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Sample records for agent targeting vesicular

  1. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

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    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  2. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

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    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  3. Ethosomes: versatile vesicular carriers for efficient transdermal delivery of therapeutic agents.

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    Pandey, Vikas; Golhani, Dilip; Shukla, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Delivery across skin is attractive due to its easy accessibility. However, drug delivery across skin is still a challenge in biomedical sciences. Over the past few decades, various successful novel devices and techniques have emerged to optimize drug delivery across skin whose obstructing behavior constricts entry of most of the therapeutic agents. Inability of various conventional vesicular formulations, e.g. liposomes to pass through the tapered (>30 nm) intercellular channels of stratum corneum, rendered invention of some lipid based vesicular carrier systems such as ethosomes which consist of phospholipid, ethanol and water. Ethosomes are non-invasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. In spite of their sophistication in conceptuality, they are exemplified by easiness in their preparation, safety and efficacy - a combination that can highly inflate their application. This review attempts to describe all aspects of ethosomes including roles and upshots of different excipients, various methods of preparation and characterizations, research reports on various drug deliveries, patent reports and future prospects.

  4. Spiroindolines Identify the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter as a Novel Target for Insecticide Action

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    Sluder, Ann; Shah, Sheetal; Cassayre, Jérôme; Clover, Ralph; Maienfisch, Peter; Molleyres, Louis-Pierre; Hirst, Elizabeth A.; Flemming, Anthony J.; Shi, Min; Cutler, Penny; Stanger, Carole; Roberts, Richard S.; Hughes, David J.; Flury, Thomas; Robinson, Michael P.; Hillesheim, Elke; Pitterna, Thomas; Cederbaum, Fredrik; Worthington, Paul A.; Crossthwaite, Andrew J.; Windass, John D.; Currie, Richard A.; Earley, Fergus G. P.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines) encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family. PMID:22563457

  5. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

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    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  6. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

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    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  7. Multi-target pursuit formation of multi-agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jing; Guan Xin-Ping; Luo Xiao-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to design a team of agents that can accomplish multi-target pursuit formation using a developed leader-follower strategy. It is supposed that every target can accept a certain number of agents. First, each agent can automatically choose its target based on the distance from the agent to the target and the number of agents

  8. Targeted Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüll, H.; Robillard, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular Imaging allows the visualization of biological processesin vivo, offering new chances for healthcare with respect to early diagnosis and improved therapy. The new field of molecular imaging isboosted by more sensitive imaging systems and the emergence of targeted imaging agents that hom

  9. The vesicular monoamine transporter-2: an important pharmacological target for the discovery of novel therapeutics to treat methamphetamine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin R; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse escalates, but no approved therapeutics are available to treat addicted individuals. Methamphetamine increases extracellular dopamine in reward-relevant pathways by interacting at vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) to inhibit dopamine uptake and promote dopamine release from synaptic vesicles, increasing cytosolic dopamine available for reverse transport by the dopamine transporter (DAT). VMAT2 is the target of our iterative drug discovery efforts to identify pharmacotherapeutics for methamphetamine addiction. Lobeline, the major alkaloid in Lobelia inflata, potently inhibited VMAT2, methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats but exhibited high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Defunctionalized, unsaturated lobeline analog, meso-transdiene (MTD), exhibited lobeline-like in vitro pharmacology, lacked nAChR affinity, but exhibited high affinity for DAT, suggesting potential abuse liability. The 2,4-dicholorophenyl MTD analog, UKMH-106, exhibited selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT, inhibited methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, but required a difficult synthetic approach. Lobelane, a saturated, defunctionalized lobeline analog, inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine; tolerance developed to the lobelane-induced decrease in methamphetamine self-administration. Improved drug-likeness was afforded by the incorporation of a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl moiety into lobelane to afford GZ-793A, which inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine, without tolerance. From a series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine analogs, AV-2-192 emerged as a lead, exhibiting high affinity for VMAT2 and inhibiting methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. Current results support the hypothesis that potent, selective VMAT2 inhibitors provide the requisite preclinical behavioral profile for evaluation as pharmacotherapeutics for

  10. Liver-targeting macromolecular MRI contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular ligands with liver-targeting group (pyridoxamine, PM) PHEA-DTPA-PM and PAEA-DTPA-PM were prepared by the incorporation of different amount of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid monopyridoxamine group (DTPA-PM) into poly-a, b-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-L- aspartamide] (PHEA) and poly-a, b-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-L-aspartamide] (PAEA). The macromolecular ligands thus obtained were further complexed with gadolinium chloride to give macromolecular MRI contrast agents with different Gd(Ⅲ) contents. These macromolecular ligands and their gadolinium complexes were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, UV and elementary analysis. Relaxivity studies showed that these polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes possess higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats and experimental data of biodistribution in mice indicate that these macromolecular MRI contrast agents containing pyridoxamine exhibit liver-targeting property.

  11. Biological agents targeting beyond TNF-alpha

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    Sharma Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological agents represent an important addition to the therapies for immuno-inflammatory conditions and have a great impact on the disease course and quality of life of these patients. However, recent reports of serious infections like tuberculosis, demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases, pancytopenia, cardiovascular diseases, etc. after anti-TNF therapy raised questions on their safety. Hence, focus is shifted towards drugs targeting cytokine checkpoints in the inflammatory cascades beyond TNF-a. Existing therapeutic targets include the biological agents acting as antagonists of various inflammatory cytokines (Anakinra, Tocilizumab, Atlizumab and modulators of CD80 or CD86-CD28 co-stimulatory signal (Abatacept, CD2 receptors on T-cells (Alefacept, CD11a, subunit of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (Efalizumab, vitronectin receptor and CD20 antigen on pre-B, immature and mature B cells (Rituximab. With the introduction of these novel molecules the future for immunomodulatory intervention in rheumatology, asthma, crohn′s disease, septic shock etc. looks very promising. These novel therapeutic agents could truly give a new hope to the clinician to modify the disease and achieve tangible improvements in the lives of the patients.

  12. Biological agents targeting beyond TNF-alpha

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    Sharma, Rashmi; Sharma, Chaman Lal; Mahajan, Annil

    2008-01-01

    Biological agents represent an important addition to the therapies for immuno-inflammatory conditions and have a great impact on the disease course and quality of life of these patients. However, recent reports of serious infections like tuberculosis, demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases, pancytopenia, cardiovascular diseases, etc. after anti-TNF therapy raised questions on their safety. Hence, focus is shifted towards drugs targeting cytokine checkpoints in the inflammatory cascades beyond TNF-α. Existing therapeutic targets include the biological agents acting as antagonists of various inflammatory cytokines (Anakinra, Tocilizumab, Atlizumab) and modulators of CD80 or CD86-CD28 co-stimulatory signal (Abatacept), CD2 receptors on T-cells (Alefacept), CD11a, subunit of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (Efalizumab), vitronectin receptor and CD20 antigen on pre-B, immature and mature B cells (Rituximab). With the introduction of these novel molecules the future for immunomodulatory intervention in rheumatology, asthma, crohn's disease, septic shock etc. looks very promising. These novel therapeutic agents could truly give a new hope to the clinician to modify the disease and achieve tangible improvements in the lives of the patients. PMID:19742267

  13. Targeting targeted agents: open issues for clinical trial design

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    Giannarelli Diana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of solid tumors had entered the market in the last 5 years, with a great impact upon both the scientific community and the society. Many randomized phase III trials conducted in recent years with new targeted agents, despite previous data coming from preclinical research and from phase II trials were often promising, have produced disappointingly negative results. Some other trials have actually met their primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant result favouring the experimental treatment. Unfortunately, with a few relevant exceptions, this advantage is often small, if not negligible, in absolute terms. The difference between statistical significance and clinical relevance should always be considered when translating clinical trials' results in the practice. The reason why this 'revolution' did not significantly impact on cancer treatment to displace chemotherapy from the patient' bedside is in part due to complicated, and in many cases, unknown, mechanisms of action of such drugs; indeed, the traditional way the clinical investigators were used to test the efficacy of 'older' chemotherapeutics, has become 'out of date' from the methodological perspective. As these drugs should be theoretically tailored upon featured bio-markers expressed by the patients, the clinical trial design should follow new rules based upon stronger hypotheses than those developed so far. Indeed, the early phases of basic and clinical drug development are crucial in the correct process which is able to correctly identify the target (when present. Targeted trial designs can result in easier studies, with less, better selected, and supported by stronger proofs of response evidences, patients, in order to not waste time and resources.

  14. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

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    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  15. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Detection of Senecavirus A in Swine Vesicular Diagnostic Specimens.

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    Alexa J Bracht

    Full Text Available Senecavirus A (SV-A, formerly, Seneca Valley virus (SVV, has been detected in swine with vesicular lesions and is thought to be associated with swine idiopathic vesicular disease (SIVD, a vesicular disease syndrome that lacks a defined causative agent. The clinical presentation of SIVD resembles that of other more contagious and economically devastating vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD, swine vesicular disease (SVD, and vesicular stomatitis (VS, that typically require immediate rule out diagnostics to lift restrictions on animal quarantine, movement, and trade. This study presents the development of a sensitive, SYBR Green RT-qPCR assay suitable for detection of SV-A in diagnostic swine specimens. After testing 50 pigs with clinical signs consistent with vesicular disease, 44 (88% were found to be positive for SV-A by RT-qPCR as compared to none from a negative cohort of 35 animals without vesicular disease, indicating that the assay is able to successfully detect the virus in an endemic population. SV-A RNA was also detectable at a low level in sera from a subset of pigs that presented with (18% or without (6% vesicular signs. In 2015, there has been an increase in the occurrence of SV-A in the US, and over 200 specimens submitted to our laboratory for vesicular investigation have tested positive for the virus using this method. SV-A RNA was detectable in all common types of vesicular specimens including swabs and tissue from hoof lesions, oral and snout epithelium, oral swabs, scabs, and internal organ tissues such as liver and lymph node. Genome sequencing analysis from recent virus isolates was performed to confirm target amplicon specificity and was aligned to previous isolates.

  16. Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents

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    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100`s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots.

  17. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

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    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  18. An updated patent therapeutic agents targeting MMPs.

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    Shi, Zheng-gao; Li, Jin-pei; Shi, Lei-lei; Li, Xun

    2012-01-01

    The traditional consensus that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has correlation with various pathological and physiological processes led to the exploitation of a vast number of natural or synthetic broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) for the prophylaxis or treatment of various MMP-related disorders, such as autoimmune, inflammatory, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, respiratory diseases, and malignant cancer as well. Yet the unsatisfactory preclinical and/or clinical results motivated further investigation of the physiological roles of certain MMP subtypes. Despite the intricate and complicated MMP functions in normal physiology and disease pathology, the effort of designing specific inhibitors that can selectively target certain MMP family members for individualized therapy is ongoing and remains an arduous task. Success will rely on continued insight into the biological roles of these multifaced proteases. In our previous effort, we summarized various MMPIs that have entered preclinical or clinical trials as well as the patents in regard to MMPIs (Recent Pat Anticancer Drug Discov. 2010; 5(2): 109-41). In our on-going review, to illustrate the major challenges in MMP validation as druggable targets, we highlighted the physiological and pathological roles of representative MMPs, with an emphasis on description of the newly emerging MMPI-based patents, in particular, the inhibitors containing sulfonamide or sulfone motif. By analyzing the structural characteristics and selectivity profiles of these supplementary inhibitors, we hereby described their pharmaceutical application, and also expanded the strategies for potent MMPI design.

  19. Targeted Anticancer Immunotoxins and Cytotoxic Agents with Direct Killing Moieties

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    Koji Kawakami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the progress of the bioinformatics approach to characterize cell-surface antigens and receptors on tumor cells, it remains difficult to generate novel cancer vaccines or neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Among targeted cancer therapeutics, biologicals with targetable antibodies or ligands conjugated or fused to toxins or chemicals for direct cell-killing ability have been developed over the last 2 decades. These conjugated or fused chimeric proteins are termed immunotoxins or cytotoxic agents. Two agents, DAB389IL-2 (ONTAKTM targeting the interleukin-2 receptor and CD33-calicheamicin (Mylotarg®, have been approved by the FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML, respectively. Such targetable agents, including RFB4(dsFv-PE38 (BL22, IL13-PE38QQR, and Tf-CRM107, are being tested in clinical trials. Several agents using unique technology such as a cleavable adapter or immunoliposomes with antibodies are also in the preclinical stage. This review summarizes the generation, mechanism, and development of these agents. In addition, possible future directions of this therapeutic approach are discussed.

  20. Multi-agent system for target-adaptive radar tracking

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    O'Connor, Alan C.

    2012-06-01

    Sensor systems such as distributed sensor networks and radar systems are potentially agile - they have parameters that can be adjusted in real-time to improve the quality of data obtained for state-estimation and decision-making. The integration of such sensors with cyber systems involving many users or agents permits greater flexibility in choosing measurement actions. This paper considers the problem of selecting radar waveforms to minimize uncertainty about the state of a tracked target. Past work gave a tractable method for optimizing the choice of measurements when an accurate dynamical model is available. However, prior knowledge about a system is often not precise, for example, if the target under observation is an adversary. A multiple agent system is proposed to solve the problem in the case of uncertain target dynamics. Each agent has a different target model and the agents compete to explain past data and select the parameters of future measurements. Collaboration or competition between these agents determines which obtains access to the limited physical sensing resources. This interaction produces a self-aware sensor that adapts to changing information requirements.

  1. The Current State of Targeted Agents in Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Targeted biologic agents have an established role in treating metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and the integration of targeted therapies into the treatment of CRC has resulted in significant improvements in outcomes. Rapidly growing insight into the molecular biology of CRC, as well as recent developments in gene sequencing and molecular diagnostics, has led to high expectations for the identification of molecular markers to be used in personalized treatment regimens. The mechanisms of act...

  2. Agent Collaborative Target Localization and Classification in Wireless Sensor Networks

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    Sheng Wang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are autonomous networks that have beenfrequently deployed to collaboratively perform target localization and classification tasks.Their autonomous and collaborative features resemble the characteristics of agents. Suchsimilarities inspire the development of heterogeneous agent architecture for WSN in thispaper. The proposed agent architecture views WSN as multi-agent systems and mobileagents are employed to reduce in-network communication. According to the architecture,an energy based acoustic localization algorithm is proposed. In localization, estimate oftarget location is obtained by steepest descent search. The search algorithm adapts tomeasurement environments by dynamically adjusting its termination condition. With theagent architecture, target classification is accomplished by distributed support vectormachine (SVM. Mobile agents are employed for feature extraction and distributed SVMlearning to reduce communication load. Desirable learning performance is guaranteed bycombining support vectors and convex hull vectors. Fusion algorithms are designed tomerge SVM classification decisions made from various modalities. Real world experimentswith MICAz sensor nodes are conducted for vehicle localization and classification.Experimental results show the proposed agent architecture remarkably facilitates WSNdesigns and algorithm implementation. The localization and classification algorithms alsoprove to be accurate and energy efficient.

  3. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

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    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  4. Targeted Agents in Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors of Pancreas

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    Ilias N Karampelas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumors (NET of the pancreas are uncommon neoplasms that arise from the pancreatic islet cells. Surgical resections are being tested, as well as multiple chemotherapy agents. Current treatment options for nonresectable disease include somatostatin analogs and chemotherapy. New therapies focus on specific molecular targets such as sunitinib, angiogenesis inhibitor, that target vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and other growth factor receptors and everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Functionally based medical therapies for NET include somatostatin analogs to control symptoms. The 2014 annual meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO brought us new insights into the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The focus of this review will serve to highlight specific Abstracts (#e15160 and #e15161, that shed light on new therapeutic options that help target the unique pathways of this malignancies.

  5. Molecular targeted agents for gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancer.

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    Oshima, Takashi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2012-04-01

    Despite recent improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy, advanced cancers of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) continue to have poor clinical outcomes. However, molecules intimately related to cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis have been studied as candidates for molecular targeted agents. Target molecules, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and P13k/Akt/mTor pathway, as well as the insulin-like growth factor receptor, c-Met pathways, fibroblast growth factor receptor, and other pathways are considered to be promising candidates for molecular targeted therapy for gastric and GEJ cancer. In this review we focus on the recent developments in targeting relevant pathways in these types of cancer.

  6. Lipoprotein Nanoplatform for Targeted Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

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    Jerry D. Glickson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of visible or near-infrared fluorescent optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and photodynamic therapy and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that overexpress low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs. Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from about 10 nm (high-density lipoprotein [HDL] to over a micron (chylomicrons is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic agents onto or into these particles has been achieved by protein loading (covalent attachment to protein side chains, surface loading (intercalation into the phospholipid monolayer, and core loading (extraction and reconstitution of the triglyceride/cholesterol ester core. Core and surface loading of LDL have been used for delivery of optical imaging agents to tumor cells in vivo and in culture. Surface loading was used for delivery of gadolinium-bis-stearylamide contrast agents for in vivo MRI detection in tumor-bearing mice. Chlorin and phthalocyanine near-infrared photodynamic therapy agents (≤ 400/LDL have been attached by core loading. Protein loading was used to reroute the LDL from its natural receptor (LDLR to folate receptors and could be used to target other receptors. A semisynthetic nanoparticle has been constructed by coating magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxylated cholesterol and overlaying a monolayer of phospholipid to which apolipoprotein A1 or E was adsorbed for targeting HDL or adsorbing synthetic amphipathic helical peptides ltargeting LDL or folate receptors. These particles can be used for in situ loading of magnetite into cells for MRI-monitored cell tracking or gene expression.

  7. Novel Bone-targeted Agents for Treatment of Osteoporosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Bo WANG; Chun Hao YANG; Xue Ming YAN; Xi Han WU; Yu Yuan XIE

    2005-01-01

    The novel bone-targeted agents were designed and synthesized by the combination of raloxifene and bisphosphonates. The anti-osteoporosis effect was evaluated by bone mineral density (BMD) obtained from OVX mice in vivo. The results indicated that the compound 8, 9not only prevented ovariectomy induced loss of bone but also enhanced BMD to 0.87% and 19.67% compared to Sham, respectively.

  8. Site-specific tumor-targeted fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Wilhelm, R. Randy; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Erion, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as photo therapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carries such as antibodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in prolonged blood circulation times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmocokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near IR light absorbing dye to bioactive peptides that specifically target over expressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit form this approach.

  9. Lipid Based Vesicular Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular drug delivery system can be defined as highly ordered assemblies consisting of one or more concentric bilayers formed as a result of self-assembling of amphiphilic building blocks in presence of water. Vesicular drug delivery systems are particularly important for targeted delivery of drugs because of their ability to localize the activity of drug at the site or organ of action thereby lowering its concentration at the other sites in body. Vesicular drug delivery system sustains drug action at a predetermined rate, relatively constant (zero order kinetics, efficient drug level in the body, and simultaneously minimizes the undesirable side effects. It can also localize drug action in the diseased tissue or organ by targeted drug delivery using carriers or chemical derivatization. Different types of pharmaceutical carriers such as polymeric micelles, particulate systems, and macro- and micromolecules are presented in the form of novel drug delivery system for targeted delivery of drugs. Particulate type carrier also known as colloidal carrier system, includes lipid particles, micro- and nanoparticles, micro- and nanospheres, polymeric micelles and vesicular systems like liposomes, sphingosomes, niosomes, transfersomes, aquasomes, ufasomes, and so forth.

  10. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  11. Vesicular palmoplantar pityriasis rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varinder; Sharma, Meghna; Narang, Tarun; Madan, Manas

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old young man presented with intensely itchy erythematous dermatitis on the body for 1 week and vesicular lesions on the palms and soles for 4 to 5 days. Lesions on the palms and soles were accompanied by severe burning and itching. The patient gave a history of sore throat and fever, 1 week prior to the onset of lesions. A general physical examination was normal, and cutaneous examination revealed multiple, well-defined erythematous scaly plaques with collaret scaling on the trunk and extremities (Figure 1). Vesicular lesions were seen on the palms and soles (Figure 2). The differential diagnoses we considered were pityriasis rosea and secondary syphilis. The possibility of dermatophytid, vesicular pityriasis rosea, and pompholyx was limited to the palms and sole lesions. Complete blood cell count was within normal limits. Results from antistreptolysin O titer, potassium hydroxide mount, and venereal disease research laboratory were negative. Skin biopsies were taken from the back and left palm. The biopsy specimen from the back revealed focal spongiosis, lymphocyte exocytosis, vacuolar changes in the basal layer, and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the dermis (Figure 3). The biopsy obtained from the vesicular lesion on the left palm revealed an intraepidermal vesicle with no evidence of acantolytic process (Figure 4). A diagnosis of pityriasis rosea was made and the patient was started on clarithromycin 500 mg once a day for 7 days, along with antihistamines and emollients. The lesions faded dramatically in a very short period, and there was significant involution of almost all of the lesions after 7 days of clarithromycin. During the 6 months of follow-up, no recurrence was observed.

  12. Vascular targeting agents enhance chemotherapeutic agent activities in solid tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemann, Dietmar W; Mercer, Emma; Lepler, Sharon; Rojiani, Amyn M

    2002-05-01

    The utility of combining the vascular targeting agents 5,6-dimethyl-xanthenone-4 acetic acid (DMXAA) and combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) with the anticancer drugs cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) was evaluated in experimental rodent (KHT sarcoma), human breast (SKBR3) and ovarian (OW-1) tumor models. Doses of the vascular targeting agents that led to rapid vascular shutdown and subsequent extensive central tumor necrosis were identified. Histologic evaluation showed morphologic damage of tumor cells within a few hours after treatment, followed by extensive hemorrhagic necrosis and dose-dependent neoplastic cell death as a result of prolonged ischemia. Whereas these effects were induced by a range of CA4DP doses (10-150 mg/kg), the dose response to DMXAA was extremely steep; doses or = 20 mg/kg were toxic. DMXAA also enhanced the tumor cell killing of cisplatin, but doses > 15 mg/kg were required. In contrast, CA4DP increased cisplatin-induced tumor cell killing at all doses studied. This enhancement of cisplatin efficacy was dependent on the sequence and interval between the agents. The greatest effects were achieved when the vascular targeting agents were administered 1-3 hr after cisplatin. When CA4DP (100 mg/kg) or DMXAA (17.5 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr after a range of doses of cisplatin or CP, the tumor cell kill was 10-500-fold greater than that seen with chemotherapy alone. In addition, the inclusion of the antivascular agents did not increase bone marrow stem cell toxicity associated with these anticancer drugs, thus giving rise to a therapeutic gain.

  13. Telomerase:a novel target of antitumor agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Telomerase activity was found to be high in various human cancers, but absent in most normal tissues. Its expression pattern made it a novel target for antitumor agents. Several strategies against telomerase were presented in this review. Targeting the telomerase RNA component by oligonucleotide/ribozyme was considered to be one of the most hopeful approaches. Some progresses were made in this area, such as the use of PANs and 2- 5A antisense compounds. The relationships among telomerase activity and cell differentiation, signal transduction, oncogene, tumor suppressor gene as well as cell cycle modulation also provided a series of valuable ideas in designing anti-telomerase drugs for cancer therapy. In conclusion, although there is still a long way in understanding the mechanism and regulation of telomerase, the advance of studies on telomerase has allowed the development of numerous strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  14. Targeted agents and immunotherapies: optimizing outcomes in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Flaherty, Keith T; Ribas, Antoni; Long, Georgina V

    2017-08-01

    Treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma, and especially BRAF-mutant melanoma, have changed dramatically in the past 5 years, with the FDA approval of eight new therapeutic agents. During this period, the treatment paradigm for BRAF-mutant disease has evolved rapidly: the standard-of-care BRAF-targeted approach has shifted from single-agent BRAF inhibition to combination therapy with a BRAF and a MEK inhibitor. Concurrently, immunotherapy has transitioned from cytokine-based treatment to antibody-mediated blockade of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and, now, the programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1) immune checkpoints. These changes in the treatment landscape have dramatically improved patient outcomes, with the median overall survival of patients with advanced-stage melanoma increasing from approximately 9 months before 2011 to at least 2 years - and probably longer for those with BRAF-V600-mutant disease. Herein, we review the clinical trial data that established the standard-of-care treatment approaches for advanced-stage melanoma. Mechanisms of resistance and biomarkers of response to BRAF-targeted treatments and immunotherapies are discussed, and the contrasting clinical benefits and limitations of these therapies are explored. We summarize the state of the field and outline a rational approach to frontline-treatment selection for each individual patient with BRAF-mutant melanoma.

  15. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  16. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  17. Relacin, a novel antibacterial agent targeting the Stringent Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Wexselblatt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Finding bacterial cellular targets for developing novel antibiotics has become a major challenge in fighting resistant pathogenic bacteria. We present a novel compound, Relacin, designed to inhibit (pppGpp production by the ubiquitous bacterial enzyme RelA that triggers the Stringent Response. Relacin inhibits RelA in vitro and reduces (pppGpp production in vivo. Moreover, Relacin affects entry into stationary phase in Gram positive bacteria, leading to a dramatic reduction in cell viability. When Relacin is added to sporulating Bacillus subtilis cells, it strongly perturbs spore formation regardless of the time of addition. Spore formation is also impeded in the pathogenic bacterium Bacillus anthracis that causes the acute anthrax disease. Finally, the formation of multicellular biofilms is markedly disrupted by Relacin. Thus, we establish that Relacin, a novel ppGpp analogue, interferes with bacterial long term survival strategies, placing it as an attractive new antibacterial agent.

  18. Targeting GIRK Channels for the Development of New Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth eWalsh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled inward rectifier K+ (GIRK channels represent novel targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. GIRK channels are activated by a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and regulate the electrical activity of neurons, cardiac myocytes and β-pancreatic cells. Abnormalities in GIRK channel function have been implicated in the patho-physiology of neuropathic pain, drug addiction, cardiac arrhythmias and other disorders. However, the pharmacology of these channels remains largely unexplored. In this paper we describe the development of a screening assay for identifying new modulators of neuronal and cardiac GIRK channels. Pituitary (AtT20 and cardiac (HL-1 cell lines expressing GIRK channels were cultured in 96-well plates, loaded with oxonol membrane potential-sensitive dyes and measured using a fluorescent imaging plate reader. Activation of the endogenous GPCRs in the cells caused a rapid, time-dependent decrease in the fluorescent signal; indicative of K+ efflux through the GIRK channels (GPCR stimulation versus control, Z’-factor = 0.5-0.7. As expected this signal was inhibited by addition of Ba2+ and the GIRK channel toxin tertiapin-Q. To test the utility of the assay for screening GIRK channel blockers, cells were incubated for 5 minutes with a compound library of Na+ and K+ channel modulators. Ion transporter inhibitors such as 5-(N,N-hexamethylene-amiloride and SCH-28080 were identified as blockers of the GIRK channel at sub-micromolar concentrations. Thus, the screening assay will be useful for expanding the limited pharmacology of the GIRK channel and in developing new agents for the treatment of GIRK channelopathies.

  19. Targeted contrast agents--an adjunct to whole-body imaging: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Paul; Bolster, Ferdia; Crosbie, Ian; MacMahon, Peter; O'Kennedy, Richard; Eustace, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    This article reviews the potential use of a combination of whole-body imaging and targeted contrast agents in improving diagnostics, with a particular focus on oncology imaging. It looks at the rationale for nanoparticles and their development as targeted contrast agents. It subsequently describes many of the advances made thus far in developing tissue-specific contrast agents capable of targeting tumors that combined with whole-body imaging may enable superior cancer detection and characterization.

  20. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  1. Development of Antibacterials Targeting the MEP Pathway of Select Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    chemical class of antimicrobial drugs targeting MEP synthase. Additionally, our screening has highlighted a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of...identify top compounds. • Mode of inhibition studies to determine the mechanism of action for the top hit compounds. • Identification of a...chemical class of antimicrobial drugs targeting MEP synthase. Additionally, our screening has highlighted a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of

  2. Targets and assays for discovering novel antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadio, Stefano; Carrano, Lucia; Brandi, Letizia; Serina, Stefania; Soffientini, Adolfo; Raimondi, Elena; Montanini, Nicoletta; Sosio, Margherita; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2002-11-13

    The increasing frequency of nosocomial infections due to multi-resistant pathogens exerts a significant toll and calls for novel and better antibiotics. Different approaches can be used in the search for novel antibiotics acting on drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. We present some considerations on valid bacterial targets to be used for searching new antibiotics, and how the information from bacterial genome sequences can assist in choosing the appropriate targets. Other factors to be considered in target selection are the chemical diversity available for screening and its uniqueness. We will conclude discussing our strategy for searching novel antibacterials. This is based on a large collection of microbial extracts as a source of chemical diversity and on the use of specific targets essential for the viability of bacterial pathogens. Two assay strategies have been implemented: a pathway-based assay, where a series of essential bacterial targets is screened in a single assay; and a binding assay, where many targets can be screened individually in the same format.

  3. Targeting advanced glycation with pharmaceutical agents: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Danielle J; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the final products of the Maillard reaction, a complex process that has been studied by food chemists for a century. Over the past 30 years, the biological significance of advanced glycation has also been discovered. There is mounting evidence that advanced glycation plays a homeostatic role within the body and that food-related Maillard products, intermediates such as reactive α-dicarbonyl compounds and AGEs, may influence this process. It remains to be understood, at what point AGEs and their intermediates become pathogenic and contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases that inflict current society. Diabetes and its complications have been a major focus of AGE biology due to the abundance of excess sugar and α-dicarbonyls in this family of diseases. While further temporal information is required, a number of pharmacological agents that inhibit components of the advanced glycation pathway have already showed promising results in preclinical models. These therapies appear to have a wide range of mechanistic actions to reduce AGE load. Some of these agents including Alagebrium, have translated successfully to clinical trials, while others such as aminoguanidine, have had undesirable side-effect profiles. This review will discuss different pharmacological agents that have been used to reduce AGE burden in preclinical models of disease with a focus on diabetes and its complications, compare outcomes of those therapies that have reached clinical trials, and provide further rationale for the use of inhibitors of the glycation pathway in chronic diseases.

  4. Pharmacosomes: A Potential Vesicular Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nagasamy Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid based drug delivery systems have been examined in various studies and exhibited their potential in controlled and targeted drug delivery. Pharmacosomes, a novel vesicular drug delivery system, offering a unique advantage over liposomes and niosomes, and serve as potential alternative to these conventional vesicles. They constitute an amphiphilic phospholipid complex with drug bearing an active hydrogen atom covalently that bind to phospholipids. They provide an efficient delivery of drug required at the site of action, which ultimately reduces the drug toxicity with reduced adverse effects and also reduces the cost of therapy by imparting better biopharmaceutical properties to the drug, resulting in increases bioavailability, especially in case of poorly soluble drugs. As the system is formed by binding the drug (pharmakon to carrier (soma, they are termed as pharmacosomes. Depending upon the chemical structure of the drug lipid complex they may exist as ultrafine vesicular, micellar and hexagonal aggregate. Drug having active hydrogen group such as carboxyl, hydroxyl group can be esterified to lipids, resulting in amphiphilic compound. Pharmacosomes are widely used as carriers for various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins, cardiovascular and antineoplastic drugs. The release of drug from pharmacosomes is generally governed by the process of enzymatic reaction and acid hydrolysis. Here, in the present review paper we have discussed the potential of pharmacosomes as a controlled and targeted drug delivery system and highlighted the method of preparation and characterization.

  5. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  6. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  7. Cooperative enclosing control for multiple moving targets by a group of agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y. J.; Li, R.; Teo, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the enclosing control problem of second-order multi-agent systems is considered, where the targets can be either stationary or moving. The objective is to achieve an equidistant circular formation for a group of agents to enclose a team of targets. In order to do so, we first introduce a formal definition explaining certain basic properties of the exploring relation between the agents and the targets. We then construct the estimator of the centre of the targets, which is used to build the control protocol to achieve equidistant circular enclosing. Using a Lyapunov function and Lasalle's Invariance Principle, the convergency of the estimator and control protocol are, respectively, established. We then construct a smooth function to approximate the discontinuous term in the estimator. Finally, the simulations for stationary targets and moving targets are given to verify the validity of the results obtained.

  8. Targeted therapies for malignant gliomas: novel agents, same barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are common and devastating brain malignancies. Despite this extensive treatment the mean overall survival is still only 14.6 months and more effective treatments are urgently needed. Targeted therapy holds the promise for the new generation of chemotherapy due to the selectively ta

  9. Use of Bifunctional Immunotherapeutic Agents to Target Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Selective Tumor Cell Targeting Using Low-Affinity, Multivalent Interactions Coby B. Carlson†,‡, Patricia Mowery‡, Robert M. Owen†, Emily C. Dykhuizen†, and...washed cells and immediately analyzed for fluorescence using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson ). Data were ana- lyzed using CellQuest...software (Becton Dickinson ). An identical assay omitting the bifunctional conjugate assessed background fluorescence. The relative fluorescence is

  10. Autonomous Collaborative Agents for Onboard Multi-Sensor Re-Targeting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In our Phase I effort we developed a prototype software-agent based framework to provide for autonomous re-targeting of sensors hosted on satellites in polar orbits,...

  11. In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0242 TITLE: In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0242 5b...men with false positive PSA elevation and to ensure successful biopsy for those with small cancers. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging functional

  12. Kv3.3 immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of the rat with focus on the medial vestibular nucleus: targeting of Kv3.3 neurones by terminals positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth Elizabeth; Corns, Laura; Edwards, Ian James; Deuchars, Jim

    2010-07-23

    Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels are important in shaping neuronal excitability and are abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene exhibiting a unique expression pattern. Mice lacking the gene encoding for the Kv3.3 subunit exhibit motor deficits. Furthermore, mutations in this gene have been linked to the human disease spinocerebellar ataxia 13, associated with cerebellar and extra-cerebellar symptoms such as imbalance and nystagmus. Kv subunit localisation is important in defining their functional roles and thus, we investigated the distribution of Kv3.3-immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of rats with particular focus on the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN). Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was widespread in the vestibular nuclei and was detected in somata, dendrites and synaptic terminals. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was observed in distinct neuronal populations and dual labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN revealed 28.5+/-1.9% of NeuN labelled MVN neurones were Kv3.3-positive. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity co-localised presynaptically with the synaptic vesicle marker SV2, parvalbumin, the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT2 and the glycine transporter GlyT2. VGluT1 terminals were scarce within the MVN (2.5+/-1.1 per 50 microm(2)) and co-localisation was not observed. However, 85.4+/-9.4% of VGluT1 terminals targeted and enclosed Kv3.3-immunoreactive somata. Presynaptic Kv3.3 co-localisation with the GABAergic marker GAD67 was also not observed. Cytoplasmic GlyT2 labelling was observed in a subset of Kv3.3-positive neurones. Electron microscopy confirmed a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of the Kv3.3 protein. This study provides evidence supporting a role for Kv3.3 subunits in vestibular processing by regulating neuronal excitability pre- and post-synaptically.

  13. Bone-targeted agents: preventing skeletal complications in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgans, Alicia K; Smith, Matthew R

    2012-11-01

    In men, prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death. Skeletal complications occur at various points during the disease course, either due to bone metastases directly, or as an unintended consequence of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Bone metastases are associated with pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, and bone pain and can require narcotics or palliative radiation for pain relief. ADT results in bone loss and fragility fractures. This review describes the biology of bone metastases, skeletal morbidity, and recent advances in bone-targeted therapies to prevent skeletal complications of prostate cancer.

  14. Targets of 3-bromopyruvate, a new, energy depleting, anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Antone, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a pyruvate analog recently proposed as a possible anticancer drug, was investigated in relation to its capacity to inhibit energy production in fractions obtained from normal cells (rat hepatocytes) and in isolated rat thymocytes . Findings were that main targets of the drug were glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and not hexokinase as suggested for hepatoma cells, and succinate -driven ATP synthesis. Consistently with the above findings, in the normal cells studied (thymocytes ) the drug elicited an important fall in ATP levels. The significance of the present findings in concern with a possible therapeutic usefulness of the drug is discussed.

  15. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is an enterovirus that is both genetically and antigenically closely related to human coxsackievirus B5 within the Picornaviridae family. SVDV is the causative agent of a highly contagious (though rarely fatal) vesicular disease in pigs. We report a rapid method...

  16. Unbinding of targeted ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles by secondary acoustic forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Garbin (Valeria); M. Overvelde (Marlies); B. Dollet (Benjamin); N. de Jong (Nico); D. Lohse (Detlef); M. Versluis (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTargeted molecular imaging with ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles is achieved by incorporating targeting ligands on the bubble coating and allows for specific imaging of tissues affected by diseases. Improved understanding of the interplay between the acoustic forces acting on the b

  17. Molecular targeted agents-where we are and where we are going

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan

    2013-01-01

    A total of 23 new cancer medicines or indication expansions were approved by the U.S.Food and Drug Administration in 2012.Among these,12 are new molecular entities (NMEs)-new chemical or biological drugs approved for the first time for oncologic use-and 10 of these NMEs are molecular targeted agents.Among the 10 targeted agents,4 are anti-angiogenesis agents and 2 are Bcr-Abl pathway inhibitors,targeting well established targets validated by previously approved agents such as bevacizumab (Avastin) or imatinib (Gleevec).Despite this progress,several questions remain:Do these newly approved agents provide sufficient treatment options to manage the broad spectrum of cancers we deal with in the clinic? Where will the next wave of new cancer drugs come from? Where should R&D efforts be invested to continue improve cancer treatment and management,especially for tumor types uniquely prevalent in China?This editorial and the review articles in this special issue of Chinese Journal of Cancer provide an in depth review of the progress and challenges in developing targeted cancer therapies,as well as an outlook of new research areas where near term breakthroughs are expected to overcome some of these challenges.

  18. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  19. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  20. Novel Targeted Agents in Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Natalie S.; Park, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have shown significant promise in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and in the frontline setting. With the development of these new therapies, cytotoxic chemotherapy ma...

  1. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  2. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  3. Realizing the Potential of Vascular Targeted Therapy: The Rationale for Combining Vascular Disrupting Agents and Anti-Angiogenic Agents to Treat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemann, D W; Chaplin, D J; Horsman, M R

    2017-09-14

    Vascular targeted therapies (VTTs) are agents that target tumor vasculature and can be classified into two categories: those that inhibit angiogenesis and those that directly interfere with established tumor vasculature. Although both the anti-angiogenic agents (AAs) and the vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) target tumor vasculature, they differ in their mechanism of action and therapeutic application. Combining these two agents may realize the full potential of VTT and produce an effective therapeutic regimen. Here, we review AAs and VDAs (monotherapy and in combination with conventional therapies). We also discuss the rationale of combined VTT and its potential to treat cancer.

  4. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  5. Vesicular transport of a ribonucleoprotein to mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyita Mukherjee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular trafficking of viruses and proteins commonly occurs via the early endosome in a process involving Rab5. The RNA Import Complex (RIC-RNA complex is taken up by mammalian cells and targeted to mitochondria. Through RNA interference, it was shown that mito-targeting of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP was dependent on caveolin 1 (Cav1, dynamin 2, Filamin A and NSF. Although a minor fraction of the RNP was transported to endosomes in a Rab5-dependent manner, mito-targeting was independent of Rab5 or other endosomal proteins, suggesting that endosomal uptake and mito-targeting occur independently. Sequential immunoprecipitation of the cytosolic vesicles showed the sorting of the RNP away from Cav1 in a process that was independent of the endosomal effector EEA1 but sensitive to nocodazole. However, the RNP was in two types of vesicle with or without Cav1, with membrane-bound, asymmetrically orientated RIC and entrapped RNA, but no endosomal components, suggesting vesicular sorting rather than escape of free RNP from endosomes. In vitro, RNP was directly transferred from the Type 2 vesicles to mitochondria. Live-cell imaging captured spherical Cav1− RNP vesicles emerging from the fission of large Cav+ particles. Thus, RNP appears to traffic by a different route than the classical Rab5-dependent pathway of viral transport.

  6. Recent Progress and Advances in HGF/MET-Targeted Therapeutic Agents for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilong Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF: MET axis is a ligand-mediated receptor tyrosine kinase pathway that is involved in multiple cellular functions, including proliferation, survival, motility, and morphogenesis. Aberrancy in the HGF/MET pathway has been reported in multiple tumor types and is associated with tumor stage and prognosis. Thus, targeting the HGF/MET pathway has become a potential therapeutic strategy in oncology development in the last two decades. A number of novel therapeutic agents—either as therapeutic proteins or small molecules that target the HGF/MET pathway—have been tested in patients with different tumor types in clinical studies. In this review, recent progress in HGF/MET pathway-targeted therapy for cancer treatment, the therapeutic potential of HGF/MET-targeted agents, and challenges in the development of such agents will be discussed.

  7. Early oncology clinical trial design in the era of molecular-targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Andre T; Kristeleit, Rebecca S; de Bono, Johann S

    2010-08-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted agents has changed the concept of drug development. The field has evolved over the last decade and therapeutic drugs are now being rationally designed to affect specific intracellular or extracellular pathways that are thought to be important for cancer progression. Traditionally, toxicity has been the primary end point for dose definition and escalation; however, novel targeted compounds are characterized by the lack of significant clinical toxicity compared with conventional chemotherapy. Alternative trial designs and pharmacodynamic-driven biomarkers that assess drug-target effect and allow demonstration of proof-of-concept for intended target modulation and achievement of desired biological effects have emerged to guide dose selection. This must be facilitated by validated preclinical tumor models and biomarker assays that are critical to aid understanding of which agents are likely to be beneficial in different cancer subtype patients and which biomarkers should be implemented into early trial design.

  8. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eDasgupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in low-grade gliomas is being exploited with targeted inhibitors. These agents are also being combined with XRT to increase their efficacy. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in low-grade gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. B-Raf is a kinase in the Ras/Raf/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival and metabolism. In low-grade pediatric gliomas, point mutations in BRAF (BRAF V600E or a BRAF fusion mutation (KIAA1549:BRAF causes overactivation of the MEK/MAPK pathway. Pre-clinical data shows cooperation between XRT and tagrgeted inhibitors of BRAF V600E, and MEK and mTOR inhibitors in the gliomas with the BRAF fusion. A second important signaling cascade in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3 kinase (PI3K/mTOR pathway. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis. Several inhibitors of immunomodulators are currently being evaluated in in clinical trials for the treatment of recurrent or refractory pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors. In summary, combinations of these targeted inhibitors with radiation are currently under investigation in both translational bench research and early clinical trials. We summarize the molecular rationale for, and the pre-clinical data supporting the combinations of these targeted agents with other anti-cancer agents and XRT in pediatric gliomas. Parallels are drawn to adult gliomas, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of these agents is discussed

  9. Multi-agent target tracking using particle filters enhanced with context data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claessens, R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed framework for Multi-Agent Target Tracking supports i) tracking of objects and ii) search and rescue based on the fusion of very heterogeneous data. The system is based on a novel approach to fusing sensory observations, intelligence...

  10. Transmission and pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is caused by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative single stranded RNA arthropod-borne virus member of the Family Rhabdoviridae. The virion is composed of the host derived plasma membrane, the envelope, and an internal ribonucleoprotein core. The envelope contain...

  11. Targeting multiple signal pathways by chemopreventive agents for cancer prevention and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fazlul H SARKAR; Yi-wei LI

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, growing interest has been focused on the field of cancer prevention.Cancer prevention by chemopreventive agents offers significant promise for re-ducing the incidence and mortality of cancer. Chemopreventive agents may exert their effects either by blocking or metabolizing carcinogens or by inhibiting tumor cell growth. Another important benefit of chemopreventive agents is their non-toxic nature. Therefore, chemopreventive agents have recently been used for cancer treatment in combination with chemotherapeutics or radiotherapy, uncov-ering a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This strategy opens a new avenue fromcancer prevention to cancer treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies have demon-strated that chemopreventive agents could enhance the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics, improving the treatment outcome. Growing evidence has shown that chemopreventive agents potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy through the regulation of multiple signaling pathways, including Akt, NF-κB, c-Myc, cyclooxygenase-2, apoptosis, and others, suggesting a multitargeted nature of chemopreventive agents. However, further in-depth mecha-nistic studies, in vivo animal experiments, and clinical trials are needed to investi-gate the effects of chemopreventive agents in combination treatment of cancer with conventional cancer therapies. More potent natural and synthetic chemo-preventive agents are also needed to improve the efficacy of mechanism-based and targeted therapeutic strategies against cancer, which are likely to make a significant impact on saving lives. Here, we have briefly reviewed the role of chemopreventive agents in cancer prevention, but most importantly, we have reviewed how they could be useful for cancer therapy in combination with con-ventional therapies.

  12. Candidate cancer-targeting agents identified by expression-profiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Termglinchan V

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vittavat Termglinchan,1 Wachiraporn Wanichnopparat,1 Kulachanya Suwanwongse,1 Chunhakarn Teeyapant,1 Kanticha Chatpermporn,1 Kanchana Leerunyakul,1 Khwanruthai Chuadpia,1 Onpailin Sirimaneethum,1 Parinya Wijitworawong,1 Wattanakitch Mutirangura,1 Chatchawit Aporntewan,2 Chanida Vinayanuwattikun,3 Apiwat Mutirangura4 1Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and The King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center of Excellence in Molecular Genetics of Cancer and Human Diseases, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: One particularly promising component of personalized medicine in cancer treatment is targeted therapy, which aims to maximize therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity. However, the number of approved targeted agents remains limited. Expression microarray data for different types of cancer are resources to identify genes that were upregulated. The genes are candidate targets for cancer-targeting agents for future anticancer research and targeted treatments. Methods and findings: The gene expression profiles of 48 types of cancer from 2,141 microarrays reported in the Gene Expression Omnibus were analyzed. These data were organized into 78 experimental groups, on which we performed comprehensive analyses using two-tailed Student's t-tests with significance set at P < 0.01 to identify genes that were upregulated compared with normal cells in each cancer type. The resulting list of significantly upregulated genes was cross-referenced with three categories of protein inhibitor targets, categorized by inhibitor type ('Targets of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved anticancer drugs', 'Targets of FDA

  13. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  14. The combination of novel targeted molecular agents and radiation in the treatment of pediatric gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Tina; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are the most common solid pediatric malignancy. For high-grade, recurrent, or refractory pediatric brain tumors, radiation therapy (XRT) is an integral treatment modality. In the era of personalized cancer therapy, molecularly targeted agents have been designed to inhibit pathways critical to tumorigenesis. Our evolving knowledge of genetic aberrations in pediatric gliomas is being exploited with the use of specific targeted inhibitors. These agents are additionally being combined with XRT to increase the efficacy and duration of local control. In this review, we discuss novel agents targeting three different pathways in gliomas, and their potential combination with XRT. BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase in the RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase pathway, which is integral to cellular division, survival, and metabolism. Two-thirds of pilocytic astrocytomas, a low-grade pediatric glioma, contain a translocation within the BRAF gene called KIAA1549:BRAF that causes an overactivation of the MEK/MAPK signaling cascade. In vitro and in vivo data support the use of MEK or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in low-grade gliomas expressing this translocation. Additionally, 15-20% of high-grade pediatric gliomas express BRAF V600E, an activating mutation of the BRAF gene. Pre-clinical in vivo and in vitro data in BRAF V600E gliomas demonstrate dramatic cooperation between XRT and small molecule inhibitors of BRAF V600E. Another major signaling cascade that plays a role in pediatric glioma pathogenesis is the PI3-kinase (PI3K)/mTOR pathway, known to be upregulated in the majority of high- and low-grade pediatric gliomas. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors are in clinical trials for adult high-grade gliomas and are poised to enter studies of pediatric tumors. Finally, many brain tumors express potent stimulators of angiogenesis that render them refractory to treatment. An analog of thalidomide, CC-5103 increases the secretion of critical cytokines of the tumor

  15. Multispectral photoacoustic decomposition with localized regularization for detecting targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Chen, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Pomper, Martin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Targeted contrast agents can improve the sensitivity of imaging systems for cancer detection and monitoring the treatment. In order to accurately detect contrast agent concentration from photoacoustic images, we developed a decomposition algorithm to separate photoacoustic absorption spectrum into components from individual absorbers. In this study, we evaluated novel prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted agents for imaging prostate cancer. Three agents were synthesized through conjugating PSMA-targeting urea with optical dyes ICG, IRDye800CW and ATTO740 respectively. In our preliminary PA study, dyes were injected in a thin wall plastic tube embedded in water tank. The tube was illuminated with pulsed laser light using a tunable Q-switch ND-YAG laser. PA signal along with the B-mode ultrasound images were detected with a diagnostic ultrasound probe in orthogonal mode. PA spectrums of each dye at 0.5 to 20 μM concentrations were estimated using the maximum PA signal extracted from images which are obtained at illumination wavelengths of 700nm-850nm. Subsequently, we developed nonnegative linear least square optimization method along with localized regularization to solve the spectral unmixing. The algorithm was tested by imaging mixture of those dyes. The concentration of each dye was estimated with about 20% error on average from almost all mixtures albeit the small separation between dyes spectrums.

  16. Aurora kinases as druggable targets in pediatric leukemia: heterogeneity in target modulation activities and cytotoxicity by diverse novel therapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarthi Jayanthan

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy, constituting more than 30% of all childhood cancers. Although cure rates have improved greatly, approximately one in five children relapse and poor survival rates post relapse remain a challenge. Given this, more effective and innovative therapeutic strategies are needed in order to improve prognosis. Aurora kinases, a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for the regulation of several mitotic processes, have been identified as potential targets for cancer therapeutics. Elevated expression of Aurora kinases has been demonstrated in several malignancies and is associated with aberrant mitotic activity, aneuploidy and alterations in chromosomal structure and genome instability. Based on this rationale, a number of small molecule inhibitors have been formulated and advanced to human studies in the recent past. A comparative analysis of these agents in cytotoxicity and target modulation analyses against a panel of leukemia cells provides novel insights into the unique mechanisms and codependent activity pathways involved in targeting Aurora kinases, constituting a distinctive preclinical experimental framework to identify appropriate agents and combinations in future clinical studies.

  17. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy.

  18. Effects of cell geometry on reversible vesicular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-02-01

    A major question in cell biology concerns the biophysical mechanism underlying delivery of newly synthesized macromolecules to specific targets within a cell. A recent modeling paper investigated this phenomenon in the context of vesicular delivery to en passant synapses in neurons (Bressloff and Levien 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett.). It was shown how reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses could play a crucial role in achieving uniformity in the distribution of resources throughout an axon, which is consistent with experimental observations in C. elegans and Drosophila. In this work we generalize the previous model by investigating steady-state vesicular distributions on a Cayley tree, a disk, and a sphere. We show that for irreversible transport on a tree, branching increases the rate of decay of the steady-state distribution of vesicles. On the other hand, the steady-state profiles for reversible transport are similar to the 1D case. In the case of higher-dimensional geometries, we consider two distinct types of radially-symmetric microtubular network: (i) a continuum and (ii) a discrete set. In the continuum case, we model the motor-cargo dynamics using a phenomenologically-based advection-diffusion equation in polar (2D) and spherical (3D) coordinates. On the other-hand, in the discrete case, we derive the population model from a stochastic model of a single motor switching between ballistic motion and diffusion. For all of the geometries we find that reversibility in vesicular delivery to target sites allows for a more uniform distribution of vesicles, provided that cargo-carrying motors are not significantly slowed by their cargo. In each case we characterize the loss of uniformity as a function of the dispersion in velocities.

  19. [Preparation of hepatic targeting antivirus agent NGA-ACV and its targeting property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J Z; Li, T L; Pang, Q J; Guan, C T; He, Y; Su, K Y

    1996-01-01

    Neoglycoalbumin (NGA), a special ligend of asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatocyte, was linked via a butanediacyl bridge to acyclovir to form a conjugate NGA-ACV. By using DTA (Differential thermoanalysis) and HPLC analysis, ACV was shown to be connected with NGA by covalent bonds and stable in blood. The radio-biodistribution of 131I-NGA-ACV with high drug density in vivo was carried out in mice. The maximum absorption of 131I-NGA-ACV in liver was 81.7 +/- 10.4% at 5 min. The radioimage of 131I-NGA-ACV with high or low drug density in rabbit showed no significant difference in liver targeting property. The competitive connection tests indicated that 131I-NGA-ACV was concentrated in liver through receptor mediated mechanism. A tentative test of antihepatitis B of NGA-ACV and ACV in vitro showed that the effective dose of the former was significantly lower than that of the latter.

  20. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  1. 3-bromopyruvate: a new targeted antiglycolytic agent and a promise for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, S; Vali, M; Kunjithapatham, R; Buijs, M; Syed, L H; Rao, P P; Ota, S; Kwak, B K; Loffroy, R; Geschwind, J F

    2010-08-01

    The pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate, is an alkylating agent and a potent inhibitor of glycolysis. This antiglycolytic property of 3-bromopyruvate has recently been exploited to target cancer cells, as most tumors depend on glycolysis for their energy requirements. The anticancer effect of 3-bromopyruvate is achieved by depleting intracellular energy (ATP) resulting in tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss the principal mechanism of action and primary targets of 3-bromopyruvate, and report the impressive antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate in multiple animal tumor models. We describe that the primary mechanism of 3-bromopyruvate is via preferential alkylation of GAPDH and that 3-bromopyruvate mediated cell death is linked to generation of free radicals. Research in our laboratory also revealed that 3-bromopyruvate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, inhibits global protein synthesis further contributing to cancer cell death. Therefore, these and other studies reveal the tremendous potential of 3-bromopyruvate as an anticancer agent.

  2. Discovery of Multi-target Anticancer Agents Based on HDAC Inhibitor MS-275 and 5-FU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuqi; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Xiaoyang; Hou, Jinning; Ding, Yongzheng; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors have multiple effects targeting the cancer cells and have become one of the promising cancer therapeutics with possibly broad applicability. Combination of HDAC inhibitors with the cytotoxic fluorouracil (5-FU) showed additive and synergistic effects both in vitro and in vivo. To explore the possibility in cancer therapy of a bivalent agent that combines two bioactive groups within a single molecular architecture, we designed and synthesized new dual-acting compounds by combining the bioactive fragment of MS-275, a clinical HDACs inhibitor, with cytotoxic agent 5-FU. The target compounds 9a and 9b showed comparable HDACs inhibition with MS-275 and moderate antiproliferative acitivities against six cancer cells lines.

  3. A Nanocomplex System as Targeted Contrast Agent Delivery Vehicle for MRI Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Study

    OpenAIRE

    Korotcov, Alexandru; Shan, Liang; Meng, Huan; Wang, Tongxin; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and tested a liposomal nanocomplex system, which contains Gd-DTPA as a payload and transferrin on the surface, as a tumor specific targeting MRI contrast agent for studying prostate cancer tumors in mice. In vivo, the probe significantly enhanced the MRI signal. The image contrast between the peripheral region of the tumor and the non-involved muscle was nearly 50% higher two hours after administration of the nanocomplex. The liposomal nanocomplex increased the amount of Gd ...

  4. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Farshad, E-mail: fyazdani@ccerci.ac.ir; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r{sub 2} relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  5. Lesion development and replication kinetics during early infection in cattle inoculated with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus via scarification and black fly (Simulium vittatum) bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis viruses are the causative agents of vesicular stomatitis, an economically important contagious disease of livestock that occurs in North, Central, and South America. Little is known regarding the early stages of infection in natural hosts. Twelve adult Holstein steers were inocu...

  6. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

  7. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions...

  8. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  9. The Place of Targeted Agents in the Treatment of Elderly Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios Matikas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence of colorectal cancer in a continuously aging population and the substantial advances in the treatment of metastatic disease during the past decade, the treatment of elderly patients with advanced, unresectable or metastatic colorectal cancer is a clearly unmet need. Since older patients are under-represented or even excluded from randomized trials, the evidence that oncologists use as guidance is weak. However, small prospective studies, pooled analyses and observational studies show that combination approaches are safe, efficacious and feasible in the geriatric population with metastatic colorectal cancer. The use of biologic agents targeting angiogenesis and the epidermal growth factor receptor, which have been shown to clearly improve outcomes in multiple prospective trials in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, is a vital component of the aforementioned combination approaches. Herein, we review all available data concerning the management of elderly patients with these agents and underscore the differences between this age subgroup and younger patients.

  10. Bevacizumab plus microtubule targeting agents in heavily pre-treated ovarian cancer patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmane, Irène; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Bajard, Agathe; Guastalla, Jean-Paul; Meeus, Pierre; Tredan, Olivier; Labidi Galy, Intidhar; Moullet, Isabelle; Ardisson, Philippe; Vincent, Lionel; Coeffic, David; Dufresne, Armelle; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVES. As vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed in ovarian cancer, we assessed the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab (a monoclonal antibody targeting VEGF) plus microtubule targeting agents for heavily pre-treated ovarian carcinoma patients. METHODS. We retrospectively reviewed 43 patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Combined treatment included bevacizumab with paclitaxel in 32 (74%), docetaxel in 10 (23%), and vinorelbine in one (2.3%) patients, respectively. RESULTS. The median number of combined treatment was six cycles (range 1-29). On RECIST criteria, the objective response rate (ORR) was 40% (16% CR and 24% PR). Clinical benefit (complete response [CR] plus partial response [PR] and stable disease [SD] lasting ≥ 3 months) was 74% (CI95%: 46.7-77%). Median duration of treatment and overall survival were 3.9 months (range 0.2-14.4 months) and 20.1 months (CI95%: 13.8-20.1) respectively. No toxic death was reported. Grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 30% of patients. Gastrointestinal perforations and fistula occurred in 3 (7%) and 6 (14%) patients, respectively. CONCLUSION. Although being active in terms of ORR, bevacizumab plus microtubule targeting agents - mainly taxanes - leads to a high rate of gastro-intestinal perforations and fistula in heavily pre-treated ovarian carcinoma patients.

  11. Molecular Targeted Agents for Gastric Cancer: A Step Forward Towards Personalized Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Geldart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and its signaling pathways, offers the hope of clinically significant promising advances for selected groups of patients. Patients with Her-2 overexpression or amplification have experienced benefit from the integration of monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab to the standard chemotherapy. Additionally, drugs targeting angiogenesis (bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib are under investigation and other targeted agents such as mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are in preclinical or early clinical development. Patient selection and the development of reliable biomarkers to accurately select patients most likely to benefit from these tailored therapies is now key. Future trials should focus on these advances to optimize the treatment for GC patients. This article will review recent progress and current status of targeted agents in GC.

  12. Novel Approaches for Targeting Antiviral Agents in the Treatment of Arena-, Bunya-, Flavi-, and Retroviral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-22

    a variety of viral proteins including hepatitis B surface antigen, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins, and adenovirus capsid proteins...infections. Moreover, this model could be used to establish a base from which therapeutic strategies to be employed in other more costly feline and primate...treatment of human AIDS. Most of the animal models (primate, bovine or feline ) considered relevant are too expensive for routine drug evaluation and too

  13. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataman, Ozlem U., E-mail: ouataman@hotmail.com [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Sambrook, Sally J. [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Wilks, Chris [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Lloyd, Andrew [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Taylor, Amanda E. [Yellow Delaney Communications Ltd, Wilmslow, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Wedge, Stephen R. [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that

  14. Methyl-hydroxylamine as an efficacious antibacterial agent that targets the ribonucleotide reductase enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Julián

    Full Text Available The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for anticancer and antiviral activity. However, the high toxicity of these current drugs to eukaryotic cells does not permit their use as antibacterial agents. Here, we present a radical scavenger compound that inhibited bacterial RNR, and the compound's activity as an antibacterial agent together with its toxicity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated. First, the efficacy of N-methyl-hydroxylamine (M-HA in inhibiting the growth of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated, and no effect on eukaryotic cells was observed. M-HA showed remarkable efficacy against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, given the M-HA activity against these two bacteria, our results showed that M-HA has intracellular antimycobacterial activity against BCG-infected macrophages, and it is efficacious in partially disassembling and inhibiting the further formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Furthermore, M-HA and ciprofloxacin showed a synergistic effect that caused a massive reduction in a P. aeruginosa biofilm. Overall, our results suggest the vast potential of M-HA as an antibacterial agent, which acts by specifically targeting a bacterial RNR enzyme.

  15. Self-assembled nanoplatform for targeted delivery of chemotherapy agents via affinity-regulated molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Spencer; Kang, Sungkwon; Veach, Alexander J; Vedvyas, Yogindra; Zarnegar, Rasa; Kim, Ju-Young; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2010-10-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs while minimizing unwanted distribution has been one of the pursued goals in cancer therapy. In this endeavor, we have developed targeted polymeric nanoparticles called amphiphilic urethane acrylate nonionomer (UAN) for encapsulation of diverse water-insoluble drugs and diagnostic agents, as well as for simple and reproducible surface conjugation of targeting ligands. Using monoclonal antibodies or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) I domain engineered for varying affinities to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, we were able to deliver UAN nanoparticles to human cancer cells with the efficiency dependent on the strength of the molecular interactions and the degree of ICAM-1 expression on cell surface. Compared to non-specific uptake of free drugs, targeted delivery of UAN nanoparticles carrying equal amount of drugs produced more potent cytotoxicity. Notably, without the targeting ligands attached, UAN nanoparticles were largely precluded from non-specific uptake by the cells, resulting in much lower toxicity. The versatility of our UAN nanoparticles in both payload encapsulation and presentation of targeting ligands may facilitate developing a robust platform for evaluating various combinations of cancer drugs and molecular interactions toward developing effective cancer therapy formulations.

  16. An information potential approach for tracking and surveilling multiple moving targets using mobile sensor agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Zhang, G.; Ferrari, S.; Fierro, R.; Palunko, I.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of surveilling moving targets using mobile sensor agents (MSAs) is applicable to a variety of fields, including environmental monitoring, security, and manufacturing. Several authors have shown that the performance of a mobile sensor can be greatly improved by planning its motion and control strategies based on its sensing objectives. This paper presents an information potential approach for computing the MSAs' motion plans and control inputs based on the feedback from a modified particle filter used for tracking moving targets. The modified particle filter, as presented in this paper implements a new sampling method (based on supporting intervals of density functions), which accounts for the latest sensor measurements and adapts, accordingly, a mixture representation of the probability density functions (PDFs) for the target motion. It is assumed that the target motion can be modeled as a semi-Markov jump process, and that the PDFs of the Markov parameters can be updated based on real-time sensor measurements by a centralized processing unit or MSAs supervisor. Subsequently, the MSAs supervisor computes an information potential function that is communicated to the sensors, and used to determine their individual feedback control inputs, such that sensors with bounded field-of-view (FOV) can follow and surveil the target over time.

  17. Development and evaluation of a novel VEGFR2-targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Houqiang; Li, Chunfang; He, Xiaoling; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Recent literatures have reported that the targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents are becoming more and more important in medical application, like ultrasound imaging, detection of perfusion, drug delivery and molecular imaging and so on. In this study, we fabricated an uniform nanoscale bubbles (257 nm with the polydispersity index of 0.458) by incorporation of antibody targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) into the nanobubbles membrane by using avidin-biotin interaction. Some fundamental characterizations such as nanobubble suspension, surface morphology, particle size distribution and zeta potential were investigated. The concentration and time-intensity curves (TICs) were obtained with a self-made ultrasound experimental setup in vitro evaluation. In addition, in order to evaluate the contrast enhancement ability and the potential tumor-targeted ability in vivo, normal Wistar rats and nude female BALB/c mice were intravascular administration of the nanobubbles via tail vein injection, respectively. Significant contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging within liver and tumor were visualized. These experiments demonstrated that the targeted nanobubbles is efficient in ultrasound molecular imaging by enhancement of the contrast effect and have potential capacity for targeted tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  18. Pentameric models as alternative molecular targets for the design of new antiaggregant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E; Gutierrez, Lucas J; Andujar, Sebastián A; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    The structure-based drug design has been an extremely useful technique used for searching and developing of new therapeutic agents in various biological systems. In the case of AD, this approach has been difficult to implement. Among other several causes, the main problem might be the lack of a specific stable and reliable molecular target. In this paper the results obtained using a pentameric amyloid beta (Aβ) model as a molecular target are discussed. Our MD simulations have shown that this system is relatively structured and stable, displaying a lightly conformational flexibility during 2.0 μs of simulation time. This study allowed us to distinguish characteristic structural features in specific regions of the pentamer which should be taken into account when choosing this model as a molecular target. This represents a clear advantage compared to the monomer or dimer models which are highly flexible structures with large numbers of possible conformers. Using this pentameric model we performed two types of studies usually carried out on a molecular target: a virtual screening and the design on structural basis of new mimetic peptides with antiaggregant properties. Our results indicate that this pentameric model might be a good molecular target for these particular studies of molecular modeling. Details about the predictive power of our virtual screening as well as about the molecular interactions that stabilize the mimetic peptide-pentamer Aβ complexes are discussed in this paper.

  19. New tuberculostatic agents targeting nucleic acid biosynthesis: drug design using QSAR approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Renata V; Braga, Rodolpho C; Segretti, Natanael D; Ferreira, Elizabeth I; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Andrade, Carolina H

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death among curable infectious diseases. The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB is a growing global health concern and there is an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Enzymes involved in DNA and ATP biosynthesis are potential targets for tuberculostatic drug design, since these enzymes are essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. This review presents the current progress and applications of structure-activity relationship analysis for the discovery of innovative tuberculostatic agents as inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, DNA gyrase, ATP synthase, and thymidylate kinase enzymes, highlighting present challenges and new opportunities in TB drug design.

  20. Design of a modular protein-based MRI contrast agent for targeted application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grum

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI offers a non-radioactive alternative for the non-invasive detection of tumours. Low molecular weight MRI contrast agents currently in clinical use suffer either from a lack of specificity for tumour tissue or from low relaxivity and thus low contrast amplification. In this study, we present the newly designed two domain fusion protein Zarvin, which is able to bind to therapeutic IgG antibodies suitable for targeting, while facilitating contrast enhancement through high affinity binding sites for Gd(3+. We show that the Zarvin fold is stable under serum conditions, specifically targets a cancer cell-line when bound to the Cetuximab IgG, and allows for imaging with high relaxivity, a property that would be advantageous for the detection of small tumours and metastases at 1.5 or 3 T.

  1. Management of Psoriatic Arthritis: Traditional Disease-Modifying Rheumatic Agents and Targeted Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Enrique R

    2015-11-01

    Traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) remain the first-line treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), despite lack of randomized controlled trials, and with evidence based on observational studies. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents remain a top choice for biologic treatment, complemented with new biologics with different targets (IL12-23 and IL17). Unmet needs have been identified for patients who do not respond to treatment. Among targeted small molecules Apremilast is approved for the treatment of PsA and Tofactitinib is under investigation. The drugs discussed herein have the potential to address unmet needs; however, additional research is required to identify more effective therapies for PsA.

  2. Combination of chemotherapy and cancer stem cell targeting agents: Preclinical and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Atkinson, Katharine; Zhang, Tao

    2017-06-28

    The cancer stem cell model claims that the initiation, maintenance, and growth of a tumor are driven by a small population of cancer cells termed cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells possess a variety of phenotypes associated with therapeutic resistance and often cause recurrence of the diseases. Several strategies have been investigated to target cancer stem cells in a variety of cancers, such as blocking one or more self-renewal signaling pathways, reducing the expression of drug efflux and ATP-binding cassette efflux transporters, modulating epigenetic aberrations, and promoting cancer stem cell differentiation. A number of cell and animal studies strongly support the potential benefits of combining chemotherapeutic drugs with cancer stem cell targeting agents. Clinical trials are still underway to address the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of combination treatment. This mini-review provides an updated discussion of these preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lin Hou,* Huijuan Zhang,* Yating Wang, Lili Wang, Xiaomin Yang, Zhenzhong ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents (CAs targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor.Keywords: gadolinium, magnetic resonance, SWCNTs, hyaluronic acid, contrast agent

  4. Role of cytokine therapy for renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, R.; Hotte, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Starting in the late 1980s, cytokines were considered the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (rcc) because of a lack of improved survival with either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy alone. The cytokine agents interferon alfa (ifnα) and interleukin-2 (il-2) have been the most evaluated, but a low overall response rate and a marginal survival advantage, coupled with significant toxicity, make these therapies less than ideal. Although complete tumour responses have occasionally been seen with high-dose il-2, this therapy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and its approval has been based on limited nonrandomized evidence. Newer anti-angiogenesis agents have been evaluated as single agents and in combination with infα, and these are now considered the standard of care for most patients with rcc. However, cytokines may still occasionally be recommended when angiogenesis inhibitors are not available or are contraindicated. In the present paper, we discuss the evidence for the use of cytokine therapy in the setting of pre– and post–targeted therapy for rcc. PMID:19478896

  5. Molecular epidemiology of senecavirus A associated with vesicular disease in pigs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Gasparini, Marcela R; Sales, Érica B; Rivetti, Anselmo V; Sousa, Natália M; Oliveira, Anapolino M; Camargos, Marcelo F; Pinheiro de Oliveira, Tatiana F; Gonçalves, Junia P M; Madureira, Marieta C; Ribeiro, Damaso P; Marcondes, Ivone V; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel F; Fonseca, Antônio A

    2016-10-01

    Senecavirus A (SV-A) may cause vesicular disease and neonatal mortality in pigs, and was first detected in Brazil in 2015. Samples including tissues and serum from pigs with suspected vesicular diseases were collected from January to August in 2015 from farms in the states of Minas Gerais, Santa Catarina, Goiás and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and tested for the presence of SV-A by reverse transcriptase PCR. All samples were negative for foot and mouth disease virus, as well as 13 other infectious agents associated with vesicular diseases in pigs. SV-A was detected by PCR in 65/265 (24.5%) specimens. A 530 base pair fragment sequenced from the VP1 protein coding region indicated a high genetic distance from SV-A in other countries, but a common origin among the Brazilian isolates.

  6. Targeting Bacterial Dsb Proteins for the Development of Anti-Virulence Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roxanne P; Paxman, Jason J; Scanlon, Martin J; Heras, Begoña

    2016-07-16

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in bacterial antimicrobial resistance and a decline in the development of novel antibiotics. New therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to combat the growing threat posed by multidrug resistant bacterial infections. The Dsb disulfide bond forming pathways are potential targets for the development of antimicrobial agents because they play a central role in bacterial pathogenesis. In particular, the DsbA/DsbB system catalyses disulfide bond formation in a wide array of virulence factors, which are essential for many pathogens to establish infections and cause disease. These redox enzymes are well placed as antimicrobial targets because they are taxonomically widespread, share low sequence identity with human proteins, and many years of basic research have provided a deep molecular understanding of these systems in bacteria. In this review, we discuss disulfide bond catalytic pathways in bacteria and their significance in pathogenesis. We also review the use of different approaches to develop inhibitors against Dsb proteins as potential anti-virulence agents, including fragment-based drug discovery, high-throughput screening and other structure-based drug discovery methods.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd2-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd2-DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pKa, complex constant, and T1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd2-DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd2-DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r1) of 7.613mM(-1)s(-1) (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd2-DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd2-DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd2-DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd2-DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd2-DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF: Preclinical characterization of a potential radionuclide targeting agent against glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Asa Liljegren; Gedda, Lars; Orlova, Anna; Bruskin, Alexander; Blomquist, Erik; Carlsson, Jörgen; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2004-04-01

    Patients with glioblastoma multiforme have a poor prognosis due to recurrences originating from spread cells. The use of radionuclide targeting might increase the chance of inactivating single tumor cells with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. As a target, overexpressed epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) may be used. A natural ligand to EGFR, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an attractive targeting agent due to its low molecular weight (6 kDa) and high affinity for EGFR. 177Lu (T(1/2) = 6.7 days) is a radionuclide well suited for treatment of small tumor cell clusters, since it emits relatively low-energy beta particles. The goal of this study was to prepare and preclinically evaluate both in vitro and in vivo the [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF conjugate. The conjugate was characterized in vitro for its cell-binding properties, and in vivo for its pharmacokinetics and ability to target EGFR. [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF bound to cultured U343 glioblastoma cells with an affinity of 1.9 nM. Interaction with EGFR led to rapid internalization, and more than 70% of the cell-associated radioactivity was internalized after 30 minutes of incubation. The retention of radioactivity was good, with more than 65% of the 177Lu still cell-associated after 2 days. Biodistribution studies of i.v. injected [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF in NMRI mice demonstrated a rapid blood clearance. Most of the radioactivity was found in the liver and kidneys. The liver uptake was receptor-mediated, since it could be significantly reduced by preinjection of unlabeled EGF. In conclusion, [177Lu]Bz-DTPA-EGF seems to be a promising candidate for locoregional treatment of glioblastoma due to its high binding affinity, low molecular weight, and ability to target EGFR in vivo.

  9. Trackable and Targeted Phage as Positron Emission Tomography (PET Agent for Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibo Li, Qiaoling Jin, Chiunwei Huang, Siva Dasa, Liaohai Chen, Li-peng Yap, Shuanglong Liu, Hancheng Cai, Ryan Park, Peter S Conti

    2011-01-01

    partially blocked at 1 h time point. Phage-RGD particle was also used as the competitive ligand. In this case, the tumor uptake was significantly reduced and the value was kept at low level consistently. Conclusion: In this report, we constructed a PET trackable nanoplatform based on phage particle and demonstrated the imaging capability of these targeted agents. We also demonstrated that the choice of chelator could have significant impact on imaging results of nano-agents. The method established in this research may be applicable to other receptor/ligand systems for theranostic agent construction, which could have an immediate and profound impact on the field of imaging/therapy and lay the foundation for the construction of next generation cancer specific theranostic agents.

  10. Re-directing an alkylating agent to mitochondria alters drug target and cell death mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida Mourtada

    Full Text Available We have successfully delivered a reactive alkylating agent, chlorambucil (Cbl, to the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the mechanism of cell death for mitochondria-targeted chlorambucil (mt-Cbl in vitro and assess its efficacy in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia. Using a ρ° cell model, we show that mt-Cbl toxicity is not dependent on mitochondrial DNA damage. We also illustrate that re-targeting Cbl to mitochondria results in a shift in the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that this behavior is a general feature of mitochondria-targeted Cbl. Despite the change in cell death mechanisms, we show that mt-Cbl is still effective in vivo and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to the parent drug. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial rerouting changes the site of action of Cbl and also alters the cell death mechanism drastically without compromising in vivo efficacy. Thus, mitochondrial delivery allows the exploitation of Cbl as a promiscuous mitochondrial protein inhibitor with promising therapeutic potential.

  11. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Carlsson, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  12. Stereochemical control of nucleosome targeting by platinum-intercalator antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Eugene Y D; Davey, Gabriela E; Chin, Chee Fei; Dröge, Peter; Ang, Wee Han; Davey, Curt A

    2015-06-23

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs act therapeutically by forming DNA adducts, but suffer from severe toxicity and resistance problems, which have not been overcome in spite of decades of research. And yet defined chromatin targets have generally not been considered in the drug development process. Here we designed novel platinum-intercalator species to target a highly deformed DNA site near the nucleosome center. Between two seemingly similar structural isomers, we find a striking difference in DNA site selectivity in vitro, which comes about from stereochemical constraints that limit the reactivity of the trans isomer to special DNA sequence elements while still allowing the cis isomer to efficiently form adducts at internal sites in the nucleosome core. This gives the potential for controlling nucleosome site targeting in vivo, which would engender sensitivity to epigenetic distinctions and in particular cell type/status-dependent differences in nucleosome positioning. Moreover, while both compounds yield very similar DNA-adduct structures and display antitumor cell activity rivalling that of cisplatin, the cis isomer, relative to the trans, has a much more rapid cytotoxic effect and distinct impact on cell function. The novel stereochemical principles for controlling DNA site selectivity we discovered could aid in the design of improved site discriminating agents. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Aptamer-conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles as Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Mohammad; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Mehrgardi, Masoud A.; Aghaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is the most effective way to improve the survival rate in women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high spatial resolution and good anatomic details, and its lower sensitivity can be improved by using targeted molecular imaging. In this study, AS1411 aptamer was conjugated to Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles for specific targeting of mouse mammary carcinoma (4T1) cells that overexpress nucleolin. In vitro cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated nanoparticles was assessed on 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 (control) cells. The ability of the synthesized nanoprobe to target specifically the nucleolin overexpressed cells was assessed with the MRI technique. Results show that the synthesized nanoprobe produced strongly darkened T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with 4T1 cells, whereas the MR images of HFFF-PI6 cells incubated with the nanoprobe are brighter, showing small changes compared to water. The results demonstrate that in a Fe concentration of 45 μg/mL, the nanoprobe reduced by 90% MR image intensity in 4T1 cells compared with the 27% reduction in HFFF-PI6 cells. Analysis of MR signal intensity showed statistically significant signal intensity difference between 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 cells treated with the nanoprobe. MRI experiments demonstrate the high potential of the synthesized nanoprobe as a specific MRI contrast agent for detection of nucleolin-expressing breast cancer cells. PMID:28028501

  14. Pharmacological Agents Targeting Myocardial Metabolism for the Management of Chronic Stable Angina : an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Huqi, Alda; Morrone, Doralisa; Marzilli, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Despite continuous advances in myocardial revascularization procedures and intracoronary devices, patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) still experience worse prognosis and poor quality of life (QoL). Indeed, chronic stable angina (CSA) is a common disease with a large burden on healthcare costs. Traditionally, CSA is interpreted as episodes of reversible myocardial ischemia related to the presence of stable coronary artery plaque causing myocardial demand/supply mismatch when myocardial oxygen consumption increases. Accordingly, revascularization procedures are performed with the aim to remove the flow limiting stenosis, whereas traditional medical therapy (hemodynamic agents) aims at reducing myocardial oxygen demands. However, although effective, none of these treatment strategies or their combination is either able to confer symptomatic relief in all patients, nor to reduce mortality. Failure to significantly improve QoL and prognosis may be attributed at least in part to this "restrictive" understanding of IHD. Despite for many years myocardial metabolic derangement has been overlooked, recently it has gained increased attention with the development of new pharmacological agents (metabolic modulators) able to influence myocardial substrate selection and utilization thus improving cardiac efficiency. Shifting cardiac metabolism from free fatty acids (FA) towards glucose is a promising approach for the treatment of patients with stable angina, independently of the underling disease (macrovascular and/or microvascular disease). In this sense cardiac metabolic modulators open the way to a "revolutionary" understanding of ischemic heart disease and its common clinical manifestations, where myocardial ischemia is no longer considered as the mere oxygen and metabolites demand/supply unbalance, but as an energetic disorder. Keeping in mind such an alternative approach to the disease, development of new pharmacological agents directed toward multiple metabolic

  15. Natural products for cancer-targeted therapy: citrus flavonoids as potent chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiyanto, Edy; Hermawan, Adam; Anindyajati

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapy has been a very promising strategy of drug development research. Many molecular mechanims of diseases have been known to be regulated by abundance of proteins, such as receptors and hormones. Chemoprevention for treatment and prevention of diseases are continuously developed. Pre-clinical and clinical studies in chemoprevention field yielded many valuable data in preventing the onset of disease and suppressing the progress of their growth, making chemoprevention a challenging and a very rational strategy in future researches. Natural products being rich of flavonoids are those fruits belong to the genus citrus. Ethanolic extract of Citrus reticulata and Citrus aurantiifolia peels showed anticarcinogenic, antiproliferative, co-chemotherapeutic and estrogenic effects. Several examples of citrus flavonoids that are potential as chemotherapeutic agents are tangeretin, nobiletin, hesperetin, hesperidin, naringenin, and naringin. Those flavonoids have been shown to possess inhibition activity on certain cancer cells' growth through various mechanisms. Moreover, citrus flavonoids also perform promising effect in combination with several chemotherapeutic agents against the growth of cancer cells. Some mechanisms involved in those activities are through cell cycle modulation, antiangiogenic effect, and apoptosis induction. Previous studies showed that tangeretin suppressed the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. While in combination with tamoxifen, doxorubicin, and 5-FU, respectively, it was proven to be synergist on several cancer cells. Hesperidin and naringenin increased cytotoxicitity of doxorubicin on MCF-7 cells and HeLa cells. Besides, citrus flavonoids also performed estrogenic effect in vivo. One example is hesperidin having the ability to decrease the concentration of serum and hepatic lipid and reduce osteoporosis of ovariectomized rats. Those studies showed the great potential of citrus fruits as natural product

  16. F-18 Polyethyleneglycol stilbenes as PET imaging agents targeting A{beta} aggregates in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meiping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Maier, Donna L. [Department of Neuroscience, AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE 19850 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes a novel series of {sup 18}F-labeled polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-stilbene derivatives as potential {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaque-specific imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). In these series of compounds, {sup 18}F is linked to the stilbene through a PEG chain, of which the number of ethoxy groups ranges from 2 to 5. The purpose of adding PEG groups is to lower the lipophilicity and improve bioavailability. The syntheses of the 'cold' compounds and the {sup 18}F-labeled PEG stilbene derivatives are successfully achieved. All of the fluorinated stilbenes displayed high binding affinities in an assay using postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.9-6.7 nM). Labeling was successfully performed by a substitution of the mesylate group of 10a-d by [{sup 18}F]fluoride giving the target compounds [{sup 18}F]12a-d (EOS, specific activity, 900-1500 Ci/mmol; radiochemical purity >99%). In vivo biodistribution of these novel {sup 18}F ligands in normal mice exhibited excellent brain penetrations and rapid washouts after an intravenous injection (6.6-8.1 and 1.2-2.6% dose/g at 2 and 60 min, respectively). Autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections of [{sup 18}F]12a-d confirmed the specific binding related to the presence of A{beta} plaques. In addition, in vivo plaque labeling can be clearly demonstrated with these {sup 18}F-labeled agents in transgenic mice (Tg2576), a useful animal model for Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, the preliminary results strongly suggest these fluorinated PEG stilbene derivatives are suitable candidates as A{beta} plaque imaging agents for studying patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  18. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  19. Liver dysplasia: US molecular imaging with targeted contrast agent enables early assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouls, Christoph; Hatting, Maximillian; Rix, Anne; Pochon, Sibylle; Lederle, Wiltrud; Tardy, Isabelle; Kuhl, Christiane K; Trautwein, Christian; Kiessling, Fabian; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the ability of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2)-targeted ultrasonographic (US) microbubbles for the assessment of liver dysplasia in transgenic mice. Animal experiments were approved by the governmental review committee. Nuclear factor-κB essential modulator knock-out mice with liver dysplasia and wild-type mice underwent liver imaging by using a clinical US system. Two types of contrast agents were investigated: nontargeted, commercially available, second-generation microbubbles (SonoVue) and clinically translatable PEGylated VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles (BR55). Microbubble kinetics was investigated over the course of 4 minutes. Targeted contrast material-enhanced US signal was quantified 5 minutes after injection. Competitive in vivo binding experiments with BR55 were performed in knock-out mice. Immunohistochemical and hematoxylin-eosin staining of liver sections was performed to validate the in vivo US results. Groups were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Peak enhancement after injection of SonoVue and BR55 did not differ in healthy and dysplastic livers (SonoVue, P = .46; BR55, P = .43). Accordingly, immunohistochemical findings revealed comparable vessel densities in both groups. The specificity of BR55 to VEGFR2 was proved by in vivo competition (P = .0262). While the SonoVue signal decreased similarly in healthy and dysplastic livers during the 4 minutes, there was an accumulation of BR55 in dysplastic livers compared with healthy ones. Furthermore, targeted contrast-enhanced US signal indicated a significantly higher site-specific binding of BR55 in dysplastic than healthy livers (P = .005). Quantitative immunohistologic findings confirmed significantly higher VEGFR2 levels in dysplastic livers (P = .02). BR55 enables the distinction of early stages of liver dysplasia from normal liver. © RSNA, 2013.

  20. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  1. Bioluminescent bioreporter assays for targeted detection of chemical and biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven; Jegier, Pat; Johnson, Courtney; Moser, Scott; Islam, Syed; Sayler, Gary

    2008-04-01

    Bioluminescent bioreporters carrying the bacterial lux gene cassette have been well established for the sensing and monitoring of select chemical agents. Their ability to generate target specific visible light signals with no requirement for extraneous additions of substrate or other hands-on manipulations affords a real-time, repetitive assaying technique that is remarkable in its simplicity and accuracy. Although the predominant application of lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters has been towards chemical compound detection, novel genetic engineering schemes are yielding a variety of new bioreporter systems that extend the lux sensing mechanism beyond mere analyte discrimination. For example, the unique specificity of bacteriophage (bacterial viruses) has been exploited in lux bioluminescent assays for specific identification of foodborne bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. With the concurrent ability to interface bioluminescent bioreporter assays onto integrated circuit microluminometers (BBICs; bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuits), the potential exists for the development of sentinel microchips that can function as environmental monitors for multiplexed recognition of chemical and biological agents in air, food, and water. The size and portability of BBIC biosensors may ultimately provide a deployable, interactive network sensing technology adaptable towards chem/bio defense.

  2. NOVEL AGENTS AND EMERGING STRATEGIES FOR TARGETING THE B-CELL RECEPTOR PATHWAY IN CLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Efremov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a disease of malignant CD5+ B lymphocytes that are characterized by frequent expression of autoreactive B-cell receptors (BCRs and marked dependence on microenvironmental signals for proliferation and survival. Among the latter, signals propagated through the BCR are believed to play a key role in leukemia initiation, maintenance and evolution. Drugs that can disrupt these signals have recently emerged as potential therapeutic agents in CLL and several of them are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Particularly promising clinical responses have been obtained with inhibitors of the kinases SYK, BTK, and PI3Kδ, which function by blocking BCR signal transduction. In addition, recent studies focusing on the phosphatase PTPN22, which is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and is markedly overexpressed in CLL cells, suggest that it may be possible in the future to develop strategies that will selectively reprogram BCR survival signals into signals that induce leukemic cell death. This review focuses on the biological basis behind these strategies and highlights some of the most promising BCR-targeting agents in ongoing preclinical and clinical studies.

  3. Targeting Potassium Channels for Increasing Delivery of Imaging Agents and Therapeutics to Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Sanyasihally Ningaraj

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/ capillaries that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. Studies in our laboratory have identified significant differences in the expression levels of certain genes and proteins between normal and brain tumor capillary endothelial cells. In this study, we validated the non-invasive and clinically relevant Dynamic Contrast Enhancing-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI method with invasive, clinically irrelevant but highly accurate Quantitative Autoradiography (QAR method using rat glioma model. We also showed that DCE-MRI metric of tissue vessel perfusion-permeability is sensitive to changes in blood vessel permeability following administration of calcium-activated potassium (BKCa channel activator NS-1619. Our results show that human gliomas and brain tumor endothelial cells that overexpress BKCa channels can be targeted for increased BTB permeability for MRI enhancing agents to brain tumors. We conclude that monitoring the outcome of increased MRI enhancing agents’ delivery to microsatellites and leading tumor edges in glioma patients would lead to beneficial clinical outcome.

  4. Host-Targeting Agents to Prevent and Cure Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam B. Zeisel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC which are leading indications of liver transplantation (LT. To date, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and LT is invariably followed by infection of the liver graft. Within the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have had a major impact on the management of chronic hepatitis C, which has become a curable disease in the majority of DAA-treated patients. In contrast to DAAs that target viral proteins, host-targeting agents (HTAs interfere with cellular factors involved in the viral life cycle. By acting through a complementary mechanism of action and by exhibiting a generally higher barrier to resistance, HTAs offer a prospective option to prevent and treat viral resistance. Indeed, given their complementary mechanism of action, HTAs and DAAs can act in a synergistic manner to reduce viral loads. This review summarizes the different classes of HTAs against HCV infection that are in preclinical or clinical development and highlights their potential to prevent HCV infection, e.g., following LT, and to tailor combination treatments to cure chronic HCV infection.

  5. Host-Targeting Agents to Prevent and Cure Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisel, Mirjam B; Crouchet, Emilie; Baumert, Thomas F; Schuster, Catherine

    2015-11-02

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which are leading indications of liver transplantation (LT). To date, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and LT is invariably followed by infection of the liver graft. Within the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have had a major impact on the management of chronic hepatitis C, which has become a curable disease in the majority of DAA-treated patients. In contrast to DAAs that target viral proteins, host-targeting agents (HTAs) interfere with cellular factors involved in the viral life cycle. By acting through a complementary mechanism of action and by exhibiting a generally higher barrier to resistance, HTAs offer a prospective option to prevent and treat viral resistance. Indeed, given their complementary mechanism of action, HTAs and DAAs can act in a synergistic manner to reduce viral loads. This review summarizes the different classes of HTAs against HCV infection that are in preclinical or clinical development and highlights their potential to prevent HCV infection, e.g., following LT, and to tailor combination treatments to cure chronic HCV infection.

  6. Host-targeting agents for treatment of hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Thomas F; Verrier, Eloi R; Nassal, Michael; Chung, Raymond T; Zeisel, Mirjam B

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-the second leading and fastest rising cause of cancer death world-wide. While de novo infection can be efficiently prevented by vaccination and chronic infection can be controlled using antivirals targeting the viral polymerase, the development of efficient antiviral strategies to eliminate the virus and thus to cure infection remains a key unmet medical need. The recent progress in the development of robust infectious HBV cell culture models now enables the investigation of the full viral life cycle, including a more detailed study of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions responsible for viral persistence. The understanding of these virus-host interactions will be instrumental for the development of curative treatments. Host-dependency factors have recently emerged as promising candidates to treat and prevent infection by various pathogens. This review focuses on the potential of host-targeting agents (HTAs) as novel antivirals to treat and cure HBV infection. These include HTAs that inhibit de novo and re-infection, synthesis and spread of cccDNA as well as development of immune-based approaches eliminating or curing infected hepatocytes, including the eradication of viral cccDNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alex Matter

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery&development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. hTe conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. hTe importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. hTe most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. hTe factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery&development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials.

  8. Analysis of current antifungal agents and their targets within the Pneumocystis carinii genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porollo, Aleksey; Meller, Jaroslaw; Joshi, Yogesh; Jaiswal, Vikash; Smulian, A George; Cushion, Melanie T

    2012-11-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a leading opportunistic infection in patients with weakened immune systems. The fungus causing the infection belongs to the genus, Pneumocystis, and its members are found in a large variety of mammals. Adaptation to the lung environment of a host with an intact immune system has been a key to its successful survival. Unfortunately, the metabolic strategies used by these fungi to grow and survive in this context are largely unknown. There were considerable impediments to standard approaches for investigation of this unique pathogen, the most problematic being the lack of a long term in vitro culture system. The absence of an ex vivo cultivation method remains today, and many fundamental scientific questions about the basic biology, metabolism, and life cycle of Pneumocystis are unanswered. Recent progress in sequencing of the Pneumocystis carinii genome, a species infecting rats, permitted a more informative search for genes and biological pathways within this pathogen that are known to be targets for existing antifungal agents. In this work, we review the classes of antifungal drugs with respect to their potential applicability to the treatment of PCP. Classes covered in the review are the azoles, polyenes, allylamines, and echinocandins. Factors limiting the use of standard antifungal treatments and the currently available alternatives (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, atovaquone, and pentamidine) are discussed. A summary of genomic sequences within Pneumocystis carinii associated with the corresponding targeted biological pathways is provided. All sequences are available via the Pneumocystis Genome Project at http://pgp.cchmc.org/.

  9. Human DDX3 protein is a valuable target to develop broad spectrum antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brai, Annalaura; Fazi, Roberta; Tintori, Cristina; Zamperini, Claudio; Bugli, Francesca; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Stigliano, Egidio; Esté, José; Badia, Roger; Franco, Sandra; Martinez, Miguel A; Martinez, Javier P; Meyerhans, Andreas; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio; Garbelli, Anna; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-05-10

    Targeting a host factor essential for the replication of different viruses but not for the cells offers a higher genetic barrier to the development of resistance, may simplify therapy regimens for coinfections, and facilitates management of emerging viral diseases. DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) is a human host factor required for the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses, including some of the most challenging human pathogens currently circulating, such as HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus, Dengue virus, and West Nile virus. Herein, we showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that the inhibition of DDX3 by a small molecule could be successfully exploited for the development of a broad spectrum antiviral agent. In addition to the multiple antiviral activities, hit compound 16d retained full activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 strains in the absence of cellular toxicity. Pharmacokinetics and toxicity studies in rats confirmed a good safety profile and bioavailability of 16d. Thus, DDX3 is here validated as a valuable therapeutic target.

  10. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Chalcone scaffolds as anti-infective agents: structural and molecular target perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-08-28

    In recent years, widespread outbreak of numerous infectious diseases across the globe has created havoc among the population. Particularly, the inhabitants of tropical and sub-tropical regions are mainly affected by these pathogens. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential anti-infective candidates that inhibit various parasitic, malarial, bacterial, viral, and fungal targets like cruzain-1/2, trypanopain-Tb, trans-sialidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fumarate reductase, falcipain-1/2, β-hematin, topoisomerase-II, plasmepsin-II, lactate dehydrogenase, protein kinases (Pfmrk and PfPK5), and sorbitol-induced hemolysis, DEN-1 NS3, H1N1, HIV (Integrase/Protease), protein tyrosine phosphatase A/B (Ptp-A/B), FtsZ, FAS-II, lactate/isocitrate dehydrogenase, NorA efflux pump, DNA gyrase, fatty acid synthase, chitin synthase, and β-(1,3)-glucan synthase. In this review, a comprehensive study (from Jan. 1982 to May 2015) of the structural features of anti-infective chalcones, their mechanism of actions (MOAs) and structure activity relationships (SARs) have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-infective agents.

  12. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-04-04

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  13. Analyzing the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using optimal assignment algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tovey, C.A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This work considers the problem of maximum utilization of a set of mobile robots with limited sensor-range capabilities and limited travel distances. The robots are initially in random positions. A set of robots properly guards or covers a region if every point within the region is within the effective sensor range of at least one vehicle. The authors wish to move the vehicles into surveillance positions so as to guard or cover a region, while minimizing the maximum distance traveled by any vehicle. This problem can be formulated as an assignment problem, in which they must optimally decide which robot to assign to which slot of a desired matrix of grid points. The cost function is the maximum distance traveled by any robot. Assignment problems can be solved very efficiently. Solutions times for one hundred robots took only seconds on a Silicon Graphics Crimson workstation. The initial positions of all the robots can be sampled by a central base station and their newly assigned positions communicated back to the robots. Alternatively, the robots can establish their own coordinate system with the origin fixed at one of the robots and orientation determined by the compass bearing of another robot relative to this robot. This paper presents example solutions to the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using a matching algorithm. Two separate cases with one hundred agents in each were analyzed using this method. They have found these mobile robot problems to be a very interesting application of network optimization methods, and they expect this to be a fruitful area for future research.

  14. Emulsomes: An emerging vesicular drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawandeep Gill

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is the easiest, cost effective, and most vital method for drug administration. Therefore, improvement of dosage forms mainly for the prolonged release purpose has been a challenge for scientists. Vesicular drug delivery systems are developed with a purpose to overcome problems coupled with the drugs such a poor bioavailability, protection from harsh gastric environment, and from gastric enzymes, which degrade the drug. Vesicular drug delivery systems such as liposomes, emulsions, niosomes, proniosomes, solid lipid-nano particles, ethosomes, nanoparticles, and pharmacosomes, etc have gained much attention, but emulsomes have rouse as system, which bypasses many disadvantages associated with other systems, developed as novel lipoidal vesicular system with internal solid fat core surrounded by phospholipid bilayer. This technology is designed to act as vehicle for poorly soluble drugs. The drug is enclosed in the emulsomes and provide prolong existence of drug in systemic circulation. Furthermore, emulsomal-based formulations of genetic drugs such as antisense oligonucleotides and plasmids for gene therapy that have clear potential for systemic utility are increasingly available. This review addresses the concept of emulsomal drug delivery system, summarizes the success of emulsomes for the delivery of small molecules, and special attention has been paid to its formulation design, advantages, biopharmaceutical aspects, stability aspects, and various aspects related to drug delivery including future aspects.

  15. Systemic coagulation parameters in mice after treatment with vascular targeting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottstein Claudia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular targeting of malignant tumors has become a clinically validated new treatment approach with clear patient benefit. However clinical studies have also revealed that some types of vascular targeting agents (VTAs are prone to coagulation system side effects. It is therefore essential to predetermine coagulation parameters in preclinical studies. As of to date, this has rarely been done, predominantly due to technical issues. The goal of this study was to establish and apply a standardized process, whereby systemic coagulation activation can be routinely measured in mice. Results We have evaluated a number of sampling techniques and coagulation tests regarding their suitability for this purpose. We were able to adapt two assays measuring soluble fibrin, a marker for a prethrombotic status. Thus, soluble fibrin could be measured for the first time in mice. All assays were validated in a positive control model for systemic coagulation activation, i.e. lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia. Based on our results, we selected a panel of coagulation tests, which are both feasable and informative for preclinical testing of VTAs: soluble fibrin, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, free antithrombin III, white blood cell counts and platelet counts. The effect of tumor transplants on coagulation parameters was evaluated using this panel. We then applied this set of assays in treatment studies with a VTA developed in our laboratory to investigate a potential systemic coagulation activation. Conclusion We have established a standardized panel of assays that can be used to test murine blood samples for coagulation activation in preclinical studies. All tests are feasible to perform in any research laboratory without specialized equipment. In addition, this is the first report to measure soluble fibrin, an early marker of systemic coagulation activation, in mice. The panel was applied on tumor bearing mice and mice treated with a VTA

  16. Targeted in vivo delivery of siRNA and an endosome-releasing agent to hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Magdolna G; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Lewis, David L; Wooddell, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    The discoveries of RNA interference (RNAi) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have provided the opportunity to treat diseases in a fundamentally new way: by co-opting a natural process to inhibit gene expression at the mRNA level. Given that siRNAs must interact with the cells' natural RNAi machinery in order to exert their silencing effect, one of the most fundamental requirements for their use is efficient delivery to the desired cell type and, specifically, into the cytoplasm of those cells. Numerous research efforts involving the testing of a large number of delivery approaches using various carrier molecules and inventing several distinct formulation technologies during the past decade illustrate the difficulty and complexity of this task. We have developed synthetic polymer formulations for in vivo siRNA delivery named Dynamic PolyConjugates™ (DPCs) that are designed to mimic the features viruses possess for efficient delivery of their nucleic acids. These include small size, long half-life in circulation, capability of displaying distinct host cell tropism, efficient receptor binding and cell entry, disassembly in the endosome and subsequent release of the nucleic acid cargo to the cytoplasm. Here we present an example of this delivery platform composed of a hepatocyte-targeted endosome-releasing agent and a cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). This delivery platform forms the basis of ARC-520, an siRNA-based therapeutic for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this chapter, we provide a general overview of the steps in developing ARC-520 and detailed protocols for two critical stages of the discovery process: (1) verifying targeted in vivo delivery to hepatocytes and (2) evaluating in vivo drug efficacy using a mouse model of chronic HBV infection.

  17. Linker design for the modular assembly of multifunctional and targeted platinum(ii)-containing anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S; Bierbach, U

    2016-08-16

    A versatile and efficient modular synthetic platform was developed for assembling multifunctional conjugates and targeted forms of platinum-(benz)acridines, a class of highly cytotoxic DNA-targeted hybrid agents. The synthetic strategy involved amide coupling between succinyl ester-modified platinum compounds (P1, P2) and a set of 11 biologically relevant primary and secondary amines (N1-N11). To demonstrate the feasibility and versatility of the approach, a structurally and functionally diverse range of amines was introduced. These include biologically active molecules, such as rucaparib (a PARP inhibitor), E/Z-endoxifen (an estrogen receptor antagonist), and a quinazoline-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Micro-scale reactions in Eppendorf tubes or on 96-well plates were used to screen for optimal coupling conditions in DMF solution with carbodiimide-, uronium-, and phosphonium-based compounds, as well as other common coupling reagents. Reactions with the phosphonium-based coupling reagent PyBOP produced the highest yields and gave the cleanest conversions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the chemistry can also be performed in aqueous media and is amenable to parallel synthesis based on multiple consecutive reactions in DMF in a "one-tube" format. In-line LC-MS was used to assess the stability of the conjugates in physiologically relevant buffers. Hydrolysis of the conjugates occurs at the ester moiety and is facilitated by the aquated metal moiety under low-chloride ion conditions. The rate of ester cleavage greatly depends on the nature of the amine component. Potential applications of the linker technology are discussed.

  18. Evidence for nonacetylcholinesterase targets of organophosphorus nerve agent: supersensitivity of acetylcholinesterase knockout mouse to VX lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duysen, E G; Li, B; Xie, W; Schopfer, L M; Anderson, R S; Broomfield, C A; Lockridge, O

    2001-11-01

    The possibility that organophosphate toxicity is due to inhibition of targets other than acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) was examined in AChE knockout mice. Mice (34-55 days old) were grouped for this study, after it was determined that AChE, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and carboxylesterase activities had reached stable values by this age. Mice with 0, 50, or 100% AChE activity were treated subcutaneously with the nerve agent VX. The LD50 for VX was 10 to 12 microg/kg in AChE-/-, 17 microg/kg in AChE+/-, and 24 microg/kg in AChE+/+ mice. The same cholinergic signs of toxicity were present in AChE-/- mice as in wild-type mice, even though AChE-/- mice have no AChE whose inhibition could lead to cholinergic signs. Wild-type mice, but not AChE-/- mice, were protected by pretreatment with atropine. Tissues were extracted from VX-treated and untreated animals and tested for AChE, BChE, and acylpeptide hydrolase activity. VX treatment inhibited 50% of the AChE activity in brain and muscle of AChE+/+ and +/- mice, 50% of the BChE activity in all three AChE genotypes, but did not significantly inhibit acylpeptide hydrolase activity. It was concluded that the toxicity of VX must be attributed to inhibition of nonacetylcholinesterase targets in the AChE-/- mouse. Organophosphorus ester toxicity in wild-type mice is probably due to inhibition or binding to several proteins, only one of which is AChE.

  19. Fabrication of Photofunctional Nanoporous Membrane and Its Photoinactivation Effect of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Kyun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and photophysical study of photofunctional nanoporous alumina membrane (PNAM were performed, and its application of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT was investigated. Nanoporous alumina membrane (NAM was fabricated by two-step aluminium anodic oxidation process. Surface of the fabricated NAM was modified with organo-silane agent to induce covalent bonding between NAM and a photosensitizer (PtCP: [5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-methoxycarbonylphenyl-porphyrin] platinum. PtCP was covalently bonded to the surface of the modified NAM by nucleophilic acyl substitution reaction process. The morphology and the photophysical properties of the fabricated PNAM were confirmed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, steady-state spectroscopies, and nanosecond laser-induced time-resolved spectroscopy. For the efficacy study of PNAM in PACT, an enveloped animal virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, was utilized as a target organism. Antiviral effect of the PNAM-PACT was measured by the extent of suppression of plaque-forming units (PFU after the light irradiation. In the cultures inoculated with PACT-treated VSV, the suppression of PFU was prominent, which demonstrates that PNAM is a potential bio clean-up tool.

  20. Targeting 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, S; Lin, R; Xia, S; Pan, Y; Shan, C; Wu, S; Lonial, S; Gaddh, M; Arellano, M L; Khoury, H J; Khuri, F R; Lee, B H; Boggon, T J; Fan, J; Chen, J

    2017-01-12

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is crucial for cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. We recently reported that targeting a key oxidative PPP enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), using our novel small-molecule 6PGD inhibitors Physcion and its derivative S3, shows anticancer effects. Notably, humans with genetic deficiency of either 6PGD or another oxidative PPP enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, exhibit non-immune hemolytic anemia upon exposure to aspirin and various antimalarial drugs. Inspired by these clinical observations, we examined the anticancer potential of combined treatment with 6PGD inhibitors and antimalarial drugs. We found that stable knockdown of 6PGD sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA). Combined treatment with DHA and Physcion activates AMP-activated protein kinase, leading to synergistic inhibition of human leukemia cell viability. Moreover, our combined therapy synergistically attenuates tumor growth in xenograft nude mice injected with human K562 leukemia cells and cell viability of primary leukemia cells from human patients, but shows minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells in mice as well as red blood cells and mononucleocytes from healthy human donors. Our findings reveal the potential for combined therapy using optimized doses of Physcion and DHA as a novel antileukemia treatment without inducing hemolysis.

  1. Synthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives as mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and cytotoxic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop agents with superior chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against hepatocellular carcinomas, mitochondria-targeted hydroxycinnamic acids (MitoHCAs were synthesized by conjugation with a triphenylphosphonium cation. These synthetic compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant activities in hepatic mitochondria, including against OH∙− and ROO∙− induced lipid peroxidation. H2O2 production was decreased significantly by increasing glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities. In addition, cell proliferation data from three cell lines (HepG2, L02 and WI38 indicated that the MitoHCAs were selective for cancer cells. Interestingly, the MitoHCAs both with or without Ca2+ triggered mitochondrial dysfunction by inducing mitochondrial swelling, collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential and causing cytochrome c release. In particular, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP, cyclosporin A, attenuated mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, indicating that mPTP may be involved in the antiproliferative activity of MitoHCAs. Further studies focused on structural optimization of these compounds are onging.

  2. Optimizing the radiosensitive liquid-core microcapsules for the targeting of chemotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, S. [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)]. E-mail: sharada@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, S. [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan); Ishii, K. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Yamazaki, H. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Matsuyama, S. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Sakai, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Arakawa, K. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Sato, T. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Oikawa, S. [Takasaki Institute of the Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Microcapsules consisting of alginate and hyaluronic acid that can be decomposed by radiation are currently under development. In this study, the composition of the microcapsule material was optimized by changing the amounts of alginate and hyaluronic acid. Solutions of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.4% (wt./vol.) hyaluronic acid were mixed into a 0.2% alginate solution. To these mixtures, carboplatin (0.2 mmol) was added and the resulting material was used for the capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a CaCl{sub 2} solution (0.34 mol/l) using a microatomizer. These capsules were irradiated by a single dose of 2, 5, or 10 Gy {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray radiation. Immediately after irradiation, the releasing of core content of microcapsule was determined, using a micro particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) camera. The average diameter of the microcapsules was 22.3 {+-} 3.3 {mu}m, and that of the liquid core was 10.2 {+-} 4.3 {mu}m. The maximum radiation-induced content release was observed with liquid-core microcapsules containing 0.1% hyaluronic acid and 0.2% alginate. Our liquid-core microcapsules suggest a new potential use for radiation: the targeted delivery of the chemotherapeutic agents or radiosensitizers. This offers the prospect of increased combined effectiveness of radiation with chemotherapy or radiosensitization and decreased adverse side effects.

  3. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p<0.001. Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48–5.43. Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes.

  4. Cutaneous reactions to anticancer agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor: a dermatology-oncology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacouture, M E; Melosky, B L

    2007-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often overexpressed or dysregulated in solid tumors. Targeting the EGFR-mediated signaling pathway has become routine practice in the treatment of lung, pancreatic, head and neck, and colon carcinomas. Available agents with selected activity towards the EGFR include low molecular weight tyrosine kinase inhibitors, e.g., erlotinib (Tarceva, Genentech BioOncology/ OSI Pharmaceuticals/ F. Hoffmann-La Roche) and monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab (Erbitux, Bristol-Myers Squibb/ ImClone Systems/ Merck) and panitumumab (Vectibix, Amgen). Their use is anticipated to increase for treating other solid tumors that are dependent on this pathway for growth and proliferation. Health Canada and the US FDA have approved erlotinib for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). It has also been approved in the US for use against pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine (Gemzar, Eli Lilly). Cetuximab and most recently panitumumab (Vectibix, Amgen/ Abgenix) were approved by the US FDA for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Cetuximab is also approved in the US for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The safety profile for this class of drugs is unique, with virtually no hematological toxicity, but frequent cutaneous and gastrointestinal side-effects. Although there is a dearth of randomized trials addressing treatment of the dermatological side-effects, some basic principles of management have been agreed upon and can likely improve patient compliance and decrease inappropriate dose reduction, which may negatively influence the antitumor effect.

  5. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondria-targeted agents: Future perspectives of mitochondrial pharmaceutics in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thekkuttuparambil; Ananthanarayanan; Ajith; Thankamani; Gopinathan; Jayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of the major sites for the genera-tion of reactive oxygen species(ROS) as an undesirable side product of oxidative energy metabolism. Damaged mitochondria can augment the generation of ROS. Dys-function of mitochondria increase the risk for a large number of human diseases, including cardiovascular diseases(CVDs). Heart failure(HF) following ischemic heart disease, infantile cardiomyopathy and cardiac hypertrophy associated with left ventricular dilations are some of the CVDs in which the role of mitochon-drial oxidative stress has been reported. Advances in mitochondrial research during the last decade focused on the preservation of its function in the myocardium, which is vital for the cellular energy production. Expe-rimental and clinical trials have been conducted using mitochondria-targeted molecules like: MnSOD mimetics, such as EUK-8, EUK-134 and MitoSOD; choline esters of glutathione and N-acetyl-L-cysteine; triphenylphospho-nium ligated vitamin E, lipoic acid, plastoquinone andmitoCoQ10; and Szeto-Schiller(SS)- peptides(SS-02 and SS-31). Although many results are inconclusive, some of the findings, especially on CoQ10, are worthwhile. This review summarizes the role of mitochondria-tar-geted delivery of agents and their consequences in the control of HF.

  7. Optimizing the radiosensitive liquid-core microcapsules for the targeting of chemotherapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, S.; Ehara, S.; Ishii, K.; Yamazaki, H.; Matsuyama, S.; Kamiya, T.; Sakai, T.; Arakawa, K.; Sato, T.; Oikawa, S.

    2007-07-01

    Microcapsules consisting of alginate and hyaluronic acid that can be decomposed by radiation are currently under development. In this study, the composition of the microcapsule material was optimized by changing the amounts of alginate and hyaluronic acid. Solutions of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.4% (wt./vol.) hyaluronic acid were mixed into a 0.2% alginate solution. To these mixtures, carboplatin (0.2 mmol) was added and the resulting material was used for the capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a CaCl 2 solution (0.34 mol/l) using a microatomizer. These capsules were irradiated by a single dose of 2, 5, or 10 Gy 60Co γ-ray radiation. Immediately after irradiation, the releasing of core content of microcapsule was determined, using a micro particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) camera. The average diameter of the microcapsules was 22.3 ± 3.3 μm, and that of the liquid core was 10.2 ± 4.3 μm. The maximum radiation-induced content release was observed with liquid-core microcapsules containing 0.1% hyaluronic acid and 0.2% alginate. Our liquid-core microcapsules suggest a new potential use for radiation: the targeted delivery of the chemotherapeutic agents or radiosensitizers. This offers the prospect of increased combined effectiveness of radiation with chemotherapy or radiosensitization and decreased adverse side effects.

  8. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-lanreotide: a novel tracer as a targeted agent for tumor therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Sharmila; Das, Tapas; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Samuel, Grace; Korde, Aruna; Srivastava, Sudha; Venkatesh, Meera E-mail: meerav@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Pillai, M.R.A

    2004-08-01

    {sup 177}Lu of specific activity {approx}100-110 TBq/g and radionuclidic purity of {approx}100% was obtained by irradiation of enriched Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} (60.6% {sup 176}Lu) target for 7 days at a thermal neutron flux of 3x10{sup 13}n/cm{sup 2}/sec. The {sup 177}Lu labeling of a macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent viz. 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) has been extensively studied. Lanreotide, [{beta}-naphthyl-Ala-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Thr-NH{sub 2}] a disulfide-linked cyclic octapeptide and a somatostatin analog, reported to bind with a wide variety of tumors expressing somatostatin receptors, was conjugated with DOTA. The peptide-BFCA conjugate was characterized with the help of high-resolution two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. The {sup 177}Lu labeling of the DOTA-lanreotide conjugate has been standardized to give a radiolabeling yield of 85%. The tracer showed specific binding with A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma and IMR-32 human brain neuroblastoma cells.

  9. Paramagnetic Gd2O3 Nanoparticle-Based Targeting Theranostic Agent for C6 Rat Glioma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Pyo Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to synthesize theranostic agent targeting C6 rat glioma cell, which was based on the dextran coated paramagnetic gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (D-PGONs conjugated with folic acid (FA or paclitaxel (PTX. The D-PGONs were synthesized by the in situ coprecipitation method, and the average value of the size distribution was 2.9 nm. FTIR spectroscopy was fulfilled to confirm the conjugations of FA or PTX with D-PGONs. The bioprotective effects of dextran coating and chemotherapeutic effect of PTX in the C6 glioma cell were evaluated by the MTT assay. The differences in uptakes between the synthesized theranostic agents into C6 cells were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, the magnetic contrast enhancement with different concentration of the synthesized agent was compared by the T1-weighted MRI imaging. It was experimentally shown that the synthesized theranostic agent targets C6 cells due to the ligand-receptor-mediated endocytosis and provides enhancement in MR contrast depending on the concentration due to the paramagnetic property of gadolinium nanoparticle. In addition, it was shown by the results of MTT assay that the synthesized nanocomposites were more effective in reducing cell viability than bare gadolinium nanoparticles. In conclusion, it was shown that FA and PTX conjugated D-PGONs could be used as the theranostic agent with paramagnetism and chemotherapeutic property.

  10. Ultrasonic Analysis of Peptide- and Antibody-Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of αvβ3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dayton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of targeted ultrasound contrast agents is to significantly and selectively enhance the detection of a targeted vascular site. In this manuscript, three distinct contrast agents targeted to the αvβ3 integrin are examined. The αvβ3 integrin has been shown to be highly expressed on metastatic tumors and endothelial cells during neovascularization, and its expression has been shown to correlate with tumor grade. Specific adhesion of these contrast agents to αvβ3-expressing cell monolayers is demonstrated in vitro, and compared with that of nontargeted agents. Acoustic studies illustrate a backscatter amplitude increase from monolayers exposed to the targeted contrast agents of up to 13-fold (22 dB relative to enhancement due to control bubbles. A linear dependence between the echo amplitude and bubble concentration was observed for bound agents. The decorrelation of the echo from adherent targeted agents is observed over successive pulses as a function of acoustic pressure and bubble density. Frequency–domain analysis demonstrates that adherent targeted bubbles exhibit high-amplitude narrowband echo components, in contrast to the primarily wideband response from free microbubbles. Results suggest that adherent targeted contrast agents are differentiable from free-floating microbubbles, that targeted contrast agents provide higher sensitivity in the detection of angiogenesis, and that conventional ultrasound imaging techniques such as signal subtraction or decorrelation detection can be used to detect integrin-expressing vasculature with sufficient signal-to-noise.

  11. Autophagy and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Celina; Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Colombo, María Isabel

    2015-11-14

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that, as a basic mechanism it delivers cytoplasmic components to the lysosomes in order to maintain adequate energy levels and cellular homeostasis. This complex cellular process is activated by low cellular nutrient levels and other stress situations such as low ATP levels, the accumulation of damaged proteins or organelles, or pathogen invasion. Autophagy as a multistep process involves vesicular transport events leading to tethering and fusion of autophagic vesicles with several intracellular compartments. This review summarizes our current understanding of the autophagic pathway with emphasis in the trafficking machinery (i.e. Rabs GTPases and SNAP receptors (SNAREs)) involved in specific steps of the pathway.

  12. OUR APPROACH TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SPECIFIC TUMOR-TARGETED MRI CONTRAST AGENT FOR THE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; BULTE, JWM; DELEY, L; THE, TH; KAMMAN, RL; HULSTAERT, CE; BLAAUW, EH; MA, LD

    1993-01-01

    This review presents various aspects of the technological development, and their assessment in the design of a contrast agent for MRI, tailored to visualise tumours in the brain. First, it was demonstrated that magnetite as a contrast agent exhibited a much stronger relaxivity than gadolinium. The p

  13. Serological and Molecular Detection of Senecavirus A Associated with an Outbreak of Swine Idiopathic Vesicular Disease and Neonatal Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Lirola, Luis Gabriel; Rademacher, Chris; Linhares, Daniel; Harmon, Karen; Rotolo, Marisa; Sun, Yaxuan; Baum, David H; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Piñeyro, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    We performed a longitudinal field study in a swine breeding herd that presented with an outbreak of vesicular disease (VD) that was associated with an increase in neonatal mortality. Initially, a USDA Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) investigation confirmed the presence of Senecavirus A (SVA) and ruled out the presence of exotic agents that produce vesicular lesions, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus and others. Subsequently, serum samples, tonsil swabs, and feces were collected from sows (n = 22) and their piglets (n = 33) beginning 1 week after the onset of the clinical outbreak and weekly for 6 weeks. The presence of SVA RNA was evaluated in all specimens collected by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) targeting a conserved region of the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR). The serological response (IgG) to SVA was evaluated by the weekly testing of sow and piglet serum samples on a SVA VP1 recombinant protein (rVP1) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The rVP1 ELISA detected seroconversion against SVA in clinically affected and non-clinically affected sows at early stages of the outbreak as well as maternal SVA antibodies in offspring. Overall, the absence of vesicles (gross lesions) in SVA-infected animals and the variability of RT-qPCR results among specimen type demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on the combination of clinical observations, RT-qPCR in multiple diagnostic specimens, and serology are essential to ensure an accurate diagnosis of SVA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Editor’s Pick: Targeted Agents in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Dialysis: Myths and Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Guida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR pathway, as well as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors have revolutionised the therapeutic landscape of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in the past decade, greatly improving the survival rates of these patients. However, translating results of registrative Phase III trials into everyday clinical practice is often troublesome, since real-world patients are completely different from those enrolled in randomised controlled Phase III trials. Prospective data on active oncological treatments in mRCC patients on dialysis are dramatically lacking. This literature review summarises and critically comments on available data relative to mRCC patients on dialysis receiving either VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents, or mTOR inhibitors. Although prospective studies would definitely be warranted in these specific patient populations, all the available data suggest that mRCC patients on dialysis have the same outcome, both in terms of efficacy and safety, as mRCC patients with normal or marginally impaired kidney function, when treated with VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents and/or mTOR inhibitors.

  15. Detection of multiple viral infections in cattle and buffalo with suspected vesicular disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Sales, Érica Bravo; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; de Souza, Natália Mendes; da Silva, Josiane Aparecida Gonçalina; Souza, Giovana Gonçalves; Carani, Fernanda Rezek; Dos Santos, Alyane Figueiredo; Rivetti Júnior, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Vesicular diseases are of high importance for livestock, primarily because of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a high-morbidity disease that generates direct losses caused by low milk production, weight loss, and indirect losses because of the need for sanitary barriers. Other vesicular diseases are also of importance for livestock because of direct impacts or because their clinical signs may be confused with those of FMD. We report herein the detection of multiple infections in cattle with suspected vesicular disease in the Brazilian states of Amazonas (AM), Mato Grosso (MT), and Roraima. Thirty-seven epithelial samples from cattle and 1 sample from a buffalo were sent to the laboratory for testing for FMDV and similar disease agents. All samples from MT were positive for parapoxvirus (Pseudocowpox virus and Bovine papular stomatitis virus). In addition, 3 samples were positive for Bluetongue virus, and 5 samples were positive for Bovine herpesvirus 1 Among these samples, 1 was positive for all of these 3 agents. Only 2 samples from AM were negative for parapoxvirus. The molecular tests conducted in this study detected multiple infections, with a high prevalence of parapoxvirus.

  16. Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase, a novel target for antifungal agents. Molecular modelling studies in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Marek; Milewski, Sławomir; Mazerski, Jan; Borowski, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Fungal infections are a growing problem in contemporary medicine, yet only a few antifungal agents are used in clinical practice. In our laboratory we proposed the enzyme L-glutamine: D-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (EC 2.6.1.16) as a new target for antifungals. The structure of this enzyme consists of two domains, N-terminal and C-terminal ones, catalysing glutamine hydrolysis and sugar-phosphate isomerisation, respectively. In our laboratory a series of potent selective inhibitors of GlcN-6-P synthase have been designed and synthesised. One group of these compounds, including the most studied N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-l-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP), behave like glutamine analogs acting as active-site-directed inactivators, blocking the N-terminal, glutamine-binding domain of the enzyme. The second group of GlcN-6-P synthase inhibitors mimic the transition state of the reaction taking place in the C-terminal sugar isomerising domain. Surprisingly, in spite of the fact that glutamine is the source of nitrogen for a number of enzymes it turned out that the glutamine analogue FMDP and its derivatives are selective against GlcN-6-P synthase and they do not block other enzymes, even belonging to the same family of glutamine amidotransferases. Our molecular modelling studies of this phenomenon revealed that even within the family of related enzymes substantial differences may exist in the geometry of the active site. In the case of the glutamine amidotransferase family the glutamine binding site of GlcN-6-P synthase fits a different region of the glutamine conformational space than other amidotransferases. Detailed analysis of the interaction pattern for the best known, so far, inhibitor of the sugar isomerising domain, namely 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucitol-6-phosphate (ADGP), allowed us to suggest changes in the structure of the inhibitor that should improve the interaction pattern. The novel ligand was designed and synthesised. Biological experiments confirmed

  17. A single-reagent method for the speciation of chromium in natural waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry based on vesicular liquid coacervate extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsogas, George Z.; Giokas, Dimosthenis L.; Vlessidis, Athanasios G.; Evmiridis, Nicholaos P.

    2004-07-01

    The concept of liquid coacervate extraction (LCE) is deployed to accomplish metal speciation after appropriate derivatization of the target metallic species. The method involves the partitioning of the hydrophobic metal chelates, produced from the reaction of Cr with APDC, in the vesicular aggregates formed from an anionic surfactant with alkaline earth metals and a cosurfactant, which are separated from the bulk aqueous phase. Under the established experimental conditions, the method offers high reproducibility, very low detection limits and recoveries in the range of 95-104%. Moreover, the method affords high tolerance for EDTA, which is used as a masking agent in order to avoid interferences from co-extracted metals. Validation of the outlined method was performed by analysing a certified reference material (BCR 544) yielding recoveries higher than 94% for both Cr oxidation states.

  18. A single-reagent method for the speciation of chromium in natural waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry based on vesicular liquid coacervate extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsogas, George Z.; Giokas, Dimosthenis L. E-mail: dgiokas@cc.uoi.gr; Vlessidis, Athanasios G.; Evmiridis, Nicholaos P

    2004-07-30

    The concept of liquid coacervate extraction (LCE) is deployed to accomplish metal speciation after appropriate derivatization of the target metallic species. The method involves the partitioning of the hydrophobic metal chelates, produced from the reaction of Cr with APDC, in the vesicular aggregates formed from an anionic surfactant with alkaline earth metals and a cosurfactant, which are separated from the bulk aqueous phase. Under the established experimental conditions, the method offers high reproducibility, very low detection limits and recoveries in the range of 95-104%. Moreover, the method affords high tolerance for EDTA, which is used as a masking agent in order to avoid interferences from co-extracted metals. Validation of the outlined method was performed by analysing a certified reference material (BCR 544) yielding recoveries higher than 94% for both Cr oxidation states.

  19. Predicting spillover risk to non-target plants pre-release: Bikasha collaris a potential biological control agent of Chinese tallowtree (Triadica sebifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarantine host range tests accurately predict direct risk of biological control agents to non-target species. However, a well-known indirect effect of biological control of weeds releases is spillover damage to non-target species. Spillover damage may occur when the population of agents achieves ou...

  20. Delivery of Liquid Metal to the Target Vessels as Vascular Embolic Agent to Starve Diseased Tissues or Tumors to Death

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth relies heavily on the continuous blood and nutrients supply. Theoretically, it is an ideal therapeutic way of killing tumor by only vascular embolization. However, most of the existing vascular embolic agents are still rather insufficient to fulfill the real clinical need due to the reasons like: incomplete filling of target vasculature, being easily washed away by blood or body solution, or just producing toxicity to tissues. Here from an alternative way, the body temperature liquid metal, a kind of soft and highly compliant material, was proposed for the first time as blood vessel embolization agent for tumor physical therapy. With its unique capability of easy phase transition between liquid and solid state and sub-cooling behavior, such material can be fluently injected into the tiny vessels including ending capillaries and fully block them. The in vitro cytotoxicity experiments were performed which showed that treating localized diseased tissues through liquid metal embolic agent is acceptab...

  1. Maintenance Therapy in Ovarian Cancer with Targeted Agents Improves PFS and OS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Qian

    Full Text Available Maintenance therapy with targeted agents for prolonging remission for ovarian cancer patients remains controversial. As a result, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of using maintenance therapy with targeted agents for the treatment of ovarian cancer.From inception to January 2015, we searched for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs using the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrials.gov and EBSCO. Eligible trials included RCTs that evaluated standard chemotherapy which was either followed or not followed by targeted maintenance in patients with ovarian cancer who had been previously receiving adjunctive treatments, such as cytoreductive surgery and standard chemotherapy. The outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and incidence of adverse events.A total of 13 RCTs, which were published between 2006 and 2014, were found to be in accordance with our inclusion criteria. The primary meta-analysis indicated that both PFS and OS were statistically and significantly improved in the targeted maintenance therapy group as compared to the control group (PFS: HR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.75 to 0.95, p = 0.001; OS: HR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84 to 0.98, p = 0.02. When taking safety into consideration, the use of targeted agents was significantly correlated with increased risks of fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and hypertension. However, no significant differences were found in incidence rates of abdominal pain, constipation or joint pain.Our results indicate that targeted maintenance therapy clearly improves the survival of ovarian cancer patients but may also increase the incidence of adverse events. Additional randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter investigations will be required on a larger cohort of patients to verify our findings.

  2. Fabrication and evaluation of tumor-targeted positive MRI contrast agent based on ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haitao; Yue, Tao; Xu, Ke; Golzarian, Jafar; Yu, Jiahui; Huang, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Gd(III) chelate is currently used as positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in clinical diagnosis, but generally induces the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) due to the dissociated Gd(3+) from Gd(III) chelates. To develop a novel positive MRI contrast agent with low toxicity and high sensitivity, ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles were PEGylated via catechol-Mn chelation and conjugated with cRGD as active targeting function to tumor. Particularly, the MnO nanoparticles with a size of ca. 5nm were modified by α,β-poly(aspartic acid)-based graft polymer containing PEG and DOPA moieties and, meanwhile, conjugated with cRGD to produce the contrast agent with a size of ca. 100nm and a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 10.2mM(-1)S(-1). Such nanoscaled contrast agent integrated passive- and active-targeting function to tumor, and its efficient accumulation behavior in tumor was verified by in vivo distribution study. At the same time, the PEG moiety played a role of hydrophilic coating to improve the biocompatibility and stability under storing and physiological conditions, and especially might guarantee enough circulation time in blood. Moreover, in vivo MRI revealed a good and long-term effect of enhancing MRI signal for as-fabricated contrast agent while cell viability assay proved its acceptable cytotoxicity for MRI application. On the whole, the as-fabricated PEGylated and cRGD-functionalized contrast agent based on ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles showed a great potential to the T1-weighted MRI diagnosis of tumor.

  3. Targeted delivery of cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Huang, Jiwei; Tweedle, Michael F.; Schmidt, Carl; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2010-02-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of tumor boundaries and intraoperative detection of therapeutic margins are important oncologic principles for minimal recurrence rates and improved long-term outcomes. However, many existing cancer imaging tools are based on preoperative image acquisition and do not provide real-time intraoperative information that supports critical decision-making in the operating room. Method: Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microbubbles (MBs) and nanobubbles (NBs) were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method. The MB and NB surfaces were conjugated with CC49 antibody to target TAG-72 antigen, a human glycoprotein complex expressed in many epithelial-derived cancers. Multiple imaging agents were encapsulated in MBs and NBs for multimodal imaging. Both one-step and multi-step cancer targeting strategies were explored. Active MBs/NBs were also fabricated for therapeutic margin assessment in cancer ablation therapies. Results: The multimodal contrast agents and the cancer-targeting strategies were tested on tissue simulating phantoms, LS174 colon cancer cell cultures, and cancer xenograft nude mice. Concurrent multimodal imaging was demonstrated using fluorescence and ultrasound imaging modalities. Technical feasibility of using active MBs and portable imaging tools such as ultrasound for intraoperative therapeutic margin assessment was demonstrated in a biological tissue model. Conclusion: The cancer-specific multimodal contrast agents described in this paper have the potential for intraoperative detection of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  4. Evaluation of Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits Using a Nanoscale Ultrasound Contrast Agent Targeting ICAM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xie

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging in the early diagnosis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI using a nanoscale contrast agent targeting anti-intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (anti-ICAM-1.The targeted nanobubbles containing anti-ICAM-1 antibody were prepared using the avidin-biotin binding method. Human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HHSECs were cultured at the circumstances of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R and low temperature. The rabbit liver IRI model (I/R group was established using the Pringle's maneuver. The time-intensity curve of the liver contrast ultrasonographic images was plotted and the peak intensity, time to peak, and time of duration were calculated.The size of the targeted nanobubbles were 148.15 ± 39.75 nm and the concentration was 3.6-7.4 × 109/ml, and bound well with the H/R HHSECs. Animal contrast enhanced ultrasound images showed that the peak intensity and time of duration of the targeted nanobubbles were significantly higher than that of common nanobubbles in the I/R group, and the peak intensity and time of duration of the targeted nanobubbles in the I/R group were also significantly higher than that in the SO group.The targeted nanobubbles have small particle size, stable characteristic, and good targeting ability, which can assess hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury specifically, noninvasively, and quantitatively at the molecular level.

  5. Target-enclosing control for second-order multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y. J.; Li, R.; Wei, T. T.

    2015-09-01

    This paper poses the enclosing control problem with identical geometry for a group of targets which are either stationary or moving and offers consensus-based distributed control protocols. An estimator is first introduced to estimate the central position of the targets. We then propose a target-enclosing control law with velocity information based on the centre estimating algorithm and consensus theory. A target-enclosing control law without the velocity information is further designed. The Lyapunov theory and Lasalle's invariance principle are applied to show the convergence of the proposed control algorithms. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed strategy.

  6. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with cholesterol depleting agents. We show that MCF-7 CETP knockout BC cells pose less resistance towards cytotoxic compounds (Tamoxifen and Acetyl Plumbagin (AP)), and were more susceptible to intrinsic apoptosis. Analysis of differentially expressed genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), in vivo tumor inhibition, and in vitro phenotypic responses to AP revealed a unique CETP-centric cholesterol pathway involved in sensitizing ER+ BC cells to intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of cell line, tissue and patient data available in publicly available databases linked elevated CETP expression to cancer, cancer relapse and overall poor survival. Overall, our findings highlight CETP as a pharmacologically relevant and unexploited cellular target in BC. The work also highlights AP as a promising chemical entity for preclinical investigations as a cholesterol depleting anticancer therapeutic agent.

  7. Identification of poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a target protein of immunosuppressive agent 15-deoxyspergualin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murahashi, Masataka; Simizu, Siro; Morioka, Masahiko [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Umezawa, Kazuo, E-mail: umezawa@aichi-med-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Target Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yazako-Karimata, Nagakute 480-1195 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent being clinically used. Unlike tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, it does not inhibit the calcineurin pathway, and its mechanism of action and target molecule have not been elucidated. Therefore, we previously prepared biotinylated derivative of DSG (BDSG) to fish up the target protein. In the present research, we identified poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a DSG-binding protein using this probe. DSG was confirmed to bind to PCBP2 by pull-down assay. Intracellular localization of PCBP2 was changed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by DSG treatment. DSG inhibited the cell growth, and over-expression of PCBP2 reduced the anti-proliferative activity of DSG. PCBP2 is known to regulate various proteins including STAT1/2. Thus, we found PCBP2 as the first target protein of DSG that can explain the immunosuppressive activity. -- Highlights: •Fifteen-deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent clinically used. •We have identified PCBP2, an RNA-binding protein, as a molecular target of DSG. •Alteration of PCBP2 activity may explain the immunosuppressive activity of DSG.

  8. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  9. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Radiotherapy has a longstanding and well-defined role in the treatment of resectable rectal cancer to reduce the historically high risk of local recurrence. In more advanced borderline or unresectable cases, where the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is breached or threatened according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), despite optimized local multimodality treatment and the gains achieved by modern high quality total mesorectal excision (TME), at least half the patients fail to achieve sufficient downstaging with current schedules. Many do not achieve an R0 resection. In less locally advanced cases, even if local control is achieved, this confers only a small impact on distant metastases and a significant proportion of patients (30-40%) still subsequently develop metastatic disease. In fact, distant metastases have now become the predominant cause of failure in rectal cancer. Therefore, increasing the intensity and efficacy of chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy by integrating additional cytotoxics and biologically targetted agents seems an appealing strategy to explore-with the aim of enhancing curative resection rates and improving distant control and survival. However, to date, we lack validated biomarkers for these biological agents apart from wild-type KRAS. For cetuximab, the appearance of an acneiform rash is associated with response, but low levels of magnesium appear more controversial. There are no molecular biomarkers for bevacizumab. Although some less invasive clinical markers have been proposed for bevacizumab, such as circulating endothelial cells (CECS), circulating levels of VEGF and the development of overt hypertension, these biomarkers have not been validated and are observed to emerge only after a trial of the agent. We also lack a simple method of ongoing monitoring of 'on target' effects of these biological agents, which could determine and pre-empt the development of resistance, prior to radiological and clinical assessessments or

  10. Targeting and timing promotional activities : An agent-based model for the takeoff of new products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delre, S. A.; Jager, W.; Bijmolt, T. H. A.; Janssen, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Many marketing efforts focus on promotional activities that support the launch of new products. Promotional strategies may play a crucial role in the early stages of the product life cycle, and determine to a large extent the diffusion of a new product. This paper proposes an agent-based model to si

  11. Targeting and timing promotional activities : An agent-based model for the takeoff of new products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delre, S. A.; Jager, W.; Bijmolt, T. H. A.; Janssen, M. A.

    Many marketing efforts focus on promotional activities that support the launch of new products. Promotional strategies may play a crucial role in the early stages of the product life cycle, and determine to a large extent the diffusion of a new product. This paper proposes an agent-based model to

  12. Multi-agent Negotiation Mechanisms for Statistical Target Classification in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent availability of low cost and miniaturized hardware has allowedwireless sensor networks (WSNs to retrieve audio and video data in real worldapplications, which has fostered the development of wireless multimedia sensor networks(WMSNs. Resource constraints and challenging multimedia data volume makedevelopment of efficient algorithms to perform in-network processing of multimediacontents imperative. This paper proposes solving problems in the domain of WMSNs fromthe perspective of multi-agent systems. The multi-agent framework enables flexible networkconfiguration and efficient collaborative in-network processing. The focus is placed ontarget classification in WMSNs where audio information is retrieved by microphones. Todeal with the uncertainties related to audio information retrieval, the statistical approachesof power spectral density estimates, principal component analysis and Gaussian processclassification are employed. A multi-agent negotiation mechanism is specially developed toefficiently utilize limited resources and simultaneously enhance classification accuracy andreliability. The negotiation is composed of two phases, where an auction based approach isfirst exploited to allocate the classification task among the agents and then individual agentdecisions are combined by the committee decision mechanism. Simulation experiments withreal world data are conducted and the results show that the proposed statistical approachesand negotiation mechanism not only reduce memory and computation requi

  13. BR55: a lipopeptide-based VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound contrast agent for molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Sibylle; Tardy, Isabelle; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Brochot, Jean; von Wronski, Mathew; Passantino, Lisa; Schneider, Michel

    2010-02-01

    BR55, an ultrasound contrast agent functionalized with a heterodimer peptide targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating its potential for specific tumor detection. The targeted contrast agent was prepared by incorporation of a biospecific lipopeptide into the microbubble membrane. Experiments were performed in vitro to demonstrate the binding capacities of BR55 microbubbles on immobilized receptor proteins and on various endothelial or transfected cells expressing VEGFR2. The performance of BR55 microbubbles was compared with that of streptavidin-conjugated microbubbles targeted to the same receptor by coupling them to a biotinylated antibody. The specificity of BR55 binding to human and mouse endothelial cells was determined in competition experiments with the free lipopeptide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or a VEGFR2-specific antibody. Molecular ultrasound imaging of VEGFR2 was performed in an orthotopic breast tumor model in rats using a nondestructive, contrast-specific imaging mode. BR55 was shown to bind specifically to the immobilized recombinant VEGFR2 under flow (dynamic conditions). BR55 accumulation on the target over time was similar to that of microbubbles bearing a specific antibody. BR55 avidly bound to cells expressing VEGFR2, and the pattern of microbubble distribution was correlated with the pattern of receptor expression determined by immunocytochemistry. The binding of targeted microbubbles on cells was competed off by an excess of free lipopeptide, the natural ligand (VEGF) and by a VEGFR2-specific antibody (P < 0.001). Although selected for the human receptor, the VEGFR2-binding lipopeptide was also shown to recognize the rodent receptor. Tumor perfusion was assessed during the vascular phase of BR55, and then the malignant lesion was highlighted by specific accumulation of the targeted microbubbles on tumoral endothelium. The presence of VEGFR2 was

  14. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  15. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species.

  16. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species. PMID:25376303

  17. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dye-labeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection.

  18. 肝癌分子靶向药物治疗的研究进展%Research progress of molecular-targeted agents in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏山; 张耀军; 徐立

    2009-01-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy is a new method and tendency in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, sorafinib, a multi-targeted gent, is the only one proved to be effective in improving the survival of patients with advanced HCC. Sorafinib is also the first line systemic agent for advanced HCC. Other multi-targeted agents, such as sunitinib, are also proved to be effective. Erlotinib, gefitinib and eetuximab, which target epidermal growth factor receptor, show effectiveness but still need further investigation. Bevacizumab, which targets vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, shows excellent results and deserves more clinical trials. The effects of bortezomib, sirolimus and imatinib, which target other pathways, are still under investigation. The future studies of molecular-targeted therapy for HCC should be focused on the combination of different targeted medicine, and combination of molecular-targeted therapy and chemotherapy, as well as individualized therapy.

  19. Vesicular uptake of macromolecules by human placental amniotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharshiner, Rita; Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2017-09-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that unidirectional vesicular transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion plays a primary role in regulating amniotic fluid volume. Our objective was to explore vesicle type, vesicular uptake and intracellular distribution of vesicles in human amnion cells using high- and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Placental amnion was obtained at cesarean section and amnion cells were prepared and cultured. At 20%-50% confluence, the cells were incubated with fluorophore conjugated macromolecules for 1-30 min at 22 °C or 37 °C. Fluorophore labeled macromolecules were selected as markers of receptor-mediated caveolar and clathrin-coated vesicular uptake as well as non-specific endocytosis. After fluorophore treatment, the cells were fixed, imaged and vesicles counted using Imaris(®) software. Vesicular uptake displayed first order saturation kinetics with half saturation times averaging 1.3 min at 37 °C compared to 4.9 min at 22 °C, with non-specific endocytotic uptake being more rapid at both temperatures. There was extensive cell-to-cell variability in uptake rate. Under super-resolution microscopy, the pattern of intracellular spatial distribution was distinct for each macromolecule. Co-localization of fluorescently labeled macromolecules was very low at vesicular dimensions. In human placental amnion cells, 1) vesicular uptake of macromolecules is rapid, consistent with the concept that vesicular transcytosis across the amnion plays a role in the regulation of amniotic fluid volume; 2) uptake is temperature dependent and variable among individual cells; 3) the unique intracellular distributions suggest distinct functions for each vesicle type; 4) non-receptor mediated vesicular uptake may be a primary vesicular uptake mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins-a rationally designed and engineered anticancer agent for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhen LIU; Shi-Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins are a sort of rationally designed and engineered anticancer recombinant fusion proteins representing a novel class of agents for cancer therapy.Bacterial protein toxins have long been known as the primary virulence factor(s) for a variety of pathogenic bacteria and are the most powerful human poisons.On the other hand,it has been well documented that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR),making up the uPA system,are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and tumor cell lines.The expression of uPA system is highly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis.To exploit these characteristics in the design of tumor cell-selective cytotoxins,two prominent bacterial protein toxins,i.e.,the diphtheria toxin and anthrax toxin are deliberately engineered through placing a sequence targeted specifically by the uPA system to form anticancer recombinant fusion proteins.These uPA system-targeted bacterial protein toxins are activated selectively on the surface of uPA systemexpressing tumor cells,thereby killing these cells.This article provides a review on the latest progress in the exploitation of these recombinant fusion proteins as potent tumoricidal agents.It is perceptible that the strategies for cancer therapy are being innovated by this novel therapeutic approach.

  1. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  2. From agents to objects: sexist attitudes and neural responses to sexualized targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Eberhardt, Jennifer L; Fiske, Susan T

    2011-03-01

    Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social-cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceivers' sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In Study 1, male (but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs ("handle") and clothed women with third-person action verbs ("handles") than the inverse, as compared to their less sexist peers. In Study 2, hostile sexism correlated negatively with activation of regions associated with mental state attribution-medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, temporal poles-but only when viewing sexualized women. Heterosexual men best recognized images of sexualized female bodies (but not faces), as compared with other targets' bodies; however, neither face nor body recognition was related to hostile sexism, suggesting that the fMRI findings are not explained by more or less attention to sexualized female targets. Diminished mental state attribution is not unique to targets that people prefer to avoid, as in dehumanization of stigmatized people. The current studies demonstrate that appetitive social targets may elicit a similar response depending on perceivers' attitudes toward them.

  3. Targeted sustained delivery of antineoplastic agent with multicomponent polylactide stereocomplex micelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kexin; Li, Di; Guan, Jingjing; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Zhongtang; Gu, Jingkai; Liu, Tongjun; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-01-05

    A c(RGDfC)-decorated polylactide stereocomplex micelle (cRGD-SCM) was prepared through the stereocomplex and hydrophobic interactions among 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D-lactide) (4-arm PEG-b-PDLA), methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (mPEG-b-PLLA), and c(RGDfC)-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (cRGD-PEG-b-PLLA) for targeted treatment of αvβ3 integrin-positive C26 colon cancer. Doxorubicin (DOX), a model antitumor drug, was loaded into cRGD-SCM with a diameter of approximately 100nm, and the drug loading efficiency was 45.9wt.%. cRGD-SCM/DOX with a sustained release pattern exhibited prolonged circulation time, upregulated accumulation in tumor, enhanced tumor inhibition, and decreased side effects compared with free DOX and non-targeting SCM/DOX in vivo. More interestingly, the targeting ligand in the terminal of PEG can be easily replaced with other targeting groups according to the different types of malignancies. Therefore, the cRGD-decorated platform might be a promising targeted drug delivery system for personal chemotherapy clinically.

  4. Infection of two non-target grasshoppers by the biological control agent Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum in the Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, E. N.; Eilenberg, J.; Langewald, J.;

    2006-01-01

    Fungal isolates from grasshoppers of the family Acrididae are suspected to be less virulent to grasshoppers of the family Pyrgomorphidae. The biological control agent Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum was isolated from an acridid and is thus hypothesized to be less virulent to pyrgomorphids....... The susceptibility of two non-target pyrgomorphids, Pyrgomorpha cognata and Poekilocerus bufonius hieroglyphicus, to M. anisopliae was tested in the field. Results show that P. cognata under field conditions is as susceptible to infection by M. anisopliae as acridids, whereas P. b. hieroglyphicus is less susceptible...

  5. Preparation and bioevaluation of a 99mTc-labeled chlorambucil analog as a tumor targeting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Drishty; Korde, Aruna; Venkatesh, Meera; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2009-09-01

    Chlorambucil belongs to a group of nitrogen mustards which are used for the treatment of variety of cancers. Hence, a chlorambucil derivative has been radiolabeled with [(99m)Tc(CO)(3)(H(2)O)(3)](+) core and its efficacy as a tumor targeting agent has been evaluated. Radiochemical yield of the complex was >98% as observed by HPLC. The in vitro studies in MCF-7 breast cancer cells showed about 30% inhibition of the radiolabeled complex in presence of the cold chlorambucil derivative. Biodistribution studies in Swiss mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumor showed an uptake of 3.2+/-0.3%ID/g at 3h.p.i.

  6. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Qu, Fulian; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2015-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3'-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, an oral irreversible BTK inhibitor, has emerged as a promising targeted therapy for patients with B-cell malignancies. The present review discusses the current understanding of BTK-mediated BCR signaling in the biology and pathobiology of normal and malignant B cells, and the cellular interaction with the tumor microenvironment. The data on ibrutinib in the preclinical and clinical settings is also discussed, and perspectives for the future use of ibrutinib are outlined.

  7. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  8. Novel Approaches for Targeting Antiviral Agents in the Treatment of Arena-, Bunya-, Flavi-, and Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    J. 25:A292, 1979. 24. Szoka, Jr., F. and Papahadjopoulos, D. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 75:4194, 1978. 25. Fidler, I.J., Raz, A., Fogler , W.E., Kirsh, R...Bugelski, P. and Poste, G. Cancer Res. 40:4460, 1980. 26. Fidler, I.J., Barnes, Z., Fogler , W.E., Kirsh, R., Bugelski, P. and Poste, G. Cancer Res...Alving, C.R., Rill, W., Swartz, G.M. and Canonico, P. Antimicrob. Agents and Chemo. 27:903, 1985. 33. Fidler, I.J., Sone, S., Fogler , W.E. and

  9. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  10. Energy- and glutathione metabolism in spermatids as possible targets for antispermatogenic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. den Boer (Piet)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIt has been reported that a number of drugs and chemicals act preferentially on spermatogenesis (Fox & Fox, 1967; Patanelli, 1975). A specific action of a toxic compound on spermatogenesis suggests a specific target in the testicular tubules and may point to a unique. or at least rare pr

  11. Biotin-tagged platinum(iv) complexes as targeted cytostatic agents against breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Nafees; Sadia, Nasreen; Zhu, Chengcheng; Luo, Cheng; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2017-09-05

    A biotin-guided platinum(IV) complex is highly cytotoxic against breast cancer cells but hypotoxic against mammary epithelial cells. The mono-biotinylated Pt(IV) complex is superior to the di-biotinylated one and hence a promising drug candidate for the targeted therapy of breast cancer.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of HER2-Targeted Agents for Breast Cancer with HER2-Overexpression: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyan Yu

    Full Text Available Clinical trials of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeted agents added to standard treatment have been efficacious for HER2-positive (HER2+ advanced breast cancer. To our knowledge, no meta-analysis has evaluated HER2-targeted therapy including trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1 and pertuzumab for HER2-positive breast caner and ranked the targeted treatments. We performed a network meta-analysis of both direct and indirect comparisons to evaluate the effect of adding HER2-targeted agents to standard treatment and examined side effects.We performed a Bayesian-framework network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare 6 HER2-targeted treatment regimens and 1 naïve standard treatment (NST, without any-targeted drugs in targeted treatment of HER2+ breast cancer in adults. These treatment regimens were T-DM1, LC (lapatinib, HC (trastuzumab, PEC (pertuzumab, LHC (lapatinib and trastuzumab, and PEHC (pertuzumab and trastuzumab. The main outcomes were overall survival and response rates. We also examined side effects of rash, LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction, fatigue, and gastrointestinal disorders, and performed subgroup analysis for the different treatment regimens in metastatic or advanced breast cancer.We identified 25 articles of 21 trials, with data for 11,276 participants. T-DM1 and PEHC were more efficient drug regimens with regard to overall survival as compared with LHC, LC, HC and PEC. The incidence of treatment-related rash occurs more frequently in the patients who received LC treatment regimen than PEHC and T-DM1 and HC. In subgroup analysis, T-DM1 was associated with increased overall survival as compared with LC and HC. PEHC was associated with increased overall response as compared with LC, HC, and NST.Overall, the regimen of T-DM1 as well as pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel is efficacious with fewer side effects as compared with other regimens, especially for advanced HER2

  13. Vesicular stomatitis outbreak in the southwestern United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Brian J; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M; Creekmore, Lynn; Schiltz, John

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease primarily affecting horses and cattle when it occurs in the United States. Outbreaks in the southwestern United States occur sporadically, with initial cases typically occurring in Texas, New Mexico, or Arizona and subsequent cases occurring in a northward progression. The viruses causing vesicular stomatitis can be transmitted by direct contact of lesioned animals with other susceptible animals, but transmission is primarily through arthropod vectors. In 2012, an outbreak of vesicular stomatitis in the United States occurred that was caused by Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus serotype. Overall, 51 horses on 36 premises in 2 states were confirmed positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the virus indicated that it was most closely related to viruses detected in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, in 2000.

  14. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions r...... stating that SVDV originated through co-infection, recombination, and a single anthroponotic event, during large viral meningitis epidemics around 1960/1961 involving the ancestral serotypes. The exact geographical origin of SVDV may remain untestable due to historical aspects....

  15. Interacción de la radioterapia con los nuevos agentes con dianas moleculares Interaction of radiotherapy and new agents with molecular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez López

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La radioquimioterapia supuso uno de los mayores logros en el tratamiento del cáncer en las últimas décadas, aunque con una importante toxicidad para los enfermos. La investigación desarrollada recientemente en la biología molecular del cáncer ha permitido conocer los cambios genéticos y moleculares que determinan la transformación maligna celular, lo que ha conducido a identificar moléculas claves convirtiéndolas en dianas moleculares además de revolucionar los conceptos radiobiológicos de respuesta celular a las radiaciones y de radiorresistencia. Los nuevos agentes contra dianas moleculares poseen mayor especificidad y menos efectos adversos, lo que les hace más atractivos que la quimioterapia para ser combinados con radioterapia. Pueden actuar inhibiendo las señales de transducción intracelular, modulando el ciclo celular, la apoptosis o inhibiendo la angiogénesis. El efecto de la radioterapia puede potenciarse a través de una inhibición de la repoblación celular, mejoría de la oxigenación tumoral, redistribución durante el ciclo celular, inhibición de la invasión y metástasis, y aumento de la radiosensibilidad. Los datos disponibles apoyan su eficacia y aplicabilidad en estudios preclínicos y clínicos en diversos modelos tumorales y abren una vía esperanzadora de cambio en el tratamiento del cáncer.Radiochemotherapy represents one of the greatest achievements in cancer treatment in recent decades, although it involves significant toxicity for patients. Research developed recently in the molecular biology of cancer has enabled understanding of the genetic and molecular changes that determine malign cellular transformation, which has led to the identification of key molecules, converting them into molecular targets that have led to a revolution in radiobiological concepts of cellular response to radiations and radioresistance. The new agents against molecular targets possess greater specificity and less adverse

  16. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10  cm−1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12  ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background. PMID:23223993

  17. Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Mayara Klimuk; Toma, Sergio Hiroshi; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Cervantes Rodríguez, Hernán Joel; Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Luz, Maciel Santos; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Toma, Henrique Eisi; Poliselli Farsky, Sandra Helena; Araki, Koiti

    2015-01-01

    Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM(-1)s(-1) in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

  18. Critical issues related to transfersomes - novel vesicular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kombath Ravindran Vinod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly apparent that vesicular drug delivery elicits modest possessions in drug targeting. Transfersomes are a form of elastic or deformable vesicle, which were first introduced in the early 1990s. Elas ticity can be achieved by using an edge activator in the lipid bilayer structure. Molecules greater than 500 Da normally do not cross the skin. This prevents epicutaneous delivery of the high molecular weight therapeutics as well as non-invasive transcutaneous immunisation. Transdermal route will always remain a lucrative area for drug delivery. With the advent of new categories of drugs like peptides this route has captured more focus to combat the problems related to their delivery through oral route. But the transdermal route is equally filled with the hopes and disappointments as the transport of drug through this route faces many problems especially for the large molecules. To answer this problem many approaches were adopted. One of the very recent approaches is the use of ultra-deformable carrier systems (transfersomes. They have been used as drug carriers for a range of small molecules, peptides, proteins and vaccines, both in vitro and in vivo. Transfersomes penetrate through the pores of stratum corneum which are smaller than its size and get into the underlying viable skin in intact form. This is because of its deformable nature. The aim of this article is explanation the formation of micelle and vesicles, various types of vesicles, specifically focusing on transfersomes.

  19. Drugs targeting the mitochondrial pore act as citotoxic and cytostatic agents in temozolomide-resistant glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Lucia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High grade gliomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat and despite surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide-based chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioma patients is poor. Resistance to temozolomide is the major barrier to effective therapy. Alternative therapeutic approaches have been shown to be ineffective for the treatment of genetically unselected glioma patients. Thus, novel therapies are needed. Mitochondria-directed chemotherapy is an emerging tool to combat cancer, and inner mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT represents a target for the development of cytotoxic drugs. A number of agents are able to induce MPT and some of them target MPT-pore (MPTP components that are selectively up-regulated in cancer, making these agents putative cancer cell-specific drugs. Objective The aim of this paper is to report a comprehensive analysis of the effects produced by selected MPT-inducing drugs (Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, CD437 in a temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells. Methods EGFRvIII expression has been assayed by RT-PCR. EGFR amplification and PTEN deletion have been assayed by differential-PCR. Drugs effect on cell viability has been tested by crystal violet assay. MPT has been tested by JC1 staining. Drug cytostatic effect has been tested by mitotic index analysis. Drug cytotoxic effect has been tested by calcein AM staining. Apoptosis has been assayed by Hoechst incorporation and Annexine V binding assay. Authophagy has been tested by acridine orange staining. Results We performed a molecular and genetic characterization of ADF cells and demonstrated that this line does not express the EGFRvIII and does not show EGFR amplification. ADF cells do not show PTEN mutation but differential PCR data indicate a hemizygous deletion of PTEN gene. We analyzed the response of ADF cells to Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, and CD437. Our data demonstrate that MPT-inducing agents produce concentration

  20. Actively targeted gold nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizer agents: an in vivo head and neck cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Mizrachi, Aviram; Motiei, Menachem; Bragilovski, Dimitri; Lubimov, Leon; Levi, Mattan; Hilly, Ohad; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2016-01-01

    A major problem in the treatment of head and neck cancer today is the resistance of tumors to traditional radiation therapy, which results in 40% local failure, despite aggressive treatment. The main objective of this study was to develop a technique which will overcome tumor radioresistance by increasing the radiation absorbed in the tumor using cetuximab targeted gold nanoparticles (GNPs), in clinically relevant energies and radiation dosage. In addition, we have investigated the biological mechanisms underlying tumor shrinkage and the in vivo toxicity of GNP. The results showed that targeted GNP enhanced the radiation effect and had a significant impact on tumor growth (P < 0.001). The mechanism of radiation enhancement was found to be related to earlier and greater apoptosis (TUNEL assay), angiogenesis inhibition (by CD34 level) and diminished repair mechanism (PCNA staining). Additionally, GNPs have been proven to be safe as no evidence of toxicity has been observed.

  1. The science of direct-acting antiviral and host-targeted agent therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral drugs targeting two major steps of the HCV life cycle, polyprotein processing and replication, and cyclophilin inhibitors, that target a host cell protein required to interact with the replication complex, have reached clinical development. In order to achieve a sustained virological response, that is, a cure of the HCV infection, it is necessary to shut down virus production, to maintain viral inhibition throughout treatment and to induce a significant, slower second-phase decline in HCV RNA levels that leads to definitive clearance of infected cells. Recent findings suggest that the interferon era is coming to an end in hepatitis C therapy and HCV infection can be cured by all-oral interferon-free treatment regimens within 12 to 24 weeks. Further results are awaited that will allow the establishment of an ideal first-line all-oral, interferon-free treatment regimen for patients with chronic HCV infection.

  2. From Agents to Objects: Sexist Attitudes and Neural Responses to Sexualized Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Cikara, Mina; Eberhardt, Jennifer L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2010-01-01

    Agency attribution is a hallmark of mind perception; thus, diminished attributions of agency may disrupt social-cognition processes typically elicited by human targets. The current studies examine the effect of perceivers’ sexist attitudes on associations of agency with, and neural responses to, images of sexualized and clothed men and women. In study 1, male (but not female) participants with higher hostile sexism scores more quickly associated sexualized women with first-person action verbs...

  3. CFTR chloride channel is a molecular target of the natural cancer preventive agent resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, B O; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Wang, Xue; Hou, Shuguang; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenol compound resveratrol (RES) has been receiving wide attention because of its variety of health benefits and favourable biological activities. Previous studies have shown that RES could induce intestinal chloride secretion in mouse jejunum and stimulate cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion in T84, primary cultured murine nasal septal and human sinonasal epithelial cells, but the precise molecular target is not clear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that RES may stimulate the activity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. Using cell-based fluorescent assays, transepithelial short-circuit current measurements and excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis; we found that RES dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl- channel activities, which was reversed by CFTR inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH101. Transepithelial Cl- secretion by CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by RES with half maximal concentration -80 microM. Intracellular cAMP content was not elevated by RES in FRT cells. Excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis indicated that RES significantly increased the chloride currents of CFTR. In ex vivo studies, RES stimulated the transmucosal chloride current of rat colon by short-circuit current assay. These data suggested that CFTR is a molecular target of RES. Our findings add a new molecular target to RES, and RES may represent a novel class of therapeutic lead compounds in treating CFTR-related diseases including CF and habitual constipation.

  4. Protective effect of Qnr on agents other than quinolones that target DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, George A; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    Qnr is a plasmid-encoded and chromosomally determined protein that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from inhibition by quinolones. Despite its prevalence worldwide and existence prior to the discovery of quinolones, its native function is not known. Other synthetic compounds and natural products also target bacterial topoisomerases. A number were studied as molecular probes to gain insight into how Qnr acts. Qnr blocked inhibition by synthetic compounds with somewhat quinolone-like structure that target the GyrA subunit, such as the 2-pyridone ABT-719, the quinazoline-2,4-dione PD 0305970, and the spiropyrimidinetrione pyrazinyl-alkynyl-tetrahydroquinoline (PAT), indicating that Qnr is not strictly quinolone specific, but Qnr did not protect against GyrA-targeting simocyclinone D8 despite evidence that both simocyclinone D8 and Qnr affect DNA binding to gyrase. Qnr did not affect the activity of tricyclic pyrimidoindole or pyrazolopyridones, synthetic inhibitors of the GyrB subunit, or nonsynthetic GyrB inhibitors, such as coumermycin A1, novobiocin, gyramide A, or microcin B17.Thus, in this set of compounds the protective activity of Qnr was confined to those that, like quinolones, trap gyrase on DNA in cleaved complexes.

  5. VGLUT3 (vesicular glutamate transporter type 3) contribution to the regulation of serotonergic transmission and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amilhon, Bénédicte; Lepicard, Eve; Renoir, Thibault; Mongeau, Raymond; Popa, Daniela; Poirel, Odile; Miot, Stéphanie; Gras, Christelle; Gardier, Alain M; Gallego, Jorge; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence; Gasnier, Bruno; Giros, Bruno; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2010-02-10

    Three different subtypes of H(+)-dependent carriers (named VGLUT1-3) concentrate glutamate into synaptic vesicles before its exocytotic release. Neurons using other neurotransmitter than glutamate (such as cholinergic striatal interneurons and 5-HT neurons) express VGLUT3. It was recently reported that VGLUT3 increases acetylcholine vesicular filling, thereby, stimulating cholinergic transmission. This new regulatory mechanism is herein designated as vesicular-filling synergy (or vesicular synergy). In the present report, we found that deletion of VGLUT3 increased several anxiety-related behaviors in adult and in newborn mice as early as 8 d after birth. This precocious involvement of a vesicular glutamate transporter in anxiety led us to examine the underlying functional implications of VGLUT3 in 5-HT neurons. On one hand, VGLUT3 deletion caused a significant decrease of 5-HT(1A)-mediated neurotransmission in raphe nuclei. On the other hand, VGLUT3 positively modulated 5-HT transmission of a specific subset of 5-HT terminals from the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. VGLUT3- and VMAT2-positive serotonergic fibers show little or no 5-HT reuptake transporter. These results unravel the existence of a novel subset of 5-HT terminals in limbic areas that might play a crucial role in anxiety-like behaviors. In summary, VGLUT3 accelerates 5-HT transmission at the level of specific 5-HT terminals and can exert an inhibitory control at the raphe level. Furthermore, our results suggest that the loss of VGLUT3 expression leads to anxiety-associated behaviors and should be considered as a potential new target for the treatment of this disorder.

  6. Integration of targeted agents in the neo-adjuvant treatment of gastro-esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, D G; Ilson, D H

    2009-11-01

    Pre- and peri-operative strategies are becoming standard for the management of localized gastro-esophageal cancer. For localized gastric/gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer there are conflicting data that a peri-operative approach with cisplatin-based chemotherapy improves survival, with the benefits seen in esophageal cancer likely less than a 5-10% incremental improvement. Further trends toward improvement in local control and survival, when combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy are given pre-operatively, are suggested by recent phase III trials. In fit patients, a significant survival benefit with pre-operative chemoradiation is seen in those patients who achieve a pathologic complete response. In esophageal/GEJ cancer, definitive chemoradiation is now considered in medically inoperable patients. In squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, surgery after primary chemoradiation is not clearly associated with an improved overall survival, however, local control may be better. In localized gastric/GEJ cancer, the integration of bevacizumab with pre-operative chemotherapy is being explored in large randomized studies, and with chemoradiotherapy in pilot trials. The addition of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor and anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibody treatment to pre-operative chemoradiation continues to be explored. Early results show the integration of targeted therapy is feasible. Metabolic imaging can predict early response to pre-operative chemotherapy and biomarkers may further predict response to pre-operative chemo-targeted therapy. A multimodality approach to localized gastro-esophageal cancer has resulted in better outcomes. For T3 or node-positive disease, surgery alone is no longer considered appropriate and neo-adjuvant therapy is recommended. The future of neo-adjuvant strategies in this disease will involve the individualization of therapy with the integration of molecular signatures, targeted therapy, metabolic imaging

  7. Gold Nanorods Targeted to Delta Opioid Receptor: Plasmon-Resonant Contrast and Photothermal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvar C. Black

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted gold nanorods were investigated for applications in both diagnostic imaging and disease treatment with cellular resolution. The nanorods were tested in two genetically engineered cell lines derived from the human colon carcinoma HCT-116, a model for studying ligand-receptor interactions. One of these lines was modified to express delta opioid receptor (δOR and green fluorescent protein, whereas the other was receptor free and expressed a red fluorescent protein, to serve as the control. Deltorphin, a high-affinity ligand for δOR, was stably attached to the gold nanorods through a thiol-terminated linker. In a mixed population of cells, we demonstrated selective imaging and destruction of receptor-expressing cells while sparing those cells that did not express the receptor. The molecularly targeted nanorods can be used as an in vitro ligand-binding and cytotoxic treatment assay platform and could potentially be applied in vivo for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes with endoscopic technology.

  8. Challenges of clinical trial design for targeted agents against pediatric leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Jay Mussai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 40 years have seen significant improvements in both event-free and overall survival for children with acute lymphoblastic or acute myeloid leukemia (ALL or AML respectively. Serial national and international clinical trials have optimised the use of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and, along with improvements in supportive care that have enabled the delivery of more intensive regimens, have been responsible for the major improvements in patient outcome seen over the past few decades,. The benefits of dose intensification, however, have likely now been maximised, and over the same period, the identification of new cytotoxic drugs has been limited.As the biology of leukemogenesis has become better understood, key molecules and intracellular pathways have been identified that offer the possibility of targeting directly the leukemia cells whilst sparing normal cells. Consequently, there is now a drive to develop novel leukemia-specific or ‘targeted’ therapies. These new classes of drugs will have mechanisms of action, toxicities and therapeutic indices quite different from conventional cytotoxic drugs previously encountered, thus rendering current clinical trial methodologies inappropriate; clinical trial methods will need to be adapted to accommodate these features of these new classes of drugs. This review will address the challenges and some of the techniques for developing clinical trials for targeted therapies.

  9. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells.

  10. NADPH Oxidase Enzymes in Skin Fibrosis: Molecular Targets and Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft versus host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms that Nox enzymes influence specific skin fibrotic disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists. PMID:24155025

  11. Human rhinovirus 3C protease as a potential target for the development of antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanga, Q May; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2007-02-01

    As the major cause of the common cold in children and adults, human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a group of small single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses. HRVs translate their genetic information into a polyprotein precursor that is mainly processed by a virally encoded 3C protease (3Cpro) to generate functional viral proteins and enzymes. It has been shown that the enzymatic activity of HRV 3Cpro is essential to viral replication. The 3Cpro is distinguished from most other proteases by the fact that it has a cysteine nucleophile but with a chymotrypsin-like serine protease folding. This unique protein structure together with its essential role in viral replication made the 3Cpro an excellent target for antiviral intervention. In recent years, considerable efforts have been made in the development of antiviral compounds targeting this enzyme. To further facilitate the design of potent 3C protease inhibitors for therapeutic use, this review summarizes the biochemical and structural characterization conducted on HRV 3C protease along with the recent progress on the development of 3C protease inhibitors.

  12. NADPH oxidase enzymes in skin fibrosis: molecular targets and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Olubukola; Mamalis, Andrew; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-05-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review, we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms by which Nox enzymes influence specific fibrotic skin disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists.

  13. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-12-08

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency.

  14. Novel platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a wogonin derivative as multi-targeted anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaodong; Xu, Gang; Chen, Feihong; Fang, Lei; Gou, Shaohua

    2017-04-15

    Platinum-based complexes like cisplatin and oxaliplatin are well known the mainstay of chemotherapy regimens on clinic. Wogonin, a natural product that possesses wide biological activities, is now in phase I clinical test as an anticancer agent in China. Herein reported are a series of novel Pt(IV) complexes that conjugated a wogonin derivative (compound 3) to the axial position via a linker group. After being tethered to the platinum(IV) complexes, the wogonin derivative provided multiple anticancer effects, especially in compound 10, a fusion containing wogonin and cisplatin units. Compound 10 not only inherited the genotoxicity from cisplatin, but also obtained the COX inhibitory property from the wogonin derivative. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that compound 10 caused the accumulation of ROS, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and then activated the p53 pathway. Overall, the research demonstrates that the "integrative" prodrug can be an effective strategy to promote the anticancer potency of Pt-based drugs for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetic therapy: use of agents targeting deacetylation and methylation in cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho AS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Allen S Ho,1 Sevin Turcan,1 Timothy A Chan1,2 1Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The emergence of epigenetic mechanisms as key regulators of gene expression has led to dramatic advances in understanding cancer biology. Driven by complex layers that include aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification, epigenetic aberrations have emerged as critical processes that disrupt cellular machinery and homeostasis. Recent discoveries have already translated into successful clinical trials and improved patient care, with several agents approved for hematologic disease and others undergoing study. As the field matures, substantial challenges persist that will require resolution. These include the need to decipher more fully the interplay between the epigenetic and genetic machinery, patient selection and improving treatment efficacy in solid tumors, and optimizing combination therapies to counteract chemoresistance and minimize adverse effects. Here, we review recent progress in epigenetic treatments and consider their implications for future cancer therapy. Keywords: epigenetics, cancer, acetylation, methylation, histone, transcription, tumor

  16. Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchiyama MK

    2015-07-01

    thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.Keywords: cationic USPIOs, MRI, contrast agent, magnetic targeting, in vivo toxicity, intravital microscopy

  17. Inosine 5'-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) as a Potential Target for the Development of a New Generation of Antiprotozoan Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotie, Jean

    2016-06-19

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the critical step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, and thus is at the center of cell growth and proliferation. However, although this enzyme has been exploited as potential target for the development of immunosuppressive, anticancer, and antiviral agents, the functional importance of IMPDH as a promising antiprotozoan drug target is still in its infancy mainly because of the availability of alternative nucleotides metabolic pathways in many of these parasites. This situation suggests that the inhibition of IMPDH might have little to no effect on the survival of protozoan parasites. As a result, no IMPDH inhibitor is currently commercially available or has advanced to clinical trials as a potential antiprotozoan drug. Nevertheless, recent advances toward the development of selective inhibitors of the IMPDH enzyme from Crystosporidium parvum as potential drug candidates against cryptosporidiosis should revive further investigations of this drug target in other protozoa parasites. The current review examines the chemical structures and biological activities of reported protozoan's IMPDH inhibitors. SciFinder was used to broadly pinpoint reports published on the topic in the chemical literature, with no specific time frame. Opportunities and challenges towards the development of inhibitors of IMPDH enzymes from protozoa parasites as potential chemotherapies toward the respective diseases they cause are also discussed.

  18. Biocompatible PEGylated gold nanorods as colored contrast agents for targeted in vivo cancer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopwitthaya, Atcha; Yong, Ken-Tye; Hu, Rui; Roy, Indrajit; Ding, Hong; Vathy, Lisa A.; Bergey, Earl J.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-08-01

    In this contribution, we report the use of a PEGylated gold nanorods formulation as a colored dye for tumor labeling in vivo. We have demonstrated that the nanorod-targeted tumor site can be easily differentiated from the background tissues by the 'naked eye' without the need of sophisticated imaging instruments. In addition to tumor labeling, we have also performed in vivo toxicity and biodistribution studies of PEGylated gold nanorods in vivo by using BALB/c mice as the model. In vivo toxicity studies indicated no mortality or adverse effects or weight changes in BALB/c mice treated with PEGylated gold nanorods. This finding will provide useful guidelines in the future development of diagnostic probes for cancer diagnosis, optically guided tumor surgery, and lymph node mapping applications.

  19. Naringenin and quercetin--potential anti-HCV agents for NS2 protease targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulu, S Sajitha; Thabitha, A; Vino, S; Priya, A Mohana; Rout, Madhusmita

    2016-01-01

    Nonstructural proteins of hepatitis C virus had drawn much attention for the scientific fraternity in drug discovery due to its important role in the disease. 3D structure of the protein was predicted using molecular modelling protocol. Docking studies of 10 medicinal plant compounds and three drugs available in the market (control) with NS2 protease were employed by using rigid docking approach of AutoDock 4.2. Among the molecules tested for docking study, naringenin and quercetin revealed minimum binding energy of - 7.97 and - 7.95 kcal/mol with NS2 protease. All the ligands were docked deeply within the binding pocket region of the protein. The docking study results showed that these compounds are potential inhibitors of the target; and also all these docked compounds have good inhibition constant, vdW+Hbond+desolv energy with best RMSD value.

  20. New cytochrome P450 isoforms as cancer biomarkers and targets for chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Szaefer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes P450 (P450 are a multigene family of enzymes possessing a central role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including anticancer drugs, and endogenous compounds. The activity of different P450 isoforms varies within specific tissues and cell types and is selectively regulated together with their gene expression. Moreover, differential expression of certain P450 isoforms’ genes in tumor cells compared to normal tissues can be observed. This creates the potential for the use of these isozymes as tumor markers or selective prodrug activators. This article discusses the characteristics and function of five isoforms of cytochrome P450 (P450 1B1, P450 2W1, P450 2S1, P450 2R1, P450 2U1 that could be potential targets for tumor therapeutic and preventive strategies. These isoforms have been chosen because their level of expression in tumor tissues is definitely higher than in normal tissues.

  1. Logical design of an anti-cancer agent targeting the plant homeodomain in Pygopus2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ferdausi; Yamaguchi, Keiichi; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Elhelaly, Abdelazim Elsayed; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Pygopus2 (Pygo2) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is required for β-catenin mediated transcription. Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in Pygo2 intercalates the methylated histone 3 (H3K4me) tail and HD1 domain of BCL9 that binds to β-catenin. Thus, PHD finger may be a potential target for the logical design of an anti-cancer drug. Here, we found that Spiro[2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-2,4'-piperidine]-1'ethanol,3,4-dihydro-4-hydroxy-α-(6-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)) termed JBC117 interacts with D339, A348, R356, V376 and A378 in PHD corresponding to the binding sites with H3K4me and/or HD1, and has strong anti-cancer effects. For colon (HCT116) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines, IC50 values were 2.6 ± 0.16 and 3.3 ± 0.14 μM, respectively, while 33.80 ± 0.15 μM for the normal human fibroblast cells. JBC117 potently antagonized the cellular effects of β-catenin-dependent activity and also inhibited the migration and invasion of cancer cells. In vivo studies showed that the survival time of mice was significantly prolonged by the subcutaneous injection of JBC117 (10 mg/kg/day). In conclusion, JBC117 is a novel anti-cancer lead compound targeting the PHD finger of Pygo2 and has a therapeutic effect against colon and lung cancer.

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SAHA as Potential Targeted Therapy Agent for Larynx Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarska, Aneta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Nowosadzka, Ewa; Gumbarewicz, Ewelina; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Krystyna; Kupisz, Krzysztof; Polberg, Krzysztof; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in the head and neck region. Due to the poor response to chemotherapeutics in patients and low survival rate, successful treatment of larynx cancer still remains a challenge. Therefore, the identification of novel treatment options is needed. We investigated the anticancer effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on two different laryngeal cancer cell lines RK33 and RK45. We also studied the antiproliferative action of SAHA in combination with cisplatin and defined the type of pharmacological interaction between these drugs. Materials and Methods: Viability and proliferation of larynx cancer cell lines were studied by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide method and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, respectively. The type of interaction between SAHA and cisplatin was determined by an isobolographic analysis. Western blotting, flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction method were used to determine acetylation of histone H3, cell cycle progression and genes expression, respectively. Apoptosis was assessed by means of nucleosomes released to cytosol. Results: SAHA alone or in combination with cisplatin inhibited larynx cancer cells proliferation, whereas displayed relatively low toxicity against normal cells - primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts. The mixture of SAHA with cisplatin exerted additive and synergistic interaction in RK33 and RK45 cells, respectively. We showed that SAHA induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 K9, K14 and K23 and triggered apoptosis. SAHA also caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of CDKN1A and downregulation of CCND1 encoding p21WAF1/CIP1 and cyclin D1 proteins, respectively. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrated that SAHA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against larynx tumors.

  3. Nitroimidazole carboxamides as antiparasitic agents targeting Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrad, A M; Debnath, A; Miyamoto, Y; Hansford, K A; Pelingon, R; Butler, M S; Bains, T; Karoli, T; Blaskovich, M A T; Eckmann, L; Cooper, M A

    2016-09-14

    Diarrhoeal diseases caused by the intestinal parasites Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica constitute a major global health burden. Nitroimidazoles are first-line drugs for the treatment of giardiasis and amebiasis, with metronidazole 1 being the most commonly used drug worldwide. However, treatment failures in giardiasis occur in up to 20% of cases and development of resistance to metronidazole is of concern. We have re-examined 'old' nitroimidazoles as a foundation for the systematic development of next-generation derivatives. Using this approach, derivatisation of the nitroimidazole carboxamide scaffold provided improved antiparasitic agents. Thirty-three novel nitroimidazole carboxamides were synthesised and evaluated for activity against G. lamblia and E. histolytica. Several of the new compounds exhibited potent activity against G. lamblia strains, including metronidazole-resistant strains of G. lamblia (EC50 = 0.1-2.5 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 6.1-18 μM). Other compounds showed improved activity against E. histolytica (EC50 = 1.7-5.1 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 5.0 μM), potent activity against Trichomonas vaginalis (EC50 = 0.6-1.4 μM cf. metronidazole EC50 = 0.8 μM) and moderate activity against the intestinal bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (0.5-2 μg/mL, cf. metronidazole = 0.5 μg/mL). The new compounds had low toxicity against mammalian kidney and liver cells (CC50 > 100 μM), and selected antiparasitic hits were assessed for human plasma protein binding and metabolic stability in liver microsomes to demonstrate their therapeutic potential.

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SAHA as Potential Targeted Therapy Agent for Larynx Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarska, Aneta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J.; Nowosadzka, Ewa; Gumbarewicz, Ewelina; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Krystyna; Kupisz, Krzysztof; Polberg, Krzysztof; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in the head and neck region. Due to the poor response to chemotherapeutics in patients and low survival rate, successful treatment of larynx cancer still remains a challenge. Therefore, the identification of novel treatment options is needed. We investigated the anticancer effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on two different laryngeal cancer cell lines RK33 and RK45. We also studied the antiproliferative action of SAHA in combination with cisplatin and defined the type of pharmacological interaction between these drugs. Materials and Methods: Viability and proliferation of larynx cancer cell lines were studied by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide method and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, respectively. The type of interaction between SAHA and cisplatin was determined by an isobolographic analysis. Western blotting, flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction method were used to determine acetylation of histone H3, cell cycle progression and genes expression, respectively. Apoptosis was assessed by means of nucleosomes released to cytosol. Results: SAHA alone or in combination with cisplatin inhibited larynx cancer cells proliferation, whereas displayed relatively low toxicity against normal cells - primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts. The mixture of SAHA with cisplatin exerted additive and synergistic interaction in RK33 and RK45 cells, respectively. We showed that SAHA induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 K9, K14 and K23 and triggered apoptosis. SAHA also caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of CDKN1A and downregulation of CCND1 encoding p21WAF1/CIP1 and cyclin D1 proteins, respectively. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrated that SAHA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against larynx tumors. PMID:28123594

  5. Mining SNPs in extracellular vesicular transcriptome of Trypanosoma cruzi: a step closer to early diagnosis of neglected Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    One of the newest and strongest members of intercellular communicators, the Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and their enclosed RNAs; Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) have been acknowledged as putative biomarkers and therapeutic targets for various diseases. Although a very deep insight has not been possible into the physiology of these vesicles, they are believed to be involved in cell-to-cell communication and host-pathogen interactions. EVs might be significantly helpful in discovering biomarkers for possible target identification as well as prognostics, diagnostics and developing vaccines. In recent studies, highly bioactive EVs have drawn attention of parasitologists for being able to communicate between different cells and having likeliness of reflecting both source and target environments. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has eased the way to have a deeper insight into these vesicles and their roles in various diseases. This article arises from bioinformatics-based analysis and predictive data mining of transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) data of EVs, derived from different life stages of Trypanosoma cruzi; a causing agent of neglected Chagas disease. Variants (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs)) were mined from Extracellular vesicular transcriptomic data and functionally analyzed using different bioinformatics based approaches. Functional analysis showed the association of these variants with various important factors like Trans-Sialidase (TS), Alpha Tubulin, P-Type H+-ATPase, etc. which, in turn, are associated with disease in different ways. Some of the ‘candidate SNPs’ were found to be stage-specific, which strengthens the probability of finding stage-specific biomarkers. These results may lead to a better understanding of Chagas disease, and improved knowledge may provide further development of the biomarkers for prognosis, diagnosis and drug development for treating Chagas disease. PMID:27904804

  6. Identification and Complete Genome of Seneca Valley Virus in Vesicular Fluid and Sera of Pigs Affected with Idiopathic Vesicular Disease, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, F A; Linhares, D C L; Barcellos, D E S N; Lam, H C; Collins, J; Marthaler, D

    2015-12-01

    Numerous, ongoing outbreaks in Brazilian swine herds have been characterized by vesicular lesions in sows and acute losses of neonatal piglets. The complete genome of Seneca Valley virus (SVV) was identified in vesicular fluid and sera of sows, providing evidence of association between SVV and vesicular disease and viraemia in affected animals.

  7. Inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export sensitizes malignant cells to cytotoxic and targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana; Cubitt, Christopher L; Baz, Rachid; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    the addition of alkylating agents (melphalan), anthracyclines (doxorubicin and daunomycin), BRAF inhibitors, platinum drugs (cisplatin and oxaliplatin), proteosome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib), or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (imatinib). Also, the sequence of treatment may be important for combination therapy. We found that the most effective treatment regimen involved first priming the cancer cells with the CRM1 inhibitor followed by doxorubicin, bortezomib, carfilzomib, or melphalan. This order sensitized both de novo and acquired drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

  8. Targeting radioresistant breast cancer cells by single agent CHK1 inhibitor via enhancing replication stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhanwen; Gao, Jinnan; Yang, Shuming; Gorityala, Shashank; Xiong, Xiahui; Deng, Ou; Ma, Zhefu; Yan, Chunhong; Susana, Gonzalo; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junran

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains a standard therapeutic modality for breast cancer patients. However, intrinsic or acquired resistance limits the efficacy of RT. Here, we demonstrate that CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 alone significantly inhibited the growth of radioresistant breast cancer cells (RBCC). Given the critical role of ATR/CHK1 signaling in suppressing oncogene-induced replication stress (RS), we hypothesize that CHK1 inhibition leads to the specific killing for RBCC due to its abrogation in the suppression of RS induced by oncogenes. In agreement, the expression of oncogenes c-Myc/CDC25A/c-Src/H-ras/E2F1 and DNA damage response (DDR) proteins ATR/CHK1/BRCA1/CtIP were elevated in RBCC. AZD7762 exposure led to significantly higher levels of RS in RBCC, compared to the parental cells. The mechanisms by which CHK1 inhibition led to specific increase of RS in RBCC were related to the interruptions in the replication fork dynamics and the homologous recombination (HR). In summary, RBCC activate oncogenic pathways and thus depend upon mechanisms controlled by CHK1 signaling to maintain RS under control for survival. Our study provided the first example where upregulating RS by CHK1 inhibitor contributes to the specific killing of RBCC, and highlight the importance of the CHK1 as a potential target for treatment of radioresistant cancer cells. PMID:27167194

  9. The neurobiology of bipolar disorder: identifying targets for specific agents and synergies for combination treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazza, Ana C; Young, L Trevor

    2014-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness described by severe changes in mood. Extensive research has been carried out to understand the aetiology and pathophysiology of BD. Several hypotheses have been postulated, including alteration in genetic factors, protein expression, calcium signalling, neuropathological alteration, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in BD. In the following paper, we will attempt to integrate these data in a manner which is to understand targets of treatment and how they may be, in particular, relevant to combination treatment. In summary, the data suggested that BD might be associated with neuronal and glial cellular impairment in specific brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex. From molecular and genetics: (1) alterations in dopaminergic system, through catechol-O-aminotransferase; (2) decreased expression and polymorphism on brain-derived neurotrophic factor; (3) alterations cyclic-AMP responsive element binding; (4) dysregulation of calcium signalling, including genome-wide finding for voltage-dependent calcium channel α-1 subunit are relevant findings in BD. Future studies are now necessary to understand how these molecular pathways interact and their connection to the complex clinical manifestations observed in BD.

  10. Discovery of potent anti-tuberculosis agents targeting leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzera, Olga I; Golub, Andriy G; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Volynets, Galyna P; Lukashov, Sergiy S; Kovalenko, Oksana P; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M; Tukalo, Michail A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious infectious disease caused by human pathogen bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial drug resistance is a very significant medical problem nowadays and development of novel antibiotics with different mechanisms of action is an important goal of modern medical science. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has been recently clinically validated as antimicrobial target. Here we report the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS. Using receptor-based virtual screening we have identified six inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS from two different chemical classes. The most active compound 4-{[4-(4-Bromo-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazonomethyl}-2-methoxy-6-nitro-phenol (1) inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 6μM. A series of derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro toward M. tuberculosis LeuRS. It was revealed that the most active compound 2,6-Dibromo-4-{[4-(4-nitro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]-hydrazonomethyl}-phenol inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 2.27μM. All active compounds were tested for antimicrobial effect against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The compound 1 seems to have the best cell permeability and inhibits growth of pathogenic bacteria with IC50=10.01μM and IC90=13.53μM.

  11. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  12. A novel agent exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial complex II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guozhen; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wa; Wang, Li; Li, Chuwen; Shan, Luchen; Xu, Changjiang; Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Yuqiang; Di, Lijun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain, including mitochondrial complex II, has emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, a novel conjugate of danshensu (DSS) and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), DT-010, was synthesized. Our results showed that DT-010 is more potent than its parental compounds separately or in combination, in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells by inducing cytotoxicity and promoting cell cycle arrest. It also inhibited the growth of 4T1 breast cancer cells in vivo. DT-010 suppressed the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial function in MCF-7 cells, including basal respiration, ATP turnover, maximal respiration. Treatment with DT-010 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ATP production. DT-010 also promoted ROS generation, while treatment with ROS scavenger, NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine), reversed DT-010-induced cytotoxicity. Further study showed that DT-010 suppressed succinate-induced mitochondrial respiration and impaired mitochondrial complex II enzyme activity indicating that DT-010 may inhibit mitochondrial complex II. Overall, our results suggested that the antitumor activity of DT-010 is associated with inhibition of mitochondrial complex II, which triggers ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer cells. PMID:27081033

  13. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohara Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. Methods We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. Results It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. Conclusion These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients.

  14. NIOSOMES: A ROLE IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles inclosing an aqueous phase and a wide range of molecules could be encapsulated within aqueous spaces of lipid membrane vesicles. They are microscopic lamellar structures formed on the admixture of a non-ionic surfactant, cholesterol and phosphate with subsequent hydration in aqueous media. Niosomes belongs to novel drug delivery system which offers a large number of advantages over other conventional and vesicular delivery systems. Namely they are the targeted drug delivery system which showing reduction of dose, stability and compatibility of non-ionic surfactants, easy modification, delayed clearance, suitability for a wide range of Active Pharmaceutical Agents.

  15. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  16. Preparation and bioevaluation of a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled chlorambucil analog as a tumor targeting agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpati, Drishty; Korde, Aruna; Venkatesh, Meera [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Banerjee, Sharmila [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: sharmila@barc.gov.in

    2009-09-15

    Chlorambucil belongs to a group of nitrogen mustards which are used for the treatment of variety of cancers. Hence, a chlorambucil derivative has been radiolabeled with [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sup +} core and its efficacy as a tumor targeting agent has been evaluated. Radiochemical yield of the complex was >98% as observed by HPLC. The in vitro studies in MCF-7 breast cancer cells showed about 30% inhibition of the radiolabeled complex in presence of the cold chlorambucil derivative. Biodistribution studies in Swiss mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumor showed an uptake of 3.2{+-}0.3% ID/g at 3 h.p.i.

  17. Use of substitute Nonidet P-40 nonionic detergents in intracellular tubulin polymerization assays for screening of microtubule targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Saptarshi; Field, Jessica J; Miller, John H

    2017-01-10

    Shell Chemical Company Nonidet P-40 has been used for decades in many biochemical assays as a nonionic, nondenaturing detergent; however, Shell no longer produces this product. Four commercially available substitutes were investigated and their activities titrated in an intracellular tubulin polymerization assay. Although claimed by the supply companies to be identical to the Shell Nonidet P-40, all four substitutes were about 10-fold more potent and needed to be diluted accordingly. As microtubule targeting drugs are a major class of anticancer agent, and many researchers use the intracellular tubulin polymerization assay, this information is important to help troubleshoot assay development with the new substitutes. As the Shell Nonidet P-40 has been used in many biochemical buffers, these results will be of general interest to the biochemical, cell, and molecular research community.

  18. Physical characterization methods for iron oxide contrast agents encapsulated within a targeted liposome-based delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagata, J A; Farkas, N; Dennis, C L; Shull, R D; Hackley, V A [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Yang, C; Pirollo, K F; Chang, E H [Department of Oncology, Georgetown University Medical Center, 2700 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20017 (United States)], E-mail: john.dagata@nist.gov

    2008-07-30

    Intact liposome-based targeted nanoparticle delivery systems (NDS) are immobilized by non-selective binding and characterized by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in a fluid imaging environment. The size, size distribution, functionality, and stability of an NDS with a payload consisting of a super-paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging are determined. SPM results are combined with information obtained by more familiar techniques such as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy. By integrating the methods presented in this work into the NDS formulation and manufacturing process, size-dependent statistical properties of the complex can be obtained and the structure-function relationship of individual, multi-component nanoscale entities can be assessed in a reliable and reproducible manner.

  19. A graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere as a novel photochemical internalization agent for targeted and stimuli-responsive cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Chen, Zhaowei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Li, Wei; Ju, Enguo; Yan, Zhengqing; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal stability, biocompatibility and cancer cell targeting ability. After CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis, the nanosystem is embedded in endo/lysosomal vesicles and HA could be specially degraded by hyaluronidase (Hyal), inducing open pores. In the following, with visible light illumination, GHCNS could produce ROS that effectively induced lipid peroxidation and caused endo/lysosomal membrane break, accelerating the cytoplasmic release of the drug in the targeted and irradiated cells. As a result, significantly increased therapeutic potency and specificity against cancer cells could be achieved.As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal

  20. Beta carbonic anhydrases: novel targets for pesticides and anti-parasitic agents in agriculture and livestock husbandry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Barker, Harlan; Hytönen, Vesa P; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Parkkila, Seppo

    2014-08-29

    -CAs are potential targets for development of small molecule pesticides or anti-parasitic agents with minimal side effects on vertebrates.

  1. Implications of a Reduction in the Hemoglobin Target in Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent-Treated Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V. Nguyen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs to a hemoglobin (Hb level >12.0 g/dl have increased risk of multiple complications, including death. The optimal Hb target for ESA use has not been established. We hypothesized that reducing the target Hb would prevent levels >12 g/dl and lead to significant cost savings. Methods: Our target Hb range was reduced to 9–11 g/dl from 10–12 g/dl. Thirty-five chronic hemodialysis (HD patients received erythropoietin (EPO and intravenous iron from January to December 2009. Data analysis included: Hb level, EPO dose, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels. EPO was administered via subcutaneous injection weekly or twice weekly. Results: The mean monthly Hb level changed from 11.2 to 10.6 g/dl. The percentages of patients with mean Hb >10.0, 12.0 and 13.0 g/dl were 82 ± 6.5, 10 ± 5.6 and 1.8 ± 1.9%, respectively. Weekly EPO dose decreased from 9,500 to 5,600 units, a 40% reduction per dose per patient and costs. The savings exceeded USD 60,000 per year for 35 patients. More than 80% of patients had transferrin saturation >20% and ferritin >200 ng/ml throughout the entire period. Conclusions: Lowering the target Hb range to 9–11 g/dl in HD patients achieved quality anemia management, avoided values >12.0 g/dl and resulted in cost savings. A minimal reduction in quality of life and no change in cardiovascular morbidity or mortality would be expected. The study has important implications in the new American bundled reimbursement model.

  2. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  3. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  4. Lupeol triterpene, a novel diet-based microtubule targeting agent: disrupts survivin/cFLIP activation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Witkowsky, Olya; Kohl, Amanda Marie; Maddodi, Nityanand

    2009-10-23

    Recently we showed Lupeol, a triterpene, found in fruits and vegetables inhibits the growth of tumors originated from human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (CaP) cells and decreases the serum-PSA levels in a mouse model. Here, we provide evidence that Lupeol inhibits the growth of androgen-sensitive as well as androgen-insensitive CaP cells by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest without exhibiting any toxicity to normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) at the doses at which it kills cancer cells. We observed that Lupeol treatment to LNCaP and DU145 cells resulted in a dose-dependent (i) decrease in the protein levels of Cyclins-A, -B1, -D1, -D2, -E2, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2 and (ii) increase in the protein level of CDK-inhibitor p21. Since G2/M cell cycle phase is regulated by microtubule assembly, we investigated effect of Lupeol on microtubule assembly, its regulation and down-stream targets in CaP cells. Lupeol treatment significantly modulated the level of (i) microtubule components alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin, (ii) microtubule-regulatory protein stathmin, and (iii) microtubule-regulatory down-stream target/pro-survival protein survivin. Lupeol treatment also decreased the level of anti-apoptotic protein cFLIP. Finally, Lupeol was observed to significantly decrease the transcriptional activation of survivin and cFLIP genes in CaP cells. We conclude that the Lupeol-induced growth inhibition of CaP cells is a net outcome of simultaneous effects on stathmin, cFLIP, and survivin which results in the disruption of microtubule assembly. We suggest that Lupeol alone or as an adjuvant to other microtubule agents could be developed as a potential agent for the treatment of human CaP.

  5. Investigations on nanoconfinement of low-molecular antineoplastic agents into biocompatible magnetic matrices for drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoiaga, Alina Maria; Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Nica, Valentin; Vasile, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles are employed as biocompatible matrices to host low-molecular antineoplastic drugs. 5-Fluorouracil is a well-known antimetabolite drug used to treat many malignancies: colon, rectal, breast, head and neck, pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, liver and G-U (bladder, penile, vulva, prostate), skin cancers (basal cell and keratosis). Unfortunately severe gastrointestinal, hematological, neural, cardiac and dermatological toxic effects are often registered due to its cytotoxicity. Thus, this work focuses on development of a magnetic silica nanosystem, capable of hosting high amounts of 5-fluorouracil and delivers it in a targeted manner, under the influence of external magnetic field. There are few reports on nanoconfinement of this particular small molecule antimetabolite on mesoporous silica hosts. Therefore we have investigated different ways to confine high amounts of 5-FU within amino-modified and non-modified mesopores of the silica shell, from water and ethanol, under magnetic stirring and ultrasound irradiation. Also, we have studied the adsorption process from water as a function of pH in order to rationalize drug-support interactions. It is shown that nature of the solvent has great influence on diffusion of small molecules into mesopores, which is slower from alcoholic solutions. More importantly, sonication is proven as an excellent alternative to long adsorption tests, since the time necessary to reach equilibrium is drastically reduced to 1h and higher amounts of drug may be immobilized within the mesopores of amino-modified magnetic silica nanoparticles. These results are highly important for optimization of drug immobilization process in order to attain desired release profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Is a Potential Target for Ovarian Cancer Sensitization to Cytotoxic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Aiste; Earp, Eleanor; Leeson, Charlotte; Dixon, Michelle; O'Donnell, Rachel; Kaufmann, Angelika; Edmondson, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor protein has been found to be inactivated or mutated in various human malignancies and to play a role in cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor sensitivity. In this study, we assessed the association of PTEN loss with homologous recombination (HR) deficiency and increased chemosensitivity. The PTEN knockdown models were created using MISSION shRNA lentiviral transduction particles in cell lines derived from normal ovarian surface epithelium and a mixed endometrioid/clear-cell carcinoma. Sensitivity to common therapeutics was assessed using sulforhodamine B assay. Twenty-eight unselected primary epithelial ovarian cancer cultures derived from ascitic fluid collected at the time of surgery and matched genomic DNA were assessed for PTEN mutations using polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger sequencing and for mRNA expression using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; HR was determined using γH2AX/RAD51 assay. The Cancer Genome Atlas data were analyzed using cBioPortal. In the carcinoma cell line, the PTEN knockdown enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin, rucaparib, doxorubicin, camptothecin, paclitaxel, and irradiation. In the primary ovarian cancer cultures, 2 point mutations were found (1105T>TG, 25L>L in 6 cultures and 1508G>GA, 159R>R in 4 cultures). The PTEN mRNA expression varied over 40-fold between the cultures, but did not correlate with HR status or in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin or rucaparib. The Cancer Genome Atlas data showed a rate of 8% alteration in PTEN and a trend toward improved survival in PTEN-mutated cases. These data indicate that although PTEN mutations in ovarian cancer are rare, PTEN inhibition results in therapeutic sensitization. Therefore, PTEN may be an important therapeutic target, in at least some cancers.

  7. RasGRPs are targets of the anti-cancer agent ingenol-3-angelate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    Full Text Available Ingenol-3-angelate (I3A is a non-tumor promoting phorbol ester-like compound identified in the sap of Euphoria peplus. Similar to tumor promoting phorbol esters, I3A is a diacylglycerol (DAG analogue that binds with high affinity to the C1 domains of PKCs, recruits PKCs to cellular membranes and promotes enzyme activation. Numerous anti-cancer activities have been attributed to I3A and ascribed to I3A's effects on PKCs. We show here that I3A also binds to and activates members of the RasGRP family of Ras activators leading to robust elevation of Ras-GTP and engagement of the Raf-Mek-Erk kinase cascade. In response to I3A, recombinant proteins consisting of GFP fused separately to full-length RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 were rapidly recruited to cell membranes, consistent with direct binding of the compound to RasGRP's C1 domain. In the case of RasGRP3, IA3 treatment led to positive regulatory phosphorylation on T133 and activation of the candidate regulatory kinase PKCδ. I3A treatment of select B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines resulted in quantitative and qualitative changes in Bcl-2 family member proteins and induction of apoptosis, as previously demonstrated with the DAG analogue bryostatin 1 and its synthetic analogue pico. Our results offer further insights into the anticancer properties of I3A, support the idea that RasGRPs represent potential cancer therapeutic targets along with PKC, and expand the known range of ligands for RasGRP regulation.

  8. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Ebola Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regules, Jason A; Beigel, John H; Paolino, Kristopher M; Voell, Jocelyn; Castellano, Amy R; Hu, Zonghui; Muñoz, Paula; Moon, James E; Ruck, Richard C; Bennett, Jason W; Twomey, Patrick S; Gutiérrez, Ramiro L; Remich, Shon A; Hack, Holly R; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Josleyn, Matthew D; Kwilas, Steven A; Van Deusen, Nicole; Mbaya, Olivier Tshiani; Zhou, Yan; Stanley, Daphne A; Jing, Wang; Smith, Kirsten S; Shi, Meng; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Sullivan, Nancy J; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Peel, Sheila A; Alimonti, Judie B; Hooper, Jay W; Silvera, Peter M; Martin, Brian K; Monath, Thomas P; Ramsey, W Jay; Link, Charles J; Lane, H Clifford; Michael, Nelson L; Davey, Richard T; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-01-26

    Background The worst Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in history has resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths. We present the final results of two phase 1 trials of an attenuated, replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine candidate designed to prevent EVD. Methods We conducted two phase 1, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-escalation trials of an rVSV-based vaccine candidate expressing the glycoprotein of a Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV). A total of 39 adults at each site (78 participants in all) were consecutively enrolled into groups of 13. At each site, volunteers received one of three doses of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine (3 million plaque-forming units [PFU], 20 million PFU, or 100 million PFU) or placebo. Volunteers at one of the sites received a second dose at day 28. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. Results The most common adverse events were injection-site pain, fatigue, myalgia, and headache. Transient rVSV viremia was noted in all the vaccine recipients after dose 1. The rates of adverse events and viremia were lower after the second dose than after the first dose. By day 28, all the vaccine recipients had seroconversion as assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the glycoprotein of the ZEBOV-Kikwit strain. At day 28, geometric mean titers of antibodies against ZEBOV glycoprotein were higher in the groups that received 20 million PFU or 100 million PFU than in the group that received 3 million PFU, as assessed by ELISA and by pseudovirion neutralization assay. A second dose at 28 days after dose 1 significantly increased antibody titers at day 56, but the effect was diminished at 6 months. Conclusions This Ebola vaccine candidate elicited anti-Ebola antibody responses. After vaccination, rVSV viremia occurred frequently but was transient. These results support further evaluation of the vaccine dose of 20 million PFU for preexposure prophylaxis and suggest that a

  9. Interleukin 16- (IL-16- Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA. Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16 by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P<0.05 and late stages (P<0.001. Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  10. Relationship between pancreatic vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and insulin expression in human pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Harris, Paul E.; Butler, Alexandra E.; Galasso, Ryan; GURLO, TATYANA; Rizza, Robert A.; Butler, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells and has recently been proposed as a target for measurement of beta cell mass in vivo. We questioned, (1) What proportion of beta cells express VMAT2? (2) Is VMAT2 expressed by other pancreatic endocrine or non-endocrine cells? (3) Is the relationship between VMAT2 and insulin expression disturbed in type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM)? Human pancreas (7 non-diabetics, 5 T2DM, 10 T1DM) was immunostained for ins...

  11. Liposomes derivatized with multimeric copies of KCCYSL peptide as targeting agents for HER-2-overexpressing tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhieri, Paola; Mannucci, Silvia; Conti, Giamaica; Nicolato, Elena; Fracasso, Giulio; Marzola, Pasquina; Morelli, Giancarlo; Accardo, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Mixed liposomes, obtained by coaggregation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and of the synthetic monomer containing a gadolinium complex ([C18]2DTPA[Gd]) have been prepared. Liposomes externally decorated with KCCYSL (P6.1 peptide) sequence in its monomeric, dimeric, and tetrameric forms are studied as target-selective delivery systems toward cancer cells overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors. Derivatization of liposomal surface with targeting peptides is achieved using the postmodification method: the alkyne-peptide derivative Pra-KCCYSL reacts, through click chemistry procedures, with a synthetic surfactant modified with 1, 2, or 4 azido moieties previously inserted in liposome formulation. Preliminary in vitro data on MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells indicated that liposomes functionalized with P6.1 peptide in its tetrameric form had better binding to and uptake into BT-474 cells compared to liposomes decorated with monomeric or dimeric versions of the P6.1 peptide. BT-474 cells treated with liposomes functionalized with the tetrameric form of P6.1 showed high degree of liposome uptake, which was comparable with the uptake of anti-HER-2 antibodies such as Herceptin. Moreover, magnetic MRI experiments have demonstrated the potential of liposomes to act as MRI contrast agents. PMID:28144135

  12. The novel microtubule targeting agent BAL101553 in combination with radiotherapy in treatment-refractory tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Vuong, Van; Messikommer, Alessandra; Nytko, Katarzyna J; Guckenberger, Matthias; Bachmann, Felix; Lane, Heidi A; Pruschy, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to microtubule targeting agents (MTA) represents a major drawback in successful cancer therapy with MTAs. Here we investigated the combined treatment modality of the novel MTA BAL101553 in combination with radiotherapy in paclitaxel and epothilone-resistant tumor models. Multiple regimens of BAL101553, or its active moiety BAL27862 for in vitro experiments, were probed in combination with radiotherapy in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing, human colon adenocarcinoma cells (SW480) and in tubulin-mutated human NSCLC cells (A549EpoB40) and tumors thereof. BAL27862 reduced the proliferative activity of SW480 and A549EpoB40 tumor cells with similar potency as in A549 wildtype cells. Combined treatment of BAL27862 with ionizing radiation in vitro resulted in an additive reduction of clonogenicity. Moreover, treatment of paclitaxel- and epothilone-resistant tumors with fractionated irradiation and different regimens of BAL101553 (a single i.v. bolus vs. oral daily) suppressed tumor growth and resulted in an extended additive tumor growth delay with strong reduction of tumor proliferation and mean tumor vessel density. BAL101553 is a promising alternative in taxane- and epothilone-refractory tumors as part of a combined treatment modality with ionizing radiation. Its potent antitumor effect is not only tumor cell-directed but also targets the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Bao, Jin-ku, E-mail: jinkubao@yahoo.com [School of Life Sciences and State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  14. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  15. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  16. Antifungal Resistance, Metabolic Routes as Drug Targets, and New Antifungal Agents: An Overview about Endemic Dimorphic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Parente-Rocha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by fungi can occur in healthy people, but immunocompromised patients are the major risk group for invasive fungal infections. Cases of fungal resistance and the difficulty of treatment make fungal infections a public health problem. This review explores mechanisms used by fungi to promote fungal resistance, such as the mutation or overexpression of drug targets, efflux and degradation systems, and pleiotropic drug responses. Alternative novel drug targets have been investigated; these include metabolic routes used by fungi during infection, such as trehalose and amino acid metabolism and mitochondrial proteins. An overview of new antifungal agents, including nanostructured antifungals, as well as of repositioning approaches is discussed. Studies focusing on the development of vaccines against antifungal diseases have increased in recent years, as these strategies can be applied in combination with antifungal therapy to prevent posttreatment sequelae. Studies focused on the development of a pan-fungal vaccine and antifungal drugs can improve the treatment of immunocompromised patients and reduce treatment costs.

  17. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Li; Fayez K. Ghishan; Liqun Bai

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas,skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestivesystem have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  18. Liposomes derivatized with multimeric copies of KCCYSL peptide as targeting agents for HER-2-overexpressing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringhieri P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paola Ringhieri,1 Silvia Mannucci,2 Giamaica Conti,2 Elena Nicolato,2 Giulio Fracasso,3 Pasquina Marzola,4 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Antonella Accardo1 1Department of Pharmacy and Interuniversity Research Centre on Bioactive Peptides (CIRPeB, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli, 2Department of Neurological Biomedical and Movement Sciences, 3Section of Immunology, Department of Medicine, 4Department of Informatics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: Mixed liposomes, obtained by coaggregation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and of the synthetic monomer containing a gadolinium complex ([C18]2DTPA[Gd] have been prepared. Liposomes externally decorated with KCCYSL (P6.1 peptide sequence in its monomeric, dimeric, and tetrameric forms are studied as target-selective delivery systems toward cancer cells overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2 receptors. Derivatization of liposomal surface with targeting peptides is achieved using the postmodification method: the alkyne-peptide derivative Pra-KCCYSL reacts, through click chemistry procedures, with a synthetic surfactant modified with 1, 2, or 4 azido moieties previously inserted in liposome formulation. Preliminary in vitro data on MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells indicated that liposomes functionalized with P6.1 peptide in its tetrameric form had better binding to and uptake into BT-474 cells compared to liposomes decorated with monomeric or dimeric versions of the P6.1 peptide. BT-474 cells treated with liposomes functionalized with the tetrameric form of P6.1 showed high degree of liposome uptake, which was comparable with the uptake of anti-HER-2 antibodies such as Herceptin. Moreover, magnetic MRI experiments have demonstrated the potential of liposomes to act as MRI contrast agents. Keywords: anti-HER2 liposomes, target peptide, KCCYSL peptide, breast cancer, click chemistry, branched peptides 

  19. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Rischin, Danny [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Fisher, Richard [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [Austin Hospital, Centre for PET, and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne (Australia); Peters, Lester J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  20. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  1. Co-existence of functionally different vesicular neurotransmitter transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eMünster-Wandowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine into synaptic vesicle (SV. Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient µH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive ( and acidic (pH. While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high pH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  2. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  3. Stochastic Model of Maturation and Vesicular Exchange in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical organization of membrane-bound organelles along intracellular transport pathways relies on vesicular exchange between organelles and on biochemical maturation of the organelle content by specific enzymes. The relative importance of each mechanism in controlling organelle dynamics remains controversial, in particular for transport through the Golgi apparatus. Using a stochastic model, we show that full maturation of membrane-bound compartments can be seen as the stochastic escape from a steady-state in which export is dominated by vesicular exchange. We show that full maturation can contribute a significant fraction of the total out-flux for small organelles such as endosomes and Golgi cisternae.

  4. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of

  5. Topical polyethylene glycol as a novel chemopreventive agent for oral cancer via targeting of epidermal growth factor response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K Wali

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a major cause of morbidity and mortality underscoring the need for safe and effective chemopreventive strategies. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is attractive in that it is an early critical event in HNSCC pathogenesis. However, current agents lack efficacy or have unacceptable toxicity. Several groups have demonstrated that the over-the-counter medication, polyethylene glycol (PEG has remarkable chemopreventive efficacy against colon carcinogenesis. Importantly, we reported that this effect is mediated through EGFR internalization/degradation. In the current study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of this agent against HNSCC, using both the well validated animal model 4-NQO (4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide rat model and cell culture with the human HNSCC cell line SCC-25. We demonstrated that daily topical application of 10% PEG-8000 in the oral cavity (tongue and cavity wall post 4NQO initiation resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden (both, tumor size and tumors/tumor bearing rat without any evidence of toxicity. Immunohistochemical studies depicted decreased proliferation (number of Ki67-positive cells and reduced expression of EGFR and its downstream effectors cyclin D1 in the tongue mucosa of 4NQO-rats treated with PEG. We showed that EGFR was also markedly downregulated in SCC-25 cells by PEG-8000 with a concomitant induction of G1-S phase cell-cycle arrest, which was potentially mediated through upregulated p21(cip1/waf1. In conclusion, we demonstrate, for the first time, that PEG has promising efficacy and safety as a chemopreventive efficacy against oral carcinogenesis.

  6. Rapid-releasing of HI-6 via brain-targeted mesoporous silica nanoparticles for nerve agent detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Fan, Lixue; Wang, Feijian; Luo, Yuan; Sui, Xin; Li, Wanhua; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yongan

    2016-05-01

    The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and mice and restored cerebral AChE activity via the released HI-6, preventing the brain damage caused by soman poisoning and increasing the survival rate in mice. Furthermore, there was no toxicity associated with the MSNs in mice or rats. These results demonstrate that TF-MSNs loaded with HI-6 represent the most effective antidote against NA poisoning by soman reported to date, and suggest that MSNs are a safe alternative to conventional drugs and an optimal nanocarrier for treating brain poisoning, which requires acute pulse cerebral administration.The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and

  7. Health care costs and utilization of a large insured female population with advanced or metastatic breast cancer by receipt of HER2-targeted agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicole Meyer,1 Yanni Hao,2 Pamela Landsman-Blumberg,1 William Johnson,1 Paul Juneau,3 Jaqueline Willemann Rogerio2 1Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 3Truven Health Analytics, Washington, DC, USA Background: This retrospective administrative claims study of women diagnosed with advanced or metastatic breast cancer compared health care costs by receipt of HER2-targeted agents and by disease stage and age group among patients using HER2-targeted agents. Methods: Women aged ≥18 years and diagnosed with stage III or IV breast cancer were selected from the 2008–2012 Truven Health MarketScan® databases (Truven Health Analytics Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA databases using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes for nondiagnostic medical claims corresponding to breast cancer and local or distant metastases (earliest diagnosis of stage III or stage IV metastasis was designated as the index date. The 12 months prior to the index date were defined as the pre-index period. The post-index period was variable in length, beginning on the index date and continuing through the end of enrolment, inpatient death, or December 31, 2012, whichever occurred first. Receipt of HER2-targeted agents was defined as at least one claim for trastuzumab or lapatinib in the pre-index or post-index period. The study cohorts were women using or not using HER2-targeted agents, women with stage III or IV breast cancer using HER2-targeted agents, and women using HER2-targeted agents and aged 18–44 years, 45–64 years, or 65+ years at index. Health care costs and utilization were calculated on a per patient per month basis for all-cause and breast cancer-related services by place of service. Generalized linear models were used to estimate total all-cause and breast cancer-related costs. Results: A total of 30,660 eligible women met the study selection criteria, 14

  8. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and epizootiology of swine vesicular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Aaldert

    2000-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was initiated after the outbreaks of swine vesicular disease (SVD) in the Netherlands in 1992. The thesis starts with a general introduction on SVD and the virus causing SVD. Infection with SVD virus had been absent from the Netherlands for 17 years, and before 1992

  9. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...

  10. Reconstitution of the fusogenic activity of vesicular stomatitis virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metsikkö, K.; van Meer, G.; Simons, K.

    1986-01-01

    Enveloped virus glycoproteins exhibit membrane fusion activity. We have analysed whether the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, reconstituted into liposomes, is able to fuse nucleated cells in a pH-dependent fashion. Proteoliposomes produced by octylglucoside dialysis did not exhibit cell fusi

  11. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and epizootiology of swine vesicular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Aaldert

    2000-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was initiated after the outbreaks of swine vesicular disease (SVD) in the Netherlands in 1992. The thesis starts with a general introduction on SVD and the virus causing SVD. Infection with SVD virus had been absent from the Netherlands for 17 years, and before 1992

  12. A bifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) silane immobilized on metallic oxide-based nanoparticles for conjugation with cell targeting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Nathan J.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-06-16

    A trifluoroethylester-terminal poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane was synthesized and self-assembled on iron oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticle system thus prepared has the flexibility to conjugate with cell targeting agents having either carboxylic and amine terminal groups for a number of biomedical applications, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and controlled drug delivery. The trifluoroethylester silane was synthesized by modifying a PEG diacid to form the corresponding bistrifluoroethylester (TFEE), followed by a reaction with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS). The APS coupled with PEG chains confers the stability of PEG self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and increases the PEG packing density on nanoparticles by establishing hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl and amine groups present within the monolayer structure. The success of the synthesis of the PEG TEFE silane was confirmed with 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The conjugating flexibility of the PEG TEFE was demonstrated with folic acid having carboxylic acid groups and amine terminal groups respectively and confirmed by FTIR. TEM analysis showed the dispersion of nanoparticles before and after they were coated with PEG and folic acid.

  13. The High Affinity IgE Receptor (FcεRI as a Target for Anti-allergic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Takahashi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of the effector cell activation via high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI is thought to be a straightforward strategy for suppressing the allergic reaction. Among the numerous methods to prevent the activation through FcεRI, three versions are described in this article. The first and second ideas involve inhibition of binding between FcεRI and IgE with a soluble form of the FceRI α chain and a humanized antibody directed against the a chain, respectively. Both of these paths involve suppression the histamine release from human peripheral blood basophils in vitro. They also inhibited the allergic reaction in vivo. The soluble α inhibited the anaphylactic reaction in rodents and the Fab fragments of the humanized anti-FcεRI α chain antibody suppressed the dermal response in rhesus monkeys. The third idea involves repression of FcεRI expression by suppressing the transcription of the genes encoding the subunits of FceRI. Although no plausible candidate molecule for actualizing this idea can be identified at present, further analyses of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in the human FcεRI α and β chain genes will lead to the discovery of novel targets for developing anti-allergic agents.

  14. Is DTPA a good competing chelating agent for Th(IV) in human serum and suitable in targeted alpha therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Du, Alicia; Sabatié-Gogova, Andrea; Morgenstern, Alfred; Montavon, Gilles

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between thorium and human serum components was studied using difference ultraviolet spectroscopy (DUS), ultrafiltration and high-pressure-anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with external inductively conducted plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Experimental data are compared with modelling results based on the law of mass action. Human serum transferrin (HSTF) interacts strongly with Th(IV), forming a ternary complex including two synergistic carbonate anions. This complex governs Th(IV) speciation under blood serum conditions. Considering the generally used Langmuir-type model, values of 10(33.5) and 10(32.5) were obtained for strong and weak sites, respectively. We showed that trace amounts of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) cannot complex Th(IV) in the blood serum at equilibrium. Unexpectedly this effect is not related to the competition with HSTF but is due to the strong competition with major divalent metal ions for DTPA. However, Th-DTPA complex was shown to be stable for a few hours when it is formed before addition in the biological medium; this is related to the high kinetic stability of the complex. This makes DTPA a potential chelating agent for synthesis of (226)Th-labelled biomolecules for application in targeted alpha therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres with Cleavable Gd(III) Chelates as MRI Contrast Agents: Synthesis, Characterization, Target-Specificity, and Renal Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L.; Huxford, Rachel C.; Rocca, Joseph Della; Okoruwa, Christie; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) are a promising material for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In this paper multifunctional MSNs with cleavable Gd(III) chelates are synthesized and characterized, and their applicability as MRI contrast agents is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The MSNs contain Gd(III) chelates that are covalently linked via a redox-responsive disulfide moiety. The MSNs are further functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and an anisamide ligand to improve their biocompatibility and target specificity. The effectiveness of MSNs as an MRI imaging contrast agent and their targeting ability are successfully demonstrated in vitro using human colon adenocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, the capability of this platform as an in vivo MRI contrast agent is tested using a 3T scanner. The Gd(III) chelate was quickly cleaved by the blood pool thiols and eliminated through the renal excretion pathway. Further tuning of the Gd(III) chelate release kinetics is needed before the MSN system can be used as target-specific MRI contrast agents in vivo. PMID:22069305

  16. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor Proteins (SNARE" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1 to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the

  17. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  18. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoacti...

  19. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth RF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rolf F Barth,1 Gong Wu,1 W Hans Meisen,2 Robin J Nakkula,1 Weilian Yang,1 Tianyao Huo,1 David A Kellough,1 Pravin Kaumaya,3–5 Claudia Turro,6 Lawrence M Agius,7 Balveen Kaur2 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Neurological Surgery, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 5Department of Microbiology, 6Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 7Department of Pathology, Mater Dei Hospital, University of Malta Medical School, Msida, Malta Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP] fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux® as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5 and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic convection-enhanced delivery (CED to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP

  20. Recent progress in fungus-derived bioactive agents for targeting of signaling machinery in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin X

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiukun Lin,1 Ammad Ahmad Farooqi,2 Muhammad Ismail2 1Department of Pharmacology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: It is becoming increasingly understood that tumor cells may have different mutations and dependencies on diverse intracellular signaling cascades for survival or metastatic potential. Overexpression of oncogenes, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, genetic/epigenetic mutations, genomic instability, and loss of apoptotic cell death are some of the mechanisms that have been widely investigated in molecular oncology. We partition this multicomponent review into the most recent evidence on the anticancer activity of fungal substances obtained from in vitro and xenografted models, and these fungal substances modulate expression of oncogenic and tumor suppressor miRNAs.  There are some outstanding questions regarding fungus-derived chemical-induced modulation of intracellular signaling networks in different cancer cell lines and preclinical models. Certain hints have emerged, emphasizing mechanisms via which apoptosis can be restored in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. Reconceptualization of the knowledge obtained from these emerging areas of research will enable us to potentially identify natural agents with notable anticancer activity and minimal off-target effects. Integration of experimentally verified evidence obtained from cancer cell line gene expression with large-scale functional screening results and pharmacological sensitivity data will be helpful in identification of therapeutics with substantial efficacy. New tools and technologies will further deepen our understanding of the signaling networks that underlie the development of cancer, metastasis, and resistance to different therapeutics at both a personal and systems-wide level. Keywords: fungal products, cell signaling, cancer, apoptosis, miRNA, xenograft

  1. α-Santalol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santha, Sreevidya; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate the chemopreventive effect and molecular mechanisms of α-santalol on UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mouse, a widely used model for human photocarcinogenesis. A dose of UVB radiation (30 mJ cm(-2) day(-1)) that is in the range of human sunlight exposure was used for the initiation and promotion of tumor. Topical treatment of mice with α-santalol (10%, wt/vol in acetone) caused reduction in tumor incidence, multiplicity and volume. In our study, the anticarcinogenic action of α-santalol against UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis was found to be associated with inhibition of inflammation and epidermal cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. α-Santalol pretreatment strongly inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia and thickness of the epidermis, expression of proliferation and inflammation markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ki-67 and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2). Significant decrease in the expression of cyclins A, B1, D1 and D2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk)s Cdk1 (Cdc2), Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 and an upregulated expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cip1/p21 were found in α-santalol pretreated group. Furthermore, an elevated level of cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were observed in α-santalol-treated group. Our data suggested that α-santalol is a safer and promising skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis.

  2. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  3. Lycopene from tomatoes: vesicular nanocarrier formulations for dermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenso, Andreia; Pinho, Sónia; Eleutério, Carla; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Silva, Olga; Simões, Sandra

    2013-07-31

    This experimental work aimed to develop a simple, fast, economic, and environmentally friendly process for the extraction of lycopene from tomato and incorporate this lycopene-rich extract into ultradeformable vesicular nanocarriers suitable for topical application. Lycopene extraction was conducted without a cosolvent for 30 min. The extracts were analyzed and incorporated in transfersomes and ethosomes. These formulations were characterized, and the cellular uptake was observed by confocal microscopy. Dermal delivery of lycopene formulations was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Lycopene extraction proved to be quite safe and selective. The vesicular formulation was taken up by the cells, being more concentrated around the nucleus. Epicutaneous application of lycopene formulations decreased the level of anthralin-induced ear swelling by 97 and 87%, in a manner nonstatistically different from the positive control. These results support the idea that the lycopene-rich extract may be a good alternative to the expensive commercial lycopene for incorporation into advanced topical delivery systems.

  4. TARGET:?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James M Acton

    2014-01-01

      By 2003. as military planners had become worried that the country's long-range conventional weapons, such as cruise missiles, might be too slow to reach hypothetical distant targets that needed to be struck urgently...

  5. In vitro toxicity in long-term cell culture of MR contrast agents targeted to cartilage evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midura, S; Schneider, E; Sakamoto, F A; Rosen, G M; Winalski, C S; Midura, R J

    2014-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods have been proposed for non-invasive evaluation of osteoarthritis (OA). We measured cell toxicities of cartilage-targeted low-generation dendrimer-linked nitroxide MR contrast agents and gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) on cultured chondrocytes. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48-h to different salts (citrate, maleate, tartrate) and concentrations of generation one or two diaminobutyl-linked nitroxides (DAB4-DLN or DAB8-DLN), Gd-DTPA, or staurosporine (positive control). Impact on microscopic cell appearance, MTT spectrophotometric assays of metabolic activity, and quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content (cell proliferation) were measured and compared to untreated cultures. Chondrocyte cultures treated with up to 7.5 mM Gd-DTPA for 48-h had no statistical differences in DNA content or MTT reaction compared to untreated cultures. At all doses, DAB4-DLN citrate treated cultures had results similar to untreated and Gd-DTPA-treated cultures. At doses >1 mM, DAB4-DLN citrate treated cultures showed statistically greater DNA and MTT reaction than maleate and tartrate DAB4-DLN salts. Cultures exposed to 5 mM or 7.5 mM DAB8-DLN citrate exhibited rounded cells, poor cell proliferation, and barely detectable MTT reaction. Treatment with 0.1 μM staurosporine caused chondrocyte death. Long-term exposure, greater than clinically expected, to either DAB4-DLN citrate or Gd-DTPA had no detectable toxicity with results equivalent to untreated cultures. DAB4-DLN citrate was more biocompatible than either the maleate or tartrate salts. Cells exposed for 48-h to 5 mM or 7.5 mM DAB8-DLN salts demonstrated significant cell toxicity. Further evaluation of DAB8-DLN with clinically appropriate exposure times is required to determine the maximum useful concentration. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity of Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Subtypes to Chemotherapeutics and Molecular Targeted Agents: A Study on Primary Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraveto, Alice; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Giuliante, Felice; De Rose, Agostino Maria; Grazi, Gian Luca; Napoletano, Chiara; Semeraro, Rossella; Lustri, Anna Maria; Costantini, Daniele; Nevi, Lorenzo; Di Matteo, Sabina; Renzi, Anastasia; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCCA) subtypes to chemotherapeutics and molecular targeted agents. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were prepared from surgical specimens (N. 18 IHCCA patients) and evaluated for cell proliferation (MTS assay) and apoptosis (Caspase 3) after incubation (72 hours) with increasing concentrations of different drugs. In vivo, subcutaneous human tumor xenografts were evaluated. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were characterized by a different pattern of expression of cancer stem cell markers, and by a different drug sensitivity. Gemcitabine and the Gemcitabine-Cisplatin combination were more active in inhibiting cell proliferation in mixed-IHCCA while Cisplatin or Abraxane were more effective against mucin-IHCCA, where Abraxane also enhances apoptosis. 5-Fluoracil showed a slight inhibitory effect on cell proliferation that was more significant in mixed- than mucin-IHCCA primary cultures and, induced apoptosis only in mucin-IHCCA. Among Hg inhibitors, LY2940680 and Vismodegib showed slight effects on proliferation of both IHCCA subtypes. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Imatinib Mesylate and Sorafenib showed significant inhibitory effects on proliferation of both mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib, inhibited proliferation of only mucin-IHCCA while the aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, Bestatin was more active against mixed-IHCCA. The c-erbB2 blocking antibody was more active against mixed-IHCCA while, the Wnt inhibitor, LGK974, similarly inhibited proliferation of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. Either mucin- or mixed-IHCCA showed high sensitivity to nanomolar concentrations of the dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235. In vivo, in subcutaneous xenografts, either NVP-BEZ235 or Abraxane, blocked tumor growth. In conclusion, mucin- and mixed-IHCCA are characterized by a different drug sensitivity. Cisplatin, Abraxane and the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib were more

  7. Sensitivity of Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Subtypes to Chemotherapeutics and Molecular Targeted Agents: A Study on Primary Cell Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fraveto

    Full Text Available We investigated the sensitivity of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCCA subtypes to chemotherapeutics and molecular targeted agents. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were prepared from surgical specimens (N. 18 IHCCA patients and evaluated for cell proliferation (MTS assay and apoptosis (Caspase 3 after incubation (72 hours with increasing concentrations of different drugs. In vivo, subcutaneous human tumor xenografts were evaluated. Primary cultures of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA were characterized by a different pattern of expression of cancer stem cell markers, and by a different drug sensitivity. Gemcitabine and the Gemcitabine-Cisplatin combination were more active in inhibiting cell proliferation in mixed-IHCCA while Cisplatin or Abraxane were more effective against mucin-IHCCA, where Abraxane also enhances apoptosis. 5-Fluoracil showed a slight inhibitory effect on cell proliferation that was more significant in mixed- than mucin-IHCCA primary cultures and, induced apoptosis only in mucin-IHCCA. Among Hg inhibitors, LY2940680 and Vismodegib showed slight effects on proliferation of both IHCCA subtypes. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Imatinib Mesylate and Sorafenib showed significant inhibitory effects on proliferation of both mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. The MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib, inhibited proliferation of only mucin-IHCCA while the aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, Bestatin was more active against mixed-IHCCA. The c-erbB2 blocking antibody was more active against mixed-IHCCA while, the Wnt inhibitor, LGK974, similarly inhibited proliferation of mucin- and mixed-IHCCA. Either mucin- or mixed-IHCCA showed high sensitivity to nanomolar concentrations of the dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor, NVP-BEZ235. In vivo, in subcutaneous xenografts, either NVP-BEZ235 or Abraxane, blocked tumor growth. In conclusion, mucin- and mixed-IHCCA are characterized by a different drug sensitivity. Cisplatin, Abraxane and the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, Selumetinib

  8. NIOSOMES- A NOVEL DRUG CARRIER FOR DRUG TARGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.KRISHNA SAILAJA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are vesicular drug delivery systems made of cholesterol and non ionic surfactants. Various novel drug delivery systems available for targeting of drugs include liposomes, nanoparticles, and resealed erythrocytes. Because of the instability and higher cost liposomes are less preferred over niosomes. The application of vesicular systems in cosmetics and for therapeutic purpose may offer several advantages for niosomes. They improve the therapeutic performance of the drug molecules by delayed clearance from the circulation, protecting the drug from biological environment and restricting effects to target cells. Niosomes have great drug delivery potential for targeted delivery of anti-cancer, anti-infective agents. Drug delivery potential of niosome can enhance by using novel concepts like proniosomes and aspasome. Niosomes also serve better aid in diagnostic imaging and as a vaccine adjuvant. Thus these areas need further exploration and research so as to bring out commercially available niosomal preparation. This article mainly focuses on the significance, advantages over other drug delivery systems, manufacturing methods, characterization methods, current research in niosomal drug delivery and their limitations.

  9. Targeted Fe-filled carbon nanotube as a multifunctional contrast agent for thermoacoustic and magnetic resonance imaging of tumor in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenzheng; Lou, Cunguang; Qiu, Jieshan; Zhao, Zongbin; Zhou, Quan; Liang, Minjie; Ji, Zhong; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) can map the microwave absorption distribution of targets, which depends on the electrical and magnetic properties. Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with good electrical properties have been used as TAI contrast agents, the negligible magnetic absorption hinders its application for sensitive detection. In order to exploit CNTs with electrical and magnetic absorption properties as agent of TAI, the ferromagnetic material-filled multi-walled CNTs (MMWCNTs) are investigated. In this study, the folic acid conjugated plain multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) and MMWCNTs were injected through the tail-vein of mice separately, and TAI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The results show the MMWCNTs can clearly image the size and edge of the tumor with the TAI contrast enhancement of 67% and T2 signal intensity decrease of four fifths compared to MWCNTs. This study demonstrated the hybrid particles have the potential to be a high-sensitive contrast agent for accurate tumor detection. From the Clinical Editor: Novel imaging modalities are emerging. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) relies on the absorption distribution of microwave of targets. In this article the authors investigate the use of ferromagnetic material-filled multi-walled CNTs as contrast agents for both TAI and MRI in an in-vivo model for tumors. The positive findings would imply that the application of dual-modality probe could provide more accurate imaging for the clinical setting.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.

  11. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsade Piermartiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Unusual armadillo fold in the human general vesicular transport factor p115.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available The golgin family gives identity and structure to the Golgi apparatus and is part of a complex protein network at the Golgi membrane. The golgin p115 is targeted by the GTPase Rab1a, contains a large globular head region and a long region of coiled-coil which forms an extended rod-like structure. p115 serves as vesicle tethering factor and plays an important role at different steps of vesicular transport. Here we present the 2.2 A-resolution X-ray structure of the globular head region of p115. The structure exhibits an armadillo fold that is decorated by elongated loops and carries a C-terminal non-canonical repeat. This terminal repeat folds into the armadillo superhelical groove and allows homodimeric association with important implications for p115 mediated multiple protein interactions and tethering.

  13. Correlation of early PET findings with tumor response to molecular targeted agents in patients with advanced driver-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Fukushima, Toshirou; Gomi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Mamiya, Keiko; Tateishi, Kazunari; Katou, Akane; Oguchi, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in positron emission tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) have facilitated not only the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer, but also the prediction of treatment outcome. The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of early FDG-PET examination for predicting subsequent tumor size reduction in response to molecular targeted agents in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with sensitive gene anomalies. I. In 29 targeted lesions of 10 NSCLC patients, changes in FDG uptake before and on day 7 after the initiation of molecular targeted therapy (gefitinib, n = 7; crizotinib, n = 3) were compared with subsequent radiographic tumor size reduction by RECIST. FDG uptake was evaluated as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each targeted lesion. SUVmax decreased in all lesions after therapy (mean SUVmax 8.3 ± 3.4 before to 3.7 ± 1.8 after therapy, p < 0.05). The % decrease in SUVmax of each lesion was significantly correlated with the % tumor size reduction (r = 0.44). In addition, the reduction rate of SUVmax in metastatic bone lesions after initiation of molecular targeted therapy was significantly lower than that in targeted organs (27.1 ± 27.5 vs. 51.2 ± 21.3%, respectively, p < 0.05). Early reduction in FDG-PET uptake after initiation of molecular targeted agents was able to predict subsequent tumor reduction in patients harboring EGFR-mutated or ALK-positive NSCLC. In addition, nontargeted bone metastasis may have different glucose metabolism after TKI treatment compared with other involved organs.

  14. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents

    OpenAIRE

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with chol...

  15. Antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus in horses from southern, midwestern and northeastern Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Leobet Lunkes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the agent of a vesicular disease that affects many animal species and may be clinically confounded with foot-and-mouth disease in ruminant and swine. Horses are especially susceptible to VSV and may serve as sentinels for virus circulation. The present study investigated the presence of neutralizing antibodies against VSV Indiana III (VSIV-3 in serum samples of 3,626 horses from six states in three Brazilian regions: Southern (RS, n = 1,011, Midwest (GO/DF, n = 1,767 and Northeast (PB, PE, RN and CE, n = 848 collected between 2013 and 2014. Neutralizing antibodies against VSIV-3 (titers ≥40 were detected in 641 samples (positivity of 17.7%; CI95%:16.5-19.0%, being 317 samples from CE (87.3%; CI95%: 83.4-90.5 %; 109 from RN (65.7%; CI95%: 57.8 -72.7%; 124 from PB (45.4%; CI95%: 39.4-51.5%; 78 from GO/DF (4.4%; CI95%: 3.5-5.5% and nine samples of RS (0.9%; CI95%: 0.4-1.7%. Several samples from the Northeast and Midwest harbored high neutralizing titers, indicating a recent exposure to the virus. In contrast, samples from RS had low titers, possibly due to a past remote exposure. Several positive samples presented neutralizing activity against other VSV serotypes (Indiana I and New Jersey, yet in lower titers, indicating the specificity of the response to VSIV-3. These results demonstrated a relatively recent circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazilian States, confirming clinical findings and demonstrating the sanitary importance of this infection.

  16. Tumor Targeting and Pharmacokinetics of a Near-Infrared Fluorescent-Labeled δ-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Agent, Dmt-Tic-Cy5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Amanda Shanks; Estrella, Veronica; Stark, Valerie E; Cohen, Allison S; Chen, Tingan; Casagni, Todd J; Josan, Jatinder S; Lloyd, Mark C; Johnson, Joseph; Kim, Jongphil; Hruby, Victor J; Vagner, Josef; Morse, David L

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging can be employed for the development of novel cancer targeting agents. Herein, we investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and cellular uptake of Dmt-Tic-Cy5, a delta-opioid receptor (δOR) antagonist-fluorescent dye conjugate, as a tumor-targeting molecular imaging agent. δOR expression is observed normally in the CNS, and pathologically in some tumors, including lung liver and breast cancers. In vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo experiments were conducted to image and quantify the fluorescence signal associated with Dmt-Tic-Cy5 over time using in vitro and intravital fluorescence microscopy and small animal fluorescence imaging of tumor-bearing mice. We observed specific retention of Dmt-Tic-Cy5 in tumors with maximum uptake in δOR-expressing positive tumors at 3 h and observable persistence for >96 h; clearance from δOR nonexpressing negative tumors by 6 h; and systemic clearance from normal organs by 24 h. Live-cell and intravital fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that Dmt-Tic-Cy5 had sustained cell-surface binding lasting at least 24 h with gradual internalization over the initial 6 h following administration. Dmt-Tic-Cy5 is a δOR-targeted agent that exhibits long-lasting and specific signal in δOR-expressing tumors, is rapidly cleared from systemic circulation, and is not retained in non-δOR-expressing tissues. Hence, Dmt-Tic-Cy5 has potential as a fluorescent tumor imaging agent.

  17. Vasoactive Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Husedzinovic, Ino; Bradic, Nikola; Goranovic, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    This article is a short review of vasoactive drugs which are in use in todays clinical practice. In the past century, development of vasoactive drugs went through several phases. All of these drugs are today divided into several groups, depending on their place of action, pharmacological pathways and/or effects on target organ or organ system. Hence, many different agents are today in clinical practice, we have shown comparison between them. These agents provide new directions in the treatmen...

  18. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  19. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  20. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  1. Gas transport and vesicularity in low-viscosity liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, Laura; Bonadonna, Costanza; Abdulkareem, Lokman; Azzopardi, Barry; Phillips, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    Vesicle textures of basaltic scoria preserve information on magma bubble content at fragmentation and are commonly used to constrain degassing, vesiculation and magma permeability. These studies are based on the assumption that microscale textures are representative of the conduit-scale structures and processes. However, the conditions for which this assumption is valid have not been investigated in detail. We have investigated conduit-scale structures by performing a series of experiments of separate two-phase flows in a 6.5-m high cylindrical bubble column using a combination of air with pure glucose syrup, water-syrup mixtures and pure water to reproduce open-system degassing and strombolian activity conditions in the upper volcanic conduit (i.e. at very low or zero liquid fluxes). We have varied gas fluxes, initial liquid height, gas inlet configuration and liquid viscosity and analyzed flow regimes and properties. Temperature and pressure were measured at several heights along the pipe and vesicularity was calculated using pressure data, liquid level measurements and an Electrical Capacitance tomography (ECT) system, which measures instantaneous vesicularity and phase distribution from capacitance measurements between pairs of electrodes placed uniformly around the pipe circumference. The aim of the experiments was to identify the effect of gas-flow rates on the flow regimes (i.e. bubbly, slug, churn and annular), the main degassing structures and the total gas content of the column. The effect of increasing and decreasing gas flow rates was also studied to check hysteresis effects. Results indicate that the vesicularity of the liquid column depends primarily on gas flux, whereas flow regimes exert a minor control. In fact, vesicularity increases with gas flux following a power-law trend whose exponent depends on the viscosity of the liquid. In addition, distributions of instantaneous gas fraction in the column cross section during syrup experiments have shown

  2. An intelligent nanotheranostic agent for targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging, and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Ming; Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; Zheng, Shuguang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Lixin; Xu, Huixiong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-04-09

    A novel multifunctional nanotheranostic agent with targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging and ultrasound imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (MSNC-PEG-HA(SS)-PFH, abbreviated as MPH(SS)-PFH) capabilities is developed. The redox-responsive guest molecule release and ultrasound imaging functions can be both integrated in such a "smart" theranostic agent, which is accomplished by the redox-triggered transition from the crosslinking state to retrocrosslinking state of the grafted polyethylene glycol-disulfide hyaluronic acid molecules on the particle surface when reaching a reducing environment in vitro. More importantly, under the tailored ultrasound imaging guiding, in vivo Hela tumor-bearing nude mice can be thoroughly and spatial-accurately ablated during HIFU therapy, due to the targeted accumulation, responsive ultrasound imaging guidance and the synergistic ablation functions of nanotheranostic agent MPH(SS)-PFH in the tumors. This novel multifunctional nano-platform can serve as a promising candidate for further studies on oncology therapy, due to its high stability, responsive and indicative ultrasound imaging of tumors, and enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficiency and spatial accuracy under ultrasound-guidance.

  3. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 as a potential biological control agent for carp (Cyprinus carpio) in Australia: susceptibility of non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, K A; Sunarto, A; Slater, J; Bell, K; Asmus, M; Fulton, W; Hall, K; Brown, P; Gilligan, D; Hoad, J; Williams, L M; Crane, M St J

    2016-12-27

    Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) is a pest species in Australian waterways, and cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is being considered as a potential biological control (biocontrol) agent. An important consideration for any such agent is its target specificity. In this study, the susceptibility to CyHV-3 of a range of non-target species (NTS) was tested. The NTS were as follows: 13 native Australian, and one introduced, fish species; a lamprey species; a crustacean; two native amphibian species (tadpole and mature stages); two native reptilian species; chickens; and laboratory mice. Animals were exposed to 100-1000 times the approximate minimum amount of CyHV-3 required to cause disease in carp by intraperitoneal and/or bath challenge, and then examined clinically each day over the course of 28 days post-challenge. There were no clinical signs, mortalities or histological evidence consistent with a viral infection in a wide taxonomic range of NTS. Furthermore, there was no molecular evidence of infection with CyHV-3, and, in particular, all RT-PCRs for viral mRNA were negative. As a consequence, the results encourage further investigation of CyHV-3 as a potential biocontrol agent that is specific for carp.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-nucleolin-targeted magnetic PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin as a theranostic agent for enhanced targeted cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosafer, Jafar; Abnous, Khalil; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)/doxorubicin (Dox) co-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles targeted with AS1411 aptamer (Apt) against murine C26 colon carcinoma cells is successfully developed via a modified multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method for theranostic purposes. The mean size of SPIO/Dox-NPs (NPs) was 130nm with a narrow particle size distribution and Dox loading of 3.0%. The SPIO loading of 16.0% and acceptable magnetic properties are obtained and analyzed using thermogravimetric and vibration simple magnetometer analysis, respectively. The best release profile from NPs was observed in PBS at pH 7.4, in which very low burst release was observed. Nucleolin is a targeting ligand to facilitate anti-tumor delivery of AS1411-targeted NPs. The Apt conjugation to NPs (Apt-NPs) enhanced cellular uptake of Dox in C26 cancer cells. Apt-NPs enhance the cytotoxicity effect of Dox followed by a significantly higher tumor inhibition and prolonged animal survival in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma xenografts. Furthermore, Apt-NPs enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images in tumor site. Altogether, these Apt-NPs could be considered as a powerful tumor-targeted delivery system for their potential as dual therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancers.

  5. Preparation and Preliminary Biological Evaluation of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA folate as Potential Folate Receptor Targeting Therapeutic Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kang-Hyuk; Hong, Young-Don; Pyun, Mi-Sun; Lee, So-Young; Felipe, Fenelope; Yoon, Sun-Ha; Choi, Sun-Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Folic Acid (FA) and FA derivatives are overexpressed on several tumor cells. The cell-membrane folic acid receptors are known to be responsible for the cellular accumulation of FA and FA analogs, such as methotrexate and folic acid. Folate has been characterized to have high affinity for the folate-receptor positive cells and tissues and considered to be useful as diagnostic imaging and therapeutic agent. In 1940s, Folate analogue, aminopterin, was first used for treatment of leukemia and recently, many folate derivatives were tried for cancer-treatment agent as well as visualization of folate receptor. Many researchers tried to conjugate folic acid with macromolecules or low molecular weight chelators through its alpha or gamma carboxylate. However, despite the reduced binding affinity, FAs are still recognized by the folate receptor. Therefore, we focused to develop folate-based radiopharmaceutical that has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent. We report here the synthesis and the radiolabeling of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA as well as the biodistribution data of our developed compound.

  6. Structure of a prereaction complex between the nerve agent sarin, its biological target acetylcholinesterase, and the antidote HI-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgardsson, Anders; Berg, Lotta; Akfur, Christine; Hörnberg, Andreas; Worek, Franz; Linusson, Anna; Ekström, Fredrik J

    2016-05-17

    Organophosphorus nerve agents interfere with cholinergic signaling by covalently binding to the active site of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This inhibition causes an accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, potentially leading to overstimulation of the nervous system and death. Current treatments include the use of antidotes that promote the release of functional AChE by an unknown reactivation mechanism. We have used diffusion trap cryocrystallography and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to determine and analyze prereaction conformers of the nerve agent antidote HI-6 in complex with Mus musculus AChE covalently inhibited by the nerve agent sarin. These analyses reveal previously unknown conformations of the system and suggest that the cleavage of the covalent enzyme-sarin bond is preceded by a conformational change in the sarin adduct itself. Together with data from the reactivation kinetics, this alternate conformation suggests a key interaction between Glu202 and the O-isopropyl moiety of sarin. Moreover, solvent kinetic isotope effect experiments using deuterium oxide reveal that the reactivation mechanism features an isotope-sensitive step. These findings provide insights into the reactivation mechanism and provide a starting point for the development of improved antidotes. The work also illustrates how DFT calculations can guide the interpretation, analysis, and validation of crystallographic data for challenging reactive systems with complex conformational dynamics.

  7. Hybrid Markov-mass action law model for cell activation by rare binding events: Application to calcium induced vesicular release at neuronal synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, Claire; Holcman, David

    2016-10-01

    Binding of molecules, ions or proteins to small target sites is a generic step of cell activation. This process relies on rare stochastic events where a particle located in a large bulk has to find small and often hidden targets. We present here a hybrid discrete-continuum model that takes into account a stochastic regime governed by rare events and a continuous regime in the bulk. The rare discrete binding events are modeled by a Markov chain for the encounter of small targets by few Brownian particles, for which the arrival time is Poissonian. The large ensemble of particles is described by mass action laws. We use this novel model to predict the time distribution of vesicular release at neuronal synapses. Vesicular release is triggered by the binding of few calcium ions that can originate either from the synaptic bulk or from the entry through calcium channels. We report here that the distribution of release time is bimodal although it is triggered by a single fast action potential. While the first peak follows a stimulation, the second corresponds to the random arrival over much longer time of ions located in the synaptic terminal to small binding vesicular targets. To conclude, the present multiscale stochastic modeling approach allows studying cellular events based on integrating discrete molecular events over several time scales.

  8. Vesicularity, bubble formation and noble gas fractionation during MORB degassing

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, G; Guillot, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to use molecular dynamics simulation (MD) to evaluate the vesicularity and noble gas fractionation, and to shed light on bubble formation during MORB degassing. A previous simulation study (Guillot and Sator (2011) GCA 75, 1829-1857) has shown that the solubility of CO2 in basaltic melts increases steadily with the pressure and deviates significantly from Henry's law at high pressures (e.g. 9.5 wt% CO2 at 50 kbar as compared with 2.5 wt% from Henry's law). From the CO2 solubility curve and the equations of state of the two coexisting phases (silicate melt and supercritical CO2), deduced from the MD simulation, we have evaluated the evolution of the vesicularity of a MORB melt at depth as function of its initial CO2 contents. An excellent agreement is obtained between calculations and data on MORB samples collected at oceanic ridges. Moreover, by implementing the test particle method (Guillot and Sator (2012) GCA 80, 51-69), the solubility of noble gases in the two coexisting pha...

  9. Histopathological analysis of vesicular and bullous lesions in Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandemir Nilüfer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, the clinical and morphological features of vesiculobullous lesions observed in Kaposi sarcoma are analyzed, and the features of bullous Kaposi sarcoma cases are emphasized. Methods A total of 178 biopsy materials of 75 cases diagnosed as classic-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma were reviewed. Twenty-five cases showing vesiculobullous features were included in the study. Tumor, epidermis, dermis, and clinical data regarding these cases was evaluated. Results Vesicular changes were observed in 21 (12% out of 178 lesions of the 75 cases, while bullous changes were present in only 4 (2%. In all cases where vesicular and bullous changes were detected, tumor, epidermis, and dermis changes were similar. All cases were nodular stage KS lesions, whereas hyperkeratosis and serum exudation in the epidermis, marked edema in the dermis, and enlarged lymphatic vessels and chronic inflammatory response were observed. Conclusions Our findings suggest that changes in vascular resistance occurring during tumor progression are the most important factors comprising vesiculobullous morphology. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1646397188748474

  10. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model.

  11. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  12. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  13. Lobelane Inhibits Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release via Inhibition of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin R.; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (Ki = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [3H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC50 = 0.65 μM; Imax = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC50 = 0.42 μM, Imax = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for the development of a

  14. Developing ultra deformable vesicular transportation of a bioactive alkaloid in pursuit of vitiligo therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod KR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop transfersomal formulation integrated with piperine intended for vitiligo. Methods: Film hydration technique was employed in the preparation of transfersomes. Modified diffusion cell, consistency tester were fabricated for ex vivo diffusion studies and spreadability studies respectively while tape stripping method was integrated with tissue extraction in the determination of tissue drug concentration. Results: When film hydration technique was used for, ultradeformable vesicles (transfersomes of piperine in soabean phosphatidylcholine was formed with (67.11依0.22 to (70.55依3.62 and (60.12依1.04 to (80.43依0.14 mean size (毺 m and entrapment efficiency (% respectively. Transfersomes are capable of crossing the pores in permeability barriers extremely efficient even if the transfersome radius (tr is much greater than the pore size (rpore ie., tr/rpore曒0.25 the driven flux rate depends on the transdermal osmotic gradient. The vesicles describes elasto-mechanical character of vesicles while penetrating through the pores. The proviso is that the vesicular membrane elasticity is dynamically to the local stress by the external. Diffusion and Spreadability studies showed maximum diffusion when the lipid was kept minimum. Tape stripping and tissue extraction method for the tissue drug retention showed that (75.25依1.72% drug was retained in the dermis. Conclusions: Span 80 was preferred over tween 80 in terms of dermal retention. Size and encapsulation was slightly altered by phosphatidylcholine concentration. The kinetics, efficiency and the transfersome mediated transport can be tailored for trans-epidermal, deep tissues and systemic depending on the vesicular composition, dose and form. Thus we have offered a successful drug delivery of piperine targeting the deep epidermis.

  15. 钆类造影剂用于肿瘤靶向性成像%Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Tumor Targeting Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈爱军; 董海青; 温惠云; 徐梦; 李永勇; 王培军

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important technique of medical imaging for the tumor diagnosis, due to its high spatial and temporal resolutions and excellent soft tissue contrast, especially after the usage of various contrast agents. However, the current contrast agents for MRI, such as Gd-DTPA-BMA, Gd-DOTA etc. ,are all small molecules, which are associated with the intrinsic drawbacks such as nonspecificity for the interesting tissue,rapid excretion in vivo. To address the above questions, the novel specific MRI contrast agents with high efficiency and low toxicity are thus becoming research hot spots in both material and medical fields. In this review, particular attention is paid on the recent progress of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents for tumor targeting imaging by summarizing the relevant research papers. Both passive and active approach for tumor targeting imaging are involved in this review. The synthesis, principle and determined factors of MRI contrast agents for tumor targeting imaging and their in vitro or in vivo effects on the interesting tissue are discussed.%核磁共振成像(MRI)是肿瘤诊断的重要手段,特别是各种造影剂的使用加速了临床应用范围.目前临床MRI检查所用各类造影剂如Gd-DTPA-BMA、Gd-DOTA等均为小分子造影剂,存在组织特异性低、体内停留时间短等缺点.构建具有组织特异性的新一代高效、低毒MRI造影剂成为材料界、医学界的研究热点之一.本文在综合最新文献的研究基础之上,重点关注含钆类造影剂在肿瘤靶向成像中的应用及发展.

  16. Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: new hypothesis regarding its etiology and pathogenesis suggests that astrocytes might be the primary target hosting a still unknown external agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Roberto E P; Nicola, Alejandro F De; González Deniselle, María C; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Monachelli, Gisella M Gargiulo; Peralta, Liliana Martinez; Bettini, Mariela

    2011-08-01

    This article briefly describes the already known clinical features and pathogenic mechanisms underlying sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, namely excitoxicity, oxidative stress, protein damage, inflammation, genetic abnormalities and neuronal death. Thereafter, it puts forward the hypothesis that astrocytes may be the cells which serve as targets for the harmful action of a still unknown environmental agent, while neuronal death may be a secondary event following the initial insult to glial cells. The article also suggests that an emergent virus or a misfolded infectious protein might be potential candidates to accomplish this task.

  17. Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: new hypothesis regarding its etiology and pathogenesis suggests that astrocytes might be the primary target hosting a still unknown external agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto E.P. Sica

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly describes the already known clinical features and pathogenic mechanisms underlying sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, namely excitoxicity, oxidative stress, protein damage, inflammation, genetic abnormalities and neuronal death. Thereafter, it puts forward the hypothesis that astrocytes may be the cells which serve as targets for the harmful action of a still unknown environmental agent, while neuronal death may be a secondary event following the initial insult to glial cells. The article also suggests that an emergent virus or a misfolded infectious protein might be potential candidates to accomplish this task.

  18. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-09

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive.

  19. The efficacy of targeted health agents education to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in a rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Eduardo; Molina, Juan; Kamis, Danielle; Calvo, Maria; Stratton, Lee; Strejilevich, Sergio; Aleman, Gabriela Gonzalez; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2015-02-01

    The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is a key determinant in the severity of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. DUP is a modifiable factor that if reduced can improve patient outcome and treatment response. We sought to decrease DUP in rural Argentina by instituting annual training of local health agents to better identify signs of mental illness and offer earlier intervention. DUP was estimated using Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). Ongoing training was correlated with a reduction in DUP. Reducing DUP through better screening can decrease the psychosocial burden of disease and improve the trajectory of psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The efficacy of targeted Health Agents education to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis in a rural population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Eduardo; Molina, Juan; Kamis, Danielle; Calvo, Maria; Stratton, Lee; Strejilevich, Sergio; Aleman, Gabriela Gonzalez; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Conesa, Horacio A.; Escobar, Javier I.; de Erausquin, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is a key determinant in the severity of symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. DUP is a modifiable factor that if reduced can improve patient outcome and treatment response. We sought to decrease DUP in rural Argentina by instituting annual training of local health agents to better identify signs of mental illness and offer earlier intervention. DUP was estimated using Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). Ongoing training was correlated with a reduction in DUP. Reducing DUP through better screening can decrease the psychosocial burden of disease and improve the trajectory of psychosis. PMID:25439394

  1. Medicinal attributes of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine based scaffold derivatives targeting kinases as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser S.M. Ismail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrazolo pyrimidines are fused heterocyclic ring systems which known as bioisosteres of adenine, that are necessary for every aspect of cell life. Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines derivatives have been explored for their inhibitory activity towards a variety of protein kinase enzymes and their function as anticancer agents. This review to the best of our knowledge is the first assemblage on synthesis and medicinal aspects including structure activity relationships of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines reported to date.

  2. Targeting glucose metabolism in cancer: new class of agents for loco-regional and systemic therapy of liver cancer and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Chapiro, Julius; Duwe, Gregor; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In patients with unresectable disease, loco-regional catheter-based intra-arterial therapies (IAT) can achieve selective tumor control while minimizing systemic toxicity. As molecular features of tumor growth and microenvironment are better understood, new targets arise for selective anticancer therapy. Particularly, antiglycolytic drugs that exploit the hyperglycolytic cancer cell metabolism – also known as the ‘Warburg effect’ – have emerged as promising therapeutic options. Thus, future developments will combine the selective character of loco-regional drug delivery platforms with highly specific molecular targeted antiglycolytic agents. This review will exemplify literature on antiglycolytic approaches and particularly focus on intra-arterial delivery methods. PMID:26989470

  3. Targeting glucose metabolism in cancer: new class of agents for loco-regional and systemic therapy of liver cancer and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Chapiro, Julius; Duwe, Gregor; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In patients with unresectable disease, loco-regional catheter-based intra-arterial therapies (IAT) can achieve selective tumor control while minimizing systemic toxicity. As molecular features of tumor growth and microenvironment are better understood, new targets arise for selective anticancer therapy. Particularly, antiglycolytic drugs that exploit the hyperglycolytic cancer cell metabolism - also known as the 'Warburg effect' - have emerged as promising therapeutic options. Thus, future developments will combine the selective character of loco-regional drug delivery platforms with highly specific molecular targeted antiglycolytic agents. This review will exemplify literature on antiglycolytic approaches and particularly focus on intra-arterial delivery methods.

  4. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products...

  5. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED...

  6. H-aggregation of azobenzene-substituted amphiphiles in vesicular membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, JM; Engberts, JBFN

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical switching has been studied of double-tailed phosphate amphiphiles containing azobenzene units in both tails in aqueous vesicular dispersions and in mixed vesicular systems with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Since the ease of switching depends on the strength of the b

  7. Viral Surveillance during the 2006 Vesicular Stomatitis Outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2006, we collected 12203 biting flies from a vesicular stomatitis outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming. Flies were identified to the species level and viruses were isolated and identified by RT-PCR. We detected vesicular stomatitis virus-New Jersey serotype in two pools of Simulium bivittatum, W...

  8. Experimental infection of Didelphis marsupialis with Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although vesicular stomatitis has been present for many years in the Americas, many aspects of its natural history remain undefined. In this study we challenged five adult Virginia opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey serotype virus (VSNJV). Opossums had no detecta...

  9. Time to seroconversion to vesicular stomatitis virus in sentinel cows in Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a disease of livestock and some wildlife species caused by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). VS epidemics are frequent in certain regions of the United States and such epidemics inflict severe economic losses to affected regions of the country. In this study, a prospecti...

  10. Vesicular Disease in 9-Week-Old Pigs Experimentally Infected with Senecavirus A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Nestor; Buckley, Alexandra; Guo, Baoqing; Kulshreshtha, Vikas; VanGeelen, Albert; Hoang, Hai; Rademacher, Christopher; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Lager, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    Senecavirus A has been infrequently associated with vesicular disease in swine since 1988. However, clinical disease has not been reproduced after experimental infection with this virus. We report vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs after Sencavirus A infection by the intranasal route under experimental conditions.

  11. STATE-SPACE BASED MASS EVENT-HISTORY MODEL I: MANY DECISION-MAKING AGENTS WITH ONE TARGET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushing, Hsieh; Zhu, Li; Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Campbell, James F; Lewis, Edwin E

    2008-12-01

    A dynamic decision-making system that includes a mass of indistinguishable agents could manifest impressive heterogeneity. This kind of non-homogeneity is postulated to result from macroscopic behavioral tactics employed by almost all involved agents. A State-Space Based (SSB) mass event-history model is developed here to explore the potential existence of such macroscopic behaviors. By imposing an unobserved internal state-space variable into the system, each individual's event-history is made into a composition of a common state duration and an individual specific time to action. With the common state modeling of the macroscopic behavior, parametric statistical inferences are derived under the current-status data structure and conditional independence assumptions. Identifiability and computation related problems are also addressed. From the dynamic perspectives of system-wise heterogeneity, this SSB mass event-history model is shown to be very distinct from a random effect model via the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) in a numerical experiment. Real data showing the mass invasion by two species of parasitic nematode into two species of host larvae are also analyzed. The analysis results not only are found coherent in the context of the biology of the nematode as a parasite, but also include new quantitative interpretations.

  12. Targeted concurrent and sequential delivery of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents to the brain by using drug-loaded nanofibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor. Surgery followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma. Chemotherapy is ineffective, because of the low therapeutic levels of pharmaceuticals in tumor tissues and the well-known tumor-cell resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, we developed bilayered poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide nanofibrous membranes that enabled the sequential and sustained release of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents by employing an electrospinning technique. The release characteristics of embedded drugs were determined by employing an in vitro elution technique and high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental results showed that the fabricated nanofibers showed a sequential drug-eluting behavior, with the release of high drug levels of chemotherapeutic carmustine, irinotecan, and cisplatin from day 3, followed by the release of high concentrations of the antiangiogenic combretastatin from day 21. Biodegradable multidrug-eluting nanofibrous membranes were then dispersed into the cerebral cavity of rats by craniectomy, and the in vivo release characteristics of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes were investigated. The results suggested that the nanofibrous membranes released high concentrations of pharmaceuticals for more than 8 weeks in the cerebral parenchyma of rats. The result of histological analysis demonstrated developmental atrophy of brains with no inflammation. Biodegradable nanofibrous membranes can be manufactured for long-term sequential transport of different chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents in the brain, which can potentially improve the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and prevent toxic effects due to systemic administration.

  13. 5'-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Minako; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2017-03-15

    essential for the substrate activity. The findings presented here are useful not only for understanding the mechanism of the substrate recognition with PRNTase but also for designing antiviral agents targeting this enzyme. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. 5′-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Minako

    2017-01-01

    of GDP as essential for the substrate activity. The findings presented here are useful not only for understanding the mechanism of the substrate recognition with PRNTase but also for designing antiviral agents targeting this enzyme. PMID:28053102

  15. Distributed Communication Countermeasures Target Assignment System Based on Multi-Agent%基于多Agent的分布式通信对抗目标分配系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冯敬; 姚佩阳; 张杰勇; 万路军

    2012-01-01

    A distributed target assignment system based on multi-Agent is proposed in the presence of the characters of communication countermeasures target assignment. The problem of communication countermeasures target assignment is depicted and the model is built. The distributed cooperative auction mechanism and the distributed cooperative auction algorithm are designed. The distributed cooperative auction algorithm includes the tuba rule of auction sequence and the update role of target's threatening degree. Simulation results show that this algorithm has the quicker convergence speed and the better real-time performance compared with the Genetic Algorithm(GA).%针对通信对抗目标分配的特点,提出一种基于多Agent的分布式目标分配系统.给出问题描述和模型建立的方法,设计分布式协同拍卖机制和分布协同拍卖算法,其中,分布协同拍卖算法包括竞拍序列禁忌规则、目标威胁度更新规则等.仿真结果表明,与遗传算法相比,该算法收敛速度较快、实时性较强.

  16. Therapeutic potential of the anti-diabetic agent metformin in targeting the skin cancer stem cell diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Anand; Powers, Matthew A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Type II diabetes is associated with increased prevalence of cancer including both melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Emerging evidence from epidemiological studies suggest that diabetic patients on metformin have a lower risk of cancer incidence and mortality in a broad range of neoplasms. In both melanoma and SCC, populations of cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to tumor initiation and metastasis. We propose that metformin constitutes a new class of targeted therapy that acts on the skin CSC diaspora. We posit that metformin selectively and simultaneously targets CSCs of the primary tumor as well as in metastatic niches thereby disrupting the dynamic dispersal of circulating CSCs between the primary tumor and metastatic site. This hypothesis suggests a new concept in dermato-oncology that treatment of type II diabetes and prevention of skin cancer are two sides of the same coin.

  17. Novel Approaches for Concurrent Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Platinum Combinations, Non-Platinum-Containing Regimens, and Molecular Targeted Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannis Mountzios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the available prevention and early detection strategies, squamous-cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is still diagnosed as locally advanced disease in a considerable proportion of patients. As a potent sensitizer of cancer cells, cisplatin has been the “traditional partner” of external beam irradiation in this setting for more than two decades. Induction chemotherapy strategies followed by concurrent chemoradiation or surgery and preoperative concurrent chemoradiation have been recently implemented in clinical trials in an effort to optimize local control and to minimize the risk of distant metastases. In this context, cisplatin has been combined with a number of other potential radiosensitizers, including 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and gemcitabine. In patients resistant or intolerant to platinum compounds, numerous non-platinum-containing regimens have been developed, implementing various antimetabolites, taxanes, antineoplastic antibiotics, and topoisomerase II inhibitors. More recently, molecular agents targeting critical pathways in cervical malignant transformation are being assessed in early clinical trials in combination with external-beam irradiation. In the current work, we review the evolving role of cisplatin and other platinum compounds, either alone or in combination regimens, in the context of other potent radiosensitizers. The emerging role of molecular targeted agents, as candidate partners of external beam irradiation, is also discussed.

  18. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identified lysosome as a fast response target to PDT agent Gd-N induced oxidative stress in human ovarian cancer IGROV1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dandan; Wang, Qianqian; Li, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Lan, Rongfeng; Kwong, Daniel W J; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Li, Shuiming; Lu, Fei

    2015-11-01

    Biological systems have developed an intact network and strategies in response to various environmental pressures such as irradiation, viral invasion and oxidative stress. Therefore, elucidation of the cellular response mechanism toward oxidative stress can contribute to the knowledge of redox regulation. By using a newly developed gadolinium based photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent Gd-N and SILAC quantified proteomic analysis, we observed 485 proteins dysregulated in expression, 106 in phosphorylation and 1050 in oxidation. Interestingly, lysosome was discovered as the main organelle affected by Gd-N induced singlet oxygen, along with the down regulation of a majority of lysosomal acid hydrolases and proton pump complex ATP6V/TCIRG1. Besides, phosphorylation sites with sequence patterns "TP" or "SP" were enriched in dysregulated phosphoproteins. Protein oxidation also shows sequence patterns in target proteins with "M.D" or "KM" taking methionine as the central residue. Oxidized proteins were most enriched in the pathways of Parkinson's disease, an oxidative stress closely related neurodegenerative disease. In conclusion, our study reveals new insights into the cellular mechanism to oxidative stress and may contribute to the discovery of new targets and development of novel PDT agents.

  19. Targeting of ICAM-1 on vascular endothelium under static and shear stress conditions using a liposomal Gd-based MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis Leonie EM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 on the endothelium of blood vessels in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli is of major importance for the regulation of local inflammation in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke. In vivo molecular imaging of ICAM-1 will improve diagnosis and follow-up of patients by non-invasive monitoring of the progression of inflammation. Results A paramagnetic liposomal contrast agent functionalized with anti-ICAM-1 antibodies for multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorescence imaging of endothelial ICAM-1 expression is presented. The ICAM-1-targeted liposomes were extensively characterized in terms of size, morphology, relaxivity and the ability for binding to ICAM-1-expressing endothelial cells in vitro. ICAM-1-targeted liposomes exhibited strong binding to endothelial cells that depended on both the ICAM-1 expression level and the concentration of liposomes. The liposomes had a high longitudinal and transversal relaxivity, which enabled differentiation between basal and upregulated levels of ICAM-1 expression by MRI. The liposome affinity for ICAM-1 was preserved in the competing presence of leukocytes and under physiological flow conditions. Conclusion This liposomal contrast agent displays great potential for in vivo MRI of inflammation-related ICAM-1 expression.

  20. Molecular-targeted agents in treatment of advanced breast cancer%晚期乳腺癌分子靶向药物治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄健; 王晓稼

    2008-01-01

    分子靶向药物已经被临床广泛使用,其疗效显著,不良反应轻微,主要有表皮生长因子(EGF)抑制剂、血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)抑制剂、小分子酪氨酸激酶抑制剂、单克隆抗体等.与多种化疗药物联合可以进一步提高疗效.%Molecular-targeted agents have had an extensive use in clinic.It has been the primary choice when treating advanced breast cancer due to its remarkable therapeutic efficacy and slightly adverse reaction. New drugs haye emerged such as inhibitors of epithelial grouth factor,inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor,tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies,etc.Molecular-targeted agents combined with multi-drugs can further improve the therapeutic effect.

  1. Comparing the suitability of autodock, gold and glide for the docking and predicting the possible targets of Ru(II)-based complexes as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Ajibade, Peter A

    2013-03-25

    In cancer chemotherapy, metal-based complexes have been recognized as the most promising means of inhibiting cancer growth due to the successful application of cis-platin and its derivatives above many of the existing organic anticancer agents. The limitations in their rational design can be traced to the complexity of the mechanism of their operations, lack of proper knowledge of their targets and lack of force fields in docking packages to appropriately define the metal centre of the organometallic complexes. In this paper, some of the promising anticancer complexes of Ru(II) such as the rapta-based complexes formulated as [Ru(η6-p-cymene)L2(pta)] and those with unusual ligands are considered. CatB and kinases which have been experimentally confirmed as possible targets of the complexes are also predicted by the three methods as one of the most targeted receptors while TopII and HDAC7 are predicted by two and one of the methods as best targets. The interesting features of the binding of the complexes show that some of the complexes preferentially target specific macromolecules than the others, which is an indication of their specificity and possibility of their therapeutic combination without severe side effects that may come from competition for the same target. Also, introduction of unusual ligands is found to significantly improve the activities of most of the complexes studied. Strong correlations are observed for the predicted binding sites and the orientation of the complexes within the binding site by the three methods of docking. However there are disparities in the ranking of the complexes by the three method of docking, especially that of Glide.

  2. Comparing the Suitability of Autodock, Gold and Glide for the Docking and Predicting the Possible Targets of Ru(II-Based Complexes as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo A. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In cancer chemotherapy, metal-based complexes have been recognized as the most promising means of inhibiting cancer growth due to the successful application of cis-platin and its derivatives above many of the existing organic anticancer agents. The limitations in their rational design can be traced to the complexity of the mechanism of their operations, lack of proper knowledge of their targets and lack of force fields in docking packages to appropriately define the metal centre of the organometallic complexes. In this paper, some of the promising anticancer complexes of Ru(II such as the rapta-based complexes formulated as [Ru(η6-p-cymeneL2(pta] and those with unusual ligands are considered. CatB and kinases which have been experimentally confirmed as possible targets of the complexes are also predicted by the three methods as one of the most targeted receptors while TopII and HDAC7 are predicted by two and one of the methods as best targets. The interesting features of the binding of the complexes show that some of the complexes preferentially target specific macromolecules than the others, which is an indication of their specificity and possibility of their therapeutic combination without severe side effects that may come from competition for the same target. Also, introduction of unusual ligands is found to significantly improve the activities of most of the complexes studied. Strong correlations are observed for the predicted binding sites and the orientation of the complexes within the binding site by the three methods of docking. However there are disparities in the ranking of the complexes by the three method of docking, especially that of Glide.

  3. Targeting activated microglia in Alzheimer's pathology by intraventricular delivery of a phagocytosable MRI contrast agent in APP23 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P; Winter, Christine; Mueller, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens; Tysiak, Eva; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Heinz, Andreas; Juckel, Georg

    2009-06-01

    The role of phagocytosing immune cells in Alzheimer's pathology can be studied experimentally in APP23 transgenic mice. This present study intended to label phagocytosing immune cells in the plaque periphery of APP23 mice in vivo by intraventricular injection of VSOP-C184, a phagocytosable iron oxide nanoparticle MRI contrast agent. Firstly, the dosages of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micromol Fe/kg body weight dissolved in 500 nl of artificial cerebrospinal fluid, delivered by stereotaxic surgery were evaluated 4 h after surgery in 7 wild type mice using 7 T MRI. Secondly, the dosage of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight was investigated in 6 APP23 mice. The distribution of iron oxide particles was evaluated histologically. The injection of 0.1 micromol Fe/kg body weight did not result in any signal alterations, 10 micromol resulted in strong signal artifacts. The delivery of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight in wild type mice resulted in MRI signal alterations throughout the ventricular system without large artifacts. It was regarded superior to other dosages for the study of the transgenic mice. There was no difference in MRI signal alterations and the distribution of iron particles in the histology between APP23 and wild type mice using the dosage of 1.0 micromol Fe/kg body weight. Upon intraventricular injection, the phagocytosable contrast agent VSOP-C184 distributes throughout the ventricular system, whereas it does not reach the periphery of amyloid plaques in APP23 mice in a concentration sufficient to cause MRI signal alterations.

  4. Highly biocompatible TiO₂:Gd³⁺ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-05

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) of size ∼25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r(1) relaxivity which is ∼2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r(1) values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd(3+) ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml(-1). The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a

  5. Gold nanorods/mesoporous silica-based nanocomposite as theranostic agents for targeting near-infrared imaging and photothermal therapy induced with laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yang Liu,1,2 Ming Xu,3 Qing Chen,1 Guannan Guan,1 Wen Hu,3 Xiuli Zhao,1 Mingxi Qiao,1 Haiyang Hu,1 Ying Liang,2 Heyun Zhu,1 Dawei Chen1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, 2Department of Pharmacy, Bengbu Medical College, Bengbu, 3College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Photothermal therapy (PTT is widely regarded as a promising technology for cancer treatment. Gold nanorods (GNRs, as excellent PTT agent candidates, have shown high-performance photothermal conversion ability under laser irradiation, yet two major obstacles to their clinical application are the lack of selective accumulation in the target site following systemic administration and the greatly reduced photothermal conversion efficiency caused by self-aggregating in aqueous environment. Herein, we demonstrate that tLyp-1 peptide-functionalized, indocyanine green (ICG-containing mesoporous silica-coated GNRs (I-TMSG possessed dual-function as tumor cells-targeting near-infrared (NIR fluorescent probe and PTT agents. The construction of the nanostructure began with synthesis of GNRs by seed-mediated growth method, followed by the coating of mesoporous silica, the chemical conjugation of PEG and tLyp-1 peptide, and the enclosure of ICG as an NIR imaging agent in the mesoporous. The as-prepared nanoparticles could shield the GNRs against their self-aggregation, improve the stability of ICG, and exhibit negligible dark cytotoxicity. More importantly, such a theranostic nanocomposite could realize the combination of GNRs-based photothermal ablation under NIR illumination, ICG-mediated fluorescent imaging, and tLyp-1-enabled more easy endocytosis into breast cancer cells. All in all, I-TMSG nanoparticles, in our opinion, possessed the strong potential to realize the effective diagnosis and PTT treatment of human mammary cancer. Keywords: theranostic nanoagents, photothermal therapy, indocyanine

  6. Biomimetic Templating of Porous Lamellar Silicas by Vesicular Surfactant Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Peter T.; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1996-03-01

    A biomimetic templating approach to the synthesis of lamellar silicas is demonstrated. The procedure is based on the hydrolysis and cross-linking of a neutral silicon alkoxide precursor in the interlayered regions of multilamellar vesicles formed from a neutral diamine bola-amphiphile. Unlike earlier surfactant-templating approaches, this method produces porous lamellar silicas (designated MSU-V) with vesicular particle morphology, exceptional thermal stability, a high degree of framework cross-linking, unusually high specific surface area and pore volume, and sorption properties that are typical of pillared lamellar materials. This approach circumvents the need for a separate pillaring step in building porosity into a lamellar host structure and offers new opportunities for the direct fabrication of adsorbents, catalysts, and nanoscale devices.

  7. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C Abel Nielsen

    Full Text Available Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV is an enterovirus that is both genetically and antigenically closely related to human coxsackievirus B5 within the Picornaviridae family. SVDV is the causative agent of a highly contagious (though rarely fatal vesicular disease in pigs. We report a rapid method that is suitable for sequencing the complete protein-encoding sequences of SVDV isolates in which the RNA is relatively intact. The approach couples a single PCR amplification reaction, using only a single PCR primer set to amplify the near-complete SVDV genome, with deep-sequencing using a small fraction of the capacity of a Roche GS FLX sequencing platform. Sequences were initially verified through one of two criteria; either a match between a de novo assembly and a reference mapping, or a match between all of five different reference mappings performed against a fixed set of starting reference genomes with significant genetic distances within the same species of viruses. All reference mappings used an iterative method to avoid bias. Further verification was achieved through phylogenetic analysis against published SVDV genomes and additional Enterovirus B sequences. This approach allows high confidence in the obtained consensus sequences, as well as provides sufficiently high and evenly dispersed sequence coverage to allow future studies of intra-host variation.

  8. Tumor Targeting Using Anti–Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (ior egf/r3 Immunoconjugate with a Tetraaza Macrocyclic Agent (DO3A-EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Mishra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling inhibition represents a highly promising arena for the application of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. EGFR conjugated metal chelates have been proposed as potential imaging agents for cancers that overexpress EGFR receptors. Through improved understanding of EGFR biology in human cancers, there is anticipation that more tumor-selective therapy approaches with diminished collateral normal tissue toxicity can be advanced. We report here on the results with a thermodynamically stable chelate, 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl-10-(2-aminoethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-EA and anti-EGFr (ior egf/r3 conjugate to develop immunospecifc imaging agent. Conjugation and labelling with anti-EGFr was performed using standard procedure and subjected to purification on size exclusion chromatography. The conjugated antibodies were labeled with a specific activity 20-30 mCi/mg of protein. Labeling efficiencies were measured by ascending paper chromatography on ITLC-SG strips. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugate was found to be 98.5 ± 0.30%. 99mTc-DO3A-EA-EGFr conjugate was studied in athymic mice bearing U-87MG, MDA-MB-468 tumors following intravenous injection. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies confirmed long circulation times (t1/2(fast= 45 min and t1/2(slow=4 hours 40 min and efficient accumulation in tumors. Biodistribution studies in athymic mice grafted with U-87MG human glioblastoma multiforme and Hela human cervical carcinoma tumors revealed significant localization of 99mTc-labeled antibodies conjugate in tumors and reduced accumulation in normal organs. This new chelating agent is promising for immunoscintigraphy since good tumour-to-normal organ contrast could be demonstrated. These properties can be exploited for immunospecifc contrast agents in nuclear medicine and SPECT imaging.

  9. In vitro chondrocyte toxicity following long-term, high-dose exposure to Gd-DTPA and a novel cartilage-targeted MR contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midura, Sharon; Midura, Ronald J. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rosen, Gerald M. [University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); NitroSci Pharmaceuticals, New Berlin, WI (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, A21, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the concentrations exhibiting toxicity of a cartilage-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DT-PA) in chondrocyte cultures. A long-term Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte-like cell line was exposed for 48 h to 1.0-20 mM concentrations of diaminobutyl-linked nitroxide (DAB4-DLN) citrate, 1.0-20 mM Gd-DTPA, 1.0 μM staurosporine (positive control), or left untreated. Cell appearance, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays of metabolic activity, quantitative PicoGreen assays of DNA content, and calcein-AM viability assays were compared. At 1.0-7.5 mM, minimal decrease in cell proliferation was found for both agents. At all doses of both agents, cell culture appearances were similar after 24 h of treatment. At the higher doses, differences in cell culture appearance were found after 48 h of treatment, with dose-dependent declines in chondrocyte populations for both agents. Concentration-dependent declines in DNA content and calcein fluorescence were found after 48 h of treatment, but beginning at a lower dose of DAB4-DLN citrate than Gd-DTPA. Dose-dependent decreases in MTT staining (cell metabolism) were apparent for both agents, but larger effects were evident at a lower dose for DAB-DLN citrate. Poor MTT staining of cells exposed for 48 h to 20 mM DAB4-DLN citrate probably indicates dead or dying cells. The minimal effect of the long-term exposure of model chondrocyte cell cultures to DAB4-DLN citrate and Gd-DTPA concentrations up to 7.5 mM (3x typical arthrographic administration) is supporting evidence that these doses are acceptable for MR arthrography. The findings are reassuring given that the experimental exposure to the contrast agents at sustained concentrations was much longer than when used clinically. (orig.)

  10. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  11. 78 FR 24670 - Notice of a Determination Regarding the Swine Vesicular Disease Status of Certain Regions in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... and Bolzano are free of swine vesicular disease. Based on an assessment of the animal health status of... presents a low risk of introducing swine vesicular disease into the United States. This determination is... communicable diseases, including swine vesicular disease (SVD). SVD is a dangerous and destructive communicable...

  12. 77 FR 74787 - Notice of Availability of an Evaluation of the Swine Vesicular Disease Status of Certain Regions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... an Evaluation of the Swine Vesicular Disease Status of Certain Regions in Italy AGENCY: Animal and... Piemonte and the autonomous provinces of Trento and Bolzano are free of swine vesicular disease. This... communicable diseases, including swine vesicular disease (SVD). These are dangerous and destructive...

  13. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  14. Discovery of a novel azaindole class of antibacterial agents targeting the ATPase domains of DNA gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, John I; Dussault, Daemian D; Rose, Jonathan A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Uria-Nickelsen, Maria; Ioannidis, Georgine; Bist, Shanta; Fleming, Paul; Hull, Kenneth G

    2012-08-01

    We present the discovery and optimization of a novel series of bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors. Starting from a virtual screening hit, activity was optimized through a combination of structure-based design and physical property optimization. Synthesis of fewer than a dozen compounds was required to achieve inhibition of the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) at compound concentrations of 1.56 μM. These compounds simultaneously inhibit DNA gyrase and Topoisomerase IV at similar nanomolar concentrations, reducing the likelihood of the spontaneous occurrence of target-based mutations resulting in antibiotic resistance, an increasing threat in the treatment of serious infections.

  15. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E; Johnson, Sadie M; Chowdhury, Sayan M; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10(th) type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI.

  16. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien F Vinet

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In contrast, recruitment of cathepsin B, the early endosomal marker EEA1 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to phagosomes was normal in the absence of Syt V. As Leishmania donovani promastigotes inhibit phagosome maturation, we investigated their potential impact on the phagosomal association of Syt V. This inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis is mediated by the virulence glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, a polymer of the repeating Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4 units attached to the promastigote surface via an unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Our results showed that insertion of lipophosphoglycan into ganglioside GM1-containing microdomains excluded or caused dissociation of Syt V from phagosome membranes. As a consequence, L. donovani promatigotes established infection in a phagosome from which the vesicular proton-ATPase was excluded and which failed to acidify. Collectively, these results reveal a novel function for Syt V in phagolysosome biogenesis and provide novel insight into the mechanism of vesicular proton-ATPase recruitment to maturing phagosomes. We also provide novel findings into the mechanism of Leishmania pathogenesis, whereby targeting of Syt V is part of the strategy used by L. donovani promastigotes to prevent phagosome acidification.

  17. Trans-synaptic transmission of vesicular Wnt signals through Evi/Wntless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Ceren; Ataman, Bulent; Ramachandran, Preethi; Ashley, James; Barria, Romina; Gherbesi, Norberto; Budnik, Vivian

    2009-10-16

    Wnts play pivotal roles during development and in the mature nervous system. However, the mechanism by which Wnts traffic between cells has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate a mechanism of Wnt transmission through release of exosome-like vesicles containing the Wnt-binding protein Evenness Interrupted/Wntless/Sprinter (Evi/Wls/Srt). We show that at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), presynaptic vesicular release of Evi is required for the secretion of the Wnt, Wingless (Wg). We also show that Evi acts cell-autonomously in the postsynaptic Wnt-receiving cell to target dGRIP, a Wg-receptor-interacting protein, to postsynaptic sites. Upon Evi loss of function, dGRIP is not properly targeted to synaptic sites, interfering with postsynaptic Wnt signal transduction. These findings uncover a previously unknown cellular mechanism by which a secreted Wnt is transported across synapses by Evi-containing vesicles and reveal trafficking functions of Evi in both the Wnt-producing and the Wnt-receiving cells. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data available online.

  18. Bio-functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles using an aminophosphonic acid coupling agent: new, ultradispersed, iron-oxide folate nanoconjugates for cancer-specific targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Manasmita; Basak, A; Pramanik, P [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Mishra, Debasish; Maiti, T K [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)], E-mail: md_manasmita@yahoo.com, E-mail: panchanan_123@yahoo.com

    2008-10-15

    The present study describes a systematic approach towards the design and development of novel, bio-functionalized, magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles for cancer-specific targeting. Biocompatible, hydrophilic, magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles with surface-pendant amine, carboxyl or aldehyde groups, to be later used for bio-conjugation, were designed using an aminophosphonic acid coupling agent. These magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles were further functionalized with folic acid, using diverse conjugation strategies. A series of new iron-oxide folate nanoconjugates with excellent aqueous dispersion stability and reasonably good hydrodynamic sizes under a wide range of physiological conditions were developed. These ultradispersed nanosystems were analyzed for their physicochemical properties and cancer-cell targeting ability, facilitated by surface modification with folic acid. The nanoparticle size, charge, surface chemistry, magnetic properties and colloidal stability were extensively studied using a variety of complementary techniques. Confocal microscopy, performed with folate receptor positive human cervical HeLa cancer cells, established that these non-cytotoxic iron-oxide folate nanoconjugates were effectively internalized by the target cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell-uptake behaviors of nanoparticles, studied using magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS), clearly demonstrated that cells over-expressing the human folate receptor internalized a higher level of these nanoparticle-folate conjugates than negative control cells.

  19. DNA-based aptamer fails as a simultaneous cancer targeting agent and drug delivery vehicle for a phenanthroline-based platinum(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinely, Nicola L; Plumb, Jane A; Wheate, Nial J

    2013-11-01

    The sgc8c aptamer is a 41-base DNA oligonucleotide that binds to leukaemia cells with high affinity and specificity. In this work we examined the utility of this aptamer as both a delivery vehicle and an active targeting agent for an inert platinum complex [(1,10-phenathroline)(ethylenediamine)platinum(II)](2+). The aptamer forms a stem-and-loop confirmation as determined by circular dichroism. This conformation is adopted in both water and phosphate buffered saline solutions. The metal complex binds through intercalation into the aptamer's double helical stem with a binding constant of approximately 4.3 × 10(4) M(-1). Binding of the metal complex to the aptamer had a significant effect on the aptamer's global conformation, and increased its melting temperature by 28°C possibly through lengthening and stiffening of the aptamer stem. The effect of the aptamer on the metal complex's cytotoxicity and cellular uptake was determined using in vitro assays with the target leukaemia cell line CCRF-CEM and the off-target ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and A2780cp70. The aptamer has little inherent cytotoxicity and when used to deliver the metal complex results in a significant decrease in the metal complex's cytotoxicity and uptake. The reason(s) for the poor uptake and activity may be due to the change in aptamer conformation which affects its ability to recognise leukaemia cells.

  20. An In Vivo Evaluation of the Effect of Repeated Administration and Clearance of Targeted Contrast Agents on Molecular Imaging Signal Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Streeter, Paul A. Dayton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive inhibition diminishes ligand adhesion as receptor sites become occupied with competing ligands. It is unknown if this effect occurs in ultrasound molecular imaging studies where endothelial binding sites become occupied with adherent bubbles or bubble fragments. The goal of this pilot study was to assess the effect that repeated administration and clearance of targeted agents has on successive adhesion. Two groups of animals were imaged with 3-D ultrasonic molecular imaging. Injections and imaging were performed on Group 1 at time 0 and 60 minutes. Group 2 received injections of microbubbles at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes with imaging at 0 and 60 minutes. At 60 minutes, Group 1 targeting relative to baseline was not significantly different from Group 2 (1.06±0.27 vs. 1.08±0.34, p=0.93. Data suggest that multiple injections of targeted microbubbles do not block sufficient binding sites to bias molecular imaging data in serial studies.

  1. Peptide-Decorated Gold Nanoparticles as Functional Nano-Capping Agent of Mesoporous Silica Container for Targeting Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ganchao; Xie, Yusheng; Peltier, Raoul; Lei, Haipeng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jun; Hu, Yi; Wang, Feng; Yao, Xi; Sun, Hongyan

    2016-05-11

    A stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) with bioactive surface is constructed by end-capping mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with functional peptide-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). MSNs are first functionalized with acid-labile α-amide-β-carboxyl groups to carry negative charges, and then capped with positively charged GNPs that are decorated with oligo-lysine-containing peptide. The resulting hybrid delivery system exhibits endo/lysosomal pH triggered drug release, and the incorporation of RGD peptide facilitates targeting delivery to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing cancer cells. The system can serve as a platform for preparing diversified multifunctional nanocomposites using various functional inorganic nanoparticles and bioactive peptides.

  2. Evaluation of (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-Bevacizumab as a radioimmunotherapy agent targeting VEGF expressing cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswaran, Mythili; Pandey, Usha; Gamre, Naresh; Vimalnath, K V; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at the preparation and evaluation of (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-Bevacizumab for targeting VEGF over-expressing cancers. Bevacizumab conjugated to p-NCS-Bn-CHX-A''-DTPA was radiolabeled with (177)Lu. The radioimmunoconjugate characterized by SE-HPLC exhibited radiochemical purity of 98.0±0.6%. In vitro stability was retained upto 4 days at 37°C. In vitro cell binding studies showed good uptake by VEGF expressing U937 tumor cells. Biodistribution studies in melanoma model showed significant uptake and retention of (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-Bevacizumab in tumor with reduction in uptake in presence of cold Bevacizumab confirming its specificity to VEGF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-performance PEGylated Mn-Zn ferrite nanocrystals as a passive-targeted agent for magnetically induced cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Yan, Caiyun; Song, Lina; Wen, Song; Zang, Fengchao; Chen, Gong; Ding, Qi; Yan, Changzhi; Gu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    An effective magnetic nanocrystals (MNCs)-mediated theranostics strategy as a combination of simultaneous diagnostics and heating treatment of tumors by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and alternating current magnetic field (ACMF) is successfully developed. In this strategy, we had firstly synthesized a well-established Mn-Zn ferrite MNCs coated with PEG-phospholipids (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol copolymers, DSPE-PEG2000). The monodisperse PEGylated MNCs with core-shell structure (15 nm) exhibited excellent performance, such as high magnetism of 98 emu g(-1) Fe, relaxivity coefficient (r2) of 338 mm(-1) s(-1), and specific absorption rate (SAR) value of 324 W g(-1) Fe. It was proved that the obtained MNCs with an average diameter of 48.6 nm can drastically minimize the recognition and phagocytosis of macrophages, simultaneously improve their biocompatibility in vitro. These advantages endowed them with efficient passive targeting ability in vivo for prominent tumor MRI and magnetically induced heating when exposed to ACMF, based on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. To ensure sufficient accumulation of MNCs within tumors for targeted hyperthermia, we described the use of MNCs with a well-tolerated intravenous single dose of 18 mg Fe/kg mouse body weight, achieving repeatedly injection and hyperthermia within a subcutaneous breast cell carcinoma mouse model. With an ACMF of 12 A at 390 kHz, the tumor surface sites could be heated to approximately 43 °C in 30 min based on MNCs-mediated intravenous injections. The long-lasting hyperthermia could effectively induce the apoptosis of tumor cells, inhibit the angiogenesis of tumor vessels, and finally suppress the tumor growth within a certain period of time.

  4. Specific targeting of gliomas with multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle optical and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-xi MENG; Jia-qi WAN; Meng JING; Shi-guang ZHAO; Wei CAI; En-zhong LIU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether glioma cells can be specifically and efficiently tar- geted by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-chlorotoxin (SPIOFC) that is detectable by magnetic reso- nance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging. Methods: SPIOFC was synthesized by conjugating SPIO with FITC and chlorotoxin. Glioma cells (human U251-MG and rat C6) were cultured with SPIOFC and SPIOF (SPIO-FITC), respectively. Neural cells were treated with SPIOFC as the control for SPIOFC-targeted glioma cells. The internalization of SPIOFC by glioma cells was assessed by MRI and was quantified using inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. The optical imaging ability of SPIOFC was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Iron per cell of U251 (72.5±1.8 pg) and C6 (74.9±2.2 pg) cells cultured with SPIOFC were significantly more than those of U251 (6.6±1.0 pg) and C6 (7.1±0.8 pg) cells incubated with SPIOF. The T2 signal intensity of U251 and C6 cells cultured with SPIOFC (233.6±25.9 and 211.4±17.2, respectively) were substantially lower than those of U251 and C6 cells incubated with SPIOF (2275.3±268.6 and 2342.7±222.4, respectively). Moreover, there were significant differences in iron per cell and T2 signal intensity between SPIOFC-treated neural cells (1.3±0.3; 2533.6±199.2) and SPIOFC-treated glioma cells. SPIOFC internalized by glioma cells exhibited green fluorescence by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Conclusion: SPIOFC is suitable for the specific and efficient targeting of glioma cells. MRI and optical imaging in conjunction with SPIOFC can differentiate glioma cells from normal brain tissue cells.

  5. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  6. Potencial bioterapêutico dos probióticos nas parasitoses intestinais Probiotics as potential biotherapeutic agents targeting intestinal parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Goulart de Oliveira-Sequeira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Probióticos são microrganismos vivos que, se administrados em quantidades adequadas, promovem benefícios à saúde do homem e dos animais. O crescente interesse nos probióticos fundamenta-se em estudos clínicos nos quais a administração desses organismos foi avaliada na prevenção e no tratamento de desordens intestinais e sistêmicas. Os potenciais mecanismos de ação desses microrganismos incluem a exclusão competitiva, a produção de metabólitos com atividade antimicrobiana e a modulação da resposta imune. Em algumas circunstâncias clínicas específicas, os benefícios produzidos por esses microrganismos foram amplamente documentados, enquanto que em outras os resultados são contraditórios. No presente artigo de revisão, os probióticos foram abordados considerando-se o potencial bioterapêutico desses microrganismos nas parasitoses intestinais.Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, beneficially affect the general health status of man and animal. The great interest in probiotic microganisms is based on evidences from clinical studies indicating benefits in the prevention or treatment of a broad spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic disorders. The potential mechanisms by which probiotics beneficially affect health include strengthening of the intestinal barrier, modulation of the immune response, and antagonism of pathogens either by the production of antimicrobial compounds or through competition for mucosal binding sites. In some specific clinical circumstances, there is clear evidence of benefit whereas in others, the results are dubious and important questions remaining unanswered. The aim of this review article is to focus probiotics on their potential as biotherapeutic agents against intestinal parasites.

  7. Micro-HCCs in rats with liver cirrhosis: paradoxical targeting effects with vascular disrupting agent CA4P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Keyzer, Frederik De; Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jianjun; Song, Shaoli; Yu, Jie; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Swinnen, Johan; Bormans, Guy; Himmelreich, Uwe; Oyen, Raymond; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Gang; Ni, Yicheng

    2017-08-15

    We sought to investigate anticancer efficacy of a vascular disrupting agent (VDA) combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA4P) in relation to tumor size among hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in rats using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem techniques. Nineteen rats with 43 chemically-induced HCCs of 2.8-20.9 mm in size on liver cirrhosis received CA4P intravenously at 10 mg/kg. Tumor-diameter was measured by T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) to define microcancers (micro-HCCs, but diverse therapeutic necrosis in larger HCCs with a positive correlation with tumor size. Necrosis in micro-HCCs was 36.9% more than that in larger HCCs. While increased diffusion coefficient (ADCdiff) suggested tumor necrosis, perfusion coefficient (ADCperf) indicated sharply decreased blood perfusion in cirrhotic liver together with a reduction in micro-HCCs. DCE revealed lowered tumor blood flow from intravascular into extravascular extracellular space (EES). Microangiography and histopathology revealed hypo- and hypervascularity in 4 and 3 micro-HCCs, massive, partial and minor degrees of tumoral necrosis in 5, 1 and 1 micro-HCCs respectively, and patchy necrotic foci in cirrhotic liver. CD34-PAS staining implicated that poorly vascularized micro-HCCs growing on liver cirrhosis tended to respond better to CA4P treatment. In this study, more complete CA4P-response occurred unexpectedly in micro-HCCs in rats, along with CA4P-induced necrotic foci in cirrhotic liver. These may help to plan clinical applications of VDAs in patients with HCCs and liver cirrhosis.

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted noscapine analogs as potent and microtubule-targeted anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ram C; Gundala, Sushma R; Karna, Prasanthi; Lopus, Manu; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Hamelberg, Donald; Tandon, Vibha; Panda, Dulal; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an opium-derived kinder-gentler microtubule-modulating drug, currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report the synthesis of four more potent di-substituted brominated derivatives of noscapine, 9-Br-7-OH-NOS (2), 9-Br-7-OCONHEt-NOS (3), 9-Br-7-OCONHBn-NOS (4), and 9-Br-7-OAc-NOS (5) and their chemotherapeutic efficacy on PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The four derivatives were observed to have higher tubulin binding activity than noscapine and significantly affect tubulin polymerization. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the interaction between tubulin and 2, 3, 4, 5 was found to be, 55±6μM, 44±6μM, 26±3μM, and 21±1μM respectively, which is comparable to parent analog. The effects of these di-substituted noscapine analogs on cell cycle parameters indicate that the cells enter a quiescent phase without undergoing further cell division. The varying biological activity of these analogs and bulk of substituent at position-7 of the benzofuranone ring system of the parent molecule was rationalized utilizing predictive in silico molecular modeling. Furthermore, the immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from cells treated with 4 and 5, revealed the induction of apoptosis and down-regulation of survivin levels. This result was further supported by the enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 enzymes in treated samples compared to the controls. Hence, these compounds showed a great potential for studying microtubule-mediated processes and as chemotherapeutic agents for the management of human cancers.

  9. Neurite outgrowth mediated by translation elongation factor eEF1A1: a target for antiplatelet agent cilostazol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Cilostazol, a type-3 phosphodiesterase (PDE3 inhibitor, has become widely used as an antiplatelet drug worldwide. A recent second Cilostazol Stroke Prevention Study demonstrated that cilostazol is superior to aspirin for prevention of stroke after an ischemic stroke. However, its precise mechanisms of action remain to be determined. Here, we report that cilostazol, but not the PDE3 inhibitors cilostamide and milrinone, significantly potentiated nerve growth factor (NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Furthermore, specific inhibitors for the endoplasmic reticulum protein inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3 receptors and several common signaling pathways (PLC-γ, PI3K, Akt, p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and the Ras/Raf/ERK/MAPK significantly blocked the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by cilostazol. Using a proteomics analysis, we identified that levels of eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A1 protein were significantly increased by treatment with cilostazol, but not cilostamide, in PC12 cells. Moreover, the potentiating effects of cilostazol on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth were significantly antagonized by treatment with eEF1A1 RNAi, but not the negative control of eEF1A1. These findings suggest that eEF1A1 and several common cellular signaling pathways might play a role in the mechanism of cilostazol-induced neurite outgrowth. Therefore, agents that can increase the eEF1A1 protein may have therapeutic relevance in diverse conditions with altered neurite outgrowth.

  10. Multiple roles of the vesicular-SNARE TI-VAMP in post-Golgi and endosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaineau, Mathilde; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry

    2009-12-01

    SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are the core machinery of membrane fusion. Vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) interact with their target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) to form SNARE complexes which mediate membrane fusion. Here we review the basic properties and functions of the v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 (Tetanus neurotoxin insensitive-vesicle associated membrane protein). TI-VAMP interacts with its t-SNARE partners, particularly plasmalemmal syntaxins, to mediate membrane fusion and with several regulatory proteins especially via its amino-terminal regulatory Longin domain. Partners include AP-3, Hrb/(Human immunodeficiency virus Rev binding) protein, and Varp (Vps9 domain and ankyrin repeats containing protein) and regulate TI-VAMP's function and targeting. TI-VAMP is involved both in secretory and endocytic pathways which mediate neurite outgrowth and synaptic transmission, plasma membrane remodeling and lysosomal secretion.

  11. Enhancement of immunostimulatory properties of exosomal vaccines by incorporation of fusion-competent G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Nchinda, Godwin; Nabi, Ghulam; Tippler, Bettina; Zelenyuk, Maryna; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus; Kuate, Seraphin

    2008-07-04

    Exosomes have been proposed as candidates for therapeutic immunization. The present study demonstrates that incorporation of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) into exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) enhances their uptake and induces the maturation of dendritic cells. Targeting of VSV-G and ovalbumin as a model antigen to the same ELVs increased the cross-presentation of ovalbumin via an endosomal acidification mechanism. Immunization of mice with VSV-G and ovalbumin containing ELVs led to an increased IgG2a antibody response, expansion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells, strong in vivo CTL responses, and protection from challenge with ovalbumin expressing tumor cells. Thus, incorporation of VSV-G and targeting of antigens to ELVs are attractive strategies to improve exosomal vaccines.

  12. Production of RS4 from rice starch and its utilization as an encapsulating agent for targeted delivery of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Gani, Asir; Gani, Adil; Shah, Asima; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad

    2018-01-15

    The research reported in this article is based on the hypothesis that crosslinking of starch can make it a potential wall material for targeted delivery of probiotics by altering its digestion. Three probiotic strains namely Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum were microencapsulated with resistant starch. Encapsulation yield (%) of resistant starch microspheres was in the range of 43.01-48.46. The average diameter of resistant starch microparticles was in the range of 45.53-49.29μm. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy of microcapsules showed peaks in the region of 900-1300cm(-1) and 2918-2925cm(-1) which corresponds to the presence of bacteria. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) showed better thermal stability of resistant starch microcapsules. Microencapsulated probiotics survived well in simulated gastrointestinal conditions and adverse heat conditions. The viability of the microcapsulated lactobacilli also remained high (>7 log cfu g(-1)) for 2months at 4°C. The results revealed that resistant starch is the potential new delivery carrier for oral administration of probiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-target effects of the microbial control agents Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54 and Clonostachys rosea IK726 in soils cropped with barley followed by sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Knudsen, Inge M.B.; Binnerup, Svend J.

    2005-01-01

    on plant growth or soil microorganisms. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis detected the perturbations of the soil microbial community structure in the MCA treatments as well as the return to non- perturbed conditions reflecting the decline of inoculant populations. The PLFA technique appears......Non-target effects of a bacterial (Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54) and a fungal (Clonostachys rosea IK726) microbial control agent (MCA), on the indigenous microbiota in bulk soil and rhizosphere of barley, and subsequent a sugar beet crop, were studied in a greenhouse experiment. MCAs were...... introduced by seed and soil inoculation. Bulk and rhizosphere soils were sampled regularly during the growth of barley and sugar beet. The soils were assayed for the fate of MCAs and various features of the indigenous soil microbiota. At the end of the experiment (193 d), DR54 and IK726 had declined...

  14. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-01-06

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors.

  15. Development and characterization of an antibody-labeled super-paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agent targeting prostate cancer cells for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bates

    Full Text Available In this study we developed, characterized and validated in vitro a functional superparagmagnetic iron-oxide based magnetic resonance contrast agent by conjugating a commercially available iron oxide nanoparticle, Molday ION Rhodamine-B Carboxyl (MIRB, with a deimmunized mouse monoclonal antibody (muJ591 targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. This functional contrast agent is intended for the specific and non-invasive detection of prostate cancer cells that are PSMA positive, a marker implicated in prostate tumor progression and metastasis. The two-step carbodiimide reaction used to conjugate the antibody to the nanoparticle was efficient and we obtained an elemental iron content of 1958 ± 611 per antibody. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that the conjugated muJ591:MIRB complex specifically binds to PSMA-positive (LNCaP cells. The muJ591:MIRB complex reduced cell adhesion and cell proliferation on LNCaP cells and caused apoptosis as tested by Annexin V assay, suggesting anti-tumorigenic characteristics. Measurements of the T2 relaxation time of the muJ591:MIRB complex using a 400 MHz Innova NMR and a multi-echo spin-echo sequence on a 3T MRI (Achieva, Philips showed a significant T2 relaxation time reduction for the muJ591:MIRB complex, with a reduced T2 relaxation time as a function of the iron concentration. PSMA-positive cells treated with muJ591:MIRB showed a significantly shorter T2 relaxation time as obtained using a 3T MRI scanner. The reduction in T2 relaxation time for muJ591:MIRB, combined with its specificity against PSMA+LNCaP cells, suggest its potential as a biologically-specific MR contrast agent.

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy of EGFR or EGFRvIII positive gliomas using either boronated monoclonal antibodies or epidermal growth factor as molecular targeting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Barth, R.F. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: rolf.barth@osumc.edu; Wu, G. [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 165 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tjarks, W. [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Binns, P.; Riley, K. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02215 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    In the present report we have summarized studies carried out over the past five years on molecular targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its mutant isoform, EFGRvIII, for BNCT of genetically engineered F98 rat gliomas, expressing either wildtype (F98{sub EGFR}) or mutant receptors (F98{sub npEGFRvIII}). EGF or the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), cetuximab (IMC-C225) and L8A4, which recognize wildtype EGFR and EGFRvIII, respectively, were heavily boronated using polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (BD) linked to the targeting vehicles by means of heterobifunctional reagents. Boronated EGF or mAbs, alone or in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA), were administered intracerebrally (i.c.) by either intratumoral (i.t.) injection or convection enhanced delivery (CED) to rats bearing F98 gliomas following which BNCT was initiated. The best survival data were obtained in rats bearing F98{sub npEGFRvIII} gliomas that had received CED of BD-L8A4 either alone or in combination with i.v. boronophenylalanine (BPA). Studies carried out in rats bearing composite tumors (F98{sub EGFR}/F98{sub npEGFRvIII}) demonstrated that it was essential to target both tumor cell populations in order to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. Based on these observations, we have concluded that EGFR targeting vehicles are useful, but not stand-alone boron delivery agents due to the heterogeneity of receptor expression in brain tumors. They could, however, be quite useful in combination with the two drugs that currently are being used clinically, BPA and sodium borocaptate (BSH) for BNCT of either brain tumors or head and neck cancers.

  17. Gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugate of arabinogalactan as a potential liver-targeting magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui; Wang, Xuxia; Lei, Hao

    2014-08-18

    A novel biocompatible macromolecule (AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd) was synthesized as a liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd consisted of a carboxymethyl-arabinogalactan unit conjugated with gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (Gd-DOTA) via ethylenediamine, and was specifically designed to bind to hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein in vivo, in an effort to develop a potential new tool for the diagnosis of liver diseases. The T1-relaxivity (8.87mmol(-1)Ls(-1)) of AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd was 1.86 times than that of Gd-DOTA (4.76mmol(-1)Ls(-1)) in D2O at 9.4 T and 25°C. MRI experiments showed significant enhancement in rat liver following the intravenous administration of AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd (0.094mmol Gd(3+)/kg body weight), which persisted for longer than Gd-DOTA (0.098mmol Gd(3+)/kg body weight). The mean percentage enhancements in the liver parenchyma were 85.2±6.5% and 19.3±3.3% for AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd and Gd-DOTA, respectively. The results of this study therefore indicate that AG-CM-EDA-DOTA-Gd could be used as a potential liver-targeting contrast agent for MRI.

  18. A near-infrared phthalocyanine dye-labeled agent for integrin αvβ6-targeted theranostics of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Duo; Gao, Liquan; Zhang, Chenran; Liu, Hao; Jia, Bing; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2015-06-01

    Integrin αvβ6 is widely upregulated in variant malignant cancers but is undetectable in normal organs, making it a promising target for cancer diagnostic imaging and therapy. Using streptavidin-biotin chemistry, we synthesized an integrin αvβ6-targeted near-infrared phthalocyanine dye-labeled agent, termed Dye-SA-B-HK, and investigated whether it could be used for cancer imaging, optical imaging-guided surgery, and phototherapy in pancreatic cancer mouse models. Dye-SA-B-HK specifically bound to integrin αvβ6 in vitro and in vivo with high receptor binding affinity. Using small-animal optical imaging, we detected subcutaneous and orthotopic BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer xenografts in vivo. Upon optical image-guidance, the orthotopically growing pancreatic cancer lesions could be successfully removed by surgery. Using light irradiation, Dye-SA-B-HK manifested remarkable antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and ex vivo fluorescence staining validated the observed decrease in proliferation of treated tumors by Dye-DA-B-HK phototherapy. Tissue microarray results revealed overexpression of integrin αvβ6 in over 95% cases of human pancreatic cancer, indicating that theranostic application of Dye-DA-B-HK has clear translational potential. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that integrin αvβ6-specific Dye-SA-B-HK is a promising theranostic agent for the management of pancreatic cancer.

  19. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  20. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  1. Clinical efficacy and IL-17 targeting mechanism of Indigo naturalis as a topical agent in moderate psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Man; Wu, Yang-Chang; Wang, Qingmin; Song, Michael; Wu, Jackson; Chen, Dion; Li, Katherine; Wadman, Eric; Kao, Shung-Te; Li, Tsai-Chung; Leon, Francisco; Hayden, Karen; Brodmerkel, Carrie; Chris Huang, C

    2017-09-02

    Indigo naturalis is a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) ingredient long-recognized as a therapy for several inflammatory conditions, including psoriasis. However, its mechanism is unknown due to lack of knowledge about the responsible chemical entity. We took a different approach to this challenge by investigating the molecular profile of Indigo naturalis treatment and impacted pathways. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted using Indigo naturalis as topical monotherapy to treat moderate plaque psoriasis in a Chinese cohort (n = 24). Patients were treated with Indigo naturalis ointment (n = 16) or matched placebo (n = 8) twice daily for 8 weeks, with 1 week of follow-up. At week 8, significant improvements in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores from baseline were observed in Indigo naturalis-treated patients (56.3% had 75% improvement [PASI 75] response) compared with placebo (0.0%). A gene expression signature of moderate psoriasis was established from baseline skin biopsies, which included the up-regulation of the interleukin (IL)-17 pathway as a key component; Indigo naturalis treatment resulted in most of these signature genes returning toward normal, including down-regulation of the IL-17 pathway. Using an in vitro keratinocyte assay, an IL-17-inhibitory effect was observed for tryptanthrin, a component of Indigo naturalis. This study demonstrated the clinical efficacy of Indigo naturalis in moderate psoriasis, and exemplified a novel experimental medicine approach to understand TCM targeting mechanisms. NCT01901705 .

  2. Compartmentalization of signaling by vesicular trafficking: a shared building design for the immune synapse and the primary cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Baldari, Cosima T

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the immune synapse (IS) of naive T cells as a site of intense vesicular trafficking. At variance with helper and cytolytic effectors, which use the IS as a secretory platform to deliver cytokines and/or lytic granules to their cellular targets, this process is exploited by naive T cells as a means to regulate the assembly and maintenance of the IS, on which productive signaling and cell activation crucially depend. We have recently identified a role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which is responsible for the assembly of the primary cilium, in the non-ciliated T-cell, where it controls IS assembly by promoting polarized T-cell receptor recycling. This unexpected finding not only provides new insight into the mechanisms of IS assembly but also strongly supports the notion that the IS and the primary cilium, which are both characterized by a specialized membrane domain highly enriched in receptors and signaling mediators, share architectural similarities and are homologous structures. Here, we review our current understanding of vesicular trafficking in the regulation of the assembly and maintenance of the naive T-cell IS and the primary cilium, with a focus on the IFT system.

  3. 2-Amino-2-deoxy-glucose conjugated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (2DG-MNP) as a targeting agent for breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşık, Elif; Aslan, Tuğba Nur; Volkan, Mürvet; Güray, N Tülin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucose (2DG) was conjugated to COOH modified cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (COOH-MNPs), which were designed to target tumor cells as a potential targetable drug/gene delivery agent for cancer treatment. According to our results, it is apparent that, 2DG labeled MNPs were internalized more efficiently than COOH-MNPs under the same conditions in all cell types (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cancer and MCF-10A normal breast cells) (p<0.001). Moreover, the highest amount of uptake was observed in MDA-MB-231, followed by MCF-7 and normal MCF-10A cells for both MNPs. The apoptotic effects of 2DG-MNPs were further evaluated, and it was found that apoptosis was not induced at low concentrations of 2DG-MNPs in all cell types, whereas dramatic cell death was observed at higher concentrations. In addition, the gene expression levels of four drug-metabolizing enzymes, two Phase I (CYP1A1, CYP1B1) and two Phase II (GSTM3, GSTZ1) were also increased with the high concentrations of 2DG-MNPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  5. Vamp-7 Mediates Vesicular Transport from Endosomes to Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Raj J.; Yang, Bin; Prekeris, Rytis; Lee, Kelly C.; Klumperman, Judith; Scheller, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    A more complete picture of the molecules that are critical for the organization of membrane compartments is beginning to emerge through the characterization of proteins in the vesicle-associated membrane protein (also called synaptobrevin) family of membrane trafficking proteins. To better understand the mechanisms of membrane trafficking within the endocytic pathway, we generated a series of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7). The antibodies recognize a 25-kD membrane-associated protein in multiple tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals colocalization with a marker of late endosomes and lysosomes, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), but not with other membrane markers, including p115 and transferrin receptor. Treatment with nocodozole or brefeldin A does not disrupt the colocalization of VAMP-7 and LAMP-1. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis shows that VAMP-7 is most concentrated in the trans-Golgi network region of the cell as well as late endosomes and transport vesicles that do not contain the mannose-6 phosphate receptor. In streptolysin- O–permeabilized cells, antibodies against VAMP-7 inhibit the breakdown of epidermal growth factor but not the recycling of transferrin. These data are consistent with a role for VAMP-7 in the vesicular transport of proteins from the early endosome to the lysosome. PMID:10459012

  6. Delayed transmission selects for increased survival of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Brian R; Bhushan, Ambika; Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that traits for survival and reproduction cannot be simultaneously maximized in evolving populations. For this reason, in obligate parasites such as infectious viruses, selection for improved between-host survival during transmission may lead to evolution of decreased within-host reproduction. We tested this idea using experimental evolution of RNA virus populations, passaged under differing transmission times in the laboratory. A single ancestral genotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a negative-sense RNA Rhabdovirus, was used to found multiple virus lineages evolved in either ordinary 24-h cell-culture passage, or in delayed passages of 48 h. After 30 passages (120 generations of viral evolution), we observed that delayed transmission selected for improved extracellular survival, which traded-off with lowered viral fecundity (slower exponential population growth and smaller mean plaque size). To further examine the confirmed evolutionary trade-off, we obtained consensus whole-genome sequences of evolved virus populations, to infer phenotype-genotype associations. Results implied that increased virus survival did not occur via convergence; rather, improved virion stability was gained via independent mutations in various VSV structural proteins. Our study suggests that RNA viruses can evolve different molecular solutions for enhanced survival despite their limited genetic architecture, but suffer generalized reproductive trade-offs that limit overall fitness gains. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Ruedas, John B. [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Ghimire, Anil [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Gudheti, Manasa V. [Vutara, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Perrault, Jacques [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Jorgensen, Erik M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Gerton, Jordan M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Bioengineering, University of Utah (United States); Saffarian, Saveez, E-mail: saffarian@physics.utah.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  8. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  9. In vitro inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus replication by purified porcine Mx1 protein fused to HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-min; He, Dan-Ni; Zhou, Bin; Pang, Ran; Liu, Ke; Zhao, Jin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2013-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the causative agent of Vesicular stomatitis (VS), a highly contagious fatal disease of human and pigs. Few effective antiviral drugs are currently available against VSV infection. Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a range of antiviral activities. Previous studies have shown that the transfected cell lines expressing either porcine Mx1 or human MxA acquired a high degree of resistance to VSV. To explore the feasibility of taking porcine Mx1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as an antiviral agent, we applied the pCold system to express this fusion protein (PTD-poMx1), which consisted of an N-terminal HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD) and the full-length porcine Mx1, and investigated its effects on the replication of VSV in Vero cells. The results demonstrated that the purified PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins could transduct into cells after incubated for 5h and had no cytotoxic. Furthermore, plaque reduction assay, determination of TCID50, real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were carried out to confirm the antiviral activity of purified fusion proteins in VSV-infected Vero cells. Altogether, these data suggested that PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins might be applicable to inhibit VSV replication as a novel antiviral therapeutic agent.

  10. A vesicular stomatitis pseudovirus expressing the surface glycoproteins of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheresiz, S V; Kononova, A A; Razumova, Yu V; Dubich, T S; Chepurnov, A A; Kushch, A A; Davey, R; Pokrovsky, A G

    2014-10-01

    Pseudotyped viruses bearing the glycoprotein(s) of a donor virus over the nucleocapsid core of a surrogate virus are widely used as safe substitutes for infectious virus in virology studies. Retroviral particles pseudotyped with influenza A virus glycoproteins have been used recently for the study of influenza hemagglutinin and neuraminidase-dependent processes. Here, we report the development of vesicular-stomatitis-virus-based pseudotypes bearing the glycoproteins of influenza A virus. We show that pseudotypes bearing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 influenza A virus mimic the wild-type virus in neutralization assays and sensitivity to entry inhibitors. We demonstrate the requirement of NA for the infectivity of pseudotypes and show that viruses obtained with different NA proteins are significantly different in their transduction activities. Inhibition studies with oseltamivir carboxylate show that neuraminidase activity is required for pseudovirus production, but not for the infection of target cells with H5N1-VSV pseudovirus. The HA-NA-VSV pseudoviruses have high transduction titers and better stability than the previously reported retroviral pseudotypes and can replace live influenza virus in the development of neutralization assays, screening of potential antivirals, and the study of different HA/NA reassortants.

  11. In Vitro Percutaneous Permeation and Skin Accumulation of Finasteride Using Vesicular Ethosomal Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found...

  12. Subepidermal vesicular dermatosis and sensory peripheral neuropathy caused by pyridoxine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M A; Resnick, J S; Baer, R L

    1986-05-01

    A woman who had ingested 2 gm of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) daily for 2 years for menstrual water retention developed a subepidermal vesicular eruption on the dorsa of the hands and toes, as well as a sensory peripheral neuropathy. The cutaneous and neurologic manifestations subsided about 2 months after discontinuation of the pyridoxine. The possible relationship of subepidermal vesicular eruptions caused by pyridoxine abuse to epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is discussed.

  13. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate ( r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM-1 s-1. In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian blue staining of the section clearly

  14. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate (r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM(-1) s(-1). In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian

  15. First case report of vesicular stomatitis in the State of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inácio José Clementino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the first case of vesicular stomatitis in the State of Paraíba, Brazil. Records from the Official Veterinary Services of the State of Paraíba were analyzed while responding to a suspected case of vesicular disease at a property (property I in the municipality of Pombal in which the cattle showed clinical signs and lesions of vesicular disease. Surveillance in the surrounding area revealed similar lesions in cattle at two other properties (II and III. Based on these events, the suspicion was considered well founded, and samples were collected for evaluation at the National Agricultural Laboratory of the State of Pará. The property was interdicted, and those located within a 3 km radius (perifocal from the focus were inspected. At property I, 42.86% (6/14 of the cattle showed vesicular disease lesions characterized by intense sialorrhea, ruptured oral vesicles, epithelial detachment of the tongue and muzzle, and vesicular lesions in the udder and interdigital space. Similar lesions were detected in cattle at properties II and III, affecting 80.95% (34/42 and 11.54% (3/26 of the animals, respectively. Tissue samples collected from the three properties were positive for the vesicular stomatitis virus (Indiana 3 subtype. The properties were monitored for 21 days after the last infected animal was cured, and afterwards, the three properties were released.

  16. Editorial: Current status and perspective on drug targets in tubercle bacilli and drug design of antituberculous agents based on structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    present status of global research on novel drug targets related to the Toll-like receptor in the MTB pathogen, with special reference to mycobacterial virulence factors that cross-talk and interfere with signaling pathways of host macrophages [6]. The following four review articles deal with drug design of novel anti-TB agents employing QSAR techniques. Firstly, Drs. Nidhi and Mohammad Imran Siddiqi review 2D and 3D QSAR approaches and the recent trends of these methods integrated with virtual screening using the 3D pharmacophore and molecular docking approaches for the identification and design of novel antituberculous agents, by presenting a comprehensive overview of QSAR studies reported for newer antituberculous agents [7]. Secondly, Drs. Filomena Martins, Cristina Ventura, Susana Santos, and Miguel Viveiros review the current status of different QSAR-based strategies for the design of novel anti-TB drugs based upon the most active anti-TB agent, isoniazid, from the viewpoint of the development of promising derivatives that are active against isoniazid- resistant strains with katG mutations [8]. Thirdly, Drs. Sanchaita Rajkhowa and Ramesh C. Deka review current studies concerning 2D and 3D QSAR models that contain density-functional theory (DFT)-based descriptors as their parameters [9]. Notably, DFT-based descriptors such as atomic charges, molecular orbital energies, frontier orbital densities, and atom-atom polarizabilities are very useful in predicting the reactivity of atoms in molecules. Fourthly, Drs. Renata V. Bueno, Rodolpho C. Braga, Natanael D. Segretti, Elizabeth I. Ferreira, Gustavo H. G. Trossini, and Carolina H. Andrade review the current progress and applications of QSAR analysis for the discovery of innovative tuberculostatic agents as inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, DNA gyrase, ATP synthase, and thymidylate kinase enzymes, highlighting present challenges and new opportunities in TB drug design [10]. The aim of this issue is to address the

  17. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. New cardioprotective agent flokalin and its supramolecular complexes with target amino acids: An integrated mass-spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Ágnes; Vékey, Károly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2017-10-01

    This study is devoted to examining the molecular structure and molecular mechanisms of action of the recently developed cardioprotective agent flokalin (Fl), a fluorine containing analogue of pinacidil, which is known as an activator of ATP sensitive potassium membrane channels. A combined experimental and computational investigation of flokalin and its biologically relevant supramolecular complexes with selected amino acids involved in KATP-channels proteins is performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) and by B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ quantum-mechanical calculations. First Fl solution is probed by ESI MS and a characteristic mass spectrum of the agent is obtained. Next the intermolecular interactions of Fl with the potentially targeted aminoacids (AA), Lys and Thr, are experimentally investigated. The spectra of the model Fl:AA systems (in 1:1 M ratio) contain information on the ions characteristic to the individual components of the mixtures; though the most interesting spectral results from the biophysical view point are related to the ions of stable molecular clusters formed by flokalin with AA. The peaks of such ions are quite prominent in the spectrum for the Fl:Lys system and less prominent for Fl:Thr. The equilibrium geometries and the corresponding interaction energies of the noncovalent supramolecular complexes registered in the mass spectra are determined in the quantum chemical calculations. The formation of the stable noncovalent complexes of Fl with Lyz and Thr revealed by the ESI MS probing and by the theoretical modelling testify to a possibility of interaction of flokalin with the KATP-channel domains enriched with the two amino acids in biological systems.

  19. A novel Tc-99 m and fluorescence labeled peptide as a multimodal imaging agent for targeting angiogenesis in a murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2016-11-01

    The serine-aspartic acid-valine (SDV) peptide binds specifically to integrin αV β3 . In the present study, we successfully developed a TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV peptide labeled with both Tc-99 m and TAMRA to target the integrin αV β3 of tumor cells; furthermore, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor of the murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV with Tc-99 m was done using ligand exchange methods. Labeling stability and cytotoxicity studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with HT-1080 and HT-29 tumors. A tumor tissue slide was prepared and analyzed using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99 m, the Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV complexes were prepared in high yield (>99%). In the gamma camera imaging study, a substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-1080 tumor (integrin αV β3 positive) and low uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV into HT-29 tumor (integrin αV β3 negative) were demonstrated. A competition study revealed that HT-1080 tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the co-injection of an excess concentration of SDV. Specific uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging and confocal microscopy studies. Our in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV in the integrin αV β3 -positive tumor. Tc-99 m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-SDV could be a good candidate for a dual-modality imaging agent targeting tumor angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  1. Vesicular Contact Reaction May Progress into Erythema Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Jenerowicz, Dorota; Szulczyńska-Gabor, Joanna; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Szyfter-Harris, Joanna; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Dear Editor, Erythema multiforme is considered an acute skin condition, characterized by a self-limiting and sometimes recurrent course. It is regarded as a type IV hypersensitivity reaction associated with certain infections, medications, and other various triggers. Allergic contact dermatitis is in turn a delayed type of induced allergy as a result of cutaneous contact with a specific allergen to which the patient develops specific sensitivity. This type of cutaneous reaction is associated with inflammation manifesting with erythema, edema, and vesicles. A 27-year old female patient presented with a 3-day history of erythematous and vesicular lesions which developed 24 hours after cesarean section. Initially the lesions were localized in the area of surgery (mainly the abdomen and upper thighs) and on the next day progressed to the buttocks and lumbar area. The patient was referred to the Outpatient Clinic and was treated with antihistamines, but her dermatological state deteriorated rapidly. At the day of admission to the Department of Dermatology, numerous erythematous and vesicular lesions were present on the skin of the abdomen, thighs, and back (Figure 1, a), but the skin of the neck, chest, and extremities was also covered with erythematous and edematous patches. On the second day of hospitalization, we observed the evolution of lesions localized within the chest and extremities into an erythema multiforme-like targetoid eruption (Figure 1, b). Initially the patient was treated with intravenous injections of dexamethasone and ceftriaxone and orally with second-generation antihistamines (in four-fold doses), followed by intravenous metyloprednisolone pulse-therapy (total dose of 3 g). As the new vesicobullous lesions started to appear on the face and arms, we introduced cyclosporine A orally 400 mg daily. We could then observe gradual remission, but on the seventh day of hospitalization the patient developed a massive labial herpes simplex infection and had

  2. Temperature-sensitive mutant TS 082 of vesicular stomatitis virus. I. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature by uv-irradiated virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Muel, B.; Brun, G.

    1979-02-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutant ts 082 of vesicular stomatitis virus efficiently complements with all the five known groups of ts mutants. This mutant is analyzed by its rescue at nonpermissive temperature with uv-irradiated virus. The existence of two targets of uv light is demonstrated that suggests rescue is mediated through two different complementation processes, gene/sup +/ survival and structural protein supply by the uv-irradiated virus. This last point is supported by rescue assays carried out in the absence of simultaneous protein synthesis. These features are also shared by the ts mutants of group II, suggesting that ts 082 might belong to complementation group II. The temperature-sensitive defect of ts 082 could be located in a domain different from the one which is mutated in the ts mutants previously classified in group II.

  3. Mechanism of membrane fusion induced by vesicular stomatitis virus G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene S; Jenni, Simon; Stanifer, Megan L; Roth, Eatai; Whelan, Sean P J; van Oijen, Antoine M; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-01-03

    The glycoproteins (G proteins) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and related rhabdoviruses (e.g., rabies virus) mediate both cell attachment and membrane fusion. The reversibility of their fusogenic conformational transitions differentiates them from many other low-pH-induced viral fusion proteins. We report single-virion fusion experiments, using methods developed in previous publications to probe fusion of influenza and West Nile viruses. We show that a three-stage model fits VSV single-particle fusion kinetics: (i) reversible, pH-dependent, G-protein conformational change from the known prefusion conformation to an extended, monomeric intermediate; (ii) reversible trimerization and clustering of the G-protein fusion loops, leading to an extended intermediate that inserts the fusion loops into the target-cell membrane; and (iii) folding back of a cluster of extended trimers into their postfusion conformations, bringing together the viral and cellular membranes. From simulations of the kinetic data, we conclude that the critical number of G-protein trimers required to overcome membrane resistance is 3 to 5, within a contact zone between the virus and the target membrane of 30 to 50 trimers. This sequence of conformational events is similar to those shown to describe fusion by influenza virus hemagglutinin (a "class I" fusogen) and West Nile virus envelope protein ("class II"). Our study of VSV now extends this description to "class III" viral fusion proteins, showing that reversibility of the low-pH-induced transition and architectural differences in the fusion proteins themselves do not change the basic mechanism by which they catalyze membrane fusion.

  4. The tumor vessel targeting agent NGR-TNF controls the different stages of the tumorigenic process in transgenic mice by distinct mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellini, Simona; Asperti, Claudia; Valentinis, Barbara; Tiziano, Elena; Mangia, Patrizia; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian-Paolo; Traversari, Catia

    2015-01-01

    NGR-TNF is a vascular targeting agent in advanced clinical development, coupling tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) with the CNGRCG peptide, which targets a CD13 isoform specifically expressed by angiogenic vessels. Antitumor efficacy of NGR-TNF has been described in different transplantation tumor models. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying its activity is not fully understood. In the wild type and in the immunodeficient (RAG−/−) RIP1-Tag2 models of multistage pancreatic carcinogenesis, we demonstrate that CD13 is highly expressed on endothelial cells of hyperplastic and angiogenic islets, whereas its expression is down regulated in tumors where it partially colocalize with pericytes. In vivo CNGRCG peptides coupled to fluorescent nanoparticles (quantum dots) bind to CD13 and colocalize with anti-CD31, in pancreatic islets. At early stage, low doses of NGR-murine (m)TNF have a direct cytotoxic effect inducing endothelial cell apoptosis, reducing vessel density and eventually inhibiting the development of angiogenic islets. At a later stage, NGR-mTNF is able to reduce tumor growth inducing vascular normalization, exclusively when treatment is carried out in the immunocompetent mice. Interestingly, NGR-mTNF-treated tumors from these mice are characterized by CD8+ T cell infiltration. At molecular level, overexpression of genes involved in vessels normalization was detected only in NGR-mTNF-treated tumors from immunocompetent mice. These findings identified a new mechanism of action of NGR-mTNF, providing support for the development of new therapeutic strategies combining chemotherapy or active/adoptive immunotherapies to low dose NGR-TNF treatment. PMID:26451306

  5. SYBR Green-based Real-Time PCR targeting kinetoplast DNA can be used to discriminate between the main etiologic agents of Brazilian cutaneous and visceral leishmaniases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pita-Pereira Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmaniases control has been hampered by the unavailability of rapid detection methods and the lack of suitable therapeutic and prophylactic measures. Accurate diagnosis, which can distinguish between Leishmania isolates, is essential for conducting appropriate prognosis, therapy and epidemiology. Molecular methods are currently being employed to detect Leishmania infection and categorize the parasites up to genus, complex or species level. Real-time PCR offers several advantages over traditional PCR, including faster processing time, higher sensitivity and decreased contamination risk. Results A SYBR Green real-time PCR targeting the conserved region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles was able to differentiate between Leishmania subgenera. A panel of reference strains representing subgenera Leishmania and Viannia was evaluated by the derivative dissociation curve analyses of the amplified fragment. Distinct values for the average melting temperature were observed, being 78.95°C ± 0.01 and 77.36°C ± 0.02 for Leishmania and Viannia, respectively (p L. (V. braziliensis and L. (V. shawii with a bootstrap value of 100%; while for L. (L. infantum and L. (L. amazonensis, two groups were formed with bootstrap values of 100% and 62%, respectively. The lower dissociation temperature observed for the subgenus Viannia amplicons could be due to a lower proportion of guanine/cytosine sites (43.6% when compared to species from subgenus Leishmania (average of 48.4%. The method was validated with 30 clinical specimens from visceral or cutaneous leishmaniases patients living in Brazil and also with DNA samples from naturally infected Lutzomyia spp. captured in two Brazilian localities. Conclusions For all tested samples, a characteristic amplicon melting profile was evidenced for each Leishmania subgenus, corroborating the data from reference strains. Therefore, the analysis of thermal dissociation curves targeting the conserved kinetoplast

  6. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques.

  7. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  8. Purification and characterization of 33.5 kDa vesicular protein in human bile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Bin Xiang; Duan Cai; Bao-Jin Ma; Xi-Liang Cha; Li-Ying Wang; Han-Qing Mo; Yan-Ling Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The present study was undertaken to purify and partially characterize the 33.5-kilodalton (33.5 kDa) vesicular protein in human bile and to explore the possible molecular mechanisms of the initial crystal nucleation process.METHODS: The 33.5 kDa vesicular protein was isolated by ultracentrifugation and further purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. The purified 33.5 kDa vesicular protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing and amino acid analysis. Cholesterol crystallization activity was detected by cholesterol crystal growth assay. The sugar chain of the 33.5 kDa vesicular protein was analyzed by dot-immunobinding assay of lectin coupled to a peroxidase (HRP-DSA, HRP-ConA, HRP-WGA) and was deglycosylated using two different enzymatic approaches (N-deglycosylation and O-deglycosylation) to determine the molecular weight of the protein component, the type of linkage between polypeptide and carbohydrate components.RFSULTS: The 33.5 kDa vesicular protein with complicated glycan was an extensively glycosylated (37.3 %) monomer and these sugar chains strongly bound to DSA, but did not bind to ConA. Amino acid sequencing indicated that the protein was unique. The 33.5 kDa vesicular protein exhibited potent cholesterol crystallization promoting activity in vitro with derived crystal growth curve indices It, Ig, Ic presented as 0.57, 1.52, and 1.63 respectively. Both enzymatic proteolysis and N-deglycosylation of the protein removed all activity.CONCLUSION: These data suggest the 33.5 kDa vesicular protein may be responsible for the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease, and the sugar chains play an important role in pro-nucleating process.

  9. What role do combinations of interferon and targeted agents play in the first-line therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2008-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a class of cytokines with pleotropic actions that regulate a variety of cellular activities. Clinical trials with recombinant IFNs (IFN-alpha2a and IFN-alpha2b) have demonstrated clinical activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Their efficacy is characterized by a low overall tumor regression rate of < 15%, progression-free survival of 4-5 months, and overall median survival of 10-18 months. This cytokine became the standard of care for patients with metastatic RCC and was then used as the comparator arm in a series of phase II and III clinical trials that have defined a new treatment paradigm for patients with advanced RCC. This paradigm uses the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sorafenib and sunitinib, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus, and the vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. These 3 categories of agents were then investigated in combination with IFN-alpha in a series of preclinical and clinical studies. The collective data from these reports suggest the combination of IFN-alpha and bevacizumab is active and has a role in RCC therapy, whereas combinations with the TKIs or mTOR inhibitors have limited efficacy and/or excessive toxicity. The clinical and preclinical studies leading to these conclusions are reviewed herein.

  10. Inhibitors incorporating zinc-binding groups target the GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Nuha Z; Crossman, Arthur T; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J; Urbaniak, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is genetically and chemically validated as a drug target against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The N-acetylglucosamine-phosphatidylinositol de-N-acetylase (deNAc) is a zinc metalloenzyme responsible for the second step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. We recently reported the synthesis of eight deoxy-2-C-branched monosaccharides containing carboxylic acid, hydroxamic acid, or N-hydroxyurea substituents at the C2 position that may act as zinc-binding groups. Here, we describe the synthesis of a glucocyclitol-phospholipid incorporating a hydroxamic acid moiety and report the biochemical evaluation of the monosaccharides and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid as inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc in the cell-free system and against recombinant enzyme. Monosaccharides with carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid substituents were found to be the inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc with IC(50) values 0.1-1.5mM and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid was found to be a dual inhibitor of the deNAc and the α1-4-mannose transferase with an apparent IC(50)= 19±0.5μm. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Molecular-targeted antitumor agents: the Saururus cernuus dineolignans manassantin B and 4-O-demethylmanassantin B are potent inhibitors of hypoxia-activated HIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Tyler W; Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Kim, Yong-Pil; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G

    2004-05-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key regulator of tumor cell adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. Selective HIF-1 inhibitors represent an important new class of potential molecular-targeted antitumor therapeutic agents. Extracts of plants and marine organisms were evaluated using a T47D human breast tumor cell-based reporter assay for HIF-1 inhibitors. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipid extract of Saururus cernuus resulted in the isolation of manassantin B (1) and a new compound, 4-O-demethylmanassantin B (2). The structure of 2 was determined spectroscopically. The absolute configurations of manassantin-type dineolignans have not been previously reported. Therefore, the absolute configurations of the chiral centers in each side chain were deduced from spectroscopic analysis of the Mosher MTPA ester derivatives of 1. Both 1 and 2 are among the most potent small molecule HIF-1 inhibitors discovered, to date, with IC(50) values of 3 and 30 nM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 selectively inhibited hypoxia-activated HIF-1 in contrast to iron chelator-activated HIF-1. Compounds 1 and 2 also inhibited hypoxic induction of the angiogenic factor VEGF. Further study revealed that 1 selectively blocked the induction of HIF-1alpha protein, the oxygen regulated HIF-1 subunit that determines HIF-1 activity.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging-guided real-time photothermal ablation of target cancer cells using polydopamine-encapsulated gold nanorods as multifunctional agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changlong; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we developed a novel "see-and-treat" theranostic system named "surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging-guided real-time photothermal therapy" for accurate cancer detection and real-time cancer cell ablation using the same Raman laser. Facilely synthesized polydopamine-encapsulated gold nanorods (AuNRs), which possess excellent biocompatibility and enhanced stability, were used as multifunctional agents. Under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation, polydopamine-encapsulated AuNRs show strong SERS effect and high photothermal conversion efficiency simultaneously. After immobilization of antibodies (anti-EpCAM), polydopamine-encapsulated gold nanorods show high specificity to target cancer cells. Tumor margins could be distinguished facilely by a quick SERS imaging process, which was confirmed by H&E staining results. By focusing the exciting light on detected cancer cells for a prolonged time, cancer cells could be ablated immediately without the need of other procedure. This "see-and-treat" theranostic strategy combining SERS imaging and real-time photothermal therapy using the same Raman laser is proposed for the first time. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of our "SERS imaging-guided real-time photothermal therapy system." This novel theranostic strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of cancer therapy in clinical application, allowing the effective ablation of cancer cells with no effects on surrounding healthy tissues. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  13. Eps15 homology domain containing protein of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEHD) associates with endocytosis and vesicular trafficking towards neutral lipid storage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vandana; Asad, Mohd; Jain, Shaifali; Hossain, Mohammad E; Gupta, Akanksha; Kaur, Inderjeet; Rathore, Sumit; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Nida J; Mohmmed, Asif

    2015-11-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, takes up numerous host cytosolic components and exogenous nutrients through endocytosis during the intra-erythrocytic stages. Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs) are conserved NTPases, which are implicated in membrane remodeling and regulation of specific endocytic transport steps in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we have characterized the dynamin-like C-terminal Eps15 homology domain containing protein of P. falciparum (PfEHD). Using a GFP-targeting approach, we studied localization and trafficking of PfEHD in the parasite. The PfEHD-GFP fusion protein was found to be a membrane bound protein that associates with vesicular network in the parasite. Time-lapse microscopy studies showed that these vesicles originate at parasite plasma membrane, migrate through the parasite cytosol and culminate into a large multi-vesicular like structure near the food-vacuole. Co-staining of food vacuole membrane showed that the multi-vesicular structure is juxtaposed but outside the food vacuole. Labeling of parasites with neutral lipid specific dye, Nile Red, showed that this large structure is neutral lipid storage site in the parasites. Proteomic analysis identified endocytosis modulators as PfEHD associated proteins in the parasites. Treatment of parasites with endocytosis inhibitors obstructed the development of PfEHD-labeled vesicles and blocked their targeting to the lipid storage site. Overall, our data suggests that the PfEHD is involved in endocytosis and plays a role in the generation of endocytic vesicles at the parasite plasma membrane, that are subsequently targeted to the neutral lipid generation/storage site localized near the food vacuole.

  14. Organization of organelles and VAMP-associated vesicular transport systems in differentiating skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular transport plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and differentiation of the cell, and intracellular vesicles play a role in the delivery of membrane components and in sorting membrane proteins to appropriate domains in organelles and the plasma membrane. Research on vesicular transport in differentiating cells has mostly focused on neurons and epithelial cells, and few such studies have been carried out on skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells have specialized organelles and plasma membrane domains, including T-tubules, sarcoplasmic reticulum, neuromuscular junctions, and myotendinous junctions. The differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is achieved by multiple steps, i.e., proliferation of myoblasts, formation of myotubes by cell-cell fusion, and maturation of myotubes into myofibers. Systematic vesicular transport is expected to play a role in the maintenance and development of skeletal muscle cells. Here, we review a map of the vesicular transport system during the differentiation of skeletal muscle cells. The characteristics of organelle arrangement in myotubes are described according to morphological studies. Vesicular transport in myotubes is explained by the expression profiles of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins.

  15. Identification and quantification of host proteins in the vesicular fluid of porcine Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P

    2014-08-01

    The host-parasite relationship in cestode infections is complex. One feature of this bidirectional molecular communication is the uptake of host proteins by the parasite. Here we describe the presence of several host proteins in the vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci dissected from the central nervous system and the skeletal muscle of naturally infected pigs. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis we compared the protein patterns of vesicular fluids of cysticerci vs. the sera of cysticercotic pigs. We found that the vesicular fluids of both groups of cysts showed 17 protein spots matching with the pig's sera spots. After mass spectrometry sequencing of these spots, five host proteins were identified: hemoglobin, albumin, serpin A3-8, haptoglobin, rho GTPase-activating protein 36-like. Three of the 17 spots corresponded to host protein fragments: hemoglobin, albumin and serpin A3-8. IgG heavy and light chains were also identified by Western blot using a specific antibody. Quantitative estimations indicated that the host proteins represented 11-13% of the protein content in the vesicular fluids. We also calculated the relative abundance of these host proteins in the vesicular fluids; all were represented in similar relative abundances as in host sera. This suggests that uptake of host proteins by cysticerci proceeds through an unspecific mechanism such as non-specific fluid pinocytosis.

  16. Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrusek, Jaime; Christensen, Philip R.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) imagery independent of chemical variations, we studied a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. These texture-related emissivity variations are probably due to the larger vesicles being relatively deeper and separated by smaller septa leaving less smooth glass available to give the characteristic emission of the lava. In studies of inaccessible lava flows (as on Mars) areas of coarsely vesicular pumice must be identified and avoided before chemical variations can be interpreted. Remotely determined distributions of vesicular and glassy textures can also be related to the volatile contents and potential hazards associated with the emplacement of silicic lava flows on Earth.

  17. Assigning agents to a line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of assigning agents to slots on a line, where only one agent can be served at a slot and each agent prefers to be served as close as possible to his target. Our focus is on aggregate gap minimizing methods, i.e., those that minimize the total gap between targets and assigned...

  18. Does the Chemotherapy Backbone Impact on the Efficacy of Targeted Agents in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Chan

    Full Text Available The EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-I cetuximab and panitumumab and the angiogenesis inhibitors (AIs bevacizumab and aflibercept have demonstrated varying efficacy in mCRC.To document the overall impact of specific chemotherapy regimens on the efficacy of targeted agents in treating patients with mCRC.MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched to 2014, supplemented by hand-searching ASCO/ESMO conference abstracts.Published RCTs of patients with histologically confirmed mCRC were included if they investigated either 1 chemotherapy with or without a biological agent or 2 different chemotherapy regimens with the same biological agent. EGFR-I trials were restricted to KRAS exon 2 wild-type (WT populations.Data were independently abstracted by two authors and trial quality assessed according to Cochrane criteria. The primary outcome was overall survival with secondary endpoints progression free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR and toxicity.EGFR-I added to irinotecan-based chemotherapy modestly improved OS with HR 0.90 (95% CI 0.81-1.00, p = 0.04, but more so PFS with HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.69-0.86, p<0.00001. No benefit was evident for EGFR-I added to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (OS HR 0.97 (95% CI 0.87-1.09 and PFS HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-1.02. Significant oxaliplatin-irinotecan subgroup interactions were present for PFS with I2 = 82%, p = 0.02. Further analyses of oxaliplatin+EGFR-I trials showed greater efficacy with infusional 5FU regimens (PFS HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72-0.94 compared to capecitabine (HR 1.09; 95% CI 0.91-1.30 and bolus 5FU (HR 1.07; 95% CI 0.79-1.45; subgroup interaction was present with I2 = 72%, p = 0.03. The oxaliplatin-irinotecan interaction was not evident for infusional 5FU regimens. For AIs, OS benefit was observed with both oxaliplatin-based (HR 0.83 and irinotecan-based (HR 0.77 regimens without significant subgroup interactions. Oxaliplatin+AI trials showed no subgroup interactions by type of FP, whilst an interaction

  19. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    radioisotope indium-111 (111In was measured and analyzed by instant thin layer chromatography. The coupling efficiency of DTPA-conjugated micelles and DTPA/GRP78BP-conjugated micelles with 111In was 85% and 93%, respectively. For characterization and trace imaging, the radioisotope 111In-targeting tumors were detected and imaged in a xenograft murine model using nano single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. The results revealed that the radioactive intensity measured in the animals administered with GRP78BP-guided 111In-labeled micelles was statistically higher than that in animals administered with 111In-labeled micelles, demonstrating that GRP78BP more than doubled the accumulation of micelles to the tumor tissue (P < 0.05. The results indicate that the gastric cancer biomarker GRP78 is a probing target in the application of nuclear imaging for tumor diagnosis. This novel GRP78BP-guided micelle agent may be applied in clinical practice to complement the histological diagnosis.Keywords: biomarker, glucose-regulated protein 78, nuclear imaging, gastric cancer, micelles

  20. Vesicular transport of progeny parvovirus particles through ER and Golgi regulates maturation and cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P F

    2013-09-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway.

  1. Stimulation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in vitro RNA Synthesis by Microtubule-Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Virginia M.; Harmon, Shirley A.; Summers, Donald F.

    1986-08-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins purified from bovine brains stimulated the in vitro transcription and replication reactions of vesicular stomatitis virus. The products of these reactions were intact messenger or genome-sized RNA species. A preparation from HeLa cells containing tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins also stimulated vesicular stomatitis virus transcription in vitro. This observation is in accord with previous studies, which suggested that a host cell factor was involved with the function of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase, and others that indicated that several animal viruses displayed an association with host cell cytoskeletal elements during their replication cycles. We show evidence in this report of a host cell protein that seems to have a functional role in interacting with the virion polymerase.

  2. Novel microtubule-targeted agent 6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin induces G2-M arrest andapoptosis in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-ming MA; Yu-bo ZHOU; Chuan-ming XIE; Dong-mei CHEN; Jia LI

    2012-01-01

    To identify a novel coumarin analogue with the highest anticancer activity and to further investigate its anticancer mechanisms.Methods:The viability of cancer cells was investigated using the MTT assay.The cell cycle progression was evaluated using both flow cytometric and Western blotting analysis.Microtubule depolymerization was observed with immunocytochemistry in vivo and a tubu-lin depolymerization assay in vitro.Apoptosis was demonstrated using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) double-staining and sub-G1analysis.Results:Among 36 analogues of coumarin,6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin showed the best anticancer activity (IC50 value about 200 nmol/L) in HCT116 cells.The compound had a broad spectrum of anticancer activity against 9 cancer cell lines derived from colon cancer,breast cancer,liver cancer,cervical cancer,leukemia,epidermoid cancer with IC5o value of 75 nmol/L-1.57 μmol/L but with low cytotocitity against WI-38 human lung fibroblasts (IC50 value of 12.128 μmol/L).The compound (0.04-10 μmol/L) induced G2-M phase arrest in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner,which was reversible after the compound was removed.The compound (10-300 μmol/L) induced the depolymerization of purified porcine tubulin in vitro.Finally,the compound (0.04-2.5 μmol/L) induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in dose- and time-dependent manners.Conclusion:6-Chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin is a novel microtubule-targeting agent that induces G2-M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  3. Gold plating using DMH as complexing agent and its application to hohlraum target%DMH镀金体系在ICF空腔靶中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨潇薇; 安茂忠; 张云望; 张林

    2012-01-01

    将5,5′-二甲基乙内酰脲(DMH)新型无氰电镀体系应用于惯性约束聚变金空腔靶制备中.利用扫描电镜和库仑计法研究了以DMH为配位剂的镀液组成和工艺条件对电镀金层质量等的影响.结果表明:该镀液体系具有良好的稳定性,控制镀液中金盐质量浓度为8g/L,DMH质量浓度为80g/L时,在阴极电流密度1.5A/dm2、pH值9~10、温度45℃的条件下,可制得结晶致密、厚度均一的金镀层.%Gold plating using DMH as complexing agent has been applied to hohlraum target. The effects of bath compositions and operating conditions on gold plating quality were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and coulometric measurement. The results show that the gold plating bath is stable. Uniform and compact gold deposits are formed in the bath containing 8 g/L gold salt and 80 g/L DMH at the cathode current density of 1. 5 A/dm2, pH level of 9-10 and bath temperature of 45 ℃.

  4. Docetaxel-loaded single-wall carbon nanohorns using anti-VEGF antibody as a targeting agent: characterization, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Nannan; Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Ma, Xiaona; Li, Xuequan; Wang, Ran; Zhong, Wenying, E-mail: wyzhong@cpu.edu.cn [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Analytical Chemistry (China)

    2015-05-15

    A novel antitumor drug delivery system, docetaxel (DTX)-loaded oxidized single-wall carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a target agent was constructed. DTX was absorbed onto the oxSWNHs via the physical adsorption or π–π interaction. DSPE–PEG–COOH was non-covalently wrapped to the hydrophobic surface of oxSWNHs to improve its water solubility and biocompatibility. The mAb was bonded to the PEG through amide bond. The DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb (DDS) exhibited suitable particle size (191.2 ± 2.1 nm), good particle size distribution (PDI: 0.196), and negative zeta potential (−24.3 ± 0.85 mV). These features enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and reduced the drug molecule uptake by the reticuloendothelial system. The in vitro drug release followed non-Fickian diffusion (n = 0.6857, R = 0.9924) with the cumulative release of DTX 59 ± 1.35 % at 72 h. Compared with free DTX, the DDS enhanced the cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cell lines in vitro efficiently (IC{sub 50}: 2.96 ± 0.6 μg/ml), and provided higher antitumor efficacy (TGI: 69.88 %) in vivo. The histological analysis indicated that the DDS had no significant side effect. Therefore, the new DDS is promising to attain higher pharmaceutical efficacy and lower side effects than free DTX for cancer therapy. The research demonstrated that DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb might have promising biomedical applications for future cancer therapy.

  5. Docetaxel-loaded single-wall carbon nanohorns using anti-VEGF antibody as a targeting agent: characterization, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Nannan; Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Ma, Xiaona; Li, Xuequan; Wang, Ran; Zhong, Wenying

    2015-05-01

    A novel antitumor drug delivery system, docetaxel (DTX)-loaded oxidized single-wall carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a target agent was constructed. DTX was absorbed onto the oxSWNHs via the physical adsorption or π-π interaction. DSPE-PEG-COOH was non-covalently wrapped to the hydrophobic surface of oxSWNHs to improve its water solubility and biocompatibility. The mAb was bonded to the PEG through amide bond. The DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb (DDS) exhibited suitable particle size (191.2 ± 2.1 nm), good particle size distribution (PDI: 0.196), and negative zeta potential (-24.3 ± 0.85 mV). These features enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and reduced the drug molecule uptake by the reticuloendothelial system. The in vitro drug release followed non-Fickian diffusion ( n = 0.6857, R = 0.9924) with the cumulative release of DTX 59 ± 1.35 % at 72 h. Compared with free DTX, the DDS enhanced the cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cell lines in vitro efficiently (IC50: 2.96 ± 0.6 μg/ml), and provided higher antitumor efficacy (TGI: 69.88 %) in vivo. The histological analysis indicated that the DDS had no significant side effect. Therefore, the new DDS is promising to attain higher pharmaceutical efficacy and lower side effects than free DTX for cancer therapy. The research demonstrated that DTX@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb might have promising biomedical applications for future cancer therapy.

  6. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and the acute and long-term response to 3,4-(±)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Lucina E; Cholanians, Aram B; Phan, Andy V; Herndon, Joseph M; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2015-01-01

    3,4-(±)-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a ring-substituted amphetamine derivative with potent psychostimulant properties. The neuropharmacological effects of MDMA are biphasic in nature, initially causing synaptic monoamine release, primarily of serotonin (5-HT). Conversely, the long-term effects of MDMA manifest as prolonged depletions in 5-HT, and reductions in 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT), indicative of serotonergic neurotoxicity. MDMA-induced 5-HT efflux relies upon disruption of vesicular monoamine storage, which increases cytosolic 5-HT concentrations available for release via a carrier-mediated mechanism. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is responsible for packaging monoamine neurotransmitters into cytosolic vesicles. Thus, VMAT2 is a molecular target for a number of psychostimulant drugs, including methamphetamine and MDMA. We investigated the effects of depressed VMAT2 activity on the adverse responses to MDMA, via reversible inhibition of the VMAT2 protein with Ro4-1284. A single dose of MDMA (20 mg/kg, subcutaneous) induced significant hyperthermia in rats. Ro4-1284 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) pretreatment prevented the thermogenic effects of MDMA, instead causing a transient decrease in body temperature. MDMA-treated rats exhibited marked increases in horizontal velocity and rearing behavior. In the presence of Ro4-1284, MDMA-mediated horizontal hyperlocomotion was delayed and attenuated, whereas rearing activity was abolished. Finally, Ro4-1284 prevented deficits in 5-HT content in rat cortex and striatum, and reduced depletions in striatal SERT staining, 7 days after MDMA administration. In summary, acute inhibition of VMAT2 by Ro4-1284 protected against MDMA-mediated hyperthermia, hyperactivity, and serotonergic neurotoxicity. The data suggest the involvement of VMAT2 in the thermoregulatory, behavioral, and neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  7. Is replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with vesicular movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Loc; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2014-04-01

    At the excitatory synapse of rat hippocampus the short-term synaptic depression observed during long high-frequency stimulation is associated with slower replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. Given that the replenishment rate is also not [Ca(++)]o sensitive this puts into question a widely held notion that the vesicles-constrained by the cytoskeleton and rendered free from such constraints by Ca(++) entry that renders them more mobile-are important in the replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. This raises a question-Is vesicular replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with significant movement? To answer this question we evaluated how okadaic acid and staurosporine (compounds known to affect vesicular mobility) influence the replenishment rate. We used patterned stimulation on the Schaffer collateral fiber pathway and recorded the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) from rat CA1 neurons, in the absence and presence of these drugs. The parameters of a circuit model with two vesicular pools were estimated by minimizing the squared difference between the ESPC amplitudes and simulated model output. [Ca(2+)]o did not influence the progressive decrease of the replenishment rate during long, high frequency stimulation. Okadaic acid did not significantly affect any parameters of the vesicular storage and release system, including the replenishment rate. Staurosporine reduced the replenishment coupling, but not the replenishment rate, and this is owing to the fact that it also reduces the ability of the readily releasable pool to contain quanta. Moreover, these compounds were ineffective in influencing how the replenishment rate decreases during long, high frequency stimulation. In conclusion at the excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus the replenishment of the readily releasable pool does not appear to be associated with a significant vesicular movement, and during long high frequency stimulation [Ca(++)]o does not influence the

  8. Isolation and Identification of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza-Stimulatory Compounds from Clover (Trifolium repens) Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Muraleedharan G.; Safir, Gene R.; Siqueira, Jose O.

    1991-01-01

    Two isoflavonoids isolated from clover roots grown under phosphate stress were characterized as formononetin (7-hydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone). At 5 ppm, these compounds stimulated hyphal growth in vitro and root colonization of an undescribed vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, a Glomus sp. (INVAM-112). The permethylated products of the two compounds were inactive. These findings suggest that the isoflavonoids studied may act as signal molecules in vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis. PMID:16348409

  9. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ) e Indiana (VSV-IN), afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar), bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos...

  10. Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy with BF2-chelated Tetraaryl-Azadipyrromethene agents: a multi-modality molecular imaging approach to therapeutic assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, A T

    2009-11-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality for a range of diseases including cancer. The BF(2)-chelated tetraaryl-azadipyrromethenes (ADPMs) are an emerging class of non-porphyrin PDT agent, which have previously shown excellent photochemical and photophysical properties for therapeutic application. Herein, in vivo efficacy and mechanism of action studies have been completed for the lead agent, ADMP06.

  11. Cytopathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our ...

  12. Hepcidin as a predictive factor and therapeutic target in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment for anemia of chronic disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurl, Milan; Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Asshoff, Malte; Haschka, David; Seifert, Markus; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Wilflingseder, Doris; Posch, Wilfried; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick R; Theurl, Igor; Weiss, Günter

    2014-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is a multifactorial disorder, resulting mainly from inflammation-driven reticuloendothelial iron retention, impaired erythropoiesis, and reduced biological activity of erythropoietin. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used for the treatment of anemia of chronic disease, although with varying response rates and potential adverse effects. Serum concentrations of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease and linked to the pathogenesis of this disease, because hepcidin blocks cellular iron egress, thus limiting availability of iron for erythropoiesis. We tested whether serum hepcidin levels can predict and affect the therapeutic efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment using a well-established rat model of anemia of chronic disease. We found that high pre-treatment hepcidin levels correlated with an impaired hematologic response to an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in rats with anemia of chronic disease. Combined treatment with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and an inhibitor of hepcidin expression, LDN-193189, significantly reduced serum hepcidin levels, mobilized iron from tissue stores, increased serum iron levels and improved hemoglobin levels more effectively than did the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent or LDN-193189 monotherapy. In parallel, both the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent/LDN-193189 combined reduced the expression of cytokines known to inhibit erythropoiesis. We conclude that serum hepcidin levels can predict the hematologic responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in anemia of chronic disease. Pharmacological inhibition of hepcidin formation improves the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent's therapeutic efficacy, which may favor a reduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosages, costs and side effects.

  13. Multifunctional Poly(L-lactide)-Polyethylene Glycol-Grafted Graphene Quantum Dots for Intracellular MicroRNA Imaging and Combined Specific-Gene-Targeting Agents Delivery for Improved Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haifeng; Dai, Wenhao; Ju, Huangxian; Lu, Huiting; Wang, Shiyan; Xu, Liping; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-05-27

    Photoluminescent (PL) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with large surface area and superior mechanical flexibility exhibit fascinating optical and electronic properties and possess great promising applications in biomedical engineering. Here, a multifunctional nanocomposite of poly(l-lactide) (PLA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-grafted GQDs (f-GQDs) was proposed for simultaneous intracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) imaging analysis and combined gene delivery for enhanced therapeutic efficiency. The functionalization of GQDs with PEG and PLA imparts the nanocomposite with super physiological stability and stable photoluminescence over a broad pH range, which is vital for cell imaging. Cell experiments demonstrate the f-GQDs excellent biocompatibility, lower cytotoxicity, and protective properties. Using the HeLa cell as a model, we found the f-GQDs effectively delivered a miRNA probe for intracellular miRNA imaging analysis and regulation. Notably, the large surface of GQDs was capable of simultaneous adsorption of agents targeting miRNA-21 and survivin, respectively. The combined conjugation of miRNA-21-targeting and survivin-targeting agents induced better inhibition of cancer cell growth and more apoptosis of cancer cells, compared with conjugation of agents targeting miRNA-21 or survivin alone. These findings highlight the promise of the highly versatile multifunctional nanocomposite in biomedical application of intracellular molecules analysis and clinical gene therapeutics.

  14. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  15. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  16. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Ignatiadis

    Full Text Available EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC in combination with paclitaxel.HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2 every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (% reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI estimated Gadolinium (Gd enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated.Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001 for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04.The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment, especially in ER-/HER2

  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  18. Vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT2 expression levels control quantal size and neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Moechars (Dieder); M.C. Weston (Matthew); S. Leo (Sandra); Z. Callaerts-Vegh (Zsuzsanna); I. Goris (Ilse); R.F. Daneels; A. Buist (A.); M. Cik (M.); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); R.S. Kass (Robert); T. Meert (Theo); R. D'Hooge (Rudi); C. Rosenmund (Christian); R.M. Hampson (R. Mark)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractUptake of L-glutamate into synaptic vesicles is mediated by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). Three transporters (VGLUT1-VGLUT3) are expressed in the mammalian CNS, with partial overlapping expression patterns, and VGLUT2 is the most abundantly expressed paralog in the thalamus,

  19. Signifiance of Arginine 20 in the 2A protease for swine vesicular disease virus pathogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Toru; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Leyuan

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic and attenuated strains of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), an enterovirus, have been characterized previously and, by using chimeric infectious cDNA clones, the key determinants of pathogenicity in pigs have been mapped to the coding region for 1D–2A. Within this region, residue 20...... and appearance of significant disease....

  20. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  1. Domestic cattle as a non-conventional amplifying host of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of vertebrates as amplifying and maintenance hosts for vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) remains unclear. Livestock have been considered dead-end hosts because detectable viremia is absent in VSNJV-infected animals. We demonstrated two situations where cattle can serve as a so...

  2. Infection of Melanoplus Sanguinipes Grasshoppers Following Ingestion of Rangeland Plant Species Harboring Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of the many mechanisms of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) transmission is critical to understanding the epidemiology of sporadic disease outbreaks in the western U.S. Migratory grasshoppers (Melanoplus sanguinipes, Fabricius) have been implicated as reservoirs and mechanical vectors of VS...

  3. Genome sequences of nine vesicular stomatitis virus isolates from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtrained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species, clade III, while two...

  4. Potential for Transovarial Transmission of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an insect transmitted rhabdovirus which causes economically devastating disease in cattle and horses in the western U.S. Important insect vectors identified thus far include Lutzomyia shannoni sand flies, Simulium vittatum black flies, and Culicoides sonorensis bi...

  5. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine whether vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection of Culicoides sonorensis affects subsequent blood feeding behavior, midges injected with either virus-infected or virus-free cell lysates were allowed to blood feed for short (10 min) or long (60 min) periods of time on days 2, 3, and 4...

  6. Characterization of the Full-Length Genomic Sequence of Vesicular Stomatitis Cocal and Alagoas Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock throughout the Americas caused by members of the vesiculovirus genus of the family Rhabdoviridae. VS outbreaks between northern South America and North America are caused principally by the New Jersey serotype (VSNJV) and to a les...

  7. Infection of grasshoppers following ingestion of grassland plant species harboring vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes sporadic, re-emerging disease outbreaks in horses and cattle in the western United States. Lesions in the oral cavity result in excessive salivation and significant virus shedding. This results in efficient direct contact transmission within the herd, and vira...

  8. Toluene-induced, Ca2+-dependent vesicular catecholamine release in rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.; Vijverberg, H.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Acute effects of toluene on vesicular catecholamine release from intact PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells have been investigated using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry. The frequency of vesicles released is low under basal conditions and is enhanced by depolarization. Toluene causes an increase in

  9. Increased vesicular and vacuolar transendothelial transport in traumatic human brain oedema. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial vacuolar and vesicular transports in traumatic human brain oedema have been reviewed and compared with experimental brain oedema in order to establish their role in both oedema formation and oedema resolution. Normal or "non-activated" and "activated" capillaries are found. The activated capillaries showed predominantly an enhanced abluminally orientated vesicular transport by means of small, medium and large uncoated and clathrin coated vesicles, as well as the presence of endothelial tubular structures. Activation of the endothelial nuclear zone is featured by the increased amount of micropinocytotic vesicles. Vesicles internalizing to the hypertrophic Golgi complex, lysosomes and multivesicular bodies are observed. The protein vacuolar transport is predominant in most cortical capillaries. A wide spectrum of endothelial cell mechanisms is observed increasing the vesicular and vacuolar transport, such as deep invaginations of the luminal surface, large coated vesicles, tubular structures, and transient and incomplete transendothelial channels formed either by chained plasmalemmal vesicles or elongated protein-containing vacuoles. Uncoated vesicles are seen surrounding lysosomes. Vesicular transport might be discriminated between abluminally orientated or transendothelial transport (oedema formation) and intraendothelial transport (oedema resolution) directed towards cell lysosomes to be degraded by lysosomal enzymes. The transendothelial passage via large vacuoles is mainly caused by macromolecular protein transport.

  10. Toluene-induced, Ca2+-dependent vesicular catecholamine release in rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952; Vijverberg, H.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Acute effects of toluene on vesicular catecholamine release from intact PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells have been investigated using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry. The frequency of vesicles released is low under basal conditions and is enhanced by depolarization. Toluene causes an increase in

  11. Bovine neuronal vesicular glutamate transporter activity is inhibited by ergovaline and other ergopeptines

    Science.gov (United States)

    L-Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter responsible for neurotransmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. Vesicular Glu transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 concentrate (50 mM) Glu (Km = 1 to 4 mM) into synaptic vesicles (S...

  12. Effect of amyloids on the vesicular machinery: implications for somatic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anand Kant; Pandit, Rucha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2015-07-01

    Certain neurodegenerative diseases are thought to be initiated by the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. However, the mechanism underlying toxicity remains obscure. Most of the suggested mechanisms are generic in nature and do not directly explain the neuron-type specific lesions observed in many of these diseases. Some recent reports suggest that the toxic aggregates impair the synaptic vesicular machinery. This may lead to an understanding of the neuron-type specificity observed in these diseases. A disruption of the vesicular machinery can also be deleterious for extra-synaptic, especially somatic, neurotransmission (common in serotonergic and dopaminergic systems which are specifically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), respectively), though this relationship has remained unexplored. In this review, we discuss amyloid-induced damage to the neurotransmitter vesicular machinery, with an eye on the possible implications for somatic exocytosis. We argue that the larger size of the system, and the availability of multi-photon microscopy techniques for directly visualizing monoamines, make the somatic exocytosis machinery a more tractable model for understanding the effect of amyloids on all types of vesicular neurotransmission. Indeed, exploring this neglected connection may not just be important, it may be a more fruitful route for understanding AD and PD.

  13. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  14. Overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances aluminium internalization by elevating vesicular trafficking in rice root apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Daoming; Shen, Hong; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2015-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) sequestration is required for internal detoxification of Al in plant cells. In this study, it was found that the rice OsPIN2 overexpression line (OX1) had significantly reduced Al content in its cell wall and increased Al concentration in cell sap only in rice root tips relative to the wild-type (WT). In comparison with WT, OX1 reduced morin staining of cytosolic Al, enhanced FM 4-64 staining of membrane vesicular trafficking in root tip sections (0-1mm), and showed morin-FM 4-64 fluorescence overlap. Recovery treatment showed that cell-wall-bound Al was internalized into vacuoles via endocytic vesicular trafficking after removal of external Al. In this process, OX1 showed a higher rate of Al internalization than WT. Brefeldin A (BFA) interfered with vesicular trafficking and resulted in inhibition of Al internalization. This inhibitory effect could be alleviated when BFA was washed out, and the process of alleviation was slower in the cells of WT than in those of OX1. Microscopic observations revealed that, upon Al exposure, numerous multilamellar endosomes were detected between the cell wall and plasma membrane in the cells of OX1. Moreover, more vesicles enriched with Al complexes accumulated in the cells of OX1 than in those of WT, and these vesicles transformed into larger structures in the cells of OX1. Taken together, the data indicate that endocytic vesicular trafficking might contribute to Al internalization, and that overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances rice Al tolerance via elevated endocytic vesicular trafficking and Al internalization.

  15. Vesicular uptake and exocytosis of l-aspartate is independent of sialin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morland, Cecilie; Nordengen, Kaja; Larsson, Max; Prolo, Laura M.; Farzampour, Zoya; Reimer, Richard J.; Gundersen, Vidar

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of release and the role of l-aspartate as a central neurotransmitter are controversial. A vesicular release mechanism for l-aspartate has been difficult to prove, as no vesicular l-aspartate transporter was identified until it was found that sialin could transport l-aspartate and l-glutamate when reconstituted into liposomes. We sought to clarify the release mechanism of l-aspartate and the role of sialin in this process by combining l-aspartate uptake studies in isolated synaptic vesicles with immunocyotchemical investigations of hippocampal slices. We found that radiolabeled l-aspartate was taken up into synaptic vesicles. The vesicular l-aspartate uptake, relative to the l-glutamate uptake, was twice as high in the hippocampus as in the whole brain, the striatum, and the entorhinal and frontal cortices and was not inhibited by l-glutamate. We further show that sialin is not essential for exocytosis of l-aspartate, as there was no difference in ATP-dependent l-aspartate uptake in synaptic vesicles from sialin-knockout and wild-type mice. In addition, expression of sialin in PC12 cells did not result in significant vesicle uptake of l-aspartate, and depolarization-induced depletion of l-aspartate from hippocampal nerve terminals was similar in hippocampal slices from sialin-knockout and wild-type mice. Further, there was no evidence for nonvesicular release of l-aspartate via volume-regulated anion channels or plasma membrane excitatory amino acid transporters. This suggests that l-aspartate is exocytotically released from nerve terminals after vesicular accumulation by a transporter other than sialin.—Morland, C., Nordengen, K., Larsson, M., Prolo, L. M., Farzampour, Z., Reimer, R. J., Gundersen, V. Vesicular uptake and exocytosis of l-aspartate is independent of sialin. PMID:23221336

  16. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  17. Exponential enhancement of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus potency by vector-mediated suppression of inflammatory responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomonte, Jennifer; Wu, Lan; Chen, Li; Meseck, Marcia; Ebert, Oliver; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2008-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising strategy for treatment of malignancy, although its effectiveness is hampered by host antiviral inflammatory responses. The efficacy of treatment of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in rats bearing multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be substantially elevated by antibody-mediated depletion of natural killer (NK) cells. In order to test the hypothesis that the oncotyic potency of VSV can be exponentially elevated by evasion of inflammatory responses in vivo, we constructed a recombinant VSV vector expressing equine herpes virus-1 glycoprotein G, which is a broad-spectrum viral chemokine binding protein (rVSV-gG). Infusion of rVSV-gG via the hepatic artery into immune-competent rats bearing syngeneic and multifocal HCC in their livers, resulted in a reduction of NK and NKT cells in the tumors and a 1-log enhancement in intratumoral virus titer in comparison with a reference rVSV vector. The treatment led to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged animal survival without toxicities. These results indicate that rVSV-gG has the potential to be developed as an effective and safe oncolytic agent to treat patients with advanced HCC. Furthermore, the novel concept that oncolytic potency can be substantially enhanced by vector-mediated suppression of host antiviral inflammatory responses could have general applicability in the field of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer.

  18. Exosomes: vesicular carriers for intercellular communication in neurodegenerative disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of misfolded proteins has received increasing attention in various neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation of specific proteins, as observed in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. One hypothesis holds that intercellular dissemination of these aggregates within the central nervous system results in the seeded assembly of the cognate soluble protein in target cells, similar to that proposed for transmissible prion diseases. The molec...

  19. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistan......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  20. Positron emission tomography imaging of (2R,3R)-5-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol in rat and monkey brain: a radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)], E-mail: mkilbour@umich.edu; Hockley, Brian; Lee, Lihsueh; Sherman, Phillip; Quesada, Carole; Frey, Kirk A.; Koeppe, Robert A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: The regional brain distribution of (2R,3R)-5-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-benzovesamicol ((-)-[{sup 18}F]FEOBV), a radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), was examined in vivo in mice, rats and rhesus monkeys. Methods: Regional brain distributions of (-)-[{sup 18}F]FEOBV in mice were determined using ex vivo dissection. MicroPET imaging was used to determine the regional brain pharmacokinetics of the radioligand in rat and rhesus monkey brains. Results: In all three species, clear heterogeneous regional brain distributions were obtained, with the rank order of brain tissues (striatum>thalamus>cortex>cerebellum) consistent with the distribution of cholinergic nerve terminals containing the VAChT. Conclusions: (-)-[{sup 18}F]FEOBV remains a viable candidate for further development as an in vivo imaging agent for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of the VAChT in the human brain.

  1. Antineoplastic agents and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gwenalyn; Atallah, Jean Paul

    2017-03-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy is an uncommon but reported adverse effect of a variety of antineoplastic drugs, including chemotherapy agents such as mitomycin C and gemcitabine, and newer targeted agents such as the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. We present a review of thrombotic microangiopathy associated with antineoplastic agents and its implications in current cancer therapy.

  2. Depletion of vesicular zinc in dorsal horn of spinal cord causes increased neuropathic pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Seung; Danscher, Gorm; Schrøder, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    to neuropathic pain we applied Chung's rodent pain model on BALB/c mice, and traced zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) proteins and zinc ions with immunohistochemistry and autometallography (AMG), respectively. Under anesthesia the left fifth lumbar spinal nerve was ligated in male mice in order to produced neuropathic......Zinc enriched (ZEN) neurons and terminals are abundant in the rodent spinal cord. Zinc ions have been suggested to modulate the excitability of primary afferent fibers believed to be important in nociceptive transmission. To test the hypothesis that vesicular zinc concentration is related...... of the smaller spinal ganglion cell, but 5 days after spinal nerve transection zinc precipitation was also found in the lager ganglion cells. The present results indicate that zinc may be involved in pain mechanism in the spinal ganglion level. These results support the hypothesis that vesicular zinc might have...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and pseudo-vesicular skin plaques: rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manriquez, Juan; Giesen, Laura; del Puerto, Constanza; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A 54 year-old woman with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consulted us because of weight loss, fever and skin eruption. On physical examination, erythematous plaques with a pseudo-vesicular appearance were seen on the back of both shoulders. Histological examination was consistent with rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis (RND). After 3 days of prednisone treatment, the skin eruption resolved. RND is a rare cutaneous manifestation of seropositive RA, characterized by asymptomatic, symmetrical erythematous plaques with a pseudo-vesicular appearance. Histology characteristically reveals a dense, neutrophilic infiltrate with leucocitoclasis but without other signs of vasculitis. Lesions may resolve spontaneously or with RA treatment. This case illustrates an uncommon skin manifestation of active rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27579747

  4. Foreign glycoproteins expressed from recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses are incorporated efficiently into virus particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell, M J; Buonocore, L; Kretzschmar, E; Johnson, E.; Rose, J K

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can be used as a vector to express a soluble protein in mammalian cells. Here we have generated VSV recombinants that express four different membrane proteins: the cellular CD4 protein, a CD4-G hybrid protein containing the ectodomain of CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail of the VSV glycoprotein (G), the measles virus hemagglutinin, or the measles virus fusion protein. The proteins were expressed at levels r...

  5. Purification of Regucalcin from the Seminal Vesicular Fluid: A Calcium Binding Multi-Functional Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishna, P; Shende, A M; Reena, K K; Thomas, Jobin; Bhure, S K

    2016-08-01

    Regucalcin is a multi-functional protein having roles in calcium homeostasis as well as in anti-apoptotic, anti-prolific and anti-oxidative functions. Recently, it has been reported from the male reproductive tract, but its role in male reproduction needs further investigation; for which the native regucalcin of reproductive origin will be more appropriate. The gel exclusion chromatography followed by diethyl aminoethane cellulose chromatography and two-dimentional cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis used for its purification are time consuming and less specific. Here, the regucalcin gene from buffalo testis has been cloned, expressed and purified in recombinant form, and subsequently used for raising hyper-immune serum. The Western blot of seminal vesicular fluid probed with anti-regucalcin polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of 28 and 34 kDa bands specific to regucalcin. Further, an affinity matrix has been prepared using anti-regucalcin polyclonal antibodies. An immuno-affinity chromatography method has been standardized to isolate regucalcin from seminal vesicular fluid. The initial complexity of the protein mixture in the seminal vesicular fluid has been reduced by a heat coagulation step. The purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band at 68 kDa that has been further confirmed as regucalcin by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The RGN purified from seminal vesicular fluid will be more appropriate for studying its possible role in male reproduction, especially sperm cell capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and cryopreservation. The study can be applied in purifying regucalcin from different tissues or species with minor modifications in the methodology.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis and pseudo-vesicular skin plaques: rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Manriquez,Juan; Giesen, Laura; Puerto,Constanza del; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: A 54 year-old woman with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consulted us because of weight loss, fever and skin eruption. On physical examination, erythematous plaques with a pseudo-vesicular appearance were seen on the back of both shoulders. Histological examination was consistent with rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatosis (RND). After 3 days of prednisone treatment, the skin eruption resolved. RND is a rare cutaneous manifestation of seropositive RA, characterized by asym...

  7. Production of Plant Growth-Regulating Substances by the Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus mosseae

    OpenAIRE

    Barea, José M.; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción

    1982-01-01

    Glomus mosseae, a representative species of Endogonaceae (Phycomycetes) able to form vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, was investigated for phytohormone production. Spores of G. mosseae were axenically germinated in water, and the resultant mycelial growth was assayed by standard procedures for extracting plant hormones from microbial cultures. Paper partition chromatography and specific bioassays were used to separate and identify plant growth-regulating substances. The microorganism synthesi...

  8. Outbreaks of Vesicular stomatitis Alagoas virus in horses and cattle in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Olinda, Roberio G; Maia, Lisanka A; de Aguiar, Gildeni M N; Neto, Eldinê G M; Simões, Sara V D; de Lima, Tatiane G; Dantas, Antônio F M; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2014-11-01

    The current article describes outbreaks of vesicular stomatitis (VS) in horses and cattle in Paraiba and Rio Grande do Norte states, northeastern Brazil, between June and August 2013. The reported cases affected 15-20 horses and 6 cattle distributed over 6 small farms in 4 municipalities, but additional data indicated the involvement of a large number of animals on several farms. The disease was characterized by blisters; eruptive lesions in coronary bands, lips, mouth, and muzzle; salivation; claudication and loss of condition. Swollen lower limbs and lips, and ulcerated and erosive areas in the lips and muzzle were observed in some horses. A necrotizing vesiculopustular dermatitis and stomatitis was observed histologically. Vesicular stomatitis virus was isolated from the vesicular fluid of a horse lesion and shown to be serologically related to the VS Indiana serogroup (VSIV) by virus neutralization. Convalescent sera of affected horses and cattle, and from healthy contacts, harbored high levels of neutralizing antibodies against the isolated virus (named VSIV-3 2013SaoBento/ParaibaE). Genomic sequences of VSIV subtype 3 (Vesicular stomatitis Alagoas virus) were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction out of clinical specimens from a cow and a horse from different farms. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the phosphoprotein gene indicated that the 2 isolates were derived from the same virus and clustered them in VSIV-3, along with VS viruses identified in southeastern and northeastern Brazil in the last decades. Thus, the present report demonstrates the circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazil and urges for more effective diagnosis and surveillance.

  9. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine Is Well-Tolerated and Protects Immunocompromised Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M.; Lewis, Mark G.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Allen Grolla; Anders Leung; Jason Paragas; Lennox Matthias; Smith, Mark A.; Jones, Steven M.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Heinz Feldmann; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatmen...

  10. Application of vesicular coacervate phase for microextraction based on solidification of floating drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-03-16

    A new, efficient and environmentally friendly method for the analysis of parabens as model compounds was developed using solidified floating vesicular coacervative drop microextraction (SFVCDME). A supramolecular solvent consisting of vesicles of decanoic acid in the nano- and microscale regimes was firstly used as the solvent in solidification of floating drop microextraction. The solvent was produced from the coacervation of decanoic acid aqueous vesicles in the presence of tetrabutylammonium (Bu(4)N(+)). Methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), and propylparaben (PP) were extracted on the basis of hydrophobic and π-cation interactions and the formation of hydrogen bonds. Microliter volume of vesicular coacervative droplet was delivered to the surface of the aqueous sample, and the sample was stirred for a desired time. The sample vial was cooled by immersing it into an ice bath for 3 min. The solidified solvent was transferred into a suitable vial and melted immediately. Twenty microliter of the vesicular coacervative solvent was directly injected to high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection, with no need to dilution or solvent evaporation. Several parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including sample temperature, stirring rate, pH, salt effect, volume of the solvent and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, preconcentration factors and relative recoveries of the studied compounds were obtained in the range of 81-174 and 91-108%, respectively; and the performance of the method was comparable with that of solid-phase extraction as the reference method.

  11. A vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination shift in myocardial sympathetic nerves in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patricia; Holmes, Courtney; Miller, Gary W; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Kopin, Irwin J

    2014-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), profound putamen dopamine (DA) depletion reflects denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic DA in residual terminals. PD also involves cardiac sympathetic denervation. Whether PD entails myocardial norepinephrine (NE) depletion and a sequestration-deamination shift have been unknown. We measured apical myocardial tissue concentrations of NE, DA, and their neuronal metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) from 23 PD patients and 23 controls and ascertained the extent of myocardial NE depletion in PD. We devised, validated in VMAT2-Lo mice, and applied 5 neurochemical indices of the sequestration-deamination shift-concentration ratios of DOPAC:DA, DA:NE, DHPG:NE, DOPAC:NE, and DHPG:DOPAC-and used a kinetic model to estimate the extent of the vesicular storage defect. The PD group had decreased myocardial NE content (p Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have profound (98%) myocardial norepinephrine depletion, because of both cardiac sympathetic denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic catecholamines in the residual nerves. This shift may be part of a final common pathogenetic pathway in the loss of catecholaminergic neurons that characterizes PD.

  12. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporter trafficking in vivo: moving from cells to flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoruk, Anna; Fei, Hao; Daniels, Richard W; Miller, Bradley R; Chen, Audrey; DiAntonio, Aaron; Krantz, David E

    2010-01-01

    During exocytosis, classical and amino acid neurotransmitters are released from the lumen of synaptic vesicles to allow signaling at the synapse. The storage of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles requires the activity of specific vesicular transporters. Glutamate and monoamines such as dopamine are packaged by VGLUTs and VMATs respectively. Changes in the localization of either protein have the potential to up- or down regulate neurotransmitter release, and some of the mechanisms for sorting these proteins to secretory vesicles have been investigated in cultured cells in vitro. We have used Drosophila molecular genetic techniques to study vesicular transporter trafficking in an intact organism and have identified a motif required for localizing Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT) to synaptic vesicles in vivo. In contrast to DVMAT, large deletions of Drosophila VGLUT (DVGLUT) show relatively modest deficits in localizing to synaptic vesicles, suggesting that DVMAT and DVGLUT may undergo different modes of trafficking at the synapse. Further in vivo studies of DVMAT trafficking mutants will allow us to determine how changes in the localization of vesicular transporters affect the nervous system as a whole and complex behaviors mediated by aminergic circuits.

  13. Inhibition of skin inflammation in mice by diclofenac in vesicular carriers: liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddeo, Carla; Sales, Octavio Diez; Valenti, Donatella; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz; Fadda, Anna Maria; Manconi, Maria

    2013-02-25

    Diclofenac-loaded phospholipid vesicles, namely conventional liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs (penetration enhancer-containing vesicles) were developed and their efficacy in TPA (phorbol ester) induced skin inflammation was examined. Vesicles were made from a cheap and unpurified mixture of phospholipids and diclofenac sodium; Transcutol P and propylene glycol were added to obtain PEVs, and ethanol to produce ethosomes. The structure and lamellar organization of the vesicle bilayer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and small and wide angle X-ray scattering, as well as the main physico-chemical features. The formulations, along with a diclofenac solution and commercial Voltaren Emulgel, were tested in a comparative trial for anti-inflammatory efficacy on TPA-treated mice dorsal skin. Vesicles were around 100 nm, negatively charged, able to encapsulate diclofenac in good yields, and disclosed different lamellarity, as a function of the formulation composition. Vesicular formulations promoted drug accumulation and reduced the permeation. Administration of vesicular diclofenac on TPA-inflamed skin resulted in marked attenuation of oedema and leucocyte infiltration, especially using PEVs. Histology confirmed the effectiveness of vesicles, since they provided an amelioration of the tissual damage induced by TPA. The proposed approach based on vesicular nanocarriers may hold promising therapeutic value for treating a variety of inflammatory skin disorders.

  14. In vitro percutaneous permeation and skin accumulation of finasteride using vesicular ethosomal carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found to be oppositely charged. Ethosomes were found to be more efficient delivery carriers with high encapsulation capacities. In vitro percutaneous permeation experiments demonstrated that the permeation of finasteride through human cadaver skin was significantly increased when ethosomes were used. The finasteride transdermal fluxes from ethosomes containing formulation (1.34 +/- 0.11 microg/cm(2)/h) were 7.4, 3.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of finasteride from aqueous solution, conventional liposomes and hydroethanolic solution respectively (P ethosomes produced a significant (P formulation. The study demonstrated that ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for enhancing percutaneous absorption of finasteride.

  15. Dextran vesicular carriers for dual encapsulation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules and delivery into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, P S; Takamura, Kathryn; Chaphekar, Sonali; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Jayakannan, M

    2012-11-12

    Dextran vesicular nanoscaffolds were developed based on polysaccharide and renewable resource alkyl tail for dual encapsulation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules (or drugs) and delivery into cells. The roles of the hydrophobic segments on the molecular self-organization of dextran backbone into vesicles or nanoparticles were investigated in detail. Dextran vesicles were found to be a unique dual carrier in which water-soluble molecules (like Rhodamine-B, Rh-B) and polyaromatic anticancer drug (camptothecin, CPT) were selectively encapsulated in the hydrophilic core and hydrophobic layer, respectively. The dextran vesicles were capable of protecting the plasma-sensitive CPT lactone pharmacophore against the hydrolysis by 10× better than the CPT alone in PBS. The aliphatic ester linkage connecting the hydrophobic tail with dextran was found to be cleaved by esterase under physiological conditions for fast releasing of CPT or Rh-B. Cytotoxicity of the dextran vesicle and its drug conjugate were tested on mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) using MTT assay. The dextran vesicular scaffold was found to be nontoxic to living cells. CPT loaded vesicles were found to be 2.5-fold more effective in killing fibroblasts compared to that of CPT alone in PBS. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that both Rh-B and CPT loaded vesicles to be taken up by fibroblasts compared to CPT alone, showing a distinctly perinuclear localization in cells. The custom designed dextran vesicular provides new research opportunities for dual loading and delivering of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules.

  16. Digital sensing and sizing of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes in complex media: a model for Ebola and Marburg detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaboul, George G; Lopez, Carlos A; Chinnala, Jyothsna; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Unlü, M Selim

    2014-06-24

    Rapid, sensitive, and direct label-free capture and characterization of nanoparticles from complex media such as blood or serum will broadly impact medicine and the life sciences. We demonstrate identification of virus particles in complex samples for replication-competent wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), defective VSV, and Ebola- and Marburg-pseudotyped VSV with high sensitivity and specificity. Size discrimination of the imaged nanoparticles (virions) allows differentiation between modified viruses having different genome lengths and facilitates a reduction in the counting of nonspecifically bound particles to achieve a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 5 × 10(3) pfu/mL for the Ebola and Marburg VSV pseudotypes. We demonstrate the simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in a single sample (composed of serum or whole blood) for screening applications and uncompromised detection capabilities in samples contaminated with high levels of bacteria. By employing affinity-based capture, size discrimination, and a "digital" detection scheme to count single virus particles, we show that a robust and sensitive virus/nanoparticle sensing assay can be established for targets in complex samples. The nanoparticle microscopy system is termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) and is capable of high-throughput and rapid sizing of large numbers of biological nanoparticles on an antibody microarray for research and diagnostic applications.

  17. Relationship between eruptive style and vesicularity of juvenile clasts during eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that juvenile pumice lapilli found in plinian eruptions have high vesicularity, while those found in phreatoplinian eruptions have low vesicularity. However, juvenile glass shards from phreatoplinian eruptions consist of large, expanded bubbles such as bubble wall-type glass. These glass shards seem to possess high vesicularity, unlike the pumice lapilli. This study examines the factors causing this difference, especially focusing on the temporal variations in the vesicularity of the juvenile pyroclasts from eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan. This examination was conducted through four analyses: density measurements of pumice lapilli, thin section texture classification of pumice lapilli, classification of glass shards, and surface texture classification of pumice lapilli. Further, pumice lapilli from plinian eruptions have a low density, and those from phreatoplinian eruptions are characterized by high density. The density of the pumice lapilli depends on the eruption style and is hence determined after the eruption. A progressive increase in the amount of large bubbles is observed in glass shards ejected during an eruptive magmatic to phreatomagmatic sequence. Because it does not hinge on the eruptive style, it is assumed that the vesicularity of the glass shards is kept from the conduit before contact with water, especially on fragmentation by magma vesiculation in the conduit. The surfaces of the pumice lapilli show a similar increase in vesicularity with time as glass shards. However, this increase is not successive throughout, but decreases temporarily at the phreatomagmatic stage of the eruption, as in the case of density. This indicates that the successive bubble growth continues within the pumice, and additional vesiculation is superposed when the magmatic eruption comes into contact with water. Because of this, different juvenile clasts exhibit different vesicularities upon cooling. Interestingly, magma

  18. Real-time monitoring of auxin vesicular exocytotic efflux from single plant protoplasts by amperometry at microelectrodes decorated with nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Liang-Sheng; Liu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Rong-Sheng; Cheng, Zhi; Chen, Shi-Jing; Amatore, Christian; Huang, Wei-Hua; Huo, Kai-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Recent biochemical results suggest that auxin (IAA) efflux is mediated by a vesicular cycling mechanism, but no direct detection of vesicular IAA release from single plant cells in real-time has been possible up to now. A TiC@C/Pt-QANFA micro-electrochemical sensor has been developed with high sensitivity in detection of IAA, and it allows real-time monitoring and quantification of the quantal release of auxin from single plant protoplast by exocytosis.

  19. Postexposure Protection Against Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever with Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors in Non-Human Primates: An Efficacy Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-29

    virus (MARV). We aimed to test the effi cacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV...including vaccines based on recombinant adenoviruses12,13 and recombinant alphaviruses .8 We previously described the generation and assessment of a live...such as Marburg virus (MARV). We aimed to test the efficacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis

  20. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with thiolated pH-responsive polymeric (PEG-b-p(2-dimethylamio ethyl methacrylate-co-itaconic acid) shell: A novel platform for targeting of anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop a new pH-responsive nano-platform for controlled and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. Engineering of pH-responsive nanocarriers was prepared via decoration of gold nanoparticles (NPs) by thiolated (methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate-co-itaconic acid) (mPEG-b-p(DMAEMA-co-IA) copolymer and fully characterized by various techniques and subsequently used for loading and targeted delivery of anticancer agent, methotrexate (MTX). By conjugation of MTX with the amino groups of polymeric shell of gold NPs (with the high loading capacity of 31%), since MTX is also the target ligand of folate receptors, the targeted performance of NPs examined through the cell uptake study. The results indicated that MTX-loaded NPs showed 1.3 times more cell internalization than MTX free NPs. Cell cytotoxicity studies pointed out ~1.5 and 3 times higher cell cytotoxicity after 24h for MTX-loaded nanoparticles than MTX in MTT assay and cell cycle arrest experiments, respectively. Additionally, mPEG was used as the outer shell of NPs which caused the long-term dispersibility of the NPs even under high ionic strength. The in-vitro pH-triggered drug release of MTX showed that MTX released more than three times in simulated cancerous tissue (40°C, pH5.3) than physiologic condition (37°C, pH7.4) during 48h. The results of various experiments determined that the developed smart nanocarrier proposed as a promising nanocarrier for active and passive targeting of anionic anti-cancer agents such as MTX. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  2. Preliminary observation of targeted contrast agent of CT in the acute tuberculosis animal model%靶向CT对比剂在结核急性感染动物模型中的初步观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昊凌; 施裕新; 钱隽; 冯峰; 刘芳; 张志勇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of anti-85B and ESAT-6 monoclonal antibodies targeted contrast agent of CT by the murine acute tuberculosis animal model.Methods Preparation the targeted contrast agent of computed tomography by iodine atoms coupled with anti-85B and ESAT-6 murine monoclonal antibodies after purified.Calculate the label rate and the quality of 127Ⅰ of the targeted contrast agent solution,and dilute the contrast agent solution to the required concentration (5μg I/ml) to spare.There were twenty mice of acute tuberculosis animal model,which were divided into four groups by completely randomized digital table and each group was five animals.According to the different antibody named as 85B group and ESAT-6 group of targeted contrast agent,common contrast agent and blank control separately.The common contrast agent group was injected with diluents of iohexol,which was diluted into the same concentration with the targeted contrast agent.The control group was injected with antibody diluents pH 7.4 Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS).All the animals were scanned before and after injection the contrast agent in different time,such as immediate,6 hours,12 hours and 24 hours.Observe the display and changes of the murine tuberculosis lesions,and measurement the CT value,which was regarded as evaluating mark.Enhancement ratio was also calculated.Two sample mean differences with t test and the multiple sample mean differences with ANOVA.Results The volume of anti-85B contrast agent solution was 2.52 ml,and the quality of antibody and 127Ⅰ were range from 210 to 255 μg and 10.5 to 16.6 μg respectively.The volume of anti-ESAT-6 contrast agent solution was 2.93 ml,and the quality of antibody and 127Ⅰ were 147 μg and 20.58 μg respectively.The lesions of the control group showed no visible density changes before and after injection of PBS.The CT value of the lung lesions in the targeted contrast agent group were gradually increased with time,and the lesion