

  4. Aging Military Aircraft Landscape : A Case for End-of-Life Fleet Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newcamp, J.M.; Verhagen, W.J.C.; Curran, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    Military aircraft fleets are continuing to age despite increased structural integrity concerns and rising maintenance costs. Aircraft are not being replaced or retired in large numbers but are instead having their lives extended beyond their original design service lives. Because aging aircraft cost

  5. Adaptation to Low Vision Caused by Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Theresa Marie

    2008-01-01

    One in eight Americans aged 65 and older has an eye disease resulting in low vision, and more women than men are visually impaired, mainly because women live longer. Age-related visual impairments are an indicator of a decline in activities of daily living and self-help skills. The top eye conditions that affect older adults are macular…

  6. ISOTOPES, PLANTS, AND RESERVOIR EFFECTS : CASE STUDY FROM THE CASPIAN STEPPE BRONZE AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shishlina, N.; Zazovskaya, E.; van der Plicht, J.; Sevastyanov, V.; Boaretto, E.; Rebollo Franco, N.R.

    2012-01-01

    Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen from several steppe Bronze Age cultures (i.e. Early Catacomb, East and West Manych Catacomb, and Lola cultures) shows large variations in delta C-13 and delta N-15 values. In general, we observed that the older the sample, the lower the delta C-13 and delta

  7. Team approach to manage difficult-to-treat TB cases: Experiences in Europe and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D’Ambrosio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO, optimal management of MDR-TB cases can be ensured by a multi-speciality consultation body known as ‘TB Consilium’. This body usually includes different medical specialities, competences and perspectives (e.g., clinical expertise both for adults and children; surgical, radiological and public health expertise; psychological background and nursing experience, among others, thus lowering the risk of making mistakes – or managing the patients inappropriately, in order to improve their clinical outcomes.At present, several high MDR-TB burden countries in the different WHO regions (and beyond have introduced TB Consilium-like bodies at the national or subnational level to reach consensus on the best treatment approach for their patients affected by TB.In addition, in countries/settings where a formal system of consultation does not exist, specialized staff from MDR-TB reference centres or international organizations usually spend a considerable amount of their working time responding to phone or e-mail clinical queries on how to manage M/XDR-TB cases.The aim of this manuscript is to describe the different experiences with the TB Consilia both at the international level (European Respiratory Society – ERS/WHO TB Consilium and in some of the countries where this experience operates successfully in Europe and beyond. The Consilium experiences are described around the following topics: (1 history, aims and focus; (2 management and funding; (3 technical functioning and structure; (4 results achieved.In addition a comparative analysis of the TB Consilia in the different countries has been performed. Keywords: MDR-TB, XDR-TB, Clinical management, Drug resistance, Prevention, Consilium

  8. Aging, subjective experience, and cognitive control: dramatic false remembering by older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Larry L; Bishara, Anthony J; Hessels, Sandra; Toth, Jeffrey P

    2005-05-01

    Recent research suggests that older adults are more susceptible to interference effects than are young adults; however, that research has failed to equate differences in original learning. In 4 experiments, the authors show that older adults are more susceptible to interference effects produced by a misleading prime. Even when original learning was equated, older adults were 10 times as likely to falsely remember misleading information and were much less likely to increase their accuracy by opting not to answer under conditions of free responding. The results are well described by a multinomial model that postulates multiple modes of cognitive control. According to that model, older adults are likely to be captured by misleading information, a form of goal neglect or deficit in inhibitory functions. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance in patients with HPV positive DNA testing and correlation with disease progression by age group: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erika F; Reynolds, Jordan P; Jenkins, Sarah M; Winter, Stephanie M; Henry, Michael R; Nassar, Aziza

    2012-01-01

    Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) is a broad diagnostic category that could be attributed to human papillomavirus infection (HPV), malignant neoplasia and reactive conditions. We evaluated our institutional experience with ASC-US in women who are positive for high risk HPV (HRHPV+) by the Digene hybrid capture method from 2005-2009 to identify the risk of progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in association with age. We reviewed cytologic and follow-up surgical pathology reports for all specimens available. Progression was defined as a diagnosis of at least CINI on follow-up biopsy or resection or SIL on cytology. We identified 2613 cases and follow-up was available in 1839 (70.4%). Of these 74.2% had just one follow-up, 16.2% had a total of 2 follow-ups, 5.3% had a total of 3 follow-ups, and the remaining had as many as 6 follow-ups. Among the 1839 patients, 69.4% were age 30 or younger, 16.0% were between 31 to 40, 9.0% were between 41 to 50, and 5.6% were 51 or older. Among these, 25-30% progressed to dysplasia. The risk of progression varied by age (p=0.04) and was lowest among women between the ages of 41-50. Our findings highlight the importance of continued cytologic follow-up in women with HRHPV+ ASC-US in order to detect progression of disease, although the risk of progression is age dependent.

  10. Multiple case study analysis of young women's experiences in high school engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Meagan C.

    richly describe the diversity of experiences. A multiple case study analysis, this study answers the question: How do gender, class, race, and other components of intersectionality, influence high school females' experiences in engineering? Nine young women taking a high school engineering course in a suburban high school in Central Texas during the school year 2011-2012 volunteered to participate. The students were observed in their engineering classes for half of the spring 2012 semester, with bi-weekly interviews with the students, monthly interviews with the teacher, and a single interview with a parent of each volunteer. The nine rich case studies provide us with new stories that help prevent us from narrowing the experiences of women to a single incomplete stereotype, because these young women vary across race, socioeconomic backgrounds, and sexual orientation. Although each story is unique, there are commonalities among their experiences, including family, influence, classroom environment, biases, and beliefs. By drawing from their collective experiences in high school engineering, the findings direct us toward recommendations for educators, parents, engineering curriculum developers, designers of teacher professional development, and future research to improve equity and access for every student in engineering.

  11. The potential use of cuticular hydrocarbons and multivariate analysis to age empty puparial cases of Calliphora vicina and Lucilia sericata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Hannah E; Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2017-05-16

    Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) have been successfully used in the field of forensic entomology for identifying and ageing forensically important blowfly species, primarily in the larval stages. However in older scenes where all other entomological evidence is no longer present, Calliphoridae puparial cases can often be all that remains and therefore being able to establish the age could give an indication of the PMI. This paper examined the CHCs present in the lipid wax layer of insects, to determine the age of the cases over a period of nine months. The two forensically important species examined were Calliphora vicina and Lucilia sericata. The hydrocarbons were chemically extracted and analysed using Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry. Statistical analysis was then applied in the form of non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS), permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and random forest models. This study was successful in determining age differences within the empty cases, which to date, has not been establish by any other technique.

  12. Risk factors for severe acute malnutrition in children below 5 y of age in India: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kirtisudha; Kumar, Praveen; Basu, Srikanta; Rai, Kiran; Aneja, Satinder

    2014-08-01

    To determine the possible risk factors for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children below 5 y admitted in a hospital in north India. This case-control study was conducted in a medical college hospital in children below 5 y of age. All cases of SAM (diagnosed as per WHO definition) between 6 and 59 mo of age were compared with age-matched controls with weight for height above -2SD of WHO 2006 growth standards. Data regarding socio-demographic parameters, feeding practices and immunization were compared between the groups by univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. A total of 76 cases and 115 controls were enrolled. Among the 14 factors compared, maternal illiteracy, daily family income less than Rs. 200, large family size, lack of exclusive breast feeding in first 6 mo, bottle feeding, administration of pre-lacteals, deprivation of colostrum and incomplete immunization were significant risk factors for SAM. Regarding complementary feeding, it was the consistency, rather than the age of initiation, frequency and variety which showed a significant influence on occurrence of SAM. Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk of SAM was independently associated with 6 factors, namely, illiteracy among mothers, incomplete immunization, practice of bottle feeding, consistency of complementary feeding, deprivation of colostrum and receipt of pre-lacteals at birth. The present study identifies certain risk factors which need to be focused on during health planning and policy making related to children with SAM in India.

  13. "Not a replacement": emotional experiences and practical consequences of Israeli second couplehood stepfamilies constructed in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Chaya; Lipman-Schiby, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    The increase in life expectancy enhances phenomena such as second couplehood in old age following widowhood or divorce as an alternative way of coping with changes that occur with aging. Research on the phenomenon has focused mainly on individual and dyadic perspectives of the repartnered. The aim of this article was to explore repartnering from the stepfamily's perspective, which has scarcely been studied. Nineteen Israeli stepfamilies (38 multigenerational families) were recruited using criterion sampling, of men who repartnered at age 65+ and women at 60+, with children and grandchildren from a lifelong marriage that ended in widowhood or divorce. We audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim 107 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with older partners, their adult children, and grandchildren. Analysis was based on grounded theory and dyadic analysis principles adapted to families. It showed how repartnering in old age changed the family structure, constructing complex stepfamilies, which require further study. Emotional experiences refer to repartnering being a replacement for couplehood but not for parenthood/grandparenthood. Practical consequences refer to "knowing their place" within the stepfamily and included the following subthemes: showing affection; participating in memorials for the deceased spouse; sharing, listening, and assisting. Findings are discussed regarding life course and family life cycle perspectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. When ageing and disasters collide: Lessons from 16 international case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, S.; Plouffe, L.; Gorr, P.

    2009-01-01

    Sixteen case studies examined the impact of various natural disasters and conflict-related emergencies on older people, the strengths and gaps in emergency planning, response and recovery, and the contributions older people made to their families and communities. Case examples were chosen from both developed and developing countries. Older persons suffered disproportionate impacts in several cases. Regardless of the country's level of prosperity, those most affected tended to be economically disadvantaged, disabled or frail, women, socially isolated, or caregivers of family members. Emergency responders were often not aware of distinct needs or abilities of older persons and not equipped to respond appropriately. The best emergency practices recognised and included specific needs within mainstream efforts and integrated older persons in community planning, response and recovery activities. This paper presents the 'lessons learned' from these case studies and makes the case for greater attention to this segment of the population in emergency management. (authors)

  15. Relationship Between Age, Experience, and Student Preference for Types of Learning Activities in Online Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Simonds

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two researchers explored student learning preferences in online courses. They used the scholarship of teaching and learning process as a research model, and embedded a web-based survey and online focus groups in the online courses they were teaching. After collecting data, the researchers conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to test their hypothesis that a relationship existed between some student factors and student preferences for types of online learning activities. The results of the data analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between student age and student preference for certain types of online learning activities. Older students in the study indicated a much stronger preference for videos of the professor lecturing, while younger students tended to prefer more interactive learning strategies. Focus group comments from the older students provide insights into some of the reasons why they found watching video lectures to be helpful for their learning, and comments from younger students illustrate how they learn best in online courses. The researchers offer suggestions for online instructors based on the findings of this study, and they explain why online instructors may find the scholarship of teaching and learning research process especially helpful for both teaching and research efforts.

  16. Understanding reliance on automation: effects of error type, error distribution, age and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Julian; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rovira, Ericka

    2015-01-01

    An obstacle detection task supported by “imperfect” automation was used with the goal of understanding the effects of automation error types and age on automation reliance. Sixty younger and sixty older adults interacted with a multi-task simulation of an agricultural vehicle (i.e. a virtual harvesting combine). The simulator included an obstacle detection task and a fully manual tracking task. A micro-level analysis provided insight into the way reliance patterns change over time. The results indicated that there are distinct patterns of reliance that develop as a function of error type. A prevalence of automation false alarms led participants to under-rely on the automation during alarm states while over relying on it during non-alarms states. Conversely, a prevalence of automation misses led participants to over-rely on automated alarms and under-rely on the automation during non-alarm states. Older adults adjusted their behavior according to the characteristics of the automation similarly to younger adults, although it took them longer to do so. The results of this study suggest the relationship between automation reliability and reliance depends on the prevalence of specific errors and on the state of the system. Understanding the effects of automation detection criterion settings on human-automation interaction can help designers of automated systems make predictions about human behavior and system performance as a function of the characteristics of the automation. PMID:25642142

  17. Brain CT studies in 26 cases of aged patients with Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yukio; Yoshihara, Sachiko; Iinuma, Kazuso.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomographic images of brains from 26 individuals (10 males and 16 females) with Down syndrome were analysed for roentgenographic measurement. Their ages ranged from 14 to 47 years, the average being 28 years. The results showed that their Sylvian fissure ratio was larger in the aged group. A high incidence of calcification in basal ganglia, choroid plexus and pineal body was noted (85%). An increased Sylvian fissure ratio and a high incidence of intracranial calcification may be practically used as representatives of premature aging. Furthermore, a high incidence of mega cisterna magna implicates that it is worthy of study whether individuals with Down syndrome have a predisposition to underdevelopment of cerebellum. (author)

  18. Experience of managing complicated diverticulitis of colon: a retrospective case series from south asian country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, T.; Alvi, A.R.; Sheikh, G.M.; Habib, H.Y.; Ghafoor, Z.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the morbidity and mortality associated with complicated diverticulitis in Pakistan. Methods: The retrospective case series was conducted at an urban tertiary care university hospital of Karachi, Pakistan, comprising data from December 1989 to November 2010. International Classification of Diseases codes for diverticular disease and diverticulitis with abscess, fistula, stricture, bowel obstruction and perforation were obtained from the medical record department. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 60 (1.9%) cases with complicated diverticulitis were located from among 3170 records reviewed. Mean age was 62.7+-13 years with male-to-female ratio being 36:24. In 37 (62%) patients, the diagnosis was established on computed tomography scan of the abdomen, followed by barium enema in 12 (20%) and colonoscopy in 11 (18%). Post-operative morbidity was observed in 24 (40%) and 7 (16%) expired within 28 days of surgery. Post-operative intra-abdominal sepsis, wound dehiscence and incisional hernia were significantly associated with generalised peritonitis (p <0.05), while admission to intensive care unit was associated with age over 60 years and faecal peritonitis. Post-operative mortality was significantly associated with high American Society of Anaesthesiologists-score III and IV and age above 60 years. Conclusion: Complicated diverticulitis carries significant morbidity and mortality in Pakistani population. Since the trend is on the rise, therefore we propose a prospective multi-centre cohort study to understand the spectrum of disease, management and identification of risk factors to achieve the best possible outcomes in patients with complicated diverticulitis. (author)

  19. Suicidal Death due to Organophosphorus Compound Poisoning ─ an Experience of 67 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashid Tabassum Khan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bangladesh is an agro-based country. Suicide by agrochemical compounds are increasing day by day in this country. Organophosphorus compounds (OPC are commonly used for suicide. Mostly these are used for suicidal purpose in rural areas in our country due to low cost, toxicity and availability. Objective: To find out the relationship of age and sex variation along with the causes that influenced different income group people to ingest OPC for committing suicide. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Dhaka Medical College during January to December 2010. Data were collected at the time of autopsy and from postmortem examination report of viscera. Viscera were preserved and sent to the Chief Chemical Examiner’s Office, Dhaka for toxicological analysis. Results: In this study, middle aged subjects (20–30 years were found to commit suicide using OPC in comparison to other age groups. Among the cases male were 57% and female 43%. Poverty was found as the most common cause (20% of OPC poisoning. Conclusion: Poverty is the leading cause of death of OPC poisoning followed by failure in love and adultery. Business failure, unhappiness in conjugal life, demand for dowry and violence against women are other causes to commit suicide by OPC.

  20. Experience in monitoring ageing phenomena for improving nuclear power plant availability. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    For more than thirty years nuclear power plants have been supplying electricity to national grids. Today, the nuclear power community is facing great challenges. The safe, reliable operation of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) must continue to be ensured. From an economic viewpoint, because of the long lead times associated with bringing new plants into service, securing the continued operation of existing plants for their planned lifetimes and possible life extension will be very important in the near term for meeting electrical power demands. The IAEA programmes in nuclear power plant ageing and life extension and in control and instrumentation promote technical information exchange between Member States with new programmes, offers assistance to Member States with an interest in reliability of NPP components, in-service inspection methods and programmes using on-line techniques, component monitoring and special technological topics of nuclear reactors. Significant experience already exists in the nuclear industry in developing and applying the monitoring techniques for different nuclear power plant applications, especially in monitoring of ageing phenomena for improving NPP availability. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to bring together experts from operations, design, research and development and licensing to share their experience in: ageing mechanics of key structural components, methods of monitoring such ageing, tools for cost-effective implementation of the methods and methodologies, life management approaches and examples from current reactors, future direction for monitoring of key structural components in nuclear power plants. The meeting was organized by the IAEA International Working Groups on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (TWG-NPPCI) in co-operation with the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission and Skoda concern. Around 40 participants from 10 countries

  1. Experience in monitoring ageing phenomena for improving nuclear power plant availability. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    For more than thirty years nuclear power plants have been supplying electricity to national grids. Today, the nuclear power community is facing great challenges. The safe, reliable operation of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) must continue to be ensured. From an economic viewpoint, because of the long lead times associated with bringing new plants into service, securing the continued operation of existing plants for their planned lifetimes and possible life extension will be very important in the near term for meeting electrical power demands. The IAEA programmes in nuclear power plant ageing and life extension and in control and instrumentation promote technical information exchange between Member States with new programmes, offers assistance to Member States with an interest in reliability of NPP components, in-service inspection methods and programmes using on-line techniques, component monitoring and special technological topics of nuclear reactors. Significant experience already exists in the nuclear industry in developing and applying the monitoring techniques for different nuclear power plant applications, especially in monitoring of ageing phenomena for improving NPP availability. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to bring together experts from operations, design, research and development and licensing to share their experience in: ageing mechanics of key structural components, methods of monitoring such ageing, tools for cost-effective implementation of the methods and methodologies, life management approaches and examples from current reactors, future direction for monitoring of key structural components in nuclear power plants. The meeting was organized by the IAEA International Working Groups on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (TWG-NPPCI) in co-operation with the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission and Skoda concern. Around 40 participants from 10 countries.

  2. Microsurgical free flap reconstructions of head and neck region in 406 cases: a 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerressen, Marcus; Pastaschek, Claudia Inge; Riediger, Dieter; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Hölzle, Frank; Noroozi, Nelson; Ghassemi, Alireza

    2013-03-01

    The reconstruction of extended soft tissue and bony defects in the maxillofacial region with microsurgical flaps is considered to be the therapy of first choice. The aim of this retrospective study was to detect different influencing factors concerning flap survival. We examined the data of 406 patient cases (121 female and 285 male cases; mean age, 57 years) undergoing reconstruction with a microsurgical flap in our facility between 1998 and 2010. In these cases 326 soft tissue flaps (radial forearm flap, scapula flap, latissimus dorsi flap, anterolateral thigh flap, lateral arm flap, and jejunum flap) and 80 bony flaps (fibula flap and deep circumflex iliac artery flap) were examined. Evaluated parameters were, among others, the timing of reconstruction, defect localization, and recipient vessels used (external vs internal jugular system), as well as anticoagulative management. We statistically analyzed data by means of a χ(2) test, taking account of the odds ratio with P < .05, which was deemed significant. The overall flap survival rate was approximately 92%, without any gender- or age-specific differences. Primary reconstructions proceeded distinctly more successfully than secondary reconstructions (P < .01). Likewise, the defect localization exerted a significant effect on the survival rate (P = .01), with a more caudal localization affecting flap survival positively. Finally, neither the anticoagulation regimen nor the choice of recipient vein system exercised an influence on the survival rate. Microsurgical tissue transfer is a convenient and reliable method in maxillofacial surgery, provided that one is aware of the determining factors for success. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An experience of corrective surgery of 37 cases of chest deformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, K.; Majeed, F.; Wyne, A.; Raza, A.; Imtiaz, T.

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out to ascertain the cosmetic outcome of corrective surgery for pectus deformity and to determine the morbidity associated with it. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in CMH Rawalpindi and CMH Quetta from 2007 to 2012. Methodology: Total number of cases operated for chest deformity was 37. Modified Welch procedure with sub perichondrial resection was done with a strut of prolene mesh in a majority of excavatum repairs and k wires in few. Pectoroplasty was subsequently carried out in all patients. Midline incision was made in a majority of patients. Submammary incision was made in some female patients with a lower deformity due to better cosmetic outcome. Inclusion criterion was patients with chest deformity without any cardiac and spinal deformity. Results: Age range was between 4 years to 12 years with mean age of 8 +- 2.3 years. Twenty four (65%) deformities were of excavatum and 9 (24%) were of carinatum type. Four (11%) cases were of unilateral asymmetrical deformity. Mean operating time was 95 +- 11 minutes. Transfusion was required in only 1 (3%) of the cases. There was no perioperative mortality. Four (11%) patients had formation of seroma and 3 (8%) developed pneumothorax which was aspirated without placement of chest tube. Two (5%) had surgical site infection. Fifteen (41%) patients were satisfied and 21 (57%) reported excellent results. Conclusion: Chest deformity correction is safe and effective procedure with acceptable cosmetic results. It is easy to perform and improves self image of the suffering individual. (author)

  4. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes.

  5. Success and limitations in the prevention of violence: a case study of nine Brazilian experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Gomes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the success of Brazilian experiences engaged in prevention of violence as well as their limitations, and seeks to show ways for a solution of the problem. The investigation underlying this article consisted in a case study of nine experiences, using triangulation of methods. For this purpose, we used questionnaires and interviewed individuals and groups. Successful results were mainly: informed citizenship, work preparation, involvement of children and adolescents in recreating and educative activities, and increased self-esteem of the children and teens involved in the experiences. The greatest difficulties found were the lack of funds and of articulation of proposals with other groups and institutions. These experiences are not the only successful ones carried out in the country, but they point to a new horizon by innovating and creating a different practical approach to violence.O presente estudo tem como objetivo analisar os êxitos e os limites de experiências nacionais na prevenção da violência e indicar possibilidades de enfrentamento do problema. A pesquisa que dá origem ao artigo consistiu num estudo de caso de nove experiências, seguindo princípios da triangulação de métodos. Foram aplicados questionários quantitativos e realizadas entrevistas (individuais e em grupo. Os resultados apontam que os principais êxitos relatados são: informação para a cidadania; preparação para o trabalho; envolvimento de crianças e adolescentes em atividades lúdicas e educativas; e o fortalecimento da auto-estima dos jovens e crianças participantes. As maiores dificuldades das experiências são a manutenção financeira e a articulação de suas propostas com as de outros grupos e instituições. O estudo leva a concluir que essas experiências, ainda que não sejam as únicas bem-sucedidas no país, apontam para um horizonte novo pela forma como atuam, inovando e criando uma práxis diferenciada na abordagem

  6. In the Cloud: Nineteenth-Century Visions and Experiments for the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Calè

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available What shapes does the nineteenth-century paper archive take in the twenty-first century digital cloud? Luisa Calè and Ana Parejo Vadillo situate the crafts, experiments, and visions discussed in this anniversary issue in the wider context of questions raised by the emergence and possibilities of nineteenth-century archives for the digital era. What happens when objects float free of their bibliographic and museum anchorings? What is gained and lost in the digital transformations? What new imaginary spaces open up in the transition from the book to the virtual codex and from the terrestrial library to cloud-sourced collections? What formations does the nineteenth century take in digital discourse networks? How are nineteenth-century objects made digital, and through what crafts, skills, and disciplines? How are they shaped by circulation through digital platforms, social media, and remix on the semantic web? What kinds of authoring, what structures of labour, what kinds of making and knowing shape agency in the nineteenth-century digital archive?

  7. Studying abroad: a multiple case study of nursing students' international experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Barbara F; Johansson, Inez; Rosser, Megan; Tengnah, Cassam; Segrott, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    This paper examines the experiences of nursing students undertaking an international placement during their pre-registration education. The study took place in two schools--one in the United Kingdom, and one in Sweden. The move of nursing education into higher education enabled students to participate in international exchange programmes. Previous research demonstrates that students participating in such programmes may gain enhanced cultural awareness and experience personal and professional growth. The study comprised a multiple case study, utilising semi-structured individual and group interviews and documentary analysis. Eighteen students from the UK and 14 from Sweden participated. Participants described an increase in confidence, self-reliance and professional knowledge and skills resulting from their international placement. There was an awareness of how healthcare roles differ between countries and a change in attitudes to others from different backgrounds and cultures. The differences between the two cases were marginal. Whilst there was support from both home and host universities this varied between the international placement providers. The international placements were beneficial; however, there is a need for change in the preparation, support and monitoring of students, greater engagement with the partner institutions, and more effective mentoring of staff.

  8. Our Experience with 67 Cases of Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmat Ozer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Minimally invasive interventions have become increasingly popular with the developments in technology and surgical tools. In this article, we present our experience with 67 cases of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Material and Method: A total of 67 cases that underwent endoscopic surgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc hernia between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively examined. Results: The mean pre-operative VAS score was 8.13. The mean post-operative VAS score was 2.4 in the 1st month and 2.01 in the 12th month. Satisfaction according to MacNab criteria in the 12th month was excellent in 35 (52.2% patients, good in 18 (26.9% patients, fair in 11 (16.4% patients, and poor in 3 (4.5% patients. Microdiscectomy was required due to continuing symptoms in 3 patients (4.5%. Temporary dysesthesia was found in 3 patients. Discussion: Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy has become a good alternative to microsurgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc herniations because of the developments in technology and surgical tools as well as the increased experience of surgeons. The technique is not limited to these localizations; it can also be used for free fragments within the channel, recurrent disc herniations, and narrow channels.

  9. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential.

  10. Combining p-values in replicated single-case experiments with multivariate outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmi, Francesca; Onghena, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Interest in combining probabilities has a long history in the global statistical community. The first steps in this direction were taken by Ronald Fisher, who introduced the idea of combining p-values of independent tests to provide a global decision rule when multiple aspects of a given problem were of interest. An interesting approach to this idea of combining p-values is the one based on permutation theory. The methods belonging to this particular approach exploit the permutation distributions of the tests to be combined, and use a simple function to combine probabilities. Combining p-values finds a very interesting application in the analysis of replicated single-case experiments. In this field the focus, while comparing different treatments effects, is more articulated than when just looking at the means of the different populations. Moreover, it is often of interest to combine the results obtained on the single patients in order to get more global information about the phenomenon under study. This paper gives an overview of how the concept of combining p-values was conceived, and how it can be easily handled via permutation techniques. Finally, the method of combining p-values is applied to a simulated replicated single-case experiment, and a numerical illustration is presented.

  11. Concordia, Antarctica, seismic experiment for the International Polar Year (CASE-IPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Maggi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The CASE-IPY project, part of the larger POLENET initiative of geophysical observations for the International Polar Year, was built on our extensive experience of running seismological stations in Antarctica, both on rock sites (Dumont d’Urville station, and directly on the ice plateau (Concordia station. For CASE-IPY, we deployed 8 temporary seismic stations on the Antarctic plateau: 3 situated near Concordia itself (starting 2008, and the other 5 regularly spaced between Concordia and Vostok (2010-2012, following the maximum in ice topography. The technical problems we have encountered in our field deployments were essentially due to a combination of extreme environmental conditions and isolation of deployment sites. The 3 stations near Concordia were used as test sites to experiment different solutions, and to converge on a design for the 5 main stations. Results from the nearest stations, which transmit data regularly to Concordia, are very promising. The data recorded by our stations will be distributed widely in the scientific community. We expect them to be exploited essentially for structural studies involving Antarctica itself (its ice-cap, crust and lithosphere via receiver functions, noise correlation, and surface-wave tomography, but also for studies of the Earth’s core.

  12. Work-related productivity losses in an era of ageing populations: the case of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Walsh, Paul M; O Céilleachair, Alan; Skally, Mairead; Staines, Anthony; Kapur, Kanika; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Sharp, Linda

    2013-02-01

    We investigated patterns and costs of lost productivity due to colorectal cancer in Ireland and examined how rising pension ages affect these costs. Data from a postal survey of colorectal cancer survivors (6 to 30 months after diagnosis; n = 159), taken from March 2010 to January 2011, were combined with population-level survival estimates and national wage data to calculate temporary and permanent disability, and premature mortality, costs using the human capital approach. Almost 40% of respondents left the workforce permanently after diagnosis and 90% took temporary time off work. Total costs of lost productivity per person were 205,847 in 2008 assuming retirement at the age of 65. When the retirement age was raised to 70, productivity costs increased by almost a half. Our study demonstrated the considerable productivity costs associated with colorectal cancer and highlighted the effect of rising retirement ages on costs.

  13. Hippocampus age-related microstructural changes in schizophrenia: a case-control mean diffusivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Fabrizio; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-08-01

    Macrostructural-volumetric abnormalities of the hippocampus have been described in schizophrenia. Here, we characterized age-related changes of hippocampal mean diffusivity as an index of microstructural damage by carrying out a neuroimaging study in 85 patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia and 85 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We performed analyses of covariance, with diagnosis as fixed factor, mean diffusivity as dependent variable and age as covariate. Patients showed an early increase in mean diffusivity in the right and left hippocampus that increased with age. Thus, microstructural hippocampal changes associated with schizophrenia cannot be confined to a specific time window. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intent at day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Owerri, Nigeria: Initial experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nonso Ekwunife

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been the default operation for cholelithiasis at Federal Medical Centre, Owerri for the past 2 years and the outcomes have been good. The duration of post operative stay has been decreasing. We therefore initiated a preliminary 2-year prospective study in May 2010 to determine the feasibility of carrying out day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study if they satisfied the following criteria: Age < 65 years, body mass index < 35 kg/m 2 , American Society of Anaesthesiology physical status class I and II, patient residence within 20 km radius of the hospital, patient acceptance of the procedure and absence of previous complicated upper abdominal surgery. Results: Twelve patients (10 females, 2 males were worked up with the intent of achieving same-day discharge of the patients. Five of the patients (41.7% were discharged on the day of operation. The reasons for overnight stay included inadequate pain control, insertion of drain and patient wishes. There was no conversion to open surgery, no major complications and no case of readmission to the hospital. Conclusions: Day case laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our environment could be safely promoted but will depend on improved facilities and patient enlightenment.

  15. A case study of a mother's intertwining experiences with incest and postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idun Røseth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA and major depression disorder (MDD gives reason to suspect that many mothers with postpartum depression (PPD have a history of CSA. However, few studies have investigated how CSA and PPD are related. In this case study we explore how the experience of incest intertwines with the experience of postpartum depression. We focus on participant subject “Nina,” who has experienced both. We interviewed her three times and we analysed the interviews with Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method to arrive at a contextualised meaning structure. Nina's intruding fantasies of men who abuse her children merge with her recollections of her own incest experiences. She may succeed in forcing these fantasies out of her consciousness, but they still alter her perceptions, thoughts, and emotions. She feels overwhelmed and succumbs to sadness, while she also is drawn towards information about CSA, which in turn feeds her fantasies. The psychodynamic concepts of repetition compulsion, transference, and projection may provide some explanation of Nina's actions, thoughts, and emotions through her past experiences. With our phenomenological stance, we aim to acknowledge Nina's descriptions of her everyday life here and now. With reference to Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Minkowski, we show that Nina's past is not a dated memory; rather it determines the structure of her consciousness that constitutes her past as her true present and future. Incest dominates Nina's world, and her possibilities for action are restricted by this perceived world. Any suspension of action implies anguish, and she resolves this by incest-structured action that in turn feeds and colours her expectations. Thus anxiety and depression are intertwined in the structure of this experience.

  16. 'Silk Road', the virtual drug marketplace: a single case study of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Bingham, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The online promotion of 'drug shopping' and user information networks is of increasing public health and law enforcement concern. An online drug marketplace called 'Silk Road' has been operating on the 'Deep Web' since February 2011 and was designed to revolutionise contemporary drug consumerism. A single case study approach explored a 'Silk Road' user's motives for online drug purchasing, experiences of accessing and using the website, drug information sourcing, decision making and purchasing, outcomes and settings for use, and perspectives around security. The participant was recruited following a lengthy relationship building phase on the 'Silk Road' chat forum. The male participant described his motives, experiences of purchasing processes and drugs used from 'Silk Road'. Consumer experiences on 'Silk Road' were described as 'euphoric' due to the wide choice of drugs available, relatively easy once navigating the Tor Browser (encryption software) and using 'Bitcoins' for transactions, and perceived as safer than negotiating illicit drug markets. Online researching of drug outcomes, particularly for new psychoactive substances was reported. Relationships between vendors and consumers were described as based on cyber levels of trust and professionalism, and supported by 'stealth modes', user feedback and resolution modes. The reality of his drug use was described as covert and solitary with psychonautic characteristics, which contrasted with his membership, participation and feelings of safety within the 'Silk Road' community. 'Silk Road' as online drug marketplace presents an interesting displacement away from 'traditional' online and street sources of drug supply. Member support and harm reduction ethos within this virtual community maximises consumer decision-making and positive drug experiences, and minimises potential harms and consumer perceived risks. Future research is necessary to explore experiences and backgrounds of other users. Copyright © 2013

  17. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia across age groups: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiołek, Anna; Gierus, Jacek; Koweszko, Tytus; Szulc, Agata

    2016-02-24

    The potential dynamics of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is discussed in the literature of the field. Recent publications suggest modest changes in level of cognitive impairment after first psychotic episode. Present article attempts to explore cognitive differences between patients and controls across age groups and differences between age groups in clinical group. One hundred and twenty-eight hospitalized patients with schizophrenia (64 women and 64 men) and 68 individuals from the control group (32 women and 32 men) aged 18-55 years were examined. The patients were divided into age groups (18-25, 26-35, 36-45, 46-55). Both groups were examined using Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, Trail Making Test (A and B), Stroop Test, verbal fluency test and Wechsler digit span. Patients with schizophrenia obtained significantly lower scores versus the control group in regard to all the measured cognitive functions (Mann-Whitney U; p age groups, however, statistically important impairment in executive functions (WCST) were present only in "older" groups. Patients with schizophrenia obtained less favourable results than the control group in all age groups. Deficits regarding executive functions do not seem to be at a significant level among the youngest group, whereas they are more noticeable in the group of 46-55-year-olds. Executive functions are significantly lowered in the group aged 36-45 in comparison to the "younger" groups. The level of cognitive functions shows a mild exacerbation in connection with age, whereas cognitive rigidity proved to be related to the number of years spent without hospital treatment.

  18. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victoria E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Christensen, John N.

    2010-04-30

    Obtaining quantitative information about the timescales associated with sediment transport, storage, and deposition in continental settings is important but challenging. The uranium-series comminution age method potentially provides a universal approach for direct dating of Quaternary detrital sediments, and can also provide estimates of the sediment transport and storage timescales. (The word"comminution" means"to reduce to powder," reflecting the start of the comminution age clock as reduction of lithic parent material below a critical grain size threshold of ~;;50 mu m.) To test the comminution age method as a means to date continental sediments, we applied the method to drill-core samples of the glacially-derived Kings River Fan alluvial deposits in central California. Sediments from the 45 m core have independently-estimated depositional ages of up to ~;;800 ka, based on paleomagnetism and correlations to nearby dated sediments. We characterized sequentially-leached core samples (both bulk sediment and grain size separates) for U, Nd, and Sr isotopes, grain size, surface texture, and mineralogy. In accordance with the comminution age model, where 234U is partially lost from small sediment grains due to alpha recoil, we found that (234U/238U) activity ratios generally decrease with age, depth, and specific surface area, with depletions of up to 9percent relative to radioactive equilibrium. The resulting calculated comminution ages are reasonable, although they do not exactly match age estimates from previous studies and also depend on assumptions about 234U loss rates. The results indicate that the method may be a significant addition to the sparse set of available tools for dating detrital continental sediments, following further refinement. Improving the accuracy of the method requires more advanced models or measurements for both the recoil loss factor fa and weathering effects. We discuss several independent methods for obtaining fa on individual samples

  19. The Spatio-temporal Distribution of Japanese Encephalitis Cases in Different Age Groups in Mainland China, 2004 - 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is very prevalent in China, but the incidence of JE among children has been greatly reduced by extensive promotion of vaccinations. The incidence of JE among adults, however, has increased in some parts of China.Data on JE in mainland China, in terms of incidence, gender, and age, were collected between 2004 and 2014. We conducted spatial and temporal analyses on data from different age groups. Generally, children aged 0-15 years still represent the major population of JE cases in China, despite the gradual decrease in incidence over years. However, the incidence of JE among adults in several provinces is notably higher than the national average, especially during the epidemic waves in 2006, 2009, and 2013. The JE cases in the 0-15-year-old group are distributed mainly in the area south of the Yangtze River, with peak incidence occurring from July to September. In the adult group, especially for those over 40 years old, the JE cases are concentrated mainly in the area north of the Yangtze River. JE incidence in the adult group in September and October is significantly greater compared to the other groups. Further analysis using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA reveals that the distribution of adult JE cases in the six provinces north of the Yangtze River, between north 30-35° latitude and east 110-130° longitude, is a hotspot for adult JE cases.The rate of JE case increase for adults is much greater than for children and has become a public health issue. Therefore, studies on the necessity and feasibility of vaccinating adults who live in JE-endemic areas, but have never been vaccinated for JE, should become a new focus of JE prevention in the future.

  20. Applying Deep Learning in Medical Images: The Case of Bone Age Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2018-01-01

    A diagnostic need often arises to estimate bone age from X-ray images of the hand of a subject during the growth period. Together with measured physical height, such information may be used as indicators for the height growth prognosis of the subject. We present a way to apply the deep learning technique to medical image analysis using hand bone age estimation as an example. Age estimation was formulated as a regression problem with hand X-ray images as input and estimated age as output. A set of hand X-ray images was used to form a training set with which a regression model was trained. An image preprocessing procedure is described which reduces image variations across data instances that are unrelated to age-wise variation. The use of Caffe, a deep learning tool is demonstrated. A rather simple deep learning network was adopted and trained for tutorial purpose. A test set distinct from the training set was formed to assess the validity of the approach. The measured mean absolute difference value was 18.9 months, and the concordance correlation coefficient was 0.78. It is shown that the proposed deep learning-based neural network can be used to estimate a subject's age from hand X-ray images, which eliminates the need for tedious atlas look-ups in clinical environments and should improve the time and cost efficiency of the estimation process.

  1. The lived experience of low back pain among Irish farmers: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Aoife; Blake, Catherine; Meredith, David; McNamara, John; Phelan, Jim; Cunningham, Caitriona

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is the most commonly reported musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) among farmers. There is limited researching regarding the lived experience of LBP among farmers. Video interviews were conducted with three dairy farmers who reported having a significant episode of LBP. The interview data were transcribed and analyzed, and results were presented in relation to the constructs explored. The farmers experienced their first significant episode of LBP in their late 20s or early 30s and all attributed their LBP to farm work or a farm-related incident. Hours worked per day ranged from 9 to 13 hours. Tasks identified by farmers that they were unable to do due to LBP included physical work, working with sheep, building work, and "certain jobs." Work changes made due to LBP included getting help, slowing down, avoiding strenuous work, carrying smaller loads, mechanizing the farm, using the tractor more, and wearing a back belt for certain jobs. Each farmer had his own way of preventing or managing his LBP, including a mix of active self-management and passive coping strategies such as swimming, using ice, spinal manipulation, and taking medication. The farmers were unable to quantify how much their LBP had cost them directly or indirectly. The case studies illustrate farmers engaging in ongoing work despite significant pain. All of the farmers have adapted at work and engaged in self-management strategies to reduce the occurrence of LBP. Given the rich data produced by these case studies, future case studies are recommended to gain greater insights into farmers' experiences concerning LBP.

  2. Abused women's experiences of a primary care identification and referral intervention: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Clark, Maria; Taylor, Julie

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to report the findings of a qualitative case study that investigated abused women's experiences of an identification and referral intervention and to discuss the implications for nurses, specifically those working in primary and community care. Domestic violence and abuse is a significant public health issue globally but it is a hidden problem that is under-reported. In the UK, Identification and Referral to Improve Safety is a primary care-based intervention that has been found to increase referral rates of abused women to support and safety services. This paper reports on the findings of an evaluation study of two sites in England. Qualitative study with a case study design. In line with case study design, the entire evaluation study employed multiple data collection methods. We report on the qualitative interviews with women referred through the programme. The aim was to elicit their experiences of the three aspects of the intervention: identification; referral; safety. Data collection took place March 2016. Ten women took part. Eight had exited the abusive relationship but two remained with the partner who had perpetrated the abuse. Women were overwhelmingly positive about the programme and irrespective of whether they had remained or exited the relationship all reported perceptions of increased safety and improved health. Nurses have an important role to play in identifying domestic violence and abuse and in referral and safety planning. As part of a portfolio of domestic violence and abuse interventions, those that empower women to take control of their safety (such as Identification and Referral to Improve Safety) are important. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Systematic literature review of integrated community case management and the private sector in Africa: Relevant experiences and potential next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awor, Phyllis; Miller, Jane; Peterson, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Despite substantial investments made over the past 40 years in low income countries, governments cannot be viewed as the principal health care provider in many countries. Evidence on the role of the private sector in the delivery of health services is becoming increasingly available. In this study, we set out to determine the extent to which the private sector has been utilized in providing integrated care for sick children under 5 years of age with community-acquired malaria, pneumonia or diarrhoea. We reviewed the published literature for integrated community case management (iCCM) related experiences within both the public and private sector. We searched PubMed and Google/Google Scholar for all relevant literature until July 2014. The search terms used were "malaria", "pneumonia", "diarrhoea", "private sector" and "community case management". A total of 383 articles referred to malaria, pneumonia or diarrhoea in the private sector. The large majority of these studies (290) were only malaria related. Most of the iCCM-related studies evaluated introduction of only malaria drugs and/or diagnostics into the private sector. Only one study evaluated the introduction of drugs and diagnostics for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea in the private sector. In contrast, most iCCM-related studies in the public sector directly reported on community case management of 2 or more of the illnesses. While the private sector is an important source of care for children in low income countries, little has been done to harness the potential of this sector in improving access to care for non-malaria-associated fever in children within the community. It would be logical for iCCM programs to expand their activities to include the private sector to achieve higher population coverage. An implementation research agenda for private sector integrated care of febrile childhood illness needs to be developed and implemented in conjunction with private sector intervention programs.

  4. Mycetoma: experience of 482 cases in a single center in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Bonifaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous disease. It is classified into eumycetoma caused by fungi and actinomycetoma due to filamentous actinomycetes. Mycetoma can be found in geographic areas in close proximity to the Tropic of Cancer. Mexico is one of the countries in which this disease is highly endemic. In this retrospective study we report epidemiologic, clinical and microbiologic data of mycetoma observed in the General Hospital of Mexico in a 33 year-period (1980 to 2013. A total of 482 cases were included which were clinical and microbiology confirmed. Four hundred and forty four cases (92.11% were actinomycetomas and 38 cases (7.88% were eumycetomas. Most patients were agricultural workers; there was a male predominance with a sex ratio of 3:1. The mean age was 34.5 years old (most ranged from 21 to 40 years. The main affected localization was lower and upper limbs (70.74% and 14.52% respectively. Most of the patients came from humid tropical areas (Morelos, Guerrero and Hidalgo were the regions commonly reported. The main clinical presentation was as tumor-like soft tissue swelling with draining sinuses (97.1%. Grains were observed in all the cases. The principal causative agents for actinomycetoma were: Nocardia brasiliensis (78.21% and Actinomadura madurae (8.7%; meanwhile, for eumycetomas: Madurella mycetomatis and Scedosporium boydii (synonym: Pseudallescheria boydii were identified. This is a single-center, with long-follow up, cross-sectional study that allows determining the prevalence and characteristics of mycetoma in different regions of Mexico.

  5. Utility of gel nails in improving the appearance of cosmetically disfigured nails: Experience with 25 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gel nails are a commonly used cosmetic procedure, though their use by dermatologists has not been evaluated. These can be used to improve the appearance of cosmetically disfigured nails where other treatment options have failed; the condition is self-limiting or irreversible; or to camouflage the dystrophy until healing. Materials and Methods: A prospective, uncontrolled, open-label study on 25 participants presenting with cosmetically disfigured nails was undertaken. Mycologically negative, consenting patients with various nail plate surface abnormalities like trachyonychia (n =8; superficial pitting (n =6; onychorrhexis (n =4; superficial pitting with onychoschizia (n =3; Beau′s lines (n =3 and pterygium (n =1 were included. The patients received gel nail application using Ranara gel nail kit ® . Extra care was taken to avoid any damage to cuticle. Standard pre- and post-treatment photographs were taken to assess improvement. Patient satisfaction score (1-10; Global assessment score of improvement (no improvement to excellent improvement and any side effects reported were recorded. Results: The average age of treated patients was 30.44±11.39 years (range 18-60 years. A total of 69 nails were treated (average of 2.76 per patient. Post-procedure, the average patient satisfaction score was 9.08 ± 0.86 (range 7-10. The Global assessment showed excellent improvement (40% cases; good improvement (56% cases and mild improvement in the single case of pterygium treated. Conclusions: The use of Gel nails in patients with cosmetically disfiguring nail plate surface abnormalities (like trachyonychia, onychoschizia, pitting, etc. was found to produce good to excellent improvement in most of the cases. The patient satisfaction with the procedure was rated as high. This, coupled with absence of side effects, make gel nails a valuable tool in improving cosmesis and satisfaction among patients presenting with nail plate surface abnormalities

  6. Retrospective study of paracetamol poisoning in children aged zero to six years found no cases of liver injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan-Nielsen, S; Bisgaard, A S; Jans, S R

    2018-01-01

    AIM: This study focused on children aged zero to six years with suspected single-dose paracetamol poisoning, which has not been investigated in Denmark. We evaluated the incidence of liver injuries and the use of activated charcoal and N-acetylcysteine treatment. METHODS: Our retrospective study.......67 ± 1.05 years. Activated charcoal treatment was given in 87% of cases, but only 15% of the children received treatment within one hour of the suspected paracetamol poisoning. Although 80% of the children received N-acetylcysteine treatment, only one case (0.5%) had a toxic plasma paracetamol level...... children aged zero to six years with suspected paracetamol poisoning. Vomiting or abdominal pain was associated with elevated plasma paracetamol levels. No liver injuries were reported....

  7. Endostatin and kidney fibrosis in aging: a case for antagonistic pleiotropy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi Hua Sarah; Chen, Jun; Ziman, Bruce; Marshall, Shannon; Maizel, Julien; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-06-15

    A recurring theme of a host of gerontologic studies conducted in either experimental animals or in humans is related to documenting the functional decline with age. We hypothesize that elevated circulating levels of a powerful antiangiogenic peptide, endostatin, represent one of the potent systemic causes for multiorgan microvascular rarefaction and functional decline due to fibrosis. It is possible that during the life span of an organism there is an accumulation of dormant transformed cells producing antiangiogenic substances (endostatin) that maintain the dormancy of such scattered malignant cells. The proof of this postulate cannot be obtained by physically documenting these scattered cells, and it rests exclusively on the detection of sequelae of shifted pro- and antiangiogenic balance toward the latter. Here we compared circulating levels of endostatin in young and aging mice of two different strains and showed that endostatin levels are elevated in the latter. Renal expression of endostatin increased ~5.6-fold in aging animals. This was associated with microvascular rarefaction and progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In parallel, the levels of sirtuins 1 and 3 were significantly suppressed in aging mice in conjunction with the expression of markers of senescence. Treating young mice with endostatin for 28 days showed delayed recovery of circulation after femoral artery ligation and reduced patency of renal microvasculature but no fibrosis. In conclusion, the findings are consistent with the hypothesis on elevation of endostatin levels and parallel microvascular rarefaction and induction of renal fibrosis in aging mice. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Inaccuracy of age assessment from images of postpubescent subjects in cases of alleged child pornography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L

    2013-03-01

    Despite frequent medical expert testimony authoritatively stating that images of individuals who are postpubescent indicate age less than 18 and therefore, child pornography, developmental experts have noted that a scientific basis for such estimation is lacking. In fact, recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of inaccuracy in such estimates, and that the stage of breast development often used as indicative of age under 18 years is present in a substantial percentage of adult women. Ten images of adult women from legitimate pornographic sites promoting youthful images were shown to 16 pediatric endocrinologists expert in evaluating maturation, who determined whether or not the individuals represented were under 18 years of age. They also provided information about what features were most important in their evaluations. Sixty-nine percent of the 160 estimates were that the images represented females under 18 years of age. There was wide variability in the designation of importance of the various features of maturation in reaching conclusions, with breast development and facial appearance considered most important. This study confirms that medical testimony, even by experts in adolescent development, can deem images of adult women selected for their youthful appearance to be under age 18 two thirds of the time. Thus, important as prosecuting users of child pornographic material may be, justice requires the avoidance of testimony that is not scientifically based.

  9. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Andres, David; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena; Juan, M-Carmen; Perez-Hernandez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5-12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children's videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables.

  10. Design and characterization of the Large-aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Age (LEDA) radiometer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. C.; Greenhill, L. J.; Fialkov, A.; Bernardi, G.; Garsden, H.; Barsdell, B. R.; Kocz, J.; Anderson, M. M.; Bourke, S. A.; Craig, J.; Dexter, M. R.; Dowell, J.; Eastwood, M. W.; Eftekhari, T.; Ellingson, S. W.; Hallinan, G.; Hartman, J. M.; Kimberk, R.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Leiker, S.; MacMahon, D.; Monroe, R.; Schinzel, F.; Taylor, G. B.; Tong, E.; Werthimer, D.; Woody, D. P.

    2018-05-01

    The Large-Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Age (LEDA) was designed to detect the predicted O(100) mK sky-averaged absorption of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Hydrogen in the neutral pre- and intergalactic medium just after the cosmological Dark Age. The spectral signature would be associated with emergence of a diffuse Lyα background from starlight during `Cosmic Dawn'. Recently, Bowman et al. (2018) have reported detection of this predicted absorption feature, with an unexpectedly large amplitude of 530 mK, centered at 78 MHz. Verification of this result by an independent experiment, such as LEDA, is pressing. In this paper, we detail design and characterization of the LEDA radiometer systems, and a first-generation pipeline that instantiates a signal path model. Sited at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Long Wavelength Array, LEDA systems include the station correlator, five well-separated redundant dual polarization radiometers and backend electronics. The radiometers deliver a 30-85 MHz band (16 z < 34) and operate as part of the larger interferometric array, for purposes ultimately of in situ calibration. Here, we report on the LEDA system design, calibration approach, and progress in characterization as of January 2016. The LEDA systems are currently being modified to improve performance near 78 MHz in order to verify the purported absorption feature.

  11. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Andres, David; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena; Juan, M.-Carmen; Perez-Hernandez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5–12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children’s videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables. PMID:29674988

  12. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rodriguez-Andres

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5–12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children’s videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables.

  13. Risk factors for unintentional poisoning in children aged 1-3 years in NSW Australia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmertmann, Marcia; Williamson, Ann; Black, Deborah; Wilson, Leigh

    2013-05-24

    Unintentional poisoning in young children is an important public health issue. Age pattern studies have demonstrated that children aged 1-3 years have the highest levels of poisoning risk among children aged 0-4 years, yet little research has been conducted regarding risk factors specific to this three-year age group and the methodologies employed varied greatly. The purpose of the current study is to investigate a broad range of potential risk factors for unintentional poisoning in children aged 1-3 years using appropriate methodologies. Four groups of children, one case group (children who had experienced a poisoning event) and three control groups (children who had been 'injured', 'sick' or who were 'healthy'), and their mothers (mother-child dyads) were enrolled into a case-control study. All mother-child dyads participated in a 1.5-hour child developmental screening and observation, with mothers responding to a series of questionnaires at home. Data were analysed as three case-control pairs with multivariate analyses used to control for age and sex differences between child cases and controls. Five risk factors were included in the final multivariate models for one or more case-control pairs. All three models found that children whose mothers used more positive control in their interactions during a structured task had higher odds of poisoning. Two models showed that maternal psychiatric distress increased poisoning risk (poisoning-injury and poisoning-healthy). Individual models identified the following variables as risk factors: less proximal maternal supervision during risk taking activities (poisoning-injury), medicinal substances stored in more accessible locations in bathrooms (poisoning-sick) and lower total parenting stress (poisoning-healthy). The findings of this study indicate that the nature of the caregiver-child relationship and caregiver attributes play an important role in influencing poisoning risk. Further research is warranted to explore the

  14. Imbalanced geodemographical structures in Târnave regional system. Case study: population ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-V. CONȚIU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The demographic prospects of a regional system, the natural dynamics of the population, the potential of manpower resources, planning and forecast of its use, show a high degree of dependence on the demographical structure by age, the identified imbalances involving an increase in the vulnerability of the regional system and therefore an enhancement of geodemographical risks (acceleration of population ageing, decreasing population trend, disappearance of some rural settlements, socio-economic failures etc.. In this study, a special attention is paid to the analysis of ageing index and demographical dependency ratio, and the share of young and old people to the Târnave regional system, taking into account as milestones, the population censuses from 1910, 1992 2002 and 2011.

  15. Postoperative delirium after partial laryngectomy in a middle-aged patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huiqian; Shen, Xia

    2018-02-01

    Postoperative delirium is a common occurrence in older patients. However, reports of postoperative delirium in middle-aged patients are limited, and the underlying mechanism of delirium in this patient population is not clear. A 45-year-old man who developed postoperative delirium on the second day after partial laryngectomy. Interviews of the surgical team, patient, and patient's spouse revealed that the patient was psychologically stressed, but had not been diagnosed or treated. The patient also suffered impairment in physiological functioning and sleep disturbance after surgery. Postoperative delirium. The postoperative delirium was treated with an antipsychotic drug. The patient recovered well. Preoperative psychological stress, which is often undiagnosed and untreated, can increase the risk of postoperative delirium in middle-aged patients undergoing laryngectomy. Therefore, screening for psychological stress and implementing strategies to prevent delirium should be considered for patients who undergo laryngectomy, even if they are not in high-risk older age groups.

  16. Effects of Parental Aging During Embryo Development and Adult Life: The Case of Nothobranchius furzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Api, Martina; Biondi, Piera; Olivotto, Ike; Terzibasi, Eva; Cellerino, Alessandro; Carnevali, Oliana

    2018-04-01

    Studies on parental aging are a very attractive field, although it is poorly understood how parental age affects embryonic development and adult traits of the offspring. In this study, we used the turquoise killifish Nothobranchius furzeri, as is the vertebrate with shortest captive lifespan and an interesting model. The embryos of N. furzeri can follow two distinct developmental pathways either entering diapause or proceeding through direct development. Thus, this embryonic plasticity allows this model to be used to study different factors that could affect their embryonic development, including parental age. The first goal of the present study was to investigate whether parental aging could affect the embryo development. To do this, we collected F1 embryos from two breeder groups (old parents and young parents). We monitored the duration of embryonic development and analyzed genes involved in dorsalization process. The second goal was to investigate if embryonic developmental plasticity could be modulated by an epigenetic process. To this end, the expression of DNMTs genes was examined. Our data support the hypothesis that diapause, occurring more frequently in embryos from old parents, is associated with increased expression of DNMT3A and DNMT3B suggesting an epigenetic control. Finally, we analyzed whether parental age could affect metabolism and growth during adult life. Morphometric results and qPCR analysis of genes from IGF system showed a slower growth in adults from old breeders. Moreover, a gender-specificity effect on growth emerged. In conclusion, these results may contribute to the better understanding of the complex mechanism of aging.

  17. Analysis, prediction, and case studies of early-age cracking in bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSafty, Adel; Graeff, Matthew K.; El-Gharib, Georges; Abdel-Mohti, Ahmed; Mike Jackson, N.

    2016-06-01

    Early-age cracking can adversely affect strength, serviceability, and durability of concrete bridge decks. Early age is defined as the period after final setting, during which concrete properties change rapidly. Many factors can cause early-age bridge deck cracking including temperature change, hydration, plastic shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and drying shrinkage. The cracking may also increase the effect of freeze and thaw cycles and may lead to corrosion of reinforcement. This research paper presents an analysis of causes and factors affecting early-age cracking. It also provides a tool developed to predict the likelihood and initiation of early-age cracking of concrete bridge decks. Understanding the concrete properties is essential so that the developed tool can accurately model the mechanisms contributing to the cracking of concrete bridge decks. The user interface of the implemented computer Excel program enables the user to input the properties of the concrete being monitored. The research study and the developed spreadsheet were used to comprehensively investigate the issue of concrete deck cracking. The spreadsheet is designed to be a user-friendly calculation tool for concrete mixture proportioning, temperature prediction, thermal analysis, and tensile cracking prediction. The study also provides review and makes recommendations on the deck cracking based mainly on the Florida Department of Transportation specifications and Structures Design Guidelines, and Bridge Design Manuals of other states. The results were also compared with that of other commercially available software programs that predict early-age cracking in concrete slabs, concrete pavement, and reinforced concrete bridge decks. The outcome of this study can identify a set of recommendations to limit the deck cracking problem and maintain a longer service life of bridges.

  18. Age at first marriage, education and divorce: the case of the U.S.A..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreira, P T

    1991-01-01

    "This paper presents an analysis of the determinants of the age of marriage and the probability of divorce among women in the United States." The author hypothesizes that the possibility of divorce enters into women's decision to marry. "As expected, empirical results indicate that in the United States, where it is easier to obtain divorce, women tend to marry earlier. Furthermore, Catholic women tend to marry later....Results seem to indicate the age at marriage and education should not be considered to be exogenous in the study of the probability of divorce. Another important result is that women who marry earlier...show a lower probability of divorce...." excerpt

  19. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico’s cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  20. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landy Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation.