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Sample records for agent-enhanced mri measuring

  1. Accuracy of MRI in Growth Plate Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Rahbek, Ole; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    was measured and compared to histology. Results. Histology measurements showed a mean growth plate thickness of 467 μm (SD = 82.2). The mean growth plate thickness measured in the 7T MR images was 465 μm (SD = 62.2) and 1325 μm (SD=183.5) on 1.5 MRI measurements. We found a better correlation between...... the growth plate thickness measured on the 7T MRI and histology samples compared to 1.5T, where the accuracy was poor. Conclusion. The growth plate can be identified and measured with high accuracy using 7T MRI. 1.5T MRI can only describe some morphological characteristics; its poor resolution impedes to do...

  2. Quantitative Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements Using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, Eric R; Watts, Lora Talley; Tiwari, Yash Vardhan; Bresnen, Andrew; Timothy Q Duong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging utilized as a quantitative and noninvasive method to image cerebral blood flow. The two most common techniques used to detect cerebral blood flow are dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Herein we describe the use of these two techniques to measure cerebral blood flow in rodents, including methods, analysis, and important considerations when utilizing these techniques.

  3. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel [University of California San Francisco (United States); Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  4. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  5. Facilitating cartilage volume measurement using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maataoui, Adel, E-mail: adel.maataoui@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gurung, Jessen, E-mail: jessen.gurung@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns, E-mail: h.ackermann@add.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Biological and Molecular Imaging, ZIK OncoRay - Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Khan, M. Fawad, E-mail: fawad@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To compare quantitative cartilage volume measurement (CVM) using different slice thicknesses. Materials and methods: Ten knees were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI (Sonata, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a 3D gradient echo sequence (FLASH, fast low-angle shot). Cartilage volume of the medial and lateral tibial plateau was measured by two independent readers in 1.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 5.0 mm slices using the Argus software application. Accuracy and time effectiveness served as control parameters. Results: Determining cartilage volume, time for calculation diminished for the lateral tibial plateau from 384.6 {+-} 127.7 s and 379.1 {+-} 117.6 s to 214.9 {+-} 109.9 s and 213.9 {+-} 102.2 s to 122.1 {+-} 60.1 s and 126.8 {+-} 56.2 s and for the medial tibial plateau from 465.0 {+-} 147.7 s and 461.8 {+-} 142.7 s to 214.0 {+-} 67.9 s and 208.9 {+-} 66.2 s to 132.6 {+-} 41.5 s and 130.6 {+-} 42.0 s measuring 1.5 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm slices, respectively. No statistically significant difference between cartilage volume measurements was observed (p > 0.05) while very good inter-reader correlation was evaluated. Conclusion: CVM using 1.5 mm slices provides no higher accuracy than cartilage volume measurement in 5 mm slices while an overall time saving up to 70% is possible.

  6. Accuracy of MRI-based Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russek, Stephen; Erdevig, Hannah; Keenan, Kathryn; Stupic, Karl

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map tissue susceptibility to identify microbleeds associated with brain injury and pathologic iron deposits associated with neurologic diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Field distortions with a resolution of a few parts per billion can be measured using MRI phase maps. The field distortion map can be inverted to obtain a quantitative susceptibility map. To determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements, a set of phantoms with paramagnetic salts and nano-iron gels were fabricated. The shapes and orientations of features were varied. Measured susceptibility of 1.0 mM GdCl3 solution in water as a function of temperature agreed well with the theoretical predictions, assuming Gd+3 is spin 7/2. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry. The paramagnetic susceptibility sits on top of the much larger diamagnetic susceptibility of water (-9.04 x 10-6), which leads to errors in the SQUID measurements. To extract out the paramagnetic contribution using standard magnetometry, measurements must be made down to low temperature (2K). MRI-based susceptometry is shown to be as or more accurate than standard magnetometry and susceptometry techniques.

  7. Triphasic MRI of pelvic organ descent: sources of measurement error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morren, Geert L. [Bowel and Digestion Centre, The Oxford Clinic, 38 Oxford Terrace, Christchurch (New Zealand)]. E-mail: geert_morren@hotmail.com; Balasingam, Adrian G. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Wells, J. Elisabeth [Department of Public Health and General Medicine, Christchurch School of Medicine, St. Elmo Courts, Christchurch (New Zealand); Hunter, Anne M. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Coates, Richard H. [Christchurch Radiology Group, P.O. Box 21107, 4th Floor, Leicester House, 291 Madras Street, Christchurch (New Zealand); Perry, Richard E. [Bowel and Digestion Centre, The Oxford Clinic, 38 Oxford Terrace, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To identify sources of error when measuring pelvic organ displacement during straining using triphasic dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: Ten healthy nulliparous woman underwent triphasic dynamic 1.5 T pelvic MRI twice with 1 week between studies. The bladder was filled with 200 ml of a saline solution, the vagina and rectum were opacified with ultrasound gel. T2 weighted images in the sagittal plane were analysed twice by each of the two observers in a blinded fashion. Horizontal and vertical displacement of the bladder neck, bladder base, introitus vaginae, posterior fornix, cul-de sac, pouch of Douglas, anterior rectal wall, anorectal junction and change of the vaginal axis were measured eight times in each volunteer (two images, each read twice by two observers). Variance components were calculated for subject, observer, week, interactions of these three factors, and pure error. An overall standard error of measurement was calculated for a single observation by one observer on a film from one woman at one visit. Results: For the majority of anatomical reference points, the range of displacements measured was wide and the overall measurement error was large. Intra-observer error and week-to-week variation within a subject were important sources of measurement error. Conclusion: Important sources of measurement error when using triphasic dynamic MRI to measure pelvic organ displacement during straining were identified. Recommendations to minimize those errors are made.

  8. Flow measurements in cardiac MRI; Flussmessungen in der kardialen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Phase-contrast flow measurements have become an established method in cardiac MRI. The quantification of intra- and extracardiac shunt volumes as well as the evaluation of valvular disease and aortic coarctation have proved their clinical usefulness. There are some rules that have to be followed when performing and analyzing phase-contrast flow measurements. With these rules in mind, quantitative phase-contrast flow measurements are a reliable and precise method for clinical use of cardiac MRI. (orig.) [German] Flussmessungen gehoeren zum Standardrepertoire der MRT des Herzens. Dabei stehen die Quantifizierungen intra- und extrakardialer Shuntvolumina sowie von Klappenvitien im Vordergrund. Aber auch die Abschaetzung von Stenosen, beispielsweise des Aortenisthmus v. a. ueber einen assoziierten Kollateralfluss, sind klinisch akzeptiert. Bei der Planung und Auswertung einer Phasenkontrastflussmessung muessen einige Regeln beachtet werden, um fehlerhafte Ergebnisse zu vermeiden. Dann aber ist die Phasenkontrastflussmessung eine wertvolle Ergaenzung fuer die taegliche Routine in der Herzbildgebung. (orig.)

  9. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  10. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  11. MRI evaluation and measurement of the normal odontoid peg position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, C.G. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)]. E-mail: carmelcronin2000@hotmail.com; Lohan, D.G. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Ni Mhuircheartigh, J. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Meehan, C.P. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Murphy, J.M. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Roche, C. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland)

    2007-09-15

    Aim: To measure the normal distances (and range) from the tip of the odontoid peg to the different reference skull baselines (Chamberlain's, McGregor's, and McRae's line) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated midline sagittal MRI brain images of 200 adults chosen randomly. Patients did not have symptoms or signs suggestive of basilar impression, spinal trauma, vertebral collapse or disease. Using SPSS data analysis program histograms, mean and standard deviation (SD), median and range values were calculated. These findings were then compared with previous plain radiograph measurements. Results: The mean position of the odontoid peg was 1.2 mm (median 1.5 mm, SD 3 mm) below Chamberlain's line; 0.9 mm (median 1.1, SD 3 mm) below McGregor's line; and 4.6 mm (median 4.8, SD 2.6) below McRae's line. Conclusion: Based on the current population, these results provide the mean and range of normal distances from the odontoid peg to the most frequently used skull baselines using MRI.

  12. Imaging of adult flatfoot: correlation of radiographic measurements with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lamb, Joshua; Kung, Justin W; Yablon, Corrie M; Wu, Jim S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to determine whether radiographic foot measurements can predict injury of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) and the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch as diagnosed on MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS. After institutional review board approval, 100 consecutive patients with radiographic and MRI examinations performed within a 2-month period were enrolled. Thirty-one patients had PTT dysfunction clinically, and 69 patients had other causes of ankle pain. Talonavicular uncoverage angle, incongruency angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height, and talar tilt were calculated on standing foot or ankle radiographs. MRI was used to assess for abnormalities of the PTT (tenosynovitis, tendinosis, and tear) and supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch (spring ligament, deltoid ligament, and sinus tarsi). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests for categoric variables; the Student t test was used for continuous variables. RESULTS. There was a statistically significant association of PTT tear with abnormal talonavicular uncoverage angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, and cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height. PTT tendinosis and isolated tenosynovitis had a poor association with most radiologic measurements. If both calcaneal pitch and Meary angles were normal, no PTT tear was present. An abnormal calcaneal pitch angle had the best association with injury to the supporting medial longitudinal arch structures. CONCLUSION. Radiographic measurements, especially calcaneal pitch and Meary angles, can be useful in detecting PTT tears. Calcaneal pitch angle provides the best assessment of injury to the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch.

  13. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Stephanie; Ghumman, Simranjit S.; Moser, Thomas P. [Hopital Notre-Dame (CHUM), Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ladouceur, Martin [Research Center CHUM, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  14. Noninvasive measurement of conductivity anisotropy at larmor frequency using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonsung; Song, Yizhuang; Choi, Narae; Cho, Sungmin; Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic electrical properties can be found in biological tissues such as muscles and nerves. Conductivity tensor is a simplified model to express the effective electrical anisotropic information and depends on the imaging resolution. The determination of the conductivity tensor should be based on Ohm's law. In other words, the measurement of partial information of current density and the electric fields should be made. Since the direct measurements of the electric field and the current density are difficult, we use MRI to measure their partial information such as B1 map; it measures circulating current density and circulating electric field. In this work, the ratio of the two circulating fields, termed circulating admittivity, is proposed as measures of the conductivity anisotropy at Larmor frequency. Given eigenvectors of the conductivity tensor, quantitative measurement of the eigenvalues can be achieved from circulating admittivity for special tissue models. Without eigenvectors, qualitative information of anisotropy still can be acquired from circulating admittivity. The limitation of the circulating admittivity is that at least two components of the magnetic fields should be measured to capture anisotropic information.

  15. Relationship of patient-reported outcomes with MRI measures in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed whether MRI measures of synovitis, osteitis and bone erosion were associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a longitudinal clinical trial setting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: This longitudinal cohort of 291 patients with RA was derived from...... across treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: MRI measures of inflammation and structural damage correlate independently with physical function, pain and patient global assessments. These observations support the validity of MRI biomarkers. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00264537; Post-results....

  16. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation.

  17. Surface EMG measurements during fMRI at 3T : Accurate EMG recordings after artifact correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Zijdewind, Inge; Hoogduin, H; Maurits, N

    2005-01-01

    In this experiment, we have measured surface EMG of the first dorsal interosseus during predefined submaximal isometric contractions (5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of maximal force) of the index finger simultaneously with fMRI measurements. Since we have used sparse sampling fMRI (3-s scanning; 2-s non-sca

  18. Measuring myocardial perfusion: the role of PET, MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, A A; Kastrup, J

    2015-06-01

    Recently, focus has changed from anatomical assessment of coronary arteries towards functional testing to evaluate the effect of stenosis on the myocardium before intervention. Besides positron-emission tomography (PET), cardiac MRI (CMR), and cardiac CT are able to measure myocardial perfusion. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities are the first sign of the ischaemic cascade in the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). PET is considered the non-invasive clinical reference standard for absolute quantification of myocardial perfusion. The diagnostic and prognostic value of PET is well-known and is used in routine clinical practice. However, PET uses radioactive tracers and has a lower spatial resolution compared to CMR and CT. CMR and CT are emerging techniques in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging. CMR uses magnetic resonance to obtain images, whereas CT uses x-rays during first-pass of non-ionic and ionic contrast agents, respectively. Absolute quantification with CMR has yet to be established in routine clinical practice, while CT has yet to prove its diagnostic and prognostic value. The upcoming years may change the way we diagnose and treat patients suspected of having CAD with more precise methods for measuring myocardial perfusion. The aim of this comprehensive review is to discuss current and emerging imaging techniques used for myocardial perfusion imaging.

  19. On the feasibility of concurrent human TMS-EEG-fMRI measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Judith C; Reithler, Joel; Schuhmann, Teresa; de Graaf, Tom; Uludag, Kâmil; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneously combining the complementary assets of EEG, functional MRI (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) within one experimental session provides synergetic results, offering insights into brain function that go beyond the scope of each method when used in isolation. The steady increase of concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS-EEG, and TMS-fMRI studies further underlines the added value of such multimodal imaging approaches. Whereas concurrent EEG-fMRI enables monitoring of brain-wide network dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution, the combination with TMS provides insights in causal interactions within these networks. Thus the simultaneous use of all three methods would allow studying fast, spatially accurate, and distributed causal interactions in the perturbed system and its functional relevance for intact behavior. Concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS-EEG, and TMS-fMRI experiments are already technically challenging, and the three-way combination of TMS-EEG-fMRI might yield additional difficulties in terms of hardware strain or signal quality. The present study explored the feasibility of concurrent TMS-EEG-fMRI studies by performing safety and quality assurance tests based on phantom and human data combining existing commercially available hardware. Results revealed that combined TMS-EEG-fMRI measurements were technically feasible, safe in terms of induced temperature changes, allowed functional MRI acquisition with comparable image quality as during concurrent EEG-fMRI or TMS-fMRI, and provided artifact-free EEG before and from 300 ms after TMS pulse application. Based on these empirical findings, we discuss the conceptual benefits of this novel complementary approach to investigate the working human brain and list a number of precautions and caveats to be heeded when setting up such multimodal imaging facilities with current hardware.

  20. Accuracy of MRI technique in measuring tendon cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, R. B.; Elbrønd (Bibs), Vibeke Sødring

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has commonly been applied to determine tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) and length either to measure structural changes or to normalize mechanical measurements to stress and strain. The ability to reproduce CSA measurements on MRI images has been reported......, but the accuracy in relation to actual tendon dimensions has never been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare tendon CSA measured by MRI with that measured in vitro with the mould casting technique. The knee of a horse was MRI-scanned with 1.5 and 3 tesla, and two examiners measured the patellar...... tendon CSA. Thereafter, the patellar tendon of the horse was completely dissected and embedded in an alginate cast. The CSA of the embedded tendon was measured directly by optical imaging of the cast impression. 1.5 tesla grey tendon CSA and 3 tesla grey tendon CSA were 16.5% and 13.2% lower than...

  1. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...... subjects using three different MRI techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), dynamic contrast enhanced T1 weighted perfusion MRI (DCE) and phase contrast mapping (PCM). All MRI measurements were performed within the same session. In 10 of the subjects repeated CBF measurements by (15) O labeled water PET......L/100 g/min, 16.2% and 4.8%, for DCE 43.0 mL/100 g/min, 20.0%, 15.1% and for PET 41.9 mL/100 g/min, 16.5% and 11.9%, respectively. Only for DCE and PCM a significant positive correlation between measurements was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm large between subject variability in CBF...

  2. Physiological measurements using ultra-high field fMRI: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sue; Panchuelo, Rosa Sanchez

    2014-09-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) has grown to be the neuroimaging technique of choice for investigating brain function. This topical review provides an outline of fMRI methods and applications, with a particular emphasis on the recent advances provided by ultra-high field (UHF) scanners to allow functional mapping with greater sensitivity and improved spatial specificity. A short outline of the origin of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is provided, followed by a review of BOLD fMRI methods based on gradient-echo (GE) and spin-echo (SE) contrast. Phase based fMRI measures, as well as perfusion contrast obtained with the technique of arterial spin labelling (ASL), are also discussed. An overview of 7 T based functional neuroimaging is provided, outlining the potential advances to be made and technical challenges to be addressed.

  3. Early development of arterial spin labeling to measure regional brain blood flow by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Alan P

    2012-08-15

    Two major avenues of work converged in the late 1980's and early 1990's to give rise to brain perfusion MRI. The development of anatomical brain MRI quickly had as a major goal the generation of angiograms using tricks to label flowing blood in macroscopic vessels. These ideas were aimed at getting information about microcirculatory flow as well. Over the same time course the development of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy had as its primary goal the assessment of tissue function and in particular, tissue energetics. For this the measurement of the delivery of water to tissue was critical for assessing tissue oxygenation and viability. The measurement of the washin/washout of "freely" diffusible tracers by spectroscopic based techniques pointed the way for quantitative approaches to measure regional blood flow by MRI. These two avenues came together in the development of arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI techniques to measure regional cerebral blood flow. The early use of ASL to measure brain activation to help verify BOLD fMRI led to a rapid development of ASL based perfusion MRI. Today development and applications of regional brain blood flow measurements with ASL continues to be a major area of activity.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  5. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  6. The Australian MRI-Linac Program: measuring profiles and PDD in a horizontal beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J.; George, A.; Alnaghy, S. J.; Causer, T.; Alharthi, T.; Glaubes, L.; Dong, B.; Goozee, G.; Liney, G.; Holloway, L.; Keall, P.

    2017-02-01

    The Australian MRI-Linac consists of a fixed horizontal photon beam combined with a MRI. Commissioning required PDD and profiles measured in a horizontal set-up using a combination of water tank measurements and gafchromic film. To validate the methodology, measurements were performed comparing PDD and profiles measured with the gantry angle set to 0 and 90° on a conventional linac. Results showed agreement to within 2.0% for PDD measured using both film and the water tank at gantry 90° relative to PDD acquired using gantry 0°. Profiles acquired using a water tank at both gantry 0 and 90° showed agreement in FWHM to within 1 mm. The agreement for both PDD and profiles measured at gantry 90° relative to gantry 0° curves indicates that the methodology described can be used to acquire the necessary beam data for horizontal beam lines and in particular, commissioning the Australian MRI-linac.

  7. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  8. Midbrain volume predicts fMRI and ERP measures of reward reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joshua M; Foti, Dan; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Proudfit, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    Ventral striatal activation measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and feedback negativity amplitude measured with event-related potentials (ERPs) are each enhanced during reward processing. Recent research has found that these two neural measures of reward processing are also related to one another, such that increases in ventral striatal activity are accompanied by increases in the amplitude of the feedback negativity. Although there is a long history of research implicating the midbrain dopamine system in reward processing, there has been little research into the possibility that structural variability in the midbrain may be linked to functional variability in reward reactivity. Here, we used structural MRI to measure midbrain volumes in addition to fMRI and ERP measures of functional neural reactivity to rewards in a simple gambling task. The results suggest that as midbrain volumes increase, fMRI reward reactivity in the ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex also increases. A similar relationship exists between midbrain structure and the amplitude of the feedback negativity; further, this relationship is mediated specifically by activity in the ventral striatum. These data demonstrate convergence between neuroanatomical, hemodynamic, and electrophysiological measures. Thus, structural variability in the midbrain relates to variability in fMRI and ERP measures of functional reward reactivity, which may play a critical role in reward-related psychopathologies and the treatment of these disorders.

  9. [Pulmonary blood flow measurement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast medium;comparison of phase contrast MRI and perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuyanagi, Eiji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Saito, Hirotsugu

    2014-02-01

    To define the accuracy of pulmonary arterial blood flow (PA-flow) measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), we compared the PA-flow data of PC-MRI with the data of perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy. Eighteen patients who preoperatively underwent PA-flow measurement using PC-MRI and perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy were evaluated. The PA-flow (cm3/sec) of MRI was calculated by multiplying maximum velocity (cm/sec) by region of interest (ROI) area (cm2) of measured main pulmonary artery using phase contrast method. The left to right ratio (R/L ratio) of PA-flow measured by PC-MRI was compared with the R/L ratios of the date of perfusion-ventilation lung scintigraphy. The R/L ratios of PC-MRI and perfusion lung scintigraphy were 1.43 ± 1.07 and 1.35 ± 0.82, respectively. Both ratios showed excellent correlation( y=-0.50+1.30x, r=0.99,pperfusion lung scintigraphy in the patients with a past history of lung resection, even if their R/L ratios of perfusion lung scintigraphy differed from those of ventilation lung scintigraphy. These results revealed that the PA-flow could be accurately measured by PC-MRI without contrast medium and nuclear medicine instruments.

  10. Measurement of Liver Iron Concentration by MRI Is Reproducible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Alústiza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objectives were (i construction of a phantom to reproduce the behavior of iron overload in the liver by MRI and (ii assessment of the variability of a previously validated method to quantify liver iron concentration between different MRI devices using the phantom and patients. Materials and Methods. A phantom reproducing the liver/muscle ratios of two patients with intermediate and high iron overload. Nine patients with different levels of iron overload were studied in 4 multivendor devices and 8 of them were studied twice in the machine where the model was developed. The phantom was analysed in the same equipment and 14 times in the reference machine. Results. FeCl3 solutions containing 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.2 mg Fe/mL were chosen to generate the phantom. The average of the intramachine variability for patients was 10% and for the intermachines 8%. For the phantom the intramachine coefficient of variation was always below 0.1 and the average of intermachine variability was 10% for moderate and 5% for high iron overload. Conclusion. The phantom reproduces the behavior of patients with moderate or high iron overload. The proposed method of calculating liver iron concentration is reproducible in several different 1.5 T systems.

  11. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment. METHODS: Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region

  12. Efficacy and toxicity in brain tumor treatment - quantitative Measurements using advanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Søren

    2016-01-01

    and are now being used for presurgical and radiation therapy (RT) planning. More advanced MRI sequences have gained attention. Sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have entered the clinical world concurrently......From the clinical introduction in the 1980s, MRI has grown to become an indispensable brain imaging modality, mainly due to its excellent ability to visualize soft tissues. Morphologically, T1- and T2-weighted brain tumor MRI have been part of routine diagnostic radiology for more than two decades...... with the introduction of magnets with higher field strength. Ongoing technical development has enabled a change from semiquantitative measurements to a true quantitative approach. This step is expected to have a great impact on the treatment of brain tumor patients in the future. The aim of this Ph.D. dissertation...

  13. Repeated quantitative perfusion and contrast permeability measurement in the MRI examination of a CNS tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonken, E.P.A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Willems, P.W.A.; Zwan, A. van der; Bakker, C.J.G.; Viergever, M.A.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2000-09-01

    This study reports on the results of quantitative MRI perfusion and contrast permeability measurement on two occasions in one patient. The measurements were separated 81 days in time. The tumor grew considerably in this period, but no change was found with respect to perfusion and contrast permeability. Non-involved white matter values were reproduced to demonstrate repeatability. The presented approach to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI allows fast and repeatable quantitative assessment of perfusion and is easily integrated in a conventional brain tumor protocol. (orig.)

  14. Validation of SPAMM Tagged MRI Based Measurement of 3D Soft Tissue Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a novel (non-ECG-triggered) MRI sequence based on SPAtial Modulation of the Magnetization (SPAMM) to non-invasively measure 3D (quasi-static) soft tissue deformations using only six acquisitions (three static and three indentations). In current SPAMM tagged MRI approaches data is typically constructed from many repeated motion cycles. This has so far restricted its application to the measurement of highly repeatable and periodic movements (e.g. cardiac deformation). In biomechanical applications where soft tissue deformation is artificially induced, often by indentation, significant repeatability constraints exist and, for clinical applications, discomfort and health issues generally preclude a large number of repetitions.

  15. Unexpected global impact of VTA dopamine neuron activation as measured by opto-fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohani, Sweyta; Poplawsky, Alexander John; Kim, Seong-Gi; Moghaddam, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are strongly implicated in cognitive and affective processing as well as in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, ADHD and substance abuse disorders. In human studies, dopamine-related functions are routinely assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signals during the performance of dopamine-dependent tasks. There is, however, a critical void in our knowledge about if and how activation of VTA dopamine neurons specifically influences regional or global fMRI signals. Here we used optogenetics in Th::Cre rats to selectively stimulate VTA dopamine neurons while simultaneously measuring global hemodynamic changes using BOLD and cerebral blood volume-weighted (CBVw) fMRI. Phasic activation of VTA dopamine neurons increased BOLD and CBVw fMRI signals in VTA-innervated limbic regions, including the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Surprisingly, basal ganglia regions that receive sparse or no VTA dopaminergic innervation, including the dorsal striatum and the globus pallidus, were also activated. In fact, the most prominent fMRI signal increase in the forebrain was observed in the dorsal striatum that is not traditionally associated with VTA dopamine neurotransmission. These data establish causation between phasic activation of VTA dopamine neurons and global fMRI signals. They further suggest that mesolimbic and non-limbic basal ganglia dopamine circuits are functionally connected and, thus, provide a potential novel framework for understanding dopamine-dependent functions and interpreting data obtained from human fMRI studies. PMID:27457809

  16. Structural linear measurements in the newborn brain: accuracy of cranial ultrasound compared to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijser, Lara M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, Latha; Cowan, Frances M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, Department of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Rutherford, Mary A.; Counsell, Serena J.; Allsop, Joanna M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, Department of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Structural size in the neonatal brain is of clinical importance. Cranial ultrasonography (cUS) is the primary method used for evaluating the neonatal brain and it is important to know whether linear measurements made using this technique are accurate. To compare linear measurements of different cerebral structures made from neonatal cUS and contemporaneous MRI. Preterm and term infants studies with cUS and MRI on the same day were studied. Linear measurements made using both techniques from many cerebral structures were compared using a paired t-test. A total of 44 sets of scans from 26 preterm and 8 term infants were assessed. Small but significant differences between the cUS and MRI measurements (P<0.05) were found for the ventricular index, the posterior horn depth of the lateral ventricle, the extracerebral space and interhemispheric fissure, and the cortex of the cingulate gyrus. No significant differences were found for any other measurements. Linear measurements from cUS are accurate for most neonatal cerebral structures. Significant differences compared to MRI were found for a few structures, but only for the cortex were the absolute differences marked and possibly of clinical importance. (orig.)

  17. Brain Metastases from Different Primary Carcinomas: an Evaluation of DSC MRI Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Zhang, G; Oudkerk, M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the roles of different dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic imaging (DSC MRI) measurements in discriminating between brain metastases derived from four common primary carcinomas. Thirty-seven patients with brain metastases were enrolled. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and relative mean transit time (rMTT) in both tumor and peritumoral edema were measured. Metastases were grouped by their primary tumor (lung, gastrointestinal, breast and renal cell carcinoma). DSC MRI measurements were compared between groups. Mean rCBV, rCBF, rMTT in tumor and peritumoral edema of all brain metastases (n=37) were 2.79 ± 1.73, 2.56 ± 2.11, 1.21 ± 0.48 and 1.05 ± 0.53, 0.86 ± 0.40, 1.99 ± 0.41, respectively. The tumoral rCBV (5.26 ± 1.89) and rCBF (5.32 ± 3.28) of renal metastases were greater than those of the other three metastases (P0.05). Evaluating various DSC MRI measurements can provide complementary hemodynamic information on brain metastases. The tumoral rCBV, rCBF and likely rMTT can help discriminate between brain metastases originating from different primary carcinomas. The peritumoral DSC MRI measurements had limited value in discriminating between brain metastases.

  18. Neural Substrates of the Topology Test to Measure Fluid Reasoning: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiromi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Horn, John L.; Sassa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In our prior study the negative correlation between Topology, a behavioral measure of fluid reasoning, and adult age diminished with the increase in the level of expertise in a cognitively-demanding domain of expertise in the game of GO. The present fMRI study was designed to investigate neural substrates of Topology. The modified topology…

  19. Multimodality correlations of patellar height measurement on X-ray, CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Pearlene P.; Chalian, Majid; Carrino, John A.; Eng, John; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-10-15

    To investigate whether the universally accepted range of normal patellar height ratios derived from radiography for the Insall-Salvati (IS) and Blackburne-Peel (BP) methods could be similarly applied to both CT and MRI. Institutional review board approval was obtained with waiver of informed consent for this HIPPA-compliant study. A total of 45 knees in 42 patients (15 men, 27 women; age range 11 to 75 years, mean age 39 {+-} 20 years) who underwent tri-modality (radiograph, CT, and MRI) examinations were selected. All patients had knee imaging obtained for a variety of reasons and measurements were performed by two independent readers who were blinded to each other's measurements or the respective measurements derived from each of the methods. Paired t test was used to compare the mean values among the modalities. Inter-observer and inter-method agreements were assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients. Statistically significant, but small quantitative differences are noted between tri-modality patellar height ratios. For comparable results, the small addition of 0.13 and 0.10 are needed for the Insall-Salvati measurements on MRI and CT respectively, compared with radiographs. For the Blackburne-Peel ratio, an additional adjustment of 0.09 is needed between radiographs and MRI, but not between radiographs and CT. These adjustments are independent of gender. The interobserver reproducibility was excellent (ICC {>=} 0.94) for both the Insall-Salvati and Blackburne-Peel methods for all modalities. The results indicate that cut-off values for patella alta and baja derived from radiographs should not be directly transposed to CT and MRI; however, the adjustments are relatively minor. These measurements show excellent reproducibility for all modalities currently used for patellar height measurements. (orig.)

  20. The Characteristics of Vascular Growth in VX2 Tumor Measured by MRI and Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-L. Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood supply is crucial for rapid growth of a malignant tumor; medical imaging can play an important role in evaluating the vascular characterstics of tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and micro-computed tomography (CT are able to detect tumors and measure blood volumes of microcirculation in tissue. In this study, we used MR imaging and micro-CT to assess the microcirculation in a VX2 tumor model in rabbits. MRI characterization was performed using the intravascular contrast agent Clariscan (NC100150-Injection; micro-CT with Microfil was used to directly depict blood vessels with diameters as low as 17 um in tissue. Relative blood volume fraction (rBVF in the tumor rim and blood vessel density (rBVD over the whole tumor was calculated using the two imaging methods. Our study indicates that rBVF is negatively related to the volume of the tumor measured by ultrasound (R=0.90. rBVF in the tissue of a VX2 tumor measured by MRI in vivo was qualitatively consistent with the rBVD demonstrated by micro-CT in vitro (R=0.97. The good correlation between the two methods indicates that MRI studies are potentially valuable for assessing characteristics or tumor vascularity and for assessing response to therapy noninvasively.

  1. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found good correlation between MRI and micro probe measurements. However, direct conversion of tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation is very limited. Furthermore, adverse effects of anesthesia and

  2. Renal masses measuring under 2 cm: Pathologic outcomes and associations with MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B., E-mail: Andrew.Rosenkrantz@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Wehrli, Natasha E. [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Melamed, Jonathan [Department of Pathology, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Taneja, Samir S. [Department of Urology, Division of Urologic Oncology, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Shaikh, Mohammed B. [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate pathologic outcomes and associations with MRI features in small renal masses measuring up to 20 mm Methods: 86 patients (61 ± 13 years; 45 M/41F) with 92 renal masses measuring up to 20 mm that underwent MRI prior to tissue diagnosis were included. Two radiologists independently evaluated all masses for microscopic lipid, hemorrhage, T2-hyperintensity, T2-homogeneity, cystic/necrotic areas, hypervascularity, enhancement homogeneity, circumscribed margins, and predominantly exophytic location. These MRI features, as well as patient age, gender, and history of RCC, were compared with pathologic findings using Fisher's exact test, unpaired t-test, and multivariate logistic regression. Results: 26.1% (24/92) of masses under 2 cm were benign, only 32.6% (30/92) were clear-cell RCC, and only 7.6% (7/92) were high-grade. Among 16 masses measuring up to 1 cm, only 12.5% (2/16) were clear-cell RCC, and none was high-grade. Within the entire cohort, no MRI or clinical feature showed a significant difference between benign and malignant lesions (p ≥ 0.053). However, for both readers, clear-cell RCC exhibited a significantly higher frequency of T2-hyperintensity, cystic/necrotic areas, and hypervascularity, and a significantly lower frequency of hemorrhage, T2-homogeneity, and enhancement homogeneity (p < 0.001–0.036). Hypervascularity was a significant independent predictor of clear-cell RCC for both readers (p = 0.002–0.007), as was T2-hyperintensity for reader 2 (p = 0.007). Conclusion: A substantial fraction of small renal masses were benign, and when malignant, largely exhibited indolent pathologic characteristics, particularly when measuring under 1 cm Although small benign and malignant masses could not be differentiated on MRI, hypervascularity showed a significant independent association with clear-cell RCC in comparison with other lesions.

  3. On the comparison between MRI and US imaging for human heel pad thickness measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoli, Sara; Corbin, Nadège Corbin; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    The human heel pad thickness, defined as the shortest distance between the calcaneus and heel skin, is one of the intrinsic factor which must be taken into account when investigating the biomechanics of the heel pad. US and MRI are the preferable imaging modalities used to measure the heel pad...... thickness as they are both ionizing-free radiations. The aim of this paper is to measure the bone to skin distance of nine heel pad phantoms from MRI and US images, and to compare the results with a true value (TV) in order to find the errors. Paired sample t-test was used to compare the measurements......1530 (P-value=0.402). Results confirm the necessity to investigate on the real speed of sound for the heel pad tissues, in order to have realistic measurements when dealing with human heel pads. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________...

  4. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Computed Tomography of Articular Cartilage: Association with Tissue Composition and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, T.S.; Jurvelin, J.S.; Aula, A.S.; Lammi, M.J.; Toeyraes, J. (Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Material and Methods: In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Results: Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R|>0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. Conclusion: The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a

  5. Intracranial artery velocity measurement using 4D PC MRI at 3 T: comparison with transcranial ultrasound techniques and 2D PC MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meckel, Stephan [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Leitner, Lorenz; Schubert, Tilman [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bonati, Leo H.; Lyrer, Philippe [University Hospital Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiological Physics, Institute of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Stalder, Aurelien F. [Xuanwu Hospital - Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago (United States); Wetzel, Stephan G. [Neuroradiology, Swiss Neuro Institute, Klinik Hirslanden, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    4D phase contrast MR imaging (4D PC MRI) has been introduced for spatiotemporal evaluation of intracranial hemodynamics in various cerebrovascular diseases. However, it still lacks validation with standards of reference. Our goal was to compare blood flow quantification derived from 4D PC MRI with transcranial ultrasound and 2D PC MRI. Velocity measurements within large intracranial arteries [internal carotid artery (ICA), basilar artery (BA), and middle cerebral artery (MCA)] were obtained in 20 young healthy volunteers with 4D and 2D PC MRI, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD), and transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCD). Maximum velocities at peak systole (PSV) and end diastole (EDV) were compared using regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. Correlation of 4D PC MRI measured velocities was higher in comparison with TCD (r = 0.49-0.66) than with TCCD (0.35-0.44) and 2D PC MRI (0.52-0.60). In mid-BA and ICA C7 segment, a significant correlation was found with TCD (0.68-0.81 and 0.65-0.71, respectively). No significant correlation was found in carotid siphon. On average over all volunteers, PSVs and EDVs in MCA were minimally underestimated compared with TCD/TCCD. Minimal overestimation of velocities was found compared to TCD in mid-BA and ICA C7 segment. 4D PC MRI appears as valid alternative for intracranial velocity measurement consistent with previous reference standards, foremost with TCD. Spatiotemporal averaging effects might contribute to vessel size-dependent mild underestimation of velocities in smaller (MCA), and overestimation in larger-sized (BA and ICA) arteries, respectively. Complete spatiotemporal flow analysis may be advantageous in anatomically complex regions (e.g. carotid siphon) relative to restrictions of ultrasound techniques. (orig.)

  6. Visual grading of 2D and 3D functional MRI compared with image-based descriptive measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnehed, Mattias [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences/Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Pihlsgaard, Johan; Lundberg, Peter [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiation Physics, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Wirell, Staffan [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Soekjer, Hannibal; Faegerstam, Patrik [Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Jiang, Bo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Smedby, Oerjan; Engstroem, Maria [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    A prerequisite for successful clinical use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the selection of an appropriate imaging sequence. The aim of this study was to compare 2D and 3D fMRI sequences using different image quality assessment methods. Descriptive image measures, such as activation volume and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR), were compared with results from visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the fMRI results. Significant differences in activation volume and TSNR were not directly reflected by differences in VGC scores. The results suggest that better performance on descriptive image measures is not always an indicator of improved diagnostic quality of the fMRI results. In addition to descriptive image measures, it is important to include measures of diagnostic quality when comparing different fMRI data acquisition methods. (orig.)

  7. MRI markers for mild cognitive impairment: comparisons between white matter integrity and gray matter volume measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the value of assessing white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for classification of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and prediction of cognitive impairments in comparison to brain atrophy measurements using structural MRI. Fifty-one patients with MCI and 66 cognitive normal controls (CN underwent DTI and T1-weighted structural MRI. DTI measures included fractional anisotropy (FA and radial diffusivity (DR from 20 predetermined regions-of-interest (ROIs in the commissural, limbic and association tracts, which are thought to be involved in Alzheimer's disease; measures of regional gray matter (GM volume included 21 ROIs in medial temporal lobe, parietal cortex, and subcortical regions. Significant group differences between MCI and CN were detected by each MRI modality: In particular, reduced FA was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and fornix; increased DR was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and bilateral uncinate fasciculi; reduced GM volume was found in bilateral hippocampi, left entorhinal cortex, right amygdala and bilateral thalamus; and thinner cortex was found in the left entorhinal cortex. Group classifications based on FA or DR was significant and better than classifications based on GM volume. Using either DR or FA together with GM volume improved classification accuracy. Furthermore, all three measures, FA, DR and GM volume were similarly accurate in predicting cognitive performance in MCI patients. Taken together, the results imply that DTI measures are as accurate as measures of GM volume in detecting brain alterations that are associated with cognitive impairment. Furthermore, a combination of DTI and structural MRI measurements improves classification accuracy.

  8. Mapping three-dimensional oil distribution with π-EPI MRI measurements at low magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Xiao, Dan; Romero-Zerón, Laura; Marica, Florea; MacMillan, Bryce; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a robust tool to image oil saturation distribution in rock cores during oil displacement processes. However, a lengthy measurement time for 3D measurements at low magnetic field can hinder monitoring the displacement. 1D and 2D MRI measurements are instead often undertaken to monitor the oil displacement since they are faster. However, 1D and 2D images may not completely reflect the oil distribution in heterogeneous rock cores. In this work, a high-speed 3D MRI technique, π Echo Planar Imaging (π-EPI), was employed at 0.2 T to monitor oil displacement. Centric scan interleaved sampling with view sharing in k-t space was employed to improve the temporal resolution of the π-EPI measurements. A D2O brine was employed to distinguish the hydrocarbon and water phases. A relatively homogenous glass bead pack and a heterogeneous Spynie core plug were employed to show different oil displacement behaviors. High quality 3D images were acquired with π-EPI MRI measurements. Fluid quantification with π-EPI compared favorably with FID, CPMG, 1D-DHK-SPRITE, 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) and 3D Conical SPRITE measurements. π-EPI greatly reduced the gradient duty cycle and improved sensitivity, compared to FSE and Conical SPRITE measurements, enabling dynamic monitoring of oil displacement processes. For core plug samples with sufficiently long lived T2, T2∗, π-EPI is an ideal method for rapid 3D saturation imaging.

  9. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kännälä, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Alanko, Tommi; Jokela, Kari

    2009-04-07

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s(-1) for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s(-1) for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s(-1)) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  10. In vivo MRI volumetric measurement of prostate regression and growth in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalcioglu Orhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse models for treatment of late-stage prostate cancer are valuable tools, but assessing the extent of growth of the prostate and particularly its regression due to therapeutic intervention or castration is difficult due to the location, small size and interdigitated anatomy of the prostate gland in situ. Temporal monitoring of mouse prostate regression requires multiple animals and examination of histological sections. Methods Initially, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed on normal year-old C57/BL6 mice. Individual mice were repeatedly imaged using inhalation anesthesia to establish the reproducibility of the method and to follow hormone manipulation of the prostate volume. Subsequently, MRI fat signal was suppressed using a chemical shift-selective (CHESS pulse to avoid signal contamination and enhance discrimination of the prostate. Results High field (7T MRI provides high resolution (117 × 117 μm in plane, highly reproducible images of the normal mouse prostate. Despite long imaging times, animals can be imaged repeatedly to establish reliability of volume measurements. Prostate volume declines following castration and subsequently returns to normal with androgen administration in the same animal. CHESS imaging allowed discrimination of both the margins of the prostate and the dorsal-lateral lobes of the prostate (DLP from the ventral lobes (VP. Castration results in a 40% reduction in the volume of the DLP and a 75% reduction in the volume of the VP. Conclusion MRI assessment of the volume of the mouse prostate is precise and reproducible. MRI improves volumetric determination of the extent of regression and monitoring of the same mouse over time during the course of treatment is possible. Since assessing groups of animals at each time point is avoided, this improves the accuracy of the measurement of any manipulation effect and reduces the number of animals required.

  11. Automated measurement of the human corpus callosum using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Herron

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum includes the majority of fibers that connect the two cortical hemispheres. Studies of cross-sectional callosal morphometry and area have revealed developmental, gender, and hemispheric differences in healthy populations and callosal deficits associated with neurodegenerative disease and brain injury. However, accurate quantification of the callosum using magnetic resonance imaging is complicated by intersubject variability in callosal size, shape, and location and often requires manual outlining of the callosum in order to achieve adequate performance. Here we describe an objective, fully automated protocol that utilizes voxel-based image to quantify the area and thickness both of the entire callosum and of different callosal compartments. We verify the method’s accuracy, reliability, robustness and multisite consistency and make comparisons with manual measurements using public brain-image databases. An analysis of age-related changes in the callosum showed increases in length and reductions in thickness and area with age. A comparison of older subjects with and without mild dementia revealed that reductions in anterior callosal area independently predicted poorer cognitive performance after factoring out Mini-Mental Status Examination scores and normalized whole brain volume. Open-source software implementing the algorithm is available at www.nitrc.org/projects/c8c8.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction fraction using MRI in patients with MELAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the cerebral OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS by using MRI. METHODS: We recruited 32 patients with MELAS confirmed by gene analysis. Conventional MRI scanning, as well as functional MRI including arterial spin labeling and oxygen extraction fraction imaging, was undertaken to obtain the pathological and metabolic information of the brains at different stages of stroke-like episodes in patients. A total of 16 MRI examinations at the acute and subacute phase and 19 examinations at the interictal phase were performed. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited for control subjects. Six regions of interest were placed in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the bilateral hemispheres to measure the OEF of the brain or the lesions. RESULTS: OEF was reduced significantly in brains of patients at both the acute and subacute phase (0.266 ± 0.026 and at the interictal phase (0.295 ± 0.009, compared with normal controls (0.316 ± 0.025. In the brains at the acute and subacute phase of the episode, 13 ROIs were prescribed on the stroke-like lesions, which showed decreased OEF compared with the contralateral spared brain regions. Increased blood flow was revealed in the stroke-like lesions at the acute and subacute phase, which was confined to the lesions. CONCLUSION: MRI can quantitatively show changes in OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes. The utilization of oxygen in the brain seems to be reduced more severely after the onset of episodes in MELAS, especially for those brain tissues involved in the episodes.

  14. Relationship between diffusion parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion MRI and perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Simona; Stefanetti, Linda; Sperati, Francesca; Anelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the link between diffusion parameters measured by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the perfusion metrics obtained with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Twenty-eight patients affected by histopathologically confirmed STT were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent both DCE MRI and IVIM DWI. The perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D and perfusion-related diffusion coefficient D* were estimated using a bi-exponential function to fit the DWI data. DCE MRI was acquired with a temporal resolution of 3-5 s. Maps of the initial area under the gadolinium concentration curve (IAUGC), time to peak (TTP) and maximum slope of increase (MSI) were derived using commercial software. The relationships between the DCE MRI and IVIM DWI measurements were assessed by Spearman's test. To exclude false positive results under multiple testing, the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure was applied. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the differences between all variables in patients with non-myxoid and myxoid STT. No significant relationship was found between IVIM parameters and any DCE MRI parameters. Higher f and D*f values were found in non-myxoid tumors compared with myxoid tumors (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). MSI was significantly higher in non-myxoid tumors than in myxoid tumors (p = 0.029). From the visual assessments of single clinical cases, both f and D*f maps were in satisfactory agreement with DCE maps in the extreme cases of an avascular mass and a highly vascularized mass, whereas, for tumors with slight vascularity or with a highly heterogeneous perfusion pattern, this association was not straightforward. Although IVIM DWI was demonstrated to be feasible in STT, our data did not support evident relationships between perfusion-related IVIM parameters and perfusion measured by DCE MRI.

  15. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neuroradiology; Reitz, Matthias; Schmidt, Nils O. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neurosurgery; Bolar, Divya S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States). Radiology; Adalsteinsson, Elfar [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2015-05-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml.kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s {sup and} -1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s {sup and} -1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s {sup and} 1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml.min {sup and} -1.100g {sup and} -1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood

  16. Cine-MRI versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure in vivo left ventricular function in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Daniel J; Carr, Carolyn A; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran

    2008-08-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography is the most commonly used non-invasive method for measuring in vivo cardiac function in experimental animals. In humans, measurements of cardiac function made using cine-MRI compare favourably with those made using echocardiography. However, no rigorous comparison has been made in small animals. Here, standard short-axis two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2D-echo) and cine-MRI measurements were made in the same rats, both control and after chronic myocardial infarction. Correlations between the two techniques were found for end diastolic area, stroke area and ejection fraction, but cine-MRI measurements of ejection fraction were 12+/-6% higher than those made using 2D-echo, because of the 1.8-fold higher temporal resolution of the MRI technique (4.6 ms vs 8.3 ms). Repeated measurements on the same group of rats over several days showed that the cine-MRI technique was more reproducible than 2D-echo, in that 2D-echo would require five times more animals to find a statistically significant difference. In summary, caution should be exercised when comparing functional results acquired using short-axis 2D-echo vs cine-MRI. The accuracy of cine-MRI allows identification of alterations in heart function that may be missed when using 2D-echo.

  17. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis mediates loss of intrinsic activity measured by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Matthew R; Day, Gregory S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Ances, Beau M

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous brain activity is required for the development and maintenance of normal brain function. Many disease processes disrupt the organization of intrinsic brain activity, but few pervasively reduce the amplitude of resting state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI fluctuations. We report the case of a female with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, longitudinally studied during the course of her illness to determine the contribution of NMDAR signaling to spontaneous brain activity. Resting state BOLD fMRI was measured at the height of her illness and 18 weeks following discharge from hospital. Conventional resting state networks were defined using established methods. Correlation and covariance matrices were calculated by extracting the BOLD time series from regions of interest and calculating either the correlation or covariance quantity. The intrinsic activity was compared between visits, and to expected activity from 45 similarly aged healthy individuals. Near the height of the illness, the patient exhibited profound loss of consciousness, high-amplitude slowing of the electroencephalogram, and a severe reduction in the amplitude of spontaneous BOLD fMRI fluctuations. The patient's neurological status and measures of intrinsic activity improved following treatment. We conclude that NMDAR-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the mechanisms that give rise to organized spontaneous brain activity. Loss of intrinsic activity is associated with profound disruptions of consciousness and cognition.

  18. Ischiofemoral space on MRI in an asymptomatic population: Normative width measurements and soft tissue signal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maras Oezdemir, Zeynep; Goermeli, Cemile Ayse; Sagir Kahraman, Ayseguel [Inoenue University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Aydingoez, Uestuen [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-08-15

    To make normative width measurements of the ischiofemoral (IF) space in an asymptomatic population and to record soft tissue MRI signal variations within the IF space in order to determine whether such variations are associated with IF space dimensions. Normative width measurements of the IF space were prospectively made in 418 hips on 1.5 T MR images of 209 asymptomatic volunteers. Quantitative and qualitative assessments of the IF soft tissues including the quadratus femoris (QF) muscle were also made. The mean IF space width was 2.56 ± 0.75 cm (right, 2.60 ± 0.75 cm; left, 2.53 ± 0.75 cm). Soft tissue MRI signal abnormalities were present within the IF space in 19 (9.1 %) of 209 volunteers. Soft tissue abnormalities within the IF space included oedema (3/209, 1.4 %) of the QF and/or surrounding soft tissue, and only fatty infiltration (16/209, 7.7 %) of the QF. Bilateral IF spaces are asymmetrical in asymptomatic persons. There is ≥10 % of width difference between right and left IF spaces in approximately half of asymptomatic individuals. Fatty infiltration and oedema can be present at the IF space in a small portion of the asymptomatic population, who also have narrower IF spaces than those without soft tissue MRI signal abnormalities. (orig.)

  19. The usefulness of 3D quantitative analysis with using MRI for measuring osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youn Soo [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of MRI 3D quantitative analysis for measuring osteonecrosis of the femoral head in comparison with MRI 2D quantitative analysis and quantitative analysis of the specimen. For 3 months at our hospital, 14 femoral head specimens with osteonecrosis were obtained after total hip arthroplasty. The patients preoperative MRIs were retrospectively reviewed for quantitative analysis of the size of the necrosis. Each necrotic fraction of the femoral head was measured by 2D quantitative analysis with using mid-coronal and mid-sagittal MRIs, and by 3D quantitative analysis with using serial continuous coronal MRIs and 3D reconstruction software. The necrotic fraction of the specimen was physically measured by the fluid displacement method. The necrotic fraction according to MRI 2D or 3D quantitative analysis was compared with that of the specimen by using Spearman's correlation test. On the correlative analysis, the necrotic fraction by MRI 2D quantitative analysis and quantitative analysis of the specimen showed moderate correlation (r = 0.657); on the other hand, the necrotic fraction by MRI 3D quantitative analysis and quantitative analysis of the specimen demonstrated a strong correlation (r = 0.952) ({rho} < 0.05). MRI 3D quantitative analysis was more accurate than 2D quantitative analysis using MRI for measuring osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Therefore, it may be useful for predicting the clinical outcome and deciding the proper treatment option.

  20. On the characterization of single-event related brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Khoram, Nafiseh

    2014-08-01

    We propose an efficient numerical technique for calibrating the mathematical model that describes the singleevent related brain response when fMRI measurements are given. This method employs a regularized Newton technique in conjunction with a Kalman filtering procedure. We have applied this method to estimate the biophysiological parameters of the Balloon model that describes the hemodynamic brain responses. Illustrative results obtained with both synthetic and real fMRI measurements are presented. © 2014 IEEE.

  1. Multimodal classification of schizophrenia patients with MEG and fMRI data using static and dynamic connectivity measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sinan Cetin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mental disorders like schizophrenia are currently diagnosed by physicians/psychiatrists through clinical assessment and their evaluation of patient’s self-reported experiences as the illness emerges. There is great interest in identifying biological markers of prognosis at the onset of illness, rather than relying on the evolution of symptoms across time. Functional network connectivity, which indicates a subject's overall level of 'synchronicity' of activity between brain regions, demonstrates promise in providing individual subject predictive power. Many previous studies reported functional connectivity changes during resting-state using only functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Nevertheless, exclusive reliance on fMRI to generate such networks may limit the inference of the underlying dysfunctional connectivity, which is hypothesized to be a factor in patient symptoms, as fMRI measures connectivity via hemodynamics. Therefore, combination of connectivity assessments using fMRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG, which more directly measures neuronal activity, may provide improved classification of schizophrenia than either modality alone. Moreover, recent evidence indicates that metrics of dynamic connectivity may also be critical for understanding pathology in schizophrenia. In this work, we propose a new framework for extraction of important disease related features and classification of patients with schizophrenia based on using both fMRI and MEG to investigate functional network components in the resting state. Results of this study show that the integration of fMRI and MEG provides important information that captures fundamental characteristics of functional network connectivity in schizophrenia and is helpful for prediction of schizophrenia patient group membership. Combined fMRI/MEG methods, using static functional network connectivity analyses, improved classification accuracy relative to use of fMRI or MEG methods alone (by 15

  2. Measuring the mutual effects between a CZT detector and MRI for the development of a simultaneous MBI/MRI insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ashley [McMaster University (Canada); Farncombe, Troy [Hamilton Health Sciences (Canada); Noseworthy, Michael [McMaster University (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening, it suffers from poor sensitivity in women with dense breast tissue. Both breast MRI and molecular breast imaging (MBI) have been used as secondary imaging techniques. However, breast MRI suffers from low specificity and low sensitivity in MBI. A CZT based detector system has been developed with the goal of simultaneous MBI/MRI imaging to address the shortcomings of each modality. The performance of each modality needs to be addressed separately and together. The CZT system is comprised of four Redlen CZT modules tiled in a 2x2 array. Each module consists of 256 pixels and feature a builtin on-board ASIC and FPGA. A custom digital readout circuit board was designed to interface the four modules with a microcontroller to a PC. MR images were acquired with a 3T GE Discovery MR750 and Hologic breast coils. A gradient echo imaging sequence was used for all image acquisitions. A tissue mimicking phantom with a plastic grid insert (1 cm spacing) was used to evaluate geometric accuracy with the CZT detectors in the MRI bore. The average distance between the grid markers was 1Å 0.2cm indicating negligible geometric distortion. Field maps were generated with a uniform phantom to quantify the effect on magnetic field homogeneity. Early results indicate a significant distortion (~10ppm) in the magnetic field closest to the coil. Further analysis of the MR images will determine the extent of image quality degradation. A flood map of Tc-99m was acquired to evaluate and implement an energy correction map and a uniformity map. In the absence of a magnetic field, the mean energy resolution at 140keV was 6.3%. After fully characterizing the uniformity, geometric accuracy and sensitivity, the same metrics will be evaluated in the MRI bore.

  3. Gas-liquid Phase Distribution and Void Fraction Measurements Using the MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daidzic, N. E.; Schmidt, E.; Hasan, M. M.; Altobelli, S.

    2004-01-01

    We used a permanent-magnet MRI system to estimate the integral and spatially- and/or temporally-resolved void-fraction distributions and flow patterns in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Air was introduced at the bottom of the stagnant liquid column using an accurate and programmable syringe pump. Air flow rates were varied between 1 and 200 ml/min. The cylindrical non-conducting test tube in which two-phase flow was measured was placed in a 2.67 kGauss MRI with MRT spectrometer/imager. Roughly linear relationship has been obtained for the integral void-fraction, obtained by volume-averaging of the spatially-resolved signals, and the air flow rate in upward direction. The time-averaged spatially-resolved void fraction has also been obtained for the quasi-steady flow of air in a stagnant liquid column. No great accuracy is claimed as this was an exploratory proof-of-concept type of experiment. Preliminary results show that MRI a non-invasive and non-intrusive experimental technique can indeed provide a wealth of different qualitative and quantitative data and is especially well suited for averaged transport processes in adiabatic and diabatic multi-phase and/or multi-component flows.

  4. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  5. Cerebral blood flow measurement using fMRI and PET: a cross-validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J; Wieckowska, Marguerite; Meyer, Ernst; Pike, G Bruce

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the study of brain hemodynamics, and MR arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging has gained wide acceptance as a robust and noninvasive technique. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements obtained with ASL fMRI have not been fully validated, particularly during global CBF modulations. We present a comparison of cerebral blood flow changes (DeltaCBF) measured using a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion method to those obtained using H(2) (15)O PET, which is the current gold standard for in vivo imaging of CBF. To study regional and global CBF changes, a group of 10 healthy volunteers were imaged under identical experimental conditions during presentation of 5 levels of visual stimulation and one level of hypercapnia. The CBF changes were compared using 3 types of region-of-interest (ROI) masks. FAIR measurements of CBF changes were found to be slightly lower than those measured with PET (average DeltaCBF of 21.5 +/- 8.2% for FAIR versus 28.2 +/- 12.8% for PET at maximum stimulation intensity). Nonetheless, there was a strong correlation between measurements of the two modalities. Finally, a t-test comparison of the slopes of the linear fits of PET versus ASL DeltaCBF for all 3 ROI types indicated no significant difference from unity (P > .05).

  6. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Using fMRI and PET: A Cross-Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean J. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the study of brain hemodynamics, and MR arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion imaging has gained wide acceptance as a robust and noninvasive technique. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF measurements obtained with ASL fMRI have not been fully validated, particularly during global CBF modulations. We present a comparison of cerebral blood flow changes (ΔCBF measured using a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR ASL perfusion method to those obtained using H2O15 PET, which is the current gold standard for in vivo imaging of CBF. To study regional and global CBF changes, a group of 10 healthy volunteers were imaged under identical experimental conditions during presentation of 5 levels of visual stimulation and one level of hypercapnia. The CBF changes were compared using 3 types of region-of-interest (ROI masks. FAIR measurements of CBF changes were found to be slightly lower than those measured with PET (average ΔCBF of 21.5±8.2% for FAIR versus 28.2±12.8% for PET at maximum stimulation intensity. Nonetheless, there was a strong correlation between measurements of the two modalities. Finally, a t-test comparison of the slopes of the linear fits of PET versus ASL ΔCBF for all 3 ROI types indicated no significant difference from unity (P>.05.

  7. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Ding

    Full Text Available Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8 or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (n = 8 via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05 decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI.

  8. Error analysis of cine phase contrast MRI velocity measurements used for strain calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisabeth R; Morrow, Duane A; Felmlee, Joel P; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-02

    Cine Phase Contrast (CPC) MRI offers unique insight into localized skeletal muscle behavior by providing the ability to quantify muscle strain distribution during cyclic motion. Muscle strain is obtained by temporally integrating and spatially differentiating CPC-encoded velocity. The aim of this study was to quantify CPC measurement accuracy and precision and to describe error propagation into displacement and strain. Using an MRI-compatible jig to move a B-gel phantom within a 1.5 T MRI bore, CPC-encoded velocities were collected. The three orthogonal encoding gradients (through plane, frequency, and phase) were evaluated independently in post-processing. Two systematic error types were corrected: eddy current-induced bias and calibration-type error. Measurement accuracy and precision were quantified before and after removal of systematic error. Through plane- and frequency-encoded data accuracy were within 0.4 mm/s after removal of systematic error - a 70% improvement over the raw data. Corrected phase-encoded data accuracy was within 1.3 mm/s. Measured random error was between 1 to 1.4 mm/s, which followed the theoretical prediction. Propagation of random measurement error into displacement and strain was found to depend on the number of tracked time segments, time segment duration, mesh size, and dimensional order. To verify this, theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally calculated displacement and strain error. For the parameters tested, experimental and theoretical results aligned well. Random strain error approximately halved with a two-fold mesh size increase, as predicted. Displacement and strain accuracy were within 2.6 mm and 3.3%, respectively. These results can be used to predict the accuracy and precision of displacement and strain in user-specific applications.

  9. Reference values of MRI measurements of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwal, Kriti; Bedoya, Maria A.; Patel, Neal; Darge, Kassa; Anupindi, Sudha A. [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rambhatla, Siri J. [Beth Israel Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Newark, NJ (United States); Sreedharan, Ram R. [University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging/cholangiopancreatography (MRI/MRCP) is now an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of biliary and pancreatic pathology in children, but there are no data depicting the normal diameters of the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct. Recognition of abnormal duct size is important and the increasing use of MRCP necessitates normal MRI measurements. To present normal MRI measurements for the common bile duct and pancreatic duct in children. In this retrospective study we searched all children ages birth to 10 years in our MR urography (MRU) database from 2006 until 2013. We excluded children with a history of hepatobiliary or pancreatic surgery. We stratified 204 children into five age groups and retrospectively measured the CBD and the pancreatic duct on 2-D axial and 3-D coronal T2-weighted sequences. We performed statistical analysis, using logistic and linear regressions to detect the age association of the visibility and size of the duct measurements. We used non-parametric tests to detect gender and imaging plane differences. Our study included 204 children, 106 (52%) boys and 98 (48%) girls, with a median age of 33 months (range 0-119 months). The children were distributed into five age groups. The common bile duct was visible in all children in all age groups. The pancreatic duct was significantly less visible in the youngest children, group 1 (54/67, 80.5%; P = 0.003) than in the oldest children, group 5 (22/22, 100%). In group 2 the pancreatic duct was seen in 19/21 (90.4%), in group 3 52/55 (94.5%), and in group 4 39/39 (100%). All duct measurements increased with age (P < 0.001; r-value > 0.423), and the incremental differences between ages were significant. The measurement variations between the axial and coronal planes were statistically significant (P < 0.001); however these differences were fractions of millimeters. For example, in group 1 the mean coronal measurement of the CBD was 2.1 mm and the axial

  10. Volume measurement by using super-resolution MRI: application to prostate volumetry

    CERN Document Server

    Oubel, Estanislao; Iannessi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy and precision of measurements are important for patient follow up in oncology but, unfortunately, partial volume effects introduce an undesired variability between observers. Super resolution techniques (SR) combine multiple acquisitions of an object into a single image richer in details. Herein, the use of SR for reducing variability is investigated in the specific context of prostate measurements. Prostate is typically imaged by T2-weighted MRI in three perpendicular low resolution images, each of them presenting partial volume effects in the direction of the slice selection gradient. SR techniques allow to combine these images into an image presenting the same level of details in all directions. This is expected to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of volume measurements, which in turn improves other derived measurements like PSA density.

  11. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdu, Angela, E-mail: angela.hajdu@net.sote.hu [Laboratory of Nanochemistry, Department of Biophysics and Radiation Biology, Semmelweis University, Nagyvarad Sq 4, H-1089 Budapest (Hungary); Tombacz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, Aradi Vt. Sq 1, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Banyai, Istvan, E-mail: banyai.istvan@science.unideb.hu [Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary); Babos, Magor, E-mail: babosmagor@yahoo.com [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged Ltd., Semmelweis St 6, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Palko, Andras, E-mail: palko@radio.szote.u-szeged.hu [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-09-15

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were done at different field strengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show characteristic differences between the tested carboxylated MFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer r1 and r2 relaxivities depend on the thickness of the protecting layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MFs have high r2/r1 ratios at each magnetic field.

  12. Tissue temperature distribution measurement by MRI and laser immunology for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In cancer treatment and immune response enhancement research, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an ideal method for non-invasive, three-dimensional temperature measurement. We used a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager for ex vivo tissues and small animal to determine temperature distribution of target tissue during laser irradiation. The feasibility of imaging is approved with high spatial resolution and high signal-noise- ratio. Tissue-simulating gel phantom gel, biological tissues, and tumor-bearing animals were used in the experiments for laser treatment and MR imaging. Thermal couple measurement of temperature in target samples was used for system calibration. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the samples with a laser power in the range of 1 to 2.5 watts. Using the MRI system and a specially developed processing algorithm, a clear temperature distribution matrix in the target tissue and surrounding tissue was obtained. The temperature profiles show that the selective laser photothermal effect could result in tissue temperature elevation in a range of 10 to 45 °C. The temperature resolution of the measurement was about 0.37°C including the total system error. The spatial resolution was 0.4 mm (128x128 pixels with field of view of 5.5x5.5 cm). The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to achieve optimal thermal effects in cancer treatment.

  13. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  14. Right-sided cardiac function in healthy volunteers measured by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and gated blood-pool SPECT: comparison with cine MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Hesse, Birger

    2005-01-01

    and breath-hold cine MRI performed according to standard protocols. RESULTS: Normal ranges for RV ejection fraction (RVEF) defined as mean +/- 2SD were 0.49-0.72, 0.44-0.66 and 0.40-0.69 when measured by MRI, FP and GBPS respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference (bias) between MRI and FP...

  15. Validation of Continuously Tagged MRI for the Measurement of Dynamic 3D Skeletal Muscle Tissue Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    A SPAMM tagged MRI methodology is presented allowing continuous (3.3-3.6 Hz) sampling of 3D dynamic soft tissue deformation using non-segmented 3D acquisitions. The 3D deformation is reconstructed by the combination of 3 mutually orthogonal tagging directions, thus requiring only 3 repeated motion cycles. In addition a fully automatic post-processing framework is presented employing Gabor scale-space and filter-bank analysis for tag extrema segmentation and triangulated surface fitting aided by Gabor filter bank derived surface normals. Deformation is derived following tracking of tag surface triplet triangle intersections. The dynamic deformation measurements were validated using indentation tests (~20 mm deep at 12 mm/s) on a silicone gel soft tissue phantom containing contrasting markers which provide a reference measure of deformation. In addition, the techniques were evaluated in-vivo for dynamic skeletal muscle tissue deformation measurement during indentation of the biceps region of the upper arm in a ...

  16. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  17. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillaney, Prasheel, E-mail: Prasheel.Lillaney@ucsf.edu; Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheterin vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangential to the catheter tip. The second, referred to the base to tip method, is an approximation that is used when it is not possible to measure the angle of the tangent line. Optical images of the catheter deflection are analyzed using the absolute tip method to quantitatively validate the predicted deflections from the mathematical model. Optical images of the catheter deflection are also analyzed using the base to tip method to quantitatively determine the differences between the absolute tip and base to tip methods. Finally, the optical images are compared to MR images using the base to tip method to determine the accuracy of measuring the catheter deflection using MR. Results: The optical catheter deflection angles measured for both catheter prototypes using the absolute tip method fit very well to the mathematical model (R{sup 2} = 0.91 and 0.86 for each prototype, respectively). It was found that the angles measured using the base to tip method were consistently smaller than those measured using the absolute tip method. The deflection angles measured

  18. MRI measurement on intercondylar notch after anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xiao; Wang, Yu Hao; Wang, Jian; Hong, Shi Dong; Xin, Feng; Wang, Lin; Yang, Xiao Wei; Wang, Jing Rong; Wang, Li Ming; Wei, B O; Wang, Qing; Cui, Wei Ding; Fu, Xing Li

    2016-04-01

    The knee joint is extremely susceptible to injury, which is usually identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, MRI was applied to quantitatively detect the association between anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and anatomic morphologic changes of the intercondylar notch. Forty patients with unilateral ACL rupture who were treated between July, 2013 and October, 2014 were enrolled in the present study. The patients were divided into the observation (affected side) and control (healthy side) groups. MRI measurements were undertaken based on parameters associated with intercondylar notch of double knee joints. The results showed that intercondylar notch width (ICW) in the observation group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, and differences were statistically significant (Pnotch height and femoral condyle width [epicondylar width (EW)] between the two groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Notch width index (NWI) and notch shape index (NSI) in the observation group were significantly less than those in the control group and differences were statistically significant (P0.05). The differential value of ICW in the observation group was 2.6±1.3 mm and the ACL rupture time of the affected knee was 20.4±1.3 months on average. The correlation was statistically significant (Pnotch stenosis degree on the affected knee was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In conclusion, after ACL rupture, ICW on the affected knee had significant stenosis, NSI and NWI were significantly reduced and the stenosis degree was aggravated with the prolongation of course. By contrast, Lysholm and Tegner scoring of patients with different degrees of stenosis had no correlation.

  19. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, B; Chen, Q [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  20. Classification of normal and pathological aging processes based on brain MRI morphology measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gonzalez, J. L.; Yanez-Suarez, O.; Medina-Bañuelos, V.

    2014-03-01

    Reported studies describing normal and abnormal aging based on anatomical MRI analysis do not consider morphological brain changes, but only volumetric measures to distinguish among these processes. This work presents a classification scheme, based both on size and shape features extracted from brain volumes, to determine different aging stages: healthy control (HC) adults, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three support vector machines were optimized and validated for the pair-wise separation of these three classes, using selected features from a set of 3D discrete compactness measures and normalized volumes of several global and local anatomical structures. Our analysis show classification rates of up to 98.3% between HC and AD; of 85% between HC and MCI and of 93.3% for MCI and AD separation. These results outperform those reported in the literature and demonstrate the viability of the proposed morphological indexes to classify different aging stages.

  1. Comparison of lumbar spinal canal measurements on MRI and CT; Comparaison des mesures du canal lombaire en IRM et TDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malghem, J.; Willems, X.; Vande Berg, B.; Cosnard, G.; Lecouvet, F. [Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Dept. d' Imagerie Medicale, Bruxelles (Belgium); Robert, A. [Ecole de Sante Publique, Faculte de Medecine, Unite d' Epidemiologie, Biostatistique et Methodes Operationnelles en Sante, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    Purpose. To compare AP diameter measurements of spinal canal and thecal sac on MM and CT. Materials and methods. The AP diameter of the spinal canal at L4 and thecal sac at L4-5 were measured on both MRI and CT performed on patients at less than one month interval. Measurements were obtained from axial CT images of the abdomen on CT and sagittal T1W (n=98 ) and T2W (n=78) MR images of the spine. The examinations were reviewed at more than 24 hours interval. Radiologists were blinded. Inter-observer agreement evaluation was performed prior to this study. Measurements were compared using a t test for paired variables. Results. For the spinal canal, mean measurements were 0.4 {+-} 1.5 mm inferior on CT compared to MRI. For the thecal sac, mean measurements were 0.1 {+-} 1.4 mm inferior on CT compared to MRI. Conclusion. Measurements on CT and MRI for lumbar spinal canal and thecal sac are fairly comparable, with mean measurement differences inferior to the degree of precision of the measurement technique itself. (authors)

  2. Noninvasive measurement of liver iron concentration at MRI in children with acute leukemia: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vag, Tibor; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Lopatta, Eric; Stenzel, Martin; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Beck, James [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Pediatrics, Jena (Germany); Renz, Diane M. [Charite University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Campus Virchow Clinic, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Routine assessment of body iron load in patients with acute leukemia is usually done by serum ferritin (SF) assay; however, its sensitivity is impaired by different conditions including inflammation and malignancy. To estimate, using MRI, the extent of liver iron overload in children with acute leukemia and receiving blood transfusions, and to examine the association between the degree of hepatic iron overload and clinical parameters including SF and the transfusion iron load (TIL). A total of 25 MRI measurements of the liver were performed in 15 children with acute leukemia (mean age 9.75 years) using gradient-echo sequences. Signal intensity ratios between the liver and the vertebral muscle (L/M ratio) were calculated and compared with SF-levels. TIL was estimated from the cumulative blood volume received, assuming an amount of 200 mg iron per transfused red blood cell unit. Statistical analysis revealed good correlation between the L/M SI ratio and TIL (r = -0.67, P = 0.002, 95% confidence interval CI = -0.83 to -0.34) in patients with acute leukemia as well as between L/M SI ratio and SF (r = -0.76, P = 0.0003, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.52). SF may reliably reflect liver iron stores as a routine marker in patients suffering from acute leukemia. (orig.)

  3. Correlation of auditory brain stem response and the MRI measurements in neuro-degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hidekazu (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate correlations of several MRI measurements of the cranium and brain, functioning as a volume conductor, to the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in neuro-degenerative disorders. The subjects included forty-seven patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and sixteen of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between I-V and III-V interpeak latencies (IPLs) and the area of cranium and brain in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between I-III and III-V IPLs and the area in the longitudinal section of those with ALS. And, also there were statistically significant correlations between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of brain stem as well as that of the cranium in the longitudinal section of SCD patients, and between the amplitude of the V wave and the area of the cerebrum in the longitudinal section of ALS. In conclusion, in the ABR, the IPLs were prolonged and the amplitude of the V wave was decreased while the MRI size of the cranium and brain increased. When the ABR is applied to neuro-degenerative disorders, it might be important to consider not only the conduction of the auditory tracts in the brain stem, but also the correlations of the size of the cranium and brain which act as a volume conductor. (author).

  4. Utilizing MRI to measure the transcytolemmal water exchange rate for the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, James D.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the exchange of water between the intra- and extracellular compartments of the brain is important both for understanding basic physiology and for the interpretation of numerous MRI results. However, due to experimental difficulties, this basic property has proven difficult to measure in vivo. In our experiments, we will track overall changes in the relaxation rate constant of water in the rat brain following the administration of gadoteridol, a relaxation agent, to the extracellular compartment. From these changes, we will utilize probability theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to infer the compartment specific water exchange and relaxation rate constants. Due to the correlated nature of these parameters and our inability to independently observe them, intelligent model selection is critical. Through analysis of simulated data sets, we refine our choice of model and method of data collection to optimize applicability to the in vivo situation.

  5. Ultrasound and MRI measurements of joint cartilage in healthy children. A validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spannow, A H; Stenboeg, E; Jensen, Mogens Pfeiffer;

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), proliferative changes in the synovium and synovial fluid accumulation are pathological findings responsible for damage to the cartilaginous tissue and periarticular bone, which are late radiographic findings in conventional radiography. Early...... detection of these joint changes would allow the clinicians to initiate relevant therapies as is essential for the long-term outcome of JIA. Ultrasonography (US) has shown great potential for this purpose but validation in a pediatric setting is needed. The objective of this study was to validate US.......5 millimeters. The coefficient of variation (CV) was found to be good (16 %) except for in the case of the wrist joint (20 %). Conclusion: We found a good level of agreement and no significant systematic joint size-related differences in cartilage thickness measurements between MRI and US. US appears...

  6. Accuracy and variability of tumor burden measurement on multi-parametric MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarian, Mehrnoush; Gibson, Eli; Shahedi, Maysam; Gaed, Mena; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Romagnoli, Cesare; Cool, Derek W.; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Chin, Joseph L.; Pautler, Stephen; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of prostate tumour volume can inform prognosis and treatment selection, including an assessment of the suitability and feasibility of focal therapy, which can potentially spare patients the deleterious side effects of radical treatment. Prostate biopsy is the clinical standard for diagnosis but provides limited information regarding tumour volume due to sparse tissue sampling. A non-invasive means for accurate determination of tumour burden could be of clinical value and an important step toward reduction of overtreatment. Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) is showing promise for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, the accuracy and inter-observer variability of prostate tumour volume estimation based on separate expert contouring of T2-weighted (T2W), dynamic contrastenhanced (DCE), and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences acquired using an endorectal coil at 3T is currently unknown. We investigated this question using a histologic reference standard based on a highly accurate MPMRIhistology image registration and a smooth interpolation of planimetric tumour measurements on histology. Our results showed that prostate tumour volumes estimated based on MPMRI consistently overestimated histological reference tumour volumes. The variability of tumour volume estimates across the different pulse sequences exceeded interobserver variability within any sequence. Tumour volume estimates on DCE MRI provided the lowest inter-observer variability and the highest correlation with histology tumour volumes, whereas the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provided the lowest volume estimation error. If validated on a larger data set, the observed correlations could support the development of automated prostate tumour volume segmentation algorithms as well as correction schemes for tumour burden estimation on MPMRI.

  7. Comparison of ASL and DCE MRI for the non-invasive measurement of renal blood flow: quantification and reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutajar, Marica; Hales, Patrick W.; Clark, Christopher A.; Gordon, Isky [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, David L. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Banks, T. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    To investigate the reproducibility of arterial spin labelling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitatively compare these techniques for the measurement of renal blood flow (RBF). Sixteen healthy volunteers were examined on two different occasions. ASL was performed using a multi-TI FAIR labelling scheme with a segmented 3D-GRASE imaging module. DCE MRI was performed using a 3D-FLASH pulse sequence. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess repeatability of each technique, and determine the degree of correspondence between the two methods. The overall mean cortical renal blood flow (RBF) of the ASL group was 263 ± 41 ml min{sup -1} [100 ml tissue]{sup -1}, and using DCE MRI was 287 ± 70 ml min{sup -1} [100 ml tissue]{sup -1}. The group coefficient of variation (CV{sub g}) was 18 % for ASL and 28 % for DCE-MRI. Repeatability studies showed that ASL was more reproducible than DCE with CV{sub g}s of 16 % and 25 % for ASL and DCE respectively. Bland-Altman analysis comparing the two techniques showed a good agreement. The repeated measures analysis shows that the ASL technique has better reproducibility than DCE-MRI. Difference analysis shows no significant difference between the RBF values of the two techniques. (orig.)

  8. Quantification of MRI measured myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy humans: a comparison with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate a noninvasive quantitative MRI technique, the K(i) perfusion method, for myocardial perfusion in humans using (13)N-ammonia PET as a reference method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten healthy males (64 +/- 8 years) were examined with combined PET and MRI perfusion imaging at rest...... and during stress induced by dipyridamole in order to determine the myocardial perfusion reserve. Myocardial and blood time concentration curves obtained by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and (13)N-ammonia PET were fitted by a two-compartment perfusion model. RESULTS: Mean perfusion values (+/-SD) derived from the MRI...... as a quantitative marker for myocardial perfusion in healthy humans....

  9. Temperature elevation by HIFU in ex vivo porcine muscle: MRI measurement and simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A., E-mail: solovchuk@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hwang, San Chao; Chang, Hsu [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan (China); Thiriet, Marc [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); Sheu, Tony W. H., E-mail: twhsheu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, Republic of China and Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Sciences (CASTS), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound is a rapidly developing medical technology with a large number of potential clinical applications. Computational model can play a pivotal role in the planning and optimization of the treatment based on the patient's image. Nonlinear propagation effects can significantly affect the temperature elevation and should be taken into account. In order to investigate the importance of nonlinear propagation effects, nonlinear Westervelt equation was solved. Weak nonlinear propagation effects were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the predicted and measured temperature elevations and lesion in a porcine muscle. Methods: The investigated single-element transducer has a focal length of 12 cm, an aperture of 8 cm, and frequency of 1.08 MHz. Porcine muscle was heated for 30 s by focused ultrasound transducer with an acoustic power in the range of 24–56 W. The theoretical model consists of nonlinear Westervelt equation with relaxation effects being taken into account and Pennes bioheat equation. Results: Excellent agreement between the measured and simulated temperature rises was found. For peak temperatures above 85–90 °C “preboiling” or cavitation activity appears and lesion distortion starts, causing small discrepancy between the measured and simulated temperature rises. From the measurements and simulations, it was shown that distortion of the lesion was caused by the “preboiling” activity. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that for peak temperatures below 85–90 °C numerical simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in three dimensions. Both temperature rise and lesion size can be well predicted. Due to nonlinear effect the temperature in the focal region can be increased compared with the linear case. The current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution is not sufficient. Due to the inevitable averaging the measured

  10. Diagnostic performance of MRI measurements to assess hindfoot malalignment. An assessment of four measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M.; Hoffmann, Adrienne; Mamisch-Saupe, Nadja; Hodler, Juerg [University Hospital Balgrist and University of Zurich, Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Farshad, Mazda; Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist and University of Zurich, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Zuerich (Switzerland); Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    To investigate the ability of coronal non-weight-bearing MR images to discriminate between normal and abnormal hindfoot alignment. Three different measurement techniques (calcaneal axis, medial/lateral calcaneal contour) based on weight-bearing hindfoot alignment radiographs were applied in 49 patients (mean, 48 years; range 21-76 years). Three groups of subjects were enrolled: (1) normal hindfoot alignment (0 -10 valgus); (2) abnormal valgus (>10 ); (3) any degree of varus hindfoot alignment. Hindfoot alignment was then measured on coronal MR images using four different measurement techniques (calcaneal axis, medial/lateral calcaneal contour, sustentaculum tangent). ROC analysis was performed to find the MR measurement with the greatest sensitivity and specificity for discrimination between normal and abnormal hindfoot alignment. The most accurate measurement on MR images to detect abnormal hindfoot valgus was the one using the medial calcaneal contour, reaching a sensitivity/specificity of 86 %/75 % using a cutoff value of >11 valgus. The most accurate measurement on MR images to detect abnormal hindfoot varus was the sustentaculum tangent, reaching a sensitivity/specificity of 91 %/71 % using a cutoff value of <12 valgus. It is possible to suspect abnormal hindfoot alignment on coronal non-weight-bearing MR images. (orig.)

  11. Patellar Articular Overlap on MRI Is a Simple Alternative to Conventional Measurements of Patellar Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Jacqueline L.; Sullivan, Jaron P.; Nguyen, Joseph T.; Mintz, Douglas; Green, Daniel W.; Shubin Stein, Beth E.; Strickland, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patella alta describes an abnormally high-riding patella in relationship to the femur and has been shown to correlate with patellofemoral pain, instability, chondromalacia, and arthrosis. Conventional measurements of patella alta involve multiple measurements and are often not defined on cross-sectional imaging as related to radiographs. Hypothesis: Patellar articular overlap on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will correlate well with conventional measurements of patella alta as measured by a standardized technique defined by our group. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: MRIs of 239 knees were reviewed by 3 attending surgeons with practices focusing on patellofemoral disease, as well as 2 sports medicine fellows and 1 musculoskeletal radiologist. Measurements included articular overlap, percentage of articular coverage, Caton-Deschamps index, Blackburne-Peel index, and modified Insall-Salvati index. Results: Interrater reliability was high for Caton-Deschamps, Blackburne-Peel, and modified Insall-Salvati indices (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.877, 0.828, and 0.787, respectively). Articular overlap and percentage articular coverage correlated well with each other (ICC, 0.961; P < .001) and with the Caton-Deschamps (overlap r = –0.271, P < .001; coverage r = –0.131, P = .037) and Blackburne-Peel (overlap r = 0.343, P < .001; coverage r = –0.238, P < .001) indices. Articular overlap and percentage coverage failed to correlate with the modified Insall-Salvati index (overlap r = –0.117, P = .091; coverage r = 0.007, P = .918). Conclusion: Patellar articular overlap and percentage of patellar articular coverage show promise as a simpler alternative to conventional, ratio-based measurements of patellar height. Future studies are needed to evaluate the range of normal and the relationship to our traditionally used measurements. PMID:27482530

  12. Reliability and agreement of adipose tissue fat fraction measurements with water-fat MRI in patients with manifest cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssens, Bas T; Eikendal, Anouk L; Leiner, Tim; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J; Hoogduin, J M

    2016-01-01

    The supraclavicular fat depot is known for brown adipose tissue presence. To unravel adipose tissue physiology and metabolism, high quality and reproducible imaging is required. In this study we quantified the reliability and agreement of MRI fat fraction measurements in supraclavicular and subcutan

  13. Measurement of the arterial concentration of Gd-DTPA using MRI: a step toward quantitative perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B;

    1996-01-01

    accordance between the two input functions was found, indicating that it is possible to measure the input function to the myocardium using MRI. A variation between the two concentration curves of 5% at upslope, 2.7% at peak point, and 7% at downslope was found. The study also indicates that a short...

  14. The effect of Gibbs ringing artifacts on measures derived from diffusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrone, Daniele; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Jeurissen, Ben; Philips, Wilfried; Leemans, A

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a unique method to investigate microstructural tissue properties noninvasively and is one of the most popular methods for studying the brain white matter in vivo. To obtain reliable statistical inferences with diffusion MRI, however, there

  15. Quantification of MRI measured myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy humans: A comparison with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Hove, J.D.; Kofoed, K.F.;

    2008-01-01

    and during stress induced by dipyridamole in order to determine the myocardial perfusion reserve. Myocardial and blood time concentration curves obtained by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and N-13-ammonia PET were fitted by a two-compartment perfusion model. Results: Mean perfusion values (+/- SD) derived from the MRI......Purpose: To validate a noninvasive quantitative MRI technique, the K-i perfusion method, for myocardial perfusion in humans using N-13-ammonia PET as a reference method. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy males (64 +/- 8 years) were examined with combined PET and MRI perfusion imaging at rest...... method at rest and at hyperemia were 80 +/- 20 and 183 +/- 56 mL/min/100 g, respectively. The same data for PET were 71 +/- 16 and 203 +/- 67 mL/min/100 g. A linear relationship was observed between MRI and PET-derived myocardial perfusion reserve for regional and global data. Linear regression...

  16. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G.; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson’s disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson’s disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment. PMID:28230070

  17. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-02-23

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson's disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson's disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment.

  18. Reproducibility of BOLD, perfusion, and CMRO2 measurements with calibrated-BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-03-01

    The coupling of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index, n, defined as the ratio between fractional CBF change and fractional CMRO(2) change. The combination of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with CBF measurements from arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a potentially powerful experimental approach for measuring n, but the reproducibility of the technique previously has not been assessed. In this study, inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the method were determined. Block design %BOLD and %CBF responses to visual stimulation and mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) were measured, and these data were used to compute the BOLD scaling factor M, %CMRO(2) change with activation, and the coupling index n. Reproducibility was determined for three approaches to defining regions-of-interest (ROIs): 1) Visual area V1 determined from prior retinotopic maps, 2) BOLD-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer, and 3) CBF-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer. For estimates of %BOLD, %CMRO(2) and n, intra-subject reproducibility was found to be best for regions selected according to CBF activation. Among all fMRI measurements, estimates of n were the most robust and were substantially more stable within individual subjects (coefficient of variation, CV=7.4%) than across the subject pool (CV=36.9%). The stability of n across days, despite wider variability of CBF and CMRO(2) responses, suggests that the reproducibility of blood flow changes is limited by variation in the oxidative metabolic demand. We conclude that the calibrated BOLD approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of n that can serve as a useful quantitative probe of the coupling of blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain.

  19. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  20. Feasibility study of high-resolution DCE-MRI for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement in a routine clinical modal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR renography has been identified as an interesting tool to determine single-kidney GFR. However, a fundamental issue for the applicability of MR-based estimate of single-kidney GFR is selecting a balance between spatial and temporal resolution of DCE-MRI data. The purpose is to assess the feasibility of GFR estimate from high-resolution (HR) dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in a routine clinical modal. Standard MR renography (2.4s/phase, total 4min; 4-ml Gd) and five-phase, HR-based imaging protocol (0, 30, 70, 120, and 240s; 0.05mmol/kg Gd) were prospectively performed in twelve volunteers who were scheduled for routine renal MRI. Data were plotted with Patlak, two-compartment modified Tofts model (2CTM), and two-compartment filtration model (2CFM) for GFR estimate. During all the measurements, only the signal intensities in the aorta and whole kidney parenchyma were considered. Standard 2CFM and 2CTM produced lower residuals over the fitted interval than HR-based measures (pGFR and higher residuals than that plots with 0-120s data points (pGFR with HR-based DCE-MRI and appreciate kinetic model. Patlak plots from 0, 30, 70, and 120s data points is better than plots from 0, 30, 70, 120, and 240s data points.

  1. Cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility studied with MRI: measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waahlin, Anders

    2012-07-01

    During each cardiac cycle pulsatile arterial blood inflates the vascular bed of the brain, forcing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and venous blood out of the cranium. Excessive arterial pulsatility may be part of a harmful mechanism causing cognitive decline among elderly. Additionally, restricted venous flow from the brain is suggested as the cause of multiple sclerosis. Addressing hypotheses derived from these observations requires accurate and reliable investigational methods. This work focused on assessing the pulsatile waveform of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flows. The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility using MRI, with respect to measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects.Two-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D PCMRI) was used to assess the pulsatile waveforms of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flow. The repeatability was assessed in healthy young subjects. The 2D PCMRI measurements of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF pulsatility were generally repeatable but the pulsatility decreased systematically during the investigation. A method combining 2D PCMRI measurements with invasive CSF infusion tests to determine the magnitude and distribution of compliance within the craniospinal system was developed and applied in a group of healthy elderly. The intracranial space contained approximately two thirds of the total craniospinal compliance. The magnitude of craniospinal compliance was less than suggested in previous studies. The vascular hypothesis for multiple sclerosis was tested. Venous drainage in the internal jugular veins was compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients using 2D PCMRI. For both groups, a great variability in the internal jugular flow was observed but no pattern specific to multiple sclerosis could be found. Relationships between regional brain volumes and potential biomarkers of intracranial cardiac-related pulsatile

  2. Quantitative MRI for hepatic fat fraction and T2* measurement in pediatric patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Donaldson, James S. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Fishbein, Mark H. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Schoeneman, Samantha E. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy. MRI is a non-invasive imaging method to provide quantitative measurement of hepatic fat content. The methodology is particularly appealing for the pediatric population because of its rapidity and radiation-free imaging techniques. To develop a multi-point Dixon MRI method with multi-interference models (multi-fat-peak modeling and bi-exponential T2* correction) for accurate hepatic fat fraction (FF) and T2* measurements in pediatric patients with NAFLD. A phantom study was first performed to validate the accuracy of the MRI fat fraction measurement by comparing it with the chemical fat composition of the ex-vivo pork liver-fat homogenate. The most accurate model determined from the phantom study was used for fat fraction and T2* measurements in 52 children and young adults referred from the pediatric hepatology clinic with suspected or identified NAFLD. Separate T2* values of water (T2*{sub W}) and fat (T2*{sub F}) components derived from the bi-exponential fitting were evaluated and plotted as a function of fat fraction. In ten patients undergoing liver biopsy, we compared histological analysis of liver fat fraction with MRI fat fraction. In the phantom study the 6-point Dixon with 5-fat-peak, bi-exponential T2* modeling demonstrated the best precision and accuracy in fat fraction measurements compared with other methods. This model was further calibrated with chemical fat fraction and applied in patients, where similar patterns were observed as in the phantom study that conventional 2-point and 3-point Dixon methods underestimated fat fraction compared to the calibrated 6-point 5-fat-peak bi-exponential model (P < 0.0001). With increasing fat fraction, T2*{sub W} (27.9 ± 3.5 ms) decreased, whereas T2*{sub F} (20.3 ± 5.5 ms) increased; and T2*{sub W} and T2*{sub F} became increasingly more similar when fat

  3. Measuring fMRI reliability with the intra-class correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Alejandro; Hall, Deanna L; Zelaya, Fernando O; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A

    2009-04-15

    The intra-class class correlation coefficient (ICC) is a prominent statistic to measure test-retest reliability of fMRI data. It can be used to address the question of whether regions of high group activation in a first scan session will show preserved subject differentiability in a second session. With this purpose, we present a method that extends voxel-wise ICC analysis. We show that voxels with high group activation have more probability of being reliable, if a subsequent session is performed, than typical voxels across the brain or across white matter. We also find that the existence of some voxels with high ICC but low group activation can be explained by stable signals across sessions that poorly fit the HRF model. At a region of interest level, we show that our voxel-wise ICC calculation is more robust than previous implementations under variations of smoothing and cluster size. The method also allows formal comparisons between the reliabilities of given brain regions; aimed at establishing which ROIs discriminate best between individuals. The method is applied to an auditory and a verbal working memory task. A reliability toolbox for SPM5 is provided at http://brainmap.co.uk.

  4. CT- and MRI-based volumetry of resected liver specimen: Comparison to intraoperative volume and weight measurements and calculation of conversion factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, C., E-mail: christoph.karlo@usz.c [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Reiner, C.S.; Stolzmann, P. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Breitenstein, S. [Department of Visceral Surgery, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland); Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Weishaupt, D. [Institute for Radiology and Radiodiagnostics, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Frauenfelder, T. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To compare virtual volume to intraoperative volume and weight measurements of resected liver specimen and calculate appropriate conversion factors to reach better correlation. Methods: Preoperative (CT-group, n = 30; MRI-group, n = 30) and postoperative MRI (n = 60) imaging was performed in 60 patients undergoing partial liver resection. Intraoperative volume and weight of the resected liver specimen was measured. Virtual volume measurements were performed by two readers (R1,R2) using dedicated software. Conversion factors were calculated. Results: Mean intraoperative resection weight/volume: CT: 855 g/852 mL; MRI: 872 g/860 mL. Virtual resection volume: CT: 960 mL(R1), 982 mL(R2); MRI: 1112 mL(R1), 1115 mL(R2). Strong positive correlation for both readers between intraoperative and virtual measurements, mean of both readers: CT: R = 0.88(volume), R = 0.89(weight); MRI: R = 0.95(volume), R = 0.92(weight). Conversion factors: 0.85(CT), 0.78(MRI). Conclusion: CT- or MRI-based volumetry of resected liver specimen is accurate and recommended for preoperative planning. A conversion of the result is necessary to improve intraoperative and virtual measurement correlation. We found 0.85 for CT- and 0.78 for MRI-based volumetry the most appropriate conversion factors.

  5. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  6. Evaluating the reliability of different preprocessing steps to estimate graph theoretical measures in resting state fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Nathassia K; Alves Filho, José O; Marques da Silva, Ana M; Franco, Alexandre R

    2015-01-01

    With resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) there are a variety of post-processing methods that can be used to quantify the human brain connectome. However, there is also a choice of which preprocessing steps will be used prior to calculating the functional connectivity of the brain. In this manuscript, we have tested seven different preprocessing schemes and assessed the reliability between and reproducibility within the various strategies by means of graph theoretical measures. Different preprocessing schemes were tested on a publicly available dataset, which includes rs-fMRI data of healthy controls. The brain was parcellated into 190 nodes and four graph theoretical (GT) measures were calculated; global efficiency (GEFF), characteristic path length (CPL), average clustering coefficient (ACC), and average local efficiency (ALE). Our findings indicate that results can significantly differ based on which preprocessing steps are selected. We also found dependence between motion and GT measurements in most preprocessing strategies. We conclude that by using censoring based on outliers within the functional time-series as a processing, results indicate an increase in reliability of GT measurements with a reduction of the dependency of head motion.

  7. A novel approach to calibrate the Hemodynamic Model using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Khoram, Nafiseh

    2016-01-21

    Background The calibration of the hemodynamic model that describes changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation during brain activation is a crucial step for successfully monitoring and possibly predicting brain activity. This in turn has the potential to provide diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases in early stages. New Method We propose an efficient numerical procedure for calibrating the hemodynamic model using some fMRI measurements. The proposed solution methodology is a regularized iterative method equipped with a Kalman filtering-type procedure. The Newton component of the proposed method addresses the nonlinear aspect of the problem. The regularization feature is used to ensure the stability of the algorithm. The Kalman filter procedure is incorporated here to address the noise in the data. Results Numerical results obtained with synthetic data as well as with real fMRI measurements are presented to illustrate the accuracy, robustness to the noise, and the cost-effectiveness of the proposed method. Comparison with Existing Method(s) We present numerical results that clearly demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the Cubature Kalman Filter (CKF), one of the most prominent existing numerical methods. Conclusion We have designed an iterative numerical technique, called the TNM-CKF algorithm, for calibrating the mathematical model that describes the single-event related brain response when fMRI measurements are given. The method appears to be highly accurate and effective in reconstructing the BOLD signal even when the measurements are tainted with high noise level (as high as 30%).

  8. The association between Placental T2* measured by MRI in dichorionic twin pregnancies and intertwin birth weight differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard Weidemann; Sinding, Marianne Munk; Peters, David Alberg;

    ABSTRACT FINAL ID: P22.06 TITLE: The association between Placental T2* measured by MRI in dichorionic twin pregnancies and intertwin birth weight differences AUTHORS (FIRST NAME, LAST NAME): Anne Sørensen1, 2, Marianne Sinding1, David Peters3, Jens B. Frøkjær4, 2, Astrid Petersen6, Niels Uldbjerg5...... the association between the intertwin placental T2* difference and the intertwin birth weight difference Methods: A total of 21 dichorionic twin pregnancies (gestational age 20.1 – 34.1 weeks) were included in this study and placental T2* was measured using a gradient recalled echo MRI sequence with readout at 16......: Intertwin placental T2* difference is strongly related to intertwin birthweight difference, even when performed several weeks before birth. Placental T2* might be a future method to predict intertwin birthweight difference in dichorionic twin pregnancies. Further studies should be performed in order...

  9. Quantification of the effect of water exchange in dynamic contrast MRI perfusion measurements in the brain and heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Rosenbaum, S; Fritz-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of myocardial and brain perfusion when using exogenous contrast agents (CAs) such as gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and MRI is affected by the diffusion of water between compartments. This water exchange may have an impact on signal enhancement, or, equivalently, on the longitudinal...... exchange can have a significant effect on perfusion estimation (F) in the brain when using Gd-DTPA, where it acts as an intravascular contrast agent....

  10. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Fischmann, Arne [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T{sub 1}-relaxometry, T{sub 2}-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T{sub 2} differences were small, but significant (p < 0.001). Fat fraction and T{sub 2} correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of model-based tracking of knee kinematics and cartilage contact measured by dynamic volumetric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jarred; Monawer, Arezu; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Johnson, Kevin M; Wieben, Oliver; Kijowski, Richard; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of knee kinematics and cartilage contact measured by volumetric dynamic MRI. A motor-actuated phantom drove femoral and tibial bone segments through cyclic 3D motion patterns. Volumetric images were continuously acquired using a 3D radially undersampled cine spoiled gradient echo sequence (SPGR-VIPR). Image data was binned based on position measured via a MRI-compatible rotary encoder. High-resolution static images were segmented to create bone models. Model-based tracking was performed by optimally registering the bone models to the volumetric images at each frame of the SPGR-VIPR series. 3D tibiofemoral translations and orientations were reconstructed, and compared to kinematics obtained by tracking fiducial markers. Imaging was repeated on a healthy subject who performed cyclic knee flexion-extension. Cartilage contact for the subject was assessed by measuring the overlap between articular cartilage surfaces. Model-based tracking was able to track tibiofemoral angles and translations with precisions less than 0.8° and 0.5mm. These precisions resulted in an uncertainty of less than 0.5mm in cartilage contact location. Dynamic SPGR-VIPR imaging can accurately assess in vivo knee kinematics and cartilage contact during voluntary knee motion performed in a MRI scanner. This technology could facilitate the quantitative investigation of links between joint mechanics and the development of osteoarthritis.

  12. Multisensory integration of dynamic emotional faces and voices: method for simultaneous EEG-fMRI measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelenz, Patrick D; Klasen, Martin; Reese, Barbara; Regenbogen, Christina; Wolf, Dhana; Kato, Yutaka; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Combined EEG-fMRI analysis correlates time courses from single electrodes or independent EEG components with the hemodynamic response. Implementing information from only one electrode, however, may miss relevant information from complex electrophysiological networks. Component based analysis, in turn, depends on a priori knowledge of the signal topography. Complex designs such as studies on multisensory integration of emotions investigate subtle differences in distributed networks based on only a few trials per condition. Thus, they require a sensitive and comprehensive approach which does not rely on a-priori knowledge about the underlying neural processes. In this pilot study, feasibility and sensitivity of source localization-driven analysis for EEG-fMRI was tested using a multisensory integration paradigm. Dynamic audiovisual stimuli consisting of emotional talking faces and pseudowords with emotional prosody were rated in a delayed response task. The trials comprised affectively congruent and incongruent displays. In addition to event-locked EEG and fMRI analyses, induced oscillatory EEG responses at estimated cortical sources and in specific temporo-spectral windows were correlated with the corresponding BOLD responses. EEG analysis showed high data quality with less than 10% trial rejection. In an early time window, alpha oscillations were suppressed in bilateral occipital cortices and fMRI analysis confirmed high data quality with reliable activation in auditory, visual and frontal areas to the presentation of multisensory stimuli. In line with previous studies, we obtained reliable correlation patterns for event locked occipital alpha suppression and BOLD signal time course. Our results suggest a valid methodological approach to investigate complex stimuli using the present source localization driven method for EEG-fMRI. This novel procedure may help to investigate combined EEG-fMRI data from novel complex paradigms with high spatial and temporal

  13. A New Similarity Measure for Non-Local Means Filtering of MRI Images

    CERN Document Server

    Dolui, Sudipto; Patarroyo, Iván C Salgado; Michailovich, Oleg V

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of MRI images offers a trade-off in terms of acquisition time, spatial/temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, for instance, increasing the time efficiency of MRI often comes at the expense of reduced SNR. This, in turn, necessitates the use of post-processing tools for noise rejection, which makes image de-noising an indispensable component of computer assistance diagnosis. In the field of MRI, a multitude of image de-noising methods have been proposed hitherto. In this paper, the application of a particular class of de-noising algorithms - known as non-local mean (NLM) filters - is investigated. Such filters have been recently applied for MRI data enhancement and they have been shown to provide more accurate results as compared to many alternative de-noising algorithms. Unfortunately, virtually all existing methods for NLM filtering have been derived under the assumption of additive white Gaussian (AWG) noise contamination. Since this assumption is known to fail at low val...

  14. Measurement of distinctive features of cortical spreading depolarizations with different MRI contrasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umesh Rudrapatna, S.; Hamming, Arend M.; Wermer, Marieke J H; van der Toorn, A; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Growing clinical evidence suggests critical involvement of spreading depolarizations (SDs) in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders such as migraine and stroke. MRI provides powerful tools to detect and assess co-occurring cerebral hemodynamic and cellular changes during SDs. This study repo

  15. Analysis of group ICA-based connectivity measures from fMRI: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a powerful tool for the in vivo study of the pathophysiology of brain disorders and disease. In this manuscript, we propose an analysis stream for fMRI functional connectivity data and apply it to a novel study of Alzheimer's disease. In the first stage, spatial independent component analysis is applied to group fMRI data to obtain common brain networks (spatial maps and subject-specific mixing matrices (time courses. In the second stage, functional principal component analysis is utilized to decompose the mixing matrices into population-level eigenvectors and subject-specific loadings. Inference is performed using permutation-based exact logistic regression for matched pairs data. The method is applied to a novel fMRI study of Alzheimer's disease risk under a verbal paired associates task. We found empirical evidence of alternative ICA-based metrics of connectivity when comparing subjects evidencing mild cognitive impairment relative to carefully matched controls.

  16. PHYCAA: Data-driven measurement and removal of physiological noise in BOLD fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchill, Nathan W.; Yourganov, Grigori; Spring, Robyn;

    2012-01-01

    The effects of physiological noise may significantly limit the reproducibility and accuracy of BOLD fMRI. However, physiological noise evidences a complex, undersampled temporal structure and is often non-orthogonal relative to the neuronally-linked BOLD response, which presents a significant cha...

  17. Correlation of preoperative MRI and intraoperative 3D ultrasound to measure brain tissue shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, David G.; Lee, Belinda K. H.; Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    B-Mode ultrasound is often used during neurosurgery to provide intra-operative images of the brain though a craniotomy, but the use of 3D ultrasound during surgery is still in its infancy. We have developed a system that provides real-time freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction at a reduced resolution. The reconstruction proceeds incrementally and the 3D image is overlayed, via a computer, on a pre-operative 3D MRI scan. This provides the operator with the necessary feedback to maintain a constant freehand sweep-rate, and also ensures that the sweep covers the desired anatomical volume. All of the ultrasound video frames are buffered, and a full-resolution, compounded reconstruction proceeds once the manual sweep is complete. We have also developed tools for manual tagging of homologous landmarks in the 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound volumes that use a piecewise cubic approximation of thin-plate spline interpolation to achieve interactive nonlinear registration and warping of the MRI volume to the ultrasound volume: Each time a homologous point-pair is identified by the use, the image of the warped MRI is updated on the computer screen after less than 0.5 s.

  18. In vitro validation of flow measurements in an aortic nitinol stent graft by velocity-encoded MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengier, Fabian, E-mail: f.rengier@dkfz.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz) Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delles, Michael, E-mail: delles@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Informatics, Institute for Anthropomatics, Adenauerring 2, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weber, Tim Frederik, E-mail: Tim.Weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, Dittmar, E-mail: dboeckler@me.com [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian, E-mail: ley@gmx.net [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: Hans-Ulrich.Kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von, E-mail: h.vontengg@dkfz.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz) Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To validate flow measurements within an aortic nickel-titanium (nitinol) stent graft using velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging (VEC MRI) and to assess intraobserver agreement of repeated flow measurements. Materials and methods: An elastic tube phantom mimicking the descending aorta was developed with the possibility to insert an aortic nitinol stent graft. Different flow patterns (constant, sinusoidal and pulsatile aortic flow) were applied by a gear pump. A two-dimensional phase-contrast sequence was used to acquire VEC perpendicular cross-sections at six equidistant levels along the phantom. Each acquisition was performed twice with and without stent graft, and each dataset was analysed twice by the same reader. The percental difference of the measured flow volume to the gold standard (pump setting) was defined as the parameter for accuracy. Furthermore, the intraobserver agreement was assessed. Results: Mean accuracy of flow volume measurements was -0.45 {+-} 1.63% without stent graft and -0.18 {+-} 1.45% with stent graft. Slightly lower accuracy was obtained for aortic flow both without (-2.31%) and with (-1.29%) stent graft. Accuracy was neither influenced by the measurement position nor by repeated acquisitions. There was significant intraobserver agreement with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 (without stent graft, p < 0.001) and 0.80 (with stent graft, p < 0.001). The coefficient of variance was 0.25% without stent graft and 0.28% with stent graft. Conclusion: This study demonstrated high accuracy and excellent intraobserver agreement of flow measurements within an aortic nitinol stent graft using VEC MRI. VEC MRI may give new insights into the haemodynamic consequences of endovascular aortic repair.

  19. Measurement of the square measure of the pharynx and the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozuki, Taizo; Ohkubo, Yasuo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply dynamic MRI for the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during snoring and sleep apnea and to compare the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and the square measure of the pharynx obtained before and after laser-assisted uvula-palate-pharyngoplasty (LAUP). From December 1997 to October 1998, dynamic MRI and overnight monitoring were performed at the hospital of Tokyo Medical University on 42 patients who complained of snoring and symptoms related to sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Of the 42 patients, four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate (soft palate type) as diagnosed by dynamic MRI, and four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate as well as the tongue (complex type). LAUP was performed on these eight patients with obstructive SAS (OSAS). After LAUP, the AHI of these eight patients with OSAS decreased significantly (p<0.05). The square measure of the pharynx of these eight patients was increased (p<0.01). The AHI of all four patients with soft-palate obstruction decreased, and the square measure of the pharynx of three of these four patients increased. The AHI of three of four patients with the complex type decreased, while the square measure of the pharynx of two of these four patients increased. (author)

  20. The value of MRI iniIdiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome by measuring the cross-sectional area of tarsal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Lee, Sheen Woo; Choi Seung; Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Hong Gi [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of MRI as a diagnostic test in tarsal tunnel syndrome. There are no published reports with this aim and no diagnostic standard for idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) using imaging modalities. We retrospectively searched our Picture Archiving and Communication System data and medical records to identify patients who were clinically and electomyographically diagnosed with idiopathic TTS without space-occupying lesion on MRI. Twenty five patients were included in the patient group. Another twenty-five patients who underwent ankle MRI for Achilles tendon disease were selected and included in the control group. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) of tarsal tunnel were manually measured independently by two radiologists who were blinded to clinical and surgical results, using three-dimensional reconstruction software in our hospital. Measurements were done on axial images at three levels (level 1, tibiotalar joint level; level 2, medial malleolar tip level; level 3, sustentaculum tali level). Patient and control group data were statistically analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test. The mean values of CSA at levels 1, 2, and 3 of the tarsal tunnel were 87.8 mm2, 98.2 mm2, and 105.2 mm2, respectively in the patient group; and 100.0 mm2, 113.8 mm2, and 127.9 mm2 in the control group, respectively, in reader 1; and 86.2 mm2, 97.6 mm2, 105.2 mm2, respectively in the patient group; and 99.7 mm2, 112.3 mm2, 124.4 mm2, respectively, in the control group, in reader 2. The mean CSA in the patient group was significantly less than that of the control group at all three levels (p < 0.05). Intra-class correlation coefficient value between reader 1 and reader 2 were 0.98 in group 1, and 0.97 in group 2, respectively. MRI can be helpful in the assessment of idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome. CSA measurements of tarsal tunnel at each level may predict TTS even though there are no space occupying lesions in the tarsal tunnel on MRI.

  1. Reliability and agreement of adipose tissue fat fraction measurements with water-fat MRI in patients with manifest cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssens, Bas T; Eikendal, Anouk L; Leiner, Tim; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J; Hoogduin, J M

    2016-01-01

    The supraclavicular fat depot is known for brown adipose tissue presence. To unravel adipose tissue physiology and metabolism, high quality and reproducible imaging is required. In this study we quantified the reliability and agreement of MRI fat fraction measurements in supraclavicular and subcutaneous adipose tissue of 25 adult patients with clinically manifest cardiovascular disease. MRI fat fraction measurements were made under ambient temperature conditions using a vendor supplied mDixon chemical-shift water-fat multi-echo pulse sequence at 1.5 T field strength. Supraclavicular fat fraction reliability (intraclass correlation coefficientagreement , ICCagreement ) was 0.97 for test-retest, 0.95 for intra-observer and 0.56 for inter-observer measurements, which increased to 0.88 when ICCconsistency was estimated. Supraclavicular fat fraction agreement displayed mean differences of 0.5% (limit of agreement (LoA) -1.7 to 2.6) for test-retest, -0.5% (LoA -2.9 to 2.0) for intra-observer and 5.6% (LoA 0.4 to 10.8) for inter-observer measurements. Median fat fraction in supraclavicular adipose tissue was 82.5% (interquartile range (IQR) 78.6-84.0) and 89.7% (IQR 87.2-91.5) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (p fat MRI has good reliability and agreement to measure adipose tissue fat fraction in patients with manifest cardiovascular disease. These findings enable research on determinants of fat fraction and enable longitudinal monitoring of fat fraction within adipose tissue depots. Interestingly, even in adult patients with manifest cardiovascular disease, supraclavicular adipose tissue has a lower fat fraction compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue, suggestive of distinct morphologic characteristics, such as brown adipose tissue.

  2. Peripheral nerve MRI: precision and reproducibility of T2*-derived measurements at 3.0-T. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Bignotti, Bianca; Martinoli, Carlo [University of Genoa, Radiology Department, Genoa, Genova (Italy); Tagliafico, Giulio [CNR-IMATI, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Matematica Applicata e Tecnologie Informatiche, Genova (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the precision and reproducibility of T2*-derived measurements of the peripheral nerves. The study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained. Bilateral upper and lower limb MRI examination was performed in 40 healthy subjects on a 3.0-T scanner. MRI protocol included T1-turbo spin-echo, T2-turbo spin-echo with fat suppression, and multiecho gradient recalled echo. Measurements of T2* times on T2* maps at different anatomical levels were performed. Three authors measured independently and in different sessions at baseline and after 4 weeks. Non-parametric tests and Bland-Altman statistics were used. Minimum and maximum percentage variability were 10 % and 19 % for T2* (84-91 % of reproducibility). Maximum values of minimum detectable differences between limbs was 16 % (with 95 % CI: 2-37). Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the three radiologists for T2* was considered good. Evaluating the combined influence of the observer and of the repeated measurements the reproducibility was 87-98 %. T2* measurement of the peripheral nerves is precise and reproducible. The healthy contralateral side can be used as an internal control. Variations in T2* values up to 16 % have to be considered. (orig.)

  3. Relationship between saccadic eye movements and cortical activity as measured by fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmig, H.; Greenlee, M.W.; Gondan, Matthias;

    2001-01-01

    quantitative changes in cortical activity associated with qualitative changes in the saccade task for comparable levels of saccadic activity. All experiments required the simultaneous acquisition of eye movement and fMRI data. For this purpose we used a new high-resolution limbus-tracking technique......We investigated the quantitative relationship between saccadic activity (as reflected in frequency of occurrence and amplitude of saccades) and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) changes in the cerebral cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Furthermore, we investigated....... The latter finding is taken to indicate a more demanding cortical processing in the "anti" task than the "pro" task, which could explain the observed difference in BOLD activation. We hold that a quantitative analysis of saccade parameters (especially saccade frequency and latency) is important...

  4. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  5. Perfusion and vascular permeability: basic concepts and measurement in DCE-CT and DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenod, C A; Balvay, D

    2013-12-01

    The microvascular network formed by the capillaries supplies the tissues and permits their function. It provides a considerable surface area for exchanges between blood and tissues. All pathological conditions cause changes in the microcirculation. These changes can be used as imaging biomarkers for the diagnosis of lesions and optimisation of treatment. Among the many imaging techniques developed to study the microcirculation, the analysis of the tissue kinetics of intravenously injected contrast agents is the most widely used, either as positive enhancement for CT, T1-weighted MRI and ultrasound - dynamic contrast-enhanced-imaging (DCE-imaging) - or negative enhancement in T2*-weighted brain MRI - dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI) -. Acquisition involves an injection of contrast agent during the acquisition of a dynamic series of images on a zone of interest. These kinetics may be analyzed visually, to define qualitative criteria, or with software using mathematical modelling, to extract quantitative physiological parameters. The results depend on the acquisition conditions (type of imaging device, imaging mode, frequency and total duration of acquisition), the type of contrast agent, the data pre-processing (motion correction, conversion of the signal into concentration) and the data analysis method. Because of these multiple choices it is necessary to understand the physiological processes involved and understand the advantages and limits of each strategy.

  6. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  7. Longitudinal measurements of MRI-T2 in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: effects of age and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, R J; Arpan, I A; Forbes, S C; Lott, D J; Senesac, C R; Senesac, E; Deol, J; Triplett, W T; Baligand, C; Daniels, M J; Sweeney, H L; Walter, G A; Vandenborne, K

    2014-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by an increased muscle damage and progressive replacement of muscle by noncontractile tissue. Both of these pathological changes can lengthen the MRI transverse proton relaxation time (T2). The current study measured longitudinal changes in T2 and its distribution in the lower leg of 16 boys with DMD (5-13years, 15 ambulatory) and 15 healthy controls (5-13years). These muscles were chosen to allow extended longitudinal monitoring, due to their slow progression compared with proximal muscles in DMD. In the soleus muscle of boys with DMD, T2 and the percentage of pixels with an elevated T2 (⩾2SD above control mean T2) increased significantly over 1year and 2years, while the width of the T2 histogram increased over 2years. Changes in soleus T2 variables were significantly greater in 9-13years old compared with 5-8years old boys with DMD. Significant correlations between the change in all soleus T2 variables over 2years and the change in functional measures over 2years were found. MRI measurement of muscle T2 in boys with DMD is sensitive to disease progression and shows promise as a clinical outcome measure.

  8. Cerebral Blood Flow Measured by Arterial Spin Labeling MRI as a Preclinical Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Christina E.; Hays, Chelsea C.; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that cerebral hypoperfusion is related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), implicating the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) as a possible biomarker of AD. The ability to identify the earliest and most reliable markers of incipient cognitive decline and clinical symptoms is critical to develop effective preventive strategies and interventions for AD. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures CBF by magnetically labeling arterial water and using it as an endogenous tracer. Studies using ASL MRI in humans indicate that CBF changes are present several years before the development of the clinical symptoms of AD. Moreover, ASL-measured CBF has been shown to distinguish between cognitively normal individuals, adults at risk for AD, and persons diagnosed with AD. Some studies indicate that CBF may even be sensitive for predicting cognitive decline and conversion to mild cognitive impairment and AD over time. Taken together, evidence suggests that the current staging models of AD biomarker pathology should incorporate early changes in CBF as a useful biomarker, possibly present even earlier than amyloid β accumulation. Though still a research tool, ASL imaging is a promising non-invasive and reliable method with the potential to serve as a future clinical tool for the measurement of CBF in preclinical AD. PMID:25159672

  9. MRI characterization of temporal lobe epilepsy using rapidly measurable spatial indices with hemisphere asymmetries and gender features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Siddhartha; Chakrabarti, Nilkanta [University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology and UGC-CPEPA Centre for ' ' Electro-physiological and Neuro-imaging studies including Mathematical Modelling' ' , Kolkata (India); Sarkar, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Sumit; Basu, Swadhapriya [IPGME and R, SSKM Hospital, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kolkata (India); Mulpuru, Sai Krishna [National Brain Research Centre, National Neuro-Imaging Facility, Manesar (India); Tiwary, Basant K. [Pondicherry University, Centre for Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry (India); Roy, Prasun Kumar [National Brain Research Centre, Computational Neuroimaging Division, Manesar (India); National Brain Research Centre, Clinical Neuroscience Unit, Gurgaon (India)

    2015-09-15

    The paucity of morphometric markers for hemispheric asymmetries and gender variations in hippocampi and amygdalae in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) calls for better characterization of TLE by finding more useful prognostic MRI parameter(s). T1-weighted MRI (3 T) morphometry using multiple parameters of hippocampus-parahippocampus (angular and linear measures, volumetry) and amygdalae (volumetry) including their hemispheric asymmetry indices (AI) were evaluated in both genders. The cutoff values of parameters were statistically estimated from measurements of healthy subjects to characterize TLE (57 patients, 55 % male) alterations. TLE had differential categories with hippocampal atrophy, parahippocampal angle (PHA) acuteness, and several other parametric changes. Bilateral TLE categories were much more prevalent compared to unilateral TLE categories. Female patients were considerably more disposed to bilateral TLE categories than male patients. Male patients displayed diverse categories of unilateral abnormalities. Few patients (both genders) had combined bilateral appearances of hippocampal atrophy, amygdala atrophy, PHA acuteness, and increase in hippocampal angle (HA) where medial distance ratio (MDR) varied among genders. TLE had gender-specific and hemispheric dominant alterations in AI of parameters. Maximum magnitude of parametric changes in TLE includes (a) AI increase in HA of both genders, (b) HA increase (bilateral) in female patients, and (c) increase in ratio of amygdale/hippocampal volume (unilateral, right hemispheric), and AI decrease in MDR, in male patients. Multiparametric MRI studies of hippocampus and amygdalae, including their hemispheric asymmetry, underscore better characterization of TLE. Rapidly measurable single-slice parameters (HA, PHA, MDR) can readily delineate TLE in a time-constrained clinical setting, which contrasts with customary three-dimensional hippocampal volumetry that requires many slice computation. (orig.)

  10. Efficient solution methodology for calibrating the hemodynamic model using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Zambri, Brian

    2015-11-05

    Our aim is to propose a numerical strategy for retrieving accurately and efficiently the biophysiological parameters as well as the external stimulus characteristics corresponding to the hemodynamic mathematical model that describes changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation during brain activation. The proposed method employs the TNM-CKF method developed in [1], but in a prediction/correction framework. We present numerical results using both real and synthetic functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) measurements to highlight the performance characteristics of this computational methodology. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  12. Relationship between saccadic eye movements and cortical activity as measured by fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmig, H.; Greenlee, M.W.; Gondan, Matthias;

    2001-01-01

    quantitative changes in cortical activity associated with qualitative changes in the saccade task for comparable levels of saccadic activity. All experiments required the simultaneous acquisition of eye movement and fMRI data. For this purpose we used a new high-resolution limbus-tracking technique...... that repeated processing of saccades is integrated over time in the BOLD response. In contrast, there was no comparable BOLD change with variation of saccade amplitude. This finding speaks for a topological rather than activity-dependent coding of saccade amplitudes in most cortical regions. In the experiments...

  13. In vivo measurements of relaxation process in the human liver by MRI. The role of respiratory gating/triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1988-01-01

    In vivo estimation of relaxation processes in the liver by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful for characterization of various pathological conditions in the liver. However, such measurements may be significantly hampered by movement of the liver with the respiration. The effect...... of synchronization of data acquisition to the respiratory cycle on measured T1- and T2-relaxation curves was studied in normal subjects, patients with diffuse liver disease, and patients with focal liver pathology. Multi spin echo sequences with five different repetition times were used. The measurements were...... different, when respiratory synchronization was employed. The results indicate that respiratory synchronization is only necessary for estimation of relaxation processes in the liver with focal pathology....

  14. Correlation of intra-articular osseous measurements with posterior cruciate ligament length on MRI scans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orakzai, S H

    2010-01-01

    Six patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture, based on a positive posterior drawer test, had a normal appearance of the PCL on an MRI scan. It is postulated that the PCL had been ruptured but healed in a lengthened state. 12 volunteers with no history of knee trauma underwent an MRI scan of the knee. In this control group (n = 12), there was a close correlation between the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane and the PCL length, with a ratio of 2:1 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.817-2.095). In the clinically abnormal group (n = 6), the ratio was 1.49:1 (95% CI = 1.206-1.782) (p< 0.0005). In conclusion, the ratio of the lateral femoral condylar width in the sagittal plane to the PCL length is a useful index for diagnosing PCL attenuation and lengthening in the presence of a normal morphological MR appearance.

  15. The effects of hippocampal lesions on MRI measures of structural and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Richard N; Greve, Andrea; Cooper, Elisa; Gregori, Mariella; Simons, Jon S; Geerligs, Linda; Erzinçlioğlu, Sharon; Kapur, Narinder; Browne, Georgina

    2016-11-01

    Focal lesions can affect connectivity between distal brain regions (connectional diaschisis) and impact the graph-theoretic properties of major brain networks (connectomic diaschisis). Given its unique anatomy and diverse range of functions, the hippocampus has been claimed to be a critical "hub" in brain networks. We investigated the effects of hippocampal lesions on structural and functional connectivity in six patients with amnesia, using a range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses. Neuropsychological assessment revealed marked episodic memory impairment and generally intact performance across other cognitive domains. The hippocampus was the only brain structure exhibiting reduced grey-matter volume that was consistent across patients, and the fornix was the only major white-matter tract to show altered structural connectivity according to both diffusion metrics. Nonetheless, functional MRI revealed both increases and decreases in functional connectivity. Analysis at the level of regions within the default-mode network revealed reduced functional connectivity, including between nonhippocampal regions (connectional diaschisis). Analysis at the level of functional networks revealed reduced connectivity between thalamic and precuneus networks, but increased connectivity between the default-mode network and frontal executive network. The overall functional connectome showed evidence of increased functional segregation in patients (connectomic diaschisis). Together, these results point to dynamic reorganization following hippocampal lesions, with both decreased and increased functional connectivity involving limbic-diencephalic structures and larger-scale networks. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A;

    2016-01-01

    ) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. RESULTS: Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular VCSF increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T2...... of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). CONCLUSION: A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus...

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion measurement of the brain using T-1-weighted MRI at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Hansen, A.E.; Berg, H.K.;

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for the measurement of brain perfusion based on dynamic contrast-enhanced T-1-weighted MR imaging. Materials and Methods: Dynamic imaging of the first pass of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent was performed using a 3T whole-body magnet and a T-1-weighted fast...... field echo sequence. The input function was obtained from the internal carotid artery. An initial T-1 measurement was performed in order to convert the MR signal to concentration of the contrast agent. Pixelwise and region of interest (ROI)based calculation of cerebral perfusion (CBF) was performed...... inside the infarct core was, 9 mL/100g/min in one of the stroke patients. The other stroke patient had postischemic hyperperfusion and CBF was 140 mL/100g/min. Conclusion: Absolute values of brain perfusion can be obtained using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These values correspond,to expected values...

  19. Evaluation of MRI-based Polymer Gel Dosimetry for Measurement of CT Dose Index (CTDI on 64 slices CT Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leaila Karimi-Afshar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Computed tomography (CT has numerous applications in clinical procedures but its main problem is its high radiation dose to the patients compared to other imaging modalities using x-ray. CT delivers approximately high doses to the nearby tissues due to the scattering effect, fan beam (beam divergence and limited collimator efficiency. The radiation dose from multi-slice scanners is greater than the single-slice scanners and since multi-slice scanners increasingly employ a wide beam, 100 mm ion chambers currently used in measuring the CTDI100, are not capable of accurately measuring the total dose profile of the slice width. Therefore, the CT dose is underestimated by using them. The purpose of this study is to measure the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI of a GE multi-slice CT scanner (64-slice using polymer gel dosimetry based on MRI imaging (MRPD. CTDI is the sum of point doses along the central axis and estimates the average patient dose during CT scanning. Materials and Methods: For measuring CTDI, after designing and fabricating the phantom and preparing the MAGIC gel, MRI imaging using a 1.5 T Siemens MRI scanner was performed with the imaging parameters of ST = 2 mm, NEX = 1, TE = 20-640 ms and TR = 2000 ms. CTDI was measured with a 100 mm ion chamber (CTDI100 and also the MAGIC gel with MRPD method for 10 mm and 40 mm CT scan nominal widths. Results: Following the measurement of the CTDI100 for 10 mm and 40 mm nominal slice widths of the multi-slice scanner using both ion chamber and MAGIC gel, the results showed that the ion chamber underestimates CTDI100 by 28.71% and 14.03% compared to gel for 10 mm and 40 mm respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: It was concluded from this study that gel dosimeters have the capability to measure CTDI in wide beams of multi-slice CT scanners whereas 100 mm standard ion chamber due to its limited length is not reliable even for a 10 mm beam width. In addition, due to the 3

  20. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F;

    2003-01-01

    with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints 2 to 5 of the dominant hand included in the field of view. Three readers were instructed to grade MCP 2 and 3 using the OMERACT grading system and then to measure the erosion volume of the same joints using OSIRIS software. The inter-reader reliability of the grading method....... Good correlation was demonstrated between the total erosion scores and the total erosion volumes. For both erosion volumes and erosion scores, 1 mm and 3 mm acquisitions produced variable results between readers, with no clear pattern of underestimation or overestimation for either slice thickness....... The volume estimation method was more time consuming, taking roughly 5 times as long as the scoring method. Computerized MRI erosion volume measurements are feasible, with high intra-observer and inter-occasion reliabilities. Despite high ICC, the inter-observer reliability is not sufficient for multicenter...

  1. Hemodynamic measurement using four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI: Quantification of hemodynamic parameters and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; KIm, Nam Kug [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  2. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hojin [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [Asan Institute of Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Jihoon [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hak [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  3. Assessment of histological response of paediatric bone sarcomas using FDG PET in comparison to morphological volume measurement and standardized MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denecke, Timm; Misch, Daniel; Steffen, Ingo G.; Plotkin, Michail; Stoever, Brigitte [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Henze, Guenter [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Paediatrie m.S. Onkologie und Haematologie, Otto-Heubner-Zentrum, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Schoenberger, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Kinder-Onkologie, -Haematologie und -Immunologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Furth, Christian; Ruf, Juri [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany); Hautzel, Hubertus [Universitaetsklinikum der Heinrich Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kluge, Regine [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig A.oe.R., Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Leipzig (Germany); Bierbach, Uta [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig A.oe.R., Abteilung fuer Kinder-Haematologie, -Onkologie und -Haemostaseologie, Leipzig (Germany); Otto, Sylke [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany); Beck, James F. [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald, Abteilung fuer Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie, Greifswald (Germany); Franzius, Christiane [MR- und PET/CT-Zentrum, Bremen-Mitte (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenster (Germany); Amthauer, Holger [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in comparison to volumetry and standardized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters for the assessment of histological response in paediatric bone sarcoma patients. FDG PET and local MRI were performed in 27 paediatric sarcoma patients [Ewing sarcoma family of tumours (EWS), n = 16; osteosarcoma (OS), n = 11] prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy before local tumour resection. Several parameters for assessment of response of the primary tumour to therapy by FDG PET and MRI were evaluated and compared with histopathological regression of the resected tumour as defined by Salzer-Kuntschik. FDG PET significantly discriminated responders from non-responders using the standardized uptake value (SUV) reduction and the absolute post-therapeutic SUV (SUV2) in the entire patient population ({nabla}SUV, p = 0.005; SUV2, p = 0.011) as well as in the subgroup of OS patients ({nabla}SUV, p = 0.009; SUV2, p = 0.028), but not in the EWS subgroup. The volume reduction measured by MRI/CT did not significantly discriminate responders from non-responders either in the entire population (p = 0.170) or in both subgroups (EWS, p = 0.950; OS, p = 1.000). The other MRI parameters alone or in combination were unreliable and did not improve the results. Comparing diagnostic parameters of FDG PET and local MRI, metabolic imaging showed high superiority in the subgroup of OS patients, while similar results were observed in the population of EWS. FDG PET appears to be a useful tool for non-invasive response assessment in the group of OS patients and is superior to MRI. In EWS patients, however, neither FDG PET nor volumetry or standardized MRI criteria enabled a reliable response assessment to be made after neoadjuvant treatment. (orig.)

  4. SU-D-303-03: Impact of Uncertainty in T1 Measurements On Quantification of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryal, M; Cao, Y [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires native longitudinal relaxation time (T1) measurement. This study aimed to assess uncertainty in T1 measurements using two different methods. Methods and Materials: Brain MRI scans were performed on a 3T scanner in 9 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiotherapy without chemotherapy at pre-RT, week-3 during RT (wk-3), end-RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using gradient echo sequences with 1) 2 different flip angles (50 and 150), and 2) 5 variable TRs (100–2000ms). After creating quantitative T1 maps, average T1 was calculated in regions of interest (ROI), which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses < 5 Gy at wk-3. ROIs included left and right normal Putamen and Thalamus (gray matter: GM), and frontal and parietal white matter (WM). Since there were no significant or even a trend of T1 changes from pre-RT to wk-3 in these ROIs, a relative repeatability coefficient (RC) of T1 as a measure of uncertainty was estimated in each ROI using the data pre-RT and at wk-3. The individual T1 changes at later time points were evaluated compared to the estimated RCs. Results: The 2-flip angle method produced small RCs in GM (9.7–11.7%) but large RCs in WM (12.2–13.6%) compared to the saturation-recovery (SR) method (11.0–17.7% for GM and 7.5–11.2% for WM). More than 81% of individual T1 changes were within T1 uncertainty ranges defined by RCs. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the impact of T1 uncertainty on physiological parameters derived from DCE MRI is not negligible. A short scan with 2 flip angles is able to achieve repeatability of T1 estimates similar to a long scan with 5 different TRs, and is desirable to be integrated in the DCE protocol. Present study was supported by National Institute of Health (NIH) under grant numbers; UO1 CA183848 and RO1 NS064973.

  5. Zero echo time magnetic resonance imaging of contrast-agent-enhanced calcium phosphate bone defect fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Ventura, Manuela; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank; Heerschap, Arend

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used bone substitutes. However, CPCs have similar radiopacity as natural bone, rendering them difficult to be differentiated in classical X-ray and computed tomography imaging. As conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bone is cumbersome, due to low water content and very short T(2) relaxation time, ultra-short echo time (UTE) and zero echo time (ZTE) MRI have been explored for bone visualization. This study examined the possibility to differentiate bone and CPC by MRI. T(1) and T(2)* values determined with UTE MRI showed little difference between bone and CPC; hence, these materials were difficult to separate based on T(1) or T(2) alone. Incorporation of ultra-small particles of iron oxide and gadopentetatedimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; 1 weight percentage [wt%] and 5 wt% respectively) into CPC resulted in visualization of CPC with decreased intensity on ZTE images in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, these additions had unfavorable effects on the solidification time and/or mechanical properties of the CPC, with the exception of 1% Gd-DTPA alone. Therefore, we tested this material in an in vivo experiment. The contrast of CPC was enhanced at an early stage postimplantation, and was significantly reduced in the 8 weeks thereafter. This indicates that ZTE imaging with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent could be a valid radiation-free method to visualize CPC degradation and bone regeneration in preclinical experiments.

  6. MRI of small bowel Crohn's disease: determining the reproducibility of bowel wall gadolinium enhancement measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharman, A.; Zealley, I.A. [Ninewells Hospital, Dundee (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, R.; Taylor, S.A. [University College Hospital, Department of Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bassett, P. [Stats Consultancy, Ruislip (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    This study aims to determine inter- and intra-observer variation in MRI measurements of relative bowel wall signal intensity (SI) in Crohn's disease. Twenty-one small bowel MRI examinations (11 male, mean age 40), including T1-weighted acquisitions acquired 30 to 120s post-gadolinium, were analysed. Maximal bowel wall SI (most avid, conspicuous contrast enhancement) in designated diseased segments was measured by two radiologists and two trainees using self-positioned ''free'' regions of interest (ROIs) followed by ''fixed'' ROIs chosen by one radiologist, and this procedure was repeated 1 month later. Relative enhancement (post-contrast SI minus pre-contrast SI/pre-contrast SI) was calculated. Data were analysed using Bland-Altman limits of agreement and intra-class correlation. Inter-observer agreement for relative enhancement was poor (spanning over 120%) using a free ROI - 95% limits of agreement -0.69, 0.70 and -0.47, 0.74 for radiologists and trainees, respectively, only marginally improved by use of a fixed ROI -0.60, 0.67 and -0.59, 0.49. Intra-class correlation ranged from 0.46 to 0.72. Intra-observer agreement was slightly better and optimised using a fixed ROI - 95% limits of agreement -0.52, 0.50 and -0.34, 0.28 for radiologists and trainees, respectively. Intra-class correlation ranged from 0.49 to 0.86. Relative bowel wall signal intensity measurements demonstrate wide limits of observer agreement, unrelated to reader experience but improved using fixed ROIs. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of global cerebral blood flow measured by phase‐contrast mapping MRI with 15O‐H2O positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann‐Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Law, Ian; Larsson, Henrik Bo Wiberg; Henriksen, Otto Mølby

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase‐contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by 15O‐H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated in vivo against an accepted reference technique. Materials and Methods Same‐day measurements of CBF by 15O‐H2O PET and subsequently by PCM MRI were performed on 22 healthy young male volunteers. Global CBF by PET was determined by applying a one‐tissue compartment model with measurement of the arterial input function. Flow was measured in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries by a noncardiac triggered PCM MRI sequence at 3T. The measured flow was normalized to total brain weight determined from a volume‐segmented 3D T 1‐weighted anatomical MR‐scan. Results Mean CBF was 34.9 ± 3.4 mL/100 g/min measured by 15O‐H2O PET and 57.0 ± 6.8 mL/100 g/min measured by PCM MRI. The measurements were highly correlated (P = 0.0008, R2 = 0.44), although values obtained by PCM MRI were higher compared to 15O‐H2O PET (absolute and relative differences were 22.0 ± 5.2 mL/100 g/min and 63.4 ± 14.8%, respectively). Conclusion This study confirms the use of PCM MRI for quantification of global CBF, but also that PCM MRI systematically yields higher values relative to 15O‐H2O PET, probably related to methodological bias. Level of Evidence: 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:692–699. PMID:27619317

  8. Is the type and extent of hippocampal sclerosis measurable on high-resolution MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H; Schwarzwald, R [Medical Center University of Freiburg, Dept. of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Huppertz, H.J. [Swiss Epilepsy Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Becker, A.J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Neuropathology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Bahri, M. Delsous; Tschampa, H.J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to relate hippocampal volume and FLAIR signal intensity to Wyler grading of hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Of 100 consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and HS as histopathological diagnosis, 32 had high-resolution 3 Tesla MRI and anatomically well-preserved hippocampi following amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Hippocampal volume on 3D T1-weighted gradient echo and signal intensity on coronal FLAIR sequences were determined using FreeSurfer and SPM tools and related to Wyler grading. Seizure outcome was determined after 1 year. Histopathology showed four Wyler II, 19 Wyler III, and 9 Wyler IV HS. Hippocampal volumes were 3.08 ml for Wyler II (Wyler II/contralateral side: p > 0.05), 2.19 ml for Wyler III (p < 0.01), 2.62 ml for Wyler IV (p = 0.01), and 3.08 ml for the contralateral side. Normalized FLAIR signals were 1,354 (p = 0.0004), 1,408 (p < 0.0001), 1,371 (p < 0.04), and 1,296, respectively. Wyler II hippocampi were visually normal. Two of four (50 %) Wyler II, 16/19 (84 %) Wyler III, and 6/9 (66 %) Wyler IV patients achieved Engel I outcome. Combined volumetry and quantitative FLAIR signal analysis clearly identifies Wyler III and IV HS. Quantitative FLAIR signal analysis may be helpful to identify Wyler II HS. (orig.)

  9. Combining classification with fMRI-derived complex network measures for potential neurodiagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Fekete

    Full Text Available Complex network analysis (CNA, a subset of graph theory, is an emerging approach to the analysis of functional connectivity in the brain, allowing quantitative assessment of network properties such as functional segregation, integration, resilience, and centrality. Here, we show how a classification framework complements complex network analysis by providing an efficient and objective means of selecting the best network model characterizing given functional connectivity data. We describe a novel kernel-sum learning approach, block diagonal optimization (BDopt, which can be applied to CNA features to single out graph-theoretic characteristics and/or anatomical regions of interest underlying discrimination, while mitigating problems of multiple comparisons. As a proof of concept for the method's applicability to future neurodiagnostics, we apply BDopt classification to two resting state fMRI data sets: a trait (between-subjects classification of patients with schizophrenia vs. controls, and a state (within-subjects classification of wake vs. sleep, demonstrating powerful discriminant accuracy for the proposed framework.

  10. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs.

  11. Regional MRI Perfusion Measures Predict Motor/Executive Function in Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini Z. Papadaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS demonstrate brain hemodynamic changes and also suffer from difficulties in processing speed, memory, and executive functions. Objective. To explore whether brain hemodynamic disturbances in CIS patients correlate with executive functions. Methods. Thirty CIS patients and forty-three healthy subjects, matched for age, gender, education level, and FSIQ, were administered tests of visuomotor learning and set shifting ability. Cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, and mean transit time (MTT values were estimated in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM and normal-appearing deep gray Matter (NADGM structures, using a perfusion MRI technique. Results. CIS patients showed significantly elevated reaction time (RT on both tasks, while their CBV and MTT values were globally increased, probably due to inflammatory vasodilation. Significantly, positive correlation coefficients were found between error rates on the inhibition condition of the visuomotor learning task and CBV values in occipital, periventricular NAWM and both thalami. On the set shifting condition of the respective task significant, positive associations were found between error rates and CBV values in the semioval center and periventricular NAWM bilaterally. Conclusion. Impaired executive function in CIS patients correlated positively with elevated regional CBV values thought to reflect inflammatory processes.

  12. Precise spatial co-registration in simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI measurements using markers coaxially fixable to the optodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toru; Matsuda, Keiji; Iwano, Takayuki; Umeyama, Shinji

    2014-03-01

    Similar to blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional nearinfrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) observes regional hemodynamic responses associated with neuronal activation. However, the conventional criteria for detecting true positive fNIRS and fMRI signals appear to be based on different understandings of cerebral hemodynamics. Considerable numbers of fNIRS studies have ascribed the increase in oxygenated hemoglobin to a typical sign of functional activation, whereas the corresponding BOLD signal in fMRI directly correlates with a decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin. This inconsistency requires solution through the simultaneous measurements of fNIRS and fMRI. In practice, however, there remain several technical problems associated with conducting simultaneous measurements with high reproducibility. One issue is the precise spatial registration of NIRS optodes in MR images. We prepared marker containers of an annular shape that can be coaxially fixed to the optode. Liquid paraffin with α-tocopheryl acetate, which exhibits a bright contrast in T1-weighted MR images of human heads, was solidified in each container by adding higher fatty acid. A subject wearing the marker-fixed optodes at parietal area participated in preliminary fNIRS and fMRI experiments; the subject was instructed to execute single-sided hand finger tapping. The positions showed that deoxygenated hemoglobin decreases in fNIRS coincided with the BOLD-positive region in fMRI. The prepared marker is chemically stable and repetitively usable. We believe that this simple method contributes precision to the co-registration of fNIRS and fMRI.

  13. Comparison of global cerebral blood flow measured by phase-contrast mapping MRI with (15) O-H2 O positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase-contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by (15) O-H2 O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated...... of the arterial input function. Flow was measured in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries by a noncardiac triggered PCM MRI sequence at 3T. The measured flow was normalized to total brain weight determined from a volume-segmented 3D T1 -weighted anatomical MR-scan. RESULTS: Mean CBF was 34.9 ± 3.4 mL/100 g...... in vivo against an accepted reference technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Same-day measurements of CBF by (15) O-H2 O PET and subsequently by PCM MRI were performed on 22 healthy young male volunteers. Global CBF by PET was determined by applying a one-tissue compartment model with measurement...

  14. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/-2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  15. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safari, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting. Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98% (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm. The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/–2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  16. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  17. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  18. Measuring the representational space of music with fMRI: a case study with Sting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Daniel J; Grafton, Scott T

    2016-12-01

    Functional brain imaging has revealed much about the neuroanatomical substrates of higher cognition, including music, language, learning, and memory. The technique lends itself to studying of groups of individuals. In contrast, the nature of expert performance is typically studied through the examination of exceptional individuals using behavioral case studies and retrospective biography. Here, we combined fMRI and the study of an individual who is a world-class expert musician and composer in order to better understand the neural underpinnings of his music perception and cognition, in particular, his mental representations for music. We used state of the art multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) and representational dissimilarity analysis (RDA) in a fixed set of brain regions to test three exploratory hypotheses with the musician Sting: (1) Composing would recruit neutral structures that are both unique and distinguishable from other creative acts, such as composing prose or visual art; (2) listening and imagining music would recruit similar neural regions, indicating that musical memory shares anatomical substrates with music listening; (3) the MVPA and RDA results would help us to map the representational space for music, revealing which musical pieces and genres are perceived to be similar in the musician's mental models for music. Our hypotheses were confirmed. The act of composing, and even of imagining elements of the composed piece separately, such as melody and rhythm, activated a similar cluster of brain regions, and were distinct from prose and visual art. Listened and imagined music showed high similarity, and in addition, notable similarity/dissimilarity patterns emerged among the various pieces used as stimuli: Muzak and Top 100/Pop songs were far from all other musical styles in Mahalanobis distance (Euclidean representational space), whereas jazz, R&B, tango and rock were comparatively close. Closer inspection revealed principaled explanations for the

  19. Gender and age effects in structural brain asymmetry as measured by MRI texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Vassili A; Kruggel, Frithjof; von Cramon, D Yves

    2003-07-01

    Effects of gender and age on structural brain asymmetry were studied by 3D texture analysis in 380 adults. Asymmetry is detected by comparing the complex 3D gray-scale image patterns in the left and right cerebral hemispheres as revealed by anatomical T1-weighted MRI datasets. The Talairach and Tournoux parcellation system was applied to study the asymmetry on five levels: the whole cerebrum, nine coronal sections, 12 axial sections, boxes resulting from both coronal and axial subdivisions, and by a sliding spherical window of 9 mm diameter. The analysis revealed that the brain asymmetry increases in the anterior-posterior direction starting from the central region onward. Male brains were found to be more asymmetric than female. This gender-related effect is noticeable in all brain areas but is most significant in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, the adjacent white matter regions in the temporal stem and the knee of the optic radiation, the thalamus, and the posterior cingulate. The brain asymmetry increases significantly with age in the inferior frontal gyrus, anterior insula, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, coronal radiata, and knee region of the internal capsule. Asymmetry decreases with age in the optic radiation, precentral gyrus, and angular gyrus. The texture-based method reported here is based on extended multisort cooccurrence matrices that employ intensity, gradient, and anisotropy features in a uniform way. It is sensitive, simple to reproduce, robust, and unbiased in the sense that segmentation of brain compartments and spatial transformations are not necessary. Thus, it should be considered as another tool for digital morphometry in neuroscience.

  20. Correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and histopathology in the measurement of tumor and breast volume and their ratio in breast cancer patients: a prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qian; YE Jing-ming; XU Ling; DUAN Xue-ning; ZHAO Jian-xin; LIU Yin-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have examined the association between the diameter of primary tumors measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology in breast cancer patients.However,the diameter does not completely describe the dimensions of the breast tumor or its volumetric proportion relative to the whole breast.The association between breast tumor volume/breast volume ratios measured by these two techniques has not been reported.Methods Seventy-three patients were recruited from female patients with primary breast tumors admitted to our center between January and December 2010.They were divided into two groups.Group A (n=46) underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM),and Group B (n=27) underwent preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy before MRM.They were examined by dynamic-contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to measure breast volumes (BVs),tumor volumes (TVs),and tumor volume/breast volume ratios (TV/BV).These measurements were compared with histopathology results after MRM,and the associations between MRI and pathology were analyzed by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis.Results For Group A,the correlation coefficients for BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios measured by the two techniques were 0.938,0.921,and 0.897 (all P <0.001),respectively.For Group B,the correlation coefficients for BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios were 0.936,0.902,and 0.869 (all P<0.01),respectively.The results suggest statistically significant correlations between these parameters measured by the two techniques for both groups.Conclusion For these patients,BVs,TVs,and TV/BV ratios measured by DCE-MRI significantly correlated with those determined by histopathology.

  1. Quantitative renal perfusion measurements in a rat model of acute kidney injury at 3T: testing inter- and intramethodical significance of ASL and DCE-MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Zimmer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To establish arterial spin labelling (ASL for quantitative renal perfusion measurements in a rat model at 3 Tesla and to test the diagnostic significance of ASL and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI in a model of acute kidney injury (AKI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ASL and DCE-MRI were consecutively employed on six Lewis rats, five of which had a unilateral ischaemic AKI. All measurements in this study were performed on a 3 Tesla MR scanner using a FAIR True-FISP approach and a TWIST sequence for ASL and DCE-MRI, respectively. Perfusion maps were calculated for both methods and the cortical perfusion of healthy and diseased kidneys was inter- and intramethodically compared using a region-of-interest based analysis. RESULTS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both methods produce significantly different values for the healthy and the diseased kidneys (P<0.01. The mean difference was 147±47 ml/100 g/min and 141±46 ml/100 g/min for ASL and DCE-MRI, respectively. ASL measurements yielded a mean cortical perfusion of 416±124 ml/100 g/min for the healthy and 316±102 ml/100 g/min for the diseased kidneys. The DCE-MRI values were systematically higher and the mean cortical renal blood flow (RBF was found to be 542±85 ml/100 g/min (healthy and 407±119 ml/100 g/min (AKI. CONCLUSION: Both methods are equally able to detect abnormal perfusion in diseased (AKI kidneys. This shows that ASL is a capable alternative to DCE-MRI regarding the detection of abnormal renal blood flow. Regarding absolute perfusion values, nontrivial differences and variations remain when comparing the two methods.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of kidney function by dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and FITC-sinistrin clearance in rats at 3 tesla: initial results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank G Zöllner

    Full Text Available Glomerular filtration rate (GFR is an essential parameter of kidney function which can be measured by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-GFR and transcutaneous approaches based on fluorescent tracer molecules (optical-GFR. In an initial study comparing both techniques in separate measurements on the same animal, the correlation of the obtained GFR was poor. The goal of this study was to investigate if a simultaneous measurement was feasible and if thereby, the discrepancies in MRI-GFR and optical-GFR could be reduced. For the experiments healthy and unilateral nephrectomised (UNX Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used. The miniaturized fluorescent sensor was fixed on the depilated back of an anesthetized rat. A bolus of 5 mg/100 g b.w. of FITC-sinistrin was intravenously injected. For dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion imaging (DCE-MRI a 3D time-resolved angiography with stochastic trajectories (TWIST sequence was used. By means of a one compartment model the excretion half-life (t1/2 of FITC-sinistrin was calculated and converted into GFR. GFR from DCE-MRI was calculated by fitting pixel-wise a two compartment renal filtration model. Mean cortical GFR and GFR by FITC-sinistrin were compared by Bland-Altman plots and pair-wise t-test. Results show that a simultaneous GFR measurement using both techniques is feasible. Mean optical-GFR was 4.34 ± 2.22 ml/min (healthy SD rats and 2.34 ± 0.90 ml/min (UNX rats whereas MRI-GFR was 2.10 ± 0.64 ml/min (SD rats and 1.17 ± 0.38 ml/min (UNX rats. Differences between healthy and UNX rats were significant (p<0.05 and almost equal percentage difference (46.1% and 44.3% in mean GFR were assessed with both techniques. Overall mean optical-GFR values were approximately twice as high compared to MRI-GFR values. However, compared to a previous study, our results showed a higher agreement. In conclusion, the possibility to use the transcutaneous method in MRI may have a huge impact in

  3. The impact of reliable pre-bolus T1 measurements or a fixed T1 value in the assessment of glioma patients with Dynamic Contrast Enhancing MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate quantification of hemodynamic parameters using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE) requires a measurement of tissue T1 prior to contrast injection (T1). We evaluate (i) T1 estimation using the variable flip angle (VFA) and the saturation recovery (SR) techniques and (ii) investi...

  4. FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY OF THE SOFT-TISSUES OF THE HAND AND WRIST - INVIVO EXCURSION MEASUREMENT OF THE FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS-TENDON USING MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; KONINGS, JG; WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the flexor pollicis longus-tendon (FPL-tendon) with the thumb in different positions allows the in vivo assessment of its abduction-adduction/flexion excursion. Measurements can also be performed in different positions of the wrist. In our study, the mean excursio

  5. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

  6. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  7. Regional Reproducibility of BOLD Calibration Parameter M, OEF and Resting-State CMRO2 Measurements with QUO2 MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Isabelle; Tancredi, Felipe B.; Hoge, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The current generation of calibrated MRI methods goes beyond simple localization of task-related responses to allow the mapping of resting-state cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in micromolar units and estimation of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). Prior to the adoption of such techniques in neuroscience research applications, knowledge about the precision and accuracy of absolute estimates of CMRO2 and OEF is crucial and remains unexplored to this day. In this study, we addressed the question of methodological precision by assessing the regional inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the BOLD calibration parameter M, OEF, O2 delivery and absolute CMRO2 estimates derived from a state-of-the-art calibrated BOLD technique, the QUantitative O2 (QUO2) approach. We acquired simultaneous measurements of CBF and R2* at rest and during periods of hypercapnia (HC) and hyperoxia (HO) on two separate scan sessions within 24 hours using a clinical 3 T MRI scanner. Maps of M, OEF, oxygen delivery and CMRO2, were estimated from the measured end-tidal O2, CBF0, CBFHC/HO and R2*HC/HO. Variability was assessed by computing the between-subject coefficients of variation (bwCV) and within-subject CV (wsCV) in seven ROIs. All tests GM-averaged values of CBF0, M, OEF, O2 delivery and CMRO2 were: 49.5 ± 6.4 mL/100 g/min, 4.69 ± 0.91%, 0.37 ± 0.06, 377 ± 51 μmol/100 g/min and 143 ± 34 μmol/100 g/min respectively. The variability of parameter estimates was found to be the lowest when averaged throughout all GM, with general trends toward higher CVs when averaged over smaller regions. Among the MRI measurements, the most reproducible across scans was R2*0 (wsCVGM = 0.33%) along with CBF0 (wsCVGM = 3.88%) and R2*HC (wsCVGM = 6.7%). CBFHC and R2*HO were found to have a higher intra-subject variability (wsCVGM = 22.4% and wsCVGM = 16% respectively), which is likely due to propagation of random measurement errors, especially for CBFHC due to the low

  8. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, H; Steffensen, E; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2012-01-01

    technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose: To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC......, and glioblastomas. Results: rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r ¼ 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r ¼ 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated......-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and r...

  9. Effects of changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI for follow-up in brain atrophy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Malone, Ian M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Fox, Nick C

    2015-02-15

    Stable MR acquisition is essential for reliable measurement of brain atrophy in longitudinal studies. One attractive recent advance in MRI is to speed up acquisition using parallel imaging (e.g. reducing volumetric T1-weighted acquisition scan times from around 9 to 5 min). In some studies, a decision to change to an accelerated acquisition may have been deliberately taken, while in others repeat scans may occasionally be accidentally acquired with an accelerated acquisition. In ADNI, non-accelerated and accelerated scans were acquired in the same scanning session on each individual. We investigated the impact on brain atrophy as measured by k-means normalized boundary shift integral (KN-BSI) and deformation-based morphometry when changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI acquisitions over a 12-month interval using scans of 422 subjects from ADNI. KN-BSIs were calculated using both a non-accelerated baseline scan and non-accelerated 12-month scans (i.e. consistent acquisition), and a non-accelerated baseline scan and an accelerated 12-month scan (i.e. changed acquisition). Fluid-based non-rigid registration was also performed on those scans to estimate the brain atrophy rate. We found that the effect on KN-BSI and fluid-based non-rigid registration depended on the scanner manufacturer. For KN-BSI, in Philips and Siemens scanners, the change had very little impact on the measured atrophy rate (increase of 0.051% in Philips and -0.035% in Siemens from consistent acquisition to changed acquisition), whereas, in GE, the change caused a mean reduction of 0.65% in the brain atrophy rate. This is likely due to the difference in tissue contrast between gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid in the non-accelerated and accelerated scans in GE, which uses IR-FSPGR instead of MP-RAGE. For fluid-based non-rigid registration, the change caused a mean increase of 0.29% in the brain atrophy rate in the changed acquisition compared with consistent acquisition in Philips

  10. Accuracy of MRI volume measurements of breast lesions: comparison between automated, semiautomated and manual assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, Marga B.; Fournell, Daphne; Nadar, Beenarose Thanka; Figiel, Jens H.; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T. [Philipps University, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany); Behrens, Sarah N.M. [MeVis GmbH, Bremen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a dedicated software tool for automated and semiautomated volume measurement in contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance mammography (MRM). Ninety-six breast lesions with histopathological workup (27 benign, 69 malignant) were re-evaluated by different volume measurement techniques. Volumes of all lesions were extracted automatically (AVM) and semiautomatically (SAVM) from CE 3D MRM and compared with manual 3D contour segmentation (manual volume measurement, MVM, reference measurement technique) and volume estimates based on maximum diameter measurement (MDM). Compared with MVM as reference method MDM, AVM and SAVM underestimated lesion volumes by 63.8%, 30.9% and 21.5%, respectively, with significantly different accuracy for benign (102.4%, 18.4% and 11.4%) and malignant (54.9%, 33.0% and 23.1%) lesions (p<0.05). Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility was best for AVM (mean difference {+-}2SD, 1.0{+-}9.7% and 1.8{+-}12.1%) followed by SAVM (4.3{+-}25.7% and 4.3{+-}7.9%), MVM (2.3{+-}38.2% and 8.6{+-}31.8%) and MDM (33.9{+-}128.4% and 9.3{+-}55.9%). SAVM is more accurate for volume assessment of breast lesions than MDM and AVM. Volume measurement is less accurate for malignant than benign lesions. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of Renal Hemodynamics and Oxygenation by Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Quantitative Invasive Physiological Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In vivo assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation under (patho)physiological conditions by means of noninvasive diagnostic imaging is conceptually appealing. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative parametric mapping of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times T 2* and T 2 are thought to provide surrogates of renal tissue oxygenation. The validity and efficacy of this technique for quantitative characterization of local tissue oxygenation and its changes under different functional conditions have not been systematically examined yet and remain to be established. For this purpose, the development of an integrative multimodality approaches is essential. Here we describe an integrated hybrid approach (MR-PHYSIOL) that combines established quantitative physiological measurements with T 2* (T 2) mapping and MR-based kidney size measurements. Standardized reversible (patho)physiologically relevant interventions, such as brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia, are used for detailing the relation between the MR-PHYSIOL parameters, in particular between renal T 2* and tissue oxygenation.

  12. Extraction of the cerebral cortical boundaries from MRI for measurement of cortical thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskildsen, Simon F.; Uldahl, Mark; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2005-04-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cause atrophy of the cerebral cortex. Measurements of cerebral cortical thickness and volume are used in the quantification and localization of atrophy. It is possible to measure the thickness of the cerebral cortex manually from magnetic resonance imaging, but partial volume effects, orthogonality problems, large amounts of manual labor and operator bias makes it difficult to conduct measurements on large patient populations. Automatic quantification and localization of atrophy is a highly desirable goal, as it facilitates the study of early anatomical changes and track disease progression on large populations. The first step in achieving this goal is to develop robust and accurate methods for measuring cortical thickness and volume automatically. We have developed a new method, capable of both extracting surface representations of the cortical boundaries from magnetic resonance imaging and measuring the cortical thickness. Experiments show that the developed method is robust and performs well on datasets of both healthy subjects and subjects suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Quantitative MRI measures of orbitofrontal cortex in patients with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoptman, Matthew J; Volavka, Jan; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Czobor, Pál; Szeszko, Philip R; Gerig, Guido; Chakos, Miranda; Blocher, Joseph; Citrome, Leslie L; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Sheitman, Brian; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Bilder, Robert M

    2005-11-30

    The relationship between orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) volumes and functional domains in treatment-resistant patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder is poorly understood. OFC dysfunction is implicated in several of the behaviors that are abnormal in schizophrenia. However, little is known about the relationship between these behaviors and OFC volumes. Forty-nine patients received magnetic resonance imaging scanning as part of a double-blind treatment study in which psychiatric symptomatology, neuropsychological function, and aggression were measured. OFC volumes were manually traced on anatomical images. Psychiatric symptomatology was measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Aggression was measured with the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS) and with the PANSS. Neuropsychological function was assessed using a comprehensive test battery. Larger right OFC volumes were associated with poorer neuropsychological function. Larger left OFC gray matter volumes and larger OFC white matter volumes bilaterally were associated with greater levels of aggression. These findings are discussed in the context of potential iatrogenic effects.

  14. Respiration gating and Bloch fitting improve pH measurements with acidoCEST MRI in an ovarian orthotopic tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kyle M.; Randtke, Edward A.; Howison, Christine M.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a MRI method that can measure extracellular pH in tumor tissues, known as acidoCEST MRI. This method relies on the detection of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) of iopamidol, an FDA-approved CT contrast agent that has two CEST signals. A log10 ratio of the two CEST signals is linearly correlated with pH, but independent of agent concentration, endogenous T1 relaxation time, and B1 inhomogeneity. Therefore, detecting both CEST effects of iopamidol during in vivo studies can be used to accurately measure the extracellular pH in tumor tissues. Past in vivo studies using acidoCEST MRI have suffered from respiration artifacts in orthotopic and lung tumor models that have corrupted pH measurements. In addition, the non-linear fitting method used to analyze results is unreliable as it is subject to over-fitting especially with noisy CEST spectra. To improve the technique, we have recently developed a respiration gated CEST MRI pulse sequence that has greatly reduced motion artifacts, and we have included both a prescan and post scan to remove endogenous CEST effects. In addition, we fit the results by parameterizing the contrast of the exogenous agent with respect to pH via the Bloch equations modified for chemical exchange, which is less subject to over-fitting than the non-linear method. These advances in the acidoCEST MRI technique and analysis methods have made pH measurements more reliable, especially in areas of the body subject to respiratory motion.

  15. Measurement with microscopic MRI and simulation of flow in different aneurysm models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhoff, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.edelhoff@tu-dortmund.de; Frank, Frauke; Heil, Marvin; Suter, Dieter [Experimental Physics III, TU Dortmund University, Otto-Hahn-Street 4, Dortmund 44227 (Germany); Walczak, Lars; Weichert, Frank [Computer Science VII, TU Dortmund University, Otto-Hahn-Street 16, Dortmund 44227 (Germany); Schmitz, Inge [Institute for Pathology, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, Bochum 44789 (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The impact and the development of aneurysms depend to a significant degree on the exchange of liquid between the regular vessel and the pathological extension. A better understanding of this process will lead to improved prediction capabilities. The aim of the current study was to investigate fluid-exchange in aneurysm models of different complexities by combining microscopic magnetic resonance measurements with numerical simulations. In order to evaluate the accuracy and applicability of these methods, the fluid-exchange process between the unaltered vessel lumen and the aneurysm phantoms was analyzed quantitatively using high spatial resolution. Methods: Magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to visualize fluid-exchange in two different models produced with a 3D printer. One model of an aneurysm was based on histological findings. The flow distribution in the different models was measured on a microscopic scale using time of flight magnetic resonance imaging. The whole experiment was simulated using fast graphics processing unit-based numerical simulations. The obtained simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with the magnetic resonance imaging measurements, taking into account flow and spin–lattice relaxation. Results: The results of both presented methods compared well for the used aneurysm models and the chosen flow distributions. The results from the fluid-exchange analysis showed comparable characteristics concerning measurement and simulation. Similar symmetry behavior was observed. Based on these results, the amount of fluid-exchange was calculated. Depending on the geometry of the models, 7% to 45% of the liquid was exchanged per second. Conclusions: The result of the numerical simulations coincides well with the experimentally determined velocity field. The rate of fluid-exchange between vessel and aneurysm was well-predicted. Hence, the results obtained by simulation could be validated by the experiment. The

  16. MRI blood-brain barrier permeability measurements to predict hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Bredno, Jörg; Wendland, Michael F; Derugin, Nikita; Hom, Jason; Schuster, Tibor; Zimmer, Claus; Su, Hua; Ohara, Peter T; Young, William L; Wintermark, Max

    2012-12-01

    Permeability imaging might add valuable information in the risk assessment of hemorrhagic transformation. This study evaluates the predictive value of blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) measurements extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke. Spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar rats with 2 h filament occlusion of the right MCA underwent MRI during occlusion, at 4 and 24 h post reperfusion. BBBP was imaged by DCE imaging and quantified by Patlak analysis. Cresyl-violet staining was used to characterize hemorrhage in sacrificed rats at 24 h, immediately following the last imaging study. BBBP changes were evaluated at baseline, 4 and 24 h after reperfusion. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the most accurate BBBP threshold to predict hemorrhagic transformation. In animals showing macroscopic hemorrhage at 24 h, 95th BBBP percentile values ipsilateral were 0.323 [0.260, 0.387], 0.685 [0.385, 0.985], and 0.412 [0.210, 0.613] ml/min·100 g (marginal mean [95%CI]) during occlusion, at 4 and 24 h post reperfusion, respectively. The BBBP values on the infarcted and contralateral side were significantly different at 4 (p = 0.034) and 24 h post reperfusion (p = 0.031). The predictive value of BBBP in terms of macroscopic hemorrhage was highest 4 h after reperfusion (ROC area under the curve = 84 %) with a high negative predictive value (98.3 %) and limited positive predictive value (14.9 %) for a threshold of 0.35 ml/min·100g. Altered BBBP is a necessary but not sufficient condition to cause hemorrhagic transformation in rats with an infarct. Further research is needed to identify those additional risk factors that are required for hemorrhagic transformation to develop in the setting of ischemic stroke.

  17. Application of fMRI to obesity research: differences in reward pathway activation measured with fMRI BOLD during visual presentation of high and low calorie foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Adam, Tanja C.; Goran, Michael I.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    The factors behind the neural mechanisms that motivate food choice and obesity are not well known. Furthermore, it is not known when these neural mechanisms develop and how they are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. This study uses fMRI together with clinical data to shed light on the aforementioned questions by investigating how appetite-related activation in the brain changes with low versus high caloric foods in pre-pubescent girls. Previous studies have shown that obese adults have less striatal D2 receptors and thus reduced Dopamine (DA) signaling leading to the reward-deficit theory of obesity. However, overeating in itself reduces D2 receptor density, D2 sensitivity and thus reward sensitivity. The results of this study will show how early these neural mechanisms develop and what effect the drastic endocrinological changes during puberty has on these mechanisms. Our preliminary results showed increased activations in the Putamen, Insula, Thalamus and Hippocampus when looking at activations where High Calorie > Low Calorie. When comparing High Calorie > Control and Low Calorie > Control, the High > Control test showed increased significant activation in the frontal lobe. The Low > Control also yielded significant activation in the Left and Right Fusiform Gyrus, which did not appear in the High > Control test. These results indicate that the reward pathway activations previously shown in post-puberty and adults are present in pre-pubescent teens. These results may suggest that some of the preferential neural mechanisms of reward are already present pre-puberty.

  18. CBF/CMRO2 coupling measured with calibrated BOLD fMRI: sources of bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Dubowitz, David J; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-07-15

    The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index n, the ratio of fractional CBF changes to fractional CMRO2 changes. Measurements of n have yielded varying results, and it is not known if the observed variability is due to measurement techniques or underlying physiology. The calibrated BOLD approach using hypercapnia offers a promising tool for assessing changes in CBF/CMRO2 coupling in health and disease, but potential systematic errors have not yet been characterized. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the magnitude of bias in the estimate of n that arises from the way in which a region of interest (ROI) is chosen for averaging data and to relate this potential bias to a more general theoretical consideration of the sources of systematic errors in the calibrated BOLD experiment. Results were compared for different approaches for defining an ROI within the visual cortex based on: (1) retinotopically defined V1; (2) a functional CBF localizer; and (3) a functional BOLD localizer. Data in V1 yielded a significantly lower estimate of n (2.45) compared to either CBF (n=3.45) or BOLD (n=3.18) localizers. Different statistical thresholds produced biases in estimates of n with values ranging from 3.01 (low threshold) to 4.37 (high threshold). Possible sources of the observed biases are discussed. These results underscore the importance of a critical evaluation of the methodology, and the adoption of consistent standards for applying the calibrated BOLD approach to the evaluation of CBF/CMRO2 coupling.

  19. CBF/CMRO2 Coupling Measured with Calibrated-BOLD fMRI: Sources of Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Dubowitz, David J.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index n, the ratio of fractional CBF changes to fractional CMRO2 changes. Measurements of n have yielded varying results, and it is not known if the observed variability is due to measurement techniques or underlying physiology. The calibrated BOLD approach using hypercapnia offers a promising tool for assessing changes in CBF/CMRO2 coupling in health and disease, but potential systematic errors have not yet been characterized. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the magnitude of bias in the estimate of n that arises from the way in which a region of interest (ROI) is chosen for averaging data, and to relate this potential bias to a more general theoretical consideration of the sources of systematic errors in the calibrated BOLD experiment. Results were compared for different approaches for defining an ROI within the visual cortex based on: 1) retinotopically-defined V1; 2) a functional CBF localizer; and 3) a functional BOLD localizer. Data in V1 yielded a significantly lower estimate of n (2.45) compared to either CBF (n = 3.45) or BOLD (n = 3.18) localizers. Different statistical thresholds produced biases in estimates of n with values ranging from 3.01 (low threshold) to 4.37 (high threshold). Possible sources of the observed biases are discussed. These results underscore the importance of a critical evaluation of the methodology, and the adoption of consistent standards for applying the calibrated BOLD approach to the evaluation of CBF/CMRO2 coupling. PMID:17524665

  20. Hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis by vessel attenuation measurement on CT compared with adenosine perfusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekker, Martijn A.M. den; Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Pundziute, Gabija; Heuvel, Edwin R. van den; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn, E-mail: r.vliegenthart@umcg.nl

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The majority of anatomical coronary stenoses do not cause myocardial ischemia. • cCTA-derived CCO decrease expresses luminal density gradient across stenosis. • CCO decrease differentiates between anatomical stenoses with and without associated myocardial ischemia. • CCO decrease assessment can exclude the majority of stenoses without hemodynamic significance. - Abstract: Purpose: We assessed the association between corrected contrast opacification (CCO) based on coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) and inducible ischemia by adenosine perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (APMR). Methods: Sixty cardiac asymptomatic patients with extra-cardiac arterial disease (mean age 64.4 ± 7.7 years; 78% male) underwent cCTA and APMR. Luminal CT attenuation values (Hounsfield Units) were measured in coronary arteries from proximal to distal, with additional measurements across sites with >50% lumen stenosis. CCO was calculated by dividing coronary CT attenuation by descending aorta CT attenuation. A reversible perfusion defect on APMR was considered as myocardial ischemia. Results: In total, 169 coronary stenoses were found. Seven patients had 8 perfusion defects on APMR, with 11 stenoses in corresponding vessels. CCO decrease across stenoses with hemodynamic significance was 0.144 ± 0.112 compared to 0.047 ± 0.104 across stenoses without hemodynamic significance (P = 0.003). CCO decrease in lesions with and without anatomical stenosis was similar (0.054 ± 0.116 versus 0.052 ± 0.101; P = 0.89). Using 0.20 as preliminary CCO decrease cut-off, hemodynamic significance would be excluded in 82.9% of anatomical stenoses. Conclusions: CCO decrease across coronary stenosis is associated with myocardial ischemia on APMR. CCO based on common cCTA data is a novel method to assess hemodynamic significance of anatomical stenosis.

  1. Measurement of coronary flow response to cold pressor stress in asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors using spiral velocity-encoded cine MRI at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroules, Christopher D.; Peshock, Ronald M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)), e-mail: Ron.Peshock@UTSouthwestern.edu; Chang, Alice Y.; Kontak, Andrew (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); Dimitrov, Ivan; Kotys, Melanie (Dept. of Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    2010-05-15

    Background: Coronary sinus (CS) flow in response to a provocative stress has been used as a surrogate measure of coronary flow reserve, and velocity-encoded cine (VEC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established technique for measuring CS flow. In this study, the cold pressor test (CPT) was used to measure CS flow response because it elicits an endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation that may afford greater sensitivity for detecting early changes in coronary endothelial function. Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of CS flow reactivity (CSFR) to CPT using spiral VEC MRI at 3 Tesla in a sample of asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors. Material and Methods: Fourteen asymptomatic women (age 38 years +- 10) with cardiovascular risk factors were studied using 3D spiral VEC MRI of the CS at 3 T. The CPT was utilized as a provocative stress to measure changes in CS flow. CSFR to CPT was calculated from the ratio of CS flow during peak stress to baseline CS flow. Results: CPT induced a significant hemodynamic response as measured by a 45% increase in rate-pressure product (P<0.01). A significant increase in CS volume flow was also observed (baseline, 116 +- 26 ml/min; peak stress, 152 +- 34 ml/min, P=0.01). CSFR to CPT was 1.31 +- 0.20. Test-retest variability of CS volume flow was 5% at baseline and 6% during peak stress. Conclusion: Spiral CS VEC MRI at 3 T is a feasible and reproducible technique for measuring CS flow in asymptomatic women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Significant changes in CSFR to CPT are detectable, without demanding pharmacologic stress

  2. Belowground plant development measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: exploiting the potential for non-invasive trait quantification using sugar beet as a proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eMetzner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both structural and functional properties of belowground plant organs are critical for the development and yield of plants but, compared to the shoot, much more difficult to observe due to soil opacity. Many processes concerning the belowground plant performance are not fully understood, in particular spatial and temporal dynamics and their interrelation with environmental factors. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI as a noninvasive method to evaluate which traits can be measured when a complex plant organ is monitored in-vivo while growing in the soil. We chose sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris as a model system. The beet consists mainly of root tissues, is rather complex regarding tissue structure and responses to environmental factors, and thereby a good object to test the applicability of MRI for 3D phenotyping approaches. Over a time period of up to 3 months, traits such as beet morphology or anatomy were followed in the soil and the effect of differently sized pots on beet fresh weight calculated from MRI data was studied. There was a clear positive correlation between the pot size and the increase in fresh weight of a sugar beet over time. Since knowledge of the development of internal beet structures with several concentric cambia, vascular and parenchyma rings is still limited, we consecutively acquired 3D volumetric images on individual plants using the MRI contrast parameter T2 to map the development of rings at the tissue level. This demonstrates that MRI provides versatile protocols to non-invasively measure plant traits in the soil. It opens new avenues to investigate belowground plant performance under adverse environmental conditions such as drought, nutrient shortage or soil compaction to seek for traits of belowground organs making plants more resilient to stress.

  3. Using perfusion MRI to measure the dynamic changes in neural activation associated with tonic muscular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Daron G; Clarke, Collin F; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Prato, Frank S; St Lawrence, Keith S

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge regarding neural pain processing is primarily the result of studies involving models of brief cutaneous pain; however, clinical pain generally originates in deep tissue and is prolonged. This study measured the dynamic neural activation associated with a muscular pain model incorporating both acute and tonic states. Hypertonic saline (5% NaCl) was infused into the brachioradialis muscle of eleven healthy volunteers for 15min after an initial bolus of 0.5mL. Ten controls followed the same protocol with normal saline (0.9% NaCl). Magnetic resonance images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were acquired using an arterial spin labelling method. The imaging volume extended from the thalamus to the primary somatosensory cortices, but did not include the brainstem and cerebellum. Using a numerical scale from 0 to 10, ratings of pain intensity peaked at 5.9+/-0.6 and remained near 5 for the remainder of the trial. Controls experienced minimal pain, reporting a peak value of 1.8+/-0.4. Significant CBF increases in rostral and caudal anterior insula bilaterally, anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC), bilateral thalamus, and contralateral posterior insula were observed. The time courses of CBF revealed significant differences in the activation pattern during tonic pain. In particular, a more rapid return to baseline in aMCC versus insula was interpreted as a preferential decrease in the affective component of pain. This conclusion was supported by the strong correlation between pain intensity ratings and CBF in the contralateral insula (R(2)=0.911, p<0.01), which is a region believed to be responsible for pain intensity processing.

  4. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  5. Reproducibility of pulmonary blood flow measurements by phase-contrast MRI using different 1.5 T MR scanners at two institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraha, Rin; Tsuchiya, Nanae; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Iwasawa, Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be beneficial for diagnosis of disease by offering quantitative information. However, reproducibility can be a major problem when there is a numerical threshold in multi-institution, multi-vendor situations. Purpose To measure pulmonary blood flow with phase-contrast (PC) imaging using two different MR scanners (1.5 T) at different institutions in the same participants and to examine the reproducibility of the measurements. Material and Methods Participants were 10 healthy volunteers (5 men; age range, 27–36 years). The measurements included the mean and maximal blood velocities, the mean blood flow volume, and the acceleration time and volume (AT and AV), derived from the time-flow curve of the PC-MRI. Simultaneously obtained maximal, minimal, and mean areas from regions of interest set in the pulmonary artery were also calculated. In order to calculate the reproducibility of the quantitative variables, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were employed. When an adequate ICC was obtained, Bland–Altman analysis was conducted to identify any systematic bias. Results The ICCs were almost perfect for the mean blood flow volume and the AV (r = 0.82 and 0.80), and were substantial in the mean and maximal areas, and the AT (r = 0.63, 0.74, and 0.64, respectively). However, there was a fixed bias in the area measurement between the two scanners. Also, the AV had a proportional bias. Conclusion Our results reveal that various indices derived from PC-MRI on different MR scanners are promising as common indices for pulmonary flow assessment. Research and clinical use of PC-MRI for the pulmonary artery is expected to extend to multi-institution situations. PMID:28210495

  6. Cerebral hemodynamic changes measured by gradient-echo or spin-echo bolus tracking and its correlation to changes in ICA blood flow measured by phase-mapping MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, J.R.; Rostrup, Egill; Garde, Ellen;

    2001-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by Acetazolamide (ACZ) were measured using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) with both spin echo (SE) EPI and gradient echo (GE) EPI, and related to changes in internal carotid artery (ICA) flow measured by phase-mapping. Also examined...... was the effect of repeated bolus injections. CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated by singular value decomposition (SVD) and by deconvolution using an exponential function as kernel. The results showed no dependency on calculation method. GE-EPI measured a significant...... increase in CBF and CBV in response to ACZ, while SE-EPI measured a significant increase in CBV and MTT. CBV and MTT change measured by SE-EPI was sensitive to previous bolus injections. There was a significant linear relation between change in CBF measured by GE-EPI and change in ICA flow. In conclusion...

  7. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  8. Resting fMRI measures are associated with cognitive deficits in schizophrenia assessed by the MATRICS consensus cognitive battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Bustillo, Juan; Du, Yuhui; Yu, Qingbao; Jones, Thomas R.; Jiang, Tianzi; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sui, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The cognitive deficits of schizophrenia are largely resistant to current treatment, and are thus a life-long burden to patients. The MATRICS consensus cognitive battery (MCCB) provides a reliable and valid assessment of cognition across a comprehensive set of cognitive domains for schizophrenia. In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity associated with MCCB has not yet been examined. In this paper, the interrelationships between MCCB and the abnormalities seen in two types of functional measures from resting-state fMRI—fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and functional network connectivity (FNC) maps were investigated in data from 47 schizophrenia patients and 50 age-matched healthy controls. First, the fALFF maps were generated and decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA), and then the component showing the highest correlation with MCCB composite scores was selected. Second, the whole brain was separated into functional networks by group ICA, and the FNC maps were calculated. The FNC strengths with most significant correlations with MCCB were displayed and spatially overlapped with the fALFF component of interest. It demonstrated increased cognitive performance associated with higher fALFF values (intensity of regional spontaneous brain activity) in prefrontal regions, inferior parietal lobe (IPL) but lower ALFF values in thalamus, striatum, and superior temporal gyrus (STG). Interestingly, the FNC showing significant correlations with MCCB were in well agreement with the activated regions with highest z-values in fALFF component. Our results support the view that functional deficits in distributed cortico-striato-thalamic circuits and inferior parietal lobe may account for several aspects of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

  9. Automating measurement of subtle changes in articular cartilage from MRI of the knee by combining 3D image registration and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Zhao, Jenny; Peterfy, Charles G.; Genant, Harry K.

    2001-07-01

    In osteoarthritis, articular cartilage loses integrity and becomes thinned. This usually occurs at sites which bear weight during normal use. Measurement of such loss from MRI scans, requires precise and reproducible techniques, which can overcome the difficulties of patient repositioning within the scanner. In this study, we combine a previously described technique for segmentation of cartilage from MRI of the knee, with a technique for 3D image registration that matches localized regions of interest at followup and baseline. Two patients, who had recently undergone meniscal surgery, and developed lesions during the 12 month followup period were examined. Image registration matched regions of interest (ROI) between baseline and followup, and changes within the cartilage lesions were estimate to be about a 16% reduction in cartilage volume within each ROI. This was more than 5 times the reproducibility of the measurement, but only represented a change of between 1 and 2% in total femoral cartilage volume. Changes in total cartilage volume may be insensitive for quantifying changes in cartilage morphology. A combined used of automated image segmentation, with 3D image registration could be a useful tool for the precise and sensitive measurement of localized changes in cartilage from MRI of the knee.

  10. Effects of repeatability measures on results of fMRI sICA: a study on simulated and real resting-state effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Jukka J; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Ollila, Esa; Beckmann, Christian F; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Silven, Olli

    2011-05-15

    Spatial independent components analysis (sICA) has become a widely applied data-driven method for fMRI data, especially for resting-state studies. These sICA approaches are often based on iterative estimation algorithms and there are concerns about accuracy due to noise. Repeatability measures such as ICASSO, RAICAR and ARABICA have been introduced as remedies but information on their effects on estimates is limited. The contribution of this study was to provide more of such information and test if the repeatability analyses are necessary. We compared FastICA-based ordinary and repeatability approaches concerning mixing vector estimates. Comparisons included original FastICA, FSL4 Melodic FastICA and original and modified ICASSO. The effects of bootstrapping and convergence threshold were evaluated. The results show that there is only moderate improvement due to repeatability measures and only in the bootstrapping case. Bootstrapping attenuated power from time courses of resting-state network related ICs at frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz and made subsets of low frequency oscillations more emphasized IC-wise. The convergence threshold did not have a significant role concerning the accuracy of estimates. The performance results suggest that repeatability measures or strict converge criteria might not be needed in sICA analyses of fMRI data. Consequently, the results in existing sICA fMRI literature are probably valid in this sense. A decreased accuracy of original bootstrapping ICASSO was observed and corrected by using centrotype mixing estimates but the results warrant for thorough evaluations of data-driven methods in general. Also, given the fMRI-specific considerations, further development of sICA methods is strongly encouraged.

  11. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  12. 海马结构的磁共振信号测量%MRI Signal Measurement of Hippocampal Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜绪仓; 王泽忠; 鱼博浪; 任惠民; 胡海涛; 刘勇

    2001-01-01

    Objective To define the range of the normal values of MRI signals of hippocampal formation(HPF) for the diagnosis of early stage Alzheimer's disease and hippocampal sclerosis.Methods MRI signals of 254 normal adults were measured on the transverse section.Results HPF signal intensities were:T1 relaxation times,629±73 ms;T2 relaxation times,83±5.5 ms;and proton density value,5978±651.The T2 value range(χ±2S)was 72~94 ms,and mean 83 ms.T2 value greater than 104 ms will be associated with evidence of hippocampal pathologic changes.The mixed signal intensity of T2WI(30,60,120)were:3907±407,2657±347,1288±174.The signal intensity ratios of T2WI were:1.02,1.07,1.13.Conclusion As for the histological features of temporal lobe cortex and HPF,T1relaxation times and proton density values are matched but T2 relaxation times of HPF are relatively longer.%目的确定正常成年人海马结构(HPF)的磁共振信号范围,用于HS及AD的早期诊断及鉴别诊断。方法 MRI横切位定量测量了254例成年国人(年龄18~76岁)的HPF的磁共振信号。结果正常HPF的T1驰豫时间、T2驰豫时间及质子密度值分别为(629±73)ms,(83±5.5)ms,5978±651。正常T2值范围(χ±2S)为:72~94 ms。正常HPF T1WI及T2WI各回波(30、60、120)绝对信号值分别为:2263±258、3907±407、2657±347、1288±174。与颞叶皮质的相对信号强度(SIR)为:T1WI,0.98。T2WI分别为1.02、1.07、1.13。结论与颞叶皮质相比,HPF的信号特点为:T1值及质子密度值相当,T2值较长。

  13. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F;

    2003-01-01

    Scoring erosions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one method of estimating damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it has limitations. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and inter-reader reliability of computer assisted erosion volume estimation...

  14. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  15. Knee MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air-conditioned and well-lit. Some scanners have music to help you pass the time. When the ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  16. Dynamic regional phase synchrony (DRePS): An Instantaneous Measure of Local fMRI Connectivity Within Spatially Clustered Brain Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvarnia, Amir; Pedersen, Mangor; Walz, Jennifer M; Vaughan, David N; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic functional brain connectivity analysis is a fast expanding field in computational neuroscience research with the promise of elucidating brain network interactions. Sliding temporal window based approaches are commonly used in order to explore dynamic behavior of brain networks in task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. However, the low effective temporal resolution of sliding window methods fail to capture the full dynamics of brain activity at each time point. These also require subjective decisions regarding window size and window overlap. In this study, we introduce dynamic regional phase synchrony (DRePS), a novel analysis approach that measures mean local instantaneous phase coherence within adjacent fMRI voxels. We evaluate the DRePS framework on simulated data showing that the proposed measure is able to estimate synchrony at higher temporal resolution than sliding windows of local connectivity. We applied DRePS analysis to task-free fMRI data of 20 control subjects, revealing ultra-slow dynamics of local connectivity in different brain areas. Spatial clustering based on the DRePS feature time series reveals biologically congruent local phase synchrony networks (LPSNs). Taken together, our results demonstrate three main findings. Firstly, DRePS has increased temporal sensitivity compared to sliding window correlation analysis in capturing locally synchronous events. Secondly, DRePS of task-free fMRI reveals ultra-slow fluctuations of ∼0.002-0.02 Hz. Lastly, LPSNs provide plausible spatial information about time-varying brain local phase synchrony. With the DRePS method, we introduce a framework for interrogating brain local connectivity, which can potentially provide biomarkers of human brain function in health and disease. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1970-1985, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cerebral blood flow measured by arterial-spin labeling MRI: A useful biomarker for characterization of minimal hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210016 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Box648, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642-8648 (United States); Wang, Ze [Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qi, Rongfeng; Shi, Donghong [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210002 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of arterial-spin labeling (ASL) MRI to non-invasively characterize the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in cirrhotic patients and to assess the potential of ASL MRI to characterize minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Materials and methods: This study was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Thirty six cirrhosis patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (16 MHE patients and 20 non hepatic encephalopathy (non-HE) patients) and 25 controls underwent ASL MRI, and CBF was measured for each subject. One-way ANOCOVA test with age and gender as covariences was used to compare CBF difference among three groups, and post hoc analysis was performed between each two groups. Region-based correlation analysis was applied between Child–Pugh score, venous blood ammonia level, neuropsychological tests and CBF values in cirrhosis patients. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used for assessing CBF measurements in ASL MRI to differentiate MHE from non-HE patients. Results: The gray matter CBF of MHE patients (71.09 ± 11.88 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}) was significantly higher than that of non-HE patients (55.28 ± 12.30 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}, P < 0.01) and controls (52.09 ± 9.27 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}, P < 0.001). Voxel-wise ANOCOVA results showed that CBFs were significantly different among three groups in multiple gray matter areas (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). Post hoc comparisons showed that CBF of these brain regions was increased in MHE patients compared with controls and non-HE patients (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). CBF of the right putamen was of the highest sensitivity (93.8%) and moderate specificity (75.0%) for characterization of MHE when using the cutoff value of 50.57 mL min{sup −1} 100 g{sup −1}. CBFs in the bilateral median cingulate gyri, left supramarginal gyrus, right angular gyrus, right

  18. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  19. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  20. Measurement of diaphragmatic length during the breathing cycle by dynamic MRI: comparison between healthy adults and patients with an intrathoracic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian; Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monica; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Schmaehl, Astrid [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess diaphragmatic length and shortening during the breathing cycle in healthy volunteers and patients with a lung tumor using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In 15 healthy volunteers and 28 patients with a solitary lung tumor, diaphragmatic motion and length were measured during the breathing cycle using a trueFISP sequence (three images per second in the coronal and sagittal plane). Time-distance curves and maximal length reduction (= shortening) of the diaphragm were calculated. The influence of tumor localization on diaphragmatic shortening was examined. In healthy volunteers maximal diaphragmatic shortening was 30% in the coronal and 34% in the sagittal orientation, with no difference between both hemithoraces. Tumors of the upper and middle lung region did not affect diaphragmatic shortening. In contrast, tumors of the lower lung region changed shortening significantly (P<0.05). In hemithoraces with a tumor in the lower region, shortening was 18% in the coronal and 19% in the sagittal plane. The ratio of diaphragmatic length change from inspiration to expiration changed significantly from healthy subjects (inspiration length >> expiratory length, P<0.05) to patients with a tumor in the lower lung region (inspiratory length = expiratory length). dMRI is a simple, non-invasive method to evaluate diaphragmatic motion and shortening in volunteers and patients during the breathing cycle. Tumors of the lower lung region have a significant influence on shortening of the diaphragm. (orig.)

  1. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  2. Principal component analysis of the dynamic response measured by fMRI: a generalized linear systems framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A H; Gash, D M; Avison, M J

    1999-07-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is one of several structure-seeking multivariate statistical techniques, exploratory as well as inferential, that have been proposed recently for the characterization and detection of activation in both PET and fMRI time series data. In particular, PCA is data driven and does not assume that the neural or hemodynamic response reaches some steady state, nor does it involve correlation with any pre-defined or exogenous experimental design template. In this paper, we present a generalized linear systems framework for PCA based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) model for representation of spatio-temporal fMRI data sets. Statistical inference procedures for PCA, including point and interval estimation will be introduced without the constraint of explicit hypotheses about specific task-dependent effects. The principal eigenvectors capture both the spatial and temporal aspects of fMRI data in a progressive fashion; they are inherently matched to unique and uncorrelated features and are ranked in order of the amount of variance explained. PCA also acts as a variation reduction technique, relegating most of the random noise to the trailing components while collecting systematic structure into the leading ones. Features summarizing variability may not directly be those that are the most useful. Further analysis is facilitated through linear subspace methods involving PC rotation and strategies of projection pursuit utilizing a reduced, lower-dimensional natural basis representation that retains most of the information. These properties will be illustrated in the setting of dynamic time-series response data from fMRI experiments involving pharmacological stimulation of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal system in primates.

  3. Direct comparison of local cerebral blood flow rates measured by MRI arterial spin-tagging and quantitative autoradiography in a rat model of experimental cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, James R; Wei, Ling; Knight, Robert A; Pawa, Swati; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Brusca, Thomas; Divine, George W; Fenstermacher, Joseph D

    2003-02-01

    The present study determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the rat using two different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin-tagging (AST) methods and 14C-iodoantipyrine (IAP)-quantitative autoradiography (QAR), a standard but terminal technique used for imaging and quantitating CBF, and compared the resulting data sets to assess the precision and accuracy of the different techniques. Two hours after cerebral ischemia was produced in eight rats via permanent occlusion of one middle cerebral artery (MCA) with an intraluminal suture, MRI-CBF was measured over a 2.0-mm coronal slice using single-coil AST, and tissue magnetization was assessed by either a spin-echo (SE) or a variable tip-angle gradient-echo (VTA-GE) readout. Subsequently ( approximately 2.5 hours after MCA occlusion), CBF was assayed by QAR with the blood flow indicator 14C-IAP, which produced coronal images of local flow rates every 0.4 mm along the rostral-caudal axis. The IAP-QAR images that spanned the 2-mm MRI slice were selected, and regional flow rates (i.e., local CBF [lCBF]) were measured and averaged across this set of images by both the traditional approach, which involved reader interaction and avoidance of sectioning artifacts, and a whole film-scanning technique, which approximated total radioactivity in the entire MRI slice with minimal user bias. After alignment and coregistration, the concordance of the CBF rates generated by the two QAR approaches and the two AST methods was examined for nine regions of interest in each hemisphere. The QAR-lCBF rates were higher with the traditional method of assaying tissue radioactivity than with the MRI-analog approach; although the two sets of rates were highly correlated, the scatter was broad. The flow rates obtained with the whole film-scanning technique were chosen for subsequent comparisons to MRI-CBF results because of the similarity in tissue "sampling" among these three methods. As predicted by previous modeling, "true" flow rates

  4. The use of the lumbosacral enlargement as an intrinsic imaging biomarker: feasibility of grey matter and white matter cross-sectional area measurements using MRI at 3T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios C Yiannakas

    Full Text Available Histopathological studies have demonstrated the involvement of spinal cord grey matter (GM and white matter (WM in several diseases and recent research has suggested the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a promising tool for in vivo assessment of the upper spinal cord. However, many neurological conditions would benefit from quantitative assessment of tissue integrity at different levels and relatively little work has been done, mainly due to technical challenges associated with imaging the lower spinal cord. In this study, the value of the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE as an intrinsic imaging biomarker was determined by exploring the feasibility of obtaining within it reliable GM and WM cross-sectional area (CSA measurements by means of a commercially available MRI system at 3 tesla (T. 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 27.5 years, 6 female gave written informed consent and high resolution images of the LSE were acquired and analysed using an optimised MRI acquisition and analysis protocol. GM and WM mean CSA measurements were obtained from a 15 mm section at the level of the LSE and the reproducibility of the measurements was determined by means of scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer assessments. Mean (±SD LSE cross-sectional area (LSE-CSA was 62.3 (±4.1 mm2 and mean (±SD LSE grey matter cross-sectional area (LSE-GM-CSA was 19.8 (±3.3 mm2. The mean scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer % coefficient of variation (COV for measuring the LSE-CSA were 2%, 2% and 2.5%, respectively and for measuring the LSE-GM-CSA were 7.8%, 8% and 8.6%, respectively. This study has shown that the LSE can be used reliably as an intrinsic imaging biomarker. The method presented here can be potentially extended to study the LSE in the diseased state and could provide a solid foundation for subsequent multi-parametric MRI investigations.

  5. Soft tissue artefacts of the human back: comparison of the sagittal curvature of the spine measured using skin markers and an open upright MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Zemp

    Full Text Available Soft tissue artefact affects the determination of skeletal kinematics. Thus, it is important to know the accuracy and limitations of kinematic parameters determined and modelled based on skin marker data. Here, the curvature angles, as well as the rotations of the lumbar and thoracic segments, of seven healthy subjects were determined in the sagittal plane using a skin marker set and compared to measurements taken in an open upright MRI scanner in order to understand the influence of soft tissue artefact at the back. The mean STA in the flexed compared to the extended positions were 10.2±6.1 mm (lumbar/9.3±4.2 mm (thoracic and 10.7±4.8 mm (lumbar/9.2±4.9 mm (thoracic respectively. A linear regression of the lumbar and thoracic curvatures between the marker-based measurements and MRI-based measurements resulted in coefficients of determination, R2, of 0.552 and 0.385 respectively. Skin marker measurements therefore allow for the assessment of changes in the lumbar and thoracic curvature angles, but the absolute values suffer from uncertainty. Nevertheless, this marker set appears to be suitable for quantifying lumbar and thoracic spinal changes between quasi-static whole body postural changes.

  6. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...... have been described. Still, to take full advantage of simultaneously recorded VEP-fMRI one would ideally want to track single-trial changes in the VEP and use this information in the fMRI analysis. In order to do this we examined 10 healthy volunteers with simultaneous VEP-fMRI. Different measures...

  7. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. MRI Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al Nasser Assi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available   "nMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become more and more frequently used in medical imaging diagnostic in recent years. Radiologists and technicians working at these systems are relatively often confronted with image artifacts related to the radiowave with strong magnetic in the scanner. Many artifacts may be corrected or modulated through an understanding of their cause. This requires familiarity with scanner design; theory of operation; and image acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to present the most relevant artifacts that arise in MRI scanner, to provide some physical background on the formation of artifacts, and to suggest strategies to reduce or avoid these artifacts. The most frequent artifacts that can occur during MRI scanning are Motion related artifacts; Para-magnetic artifacts; Phase Wrap artifacts; Frequency artifacts; Susceptibility artifacts; Clipping artefact; Chemical Shift artifact and "Zebra" artefact .    "n  

  9. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  10. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  12. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology.

  13. Measurement of the weighted peak level for occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields for 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonutti, F; Tecchio, M; Maieron, M; Trevisan, D; Negro, C; Calligaris, F

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to give a contribution to the construction of a comprehensive knowledge of the exposure levels to gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in terms of the weighed peak (WP), especially for 3 Tesla scanners for which there are still few works available in the literature. A new generation probe for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in the range of 1 Hz-400 kHz was used to assess the occupational exposure levels to the GMF for 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI body scanners, using the method of the WP according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) approach. The probe was placed at a height of 1.1 m, close to the MRI scanners, where operators could stay during some medical procedures with particular issues. The measurements were performed for a set of typical acquisition sequences for body (liver) and head exams. The measured values of WP were in compliance with ICNIRP 2010 reference levels for occupational exposures.

  14. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subashi, Ergys [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Choudhury, Kingshuk R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Johnson, G. Allan, E-mail: gjohnson@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K{sup trans} with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1{sub 0}). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model

  15. MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicich, Jorge; Czanner, Silvester; Han, Xiao; Salat, David; van der Kouwe, Andre; Quinn, Brian; Pacheco, Jenni; Albert, Marilyn; Killiany, Ronald; Blacker, Deborah; Maguire, Paul; Rosas, Diana; Makris, Nikos; Gollub, Randy; Dale, Anders; Dickerson, Bradford C; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-05-15

    Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in

  16. Tetrachloroethene degradation by reducing-agent enhanced Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Lu, S.; Gu, X.; Yan, N.; Qiu, Z.; Sui, Q.

    2015-12-01

    This project investigated the effect of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene(PCE) by Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC). SPC possesses similar function as liquid H2O2, such that free H2O2 is released into solution when percarbonate is mixed with water. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redoxcycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations.The results of chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO● was the predominant radical in the system and that O2●-played a minor role. This was further confirmed by the results of electron paramagnetic resonance measurements and salicylic acid hydroxylationanalysis by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a strong HO● scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO● was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It should be noted that the release of Cl- was slightly delayed in the first 20 mins, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis did not detect any chlorinated organic compound except PCE, indicating these intermediates were quickly degraded, which resulted in the complete conversion of PCE to CO2. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  17. Improved cardiac MRI volume measurements in patients with tetralogy of Fallot by independent end-systolic and end-diastolic phase selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik G Freling

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent cardiac MRI derived measurements of right ventricular (RV volumes using the left ventricular (LV end-systolic and end-diastolic frame misrepresent RV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF and a right bundle branch block. METHODS: Sixty-five cardiac MRI scans of patients with ToF and a right bundle branch block, and 50 cardiac MRI scans of control subjects were analyzed. RV volumes and function using the end-systolic and end-diastolic frame of the RV were compared to using the end-systolic and end-diastolic frame of the LV. RESULTS: Timing of the RV end-systolic frame was delayed compared to the LV end-systolic frame in 94% of patients with ToF and in 50% of control subjects. RV end-systolic volume using the RV end-systolic instead of LV end-systolic frame was smaller in ToF (median -3.3 ml/m(2, interquartile range -1.9 to -5.6 ml/m(2; p<0.001 and close to unchanged in control subjects. Using the RV instead of LV end-systolic and end-diastolic frame hardly affected RV end-diastolic volumes in both groups and ejection fraction in control subjects (54±4%, both methods, while increasing ejection fraction from 45±7% to 48±7% for patients with ToF (p<0.001. QRS duration correlated positively with the changes in the RV end-systolic volume (p<0.001 and RV ejection fraction obtained in ToF patients when using the RV instead of the LV end-systolic and end-diastolic frame (p = 0.004. CONCLUSION: For clinical decision making in ToF patients RV volumes derived from cardiac MRI should be measured in the end-systolic frame of the RV instead of the LV.

  18. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with t1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in brain tumors: a comparative study with two different algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Saitta, Laura; Barletta, Laura; Bonzano, Laura; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Castellan, Lucio; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Roccatagliata, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of measuring different permeability parameters with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to investigate the blood brain-barrier permeability associated with different brain tumors. The Patlak algorithm and the extended Tofts-Kety model were used to this aim. Twenty-five adult patients with tumors of different histological grades were enrolled in this study. MRI examinations were performed at 1.5 T. Multiflip angle, fast low-angle shot, and axial 3D T1-weighted images were acquired to calculate T1 maps, followed by a DCE acquisition. A region of interest was placed within the tumor of each patient to calculate the mean value of different permeability parameters. Differences in permeability measurements were found between different tumor grades, with higher histological grades characterized by higher permeability values. A significant difference in transfer constant (K (trans)) values was found between the two methods on high-grade tumors; however, both techniques revealed a significant correlation between the histological grade of tumors and their K (trans) values. Our results suggest that DCE acquisition is feasible in patients with brain tumors and that K (trans) maps can be easily obtained by these two algorithms, even if the theoretical model adopted could affect the final results.

  19. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  20. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Braverman

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54, 57.14% central atrophy (N=88, and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69. A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740 was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115. Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787. In the centrum semiovale (CS, reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622. Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002. Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064. Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165. Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087. In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740; high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417; and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166. Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294: the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  1. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Eric R; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  2. Battlefield MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  3. MRI measurements of the pons and cerebellum in children born preterm; associations with the severity of periventricular leukomalacia and perinatal risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, M.I.; Xydis, V.; Argyropoulou, P.I.; Efremidis, S.C. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Drougia, A.; Andronikou, S. [Neonatology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, M. [Department of Paediatrics, Medical School, University of Ioannina (Greece); Bassounas, A. [Department of Computer Science, Unit of Medical Technology and Intelligent Information Systems, University of Ioannina (Greece)

    2003-10-01

    Our purpose was to measure the size of the pons and cerebellum in preterm babies with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and to study their relationship with the severity of PVL and with perinatal risk factors. We examined 33 premature children, mean gestational age 31 weeks, range 26-36 weeks with PVL on MRI, and 27 full-term controls. On MRI at 0.4-5.5 years (mean 1.4 years) we measured the area of the corpus callosum and vermis, the anteroposterior diameter of the pons and the volume of the cerebellum. The area of the corpus callosum was used as a marker of white matter loss and PVL severity. All regional brain measurements except that of the vermis were significantly lower in patients than controls: corpus callosum (mm{sup 2}): 239.6{+-}92.5 vs 434.8{+-}126.8, P <0.01; pons (mm): 14.8{+-}3.0 vs 17.9{+-}1.4, P <0.01; cerebellum (cm{sup 3}): 68.2{+-}31.6 vs 100.6{+-}28.3, P <0.01; vermis (mm{sup 2}): 808.1{+-}292.2 vs 942.2{+-}246.2, NS. Significant reduction in the area of the vermis: 411.3{+-}203.3 vs 935{+-}252.6 mm{sup 2}; cerebellar volume: 16.3{+-}12.5 vs 96.6{+-}20.2 mm{sup 3}; and the diameter of the pons: 10.1{+-}2.2 vs 17.5{+-}1.3 mm (P <0.01) were observed in seven children with gestational age {<=}28 weeks, severe hypotension and large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). There was a significant correlation between the duration of mechanical ventilation and the size of the vermis, pons and cerebellum (R=-0.65, -0.57 and -0.73, respectively, P <0.01). (orig.)

  4. Distance between the rectal wall and mesorectal fascia measured by MRI: Effect of rectal distension and implications for preoperative prediction of a tumour-free circumferential resection margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, A. [Department of Specialist Radiology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, S. [Department of Specialist Radiology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, S.A. [Department of Specialist Radiology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Marshall, M. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Northwick Park, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Aim: To determine the effect of rectal distension, used by some workers to facilitate staging, on mesorectal tissues. Subjects and methods: Ninety-seven consecutive rectal cancer staging MRI examinations were identified of which 76 were analysable: 48 studies were performed using rectal insufflation of 100 ml room air and 28 were performed without distension. Median age was 69 and 72 years, respectively. In each patient a single experienced observer measured the distance from the outer rectal wall to the inner margin of the mesorectal fascia at four locations (12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock), excluding sites of tumour involvement, from the T1-weighted axial image at the level of the sacro-coccygeal junction. The two groups of measurements were compared using Mann-Whitney test statistic, and frequencies then categorized into <5 mm or {>=}5 mm, and compared using Fisher's exact test. Results: The median distance between the rectal wall and mesorectal fascia in the distended group was approximately half that found in the non-distended group, and significantly lower at the 3, 6 and 9 o'clock positions (p<0.001). 68/167 (41%) of measurements were 5 mm or less, compared with 19/104 (18%) in the non-distended group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Rectal distension before MRI significantly reduces the distance between the rectal wall and mesorectal fascia. Although this is advocated to facilitate visualization of the primary tumour, it potentially affects the accuracy with which a clear circumferential resection margin can be predicted.

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Index Measurement for 0.5T Permanent Magnet MRI System%0.5T永磁MRI系统参数测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤剑颖; 包尚联

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To set up a set of index for our own developed 0.5T C type permanent magnet MRI system as the progress evaluation and reception check, which has been compared with national standard and gave the own self evaluation.Materials and Methods: Synthesizing the national standard and referencing the international standards of AAPM and NEMA,we proposed a set of index to be the manufacturer's standard for our 0.5T C type permanent MRI system,which included the uniformity, signal to noise of the image, geometry deformation, slice thickness and its uncertainty, space resolution et al.Conclusions: The index measured can token as its performance of the 0.5T C type permanent MRI system.The measurement results showed that the index, such as the space resolution has not seen reported inside of China.%目的:建立一套测量方法检测本课题组完成的0.5T C型永磁型磁共振成像系统的研究进展检测并对成果验收,并将检测结果与相关国家医药行业标准中对质量参数所提示的要求进行比较,并做出评价.材料与方法:采用体模,综合考虑AAPM及HEMA国际组织的测量标准,以及国家医药行业标准,提出一套方法用于测量本组内0.5T磁共振产品的测量参数集作为我们的企业标准,包括图像均匀性、图像信噪比、几何畸变、层厚及误差、空间分辨率等.结论:经过分析和比较,我们建立的测试参数系统能够表征0.5T永磁型磁共振系统的性能,我们研发的系统达到的技术指标,例如空间分辨率等指标在国内未见报道.

  7. The Compression Flow as a Measure to Estimate the Cognitive Impairment Severity in Resting State fMRI and 18FDG-PET Alzheimer's Disease Connectomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giuliano Zippo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The human brain appears organized in compartments characterized by seemingly specific functional purposes on many spatial scales. A complementary functional state binds information from specialized districts to return what is called integrated information. This fundamental network dynamics undergoes to severe disarrays in diverse degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Diseases (AD. The AD represents a multifarious syndrome characterized by structural, functional and metabolic landmarks. In particular, in the early stages of AD, adaptive functional modifications of the brain networks mislead initial diagnoses because cognitive abilities may result indiscernible from normal subjects. As a matter of facts, current measures of functional integration fail to catch significant differences among normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and even AD subjects. The aim of this work is to introduce a new topological feature called Compression Flow (CF to finely estimate the extent of the functional integration in the brain networks. The method uses a Monte Carlo-like estimation of the information integration flows returning the compression ratio between the size of the injected information and the size of the condensed information within the network. We analyzed the resting state connectomes of 75 subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 (ADNI repository. Our analyses are focused on the 18FGD-PET and functional MRI (fMRI acquisitions in several clinical screening conditions. Results indicated that CF effectively discriminate MCI, AD and normal subjects by showing a significant decrease of the functional integration in the AD and MCI brain connectomes. This result did not emerge by using a set of common complex network statistics. Furthermore, CF was best correlated with individual clinical scoring scales. In conclusion, we presented a novel measure to quantify the functional integration that resulted efficient to discriminate

  8. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies.

  9. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  11. Measuring hepatic functional reserve using low temporal resolution Gd-EOB-DTPA dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a preliminary study comparing galactosyl human serum albumin scintigraphy with indocyanine green retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Tsuyoshi; Araki, Yoichi; Akata, Soichi; Tokuuye, Koichi [Tokyo Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Ledsam, Joseph; Sourbron, Steven [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    To investigate if tracer kinetic modelling of low temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA could replace technetium-99 m galactosyl human serum albumin (GSA) single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) and indocyanine green (ICG) retention for the measurement of liver functional reserve. Twenty eight patients awaiting liver resection for various cancers were included in this retrospective study that was approved by the institutional review board. The Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI sequence acquired five images: unenhanced, double arterial phase, portal phase, and 4 min after injection. Intracellular contrast uptake rate (UR) and extracellular volume (Ve) were calculated from DCE-MRI, along with the ratio of GSA radioactivity of liver to heart-plus-liver and per cent of cumulative uptake from 15-16 min (LHL15 and LU15, respectively) from GSA-scintigraphy. ICG retention at 15 min, Child-Pugh cirrhosis score (CPS) and postoperative Inuyama fibrosis criteria were also recorded. Statistical analysis was with Spearman rank correlation analysis. Comparing MRI parameters with the reference methods, significant correlations were obtained for UR and LHL15, LU15, ICG15 (all 0.4-0.6, P < 0.05); UR and CPS (-0.64, P < 0.001); Ve and Inuyama (0.44, P < 0.05). Measures of liver function obtained by routine Gd-EOB-DTPA DCE-MRI with tracer kinetic modelling may provide a suitable method for the evaluation of liver functional reserve. (orig.)

  12. Response competition and response inhibition during different choice-discrimination tasks: evidence from ERP measured inside MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J; Inuggi, Alberto; Blasi, Valeria; Cursi, Marco; Annovazzi, Pietro; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the neural correlates underlying response inhibition and conflict detection processes using ERPs and source localization analyses simultaneously acquired during fMRI scanning. ERPs were elicited by a simple reaction time task (SRT), a Go/NoGo task, and a Stroop-like task (CST). The cognitive conflict was thus manipulated in order to probe the degree to which information processing is shared across cognitive systems. We proposed to dissociate inhibition and interference conflict effects on brain activity by using identical Stroop-like congruent/incongruent stimuli in all three task contexts and while varying the response required. NoGo-incongruent trials showed a larger N2 and enhanced activations of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and pre-supplementary motor area, whereas Go-congruent trials showed a larger P3 and increased parietal activations. Congruent and incongruent conditions of the CST task also elicited similar N2, P3 and late negativity (LN) ERPs, though CST-incongruent trials revealed a larger LN and enhanced prefrontal and ACC activations. Considering the stimulus probability and experimental manipulation of our study, current findings suggest that NoGo N2 and frontal NoGo P3 appear to be more associated to response inhibition rather than a specific conflict monitoring, whereas occipito-parietal P3 of Go and CST conditions may be more linked to a planned response competition between the prepared and required response. LN, however, appears to be related to higher level conflict monitoring associated with response choice-discrimination but not when the presence of cognitive conflict is associated with response inhibition.

  13. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  14. Reproducibility of Intra- and Inter-scanner Measurements of Liver Fat Using Complex Confounder-corrected Chemical Shift Encoded MRI at 3.0 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Han, Wei; Li, Zhenhong; Zhao, Yonghua; Ge, Mingmei; Guo, Xueqing; Wu, Xinhuai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the reproducibility of the proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) of the liver using the IDEAL algorithm, a quantitative confounder-corrected chemical-shift-encoded MRI method. Data were obtained from 15 volunteers on four different days. The first and the third examinations were conducted on scanner one with one-week intervals, while the second and the fourth tests were performed on scanner two with same time interval. For each test, two MR scans were performed, one before and one after a meal. Regions-of-interest measurements were manually calculated to estimate the PDFF in the right and left lobes on the PDFF images. Reproducibility was measured using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICCs of the PDFF in the right and left lobes were 0.935 and 0.878, respectively. The intra-scanner ICCs of the right lobe before and after a meal or at a one-week interval were 0.924 and 0.953, respectively. The inter-scanner ICCs of PDFF the next day and at a one-week interval were 0.920 and 0.864, respectively. The PDFF of liver derived from IDEAL demonstrated high intra- and inter-scanner measurement reproducibility. The PDFF of the right lobe before a meal was more reproducible than after-meal measurements. PMID:26763303

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  16. Navicular bone position determined by positional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Johannsen, Finn E; Hangaard, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine intraobserver, interobserver and between-day reproducibility of positional MRI for evaluation of navicular bone height (NVH) and medial navicular position (MNP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Positional MRI (pMRI) of the foot was performed on ten healthy participants (0.25 T G......: Navicular height and medial navicular position can be measured by pMRI in a very reproducible manner within and between observers. Increased measurement variation is observed between-days in supine position, which may be due to small positional differences or other unknown biomechanical factors....

  17. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, Bruno [Centre Hospitalier Univ. Jean Minjoz, Besancon (France); Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (FR). Lab. I4S (Health, Innovation, Intervention, Imaging, Engineering); Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  18. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    OpenAIRE

    Tzika Aria; Astrakas Loukas; Weinberg Brian; Triantafyllou Christina; Muto Andrew; Khanicheh Azadeh; Mavroidis Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, mo...

  19. Interobserver agreement of semi-automated and manual measurements of functional MRI metrics of treatment response in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonekamp, David; Bonekamp, Susanne; Halappa, Vivek Gowdra; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Eng, John; Corona-Villalobos, Celia Pamela [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kamel, Ihab R., E-mail: ikamel@jhmi.edu [The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver agreement in 50 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before and 1 month after intra-arterial therapy (IAT) using two semi-automated methods and a manual approach for the following functional, volumetric and morphologic parameters: (1) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), (2) arterial phase enhancement (AE), (3) portal venous phase enhancement (VE), (4) tumor volume, and assessment according to (5) the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and (6) the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL). Materials and methods: This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study had institutional review board approval. The requirement for patient informed consent was waived. Tumor ADC, AE, VE, volume, RECIST, and EASL in 50 index lesions was measured by three observers. Interobserver reproducibility was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). P < 0.05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Results: Semi-automated volumetric measurements of functional parameters (ADC, AE, and VE) before and after IAT as well as change in tumor ADC, AE, or VE had better interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.830–0.974) compared with manual ROI-based axial measurements (ICC = 0.157–0.799). Semi-automated measurements of tumor volume and size in the axial plane before and after IAT had better interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.854–0.996) compared with manual size measurements (ICC = 0.543–0.596), and interobserver agreement for change in tumor RECIST size was also higher using semi-automated measurements (ICC = 0.655) compared with manual measurements (ICC = 0.169). EASL measurements of tumor enhancement in the axial plane before and after IAT ((ICC = 0.758–0.809), and changes in EASL after IAT (ICC = 0.653) had good interobserver agreement. Conclusion: Semi-automated measurements of functional changes assessed by ADC and VE based on whole-lesion segmentation demonstrated better reproducibility than

  20. MRI evaluation of vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yicheng Liu; Hongxing Zhang; Wei Huang; Wenjun Wan; Hongfen Peng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTVE: To explain the association between vascular dementia and the cranial MRI manifestations, and recognize the value of cranial MRI in the early diagnosis of vascular dementia and the assessment of disease conditions.DATA SOURCES: Pubmed database was searched to identify articles about the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia published in English from January 1992 to June 2006 by using the key words of "MRI, vascular dementia". Others were collected by searching the name of journals and title of articles in the Chinese full-text journal database.STUDY SELECTTON: The collected articles were primarily checked, those correlated with the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia were selected, while the obviously irrelative ones were excluded, and the rest were retrieved manually, the full-texts were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 255 articles were collected, 41 of them were involved, and the other 214 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: MRI can be taken as one of the effective methods for the early diagnosis and disease evaluation of vascular dementia. White matter lesions are the important risk factors of vascular dementia.Vascular dementia is accompanied by the atrophy of related brain sites, but further confirmation is needed to investigate whether there is significant difference. MRI can be used to quantitatively investigate the infarcted sites and sizes of patients with vascular dementia after infarction, but there is still lack of systematic investigation on the association of the infarcted sites and sizes with the cognitive function of patients with vascular dementia.CONCLUSTON: Cranial MRI can detect the symptoms of vascular dementia at early period, so that corresponding measures can be adopted to prevent and treat vascular dementia in time.

  1. Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess functional changes measured by cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the presymptomatic stage of frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) caused by a truncating mutation in CHMP2B. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: A memory clinic and tertiary referrals centre...... changes in brain tissue perfusion were measured as CBF with two different MR techniques, gradient echo (GRE) and spin echo (SE), focusing on CBF in all cerebral vessels (GRE) and cerebral capillaries (SE), respectively. As planned, data analysis included co-registration of perfusion images to structural T...

  2. Measurement of the arterial concentration of Gd-DTPA using MRI: a step toward quantitative perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B

    1996-01-01

    A noninvasive method using an inversion recovery turbo-FLASH for dynamic measurement of the arterial input function represented by the bolus passage of Gd-DTPA in the descending aorta is presented, and the results are compared with the input function obtained by arterial blood samples. A good...

  3. Reproductibility of apparent diffusion coefficients measurements in diffusion-weighted MRI of the abdomen with different b values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgili, Mirace Yasemin Karadeniz, E-mail: mykaradeniz@hotmail.com [Kırıkkale University Medicine Faculty, Department of Radiology, Sevil sok. 16/3 06590 Cebeci/Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To test the reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) measurements of the normal liver, kidney and spleen parenchyma with different b values. Materials and methods: Eleven healthy volunteers were imaged twice with use of the same protocol. Each DWI was performed with b-factors of 0, 100 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}. The ADCs were organized according to session (1 or 2), anatomic location and repetition (twice with two different b value per session). The ADC data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance to demonstrate the influence of anatomic location, session and different b values. The coefficient of variation was calculated for each subject, b value and anatomic location, then analyzed by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: There were significant differences in mean ADCs among the three anatomic locations and with different b values (P < .05). There were no significant differences in ADCs between imaging sessions 1 or 2 for both b values (P > .05). The CV values range between 7.3% and 14.7%. There were no significant differences in CV values neither between the two b values nor for the various organ locations (P > .05). Conclusion: Using the same technical parameters, patients and the same observer, CV values range between 7.3% and 14.7%. And we recommend to be careful in examination and comparison of the measured ADC values, below these limits, without knowledge technical parameters that has been used, otherwise differences that are merely because of changes in the measurement technique could be interpreted as differences because of progression of disease or therapy.

  4. Ask for advice of measurement nuclrar magnetic resonance image(MRI)%关于对医用核磁共振成像(MRI)系统检测的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭洪涛; 张莹

    2005-01-01

    通过这篇学术文章,对全国各地技术机构正在进行的检测核磁共振成像(MRI)系统中如何正确操作、正确处理数据及客观评价起到积极的作用.所采用的方法是北美放射物理学会(AAPM)和美国国家电气生产厂家标准(NEMA)推荐的方法.从近几年来对北京地区新安装的、使用中几十台磁共振成像系统(MRI)进行了检测结果表明,采用AAPM建议书和NEMA标准所规定的方法对中国开展核磁共振成像(MRI)系统中图像的检测是可行的,也是必须的.对我们今后正在制定国家级是非常有益的.

  5. Mid-sagittal plane and mid-sagittal surface optimization in brain MRI using a local symmetry measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Skoglund, Karl; Ryberg, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    years). Traditionally, the mid-sagittal plane is localized by global measures. However, this approach fails when the partitioning plane between the brain hemispheres does not coincide with the symmetry plane of the head. We instead propose to use a sparse set of profiles in the plane normal direction...... and maximize the local symmetry around these using a general-purpose optimizer. The plane is parameterized by azimuth and elevation angles along with the distance to the origin in the normal direction. This approach leads to solutions confirmed as the optimal MSP in 98 percent of the subjects. Despite the name...

  6. T2 and T2* measurements of fetal brain oxygenation during hypoxia with MRI at 3T: correlation with fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike; Adam, Gerhard [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Andreas, Thomas; Beindorff, Nicola; Hecher, Kurt [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the oxygen saturation of blood in the fetal brain based on T2 and T2* measurements in a fetal sheep model. Five sheep fetuses were investigated during normoxia and hypoxia by 3T MRI. Multi-echo gradient-echo and turbo-spin-echo sequences were performed on the fetal brain. MR-determined oxygen saturation (MR-sO{sub 2}) of blood in the fetal brain was calculated based on T2 and T2* values. Fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation (blood-sO{sub 2}) was measured during the two experimental phases. The slope of MR-sO{sub 2} as a function of blood-sO{sub 2} was estimated and tested for compatibility using the one-sample t-test. During normoxia, mean values for carotid blood oxygen saturation were 67%, 83 ms for T2*, 202 ms for T2 and 96% for MR-sO{sub 2}. During hypoxia, arterial blood oxygen saturation, T2* and calculated MR-sO{sub 2} decreased to 22%, 64 ms, and 68% respectively. The one-sample t-test revealed the slope to be significantly different from 0(T=5.023, df=4, P=0.007). It is feasible to perform quantitative T2 and T2* measurements in the fetal brain. MR-sO{sub 2} and fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation correlated significantly. However, based on these data a reliable quantification of fetal brain tissue oxygenation is not possible. (orig.)

  7. Precise measurement of renal filtration and vascular parameters using a two-compartment model for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the kidney gives realistic normal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofts, Paul S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Cutajar, Marica [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Mendichovszky, Iosif A. [University of Manchester, Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Peters, A.M. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); Gordon, Isky [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    To model the uptake phase of T{sub 1}-weighted DCE-MRI data in normal kidneys and to demonstrate that the fitted physiological parameters correlate with published normal values. The model incorporates delay and broadening of the arterial vascular peak as it appears in the capillary bed, two distinct compartments for renal intravascular and extravascular Gd tracer, and uses a small-vessel haematocrit value of 24%. Four physiological parameters can be estimated: regional filtration K{sup trans} (ml min {sup -1} [ml tissue ]{sup -1}), perfusion F (ml min {sup -1} [100 ml tissue ]{sup -1}), blood volume v{sub b} (%) and mean residence time MRT (s). From these are found the filtration fraction (FF; %) and total GFR (ml min {sup -1}). Fifteen healthy volunteers were imaged twice using oblique coronal slices every 2.5 s to determine the reproducibility. Using parenchymal ROIs, group mean values for renal biomarkers all agreed with published values: K{sup trans}: 0.25; F: 219; v{sub b}: 34; MRT: 5.5; FF: 15; GFR: 115. Nominally cortical ROIs consistently underestimated total filtration (by {proportional_to} 50%). Reproducibility was 7-18%. Sensitivity analysis showed that these fitted parameters are most vulnerable to errors in the fixed parameters kidney T{sub 1}, flip angle, haematocrit and relaxivity. These renal biomarkers can potentially measure renal physiology in diagnosis and treatment. circle Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can measure renal function. circle Filtration and perfusion values in healthy volunteers agree with published normal values. circle Precision measured in healthy volunteers is between 7 and 15%. (orig.)

  8. Genetic correlates of brain aging on MRI and cognitive test measures: a genome-wide association and linkage analysis in the Framingham study

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cognitive tests can identify heritable endophenotypes associated with an increased risk of developing stroke, dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) and linkage analysis exploring the genetic basis of these endophenotypes in a community-based sample. Methods A total of 705 stroke- and dementia-free Framingham participants (age 62 +9 yrs, 50% male) who underwent volumetric brain MRI and ...

  9. Diffusion measurement of intraplaque hemorrhage and intramural hematoma using diffusion weighted MRI at 3T in cervical artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Bin [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wang, Guangbin; Shi, Honglu; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Huihua [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the difference between carotid haemorrhagic plaque and non-haemorrhagic plaque by using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to evaluate carotid intraplaque haemorrhage (IPH) and intramural hematoma (IMH) of cervical artery dissection with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement. Fifty-one symptomatic patients underwent 3.0-T carotid MR imaging, including conventional sequences, three-dimensional (3D) magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequence, and DWI. Thirty-nine patients with carotid plaque and eight patients with IMH of cervical artery dissection were finally included. The groups of hemorrhagic plaque, non-hemorrhagic plaque and IMH were divided according to 3D MPRAGE sequence. ADC values of different groups were measured, and t tests were performed. The mean ADC values of hemorrhagic plaques, non-hemorrhagic plaque and IMH were (1.284 ± 0.327) x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, (1.766 ± 0.477) x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, and (0.563 ± 0.119) x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The mean ADC values of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic regions in the hemorrhagic plaque group were (0.985 ± 0.376) x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s and (1.480 ± 0.465) x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The differences between the hemorrhagic plaque and non-hemorrhagic plaque, hemorrhagic region and non-hemorrhagic region in hemorrhagic plaque, and the hemorrhagic region in the hemorrhagic plaque and IMH of artery dissection were significant (P < 0.05). DWI may be a useful complement to conventional MR imaging for identifying haemorrhage of carotid plaques and differentiate IMHs from IPH. (orig.)

  10. The impact of simulated MRI scanner background noise on visual attention processes as measured by the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobald, S Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2016-06-21

    Environmental noise is known to affect personal well-being as well as cognitive processes. Besides daily life, environmental noise can also occur in experimental research settings, e.g. when being in a magnetic resonance scanner. Scanner background noise (SBN) might pose serious confounds for experimental findings, even when non-auditory settings are examined. In the current experiment we tested if SBN alters bottom-up and top-down related processes of selective visual attention mechanisms. Participants completed two blocks of a visual change detection task, one block in silence and one block under SBN exposure. SBN was found to decrease accuracy in measures of visual attention. This effect was modulated by the temporal occurrence of SBN. When SBN was encountered in the first block, it prevented a significant improvement of accuracy in the second block. When SBN appeared in the second block, it significantly decreased accuracy. Neurophysiological findings showed a strong frontal positivity shift only when SBN was present in the first block, suggesting an inhibitory process to counteract the interfering SBN. Common correlates of both top-down and bottom-up processes of selective visual attention were not specifically affected by SBN exposure. Further research appears necessary to entirely rule out confounds of SBN in assessing visual attention.

  11. The impact of simulated MRI scanner background noise on visual attention processes as measured by the EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobald, S. Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Environmental noise is known to affect personal well-being as well as cognitive processes. Besides daily life, environmental noise can also occur in experimental research settings, e.g. when being in a magnetic resonance scanner. Scanner background noise (SBN) might pose serious confounds for experimental findings, even when non-auditory settings are examined. In the current experiment we tested if SBN alters bottom-up and top-down related processes of selective visual attention mechanisms. Participants completed two blocks of a visual change detection task, one block in silence and one block under SBN exposure. SBN was found to decrease accuracy in measures of visual attention. This effect was modulated by the temporal occurrence of SBN. When SBN was encountered in the first block, it prevented a significant improvement of accuracy in the second block. When SBN appeared in the second block, it significantly decreased accuracy. Neurophysiological findings showed a strong frontal positivity shift only when SBN was present in the first block, suggesting an inhibitory process to counteract the interfering SBN. Common correlates of both top-down and bottom-up processes of selective visual attention were not specifically affected by SBN exposure. Further research appears necessary to entirely rule out confounds of SBN in assessing visual attention. PMID:27324456

  12. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws)) with experimental factor-compensated and T(1) -normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant radio frequency (RF) irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (k(ws)) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI.

  13. Changes in brain connectivity related to the treatment of depression measured through fMRI: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel; González-Garrido, Andrés A.; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental illness that presents alterations in brain connectivity in the Default Mode Network (DMN), the Affective Network (AN) and other cortical-limbic networks, and the Cognitive Control Network (CCN), among others. In recent years the interest in the possible effect of the different antidepressant treatments on functional connectivity has increased substantially. The goal of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the studies on the relationship between the treatment of depression and brain connectivity. Nineteen studies were found in a systematic review on this topic. In all of them, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms after antidepressant treatment. In 18 out of the 19 studies, clinical improvement was associated to changes in brain connectivity. It seems that both DMN and the connectivity between cortical and limbic structures consistently changes after antidepressant treatment. However, the current evidence does not allow us to assure that the treatment of depression leads to changes in the CCN. In this regard, some papers report a positive correlation between changes in brain connectivity and improvement of depressive symptomatology, particularly when they measure cortical-limbic connectivity, whereas the changes in DMN do not significantly correlate with clinical improvement. Finally, some papers suggest that changes in connectivity after antidepressant treatment might be partly related to the mechanisms of action of the treatment administered. This effect has been observed in two studies with stimulation treatment (one with rTMS and one with ECT), and in two papers that administered three different pharmacological treatments. Our review allows us to make a series of recommendations that might guide future researchers exploring the effect of anti-depression treatments on brain connectivity. PMID:26578927

  14. Multimodal assessments of the hippocampal formation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Evidences from neurobehavioral measures and functional and structural MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Knöchel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential clinical and etiological overlap between schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD has long been a subject of discussion. Imaging studies imply functional and structural alterations of the hippocampus in both diseases. Thus, imaging this core memory region could provide insight into the pathophysiology of these disorders and the associated cognitive deficits. To examine possible shared alterations in the hippocampus, we conducted a multi-modal assessment, including functional and structural imaging as well as neurobehavioral measures of memory performance in BD and SZ patients compared with healthy controls. We assessed episodic memory performance, using tests of verbal and visual learning (HVLT, BVMT in three groups of participants: BD patients (n = 21, SZ patients (n = 21 and matched (age, gender, education healthy control subjects (n = 21. In addition, we examined hippocampal resting state functional connectivity, hippocampal volume using voxel-based morphometry (VBM and fibre integrity of hippocampal connections using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. We found memory deficits, changes in functional connectivity within the hippocampal network as well as volumetric reductions and altered white matter fibre integrity across patient groups in comparison with controls. However, SZ patients when directly compared with BD patients were more severely affected in several of the assessed parameters (verbal learning, left hippocampal volumes, mean diffusivity of bilateral cingulum and right uncinated fasciculus. The results of our study suggest a graded expression of verbal learning deficits accompanied by structural alterations within the hippocampus in BD patients and SZ patients, with SZ patients being more strongly affected. Our findings imply that these two disorders may share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. The results could thus help to further advance and integrate current pathophysiological models of SZ and BD.

  15. MRI of the lungs in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Wolfgang [Paediatric Radiology in the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany)], E-mail: wolfgang.hirsch@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Sorge, Ina; Krohmer, Svetlana; Weber, Dana [Paediatric Radiology in the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany); Meier, Konstanze [Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany); Till, Holger [Department of Paediatric Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Lung diseases of children often need diagnostic imaging beyond X-ray. Although CT is considered the gold standard of lung imaging, MRI is sufficient to answer most of the questions raised. After all, the exposure to radiation caused by one CT examination corresponds to approximately the effective dose of 200 chest radiographs. What is MRI's potential in the lung today? In diseases with alveolar pathology, cardiac- and respiratory-triggered MRI examinations are roughly equivalent to CT examinations. Distinct interstitial processes are easily diagnosable using MRI. Early interstitial processes may be missed by MRI, but conventional plain films fail to recognize them just as often. For identification of lung metastases, CT is still used as the initial diagnostic measure. Subsequent therapy monitoring may then be carried out with the help of MRI. Small bullae and pulmonary emphysema at present pose a problem to MRI. On the other hand, MRI is reliable for follow-up examinations in inflammatory diseases or for imaging of complications, and the increased use of lung MRI as an alternative to chest CT may contribute immensely to reducing radiation exposure in children.

  16. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging of the brain: feasibility of cerebral blood flow measurements with FAIR-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegger, Lars [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and European Inst. for Molecular Imaging, Univ. of Munster, Munster (Germany)], E-mail: stegger@uni-muenster.de; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz [Dept. of Radiology, Section of Experimental Radiology, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D. [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Bisdas, Sotirios [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kolb, Armin; Pichler, Bernd [Dept. of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Background Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with simultaneous data acquisition promises a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral pathophysiology on a molecular, anatomical, and functional level. Considering the necessary changes to the MR scanner design the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) is unclear. Purpose To evaluate whether cerebral blood flow imaging with ASL is feasible using a prototype PET/MRI device. Material and Methods ASL imaging of the brain with Flow-sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery (FAIR) spin preparation and true fast imaging in steady precession (TrueFISP) data readout was performed in eight healthy volunteers sequentially on a prototype PET/MRI and a stand-alone MR scanner with 128 x 128 and 192 x 192 matrix sizes. Cerebral blood flow values for gray matter, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative signal change were compared. Additionally, the feasibility of ASL as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol was demonstrated in five patients with intracerebral tumors. Results Blood flow maps showed good delineation of gray and white matter with no discernible artifacts. The mean blood flow values of the eight volunteers on the PET/MR system were 51 {+-} 9 and 51 {+-} 7 mL/100 g/min for the 128 x 128 and 192 x 192 matrices (stand-alone MR, 57 {+-} 2 and 55 {+-} 5, not significant). The value for signal-to-noise (SNR) was significantly higher for the PET/MRI system using the 192 x 192 matrix size (P < 0.01), the relative signal change (dS) was significantly lower for the 192 x 192 matrix size (P = 0.02). ASL imaging as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol could successfully be accomplished in all patients in diagnostic image quality. Conclusion ASL brain imaging is feasible with a prototype hybrid PET/MRI scanner, thus adding to the value of this novel imaging technique.

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ...

  19. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  3. Measurement of Healthy Adult Kidney's Range of Motion by Cine-MRI%Cine-MRI测量健康成年人肾脏运动幅度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文骏; 龙淼淼; 沈文; 倪红艳; 黄黎香

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过电影磁共振成像(Cine-MRI)技术观察健康成年人平静规律呼吸状态下双肾运动幅度.资料与方法 选取57名健康成年志愿者(男28名,女29名),于平静规律呼吸状态下进行与双肾长轴平行的斜冠状面Cine-MRI检查,测量一次完整呼吸过程中双肾下极运动幅度,比较双侧肾脏及不同性别间肾脏运动幅度的差异.结果 Cine-MRI测得健康成年人平静规律呼吸状态下右肾运动幅度为5.6~16.5 mm,平均(9.5±2.1) mm;左肾运动幅度为4.5~13.9 mm,平均(8.1±2.0) mm;双侧肾脏运动幅度比较,差异有统计学意义(t=9.30,P<0.05);男性左、右侧肾脏运动幅度分别为(8.7±2.0) mm和(10.3±2.2) mm,均大于女性对应侧肾脏运动幅度[分别为(7.5±1.8) mm和(8.8±1.7) mm],差异有统计学意义(t=2.82、4.41,P<0.05).结论 平静规律呼吸状态下斜冠状面上右肾运动幅度大于左肾,在进行功能磁共振成像时宜选用左肾数据作为参照标准,尤其是当受检者为男性时.%Purpose To observe the healthy adult kidneys' range of motion in the calm regular breathing state through Cine-MRI.Materials and Methods Cine-MRI was applied to 57 healthy adult volunteers (28 male,29 female) on oblique coronal plane parallel to the long axis of the kidneys in a state of calm regular breathing.The range of motion of lower renal pole was measured in the process of a full breathing,and was compared between the double kidneys and between different gender.Results The range of motion of the right and left kidney of healthy adult was from 5.6 mm to 16.5 mm,mean (9.5 ±2.1) mm; and 4.5mm to 13.9 mm,mean (8.1 ±2.0) mm,respectively,and it was demonstrated significant difference between bilateral kidneys (t=9.30,P<0.05).The range of motion of left and right kidney of the male subjects were (8.7± 2.0) mm and (10.3 ± 2.2) mm,which were larger than those of female subjects [(7.5±1.8) mm and (8.8± 1.7) mm],and it revealed the significant

  4. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  5. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  6. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...

  7. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Zhang, Jingxin

    2014-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI, and presents a method to design the pulse sequence for the noiselet encoding. This novel encoding scheme is combined with the multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. An empirical RIP a...

  8. MRI、超声及钼靶在乳腺肿块大小测量中的比较%A Comparative Analysis of MRI, Ultrasonography and Molybdenum Target Mammography in the Measurement of Breast Lump Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安静; 夏玉军

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comparatively analyze the accuracy of MRI, ultrasound and mammography in the measurement of lump size in patients with breast cancer. Methods 51 cases of breast tumor patients (53 lesions) who underwent diagnosis and treatment for breast tumors from January 2014 to June 2014 in our hospital were selected as research objects. All the selected patients underwent preoperative mammography, ultrasound, and MRI examination to measure the size of breast lumps. The corresponding data was recorded and compared with postoperative pathological results. The accuracy of the three methods in determining the lump size was compared. Results The difference between the maximum cross-sectional diameter of breast lumps obtained from mammography, ultrasound, and MRI measurements and the results obtained by actual measurement of pathological specimens was≤1 cm in 10 cases ( 27.8%), 20 cases ( 55.6%) , and 24 cases ( 66.7%) respectively. Conclusion The accuracy of MRI in the measurement of breast lump size was higher than the accuracy of ultrasound and mammography. MRI is a realiable examination method in the preoperative assessment of breast tumor size.%目的:对比分析MRI、超声及钼靶测量乳腺肿块大小的准确性。方法选取2014年1月~2014年6月在本院就诊的51例乳腺肿物患者(53个病灶)为研究对象,所有患者于术前均通过钼靶、超声及MRI检查测量了肿块大小,记录相应数据,并与术后病理结果进行对比,比较3种方法测量肿块大小的准确性。结果钼靶、超声、MRI测得的乳腺肿块横截面最大径与病理标本的实际测量值差值≤1 cm者分别有10例(27.8%)、20例(55.6%)、24例(66.7%)。结论MRI检查测量乳腺肿块大小的准确性高于钼靶和超声检查,是术前准确评估乳腺肿块大小的可靠检查手段。

  9. SU-F-303-13: Initial Evaluation of Four Dimensional Diffusion- Weighted MRI (4D-DWI) and Its Effect On Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y [Duke University Medical Physics Program (United States); Yin, F; Czito, B; Bashir, M; Palta, M; Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Zhong, X; Dale, B [Siemens Healthcare, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) has been shown to have superior tumor-to-tissue contrast for cancer detection.This study aims at developing and evaluating a four dimensional DWI(4D-DWI) technique using retrospective sorting method for imaging respiratory motion for radiotherapy planning,and evaluate its effect on Apparent Diffusion Coefficient(ADC) measurement. Materials/Methods: Image acquisition was performed by repeatedly imaging a volume of interest using a multi-slice single-shot 2D-DWI sequence in the axial planes and cine MRI(served as reference) using FIESTA sequence.Each 2D-DWI image were acquired in xyz-diffusion-directions with a high b-value(b=500s/mm2).The respiratory motion was simultaneously recorded using bellows.Retrospective sorting was applied in each direction to reconstruct 4D-DWI.The technique was evaluated using a computer simulated 4D-digital human phantom(XCAT),a motion phantom and a healthy volunteer under an IRB-approved study.Motion trajectories of regions-of-interests(ROI) were extracted from 4D-DWI and compared with reference.The mean motion trajectory amplitude differences(D) between the two was calculated.To quantitatively analyze the motion artifacts,XCAT were controlled to simulate regular motion and the motions of 10 liver cancer patients.4D-DWI,free-breathing DWI(FB- DWI) were reconstructed.Tumor volume difference(VD) of each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI from the input static tumor were calculated.Furthermore, ADC was measured for each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI data,and mean tumor ADC values(M-ADC) were calculated.Mean M-ADC over all 4D-DWI phases was compared with M-ADC calculated from FB-DWI. Results: 4D-DWI of XCAT,the motion phantom and the healthy volunteer demonstrated the respiratory motion clearly.ROI D values were 1.9mm,1.7mm and 2.0mm,respectively.For motion artifacts analysis,XCAT 4D-DWI images show much less motion artifacts compare to FB-DWI.Mean VD for 4D-WDI and FB-DWI were 8.5±1.4% and 108±15

  10. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  12. MRI brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  13. Demonstration of metabolic and cellular effects of portal vein ligation using multi-modal PET/MRI measurements in healthy rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Fülöp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In the early recognition of portal vein ligation (PVL induced tumor progression, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI could improve diagnostic accuracy of conventionally used methods. It is unknown how PVL affects metabolic patterns of tumor free hepatic tissues. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the effect of PVL on glucose metabolism, using PET/MRI imaging in healthy rat liver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=30 underwent PVL. 2-deoxy-2-(18Ffluoro-D-glucose (FDG PET/MRI imaging (nanoScan PET/MRI and morphological/histological examination were performed before (Day 0 and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after PVL. Dynamic PET data were collected and the standardized uptake values (SUV for ligated and non-ligated liver lobes were calculated in relation to cardiac left ventricle (SUVVOI/SUVCLV and mean liver SUV (SUVVOI/SUVLiver. RESULTS: PVL induced atrophy of ligated lobes, while non-ligated liver tissue showed compensatory hypertrophy. Dynamic PET scan revealed altered FDG kinetics in both ligated and non-ligated liver lobes. SUVVOI/SUVCLV significantly increased in both groups of lobes, with a maximal value at the 2nd postoperative day and returned near to the baseline 7 days after the ligation. After PVL, ligated liver lobes showed significantly higher tracer uptake compared to the non-ligated lobes (significantly higher SUVVOI/SUVLiver values were observed at postoperative day 1, 2 and 3. The homogenous tracer biodistribution observed before PVL reappeared by 7th postoperative day. CONCLUSION: The observed alterations in FDG uptake dynamics should be taken into account during the assessment of PET data until the PVL induced atrophic and regenerative processes are completed.

  14. Differential cerebral response to somatosensory stimulation of an acupuncture point versus two non-acupuncture points measured with EEG and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till eNierhaus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture can be regarded as a complex somatosensory stimulation. Here, we evaluate whether the point locations chosen for a somatosensory stimulation with acupuncture needles differently change the brain activity in healthy volunteers. We used EEG, event-related fMRI, and resting-state functional connectivity fMRI to assess neural responses to standardized needle stimulation of the acupuncture point ST36 (lower leg and two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome. Cerebral responses were expected to differ for stimulation in two different dermatomes (CP2 different from ST36 & CP1, or stimulation at the acupuncture point versus the control points. For EEG, mu rhythm power increased for ST36 compared to CP1 or CP2, but not when comparing the two control points. The fMRI analysis found more pronounced insula and S2 (secondary somatosensory cortex activation, as well as precuneus deactivation during ST36 stimulation. The S2 seed-based functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity to right precuneus for both comparisons, ST36 vs. CP1 and ST36 vs. CP2, however in different regions. Our results suggest that stimulation at acupuncture points may modulate somatosensory and saliency processing regions more readily than stimulation at non-acupuncture point locations. Also, our findings suggest potential modulation of pain perception due to acupuncture stimulation.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  17. The Measurement of PCL Insertion in MRI and Its Clinical Application%核磁图像上后交叉韧带止点位置的测量及临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈连旭; 崔好才

    2013-01-01

    目的:在核磁共振图像(MRI)上观察和测量后交叉韧带(PCL)止点位置,为PCL重建骨道定位和术后骨道评估提供帮助.方法:选择102例PCL完整的患者,在MRI的SE T1WI序列矢状位图像上,分别测量PCL股骨和胫骨的止点位置和大小,以及胫骨止点中点到胫骨平台的垂直距离.利用术前MRI测量结果指导12例PCL断裂患者重建术中的骨道定位,术后利用CT评估骨道位置.结果:PCL股骨止点位于Blumensaat线的前下二分之一,止点长度为(11.08±1.51)mm,占Blumensaat线的37.55%;胫骨止点位于胫骨斜坡的后下二分之一,止点长度为(12.37±1.98)mm,占斜坡长度的44.48%.从胫骨止点中心点到胫骨平台最高点的垂直距离为(15.21±2.203)mm.利用术前测量结果指导术中骨道定位和术后骨道位置评估,骨道位置正确.结论:术前MRI测量结果,可以指导术中骨道定位,帮助术后骨道位置的评估.%Objective The purpose of this study was to measure the insertion of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),in order to position the bone tunnel for surgery and evaluate the outcome of PCL reconstruction. Methods One hundred and two patients with intact ACL were recruited to observe the location and size of femoral and tibial PCL insertions,and the distance from the center of tibial insertion to the vertex of the tibial plateau in sagittal SE T1-weighted sequences of MRI. The pre-operative measurements in MRI of 12 patients were used to determine the PCL tunnel position during surgery, and to evaluate the accuracy of post-operative tunnel position using CT scan. Results The PCL femoral insertion was located on anteroinferior half of the Blumensaat' s line, its length was 11.08±1.51 mm and accounted for 37.55% of Blumensaat's line. The tibial insertion was located on posteroinferior half of PCL facet,its length was 12.37±1.98 mm and accounted for 44.48% PCL facet. The distance from the center of

  18. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  19. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Pawar

    Full Text Available The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS. In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  20. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ... MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ...

  1. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI- ... Ultrasound-and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI- ...

  2. Diffusion MRI and its Role in Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain's white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition.

  3. Self-gated CINE MRI for combined contrast-enhanced imaging and wall-stiffness measurements of murine aortic atherosclerotic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigit den Adel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI method at 9.4T to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and vessel wall distensibility in the aortic arch of aged ApoE(-/- mice after injection of a contrast agent. The method enabled detection of contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch after I.V. injection of micelles and iron oxides resulting in reproducible plaque enhancement. Both contrast agents were taken up in the plaque, which was confirmed by histology. Additionally, the retrospective-gated CINE method provided images of the aortic wall throughout the cardiac cycle, from which the vessel wall distensibility could be calculated. Reduction in plaque size by statin treatment resulted in lower contrast enhancement and reduced wall stiffness. CONCLUSIONS: The retrospective-gated CINE MRI provides a robust and simple way to detect and quantify contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic wall of ApoE(-/- mice. From the same scan, plaque-related changes in stiffness of the aortic wall can be determined. In this mouse model, a correlation between vessel wall stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions was found.

  4. Characteristics of the default mode functional connectivity in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease using resting state fMRI with a combined approach of entropy-based and graph theoretical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Paule-Joanne; Maiz, Sofiane; Coynel, David; Doyon, Julien; Messé, Arnaud; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Sarazin, Marie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Habert, Marie-Odile; Benali, Habib

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive decline in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease (AD) emerges from functional disruption in the coordination of large-scale brain systems sustaining cognition. Integrity of these systems can be examined by correlation methods based on analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Here we investigate functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) in normal ageing and AD using resting state fMRI. Images from young and elderly controls, and patients with AD were processed using spatial independent component analysis to identify the DMN. Functional connectivity was quantified using integration and indices derived from graph theory. Four DMN sub-systems were identified: Frontal (medial and superior), parietal (precuneus-posterior cingulate, lateral parietal), temporal (medial temporal), and hippocampal (bilateral). There was a decrease in antero-posterior interactions (lower global efficiency), but increased interactions within the frontal and parietal sub-systems (higher local clustering) in elderly compared to young controls. This decreased antero-posterior integration was more pronounced in AD patients compared to elderly controls, particularly in the precuneus-posterior cingulate region. Conjoint knowledge of integration measures and graph indices in the same data helps in the interpretation of functional connectivity results, as comprehension of one measure improves with understanding of the other. The approach allows for complete characterisation of connectivity changes and could be applied to other resting state networks and different pathologies.

  5. PET/MRI: A luxury or a necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras-Delgado, J L; Pérez-Dueñas, V; Riola-Parada, C; García-Cañamaque, L

    2016-01-01

    PET/MRI is a new multimodality technique with a promising future in diagnostic imaging. Technical limitations are being overcome. Interference between the two systems (PET and MRI) seems to have been resolved. MRI-based PET attenuation correction can be performed safely. Scan time is acceptable and the study is tolerable, with claustrophobia prevalence similar to that of MRI. Quantification with common parameters, such as Standardized Uptake Value (SUV), shows a fairly good correlation between both systems. However, PET/CT currently provides better results in scan time, scan costs, and patient comfort. Less patient radiation exposure is a big advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT, which makes it particularly recommended in paediatric and adolescent patients requiring one or more studies. PET/MRI indications are the same as those of PET/CT, given that in cases where MRI is superior to CT, PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT. This superiority is clear in many soft tissue tumours. Moreover, it is common to perform both PET/CT and MRI in neurological diseases, as well as in some tumours, such as breast cancer. A single PET/MRI study replaces both with obvious benefit. MRI also allows other MRI-based PET corrections, such as motion or partial volume effect corrections. The better spatial resolution of MRI allows the transfer of well-defined MRI areas or small volumes of interest to PET image, in order to measure PET biomarkers in these areas. The richness of information of both techniques opens up immense possibilities of synergistic correlation between them.

  6. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) of the Human Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfermann, H; Schindler, C; Jordan, J; Krug, N; Raab, P

    2015-10-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) of the central nervous system (CNS) addresses the increasing demands in the biopharma industry for new methods that can accurately predict, as early as possible, whether novel CNS agents will be effective and safe. Imaging of physiological and molecular-level function can provide a more direct measure of a drug mechanism of action, enabling more predictive measures of drug activity. The availability of phMRI of the nervous system within the professional infrastructure of the Clinical Research Center (CRC) Hannover as proof of concept center ensures that advances in basic science progress swiftly into benefits for patients. Advanced standardized MRI techniques including quantitative MRI, kurtosis determination, functional MRI, and spectroscopic imaging of the entire brain are necessary for phMRI. As a result, MR scanners will evolve into high-precision measuring instruments for assessment of desirable and undesirable effects of drugs as the basic precondition for individually tailored therapy. The CRC's Imaging Unit with high-end large-scale equipment will allow the following unique opportunities: for example, identification of MR-based biomarkers to assess the effect of drugs (surrogate parameters), establishment of normal levels and reference ranges for MRI-based biomarkers, evaluation of the most relevant MRI sequences for drug monitoring in outpatient care. Another very important prerequisite for phMRI is the MHH Core Facility as the scientific and operational study unit of the CRC partner Hannover Medical School. This unit is responsible for the study coordination, conduction, complete study logistics, administration, and application of the quality assurance system based on required industry standards.

  7. MRI in perianal fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khera Pushpinder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI has become the method of choice for evaluating perianal fistulae due to its ability to display the anatomy of the sphincter muscles orthogonally, with good contrast resolution. In this article we give an outline of the classification of perianal fistulae and present a pictorial assay of sphincter anatomy and the MRI findings in perianal fistulae. This study is based on a retrospective analysis of 43 patients with a clinical diagnosis of perianal fistula. MRI revealed a total of 44 fistulae in 35 patients; eight patients had only perianal sinuses.

  8. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates.

  9. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  10. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoetker, Andreas M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazaheri, Yousef [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, Leonard B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K{sup trans} on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  11. Calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling (COSMOS): a method for conditioning the inverse problem from measured magnetic field map to susceptibility source image in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Kressler, Bryan; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility differs among tissues based on their contents of iron, calcium, contrast agent, and other molecular compositions. Susceptibility modifies the magnetic field detected in the MR signal phase. The determination of an arbitrary susceptibility distribution from the induced field shifts is a challenging, ill-posed inverse problem. A method called "calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling" (COSMOS) is proposed to stabilize this inverse problem. The field created by the susceptibility distribution is sampled at multiple orientations with respect to the polarization field, B(0), and the susceptibility map is reconstructed by weighted linear least squares to account for field noise and the signal void region. Numerical simulations and phantom and in vitro imaging validations demonstrated that COSMOS is a stable and precise approach to quantify a susceptibility distribution using MRI.

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  16. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  17. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used for ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  20. Extradural spinal meningioma: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States); Sze, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of extradural spinal meningioma with pathologically proven features of malignant transformation. The MRI findings of extradural spinal meningioma and differences in the findings from intradural meningiomas are discussed. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you ...

  10. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM).

  11. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  12. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Abdelmoumene, A.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gailloud, M.C.; Resnick, D. [CHUV, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  13. Lying about Facial Recognition: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, S.; Mbwana, J.; Adeyemo, A.; Sawyer, A.; Hailu, A.; VanMeter, J.

    2009-01-01

    Novel deception detection techniques have been in creation for centuries. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a neuroscience technology that non-invasively measures brain activity associated with behavior and cognition. A number of investigators have explored the utilization and efficiency of fMRI in deception detection. In this study,…

  14. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique for a previously unaddressed problem, namely, mapping axon diameter in crossing fiber regions, using diffusion MRI. Direct measurement of tissue microstructure of this kind using diffusion MRI offers a new class of biomarkers that give more specific information abo...

  15. Mapping Human Brain Function with MRI at 7 Tesla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In the past decade, the most significant development in MRI is the introduction of fMRI, which permits the mapping of human brain function with exquisite details noninvasively. Functional mapping can be achieved by measuring changes in the blood oxygenation level (I.e. The BOLD contrast) or cerebral blood flow.

  16. An fMRI Study Dissociating Distance Measures Computed by Broca’s Area in Movement Processing: Clause boundary vs Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eSanti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of sentence comprehension suggest that processing long-distance dependencies is subject to interference effects when Noun Phrases (NP similar to the dependency head intervene the dependency. Neuroimaging studies converge in localizing such effects to Broca’s area, showing that activity in Broca’s area increases with the number of NP interveners crossed by a moved NP of the same type. To test if NP interference effects are modulated by adding an intervening clause boundary, which should by hypothesis increase the number of successive-cyclic movements, we conducted an fMRI study contrasting NP interveners with clausal (CP interveners. Our design thus had two components: (I the number of NP interveners crossed by movement was parametrically modulated; (II CP-intervention was contrasted with NP-intervention. The number of NP interveners parametrically modulated a cluster straddling left BA44/45 of Broca’s area, replicating earlier studies. Adding an intervening clause boundary did not significantly modulate the size of the NP interference effect in Broca’s area. Yet, such an interaction effect was observed in the Superior Frontal Gyrus (SFG. Therefore, the involvement of Broca’s area in processing syntactic movement is best captured by memory mechanisms affected by a grammatically instantiated type-identity (ie, NP intervention.

  17. Using a combination of fMRI and anterior temporal lobe rTMS to measure intrinsic and induced activation changes across the semantic cognition network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, Richard J.; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    By developing and applying a method which combines fMRI and rTMS to explore semantic cognition, we identified both intrinsic (related to automatic changes in task/stimulus-related processing) and induced (i.e., associated with the effect of TMS) activation changes in the core, functionally-coupled network elements. Low-frequency rTMS applied to the human anterior temporal lobe (ATL) induced: (a) a local suppression at the site of stimulation; (b) remote suppression in three other ipsilateral semantic regions; and (c) a compensatory up-regulation in the contralateral ATL. Further examination of activity over time revealed that the compensatory changes appear to be a modulation of intrinsic variations that occur within the unperturbed network. As well as providing insights into the dynamic collaboration between core regions, the ability to observe intrinsic and induced changes in vivo may provide an important opportunity to understand the key mechanisms that underpin recovery of function in neurological patient groups. PMID:25448851

  18. MRI-based flow measurements in the main pulmonary artery to detect pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis; MRT-basierte Flussmessungen im Truncus pulmonalis zur Detektion einer pulmonal-arteriellen Hypertonie in Patienten mit zystischer Fibrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, T.; Anjorin, A.; Abolmaali, N. [TU Dresden (Germany). OncoRay, Biologisches und Molekulares Imaging; Posselt, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Paediatrie I, Muskoviszidoseambulanz; Smaczny, C. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I, Pneumologie und Allergologie; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2009-02-15

    Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is a common problem in the course of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was performed to evaluate MRI based flow measurements (MR{sub venc}; Velocity ENCoding) to detect signs of an evolving PH in patients suffering from CF. 48 patients (median age: 16 years, range: 10 - 40 years, 25 female) suffering from CF of different severity (mean FEV1: 74 % {+-} 23, mean Shwachman-score: 63 {+-} 10) were examined using MRI based flow measurements of the main pulmonary artery (MPA). Phase-contrast flash sequences (TR: 9.6 ms, TE: 2.5 ms, bandwidth: 1395 Hertz/Pixel) were utilized. Results were compared to an age- and sex-matched group of 48 healthy subjects. Analyzed flow data where: heart frequency (HF), cardiac output (HZV), acceleration time (AT), proportional acceleration time related to heart rate (ATr), mean systolic blood velocity (MFG), peak velocity (Peak), maximum flow (Fluss{sub max}), mean flow (Fluss{sub mitt}) and distensibility (Dist). The comparison of means revealed significant differences only for MFG, Fluss{sub max} and Dist, but overlap was marked. However, using a scatter-plot of AT versus MFG, it was possible to identify five CF-patients demonstrating definite signs of PH: AT = 81 ms {+-} 14, MFG = 46 {+-} 11 cm/s, Dist = 41 % {+-} 7. These CF-patients where the most severely affected in the investigated group, two of them were listed for complete heart and lung transplantation. The comparison of this subgroup and the remaining CF-patients revealed a highly significant difference for the AT (p = 0.000001) without overlap. Screening of CF-patients for the development of PH using MR{sub venc} of the MPA is not possible. In later stages of disease, the quantification of AT, MFG and Dist in the MPA may be useful for the detection, follow-up and control of therapy of PH. MR{sub venc} of the MPA completes the MRI-based follow-up of lung parenchyma damage in patients suffering from CF

  19. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  20. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Hainc, N.; Studler, U. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bieri, O. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Miska, M. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiewiorski, M.; Valderrabano, V. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm{sup 2}/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm{sup 2}/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  2. Volume measurement of brain using 3.0T MRI in 140 normal Chinese and data analysis%采用3.0T MRI 对正常人脑体积定量测量研究(附140例分析)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔彩霞; 周存河; 崔慧先; 刘怀军; 周立霞; 黄渤源; 贺丹

    2014-01-01

    目的:采用3.0T MRI 对正常志愿者脑体积进行定量测量,确定正常值参考范围,并探讨其与年龄和性别的相关性。方法采用CE Signa EXCITE 3.0T高分辨MRI对140例健康志愿者(男性73例,女性67例,年龄10~84岁,平均45.8±18.3)进行头颅MRI 3DT1成像,在AW4.2工作站上采用半自动方法计算脑体积。并对不同性别、年龄进行统计分析。结果脑体积95%可信区间:男性为1480.15±141.04cm 3,女性为1322.91±110.11cm 3。脑体积与性别间差异有统计学意义(p<0.05),男性的脑体积要大于女性。脑体积在各年龄段之间差异无统计学意义( p>0.05)。结论头颅MRI 3D可以提供更准确的大脑容积定量,为各种相关疾病的临床诊断和治疗方案的制定提供客观依据。%Objective To measure the brain volume in normal Chinese , try to explore the relationship Methods 140 volunteers were examined with 3D T1 weighted images to obtain the between that with gender and age . whole brain image .The volume of whole brain was calculated on AW 4.1 workstation in semi-auto manner .Data of whole brain volume were analyzed in different gender and age with test and variance analysis .Results Volumes of the whole brain (The 95%confidence interval) were 1480.15±141.04 cm3 for male and 1322.91±110.11cm3 for . There was significant statistical correlation between whole brain volume and gender ( p0.05).Conclusion Whole brain MRI3D can provide quantitative brain volume more accurately , and provide objective basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment of various diseases .

  3. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI.

  4. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  5. Altered Dynamics of the fMRI Response to Faces in Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Richards, Todd; Greenson, Jessica; Dawson, Geraldine; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal fMRI habituation in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has been proposed as a critical component in social impairment. This study investigated habituation to fearful faces and houses in ASD and whether fMRI measures of brain activity discriminate between ASD and typically developing (TD) controls. Two identical fMRI runs presenting masked…

  6. Introduction to Interventional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jarmo Ruohonen; William G.Bradley; Jr.MD

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of interventional procedures are done under imaging guidance. These include biopsies, drainages and injections. Likewise, imaging guidance and monitoring have enabled the use of sophisticated techniques for minimally invasive therapy of tumors. Since MRI provides the best tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity,the use of MR-guided procedures (MRGP) is quickly gaining momentum. Special hardware and software solutions have been developed that allow more efficient interventional use of the MR scanner.This introduction summarizes the basic concepts of interventional MRI and outlines some of the applications of today and tomorrow.

  7. MRI of osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2004-12-01

    Osteonecrosis is a relatively common condition, which may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of clinical situations. It may involve the subarticular region of a joint, when it is commonly referred to as ischaemic necrosis, or the metaphyseal regions of long bones, when it is referred to as bone infarction. In both situations, early lesions may be radiographically occult. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive in identifying and characterizing osteonecrosis. This review illustrates the varied MRI features of osteonecrosis that enable a confident diagnosis to be made. Complications and differential diagnosis are also considered.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  14. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20251 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: wedegaer@uke.uni-hamburg.de; Schroeder, Hobe J. [Experimental Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods.

  15. On clustering fMRI time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Toft, Peter Aundal; Rostrup, E.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do not indi...... between the activation stimulus and the fMRI signal. We present two different clustering algorithms and use them to identify regions of similar activations in an fMRI experiment involving a visual stimulus....... not indicate whether sets of voxels are activated in a similar way or in different ways. Typically, delays between two activated signals are not identified. In this article, we use clustering methods to detect similarities in activation between voxels. We employ a novel metric that measures the similarity...

  16. A potential biomarker in sports-related concussion: brain functional connectivity alteration of the default-mode network measured with longitudinal resting-state fMRI over thirty days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, David C; Covassin, Tracey; Nogle, Sally; Doyle, Scarlett; Russell, Doozie; Pearson, Randolph L; Monroe, Jeffrey; Liszewski, Christine M; DeMarco, J Kevin; Kaufman, David I

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnosis and monitoring of sports-related concussion rely on clinical signs and symptoms, and balance, vestibular, and neuropsychological examinations. Conventional brain imaging often does not reveal abnormalities. We sought to assess if the longitudinal change of functional and structural connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) can serve as a potential biomarker. Eight concussed Division I collegiate football student-athletes in season (one participated twice) and 11 control subjects participated in this study. ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) was administered over the course of recovery. High-resolution three dimensional T1-weighted, T2*-weighted diffusion-tensor images and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans were collected from each subject within 24 h, 7±1 d and 30±1 d after concussion. Both network based and whole-brain based functional correlation analyses on DMN were performed. ImPACT findings demonstrated significant cognitive impairment across multiple categories and a significant increase of symptom severity on Day 1 following a concussion but full recovery by 6.0±2.4 d. While the structural connectivity within DMN and gross anatomy appeared unchanged, a significantly reduced functional connectivity within DMN from Day 1 to Day 7 was found in the concussed group in this small pilot study. This reduction was seen in eight of our nine concussion cases. Compared with the control group, there appears a general trend of increased DMN functional connectivity on Day 1, a significant drop on Day 7, and partial recovery on Day 30. The results of this pilot study suggest that the functional connectivity of DMN measured with longitudinal rs-fMRI can serve as a potential biomarker to monitor the dynamically changing brain function after sports-related concussion, even in patients who have shown clinical improvement.

  17. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  18. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  19. Less Confusion in Diffusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tax, C.M.W.

    2016-01-01

    With its unique ability to investigate tissue architecture and microstructure in vivo, diffusion MRI (dMRI) has gained tremendous interest and the society has been continuously triggered to develop novel dMRI image analysis approaches. With the overwhelming amount of strategies currently available i

  20. Vesicouterine fistula: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.M.; Lomas, D.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Lee, G.; Doble, A. [Dept. of Urology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sharma, S.D. [Dept. of Urology, Peterborough NHS Trust Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    A case of vesicouterine fistula in a young woman following caesarean section is presented. The diagnosis was established successfully using heavily T2-weighted MRI which clearly demonstrated fluid within the fistula, obviating the need for conventional radiographic contrast examination. (orig.)

  1. MRI in suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, M.M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op de optimalisatie van beeldvormende diagnostiek bij patiënten met een klinische verdenking op appendicitis, waarbij het gebruik van ‘magnetic resonance imaging’ (MRI) wordt verkend. Het proefschrift omvat de resultaten van de OPTIMAP-studie (OPTimisation of IMaging Appe

  2. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A CT scan may be preferred in emergency cases, since it is faster and often available in the emergency room. Note: MRI is not as effective as CT in defining the anatomy of the sinuses, and therefore is not typically used for suspected acute sinusitis.

  3. MRI of intact plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  4. MRI of intact plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. Women should always inform their physician or technologist if ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  7. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it

    2001-06-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium.

  8. The impact of reliable prebolus T{sub 1} measurements or a fixed T{sub 1} value in the assessment of glioma patients with dynamic contrast enhancing MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Anna [Aarhus University Hospital, Dept. of Neuroradiology, Aarhus (Denmark); Aarhus University, Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus (Denmark); Mouridsen, Kim; Mikkelsen, Irene Klaerke [Aarhus University, Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-06

    Accurate quantification of hemodynamic parameters using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires a measurement of tissue T{sub 1} prior to contrast injection (T{sub 1}). We evaluate (i) T{sub 1} estimation using the variable flip angle (VFA) and the saturation recovery (SR) techniques and (ii) investigate if accurate estimation of DCE parameters outperform a time-saving approach with a predefined T{sub 1} value when differentiating high- from low-grade gliomas. The accuracy and precision of T{sub 1} measurements, acquired by VFA and SR, were investigated by computer simulations and in glioma patients using an equivalence test (p > 0.05 showing significant difference). The permeability measure, K{sub trans}, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and - volume, V{sub p}, were calculated in 42 glioma patients, using fixed T{sub 1} of 1500 ms or an individual T{sub 1} measurement, using SR. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were used as measures for accuracy to differentiate tumor grade. The T{sub 1} values obtained by VFA showed larger variation compared to those obtained using SR both in the digital phantom and the human data (p > 0.05). Although a fixed T{sub 1} introduced a bias into the DCE calculation, this had only minor impact on the accuracy differentiating high-grade from low-grade gliomas, (AUC{sub fix} = 0.906 and AUC{sub ind} = 0.884 for K{sub trans}; AUC{sub fix} = 0.863 and AUC{sub ind} = 0.856 for V{sub p;} p for AUC comparison > 0.05). T{sub 1} measurements by VFA were less precise, and the SR method is preferable, when accurate parameter estimation is required. Semiquantitative DCE values, based on predefined T{sub 1} values, were sufficient to perform tumor grading in our study. (orig.)

  9. Measurement and Clinic Value of Blumensaat's Line on MRI for Reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament%股骨Blumensaat线的MRI测量及其对重建ACL的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少战; 黄长明; 王建雄; 沈瑞群; 范华强; 傅仰攀

    2012-01-01

    Objective to measure Blumensaat's line of femur on MRI to provide reference to locate the tibial insertion in ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament ,ACL)reconstruction. Methods 100 patients who had no obvious abnormality on MRI was chosen. The Blumensaat's line was lengthened to cross the tibial plateau. The distances between the crossing point and the midpoint of the ACL tibial insertion and the posterior plateau border were measured. The distances between the anterior and the posterior plateau border were measured. Results The crossing point was located at anterior (51. 9 ± 7. 3)% of the tibial plateau sagittal line or (14. 2 ± 2. 5) mm forwards the anterior border of the PCL.where is behind the medpoint of the ACL tibial insertion. Conclusion To avoid intercondylar fossa impingement, the tibial insertion of the reconstructed ACL should be located behind the middle point of tibial insertion or 8~ 10 mm before the PCL. The tibial insertion of the reconstructed ACL should be located more backward in some patients.%目的 应用MRI对股骨Blumensaat线的测量,为重建前交叉韧带(anterior cruciate ligament,ACL)提供参考.方法 通过选择100例正常的膝关节伸直位磁共振检查结果,在适当的切面上绘制Blumensaat线延长线与胫骨平台的交点,测量其在胫骨矢状径位置及其与后交义韧带(posterior cruciate ligament,PCL)的距离,并与ACL胫骨侧生理止点中心和PCL的距离比较.结果 Blumensaat线延长线与胫骨平台的交点在胫骨矢状径上距前缘(51.9±7.3)%,与PCL距离(14.2±2.5)mm.较ACL生理止点中心靠后.结论 为避免髁间窝前方撞击,重建ACL胫骨侧止点定位于胫骨平台生理性止点中心后方或PCL前方8~10 mm,个别人需更后方.

  10. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  12. Hippocampus, caudate nucleus and entorhinal cortex volumetric MRI measurements in discrimination between Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, and normal aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Elshafey

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Semi-automated MR volumetric measurements can be used to determine atrophy in hippocampus, caudate nucleus and entorhinal cortex which aided in discrimination of healthy elderly control subjects from subjects with AD and MCI and predict clinical decline of MCI leading to increase the efficiency of clinical treatments, delay institutionalization and improve cognition and behavioral symptoms.

  13. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  14. Stereological Analysis of Liver Biopsy Histology Sections as a Reference Standard for Validating Non-Invasive Liver Fat Fraction Measurements by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pierre, Tim G.; House, Michael J.; Bangma, Sander J.; Pang, Wenjie; Bathgate, Andrew; Gan, Eng K.; Ayonrinde, Oyekoya T.; Bhathal, Prithi S.; Clouston, Andrew; Olynyk, John K.; Adams, Leon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Validation of non-invasive methods of liver fat quantification requires a reference standard. However, using standard histopathology assessment of liver biopsies is problematical because of poor repeatability. We aimed to assess a stereological method of measuring volumetric liver fat fraction (VLFF) in liver biopsies and to use the method to validate a magnetic resonance imaging method for measurement of VLFF. Methods VLFFs were measured in 59 subjects (1) by three independent analysts using a stereological point counting technique combined with the Delesse principle on liver biopsy histological sections and (2) by three independent analysts using the HepaFat-Scan® technique on magnetic resonance images of the liver. Bland Altman statistics and intraclass correlation (IC) were used to assess the repeatability of each method and the bias between the methods of liver fat fraction measurement. Results Inter-analyst repeatability coefficients for the stereology and HepaFat-Scan® methods were 8.2 (95% CI 7.7–8.8)% and 2.4 (95% CI 2.2–2.5)% VLFF respectively. IC coefficients were 0.86 (95% CI 0.69–0.93) and 0.990 (95% CI 0.985–0.994) respectively. Small biases (≤3.4%) were observable between two pairs of analysts using stereology while no significant biases were observable between any of the three pairs of analysts using HepaFat-Scan®. A bias of 1.4±0.5% VLFF was observed between the HepaFat-Scan® method and the stereological method. Conclusions Repeatability of the stereological method is superior to the previously reported performance of assessment of hepatic steatosis by histopathologists and is a suitable reference standard for validating non-invasive methods of measurement of VLFF. PMID:27501242

  15. Quantitative grey matter histological measures do not correlate with grey matter probability values from in vivo MRI in the temporal lobe

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, S.H.; Free, S. L.; Thom, M; Symms, M. R.; Martinian, L.; Duncan, J.S.; Sisodiya, S M

    2009-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is commonly used to study systematic differences in brain morphology from patients with various disorders, usually by comparisons with control subjects. It has often been suggested, however, that VBM is also sensitive to variations in composition in grey matter. The nature of the grey matter changes identified with VBM is still poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to determine whether grey matter histopathological measurements of neuronal tissue or...

  16. Pediatric elbow fractures: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Rosenberg, Z.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Kawelblum, M. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Montes, L. (Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Bergman, A.G. (Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Univ., School of Medicine, CA (United States)); Strongwater, A. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in eight patients under the age of 8 years who suffered elbow fractures, to assess possible fracture extension into the distal nonossified epiphysis of the humerus in seven cases and to determine the displacement and location of the radial head in one case. MRI allowed accurate depiction of the fracture line when it extended into the cartilaginous epiphysis. In four cases, MRI findings were confirmed at surgery. In five cases, surgery was obviated because no articular extension of the fracture was seen on MRI (4 cases) or because no displacement was noted (1 case). In one patient, the plain film diagnosis of a Salter type II fracture was changed to Salter type IV on the basis of the MRI findings. It is concluded that MRI might play a role in the preoperative evaluation of pediatric patients presenting with elbow trauma when extension of the fracture cannot be determined with routine radiographic studies. (orig.)

  17. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of a cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to a magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1 mm×1.4 mm in about 6 min of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discussed. We discuss several measures to increase the sensitivity to reach a resolution 1 mm×1 mm.

  18. Background and Mathematical Analysis of Diffusion MRI Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Alpay; Wong, Kenneth H; Larson-Prior, Linda; Cho, Zang-Hee; Mun, Seong K

    2012-03-01

    The addition of a pair of magnetic field gradient pulses had initially provided the measurement of spin motion with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. In the adaptation of DW-NMR techniques to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the taxonomy of mathematical models is divided in two categories: model matching and spectral methods. In this review, the methods are summarized starting from early diffusion weighted (DW) NMR models followed up with their adaptation to DW MRI. Finally, a newly introduced Fourier analysis based unifying theory, so-called Complete Fourier Direct MRI, is included to explain the mechanisms of existing methods.

  19. MRI assessment program. Consensus statement on clinical efficacy of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This consensus statement is largely based on the experience gained at the MRI units at the four hospitals which have operated scanners in the MRI program. It reflects the considered opinion of the radiologists responsible for the MRI services at those hospitals. Account has also been taken of relevant overseas data. This collection of opinion relates particularly to comparison with other imaging modalities. The specific comments will require further consideration as technical developments with MRI become available, additional experience is gained with gadolinium contrast material and additional data are obtained on the influence of MRI on patient management. MRI, at present, is used either to improve diagnostic accuracy when other tests are negative or equivocal, when there is strong clinical suspicion of disease, or to improve surgical or other management planning when the diagnosis known. In some situations (eg syringomyelia, congenital spinal disease, posterior fossa/cerebello-pontine angle tumours) it may entirely replace other tests (eg myelography, air contrast, CT) which are substantially less accurate and/or more invasive. In other situations (eg hemispheric brain tumours, lumbar disc protrusions) when other tests, such as CT, can be as accurate, MRI is not usually or initially indicated because it is currently more expensive and of limited availability. However, balanced against this is the fact that it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionising radiation. It is also stressed that MRI images depend on complex, widely variable and, as yet, incompletely understood parameters. There is concern that this may result in false positive diagnoses, especially where MRI is used alone as a screening test, or used as the initial test. For several reasons (availability, cost, medical and diagnostic efficacy), the specific comments on indications for MRI presented are based upon the assumption that MRI is a tertiary and complementary imaging examination

  20. NMR, MRI, and spectroscopic MRI in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander; Martin, Rachel W; Franck, John; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-24

    A method for locally creating effectively homogeneous or "clean" magnetic field gradients (of high uniformity) for imaging (with NMR, MRI, or spectroscopic MRI) both in in-situ and ex-situ systems with high degrees of inhomogeneous field strength. THe method of imaging comprises: a) providing a functional approximation of an inhomogeneous static magnetic field strength B.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}) at a spatial position {right arrow over (r)}; b) providing a temporal functional approximation of {right arrow over (G)}.sub.shim(t) with i basis functions and j variables for each basis function, resulting in v.sub.ij variables; c) providing a measured value .OMEGA., which is an temporally accumulated dephasing due to the inhomogeneities of B.sub.0({right arrow over(r)}); and d) minimizing a difference in the local dephasing angle .phi.({right arrow over (r)},t)=.gamma..intg..sub.0.sup.t{square root over (|{right arrow over (B)}.sub.1({right arrow over (r)},t')|.sup.2+({right arrow over (r)}{right arrow over (G)}.sub.shimG.sub.shim(t')+.parallel.{right arrow over (B)}.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}).parallel..DELTA..omega.({right arrow over (r)},t'/.gamma/).sup.2)}dt'-.OMEGA. by varying the v.sub.ij variables to form a set of minimized v.sub.ij variables. The method requires calibration of the static fields prior to minimization, but may thereafter be implemented without such calibration, may be used in open or closed systems, and potentially portable systems.

  1. Quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy and (1)H MRI measurements of bone mineral and matrix density differentiate metabolic bone diseases in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haihui; Nazarian, Ara; Ackerman, Jerome L; Snyder, Brian D; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Hrovat, Mirko I; Dai, Guangping; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Wu, Yaotang

    2010-06-01

    In this study, bone mineral density (BMD) of normal (CON), ovariectomized (OVX), and partially nephrectomized (NFR) rats was measured by (31)P NMR spectroscopy; bone matrix density was measured by (1)H water- and fat-suppressed projection imaging (WASPI); and the extent of bone mineralization (EBM) was obtained by the ratio of BMD/bone matrix density. The capability of these MR methods to distinguish the bone composition of the CON, OVX, and NFR groups was evaluated against chemical analysis (gravimetry). For cortical bone specimens, BMD of the CON and OVX groups was not significantly different; BMD of the NFR group was 22.1% (by (31)P NMR) and 17.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. For trabecular bone specimens, BMD of the OVX group was 40.5% (by (31)P NMR) and 24.6% (by gravimetry) lower than CON; BMD of the NFR group was 26.8% (by (31)P NMR) and 21.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. No significant change of cortical bone matrix density between CON and OVX was observed by WASPI or gravimetry; NFR cortical bone matrix density was 10.3% (by WASPI) and 13.9% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. OVX trabecular bone matrix density was 38.0% (by WASPI) and 30.8% (by gravimetry) lower than CON, while no significant change in NFR trabecular bone matrix density was observed by either method. The EBMs of OVX cortical and trabecular specimens were slightly higher than CON but not significantly different from CON. Importantly, EBMs of NFR cortical and trabecular specimens were 12.4% and 26.3% lower than CON by (31)P NMR/WASPI, respectively, and 4.0% and 11.9% lower by gravimetry. Histopathology showed evidence of osteoporosis in the OVX group and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (renal osteodystrophy) in the NFR group. These results demonstrate that the combined (31)P NMR/WASPI method is capable of discerning the difference in EBM between animals with osteoporosis and those with impaired bone mineralization.

  2. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Huang, Xinglu [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Qian, Chunqi [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhu, Lei [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Hida, Naoki [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu, Gang, E-mail: niug@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan, E-mail: shawn.chen@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  3. Differentiation of breast cancer from fibroadenoma with dual-echo dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Wang

    Full Text Available Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI of the breast is a routinely used imaging method which is highly sensitive for detecting breast malignancy. Specificity, though, remains suboptimal. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI, an alternative dynamic contrast imaging technique, evaluates perfusion-related parameters unique from DCE MRI. Previous work has shown that the combination of DSC MRI with DCE MRI can improve diagnostic specificity, though an additional administration of intravenous contrast is required. Dual-echo MRI can measure both T1W DCE MRI and T2*W DSC MRI parameters with a single contrast bolus, but has not been previously implemented in breast imaging. We have developed a dual-echo gradient-echo sequence to perform such simultaneous measurements in the breast, and use it to calculate the semi-quantitative T1W and T2*W related parameters such as peak enhancement ratio, time of maximal enhancement, regional blood flow, and regional blood volume in 20 malignant lesions and 10 benign fibroadenomas in 38 patients. Imaging parameters were compared to surgical or biopsy obtained tissue samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and area under the ROC curves were calculated for each parameter and combination of parameters. The time of maximal enhancement derived from DCE MRI had a 90% sensitivity and 69% specificity for predicting malignancy. When combined with DSC MRI derived regional blood flow and volume parameters, sensitivity remained unchanged at 90% but specificity increased to 80%. In conclusion, we show that dual-echo MRI with a single administration of contrast agent can simultaneously measure both T1W and T2*W related perfusion and kinetic parameters in the breast and the combination of DCE MRI and DSC MRI parameters improves the diagnostic performance of breast MRI to differentiate breast cancer from benign fibroadenomas.

  4. Combination of signal intensity measurements of lesions in the peripheral zone of prostate with MRI and serum PSA level for differentiating benign disease from prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, K.; Kreckel, M. [Department of Radiology, Martha-Maria Hospital Nuernberg (Germany); Hollenbach, H.P.; Deimling, M. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Riedl, C. [Dept. of Urology, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the benign or malignant nature of a prostatic lesion by defining a threshold value of signal intensity ratio and a limiting value of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with elevated PSA level. Twenty-six patients with elevated PSA level and no hypoechogenic lesions at endosonography underwent MR imaging using an endorectal body phased-array coil at 1.5 T (Siemens Magnetom Symphony). A T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) pulse sequence was applied in a transverse orientation. Two radiologists evaluated the images. In the presence of a pathological finding they defined regions of interest (ROI) in the suspicious pathological area of the peripheral zone and in muscle for reference. The quotient of the two ROIs was calculated and then correlated with the actual PSA level. Diagnosis was confirmed by prostate biopsy. Ten of 12 patients with quotients smaller than 4 showed cancer at histology. Nine of 12 men with cancer proven by biopsy had PSA levels higher than 10 ng/ml. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between the quotients of cancer and quotients of chronic prostatitis, fibrosis, or glandular atrophy. The accuracy of tumor differentiation of the method was 77 %. Measurement of signal intensity quotients in the peripheral zone of the prostate in combination with knowledge of defined limits of PSA levels the technique could be helpful in detecting additional cancer areas for prostate biopsy. False-negative tumor results of standard sextant biopsy can be reduced. In men with high PSA values the method has a role in differentiating between patients who require prostate biopsy and those of clinical observation. (orig.)

  5. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  7. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  8. Reference values of MRI flow measurements of the pulmonary outflow tract in healthy children; Erstellung von Referenzwerten fuer die MRT-basierte Flussmessung im Truncus pulmonalis bei gesunden Kindern und Jugendlichen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolmaali, N.D.; Feist, P.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Esmaeili, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Paediatrische Kardiologie; Ackermann, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Informatik; Requardt, M. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Funktionsbereich Paediatrische Radiologie

    2004-06-01

    Purpose: To provide reference values for MRI-based flow measurements in the main pulmonary artery in healthy children. Materials and Methods: In 98 healthy children (age: 3-17 years, median: 11 years), the main pulmonary artery was examined using MRI-based flow measurements with high temporal resolution (9.6 ms per cardiac phase). Results: The acceleration time revealed a distinct age dependency and varied between 90 and 155 ms (mean: 124 ms{+-}14). The relative acceleration time (related to the RR-interval) varied between 12.7 and 27% (mean: 18%{+-}2.6). The mean values and the standard deviations for the determined values were as follows: cardiac output (5.4 l/min{+-}1.4), cardiac output normalized to the body surface area (4.2 [l/min]/m{sup 2}{+-}0.8), average systolic flow velocity (66 cm/s{+-}12), maximum systolic flow (309 ml/s{+-}79), mean flow (110 ml/s{+-}30), distensibility of the wall of the main pulmonary artery (79%{+-}26), peak velocity (96 cm/s{+-}15), pressure gradient along the pulmonary valve (3.8 mm Hg{+-}1.2), stroke volume (63.2 ml{+-}17.9), acceleration volume (23.7 ml{+-}8.7), maximum acceleration of flow (4924 ml/s{sup 2}{+-}1431), and reverse volume (0.2 ml{+-}0.3). Conclusions: The acquired values of reference are applicable to all pediatric patients and serve as a framework for the communication between the radiologist and the pediatric cardiologists. High temporal resolution of the measurement sequence is mandatory. Noticeable deviations of these values should induce additional (probably invasive) evaluation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Erstellung von Referenzwerten fuer die MRT-basierte Flussmessung im Truncus pulmonalis bei gesunden Kindern und Jugendlichen. Methode: 98 anamnestisch herzgesunde Kinder (Alter: 3-17 Jahre, Median: 11 Jahre) wurden mit einer zeitlich hoch aufloesenden MRT-Flussmessung (9,6 ms pro Herzphase) im Truncus pulmonalis untersucht. Ergebnisse: Die Akzelerationszeit wies eine starke Altersabhaengigkeit auf und

  9. Coccygeal movement: Assessment with dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Roberto [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: Roberto.grassi@unina2.it; Lombardi, Giulio [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy); Reginelli, Alfonso [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy); Capasso, Francesco [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy); Romano, Francesco [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy); Floriani, Irene [Clinical Trial Unit, Oncology Department, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche ' Mario Negri' , Milan (Italy); Colacurci, Nicola [Department of Gynecologic Obstetric and Reproduction Sciences, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Chronic coccygodynia is a difficult problem diagnostically and therapeutically. Moreover, there is no deep knowledge especially in the field of imaging of chronic coccygodynia. In this study several possible measurements are proposed, which all are able to demonstrate coccygeal movement during defecation, in order to assess coccygeal mobility using dynamic MRI during maximum contraction and during straining-evacuation. Materials and methods: A dynamic MRI study of the pelvic floor was performed in 112 patients. Five methods of measurement were assessed. Coccygeal movements were determined through the evaluation of three angles pair and two different distances measured during the phase of maximum contraction and during the phase of straining-evacuation. Results were compared according to age, sex, parity and experience of minor trauma. No patient included in the study had coccygodynia. Measurements taken by two radiologist were compared to determine interobserver agreement. Results: The maximum measurement values of the two distances are homogeneous, between 9 and 9.4 mm. The maximum measurement values of the three angles showed a difference that is between 21 deg. and 38 deg. Two of three angles showed a major measurement values in the funtional texts. In only one patient the coccyx was not mobile. Conclusion: Our dynamic MRI study indicates that the coccyx is mobile during defecation and that it is possible to demonstrate coccygeal excursions by assessing the difference between its positions at maximum contraction and during straining-evacuation. The measurement methods used in this study for evaluating coccygeal movements resulted in variably sized observed differences, but all yielded statistically significant results in demonstrating coccygeal excursion. Among the five measurement methods, two resulted in the largest differences. Our data indicate no correlation between coccygeal movements and age, sex, parity, minor trauma and coccygodynia.

  10. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  11. MRI in intraspinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gupta, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kumar, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kohli, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Misra, U.K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gujral, R.B. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    1994-01-01

    We studied 20 patients with intraspinal tuberculosis (TB), to characterise the MRI features of tuberculous meningitis and myelitis. MRI leptomeningitis and intramedullary involvement in 11 patients, intramedullary lesions alone in 5, leptomeningitis alone in 2, and isolated extradural disease in 2. TB leptomeningitis was characterised by loculation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root thickening and clumping (seen only in the lumbar region) or complete obliteration of the subarachnoid space on unenhanced images. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images proved useful in 6 cases, revealing linear enhancement of the surface of the spinal cord and nerve roots or plaque-like enhancement of the dura-arachnoid mater complex. Intramedullary lesions included tuberculomas (8), cord oedema (5) and cavitation (3). In seven cases of intramedullary tuberculoma multiple lesions with skip areas were seen, without significant cord swelling. One patient had an isolated lesion in the conus medullaris. The lesions were iso- or hypointense on T1-weighted images, iso-, hypo- or hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed rim or nodular enhancement with contrast medium. (orig.)

  12. MRI of ranulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurabayashi, T.; Ida, M.; Ohbayashi, N.; Yoshino, N.; Tetsumura, A.; Sasaki, T. [Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Yasumoto, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    We reviewed the MRI of 20 patients with a ranula (8 simple and 12 plunging) and ten with other cystic masses in the floor of the mouth and/ or suprahyoid portion of the neck (three haemangiomas, two neuromas, one monomorphic adenoma, one lipoma, two lateral cervical cysts and one dermoid cyst). Histological diagnoses were obtained in all cases with the exception of one presumed haemangioma. Ranulas were all well-defined, homogeneous masses giving low signal on T1-and markedly high signal on T2-weighted images. While simple ranulas were all confined to the sublingual space, plunging ranulas were centered on the submandibular space and tended to spill into one or more adjacent spaces. They extended into the sublingual space anteriorly (producung a so-called tail sign) in eight of 12 cases and into the parapharyngeal space superiorly in five. Although they sometimes filled a considerable part of the parapharyngeal space, displacement of surrounding muscles or vessels was usually slight, which was thought to reflect the nature of extravasation pseudocysts. All other cystic masses in our study had one or more MRI finding different from those of ranulas and could be easily differentiated from them. (orig.)

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Chiral Dendrimer-Triamine-Coordinated Gd-MRI Contrast Agents Evaluated by in Vivo MRI and Estimated by in Vitro QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Miyake

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed novel chiral dendrimer-triamine-coordinated Gd-MRI contrast agents (Gd-MRI CAs, which showed longitudinal relaxivity (r1 values about four times higher than that of clinically used Gd-DTPA (Magnevist®, Bayer. In our continuing study of pharmacokinetic differences derived from both the chirality and generation of Gd-MRI CAs, we found that the ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to circulate within the body can be directly evaluated by in vitro MRI (7 T. In this study, the association constants (Ka of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to bovine serum albumin (BSA, measured and calculated with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in vitro, were found to be an extremely easy means for evaluating the body-circulation ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs. The Ka values of S-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs were generally greater than those of R-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs, which is consistent with the results of our previous MRI study in vivo.

  14. MRI Findings In Dengue Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf V.V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations are rare in dengue fever. Two cases with encephalopathy and systemic features of dengue fever with abnormal CSF and MR imaging are reported. Striking MRI finding was bilateral symmetrical thalamic lesions similar to those reported in Japanese encephalitis. This report highlights that MRI findings can be similar in dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

  15. MRI atlas of ectopic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaudière, B; Salut, C; Hummel, V; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Rouanet, J-P; Maubon, A

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic endometriosis is a common condition which is often underdiagnosed, where MRI can help make a diagnosis simply, non-invasively and without irradiation. However, imagery signs of it are enormously polymorphic with a wide range of possible locations. In this paper, we have tried to illustrate comprehensively all its MRI appearances depending on the different locations where it occurs.

  16. Molecular MRI of Atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adel, Brigit den

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of MRI contrast agents and vessel wall parameters to image different stages of atherosclerosis. Chapter 2 summerizes different MRI contrast agents targeted towards vulnerable plaques that have been presented in literature. Chapter 3 illustrates accumulation of paramagn

  17. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. MRI assessment of cervical cancer for adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schirl, Gertrude; Baldinger, Anja; Poetter, Richard [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept of Radiology

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the importance of the information obtained from MRI for adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy. Patients and methods: 49 patients with cervix cancer, treated by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and MRI-assisted high-dose-rate brachytherapy {+-} concomitant cisplatin, underwent MRI at diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy fractions. 190 MRI examinations were performed. Pretreatment scans were correlated with clinical examination (CE) findings. Measurements in 3-D of the tumor extension and also of the distance from the tumor to the pelvic side wall were performed using both MRI and CE. The tumor volume regression induced initially by EBRT and the subsequent regression after each brachytherapy fraction were assessed. Results: MRI and CE showed 92% agreement in overall parametrial staging and 73% agreement in terms of vaginal involvement. There was, however, disagreement in parametrial side (right/left) classification in 25% of the parametria examined. These were patients with unilateral displacement of the cervix and contralateral invasion of the parametrium. The mean tumor volume on the pretreatment MRI scan (GTVD) was 61 cm{sup 3}. At the time of the four brachytherapy fractions the mean was 16 cm{sup 3}, 10 cm{sup 3}, 9 cm{sup 3}, and 8 cm{sup 3}, defined as the GTVBT plus the gray zones in the parametria. Conclusion: CE and MRI findings agree well in terms of overall staging. The clinical assessment of side-specific parametrial invasion improved when having access to the additional knowledge obtained from MRI. The greatest decrease in tumor volume occurs during EBRT, whereas tumor regression between the first and subsequent brachytherapy fractions is minor. (orig.)

  20. Fast Reference-Based MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Weizman, Lior; Ben-Basaht, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    In many clinical MRI scenarios, existing imaging information can be used to significantly shorten acquisition time or to improve Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In some cases, a previously acquired image can serve as a reference image, that may exhibit similarity to the image being acquired. Examples include similarity between adjacent slices in high resolution MRI, similarity between various contrasts in the same scan and similarity between different scans of the same patient. In this paper we present a general framework for utilizing reference images for fast MRI. We take into account that the reference image may exhibit low similarity with the acquired image and develop an iterative weighted approach for reconstruction, which tunes the weights according to the degree of similarity. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the method in three different clinical MRI scenarios: SNR improvement in high resolution brain MRI, utilizing similarity between T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)...

  1. Visualizing electromagnetic vacuum by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekar, Chandrika S; Chandrashekar, S; Taylor, Erika A; Taylor, Deanne M

    2016-01-01

    Based upon Maxwell's equations, it has long been established that oscillating electromagnetic (EM) fields incident upon a metal surface decay exponentially inside the conductor, leading to a virtual EM vacuum at sufficient depths. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizes radiofrequency (r.f.) EM fields to produce images. Here we present the first visualization of an EM vacuum inside a bulk metal strip by MRI, amongst several novel findings. We uncover unexpected MRI intensity patterns arising from two orthogonal pairs of faces of a metal strip, and derive formulae for their intensity ratios. Further, we furnish chemical shift imaging (CSI) results that discriminate different faces (surfaces) of a metal block according to their distinct nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, which holds much promise for monitoring surface chemical reactions noninvasively. Bulk metals are ubiquitous, and MRI is a premier noninvasive diagnostic tool. Combining the two, the emerging field of bulk metal MRI can be expe...

  2. Combined MRI and MRS improves pre-therapeutic diagnoses of pediatric brain tumors over MRI alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilles, Floyd H. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pathology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio [All Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Blueml, Stefan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The specific goal of this study was to determine whether the inclusion of MRS had a measureable and positive impact on the accuracy of pre-surgical MR examinations of untreated pediatric brain tumors over that of MRI alone in clinical practice. Final imaging reports of 120 pediatric patients with newly detected brain tumors who underwent combined MRI/MRS examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Final pathology was available in all cases. Group A comprised 60 subjects studied between June 2001 and January 2005, when MRS was considered exploratory and radiologists utilized only conventional MRI to arrive at a diagnosis. For group B, comprising 60 subjects studied between January 2005 and March 2008, the radiologists utilized information from both MRI and MRS. Furthermore, radiologists revisited group A (blind review, time lapse >4 years) to determine whether the additional information from MRS would have altered their interpretation. Sixty-three percent of patients in group A were diagnosed correctly, whereas in 10 % the report was partially correct with the final tumor type mentioned (but not mentioned as most likely tumor), while in 27 % of cases the reports were wrong. For group B, the diagnoses were correct in 87 %, partially correct in 5 %, and incorrect in 8 % of the cases, which is a significant improvement (p < 0.005). Re-review of combined MRI and MRS of group A resulted 87 % correct, 7 % partially correct, and 7 % incorrect diagnoses, which is a significant improvement over the original diagnoses (p < 0.05). Adding MRS to conventional MRI significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in preoperative pediatric patients with untreated brain tumors. (orig.)

  3. MRI findings in Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval Monali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7, abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  4. fMRI repetition suppression: neuronal adaptation or stimulus expectation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jonas; Smith, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of repetition suppression with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI adaptation) have been used widely to probe neuronal population response properties in human cerebral cortex. fMRI adaptation techniques assume that fMRI repetition suppression reflects neuronal adaptation, an assumption that has been challenged on the basis of evidence that repetition-related response changes may reflect unrelated factors, such as attention and stimulus expectation. Specifically, Summerfield et al. (Summerfield C, Trittschuh EH, Monti JM, Mesulam MM, Egner T. 2008. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations. Nat Neurosci. 11:1004-1006) reported that the relative frequency of stimulus repetitions and non-repetitions influenced the magnitude of repetition suppression in the fusiform face area, suggesting that stimulus expectation accounted for most of the effect of repetition. We confirm that stimulus expectation can significantly influence fMRI repetition suppression throughout visual cortex and show that it occurs with long as well as short adaptation durations. However, the effect was attention dependent: When attention was diverted away from the stimuli, the effects of stimulus expectation completely disappeared. Nonetheless, robust and significant repetition suppression was still evident. These results suggest that fMRI repetition suppression reflects a combination of neuronal adaptation and attention-dependent expectation effects that can be experimentally dissociated. This implies that with an appropriate experimental design, fMRI adaptation can provide valid measures of neuronal adaptation and hence response specificity.

  5. Analytic heuristics for a fast DSC-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgulin, M.; Castellaro, M.; Marcuzzi, F.; Grisan, E.

    2014-03-01

    Hemodynamics of the human brain may be studied with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) imaging. The sequence of volumes obtained exhibits a strong spatiotemporal correlation, that can be exploited to predict which measurements will bring mostly the new information contained in the next frames. In general, the sampling speed is an important issue in many applications of the MRI, so that the focus of many current researches is to study methods to reduce the number of measurement samples needed for each frame without degrading the image quality. For the DSC-MRI, the frequency under-sampling of single frame can be exploited to make more frequent space or time acquisitions, thus increasing the time resolution and allowing the analysis of fast dynamics not yet observed. Generally (and also for MRI), the recovery of sparse signals has been achieved by Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques, which are based on statistical properties rather than deterministic ones.. By studying analytically the compound Fourier+Wavelet transform, involved in the processes of reconstruction and sparsification of MR images, we propose a deterministic technique for a rapid-MRI, exploiting the relations between the wavelet sparse representation of the recovered and the frequency samples. We give results on real images and on artificial phantoms with added noise, showing the superiority of the methods both with respect to classical Iterative Hard Thresholding (IHT) and to Location Constraint Approximate Message Passing (LCAMP) reconstruction algorithms.

  6. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  7. 3D MRI volume sizing of knee meniscus cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, K R; Stoller, D W; Irving, S G; Elmquist, C; Gildengorin, G

    1994-12-01

    Meniscal replacement by allograft and meniscal regeneration through collagen meniscal scaffolds have been recently reported. To evaluate the effectiveness of a replaced or regrown meniscal cartilage, a method for measuring the size and function of the regenerated tissue in vivo is required. To solve this problem, we developed and evaluated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to measure the volume of meniscal tissues. Twenty-one intact fresh cadaver knees were evaluated and scanned with MRI for meniscal volume sizing. The sizing sequence was repeated six times for each of 21 lateral and 12 medial menisci. The menisci were then excised and measured by water volume displacement. Each volume displacement measurement was repeated six times. The MRI technique employed to measure the volume of the menisci was shown to correspond to that of the standard measure of volume and was just as precise. However, the MRI technique consistently underestimated the actual volume. The average of the coefficient of variation for lateral volumes was 0.04 and 0.05 for the water and the MRI measurements, respectively. For medial measurements it was 0.04 and 0.06. The correlation for the lateral menisci was r = 0.45 (p = 0.04) and for the medial menisci it was r = 0.57 (p = 0.05). We conclude that 3D MRI is precise and repeatable but not accurate when used to measure meniscal volume in vivo and therefore may only be useful for evaluating changes in meniscal allografts and meniscal regeneration templates over time.

  8. MRI T1ρ值的测量在早期肝硬化诊断中的应用研究%Application research of magnetic resonance T1ρ value measurement in the diagnosis of early liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪; 刘松国; 韩广; 孟祥福

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the utility of magnetic resonance T1ρ-weighted imaging (T1ρWI) in the diagnosis of early liver cirrhosis. Methods:40 cases of early cirrhosis patients (observation subjects) and 25 healthy physical examination volunteers (control subjects) were performed with conventional MRI,then T1ρWI was acquired from four breath-hold scans with different spin-lock times (10,20,40 and 80 ms). The T1ρ values of the observation subjects and healthy control subjects were measured and compared respectively. The T1ρ values of CPS A and CPS B in the observation subjects were compared with healthy control subjects respectively. The correlation between T1ρ value and the subjects age was analyzed in the healthy control subjects. Re-sults:The T1ρ value of observation subjects (56.0 ms±4.0 ms) was significantly higher than the T1ρ value of healthy control subjects (49.7 ms±3.5 ms). The T1ρ values of CPS A and CPS B in the observation subjects were significantly difference,com-pared with healthy control subjects respectively (P<0.05). There was no significant correlation between the age of healthy sub-jects and liver T1ρ value in the control subjects (r=0.18,P=0.58). Conclusion:T1ρ value in quantitative diagnosis of early liver cirrhosis has high sensitivity and repeatability.%目的:探讨MRI T1ρWI对早期肝硬化的诊断价值。方法:40例早期肝硬化患者(观察组)和25例健康体检者(对照组)均行常规MRI扫描,并根据不同的自旋锁定时间(10、20、40和80 ms)行4次屏气T1ρ扫描。分别测量出观察组和对照组肝脏的T1ρ值并进行对比;在对照组内分析受检者的年龄与肝脏T1ρ值的相关性。结果:观察组平均T1ρ值(56.0±4.0)ms明显高于对照组的(49.7±3.5)ms。观察组Child-Pugh肝功能改良分级A和B级的T1ρ值分别与对照组比较,差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.05)。对照组年龄与肝脏T1ρ值无明显相关性(r=0.18,P=0.58

  9. MRI of plants and foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  10. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  11. Once-weekly 22microg subcutaneous IFN-beta-1a in secondary progressive MS: a 3-year follow-up study on brain MRI measurements and serum MMP-9 levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, X; Kuusisto, H; Dastidar, P;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of weekly injected subcutaneous interferon (IFN)-beta-1a 22 microg on the extent of brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the level of serum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). SUBJECTS...

  12. Progression of emphysema evaluated by MRI using hyperpolarized (3)He (HP (3)He) measurements in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency compared with CT and lung function tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavngaard, T; Søgaard, L Vejby; Batz, M

    2009-01-01

    as compared to yearly decline. PURPOSE: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients with severe A1AT...

  13. Evaluation of highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI in tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Elwin C; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Wilson, Brent D; DiBella, Edward V R; Dosdall, Derek J; Ranjan, Ravi; McGann, Christopher J; Kim, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated breath-hold cine MRI is considered to be the gold standard test for the assessment of cardiac function. However, it may fail in patients with arrhythmia, impaired breath-hold capacity and poor ECG gating. Although ungated real-time cine MRI may mitigate these problems, commercially available real-time cine MRI pulse sequences using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatiotemporal resolution because of their low image acquisition efficiency. As an extension of our previous work, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality and accuracy of eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with compressed sensing (CS) for the quantification of cardiac function in tachycardia, where it is challenging for real-time cine MRI to provide sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. We evaluated the performances of eight-fold-accelerated cine MRI with CS, three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with temporal generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (TGRAPPA) and ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI in 21 large animals with tachycardia (mean heart rate, 104 beats per minute) at 3T. For each cine MRI method, two expert readers evaluated the diagnostic quality in four categories (image quality, temporal fidelity of wall motion, artifacts and apparent noise) using a Likert scale (1-5, worst to best). One reader evaluated the left ventricular functional parameters. The diagnostic quality scores were significantly different between the three cine pulse sequences, except for the artifact level between CS and TGRAPPA real-time cine MRI. Both ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI and eight-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all four scores of ≥ 3.0 (acceptable), whereas three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all scores below 3.0, except for artifact (3.0). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements agreed better between ECG-gated cine MRI and eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI

  14. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  15. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M; Paganelli, C; Lee, D; Greer, P B; Baroni, G; Keall, P J; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-21

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  16. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  17. MRI Segmentation of the Human Brain: Challenges, Methods, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Despotović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain’s anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation.

  18. MRI segmentation of the human brain: challenges, methods, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotović, Ivana; Goossens, Bart; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain's anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  1. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used for ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  7. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanders, A.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Potter, P. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rao, V.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tom, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, C.L. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, J.A. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  12. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... copied to a CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces ... MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the ...

  18. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you ...

  1. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  2. Microtesla MRI of the human brain with simultaneous MEG

    CERN Document Server

    Zotev, V S; Matlashov, A N; Savukov, I M; Espy, M A; Mosher, J C; Gómez, J J; Kraus, R H

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) uses SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) to measure spin precession at a microtesla-range field after sample magnetization is enhanced by a stronger pre-polarizing field. Here, the first ULF images of the human head acquired at 46 microtesla measurement field with pre-polarization at 30 mT are reported. The imaging was performed with 3 mm x 3 mm x 6 mm resolution using the seven-channel SQUID system designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG). Auditory MEG signals were measured immediately after the imaging while the human subject remained inside the system. These results demonstrate that ULF MRI of the human brain is feasible and can be naturally combined with MEG.

  3. Physiologically informed dynamic causal modeling of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicek, Martin; Roebroeck, Alard; Friston, Karl; Gardumi, Anna; Ivanov, Dimo; Uludag, Kamil

    2015-11-15

    The functional MRI (fMRI) signal is an indirect measure of neuronal activity. In order to deconvolve the neuronal activity from the experimental fMRI data, biophysical generative models have been proposed describing the link between neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow (the neurovascular coupling), and further the hemodynamic response and the BOLD signal equation. These generative models have been employed both for single brain area deconvolution and to infer effective connectivity in networks of multiple brain areas. In the current paper, we introduce a new fMRI model inspired by experimental observations about the physiological underpinnings of the BOLD signal and compare it with the generative models currently used in dynamic causal modeling (DCM), a widely used framework to study effective connectivity in the brain. We consider three fundamental aspects of such generative models for fMRI: (i) an adaptive two-state neuronal model that accounts for a wide repertoire of neuronal responses during and after stimulation; (ii) feedforward neurovascular coupling that links neuronal activity to blood flow; and (iii) a balloon model that can account for vascular uncoupling between the blood flow and the blood volume. Finally, we adjust the parameterization of the BOLD signal equation for different magnetic field strengths. This paper focuses on the form, motivation and phenomenology of DCMs for fMRI and the characteristics of the various models are demonstrated using simulations. These simulations emphasize a more accurate modeling of the transient BOLD responses - such as adaptive decreases to sustained inputs during stimulation and the post-stimulus undershoot. In addition, we demonstrate using experimental data that it is necessary to take into account both neuronal and vascular transients to accurately model the signal dynamics of fMRI data. By refining the models of the transient responses, we provide a more informed perspective on the underlying neuronal

  4. MRI in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldemeyer, K.S. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Smith, R.R. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Harris, T.M. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Edwards, M.K. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A retrospective analysis of CT and MRI studies in 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) was performed. MRI was the definitive modality for the assessment of the lesions of ADEM: all patients had abnormalities consistent with the clinical diagnosis. Ten had abnormalities in the brain, three spinal cord lesions, and three showed evidence of optic neuritis. CT was normal in 6 of the 7 patients in which it was performed. (orig.)

  5. MRI and intraocular tamponade media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfre, I. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Fabbri, G. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Avitabile, T. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Biondi, P. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Reibaldi, A. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Pero, G. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy))

    1993-05-01

    Thirteen patients who underwent surgery for retinal detachment and injection of intraocular tamponade media (silicone oil, flurosilicone oil, or perfluoro-carbon liquid) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images. The ophthalmic tamponade media showed different signal intensity, according to their chemical structure. Unlike ophthalmoscopy or ultrasonography, MRI showed no oil-related artefact, making possible recognition of recurrent retinal detachment. (orig.)

  6. Congenital dacryocystocele: prenatal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Zeynep [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Uludag University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey); Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Rubio, Eva I.; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Linam, Leann E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yazici, Bulent [Uludag University, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Congenital dacryocystocele can be diagnosed prenatally by imaging. Prenatal MRI is increasingly utilized for fetal diagnosis. To present the radiological and clinical features of seven fetuses with congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI. The institutional database of 1,028 consecutive prenatal MR examinations performed during a period of 4 years was reviewed retrospectively. The cases of congenital dacryocystocele were identified by reading the report of each MRI study. The incidence of dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI was 0.7% (n=7/1,028). The dacryocystocele was bilateral in three fetuses. Mean gestational age at the time of diagnosis was 31 weeks. The indication for prenatal MRI was the presence or the suspicion of central nervous system abnormality in six fetuses and diaphragmatic hernia in one. Dacryocystocele was associated with an intranasal cyst in six of ten eyes. Prenatal sonography revealed dacryocystocele in only two of seven fetuses. Of eight eyes with postnatal follow-up, four did not have any lacrimal symptoms. Prenatal MRI can delineate congenital dacryocystocele more clearly and in a more detailed fashion than ultrasonography. Presence of dacryocystocele was symptomatic in only 50% of our patients, supporting that prenatal diagnosis of dacryocystocele might follow a benign course. (orig.)

  7. SQUID-based instrumentation for ultralow-field MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotev, Vadim S; Matlashov, Andrei N; Volegov, Petr L; Urbaitis, Algis V; Espy, Michelle A; Jr, Robert H Kraus [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Group of Applied Modern Physics, MS D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultralow fields (ULF MRI) is a promising new imaging method that uses SQUID sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at a microtesla-range measurement field. In this work, a seven-channel SQUID system designed for simultaneous 3D ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is described. The system includes seven second-order SQUID gradiometers characterized by magnetic field resolutions of 1.2-2.8 fT Hz{sup -1/2}. It is also equipped with five sets of coils for 3D Fourier imaging with pre-polarization. Essential technical details of the design are discussed. The system's ULF MRI performance is demonstrated by multi-channel 3D images of a preserved sheep brain acquired at 46 {mu}T measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. The imaging resolution is 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm. The ULF MRI images are compared to images of the same brain acquired using conventional high-field MRI. Different ways to improve imaging SNR are discussed.

  8. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  9. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoad, C L [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Marciani, L [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Foley, S [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Totman, J J [Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wright, J [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bush, D [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cox, E F [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Campbell, E [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Spiller, R C [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gowland, P A [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug interventio000.

  10. Building an EEG-fMRI multi-modal brain graph: a concurrent EEG-fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbao Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA. EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma. EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics.

  11. Building an EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph: A Concurrent EEG-fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingbao; Wu, Lei; Bridwell, David A.; Erhardt, Erik B.; Du, Yuhui; He, Hao; Chen, Jiayu; Liu, Peng; Sui, Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    The topological architecture of brain connectivity has been well-characterized by graph theory based analysis. However, previous studies have primarily built brain graphs based on a single modality of brain imaging data. Here we develop a framework to construct multi-modal brain graphs using concurrent EEG-fMRI data which are simultaneously collected during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) resting states. FMRI data are decomposed into independent components with associated time courses by group independent component analysis (ICA). EEG time series are segmented, and then spectral power time courses are computed and averaged within 5 frequency bands (delta; theta; alpha; beta; low gamma). EEG-fMRI brain graphs, with EEG electrodes and fMRI brain components serving as nodes, are built by computing correlations within and between fMRI ICA time courses and EEG spectral power time courses. Dynamic EEG-fMRI graphs are built using a sliding window method, versus static ones treating the entire time course as stationary. In global level, static graph measures and properties of dynamic graph measures are different across frequency bands and are mainly showing higher values in eyes closed than eyes open. Nodal level graph measures of a few brain components are also showing higher values during eyes closed in specific frequency bands. Overall, these findings incorporate fMRI spatial localization and EEG frequency information which could not be obtained by examining only one modality. This work provides a new approach to examine EEG-fMRI associations within a graph theoretic framework with potential application to many topics. PMID:27733821

  12. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic......, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized...... reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. CONCLUSION: MRI has been further developed...

  13. MRI outcomes with cladribine tablets for multiple sclerosis in the CLARITY study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, Giancarlo; Cook, Stuart D; Giovannoni, Gavin;

    2013-01-01

    We herein provide a comprehensive assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcomes from CLARITY, a 96-week, double-blind study demonstrating significant clinical and MRI improvements in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) treated with cladribine tablets. Patients...... with RRMS were randomized 1:1:1 to annual short-course therapy with cladribine tablets cumulative dose 3.5 or 5.25 mg/kg or placebo. MRI endpoints included mean number of T1 gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+), active T2 and combined unique (CU) lesions/patient/scan. MRI-measured disease activity was significantly...

  14. Dependence of DCE-MRI biomarker values on analysis algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaan S Ng

    Full Text Available Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI biomarkers have proven utility in tumors in evaluating microvascular perfusion and permeability, but it is unclear whether measurements made in different centers are comparable due to methodological differences.To evaluate how commonly utilized analytical methods for DCE-MRI biomarkers affect both the absolute parameter values and repeatability.DCE-MRI was performed on three consecutive days in twelve rats bearing C6 xenografts. Endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans, extracellular extravascular space volume fraction (ve, and contrast agent reflux rate constant (kep measures were computed using: 2-parameter ("Tofts" or "standard Kety" vs. 3-parameter ("General Kinetic" or "extended Kety" compartmental models (including blood plasma volume fraction (vp with 3-parameter models; individual- vs. population-based vascular input functions (VIFs; and pixel-by-pixel vs. whole tumor-ROI. Variability was evaluated by within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV and variance components analyses.DCE-MRI absolute parameter values and wCVs varied widely by analytical method. Absolute parameter values ranged, as follows, median Ktrans, 0.09-0.18 min-1; kep, 0.51-0.92 min-1; ve, 0.17-0.23; and vp, 0.02-0.04. wCVs also varied widely by analytical method, as follows: mean Ktrans, 32.9-61.9%; kep, 11.6-41.9%; ve, 16.1-54.9%; and vp, 53.9-77.2%. Ktrans and kep values were lower with 3- than 2-parameter modeling (p<0.0001; kep and vp were lower with pixel- than whole-ROI analyses (p<0.0006. wCVs were significantly smaller for ve, and larger for kep, with individual- than population-based VIFs.DCE-MRI parameter values and repeatability can vary widely by analytical methodology. Absolute values of DCE-MRI biomarkers are unlikely to be comparable between different studies unless analyses are carefully standardized.

  15. Work-related factors associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Cambron-Goulet, Évelyne; Kromhout, Hans

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to identify work-related and personal factors associated with workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) from MRI scanners. METHODS: Measurements of personal exposure to SMF and TVMF were performed among MRI staff

  16. Correcting partial volume artifacts of the arterial input function in quantitative cerebral perfusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, MJP; Vonken, EJPA; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2001-01-01

    To quantify cerebral perfusion with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI), one needs to measure the arterial input function (AIF). Conventionally, one derives the contrast concentration from the DSC sequence by monitoring changes in either the amplitude or the phase signal on the assumption

  17. Motion or activity: their role in intra- and inter-subject variation in fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard Lund, Torben; Nørgaard, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) carries the potential for non-invasive measurements of brain activity. Typically, what are referred to as activation images are actually thresholded statistical parametric maps. These maps possess large inter-session variability. This is especially problematic when applying f...

  18. MRI for the evaluation of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcovici, Peter A. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); LoSasso, Barry E. [Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States); Kruk, Peter; Dwek, Jerry R. [Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Pectus excavatum, the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, is both a cosmetic and functional abnormality. The degree of abnormal chest wall deformity determines its functional effect, particularly its cardiac and pulmonary impact. Although CT scanning is the most widely used cross-sectional imaging technique used to measure the Haller index, the radiation exposure is reason to seek other alternatives. At our institution, we have introduced a rapid MRI technique for this purpose, which utilizes a single-axial 2-D FIESTA acquisition. (orig.)

  19. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  20. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, Kyle M. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Aly, Abdel-Rahman [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rajasekaran, Sathish [Health Pointe - Pain, Spine and Sport Medicine, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  1. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  2. Arterial spin-labelling perfusion MRI and outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, Jill B. de; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, Esben T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vries, Linda S. de; Bel, Frank van; Alderliesten, Thomas; Negro, Simona; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J.N.L. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Hyperperfusion may be related to outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion is associated with outcome in neonates with HIE and to compare the predictive value of ASL MRI to known MRI predictive markers. Twenty-eight neonates diagnosed with HIE and assessed with MR imaging (conventional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy [MRS], and ASL MRI) were included. Perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami was measured. Outcome at 9 or 18 months of age was scored as either adverse (death or cerebral palsy) or favourable. The median (range) perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami (BGT) was 63 (28-108) ml/100 g/min in the neonates with adverse outcome and 28 (12-51) ml/100 g/min in the infants with favourable outcome (p < 0.01). The area-under-the-curve was 0.92 for ASL MRI, 0.97 for MRI score, 0.96 for Lac/NAA and 0.92 for ADC in the BGT. The combination of Lac/NAA and ASL MRI results was the best predictor of outcome (r {sup 2} = 0.86, p < 0.001). Higher ASL perfusion values in neonates with HIE are associated with a worse neurodevelopmental outcome. A combination of the MRS and ASL MRI information is the best predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  3. Anatomical evaluation of CT-MRI combined femoral model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Gyu-Ha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both CT and MRI are complementary to each other in that CT can produce a distinct contour of bones, and MRI can show the shape of both ligaments and bones. It will be ideal to build a CT-MRI combined model to take advantage of complementary information of each modality. This study evaluated the accuracy of the combined femoral model in terms of anatomical inspection. Methods Six normal porcine femora (180 ± 10 days, 3 lefts and 3 rights with ball markers were scanned by CT and MRI. The 3D/3D registration was performed by two methods, i.e. the landmark-based 3 points-to-3 points and the surface matching using the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm. The matching accuracy of the combined model was evaluated with statistical global deviation and locally measure anatomical contour-based deviation. Statistical analysis to assess any significant difference between accuracies of those two methods was performed using univariate repeated measures ANOVA with the Turkey post hoc test. Results This study revealed that the local 2D contour-based measurement of matching deviation was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in the femoral condyle, and in the middle femoral shaft. The global 3D contour matching deviation of the landmark-based matching was 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, but local 2D contour deviation through anatomical inspection was much larger as much as 3.0 ± 1.8 mm. Conclusion Even with human-factor derived errors accumulated from segmentation of MRI images, and limited image quality, the matching accuracy of CT-&-MRI combined 3D models was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in terms of local anatomical inspection.

  4. Interstitial pregnancy: role of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhastre, M.; Lesnik, A. [Lapeyronie Hospital, Department of Radiology, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dechaud, H.; Taourel, P. [Arnaud de Villeneuve Hospital, Department of Gynecology, Montpellier (France)

    2005-01-01

    We report the MRI features of two cases of interstitial pregnancy. In both cases, MRI was able to localize the ectopic pregnancy by showing a gestational structure surrounded by a thick wall in the upper part of the uterine wall separated from the endometrium by an uninterrupted junctional zone. Because US may confuse angular and interstitial pregnancies and because interstitial pregnancy has a particular evolutive course, MR imaging may play a key role in the diagnosis and management of women with interstitial pregnancy. (orig.)

  5. MRI B-TFE Vein Imaging in the Application of Portal Vein Imaging%MRI B-TFE静脉成像在门静脉造影中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑力强; 柏沙美; 江新青; 徐向东

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨MRI B-TFE静脉成像在门静脉造影中的应用价值.方法 选择17例临床疑似门静脉高压病人,行B-TFE和DCE MRP.B-TFE组 敏感性编码因子取值为1、2.B-TFE和DCEMRP组在冠状位MIP图测量门静脉主干径线及SNR、门静脉与周围组织的CNR. 两位不知病情的影像医师对门静脉三维图像质量、门脉主干径线、MPV、RPV、LPV、SPV、SMV的显影质量评分.测量数据和图像评分进行统计学处理.结果 B-TFE组缩减因子为1,SNR为118.0±25.1;CNR为103.7±33.5.B-TFE组缩减因子为2,SNR为93.5±23.1; CNR为83.1±34.5. DCEMRP组门静脉的SNR为103.8±31.5,CNR为92.7±30.1.组内和组间门静脉三维图像质量主干径线及分支差异均无统计学意义.结论 B-TFE可以结合临床诊断门静脉高压,避免不必要的对比剂增强检查,使用非对比剂的方法多角度直观的显示门静脉系统,是值得推荐的好方法.%Objective To explore the MRI B-TFE vein imaging in the application of portal vein imaging value. Methods Select of 17 cases clinical suspected patients with portal hypertension, line B-TFE and DCE MRP. B-TFE group sensitivity encoding factor value for 1,2. B-TFE and DCE MRP group in the coronary a MIP figure measuring diameter line and the portal vein and SNR, portal vein and the surrounding tissue CNR, the two never know the condition of portal vein image doctor 3 d image quality, Portal backbone diameter line, MPV, RPV, LPV, SPV, SMV enhancement quality score. The measurement data and image processing the statistical rating. Results B-TFE group reduced factors for 1, SNR is 118.0 ± 25.1; For 103.7 ± 33.5 CNR. B-TFE group reduced factors for 2, SNR is 93.5 ± 23.1; For 83.1 ± 34.5 CNR. DCE MRP group of portal vein for 103.8 ± 31.5 CNR SNR is 92.7 ± 30.1. In the group and group 3 d image quality between Portal backbone diameter line and branch were no statistically significant differences. Conclusion B-TFE can combine clinical diagnosis of

  6. An improved MRI guided ultrasound system for superficial tumor hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Shen, Guofeng; Su, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Among many methods in tumor treatment, ultrasound hyperthermia is characterized by non-invasiveness, and it has been proven very effective for clinical treatment. But the problem of monitoring temperature limits its development. MRI-based temperature mapping techniques are safe compared with invasive methods and have been applied to detect temperature changes for a variety of applications. Among these techniques, the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method is relatively advanced. With a temperature measuring experiment and experiment conducted on tumors inside rabbit legs, the effectiveness of PRF method has been proved. This paper is to introduce an MRI guided ultrasound superficial tumor hyperthermia instrument based on PRF method.

  7. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone.

  8. Research progress of MRI for cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a common inflammatory demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS. It may be accompanied by cognitive impairment, however, the mechanism for cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis is still unknown. More and more MRI techniques are used to improve the understanding on pathogenetic mechanism of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. This paper summarizes MRI measures currently available to explain the possible mechanism for cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.012

  9. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  10. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment between echocardiography and MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddhe, Sujatha; Lewin, Mark; Olson, Aaron; Soriano, Brian D. [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Ferguson, Mark [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with death in approximately 40% of patients. Echocardiography is routinely used to assess left ventricular (LV) function; however, it has limitations in these patients. We compared echocardiographic measures of cardiac function assessment to cardiac MRI. We included children and young adults with DMD who had MRI performed between January 2010 and July 2015. We measured echocardiographic and MRI parameters of function assessment, including strain. Presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by MRI. Subjects were divided into two groups based on MRI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): group I, LVEF ≥55% and group II, LVEF <55%. We included 41 studies in 33 subjects, with 25 in group I and 16 in group II. Mean age of subjects was 13.6 ± 2.8 years and mean duration between echocardiogram and MRI was 7.6 ± 4.1 months. Only 8 of 16 (50%) patients in group II had diminished function on echocardiogram. Echocardiographic images were suboptimal in 16 subjects (39%). Overall, echocardiographic parameters had weak correlation with MRI-derived ejection fraction percentage. MRI-derived myocardial strain assessment has better correlation with MRI ejection fraction as compared to echocardiography-derived strain parameters. Echocardiography-based ventricular functional assessment has weak correlation with MRI parameters in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. While this correlation improves in the subset of subjects with adequate echocardiographic image quality, it remains modest and potentially suboptimal for clinical management. Accordingly, we conclude that MRI should be performed routinely and early in children with DMD, not only for LGE imaging but also for functional assessment. (orig.)

  11. Moyamoya disease: diagnostic accuracy of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Suzuki, [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Matsushima, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    MRI may be employed to investigate moyamoya disease, since it provides vascular information without use of contrast medium. We reported the usefulness and limitations of MR angiography (MRA) in moyamoya disease. To our knowledge, no report has appeared dealing with the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in a large number of cases of moyamoya disease, although MRI is used more commonly than MRA. We therefore undertook to evaluate the accuracy of MRI in moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  12. Prospective multiaxial motion correction for fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H A; Riederer, S J; Grimm, R C; Ehman, R L; Felmlee, J P; Jack, C R

    2000-03-01

    Corruption of the image time series due to interimage head motion limits the clinical utility of functional MRI. This paper presents a method for real-time prospective correction of rotation and translation in all six degrees of rigid body motion. By incorporating an orbital navigator (ONAV) echo for each of the sagittal, axial, and coronal planes into the fMRI pulse sequence, rotation and translation can be measured and the spatial orientation of the image acquisition sequence that follows can be corrected prospectively in as little as 160 msec. Testing of the method using a computerized motion phantom capable of performing complex multiaxial motion showed subdegree rotational and submillimeter translational accuracy over a range of +/-8 degrees and +/-8 mm of motion. In vivo images demonstrate correction of simultaneous through-plane and in-plane motion and improved detection of fMRI activation in the presence of head motion.

  13. Resolution of NASH with weight loss documented by hepatic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vasvi; Luthra, Saurav; Elajami, Tarec K; Welty, Francine K

    2015-01-06

    A 57-year-old Asian woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidaemia and history of breast cancer, was referred to the cardiovascular health and lipid centre for evaluation and management of dyslipidaemia and NASH (Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) in 2010. She originally had a detailed work up at the liver clinic for elevated liver enzymes, with no associated symptoms. Initial hepatic MRI on 22 January 2007 showed diffuse fatty infiltration quantitated at 15%. We counselled her on lifestyle modifications, including dietary measures and exercise, geared toward weight loss. Over the next 2 years, she lost 24.5 lbs; repeat hepatic MRI on 22 December 2011 showed 6% hepatic fat, which is within the normal range. This case demonstrates the efficacy of significant weight loss in the improvement and resolution of NASH. We believe that this is the first case report documenting this through liver MRI.

  14. Archetypal Analysis for Modeling Multisubject fMRI Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrich, Jesper Løve; Bardenfleth, Sophia Elizabeth; Røge, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is widely used to measure brain function during various cognitive states. However, it remains a challenge to obtain low-rank models of functional networks in fMRI that have interpretable latent features and generalize across groups of subjects, due...... are assumed to be generated by a set of 'prototype' time series. Archetypal analysis (AA) provides a promising alternative, combining the advantages of component-model flexibility with highly interpretable latent 'archetypes' (similar to cluster-model prototypes). To date, AA has not been applied to group......-level fMRI; a major limitation is that it does not generalize to multi-subject datasets, which may have significant variations in blood oxygenation-level-dependent signal and heteroscedastic noise. We develop multi-subject AA (MS-AA), which accounts for group-level data by assuming that archetypal...

  15. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease. First experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Bettina; Froekiaer, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Michael [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). MR Research Centre; Joergensen, Troels Munch [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Urology; Rittig, Soeren [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Paediatrics

    2010-07-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides. We included renal impaired children who were recruited for clinical radioisotopic GFR measurements (n=8). MRI was performed 2 hours after Cr-EDTA measurements and was conducted using a protocol involving both anatomical/structural sequences and a dynamic contrast-enhanced sequence. Data obtained with the dynamic MRI sequence were processed using the graphical Patlak approach to obtain estimates of GFR. We were able to characterize the intrarenal configuration (cortex, medulla, pelvicalyceal arrangement) in all cases. Functional analyses of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealed an overall underestimation of GFR measured by MRI compared to Cr-EDTPA measures (range: -2% to -43%). We advocate the use of MRI as a single-modality approach in the structural and functional evaluation of impaired kidneys in children, and concurrently, we presented a clinically available strategy for estimations of renal cortical volume and single kidney function. However, the use of MRI contrast agents have recently become controversial in renal patients due to the risk of NSF. (orig.)

  16. Do pedagogical agents enhance software training?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der Hans

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether a tutorial for software training can be enhanced by adding a pedagogical agent, and whether the type of agent matters (i.e., cognitive, motivational, or mixed). The cognitive agent was designed to stimulate students to process their experiences actively. The motivatio

  17. Breast MRI in high risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis we address various indications of breast MRI, with the emphasis on the value of MRI in screening of women with high genetic risk for breast cancer, and especially in BRCA1 mutation carriers. We showed that in the era of up-to-date MRI expertise and digital

  18. Highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Srichai, Monvadi B; Lim, Ruth P; Harrison, Alexis; King, Wilson; Adluru, Ganesh; Dibella, Edward V R; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    For patients with impaired breath-hold capacity and/or arrhythmias, real-time cine MRI may be more clinically useful than breath-hold cine MRI. However, commercially available real-time cine MRI methods using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatio-temporal resolution due to their low image acquisition speed. We sought to achieve relatively high spatial resolution (∼2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) and temporal resolution (∼40 ms), to produce high-quality real-time cine MR images that could be applied clinically for wall motion assessment and measurement of left ventricular function. In this work, we present an eightfold accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI pulse sequence using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). Compared with reference, breath-hold cine MRI, our eightfold accelerated real-time cine MRI produced significantly worse qualitative grades (1-5 scale), but its image quality and temporal fidelity scores were above 3.0 (adequate) and artifacts and noise scores were below 3.0 (moderate), suggesting that acceptable diagnostic image quality can be achieved. Additionally, both eightfold accelerated real-time cine and breath-hold cine MRI yielded comparable left ventricular function measurements, with coefficient of variation cine MRI with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising modality for rapid imaging of myocardial function.

  19. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins and uncovertebral joint hypertrophy in the neck. The central canal and the neurorecess may be compromised by tumor infiltration, such as metastatic disease, or by infectious spondylitis."nAP diameter of the normal adult cervical canal has a mean value of 17-18 mm at vertebral levels C3-5. The lower cervical canal measures 12-14 mm. Cervical stenosis is associated with an AP diameter of less than 10 mm. The thoracic spinal canal varies from 12 to 14 mm in diameter in the adult. The diameter of the normal lumbar spinal canal varies from 15 to 27 mm. Lumbar stenosis results from a spinal canal diameter of less than 12 mm in some patients; a diameter of 10 mm is definitely stenotic."nSpinal MRI is the most suitable technique for the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The examination should be performed using thin sections (3 mm and high resolution, including the axial and sagittal planes using T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted techniques. The bony and osteophytic components are seen best using a T2-weighted gradient-echo technique."nOn MRI, findings of spinal stenosis have a variable presentation depending on the specific disease. The goal of spinal imaging is to localize the site and level of disease and to help differentiate between conditions in which patients require surgery or conservative treatment."nIn this presentation, different kinds of spinal canal stenosis and their MRI findings would be discussed.

  20. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A. [Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrete, H. [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P. [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  1. MRI of rectal stromal tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2012-01-01

    to be aware of for the rectal multidisciplinary team. On suspicion of GIST, patients should be referred to a sarcoma centre. The diagnosis of rectal GIST can be suggested on MRI by the presence of a well-defined heterogeneously large mass with a necrotic center associated with a prominent extra...

  2. MRI of plants and foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. Women should always inform their physician or technologist if ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  7. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vocht, Frank [University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol (United Kingdom); Batistatou, Evridiki [University of Manchester, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moelter, Anna [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel [Utrecht University, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Tongeren, Martie [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Centre for Human Exposure Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Crozier, Stuart [University of Queensland, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia); Gowland, Penny [University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Physics, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  8. MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolezel, Martin, E-mail: dolezelm@email.cz [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Zizka, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel [Department of Radiology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan [Department of Gynaecology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Jalcova, Lubica [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

  9. Interpreting Intervention Induced Neuroplasticity with fMRI: The Case for Multimodal Imaging Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B. Reid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of recovery from brain injury is an important goal in neurorehabilitation, and requires reliable, objective, and interpretable measures of changes in brain function, referred to generally as “neuroplasticity.” One popular imaging modality for measuring neuroplasticity is task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (t-fMRI. In the field of neurorehabilitation, however, assessing neuroplasticity using t-fMRI presents a significant challenge. This commentary reviews t-fMRI changes commonly reported in patients with cerebral palsy or acquired brain injuries, with a focus on studies of motor rehabilitation, and discusses complexities surrounding their interpretations. Specifically, we discuss the difficulties in interpreting t-fMRI changes in terms of their underlying causes, that is, differentiating whether they reflect genuine reorganisation, neurological restoration, compensation, use of preexisting redundancies, changes in strategy, or maladaptive processes. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of heterogeneous disease states and essential t-fMRI processing steps on the interpretability of activation patterns. To better understand therapy-induced neuroplastic changes, we suggest that researchers utilising t-fMRI consider concurrently acquiring information from an additional modality, to quantify, for example, haemodynamic differences or microstructural changes. We outline a variety of such supplementary measures for investigating brain reorganisation and discuss situations in which they may prove beneficial to the interpretation of t-fMRI data.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI and ultrasound perfusion quantification of denervated muscle in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyault, G.; Beregi, J.P. [University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular imaging, Cardiologic Hospital, Lille (France); Bierry, G.; Holl, N.; Dietemann, J.L.; Kremer, S. [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Strasbourg (France); Lhermitte, B. [University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess denervated muscle perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSCMRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and to measure denervated muscle apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on b1000 diffusion-weighted MRI (DWMRI) at 3 T in order to clarify whether muscle denervation leads to an increase in the extracellular extravascular space, or an increase in blood flow - or both. Axotomy of the right sciatic nerve of six white rabbits was performed at day 0. At day 9, hind limb muscles MRI and CEUS were performed to assess the consequences of denervation and both semimembranosus muscles of each rabbit were explanted for histological studies. Signal intensity on T2- and T1-weighted MRI, ADC on DWMRI, maximum signal drop (MSD) on DSCMRI and the area under the curve (AUC) on CEUS were measured over circular regions of interest (ROI), in both semimembranosus muscles. Non-parametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used to assess the mean differences between denervated and normal muscles. T2 fat-saturated (FS) MRI studies showed a strong signal in the right semimembranosus muscles compared with the left side, and gadolinium enhancement was observed on T1 FS MRI. Denervated muscles show a significant increase in ADC on DWMRI (p < 0.01) and a significant signal enhancement on DSCMR imaging (p < 0.05) and on first-pass CEUS (p < 0.05). The results of this study - based on perfusion- and diffusion-weighted images - suggest that, after denervation, both increased blood flow through muscle tissue and expansion of the extracellular water volume are present. (orig.)

  11. fMRI-BCI: a Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Huan Li; Qin Gao; Wei-Shuai Lü; Hua-Fu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new tool for brain-computer interface (BCI).This paper presents an overview to fMRI-BCI.Our attention is mainly put on the methods of signal acquisition,signal preprocessing,and signal analysis of basic fMRI-BCI structure.The available softwares and the applications of fMRI-BCI are briefly introduced.At last,we suggest focusing on some technologies to make fMRI-BCI more perfect.

  12. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby 2800, Denmark and Department of Oncology, Radiotherapy Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby 2800, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Hansen, Rasmus H. [Department of Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark); Andersen, Jon A. L.; Edmund, Jens M. [Department of Oncology, Radiotherapy Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev 2730 (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are not uniquely related to electron density. To solve the task, voxel-based or atlas-based models have typically been used. The voxel-based models require a specialized dual ultrashort echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization and the atlas-based models require deformable registrations of conventional MRI scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods: The data consisted of CT and MRI scans of five cranial RT patients. To compare the performance of the different methods, a nested cross validation was done to find optimal model parameters for all the methods. Voxel-wise and geometric evaluations of the pCTs were done. Furthermore, a radiologic evaluation based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results: The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric, and radiologic agreement with the real CT, closely followed by the atlas-based method. In terms of the dosimetric accuracy, the patch-based method had average deviations of less than 0.5% in measures related to target coverage. Conclusions: We showed that a patch-based method could generate an accurate pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and

  13. Cine MRI of the temporomandibular joint in comparison to static MRI and axiography; Cine-MRT des Kiefergelenks im Vergleich zur konventionellen MRT und Achsiographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, A.; Rummeny, E.J. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany); Kolk, A.; Neff, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-Kiefer-Gesichtschirurgie der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany); Hof, N. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Nuklearmedizin, Krankenhaus Dritter Orden, Muenchen-Nymphenburg (Germany); Treumann, T. [Roentgeninstitut, Kantonshospital Luzern (Switzerland)

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate Cine MRI (cMRI) of the temporomandibular joint in comparison to static MRI (sMRI) and axiography. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study with 57 healthy volunteers as well as 33 patients after temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery or with severe joint dysfunction, we measured the mobility of both condyle and disc as well as the sagittal angle of condylar inclination with sMRI and cMRI. Measurements and image analysis were performed by a radiologist and a maxillofacial surgeon in consensus. The results of axiography served as standard of reference. Result: Concerning the assessment of the discoligamentous complex, sMRI was superior to cMRI in the patient-group (sensitivity sMRI 85%, cMRI 76%), while no significant difference was found in the volunteer-group (sensitivity sMRI 97.4%, cMRI 98.3%). The results of cMRI and sMRI showed a highly significant correlation with each other, as well as with the axiographic reference tracings (r=0.90). The average mobility of the disc and condyle was 6% and 10% higher in sMRI compared to cMRI (p=0.001) and showed a slightly higher variance (0.043 vs. 0.038). Concerning the condylar inclination angle, both MRI-procedures had the best correlation (r=0.94) with each other and axiography. Conclusion: Real-time MRI of the TMJ is comparable to axiography in its accuracy and is a useful adjunct to conventional static MRI. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Evaluation der Cine-MRT (cMRT) des Kiefergelenks im Vergleich zur statischen MRT (sMRT) und Achsiographie. Material und Methode: Bei 57 Probanden und bei 33 Patienten nach operativem Gelenkeingriff oder mit klinischer Funktionsstoerung wurden die Kondylus- und Diskusmobilitaet sowie die horizontale Kondylenbahnneigung (HKN) in der sMRT und in der cMRT bestimmt. Die Auswertung erfolgte durch einen Radiologen und einen Mund-Kiefer-Gesichtschirurgen im Konsensus. Die Werte der Achsiographie dienten als Goldstandard. Ergebnisse: Bezueglich der Abgrenzbarkeit des

  14. MRI texture heterogeneity in the optic nerve predicts visual recovery after acute optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Tissue heterogeneity may be a potential measure of functional outcome in ON patients and advanced analysis of the texture in standard MRI could provide insights into mechanisms of injury and recovery in patients with similar disorders.

  15. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease: first experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bettina; Karstoft, Kristian; Jørgensen, Troels Munch;

    2010-01-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides....

  16. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diffuse liver diseases. Comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Ebara, Masaaki; Ohto, Masao

    1987-06-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) was performed in 74 patients with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, Budd-Chiari syndrome, extrahepatic protal vein occlusion, Wilson disease and hemochromatosis. We measured relaxation time of the liver and the spleen in these patients and compared MRI with CT in the diagnostic capability. MRI was superior to plain CT in the detection of collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis and extrahepatic protal vein occlusion. MRI could also demonstrate the occluded part of the inferior vena cava in Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, MRI was almost the same as CT in the visualization of the hepatic configuration in liver cirrhosis. In liver cirrhosis, T1 values of the liver and the spleen were longer than those in normal controls, and T1 values of the liver were correlated with ICG R-15. Hepatic T1 values in Budd-Chiari syndrome were longer than those in normal controls.

  18. Fetal Electrocardiogram (fECG Gated MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn N.J. Paley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-compatible system to enable gating of a scanner to the heartbeat of a foetus for cardiac, umbilical cord flow and other possible imaging applications. We performed radiofrequency safety testing prior to a fetal electrocardiogram (fECG gated imaging study in pregnant volunteers (n = 3. A compact monitoring device with advanced software capable of reliably detecting both the maternal electrocardiogram (mECG and fECG simultaneously was modified by the manufacturer (Monica Healthcare, Nottingham, UK to provide an external TTL trigger signal from the detected fECG which could be used to trigger a standard 1.5 T MR (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA gating system with suitable attenuation. The MR scanner was tested by triggering rapidly during image acquisition at a typical fetal heart rate (123 beats per minute using a simulated fECG waveform fed into the gating system. Gated MR images were also acquired from volunteers who were attending for a repeat fetal Central Nervous System (CNS examination using an additional rapid cardiac imaging sequence triggered from the measured fECG. No adverse safety effects were encountered. This is the first time fECG gating has been used with MRI and opens up a range of new possibilities to study a developing foetus.

  19. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  20. Adaptive cyclic physiologic noise modeling and correction in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Erik B

    2010-03-30

    Physiologic noise in BOLD-weighted MRI data is known to be a significant source of the variance, reducing the statistical power and specificity in fMRI and functional connectivity analyses. We show a dramatic improvement on current noise correction methods in both fMRI and fcMRI data that avoids overfitting. The traditional noise model is a Fourier series expansion superimposed on the periodicity of parallel measured breathing and cardiac cycles. Correction using this model results in removal of variance matching the periodicity of the physiologic cycles. Using this framework allows easy modeling of noise. However, using a large number of regressors comes at the cost of removing variance unrelated to physiologic noise, such as variance due to the signal of functional interest (overfitting the data). It is our hypothesis that there are a small variety of fits that describe all of the significantly coupled physiologic noise. If this is true, we can replace a large number of regressors used in the model with a smaller number of the fitted regressors and thereby account for the noise sources with a smaller reduction in variance of interest. We describe these extensions and demonstrate that we can preserve variance in the data unrelated to physiologic noise while removing physiologic noise equivalently, resulting in data with a higher effective SNR than with current corrections techniques. Our results demonstrate a significant improvement in the sensitivity of fMRI (up to a 17% increase in activation volume for fMRI compared with higher order traditional noise correction) and functional connectivity analyses.