WorldWideScience

Sample records for agency national network

  1. National Lymphedema Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and article archives // Knowledge and support National Lymphedema Network News Stay up to date with NLN activities and goings-on. Follow the National Lymphedema Network newsfeed below. Also, see the following links for ...

  2. Agencies Collaborate, Develop a Cyanobacteria Assessment Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative effort integrates the efforts of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide an approach for mainstrea...

  3. 78 FR 68030 - Draft Guidance on Intellectual Property Rights for the National Network for Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... National Network for Manufacturing Innovation and Draft Institute Performance Metrics for the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), hosted...

  4. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national network of research centers: A case study in socio-political influences on research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morehouse, K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01

    During the 15 years that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has supported university-based research centers, there have been many changes in mission, operating style, funding level, eligibility, and selection process. Even the definition of the term {open_quotes}research center{close_quotes} is open to debate. Shifting national priorities, political realities, and funding uncertainties have powered the evolution of research centers in EPA, although the agency`s basic philosophy on the purpose and value of this approach to research remains essentially unchanged. Today, EPA manages 28 centers, through the Office of Exploratory Research. These centers are administered under three distinct programs. Each program has its own mission and goals which guide the way individual centers are selected and operated. This paper will describe: (1) EPA`s philosophy of reserach centers, (2) the complicated history of EPA research centers, (3) coordination and interaction among EPA centers and others, (4) opportunities for collaboration, and (5) plans for the future.

  5. National Nuclear Management and Control Agency (NNCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Nuclear Management and Control Agency (NNCA) is an independent agency for safeguards and material control for nuclear activities in the Republic of Korea. Formerly subordinate to the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), it is temporarily associated with the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). In mid-2006 it will become fully independent. The NNCA is responsible for safeguards within the ROK, cooperates with the IAEA, and supports technical needs of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). In addition, it has responsibilities in export controls and physical protection. In the future the NNCA expects to become a national 'think tank' for nuclear control and nonproliferation issues. This presentation enumerated the many responsibilities of the NNCA and explained the structure and staffing of the organization. (author)

  6. [Mortality aftermyocardial infarction: when the health local organization network has a role in interpreting themarkers of theNational Agency for RegionalHealth Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgili, Gianni; Barchielli, Alessandro; Balzi, Daniela; Matarrese, Daniela; Paci, Eugenio; Gusinu, Roberto; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2013-01-01

    The Italian National Outcome Programme has assessed the performance of Italian hospitals regarding several clinical performance indicators, including 30-daymortality after admission for acute myocardial infarction. Risk adjustment was obtained using demographic and comorbidity data based on the hospital discharge databases in the index admission, as well as in those of the previous two years. Noticeably, the ICD-9-CM 410.7* classification coding for NSTEMI (Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction)myocardial infarction, i.e. the less severe form, was not used, due to known variability in its use. We found that hospital-specific adjusted relative risk of death versus the national mean, as computed by the programme, is negatively associated with the proportion of NSTEMI infarctions at each Tuscan and Florentine hospital, coherently with the hypothesis of a selection by the emergency network, which addresses STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) patients to hospitals offering haemodynamic laboratory with reperfusive services. Individual level clinical data of 3,200 patients in the AMI-Florence study in the period April 2008-March 2010 found that ICD-9-CM410.7* is underused. The analysis based on hospital discharge diagnoses (410.7* vs. other 410* codes) cannot explain differences in mortality among Florentine hospitals, as opposed to the use of a classification of myocardial infarction type (STEMI vs. NSTEMI) based on clinical data collected in AMI-Florence.

  7. United States National Seismographic Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of a United States National Seismograph Network (USNSN) dates back nearly 30 years. The idea was revived several times over the decades. but never funded. For, example, a national network was proposed and discussed at great length in the so called Bolt Report (U. S. Earthquake Observatories: Recommendations for a New National Network, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1980, 122 pp). From the beginning, a national network was viewed as augmenting and complementing the relatively dense, predominantly short-period vertical coverage of selected areas provided by the Regional Seismograph Networks (RSN's) with a sparse, well-distributed network of three-component, observatory quality, permanent stations. The opportunity finally to begin developing a national network arose in 1986 with discussions between the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Under the agreement signed in 1987, the NRC has provided $5 M in new funding for capital equipment (over the period 1987-1992) and the USGS has provided personnel and facilities to develop. deploy, and operate the network. Because the NRC funding was earmarked for the eastern United States, new USNSN station deployments are mostly east of 105 degree W longitude while the network in the western United States is mostly made up of cooperating stations (stations meeting USNSN design goals, but deployed and operated by other institutions which provide a logical extension to the USNSN)

  8. United States National Seismographic Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The concept of a United States National Seismograph Network (USNSN) dates back nearly 30 years. The idea was revived several times over the decades. but never funded. For, example, a national network was proposed and discussed at great length in the so called Bolt Report (U. S. Earthquake Observatories: Recommendations for a New National Network, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1980, 122 pp). From the beginning, a national network was viewed as augmenting and complementing the relatively dense, predominantly short-period vertical coverage of selected areas provided by the Regional Seismograph Networks (RSN`s) with a sparse, well-distributed network of three-component, observatory quality, permanent stations. The opportunity finally to begin developing a national network arose in 1986 with discussions between the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Under the agreement signed in 1987, the NRC has provided $5 M in new funding for capital equipment (over the period 1987-1992) and the USGS has provided personnel and facilities to develop. deploy, and operate the network. Because the NRC funding was earmarked for the eastern United States, new USNSN station deployments are mostly east of 105{degree}W longitude while the network in the western United States is mostly made up of cooperating stations (stations meeting USNSN design goals, but deployed and operated by other institutions which provide a logical extension to the USNSN).

  9. Mexico's National Educational Videoconferencing Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanty, Alejandro

    This paper begins with background on the National University of Mexico (UNAM) and its networks. Other distance education projects in Mexico are described, including projects of the Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), the National Distance Education Program operated by the Secretary of Education, and the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios…

  10. 77 FR 20010 - Notice of Public Workshop: “Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... ``Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation.'' The... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Public Workshop: ``Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation'' AGENCY: Advanced...

  11. 77 FR 50469 - Notice of Public Workshop: “Designing for Impact III: Workshop on Building the National Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... entitled ``Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Public Workshop: ``Designing for Impact III: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation'' AGENCY: Advanced...

  12. 77 FR 34023 - Notice of Public Workshop: “Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... entitled ``Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Public Workshop: ``Designing for Impact: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation'' AGENCY: Advanced...

  13. 77 FR 32952 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board...

  14. 76 FR 28960 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  15. 75 FR 76423 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  16. The Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies(INEE builds on the work of its members – UN agencies, NGOs, practitioners, donors and researchers – to ensure the right to education in emergencies and post-crisis reconstruction.

  17. The National Ecological Observatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a research platform designed to advance understanding of how ecosystems and organisms respond to variations in climate and changes in land use. NEON is the first long-term ecological observatory conceived as a continental-scale network; equipped with standardized sensors, cyberinfrastructure, and data-collection protocols across the network; and designed to simultaneously address a common set of research questions and support investigator-driven ecological research in all regions of the United States. The Observatory focuses on variations in climate and land use because they are primary drivers of the Nation's environmental challenges, as identified by the National Research Council--i.e., biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, climate change, hydroecology, infectious disease, invasive species, and land use. At the broadest scale, NEON links the complexity of climate variation to the behavior of ecological systems, a core aspect of ecological complexity. At the same time, because of the complexity of the interactions among humans and ecosystems, the network design includes NEON sites in wild, managed and urban systems within climate domains. Observatory data will also be part of a national education program designed to advance ecological science literacy through new programs and activities that develop and promote scientific ways of thinking.

  18. National Nanotechnology Initiative Investments by Agency and Program Component Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — Data represents National Nanotechnology Initiative investments by agency and program component area (PCA) from FY 2001 through FY 2010 (requested). While this data...

  19. 78 FR 90 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been scheduled...

  20. 78 FR 32241 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency... given that a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been...

  1. 77 FR 71399 - Notice of Public Workshop: Blueprint for Action: Workshop on the Design of the National Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... the Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) AGENCY: National Institute of... on the Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).'' This workshop series provides a forum for the AMNPO to present the proposed design of the National Network for...

  2. Mexican national pyronometer network calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAldes, M.; Villarreal, L.; Estevez, H.; Riveros, D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to take advantage of the solar radiation as an alternate energy source it is necessary to evaluate the spatial and temporal availability. The Mexican National Meterological Service (SMN) has a network with 136 meteorological stations, each coupled with a pyronometer for measuring the global solar radiation. Some of these stations had not been calibrated in several years. The Mexican Department of Energy (SENER) in order to count on a reliable evaluation of the solar resource funded this project to calibrate the SMN pyrometer network and validate the data. The calibration of the 136 pyronometers by the intercomparison method recommended by the World Meterological Organization (WMO) requires lengthy observations and specific environmental conditions such as clear skies and a stable atmosphere, circumstances that determine the site and season of the calibration. The Solar Radiation Section of the Instituto de Geofísica of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México is a Regional Center of the WMO and is certified to carry out the calibration procedures and emit certificates. We are responsible for the recalibration of the pyronometer network of the SMN. A continuous emission solar simulator with exposed areas with 30cm diameters was acquired to reduce the calibration time and not depend on atmospheric conditions. We present the results of the calibration of 10 thermopile pyronometers and one photovoltaic cell by the intercomparison method with more than 10000 observations each and those obtained with the solar simulator.

  3. Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L.; Solakov, D.; Nikolova, S.; Stoyanov, S.; Simeonova, S.; Zimakov, L. G.; Khaikin, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) consists of a National Data Center (NDC), 13 stations equipped with RefTek High Resolution Broadband Seismic Recorders - model DAS 130-01/3, 1 station equipped with Quanterra 680 and broadband sensors and accelerometers. Real-time data transfer from seismic stations to NDC is realized via Virtual Private Network of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. The communication interruptions don't cause any data loss at the NDC. The data are backed up in the field station recorder's 4Mb RAM memory and are retransmitted to the NDC immediately after the communication link is re-established. The recorders are equipped with 2 compact flash disks able to save more than 1 month long data. The data from the flash disks can be downloaded remotely using FTP. The data acquisition and processing hardware redundancy at the NDC is achieved by two clustered SUN servers and two Blade Workstations. To secure the acquisition, processing and data storage processes a three layer local network is designed at the NDC. Real-time data acquisition is performed using REFTEK's full duplex error-correction protocol RTPD. Data from the Quanterra recorder and foreign stations are fed into RTPD in real-time via SeisComP/SeedLink protocol. Using SeisComP/SeedLink software the NDC transfers real-time data to INGV-Roma, NEIC-USA, ORFEUS Data Center. Regional real-time data exchange with Romania, Macedonia, Serbia and Greece is established at the NDC also. Data processing is performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package running on the both Servers. SNDP includes subsystems: Real-time subsystem (RTS_SNDP) - for signal detection; evaluation of the signal parameters; phase identification and association; source estimation; Seismic analysis subsystem (SAS_SNDP) - for interactive data processing; Early warning subsystem (EWS_SNDP) - based on the first arrived P-phases. The signal detection process is performed by

  4. CDC National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is a system of integrated health, exposure, and hazard information and data from a variety of national,...

  5. Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrih, R.; Godec, M.; Gosar, A.; Sincic, P.; Tasic, I.; Zivcic, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Seismology Office is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. In the year 2000 the project Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network started. The purpose of a modernized seismic network is to enable fast and accurate automatic location of earthquakes, to determine earthquake parameters and to collect data of local, regional and global earthquakes. The modernized network will be finished in the year 2004 and will consist of 25 Q730 remote broadband data loggers based seismic station subsystems transmitting in real-time data to the Data Center in Ljubljana, where the Seismology Office is located. The remote broadband station subsystems include 16 surface broadband seismometers CMG-40T, 5 broadband seismometers CMG-40T with strong motion accelerographs EpiSensor, 4 borehole broadband seismometers CMG-40T, all with accurate timing provided by GPS receivers. The seismic network will cover the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2. The network is planned in this way; more seismic stations will be around bigger urban centres and in regions with greater vulnerability (NW Slovenia, Krsko Brezice region). By the end of the year 2002, three old seismic stations were modernized and ten new seismic stations were built. All seismic stations transmit data to UNIX-based computers running Antelope system software. The data is transmitted in real time using TCP/IP protocols over the Goverment Wide Area Network . Real-time data is also exchanged with seismic networks in the neighbouring countries, where the data are collected from the seismic stations, close to the Slovenian border. A typical seismic station consists of the seismic shaft with the sensor and the data acquisition system and, the service shaft with communication equipment (modem, router) and power supply with a battery box. which provides energy in case

  6. The Italian National Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The Italian National Seismic Network is composed by about 400 stations, mainly broadband, installed in the Country and in the surrounding regions. About 110 stations feature also collocated strong motion instruments. The Centro Nazionale Terremoti, (National Earthquake Center), CNT, has installed and operates most of these stations, although a considerable number of stations contributing to the INGV surveillance has been installed and is maintained by other INGV sections (Napoli, Catania, Bologna, Milano) or even other Italian or European Institutions. The important technological upgrades carried out in the last years has allowed for significant improvements of the seismic monitoring of Italy and of the Euro-Mediterranean Countries. The adopted data transmission systems include satellite, wireless connections and wired lines. The Seedlink protocol has been adopted for data transmission. INGV is a primary node of EIDA (European Integrated Data Archive) for archiving and distributing, continuous, quality checked data. The data acquisition system was designed to accomplish, in near-real-time, automatic earthquake detection and hypocenter and magnitude determination (moment tensors, shake maps, etc.). Database archiving of all parametric results are closely linked to the existing procedures of the INGV seismic monitoring environment. Overall, the Italian earthquake surveillance service provides, in quasi real-time, hypocenter parameters which are then revised routinely by the analysts of the Bollettino Sismico Nazionale. The results are published on the web page http://cnt.rm.ingv.it/ and are publicly available to both the scientific community and the the general public. This presentation will describe the various activities and resulting products of the Centro Nazionale Terremoti. spanning from data acquisition to archiving, distribution and specialised products.

  7. National Stream Quality Accounting Network and National Monitoring Network Basin Boundary Geospatial Dataset, 2008–13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy T.

    2011-01-01

    This report and the accompanying geospatial data were created to assist in analysis and interpretation of water-quality data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and by the U.S. Coastal Waters and Tributaries National Monitoring Network (NMN), which is a cooperative monitoring program of Federal, regional, and State agencies. The report describes the methods used to develop the geospatial data, which was primarily derived from the National Watershed Boundary Dataset. The geospatial data contains polygon shapefiles of basin boundaries for 33 NASQAN and 5 NMN streamflow and water-quality monitoring stations. In addition, 30 polygon shapefiles of the closed and noncontributing basins contained within the NASQAN or NMN boundaries are included. Also included is a point shapefile of the NASQAN and NMN monitoring stations and associated basin and station attributes. Geospatial data for basin delineations, associated closed and noncontributing basins, and monitoring station locations are available at http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/metadata/usgswrd/XML/ds641_nasqan_wbd12.xml.

  8. Copernicus - Practice of Daily Life in a National Mapping Agency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiatr, T.; Suresh, G.; Gehrke, R.; Hovenbitzer, M.

    2016-06-01

    Copernicus is an European system created for Earth observation and monitoring. It consists of a set of Earth observation satellites and in-situ sensors that provide geo-information that are used, through a set of Copernicus services, for applications related to the environment and global security. The main services of the Copernicus programme address six thematic areas: land, marine, atmosphere, climate change, emergency management and security. In Germany, there is a national service team of Copernicus service coordinators, who are responsible for the national development of the Copernicus services and for providing user-specific information about the Copernicus processes. These coordinators represent the contact points for all the programmes and services concerning their respective Copernicus theme. To publish information about Copernicus, national conferences and workshops are organised. Many people are involved in planning the continuous process of bringing the information to public authorities, research institutes and commercial companies. The Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (Bundesamt für Kartographie und Geodäsie, BKG) is one such organisation, and is mainly responsible for the national land monitoring service of Copernicus. To make use of the freely available data from the Copernicus programme, the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy is currently developing new applications and projects in the field of remote sensing and land monitoring. These projects can be used by other public authorities as examples on how to use the Copernicus data and services for their individual demands and requirements. Copernicus data and services are currently not very commonly used in the daily routine of the national mapping agencies, but they will soon be.

  9. Network embeddedness and public agency performance : the strength of strong ties in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, J.; Torenvlied, R.; Allen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current research in public management reports a positive effect of agency network activity in the interorganizational network on its performance (degree centrality hypothesis). This study presents a different hypothesis: The embeddedness of agency network relations in cohesive subgroups in the inter

  10. National 2000' GPS control network of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An accurately unified national GPS network with more than 2500 stations, named "National 2000' GPS Control Network", signed the epoch 2000.0, has been established by integrating the existing six nationwide GPS networks of China set up by different departments with different objectives. This paper presents the characteristics of the existing GPS networks, summarizes the strategies in the integrated adjustment of the GPS network, including functional model, stochastic model as well as the adjustment principle modification. By modifying the adjustment strategies according to the characteristics of the existing GPS networks and under the support of the IGS stations, the accuracy of the integrated national GPS network is greatly improved. The datum differences among the sub networks disappear, the systematic error influences are weakened, and the effects of the outliers on the estimated coordinates and their variances are controlled. It is shown that the average standard deviation for the horizontal component is smaller than 1.0 cm, the vertical component is smaller than 2.0 cm, and the three-dimensional (3-D) position of geocenter coordinates is smaller than 3.0 cm. The exterior checking accuracy for the 3-D position is averagely better than 1.0 cm.

  11. National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SARS Fires Residential Fires Wildfires Floods Hurricanes Tornadoes Tsunamis Promising Practices Psychological First Aid Psychological First Aid ... Day of Service and Remembrance Preparedness Month National PTSD Awareness Day World Refugee Awareness Month LGBT Pride ...

  12. 23 CFR 658.21 - Identification of National Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identification of National Network. 658.21 Section 658... Identification of National Network. (a) To identify the National Network, a State may sign the routes or provide maps of lists of highways describing the National Network. (b) Exceptional local conditions on...

  13. Searching for realism, structure and agency in Actor Network Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder-Vass, Dave

    2008-09-01

    Superficially, Actor Network Theory (ANT) and critical realism (CR) are radically opposed research traditions. Written from a realist perspective, this paper asks whether there might be a basis for finding common ground between these two traditions. It looks in turn at the questions of realism, structure, and agency, analysing the differences between the two perspectives and seeking to identify what each might learn from the other. Overall, the paper argues that there is a great deal that realists can learn from actor network theory; yet ANT remains stunted by its lack of a depth ontology. It fails to recognize the significance of mechanisms, and of their dependence on emergence, and thus lacks both dimensions of the depth that is characteristic of critical realism's ontology. This prevents ANT from recognizing the role and powers of social structure; but on the other hand, realists would do well to heed ANT's call for us to trace the connections through which structures are constantly made and remade. A lack of ontological depth also underpins ANT's practice of treating human and non-human actors symmetrically, yet this remains a valuable provocation to sociologists who neglect non-human entities entirely.

  14. 77 FR 1945 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, National Fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ...; Comment Request, National Fire Department Census AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION... collect data for the development and continuation of the National Fire Department Census. DATES: Comments..., Statistician, United States Fire Administration, National Fire Data Center, (301) 447-1154 for...

  15. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  16. 76 FR 69287 - National Instant Criminal Background Check System Section Agency Information Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation National Instant Criminal Background Check System Section Agency Information Collection Activities: Existing collection, comments requested the Voluntary Appeal File (VAF... Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division's National Instant Criminal Background Check...

  17. 75 FR 49946 - National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... National Drug Intelligence Center: Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Extension With Change... Response System. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC... Intelligence Center, Fifth Floor, 319 Washington Street, Johnstown, PA 15901. Written comments and...

  18. 77 FR 69814 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Assessment of Educational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ..., geography, economics, technology and engineering literacy, and the arts. The National Assessment of... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Assessment of Educational Progress... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments...

  19. Human resource development, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technology might be given in a few major universities as minor course. Condition and limitation of nuclear education and training infrastructures in the national level plays as an important factor in designing HRD program. Since formal education in universities are very limited, and there are only a few training institution, therefore, domestic and overseas training for BATAN employees, as well as for industrial and medical workers are the key point in preparing qualified manpower. BATAN participation in providing scientific and technology information to public has to be stimulated through national as well as international or regional cooperation. Information to public and users need to be intensified, modified and enhanced to cater the various and specific knowledge on the nuclear technology to be adopted. In this regard, the Asian network should play an important role in disseminating information and knowledge into nuclear education and training institutions, universities and users, and in making possible experience-sharing among education and training institutions

  20. Four health data networks illustrate the potential for a shared national multipurpose big-data network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Lesley H; Brown, Jeffrey; Platt, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Information in electronic health data that are drawn from large populations of patients is transforming health care, public health practice, and clinical research. This article describes our experience in developing data networks that repurpose electronic health records and administrative data. The four programs we feature are the Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel program (which focuses on medical product safety), the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet, comparative effectiveness research), the National Institutes of Health's Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory Distributed Research Network (biomedical research), and ESPnet (public health surveillance). Challenges to these uses of electronic health data include understanding the factors driving the collection, coding, and preservation of the data; the extensive customization of different systems that collect similar data; the fragmentation of the US health care delivery system and its records; and privacy and proprietary considerations. We view these four programs as examples of the first stage in the development of a shared national big-data resource that leverages the investments of many agencies and organizations for the benefit of multiple networks and users. PMID:25006144

  1. Four health data networks illustrate the potential for a shared national multipurpose big-data network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Lesley H; Brown, Jeffrey; Platt, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Information in electronic health data that are drawn from large populations of patients is transforming health care, public health practice, and clinical research. This article describes our experience in developing data networks that repurpose electronic health records and administrative data. The four programs we feature are the Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel program (which focuses on medical product safety), the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet, comparative effectiveness research), the National Institutes of Health's Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory Distributed Research Network (biomedical research), and ESPnet (public health surveillance). Challenges to these uses of electronic health data include understanding the factors driving the collection, coding, and preservation of the data; the extensive customization of different systems that collect similar data; the fragmentation of the US health care delivery system and its records; and privacy and proprietary considerations. We view these four programs as examples of the first stage in the development of a shared national big-data resource that leverages the investments of many agencies and organizations for the benefit of multiple networks and users.

  2. Invisible but Essential: The Role of Professional Networks in Promoting Faculty Agency in Career Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of professional networks are largely invisible to the people embedded in them (O'Reilly 1991), yet professional networks may provide key benefits for faculty careers. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore the role of professional networks in faculty agency in career advancement, specifically focusing on the overall…

  3. Interpassive Agency: Engaging Actor-Network-Theory's View on the Agency of Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. van Oenen (Gijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract:With increasing frequency, questions about 'what things do' and 'evocative objects' pop up in philosophy and theoretical sociology. They direct our attention to an important phenomenon: the agency of objects. In this article, I contrast Bruno Latour's, and ANT's, view on the agency, or

  4. 77 FR 57154 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Youth...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ...; National Youth Gang Survey ACTION: 60-Day notice of information collection under review. The U.S.../Collection: National Youth Gang Survey. 3. Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the U... enforcement agencies. Other: None. Abstract: This collection will gather information related to youth...

  5. 77 FR 37678 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: Notice of Charter..., that the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for...

  6. 75 FR 65478 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Listing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    .../dockets . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: LCDR Samantha Fontenelle, Office of Science and Technology, U.S... National Listing of Fish Advisories (NLFA) Database contains information on the number of advisories issued... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National...

  7. 23 CFR 658.9 - National Network criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false National Network criteria. 658.9 Section 658.9 Highways... AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.9 National Network criteria. (a) The National Network listed in the appendix to this part is available for use by commerical...

  8. Evolving plans for the USA National Phenology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Julio L.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Breshears, David D.; Brewer, Carol A.; Frazer, Gary; Gross, John E.; Mazer, Susan J.; Reed, Bradley C.; Wilson, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Phenology is the study of periodic plant and animal life cycle events, how these are influenced by seasonal and interannual variations in climate, and how they modulate the abundance, diversity, and interactions of organisms. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) is currently being organized to engage federal agencies, environmental networks and field stations, educational institutions, and citizen scientists. The first USA-NPN planning workshop was held August 2005, in Tucson, Ariz. (Betancourt et al. [2005]; http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/Geography/npn/; by 1 June 2007, also see http://www.usanpn.org). With sponsorship from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and NASA, the second USA-NPN planning workshop was held at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee on 10–12 October 2006 to (1) develop lists of target species and observation protocols; (2) identify existing networks that could comprise the backbone of nationwide observations by 2008; (3) develop opportunities for education, citizen science, and outreach beginning in spring 2007; (4) design strategies for implementing the remote sensing component of USA-NPN; and (5) draft a data management and cyberinfrastructure plan.

  9. 77 FR 26509 - Request for Information on Proposed New Program: National Network for Manufacturing Innovation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... sensors into manufacturing processes, enabling operators to make real-time use of ``big data'' flows from... Singerman, Associate Director for Innovation & Industry Services. BILLING CODE 3510-13-P ... Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology...

  10. Journal Article: EPA's National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (Ndamn): Design, Implementation, and Final Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) established the National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN) in June of 1998, and operated it until November of 2004. The objective of NDAMN was to determine background air concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (...

  11. Analysing collaboration among HIV agencies through combining network theory and relational coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Nidhi; Marsteller, Jill Ann; Hsu, Yea Jen; Elliott, David L

    2016-02-01

    Agencies with different foci (e.g. nutrition, social, medical, housing) serve people living with HIV (PLHIV). Serving needs of PLHIV comprehensively requires a high degree of coordination among agencies which often benefits from more frequent communication. We combined Social Network theory and Relational Coordination theory to study coordination among HIV agencies in Baltimore. Social Network theory implies that actors (e.g., HIV agencies) establish linkages amongst themselves in order to access resources (e.g., information). Relational Coordination theory suggests that high quality coordination among agencies or teams relies on the seven dimensions of frequency, timeliness and accuracy of communication, problem-solving communication, knowledge of agencies' work, mutual respect and shared goals. We collected data on frequency of contact from 57 agencies using a roster method. Response options were ordinal ranging from 'not at all' to 'daily'. We analyzed data using social network measures. Next, we selected agencies with which at least one-third of the sample reported monthly or more frequent interaction. This yielded 11 agencies whom we surveyed on seven relational coordination dimensions with questions scored on a Likert scale of 1-5. Network density, defined as the proportion of existing connections to all possible connections, was 20% when considering monthly or higher interaction. Relational coordination scores from individual agencies to others ranged between 1.17 and 5.00 (maximum possible score 5). The average scores for different dimensions across all agencies ranged between 3.30 and 4.00. Shared goals (4.00) and mutual respect (3.91) scores were highest, while scores such as knowledge of each other's work and problem-solving communication were relatively lower. Combining theoretically driven analyses in this manner offers an innovative way to provide a comprehensive picture of inter-agency coordination and the quality of exchange that underlies

  12. The USA National Phenology Network: A national science and monitoring program for understanding climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J.

    2009-04-01

    Patterns of phenology for plants and animals control ecosystem processes, determine land surface properties, control biosphere-atmosphere interactions, and affect food production, health, conservation, and recreation. Although phenological data and models have applications related to scientific research, education and outreach, agriculture, tourism and recreation, human health, and natural resource conservation and management, until recently there was no coordinated effort to understand phenology at the national scale in the United States. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org), established in 2007, is an emerging and exciting partnership between federal agencies, the academic community, and the general public to establish a national science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology. The first year of operation of USA-NPN produced many new phenology products and venues for phenology research and citizen involvement. Products include a new web-site (www.usanpn.org) that went live in June 2008; the web-site includes a tool for on-line data entry, and serves as a clearinghouse for products and information to facilitate research and communication related to phenology. The new core Plant Phenology Program includes profiles for 200 vetted local, regional, and national plant species with descriptions and (BBCH-consistent) monitoring protocols, as well as templates for addition of new species. A partnership program describes how other monitoring networks can engage with USA-NPN to collect, manage or disseminate phenological information for science, health, education, management or predictive service applications. Project BudBurst, a USA-NPN field campaign for citizen scientists, went live in February 2008, and now includes over 3000 registered observers monitoring 4000 plants across the nation. For 2009 and beyond, we will initiate a new Wildlife Phenology Program, create an on-line clearing-house for phenology education and outreach, strengthen

  13. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  14. NOAA Inter-Agency Networking for Open Data and Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) generates tens of terabytes of data per day from hundreds of sensors on satellites, radars, aircraft, ships, and buoys, and from numerical models. With rare exceptions, all of these data should be made publicly accessible in a usable fashion. NOAA has long been both an advocate and a practitioner of open data, and has observations going back 150 years in its archives. The NOAA data management community therefore welcomed the White House mandates on Open Data and Open Research, and has striven to improve standardization internally and in collaboration with other organizations. This paper will summarize the state of inter-agency networking by NOAA, and will discuss future perspectives, in particular the need to achieve a state where the appropriate technology choices for particular classes of geospatial data are obvious and beyond discussion, and where data sharing and metadata creation are built into agency workflows for project planning, approval, and execution, so that instead of writing and enforcing mandates we can focus on actually using data from multiple sources to improve understanding and decision-making.

  15. 77 FR 37869 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-National Hunger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Request--National Hunger Clearinghouse Database Form AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), USDA... collection is a revision of a currently approved collection for the National Hunger Clearinghouse. DATES... 703-305-2657. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: National Hunger Clearinghouse Database Form. Form:...

  16. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes. PMID:24187127

  17. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  18. Using the structure of social networks to map inter-agency relationships in public health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert M; House, Allan O; Keen, Justin; Ward, Vicky L

    2015-11-01

    This article investigates network governance in the context of health and wellbeing services in England, focussing on relationships between managers in a range of services. There are three aims, namely to investigate, (i) the configurations of networks, (ii) the stability of network relationships over time and, (iii) the balance between formal and informal ties that underpin inter-agency relationships. Latent position cluster network models were used to characterise relationships. Managers were asked two questions, both designed to characterise informal relationships. The resulting networks differed substantially from one another in membership. Managers described networks of relationships that spanned organisational boundaries, and that changed substantially over time. The findings suggest that inter-agency co-ordination depends more on informal than on formal relationships.

  19. Agency problems of global budget system in Taiwan's National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu-Hua; Yang, Chen-Wei; Fang, Shih-Chieh

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the agency problem presented by the global budget system followed by hospitals in Taiwan. In this study, we examine empirically the interaction between the principal: Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) and agency: medical service providers (hospitals); we also describe actual medical service provider and hospital governance conditions from a agency theory perspective. This study identified a positive correlation between aversion to agency hazard (self-interest behavior, asymmetric information, and risk hedging) and agency problem risks (disregard of medical ethics, pursuit of extra-contract profit, disregard of professionalism, and cost orientation). Agency costs refer to BNHI auditing and monitoring expenditures used to prevent hospitals from deviating from NHI policy goals. This study also found agency costs negatively moderate the relationship between agency hazards and agency problems The main contribution of this study is its use of agency theory to clarify agency problems and several potential factors caused by the NHI system. This study also contributes to the field of health policy study by clarifying the nature and importance of agency problems in the health care sector.

  20. Support or Control--or Both? The Role of a National Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmgren, Claes; Roman, Ola; Sjolund, Maivor; Wahlen, Staffan; Ostling, Malin

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role and position of an educational buffer agency, as exemplified by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, with references to: (1) accreditation; (2) quality audit; (3) support of academic leadership; and (4) internal quality enhancement. Concludes that change is best accomplished by emphasizing support in the early…

  1. 75 FR 43172 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center... of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific Counselors, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease...

  2. Adoption Agency Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Prospective Parents: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinsky, David M.; Patterson, Charlotte J.; Vaziri, Mahnoush

    2002-01-01

    A nation-wide survey of adoption agencies examined policies, practices, and attitudes regarding lesbian/gay prospective adoptive parents. Attitudes and practices were found to vary as a function of agency religious affiliation. Many adoption professionals were willing to work with lesbian/gay prospective parents, and nearly 38 percent of…

  3. 76 FR 25331 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Oil and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (Renewal) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... throughout the Superfund process. Title: National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP... (NCP). All remedial actions covered by this ICR (e.g., Remedial Investigations/Feasibility Studies)...

  4. Air Quality Measures on the National Environmental Health Tracking Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides air pollution data about ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) to CDC for the Tracking Network. The EPA maintains...

  5. Recruitment & Social networking : The Future for International Recruitment Agency A

    OpenAIRE

    Juusola, Toni

    2010-01-01

    The online world is changing rapidly and making waves across many aspects of life, notably business. The author was able to observe some of these changes firsthand during his time at International Recruitment Agency A (IRAA). The combination of a developing online environment and the economic climate in 2009 forced IRAA to re-assess its strategic position. This study was therefore carried out to explore the current employment market situation and online environment to predict future trends in...

  6. Teacher Agency in Educational Reform: Lessons from Social Networks Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datnow, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a context for understanding how social networks among teachers support or constrain school improvement in terms of instructional practice, professional development, and educational reform. It comments on the articles in this special issue, summarizing their contributions to the field. This analysis reveals several important…

  7. 77 FR 59599 - Notice of Public Meeting: Designing for Impact IV: Workshop on Building the National Network for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Notice of Public Meeting: Designing for Impact IV: Workshop on Building the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation AGENCY: Advanced Manufacturing Office... National Program Office (AMNPO) announces the fourth of a series of public workshops entitled...

  8. 32 CFR Attachment A to Subpart B... - Standard A-National Agency Check With Local Agency Checks and Credit Check (NACLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Access Programs by sect. 4.4 of Executive Order 12958) (60 FR 19825, 3 CFR 1995 Comp., p. 333); (2) “L... Agency Checks and Credit Check (NACLC) A Attachment A to Subpart B of Part 147 National Defense..., Subpt. B, Att. A Attachment A to Subpart B of Part 147—Standard A—National Agency Check With...

  9. 5 CFR 230.401 - Agency authority to take personnel actions in a national emergency disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... actions in a national emergency disaster. 230.401 Section 230.401 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... personnel actions in a national emergency disaster. (a) Upon an attack on the United States, agencies are... organizations during a period of disaster without regard to any regulation or instruction of OPM, except...

  10. 77 FR 7171 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, National Fire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ...; Comment Request, National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) v5.0 AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management... National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) v5.0. The program provides a well established mechanism, using standardized reporting methods, to collect and analyze fire incident data at the Federal,...

  11. 77 FR 51577 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: National Response Team Customer Satisfaction Survey ACTION: 30-Day notice of...: National Response Team Customer Satisfaction Survey. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable... distributes a program- specific customer satisfaction survey to more effectively capture customer...

  12. 77 FR 37919 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: National Response Team Customer Satisfaction Survey ACTION: 60-Day Notice of... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: National Response Team Customer Satisfaction Survey. (3) Agency... Explosives distributes a program- specific customer satisfaction survey to more effectively capture...

  13. 77 FR 64382 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... patients that will be used to identify problems or compliant and to improve the quality of health care... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465- 2 through...

  14. 75 FR 25320 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... used to identify problems or compliant and to improve the quality of health care services delivered to... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through 1465-4. OMB...

  15. Privacy Issues of a National Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Graveman, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the right to privacy of communications focuses on privacy expectations within a National Research and Education Network (NREN). Highlights include privacy needs in scientific and education communications; academic and research networks; network security and privacy concerns; protection strategies; and consequences of privacy…

  16. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6 National Priorities List (NPL) Boundaries - 05/12/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Boundaries of sites in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6 which are documented as being part of the National Priorities List as of May 12, 2014. The...

  17. National information network and database system of hazardous waste management in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Hongchang [National Environmental Protection Agency, Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31

    Industries in China generate large volumes of hazardous waste, which makes it essential for the nation to pay more attention to hazardous waste management. National laws and regulations, waste surveys, and manifest tracking and permission systems have been initiated. Some centralized hazardous waste disposal facilities are under construction. China`s National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA) has also obtained valuable information on hazardous waste management from developed countries. To effectively share this information with local environmental protection bureaus, NEPA developed a national information network and database system for hazardous waste management. This information network will have such functions as information collection, inquiry, and connection. The long-term objective is to establish and develop a national and local hazardous waste management information network. This network will significantly help decision makers and researchers because it will be easy to obtain information (e.g., experiences of developed countries in hazardous waste management) to enhance hazardous waste management in China. The information network consists of five parts: technology consulting, import-export management, regulation inquiry, waste survey, and literature inquiry.

  18. National network of environment radioactivity measurements. Press kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document first presents the objectives, challenges, context, operation and actors of the French national network of environment radioactivity measurements. It discusses the reasons for these measurements, the way they are performed, who perform them and how they are transmitted to the national network. It describes the quality policy for these measurements, and how this network is at the service of authorities, experts and population. It outlines the originality of the French approach within the European Union, and how this network takes the population expectations and their evolution into account

  19. 76 FR 37371 - Agency Information Collection: Comment Request for National Gap Analysis Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... documents, (2) measure user satisfaction, and (3) understand user needs. Additionally, this survey can....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection: Comment Request for National Gap Analysis... that we have submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) an information collection...

  20. 75 FR 26759 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...; Comment Request; National Survey of Older Americans Act Title III Service Recipients AGENCY... collection requirements contained in consumer assessment surveys that are used by AoA to measure program performance for programs funded under Title III of the Older Americans Act. DATES: Submit written...

  1. 78 FR 74145 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Collection; Comment Request; National Survey of Older Americans Act Participants AGENCY: Administration for... information collection requirements contained in consumer assessment surveys that are used by ACL to measure program performance for programs funded under Title III of the Older Americans Act. DATES: Submit...

  2. Impacts of Psychological Science on National Security Agencies Post-9/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychologists have been an integral part of national security agencies since World War I, when psychological science helped in personnel selection. A robust infrastructure supporting wider applications of psychology to military and intelligence problems developed further during World War II and the years following, primarily in the areas of…

  3. 78 FR 76412 - Agency Information Collection (VA National Rehabilitation Special Events, Event Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... the collection of information through www.Regulations.gov or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human...., Washington, DC 20420, (202) 632-7492 or email crystal.rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA National Rehabilitation Special Events, Event...

  4. Facilitating Phenological Assessments at Local, Regional and National Scales: Year Two Progress of the USA National Phenology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    Patterns of phenology for plants and animals control ecosystem processes, determine land surface properties, control biosphere-atmosphere interactions, and affect food production, health, conservation, and recreation. Although directional climate change has already caused documented shifts in organismal, population, community and ecosystem-level patterns and processes, a national phenological assessment requires a comprehensive suite of standardized methodologies to track phenology across a range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g., organismal to landscapes). The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) is an emerging and exciting partnership between federal agencies, the academic community, and the general public to establish a national science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology as a tool to understand how plants, animals and landscapes respond to climate variation, and as a tool to facilitate human adaptation to ongoing and potential future climate change. USA-NPN will (1) integrate with other formal and informal science observation networks (e.g., NEON, LTER, Ameriflux, NPS I & M, OBFS, GEO, public gardens, conservation groups) including regional phenology networks; (2) utilize and enhance remote sensing products, emerging technologies and data management capabilities; and (3) capitalize on myriad educational opportunities and a new readiness of the public to participate in investigations of nature on a national scale. In its second year of operation, USA-NPN produced many new phenology products and venues for phenology research and citizen involvement that will facilitate local, regional or national assessments of phenology. A new web-page contains an advanced on-line user interface to facilitate entry of contemporary data into the National Phenology Database. The new plant phenology monitoring program provides standardized methodologies and monitoring protocols for 215 local, regional, and nationally distributed plant species

  5. Ordinance on technical requirements and conditions of use of optical distribution networks of the Croatian regulatory agency - Analysis and outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Brusić, Igor; Kittl, Jörg; Ruhle, Ernst-Olav; Žuti, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    In September 2010 the Croatian regulatory agency (HAKOM) put in force the ordinance on technical requirements and conditions of use of optical distribution networks. With this ordinance the Croatian regulatory agency is looking over the rim by proposing a rather technical approach for the rollout of optical access networks which will have significant influence on the deployment of next generation access networks (NGAN) in Croatia. The ordinance stipulates the requirements that have to be fulf...

  6. Stations in the USGS's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a point coverage of stations in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN). NASQAN was established in 1973....

  7. European Networks and Ideas: Changing National Policies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Kohler-Koch

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Wider involvement and better knowledge are keywords in the recent White Paper on European Governance. The political discourse has, quite obviously, taken up the academic debate about the importance of ideas and networks. The Commission is seen as an ideational entrepreneur which by arguing and networking is able to induce autonomous actors with quite diverse interests to follow a European course of action. Regional policy has been a most promising field of research to confirm this hypothesis. Recent investigations can be read, however, in quite a different way. The paper questions established conventional wisdom concerning the importance of European ideas and networks for policy change and raises the question how ideational and network competition could be explored in a better way.

  8. Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year. The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initia

  9. National environmental radioactivity networks-1993; Reti nazionali si sorveglianza della radioattivita` ambientale in Italia-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M; Notaro, M.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U; Tommasi, R.

    1998-12-31

    This report contains the environmental radioactivity data collected in Italy during 1993, by the National Environmental Radioactivity Networks. The data contained in this report have been provided by the institutions participating in the National Environmental Radioactivity Networks. The National Environmental Protection Agency (ANPA) is law-fully responsible for publishing the report. The results of the measurements of radioactivity, are generally reported by only one significant figure. An arithmetical average of a series of figures, some of which are preceded by the sign `less than` (<), is given with this sign only when the figures bearing < affect remarkably (more then 50%) the value resulting from the average. Reproduction of the data contained in this report is authorized, provided the source is acknowledged.

  10. US Environmental Protection Agency National Coastal Assessment for Hawaii 2002: Water Quality, Fish Taxon, Sediment Chemistry Data (NODC Accession 0061250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Assessment (NCA), in conjunction with...

  11. Nation-Wide Mobile Network Energy Evolution Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Eva; Frank, Philipp; Micallef, Gilbert;

    2013-01-01

    Mobile network operators are facing a challenging dilemma. While on the one hand they are committed to reducing their carbon emissions, and energy consumption, they are also required to continuously upgrade existing networks, ensuring that the relentless growth in data traffic can still...... be supported. In most cases, these upgrades increase the energy consumption of the network even further. This paper presents a nation-wide case study, based on a commercial network of a leading European operator, intended to provide a clear understanding of how the energy consumption of mobile networks...... is expected to evolve from 2012 until 2020. The study also considers an efficient network capacity evolution path, including base station equipment improvement forecasts....

  12. COPERNICUS – PRACTICE OF DAILY LIFE IN A NATIONAL MAPPING AGENCY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wiatr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Copernicus is an European system created for Earth observation and monitoring. It consists of a set of Earth observation satellites and in-situ sensors that provide geo-information that are used, through a set of Copernicus services, for applications related to the environment and global security. The main services of the Copernicus programme address six thematic areas: land, marine, atmosphere, climate change, emergency management and security. In Germany, there is a national service team of Copernicus service coordinators, who are responsible for the national development of the Copernicus services and for providing user-specific information about the Copernicus processes. These coordinators represent the contact points for all the programmes and services concerning their respective Copernicus theme. To publish information about Copernicus, national conferences and workshops are organised. Many people are involved in planning the continuous process of bringing the information to public authorities, research institutes and commercial companies. The Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (Bundesamt für Kartographie und Geodäsie, BKG is one such organisation, and is mainly responsible for the national land monitoring service of Copernicus. To make use of the freely available data from the Copernicus programme, the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy is currently developing new applications and projects in the field of remote sensing and land monitoring. These projects can be used by other public authorities as examples on how to use the Copernicus data and services for their individual demands and requirements. Copernicus data and services are currently not very commonly used in the daily routine of the national mapping agencies, but they will soon be.

  13. Social Media Platforms as a Tool for Sharing Emotions. A Perspective upon the National Security Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona-Diana LEON

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotions importance increases even more in the context of the national security agencies. Since their mission is to protect and defend the citizens against attacks and also to provide leadership and justice services to other agencies and partners, the aim of the information they post on social media should be twofold: on the one hand, it should reflect the attitudes, values and beliefs, supported by the institution, and on the other hand, it should have an impact on citizens feeling of security. But, do they manage to meet these demands? Are they focusing on impressing the audience or they concentrate on sharing specific emotions? Is it a marketing strategy or a knowledge strategy? Starting from these, the purpose of this research is to set a nexus between emotions and the use of social media by the national security organizations. In other words, we aim (i to determine the main types of emotions, (ii to establish whether these are shared within the social media platforms, (iii to identify the purpose for which the national security organizations use social media, (iv to determine whether social media could serve as Ba for the national security organizations. In order to achieve these objectives, we employ an ethic approach and develop a longitudinal study based on quantitative and qualitative content analysis. The results prove that social media platforms may serve as Ba since they appear as a shared space which fosters individual and collective knowledge creation and sharing. The national security agencies  use social media platforms for combining the classical four types of Ba: originating Ba (it shares its emotions, feelings and thoughts through its posts, interacting Ba (through the generated reactions and comments, it ensures the development of shared models and the conversion of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, cyber Ba (by fostering the virtual interaction among its followers and exercising Ba (by facilitating the creation of

  14. The impact of capacity growth in national telecommunications networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Andrew; Soppera, Andrea; Jacquet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses both UK-based and global Internet data bandwidth growth, beginning with historical data for the BT network. We examine the time variations in consumer behaviour and how this is statistically aggregated into larger traffic loads on national core fibre communications networks. The random nature of consumer Internet behaviour, where very few consumers require maximum bandwidth simultaneously, provides the opportunity for a significant statistical gain. The paper looks at predictions for how this growth might continue over the next 10-20 years, giving estimates for the amount of bandwidth that networks should support in the future. The paper then explains how national networks are designed to accommodate these traffic levels, and the various network roles, including access, metro and core, are described. The physical layer network is put into the context of how the packet and service layers are designed and the applications and location of content are also included in an overall network overview. The specific role of content servers in alleviating core network traffic loads is highlighted. The status of the relevant transmission technologies in the access, metro and core is given, showing that these technologies, with adequate research, should be sufficient to provide bandwidth for consumers in the next 10-20 years.

  15. The impact of capacity growth in national telecommunications networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Andrew; Soppera, Andrea; Jacquet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses both UK-based and global Internet data bandwidth growth, beginning with historical data for the BT network. We examine the time variations in consumer behaviour and how this is statistically aggregated into larger traffic loads on national core fibre communications networks. The random nature of consumer Internet behaviour, where very few consumers require maximum bandwidth simultaneously, provides the opportunity for a significant statistical gain. The paper looks at predictions for how this growth might continue over the next 10-20 years, giving estimates for the amount of bandwidth that networks should support in the future. The paper then explains how national networks are designed to accommodate these traffic levels, and the various network roles, including access, metro and core, are described. The physical layer network is put into the context of how the packet and service layers are designed and the applications and location of content are also included in an overall network overview. The specific role of content servers in alleviating core network traffic loads is highlighted. The status of the relevant transmission technologies in the access, metro and core is given, showing that these technologies, with adequate research, should be sufficient to provide bandwidth for consumers in the next 10-20 years. PMID:26809568

  16. Security-Enhanced Autonomous Network Management for Space Networking Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program is integrating its three current agency networks: Space Network (SN), Deep Space Network (DSN), and Near...

  17. Managing the national road network maintenance in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez Frias, Victor; Sánchez Chaparro, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Public Works manages the National Road Network, which consists in 27,000 km. In 1992, the average age of pavements was 7.2 years, whereas at present it has increased to 9 years. The great heterogeneity of pavements, the constant increase in the network length and its gradual aging demand important budgets but also agile technical, economic and administrative management models. The Subdirectorate of Maintenance and Operation is responsible of management systems for this...

  18. Tracks: A National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network Overview

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-04

    In this podcast, Dr. Mike McGeehin, Director of CDC's Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, provides an overview of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. It highlights the Tracking Network's goal, how it will improve public health, its audience, and much more.  Created: 8/4/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/4/2009.

  19. The Voice of Which People? Transnational Advocacy Networks and Governance Networks at the United Nations

    OpenAIRE

    Willetts, P.

    2013-01-01

    We can expand our understanding of the politics of global networks and how they relate to the United Nations, by closely examining the concept of a network. There is a long-established International Relations literature focusing on the more institutionalised, international non-governmental organisations. Keck and Sikkink have drawn on the Sociology literature covering social movements in global politics to discuss transnational advocacy networks. It is also necessary to distinguish a third ma...

  20. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  1. Evolution of Numeracy and the National Numeracy Network

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn Arthur Steen; Bernard L. Madison

    2008-01-01

    The National Numeracy Network grew from heightened awareness of the complex and sophisticated nature of quantitative literacy and the resulting need for interdisciplinary attention to education for quantitative literacy in schools and colleges. This complexity and sophistication applies especially to the US where it is fueled by an agile economy and the needs of a democratic society. This paper describes the environment surrounding the National Numeracy Network’s establishment, some of its ac...

  2. National Union Catalog Experience: Implications for Network Planning. Network Planning Paper No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondran, Raymond F.

    This study conducted to provide background data for the systematic development of the library bibliographic component of a national network analyzes the procedures used in producing the National Union Catalog (NUC), the nationwide union catalog in card form maintained at the Library of Congress (LC), and examines the variations found in records as…

  3. Building Service Delivery Networks: Partnership Evolution Among Children’s Behavioral Health Agencies in Response to New Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C.; Doogan, Nathan J.; Cao, Yiwen

    2014-01-01

    Meeting the complex needs of youth with behavioral health problems requires a coordinated network of community-based agencies. Although fiscal scarcity or retrenchment can limit coordinated services, munificence can stimulate service delivery partnerships as agencies expand programs, hire staff, and spend more time coordinating services. This study examines the 2-year evolution of referral and staff expertise sharing networks in response to substantial new funding for services within a regional network of children’s mental health organizations. Quantitative network survey data were collected from directors of 22 nonprofit organizations that receive funding from a county government-based behavioral health service fund. Both referral and staff expertise sharing networks changed over time, but results of a stochastic actor-oriented model of network dynamics suggest the nature of this change varies for these networks. Agencies with higher numbers of referral and staff expertise sharing partners tend to maintain these ties and/or develop new relationships over the 2 years. Agencies tend to refer to agencies they trust, but trust was not associated with staff expertise sharing ties. However, agencies maintain or form staff expertise sharing ties with referral partners, or with organizations that provide similar services. In addition, agencies tend to reciprocate staff expertise sharing, but not referrals. Findings suggest that during periods of resource munificence and service expansion, behavioral health organizations build service delivery partnerships in complex ways that build upon prior collaborative history and coordinate services among similar types of providers. Referral partnerships can pave the way for future information sharing relationships. PMID:25574359

  4. National ecological network - NECONET; 1 : 1 000 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this map directions of penetration of floristic and faunistic geo-elements, Ecological corridors of European significance, Ecological corridors of national significance, Core areas, as well as Development areas of natural elements on the territory of the Slovak Republic are shown. As the follow-up to the General Plan of Supraregional Territorial System of Ecological Stability (TSES), the proposal of the national ecological network (NECONET) was prepared. It is based on the conception of the European ecological network (EECONET), which follows a Dutch model. It represents the network of significant, above all, protected territories important for the conservation of gene pool and biodiversity. The basis of the network are the identified core areas (analogous to bio-centres in the framework of TSES), biological and ecological corridors analogous to bio-corridors in the framework of TSES) and the territories of development of the natural elements of European and national importance with the aim to create an integrated system of protected territories and potentially valuable territories of the individual European countries formed pursuing the international criteria and standards. NECONET was processed in Slovakia in 1996 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which identified 35 core territories of European significance and another 35 territories of national significance. Many of them coincide with the supra-regional and regional elements of TSES. (authors)

  5. A National Interlibrary Loan Network: The OCLC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Mary Ellen

    1979-01-01

    Describes the objectives, testing, procedures, and effects on document delivery systems of the OCLC interlibrary loan (ILL) subsystem, an uncoordinated national ILL network which provides users with immediate access to the OCLC On-Line Union Catalog, the ILL Transaction File, and the ILL Message Waiting File. (CWM)

  6. Successful neural network projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents recent and current projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that research and apply neural network technology. The projects are summarized in the paper and their direct application to space reactor power and propulsion systems activities is discussed. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Successful neural network projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent and current projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that research and apply neural network technology. The projects are summarized in the paper and their direct application to space reactor power and propulsion systems activities is discussed. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  8. 78 FR 10249 - Establishment of the National Freight Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Establishment of the National Freight Network Correction In notice document 2013-02580 appearing on pages 8686-8689, in the issue of Wednesday, February 6, 2013, make...

  9. Priorities in national space strategies and governance of the member states of the European Space Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensen, Maarten; Giannopapa, Christina; Sagath, Daniel; Papastefanou, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has twenty Member States with a variety of strategic priorities and governance structures regarding their space activities. A number of countries engage in space activities exclusively though ESA, while others have also their own national space programme. Some consider ESA as their prime space agency and others have additionally their own national agency with respective programmes. The main objective of this paper is to provide an up-to date overview and a holistic assessment of strategic priorities and the national space governance structures in 20 ESA Member States. This analysis and assessment has been conducted by analysing the Member States public documents, information provided at ESA workshop on this topic and though unstructured interviews. The paper is structured to include two main elements: priorities and trends in national space strategies and space governance in ESA Member States. The first part of this paper focuses on the content and analysis of the national space strategies and indicates the main priorities and trends in Member States. The priorities are categorised with regards to technology domains, the role of space in the areas of sustainability and the motivators that boost engagement in space. These vary from one Member State to another and include with different levels of engagement in technology domains amongst others: science and exploration, navigation, Earth observation, human space flight, launchers, telecommunications, and integrated applications. Member States allocate a different role of space as enabling tool adding to the advancement of sustainability areas including: security, resources, environment and climate change, transport and communication, energy, and knowledge and education. The motivators motivating reasoning which enhances or hinders space engagement also differs. The motivators identified are industrial competitiveness, job creation, technology development and transfer, social benefits

  10. IAEA Support to National TLD Audit Networks for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years, the IAEA has supported the development of methodology and establishment of national quality audit networks for radiotherapy dosimetry. The main objective was to extend the availability of radiotherapy dosimetry audits to as many radiotherapy centres as possible throughout the world. Since 1995, a series of three coordinated research projects (CRPs) has been conducted by the IAEA to assist its Member States to develop such national audit programmes. The first CRP focused on the basic beam calibration audits. The basic programme was extended to audits in non-reference conditions through a second CRP. The third CRP initiated in 2009 is expanding the dosimetry audit tools for more complex techniques used for treatment of cancer patients. The national audit networks participating in these CRPs have incorporated in their programmes procedures for auditing hospital dosimetry for these techniques. (author)

  11. National radioactive waste management agencies potential models for Central and Eastern European countries, Cassiopee management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In discussing institutional arrangements for radioactive waste disposal organizations particular attentions paid to the relationships between - and the responsibilities of the State, the Regulator, Waste Producer, and the national Waste Management Organization. The IAEA provide guidance relating to the establishment of appropriate radioactive waste management structures. The model of the IAEA guidance on radioactive waste management infrastructure is sometimes referred to as the 'classical triangle' principle. The model separates the three roles of the Regulator, the Waste Producer and the Waste Disposer. Each has separate responsibilities and must exhibit independence from the other. However the triangle also has another dimension, in that the arrangements should be underpinned by from government policy on radioactive waste, on the basis of the guidance on responsibilities set out by the IAEA. Models of the institutional arrangements in the countries of the European Union (EU) typically follow the principles set out by the above. Since the break up of Soviet Union, economic and political changes in the Newly Independent States and the countries of Central and Eastern Europe have, in turn, inspired changes in the management of nuclear power related activities including radioactive waste management, bringing them more in line with practices adopted in the UE. In 1993 the European Commission encouraged the creation of Cassiopee, a Consortium of EU national radioactive waste agencies comprising ANDRA (France), COVRA (The Netherlands), DBE (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), Nirex (UK), ONDRAF/ NIREX (Belgium). The consortium combines the individual members competence and capabilities and provides assistance and advice through the EU programmes to beneficiary countries in two main ways: Developing national radioactive waste management strategies; Advising on the implementation of projects. As such Cassiopee has undertaken two projects of direct relevance to the Bulgarian

  12. Review on Malaysia's national energy developments: Key policies, agencies, programmes and international involvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Shing Chyi; Oh, Tick Hui [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    This paper aims to present a review on Malaysia's national energy developments by looking at various angles in terms of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Energy demand and consumption by sectors are presented as well as the fuel mix in electricity generation. Key energy policies implemented from the incorporation of Malaysia's national oil company, Petronas in 1974 until the National Green Technology Policy 2009 and a future policy will be addressed. The roles of key players as well as important agencies in energy development are briefly presented. Key programmes in energy development such as Malaysian Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvement Project, Small Renewable Energy Power Programme and Building Energy Efficiency Programme are discussed as well as successful initiatives from the programmes. Malaysia's international involvements towards reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon emissions especially Montreal Protocol and Kyoto Protocol are highlighted. As a conclusion, Malaysia is aware of its role in formulating its national energy development policies, sensitive towards the country's development towards the environment and utilization of energy resources as well as conscientious and responsive towards the call for sustainable development in promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency. (author)

  13. Networking and interaction between a Mutual Assistance Association and other agencies (Pamplona, 1902–1919

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Leon Sanz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1902-1919, the most important Mutual Assistance Association in the northern Spanish region of Navarre was “The Catholic Workers Protection Society La Conciliación” a private, mixed association which integrated -until 1919- employers, employees and protectors members. Its primary activities involved medical-pharmaceutical assistance, financial aid to the ill and labour mediation. La Conciliación was presided by people who were influential in the political and social life of the city, a fact which allowed the representatives of this association to belong to the Commissions set up by the city council and the regional government. Aiming to solve sanitary and social problems, it was also in contact with other government agencies and other Mutual Assistance Associations both in Spain and abroad. The article analyses the relations and the networks established by this institution, using its archives and the press, where the activities of La Conciliación were widely reflected.

  14. 75 FR 41505 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR) ATSDR-263; Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical...

  15. 75 FR 75474 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  16. 76 FR 9578 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public... Director for Science, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  17. 75 FR 16488 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  18. 75 FR 59727 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  19. 41 CFR 102-77.25 - Do Federal agencies have responsibilities to provide national visibility for Art-in-Architecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities to provide national visibility for Art-in-Architecture? 102-77.25 Section 102-77.25 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 77-ART-IN-ARCHITECTURE Art-in-Architecture § 102-77.25 Do Federal agencies have responsibilities to provide national visibility for Art-in-Architecture? Yes,...

  20. Computer and Network Relational Study for Building the National Bibliographic Information Network (NBINet in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ching Emily Yang

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Bibliographic Information Network (NBINet is a bibliographic database established on October 30, 1991 and maintained by Taiwan's National Library (National Central Library. Initially, the database included 18 member libraries (16 from national universities and 2 from the public libraries. In 1998, there are 26 member libraries and 70 non-member libraries joined the NBINet. This NBINet has been considered a comprehensive and important database for Chinese studies worldwide and offered more than 1.6 million entries of bibliography records on June 1997. This paper consists three perspectives of NBINet : (1 NBINet's problems and solutions in relation to computerization and the Internet, (2 its connection with Taiwan Academic Network (TANet and Internet, (3 and users' expectation toward NBINet. Hopefully, this kind of the experience for establishing a bibliographic database can be used as a reference for others who may want 10 build up a similier database. [Article content in Chinese

  1. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  2. Evolution of Numeracy and the National Numeracy Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Arthur Steen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Numeracy Network grew from heightened awareness of the complex and sophisticated nature of quantitative literacy and the resulting need for interdisciplinary attention to education for quantitative literacy in schools and colleges. This complexity and sophistication applies especially to the US where it is fueled by an agile economy and the needs of a democratic society. This paper describes the environment surrounding the National Numeracy Network’s establishment, some of its activities, and some complementary and synergistic actions by other professional societies. The paper concludes with a sample of quantitative literacy programs in colleges and universities.

  3. Student Agency: an Analysis of Students' Networked Relations Across the Informal and Formal Learning Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Natasha Anne; Tang, Kok-Sing

    2016-05-01

    Agency is a construct facilitating our examination of when and how young people extend their own learning across contexts. However, little is known about the role played by adolescent learners' sense of agency. This paper reports two cases of students' agentively employing and developing science literacy practices—one in Singapore and the other in the USA. The paper illustrates how these two adolescent learners in different ways creatively accessed, navigated and integrated in-school and out-of-school discourses to support and nurture their learning of physics. Data were gleaned from students' work and interviews with students participating in a physics curricular programme in which they made linkages between their chosen out-of-school texts and several physics concepts learnt in school. The students' agentive moves were identified by means of situational mapping, which involved a relational analysis of the students' chosen artefacts and discourses across time and space. This relational analysis enabled us to address questions of student agency—how it can be effected, realised, construed and examined. It highlights possible ways to intervene in these networked relations to facilitate adolescents' agentive moves in their learning endeavours.

  4. Eurosdr - the Pan-European Network for Mapping Agencies and Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streilein, A.; Remondino, F.; Pfeifer, N.; Trollvik, J. A.; Stoter, J.; Crompvoets, J.; Potůčková, M.

    2016-06-01

    EuroSDR (http://www.eurosdr.net/) is a non-profit organisation that provides a pan-European network that brings together mapping / cadastre agencies and academia for the purpose of applied research, and securing timely, research-based knowledge that allows the agencies to play their role as content providers and government competence centres for geographic information and spatial data infrastructures. EuroSDR is the recognised provider of research-based knowledge to a Europe where citizens can readily benefit from geographic information. Its mission is to develop and improve methods, systems and standards for the acquisition, processing, production, maintenance, management, visualization, and dissemination of geographic reference data in support of applications and service delivery. EuroSDR delivers advanced research-based knowledge. Its value is generated by facilitating interaction between research organisations and the public and private sector with the aim of exchanging ideas and knowledge about relevant research topics; by facilitating and contributing to research projects; and by transferring knowledge and research results to real world applications. The paper gives an overview about EuroSDR research principles, research alliances, objectives and action plans of each of the technical commissions.

  5. National Waterway Network (line), Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [usace_nav_waterway_lin_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The National Waterway Network is a comprehensive network database of the nation's navigable waterways. The data set covers the 48 contiguous states plus the...

  6. National Waterway Network (node), Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [usace_nav_waterway_nod_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The National Waterway Network is a comprehensive network database of the nation's navigable waterways. The data set covers the 48 contiguous states plus the...

  7. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency.

  8. Research on Ethnic Minority Representatives in State Council Agencies During the Period of Nanjing National Government

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xueyin

    2016-01-01

    China is a multi-ethnic country. From the wuzu gonghe ( Five nationalities under one union ) in the early Republic of China to the current union of 56 ethnic groups, the participation of ethnic minorities in political affairs has always been a vital and important factor for the develop-ment of China’s democratic politics. On one hand, the Nanjing National Government was dedicated to the model of a“civil identification” and weakening ethnic characteristics. On the other hand, due to the immense pressure from the resistance of the Japanese invasion and the increase of minority representatives’ appeals, they had to gradually al-low some ethnic elites, as ethnic minority repre-sentatives, to participate in the national affairs so that they could acquire more political identity. Al-though the government of the Republic of China claimed “Five nationalities under one union” as well as declaring many times to guarantee extensive and orderly ethnic minority participation in national affairs, by analyzing cases of elections in the state council agencies during the period of Nanjing na-tional government, not all the promises were imple-mented. I. The general situation of the elections for ethnic minority representatives in the state council agencies. In the National Conference in 1931 , only Mongolia and Tibet were allowed to organize their own elections and send their own ethnic representa-tives. Among the total of 520 national conference representatives, Mongolian representatives accoun-ted for 12 , and Tibetans accounted for 10 . The National Political Council, which also known as“the Congress during war”, was founded on July 6 , 1938 , and was abolished on March 28 , 1948 . It lasted for 9 years and held conferences a total of 4 times. In all the 4 conferences, 10 people were elected as participants to represent Tibet to discuss political affairs, and 18 people were elected as participants representing Mongolia. However, al-though other minorities were

  9. Status of contamination monitoring in radiation activities of National Atomic Energy Agency (NAEA) in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhariyono, Gatot [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1997-06-01

    National Atomic Energy Agency (NAEA) or Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional (BATAN) is a non departmental governmental agency, headed by a Director General who is directly responsible to the President. Center for Standardization and Radiation Safety Research (CSRSR) is one of the research centers within the deputy for the assessment of nuclear science and technology of the NAEA. The main task of the CSRSR is to implement research and development program, development and services in the field of radiation safety, standardization, dosimetry, radiation health as well as the application of nuclear techniques in medicine, according to the policy confirmed by the director general of BATAN. Task of radiation protection division is to set up programs and to develop radiation protection, personal monitoring system and radiation level of the working areas and their surroundings as well as dose limitation system, to carry out technical up grading of radiation protection officials skill and to help coping with radiation accident. The key factor on contamination monitoring is to reduce human error and mechanical failures. These problems can be achieved to the highest degree by developing knowledge and skill of staffs via trainings or courses on contamination and decontamination, so that they are hoped to become trained and qualified staffs. (G.K.)

  10. Innovation – a national priority, supported by the regional development agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ENACHE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Union is interested in the overall performance of the group of 27, and in the national contributions in innovation. The target is to create an „Innovation Union” which aims to provide to entrepreneurs the necessary support to transform innovative ideas into products and services because it has been found that the rate is inefficient to reduce the gap between Europe and its main competitors. The competition with the emerging countries cannot also be won without carrying out the provisions of the Europe 2020 Strategy. This paper addresses the Romanian vision on innovation supported by the Regional Development Agencies whose experience can be considered best-practice model.

  11. The National Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence Network: Building Bridges Between Ocean Scientists and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G.; Hotaling, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2002 the National Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Network, funded by the National Science Foundation with support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has worked to increase the understanding of the ocean and its relevance to society. The Network is currently comprised of twelve Centers located throughout the United States and a Central Coordinating Office. COSEE focuses on innovative activities that transform and broaden participation in the ocean science education enterprise. A key player in the national ocean literacy movement, COSEE’s objectives are to develop partnerships between ocean scientists and educators and foster communication and coordination among ocean science education programs nationwide. COSEE has grown into the nation's most comprehensive ocean science and education network with over 200 partners, including universities and research institutions, community colleges, school districts, informal science education institutions, and state/federal agencies. Each Center is a consortium of one or more ocean science research institutions, informal science education organizations, and formal education entities. The mission of the National COSEE Network is to engage scientists and educators to transform ocean sciences education. Center activities include the development of catalytic partnerships among diverse institutions, the integration of ocean science research into high-quality educational materials, and the establishment of pathways that enable ocean scientists to interact with educators, students, and the public. In addition to the work and projects implemented locally and regionally by the Centers, Network-level efforts occur across Centers, such as the national promotion of Ocean Literacy Principals and encouragement of our nation’s youth to pursue ocean related areers. This presentation will offer several examples of how the National COSEE Network is playing an important and evolving role in

  12. 34 CFR 412.4 - What is the National Network of Directors Council?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the National Network of Directors Council? 412...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL NETWORK FOR CURRICULUM COORDINATION IN VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION General § 412.4 What is the National Network of...

  13. Announcement: 20th Anniversary of PulseNet: the National Molecular Subtyping Network for Foodborne Disease Surveillance - United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PulseNet is celebrating 20 years of public health achievements in transforming the way foodborne disease outbreaks are detected and investigated. PulseNet is a national surveillance network of federal, state, and local public health laboratories that work together to detect foodborne disease outbreaks by connecting DNA fingerprints of bacteria that cause illness (1). The network facilitates the early identification of common sources of foodborne outbreaks and helps regulatory agencies identify areas where implementation of new measures are likely to improve the safety of the food supply. PMID:27337605

  14. Comparative analysis of formulation techniques for national and regional ecological networks Comparative analysis of formulation techniques for national and regional ecological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Amsallem, Michel Deshayes and Marie Bonnevialle

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of its mission to assist the Ecology ministry in setting up the National ecological network, Cemagref carried out a comparative analysis on network formulation methods to assist in the establishment of national guidelines. This article presents the salient points.The French ecological network aims to preserve and restore ecological continuities. In support of the Ecology ministry and the National ecological-network implementation committee, Cemagref coordinated the drafting of national guidelines. As part of this work, Cemagref identified significant national and regional projects and compared the methods used. Elements for a national framework and recommendations for the design and mapping of the network on the regional level were presented to the committee and, following review, were included in the national guidelines.

  15. Powerful connections for public health: the National Library of Medicine and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, B L; Ruffin, A B; Cahn, M A; Rambo, N

    1999-11-01

    As incorporated in Healthy People 2010 objectives, data and information systems and a skilled workforce are 2 of the critical components of the public health infrastructure. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) are important resources for improving Internet access and providing related training to the public health workforce and to those in training for public health careers. The NLM and the NN/LM have joined forces with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, the National Association of County and City Health Officials, and the Public Health Foundation. The goal of this collaboration is to improve electronic resources useful in public health practice and increase awareness of them, to train public health professionals to use electronic information services, and to help public health agencies obtain the equipment and Internet connections needed to use these services effectively. The databases, outreach programs, and connection grants available to public health professionals from the NLM, and the training and ongoing support available from the NN/LM for accessing these programs and services, are described.

  16. Estimating National-scale Emissions using Dense Monitoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Grant, A.; Young, D.; Oram, D.; Sturges, W. T.; Moncrieff, J. B.; O'Doherty, S.

    2014-12-01

    The UK's DECC (Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change) network consists of four greenhouse gas measurement stations that are situated to constrain emissions from the UK and Northwest Europe. These four stations are located in Mace Head (West Coast of Ireland), and on telecommunication towers at Ridge Hill (Western England), Tacolneston (Eastern England) and Angus (Eastern Scotland). With the exception of Angus, which currently only measures carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), the remaining sites are additionally equipped to monitor nitrous oxide (N2O). We present an analysis of the network's CH4 and N2O observations from 2011-2013 and compare derived top-down regional emissions with bottom-up inventories, including a recently produced high-resolution inventory (UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory). As countries are moving toward national-level emissions estimation, we also address some of the considerations that need to be made when designing these national networks. One of the novel aspects of this work is that we use a hierarchical Bayesian inversion framework. This methodology, which has newly been applied to greenhouse gas emissions estimation, is designed to estimate temporally and spatially varying model-measurement uncertainties and correlation scales, in addition to fluxes. Through this analysis, we demonstrate the importance of characterizing these covariance parameters in order to properly use data from high-density monitoring networks. This UK case study highlights the ways in which this new inverse framework can be used to address some of the limitations of traditional Bayesian inverse methods.

  17. Nutrition labelling: perspectives of a bi-national agency for Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Margaret A

    2002-01-01

    Australia New Zealand Food Authority (ANZFA) is a bi-national government agency forming a partnership between all of Australia's States and Territories and the New Zealand government. Australia New Zealand Food Authority employs scientific, legal policy, communication and administrative staff in our Australia and New Zealand offices. Prior to 1991 each of Australia's States and Territories had their own food standards; however, in 1991 Commonwealth legislation was introduced to consolidate responsibility for developing food standards in one specialist agency and to ensure the uniformity of Standards across all States and Territories in Australia. This was extended to New Zealand in 1995 when we became a bi-national agency following the signing of a Treaty between Australia and New Zealand to develop joint food standards for both countries. Australia New Zealand Food Authority's objectives in setting food standards are to: protect public health and safety; provide adequate information to enable consumers to make informed choices; and prevent misleading or deceptive conduct. Health Ministers have recently approved a new Joint Food Standards Code for Australia and New Zealand. This is the result of over 6 year's work and many rounds of public consultation. The new Code has had extensive input from government agencies, industry and consumers. In drafting the new code our emphasis has been on making decisions based on sound science and the most up-to-date information available. We also recognized the need for Standards to be practical in not imposing unnecessary costs on food manufacturers with an inevitable flow on effect to consumer prices. The Joint Code will replace both the existing Australian Food Standards Code and the New Zealand Food Regulations after a 2-year transition period. During the development of the Joint Code a wide range of matters were considered in relation to labelling. Amongst these were consumer needs, costs to industry, voluntary versus

  18. Development of a Coordinated National Soil Moisture Network: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiring, S. M.; Lucido, J. M.; Winslow, L.; Ford, T.; Bijoy Baruah, P.; Verdin, J. P.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Strobel, M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is critical for accurate drought assessment and forecasting, identifying flood potential, climate modeling, estimation of crop yields and water budgeting. However, soil moisture data are collected by many agencies and organizations in the United States using a variety of instruments and methods for varying applications. These data are often distributed and represented in disparate formats, posing significant challenges for reuse. Recognizing this need, the President's Climate Action Plan called for the creation of a coordinated national soil moisture network. In response, a team led by the National Integrated Drought Information System has completed a proof-of-concept pilot project. The pilot comprises both in-situ and assimilated soil moisture datasets. It focuses on providing real-time soil moisture data via standard web services to feed map-based visualization tools in order to meet the following use cases: operational drought monitoring, experimental land surface modeling, and operational hydrological modeling. The result of this pilot is a reference architecture that will inform the implementation of the national network.

  19. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency concerning the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Director General has received a letter dated 16 September 2009 from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency attaching the text of the Statement of Principles of the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN). The letter and, as requested therein, the Statement of Principles are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  20. 2010 VA Information Technologies Agency (VITA)/VA Geographic Information Network (VGIN) Lidar: Eastern Shore, VA (Accomack and Northampton Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Virginia Geographic Information Network (VGIN) contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for Accomack and Northampton counties on the eastern...

  1. Establishment of National Gravity Base Network of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam Chavari, Y.; Bayer, R.; Hinderer, J.; Ghazavi, K.; Sedighi, M.; Luck, B.; Djamour, Y.; Le Moign, N.; Saadat, R.; Cheraghi, H.

    2009-04-01

    A gravity base network is supposed to be a set of benchmarks uniformly distributed across the country and the absolute gravity values at the benchmarks are known to the best accessible accuracy. The gravity at the benchmark stations are either measured directly with absolute devices or transferred by gravity difference measurements by gravimeters from known stations. To decrease the accumulation of random measuring errors arising from these transfers, the number of base stations distributed across the country should be as small as possible. This is feasible if the stations are selected near to the national airports long distances apart but faster accessible and measurable by a gravimeter carried in an airplane between the stations. To realize the importance of such a network, various applications of a gravity base network are firstly reviewed. A gravity base network is the required reference frame for establishing 1st , 2nd and 3rd order gravity networks. Such a gravity network is used for the following purposes: a. Mapping of the structure of upper crust in geology maps. The required accuracy for the measured gravity values is about 0.2 to 0.4 mGal. b. Oil and mineral explorations. The required accuracy for the measured gravity values is about 5 µGal. c. Geotechnical studies in mining areas for exploring the underground cavities as well as archeological studies. The required accuracy is about 5 µGal and better. d. Subsurface water resource explorations and mapping crustal layers which absorb it. An accuracy of the same level of previous applications is required here too. e. Studying the tectonics of the Earth's crust. Repeated precise gravity measurements at the gravity network stations can assist us in identifying systematic height changes. The accuracy of the order of 5 µGal and more is required. f. Studying volcanoes and their evolution. Repeated precise gravity measurements at the gravity network stations can provide valuable information on the gradual

  2. US earthquake observatories: recommendations for a new national network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report is the first attempt by the seismological community to rationalize and optimize the distribution of earthquake observatories across the United States. The main aim is to increase significantly our knowledge of earthquakes and the earth's dynamics by providing access to scientifically more valuable data. Other objectives are to provide a more efficient and cost-effective system of recording and distributing earthquake data and to make as uniform as possible the recording of earthquakes in all states. The central recommendation of the Panel is that the guiding concept be established of a rationalized and integrated seismograph system consisting of regional seismograph networks run for crucial regional research and monitoring purposes in tandem with a carefully designed, but sparser, nationwide network of technologically advanced observatories. Such a national system must be thought of not only in terms of instrumentation but equally in terms of data storage, computer processing, and record availability.

  3. A National Water Network for Future Impacts Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, J. A.; Troy, T.; Lall, U.

    2015-12-01

    Water availability is driven by both climate and socioeconomicinteractions, and in some cases needs to be studied at a large scalethat spans multiple watersheds. To understand how regions will beimpacted as precipitation and demand patterns shift, this projectbuilds a national water network for the United States, incorporatinggauges, reservoirs, canals, and their interactions with counties. Thebasic structure of the network follows the HydroSHEDS dataset, anddownstream and demand interactions are modeled using all availablemonthly data from the USGS GAGES II database. As a diagnostic, we usethe database to study the extent that snowmelt supports downstreamstreamflow. Using these models, we can also estimate streamflowsduring unrecorded years, expanding the dataset. We then use thenetwork to develop a model of optimal extraction, and consider athought experiment for reallocating U.S. cropland to generate the mosteconomic benefit for irrigation.

  4. U.S. Science agencies unveil FY 92 budgets: National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan; Simarski, Lynn Teo

    NSF's budget request is $2.72 billion for FY 1992, 17.5% above what it received last year. In introducing the budget, Frederick M. Bernthal, NSF acting director, stressed the critical role that scientific research and education must play to keep America competitive in the world economy—a context that has shaped the budget. Bernthal called the request “an extraordinarily good budget,” characterizing NSF's allotment as “favored treatment.” NSF cited two major objectives behind its budget: to “strengthen the research base and infrastructure,” and “to develop human resources, broaden participation, and improve science and engineering education and training.” Bernthal ranked NSF's priorities as people first, instrumentation next, and facilities third. About three-fourths of the budget would fund research and infrastructure. One special high-priority area is high performance computing and communications ($213 million, up 26%), “to provide the cutting-edge computing and networking technology and the development and infrastructure necessary for advanced research in all science and engineering disciplines,” according to NSF. Another special area is global change research, receiving $118.5 million (up 36%) for basic research on “future changes in the Earth-s environment.” Eight other federal agencies are part of this initiative. Education and human resources also receives priority ($582 million, with $390 million devoted to education).

  5. Preliminary Design Study for a National Digital Seismograph Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jon; Hutt, Charles R.

    1981-01-01

    Introduction Recently, the National Research Council published a report by the Panel on National, Regional, and Local Seismograph Networks of the Committee on Seismology in which the principal recommendation was for the establishment of a national digital seismograph network (NDSN). The Panel Report (Bolt, 1980) addresses both the need and the scientific requirements for the new national network. The purpose of this study has been to translate the scientific requirements into an instrumentation concept for the NSDS. There are literally hundreds, perhaps thousands, of seismographs in operation within the United States. Each serves an important purpose, but most have limited objectives in time, in region, or in the types of data that are being recorded. The concept of a national network, funded and operated by the Federal Government, is based on broader objectives that include continuity of time, uniform coverage, standardization of data format and instruments, and widespread use of the data for a variety of research purposes. A national digital seismograph network will be an important data resource for many years to come; hence, its design is likely to be of interest to most seismologists. Seismologists have traditionally been involved in the development and field operation of seismic systems and thus have been familiar with both the potential value and the limitations of the data. However, in recent years of increasing technological sophistication, the development of data sstems has fallen more to system engineers, and this trend is likely to continue. One danger in this is that the engineers may misinterpret scientific objectives or subordinate them to purely technological considerations. Another risk is that the data users may misuse or misinterpret the data because they are not aware of the limitations of the data system. Perhaps the most important purpose of a design study such as this is to stimulate a dialogue between system engineers and potential data users

  6. Academic research opportunities at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency(NGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, Scott A.

    2006-05-01

    The vision of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is to "Know the Earth...Show the Way." To achieve this vision, the NGA provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. Academia plays a key role in the NGA research and development program through the NGA Academic Research Program. This multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics provides grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program are: *NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. *Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. *Intelligence Community Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program. In addition, other opportunities for academia to engage with NGA through

  7. Establishment of 2000 National Geodetic Control Network of China and It’s Technological Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Junyong

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 2000’ National Geodetic Control Network of China is an important fundamental scientific engineering project in China. It consists of three parts which are establishment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, its combination adjustment with national astro-geodetic network and 2000 National Gravity Fundamental network. It provides the high precise coordinate reference and gravity reference for three dimensional geo-center national coordinates system and gravity system, respectively. Additionally, it provides precise unified geometric and physical geodesy information for the economic construction, the national defense and the scientific research. Methods: 1. The larger number of data are processed in triple networks adjustment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, which are chosen from the GPS monitoring stations, such as grade A, B of national GPS network , grade 1st and 2nd of national GPS network, crustal movement observation network of China, and others crustal deformation monitoring stations. Finally, the data of 2666 GPS stations are used in the data processing of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network, including 124 external stations and 2542 internal stations. In order to the results of triple networks adjustment are corresponding to that of three dimensional geo-center coordinates system, ITRF 97 and epoch 2000.0 are chosen as the coordinate reference frame and epoch reference, respectively. The methods of “strong reference” and “weak reference” are combined used in the control data selection of triple networks adjustment. The scale and rotation scales are adopted for each sub network. The least square adjustment is firstly adopted in each sub network adjustment. The data of obvious abnormal baselines are found and rejected firstly. And the method of double factor robust estimation is adopted in the data processing. 2. The combined adjustment of 2000 National GPS Geodetic Network and national astro-geodetic network is

  8. National REDD+ policy networks: from cooperation to conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Brockhaus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+ is a financial mechanism aimed at providing incentives to reduce carbon emissions from forests and enhance carbon stocks. In most forest-rich developing countries, policy actors, i.e., state and nonstate as well as international and national, are designing national REDD+ policies. Actors' interests and beliefs shape patterns of interactions, ranging from cooperation to conflict, and these interactions influence a country's direction and progress in REDD+ policy formulation and implementation. We used a comparative policy network approach to analyze the power structures in national REDD+ policy domains in seven countries. We drew on the typology of power structures defined by two dimensions, namely the distribution of power in the policy arena and the dominant type of interaction, cooperative or conflictual, among actors, and we mapped the progress of national REDD+ decision-making processes against these power structures. We tested three hypotheses and found that (1 national ownership over the policy process is a prerequisite for progress. In addition, (2 the level of concentration of power in an actor group can facilitate progress in REDD+; however, particularly when concentration of power is high, progress will be possible only if the interests of the most powerful are aligned with the objectives of REDD+ and address the drivers of deforestation and forest degradation. Furthermore, (3 although cooperation is perceived as ideal in any collective decision-making setting, a certain level of conflict is necessary for progress in REDD+ decision making. This applies particularly in more advanced national REDD+ domains, where, following a honeymoon phase during which most policy actors embrace the broad idea of REDD+, policy decisions must deal with difficult realities associated with negotiating established business-as-usual interests, which entails high political costs.

  9. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  10. 36 CFR 1233.16 - How does an agency transfer records to the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Military health care facilities should contact their facility records managers for guidance on transferring... records to the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC)? 1233.16 Section 1233.16 Parks, Forests, and... DISPOSITION OF RECORDS IN A NARA FEDERAL RECORDS CENTER § 1233.16 How does an agency transfer records to...

  11. Agency and Resilience: Teachings of Pikangikum First Nation Elders, Northwestern Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Miller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although scholars of social-ecological resilience propose unity between humans and the natural world, much of this work remains based on Cartesian division of mind and body that denies it. We present an example of a unified system of resilience thinking shared with us by Anishinaabe (Ojibway elders of Pikangikum First Nation, northwestern Ontario. The elders' views of boreal forest disturbance and renewal are distinct from western scientific approaches in their recognition of agency, the ability to individually express free will in nonhuman beings including animals, plants, rocks, and forest fire within their landscape. Pikangikum elders perceive that, if relationships based on respect, reciprocity, and noninterference are maintained with other agents, renewal will continue. The proposition of living landscapes composed of diverse nonhuman agents poses challenges to collaboration with western worldviews, which view nature largely as mechanistic and without moral standing. We suggest that a greater attention to nonwestern ontologies can contribute to productive cross-cultural partnerships directed toward fostering resilience.

  12. 77 FR 33229 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; National Resource Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; National Resource Network.... This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: National Resource Network. OMB... Resource Network. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub....

  13. Enhancement of the national strong-motion network in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkan, Polat; Ceken, U.; Colakoglu, Z.; Ugras, T.; Kuru, T.; Apak, A.; Anderson, J.G.; Sucuoglu, H.; Celebi, M.; Akkar, D.S.; Yazgan, U.; Denizlioglu, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Two arrays comprising 20 strong-motion sensors were established in western Turkey. The 14 stations of BYTNet follow a N-S trending line about 65 km in length, normal to strands of the North Anatolian fault that runs between the cities of Bursa and Yalova. Here the dominant character of the potential fault movement is a right-lateral transform slip. The DATNet array, comprising a total of eight stations, is arranged along a 110-km-long E-W trending direction along the Menderes River valley between Denizli and Aydin. (Two stations in this array were incorporated from the existing Turkish national strong-motion network.) This is an extensional tectonic environment, and the network mornitors potential large normal-faulting earthquakes on the faults in the valley. The installation of the arrays was supported by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) under its Science for Peace Program. Maintenance and calibration is performed by the General Directorate of Disaster Affairs (GDDA) according to a protocol between Middle East Technical University (METU) and GDDA. Many young engineers and scientists have been trained in network operation and evaluation during the course of the project, and an international workshop dealing with strong-motion instrumentation has been organized as part of the project activities.

  14. An Assessment of the Efficiency of Government Regulatory Agencies in Nigeria. Case of the National Agency for Food and Drugs Administration and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwanehi Barbara Ofuani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines Business, Government and Society interrelationships. It eventually narrowed down to assessing the efficiency of government regulatory agencies, in fulfilling the role of government in protecting consumers from unscrupulous practices of businesses. The National Agency for Food and Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC was chosen for the study. Since the expectations of the consumers are paramount here, the stakeholder approach method was used for assessing the efficiency of NAFDAC. Literature and previous empirical studies on the topic were examined. For representativeness, data was collected utilizing the survey research design through Questionnaire distributed to 200 respondents in some areas of Lagos Mainland in Lagos state, using the convenience sampling method. 187 copies of the questionnaire representing 93.5% were returned and usable. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the responses to questions regarding the efficiency of NAFDAC and a hypothesis tested using a one-sample T-test. The findings ran contrary to results from some previous studies. Instead, consumer awareness of the existence of NAFDAC as a regulatory agency and its functions were established, along with a high rate of consumer education. The assessment of its efficiency also showed a high rating. Recommendations were made that the study be replicated in other states of Nigeria and further studies carried out to evaluate its efficiency under previous and current directors for improvement purposes.

  15. 32 CFR 2001.50 - Telecommunications automated information systems and network security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and network security. 2001.50 Section 2001.50 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION CLASSIFIED... network security. Each agency head shall ensure that classified information electronically...

  16. Hydrologic science, the USGS, and national observatory networks in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M.; Hirsch, R.

    2004-05-01

    Hydrologic research requires long-term monitoring and investigation of fundamental processes that govern the movement of water and constituents in the atmosphere and on the earth's surface. Numerous multiyear investigations have advanced our knowledge by using watershed-scale studies to characterize and quantify fluxes of water and constituents. Historically, most of these studies have been conducted by researchers in narrow subsets of scientific disciplines, and have been focused on small, undisturbed watersheds. As the U.S. population surpasses 300 million in 2004, hydrologic-process understanding must be expanded to include larger scale, anthropogenically disturbed environments. These types of studies present significant challenges to our scientific understanding because of factors such as: 1) the great number of human-derived constituents and contaminants in our Nation's water, many previously unknown or unmeasurable; 2) the complexities of rivers and aquifers that transcend ecologic, climatologic, and political boundaries; 3) the lack of stationarity in hydrologic and climatologic trends; and 4) the need for a multidisciplinary approach involving scientists with varied expertise. The future of field-based hydrologic science requires a combination of large-scale hydrologic monitoring and investigation that crosses the traditional interfaces of scientific discipline, as well as land-use, political, and geographic boundaries. Federal, academic, and other researchers will need to collaborate. Federal agencies such as the USGS have a record of conducting and publishing detailed scientific investigations that contribute to our scientific knowledge. Equally important, since the 19th century, the USGS and other Federal agencies have collected, archived, and provided publicly available, high-quality, internally-consistent, long-term data sets. The USGS has a history of collaboration with national observation networks such as the LTER and IRIS, and embraces future

  17. The accountability of the brazilian regulatory agencies: the experience of the National Petroleum Agency; O controle externo das agencias reguladoras: o caso da Agencia Nacional do Petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Junior, Helder Queiroz; Borges, Heloisa Lopes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Economia. Grupo de Economia da Energia

    2004-07-01

    During the reform process for which passed the Brazilian Oil and Gas Industry, the academic debate was centered mostly in the sectorial restructuring process, in the contract designs and regulatory environment for the industries in change, particularly the desired attributes of its institutions. The debate tends, in the present, to converge towards the existence of different possible combinations between market structures and institutional structures (the regulators among them) that would lead to a desirable result. Thus, the various characteristics and configurations, originally appointed as necessary conditions for the success of any reform, are not dealt with such great deference anymore. The hypothesis that the existence of a independent regulator is a determinant choice for the success of structural and institutional reforms was relaxed as general rule, but there are still strong economic reasons to justify the option, adopted in Brazil. The creation of the Oil National Agency (ANP), the Brazilian regulator for the Oil and Gas Industry is a recent phenomenon. And few studies specifically approach the issue of its accountability, institutional role that in Brazil is delegated mostly, but not exclusively, to the National Court of Accounts (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao). Therefore, the objective of this work will be to discuss the different possibilities of accountability over the ANP, evaluating the paper and the functions of the TCU and the forms of external control on the Agency, pointing out the possibilities, the impediments and the challenges, as well as the economic consequences to the Natural Gas Industry of the current configuration. (author)

  18. 75 FR 61490 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Consumer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... distribution channels that have the greatest potential to influence the target audience's attitudes and... the agency and the entities it regulates is appropriately reaching targeted audiences in...

  19. GENASIS national and international monitoring networks for persistent organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Karel; Dušek, Ladislav; Holoubek, Ivan; Hřebíček, Jiří; Kubásek, Miroslav; Urbánek, Jaroslav

    2010-05-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) remain in the centre of scientific attention due to their slow rates of degradation, their toxicity, and potential for both long-range transport and bioaccumulation in living organisms. This group of compounds covers large number of various chemicals from industrial products, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, etc. The GENASIS (Global Environmental Assessment and Information System) information system utilizes data from national and international monitoring networks to obtain as-complete-as-possible set of information and a representative picture of environmental contamination by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). There are data from two main datasets on POPs monitoring: 1.Integrated monitoring of POPs in Košetice Observatory (Czech Republic) which is a long term background site of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) for the Central Europe; the data reveals long term trends of POPs in all environmental matrices. The Observatory is the only one in Europe where POPs have been monitored not only in ambient air, but also in wet atmospheric deposition, surface waters, sediments, soil, mosses and needles (integrated monitoring). Consistent data since the year 1996 are available, earlier data (up to 1998) are burdened by high variability and high detection limits. 2.MONET network is ambient air monitoring activities in the Central and Eastern European region (CEEC), Central Asia, Africa and Pacific Islands driven by RECETOX as the Regional Centre of the Stockholm Convention for the region of Central and Eastern Europe under the common name of the MONET networks (MONitoring NETwork). For many of the participating countries these activities generated first data on the atmospheric levels of POPs. The MONET network uses new technologies of air passive sampling, which was developed, tested, and calibrated by RECETOX in cooperation with Environment Canada and Lancaster University, and was originally launched as a

  20. US Environmental Protection Agency National Coastal Assessment for American Samoa 2004: Water Quality, Sediment Grain and Chemistry Data (NODC Accession 0000455)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Assessment (NCA), coordinated through the...

  1. A National Climate Change Adaptation Network for Protecting Water Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A.; Sauchyn, D.; Byrne, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Water security and resource-dependent community-survival are being increasingly challenged as a consequence of climate change, and it is urgent that we plan now for the security of our water supplies which support our lives and livelihoods. However, the range of impacts of climate change on water availability, and the consequent environmental and human adaptations that are required, is so complex and serious that it will take the combined work of natural, health and social scientists working with industries and communities to solve them. Networks are needed that will identify crucial water issues under climate change at a range of scales in order to provide regionally-sensitive, solutions-oriented research and adaptation. We suggest national and supra-national water availability and community sustainability issues must be addressed by multidisciplinary research and adaptation networks. The work must be driven by a bottom-up research paradigm — science in the service of community and governance. We suggest that interdisciplinary teams of researchers, in partnership with community decision makers and local industries, are the best means to develop solutions as communities attempt to address future water demands, protect their homes from infrastructure damage, and meet their food, drinking water, and other essential resource requirements. The intention is to cover: the impact of climate change on Canadian natural resources, both marine and terrestrial; issues of long-term sustainability and resilience in human communities and the environments in which they are embedded; the making and moving of knowledge, be that between members of Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, researchers of different disciplines, communities, industry, policymakers and the academy and the crucial involvement of the various orders of government in the response to water problems, under conditions of heightened uncertainty. Such an adaptation network must include a national

  2. Development of a Coordinated National Soil Moisture Network: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, J. M.; Quiring, S. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Baker, B.; Cosgrove, B.; Escobar, V. M.; Strobel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture data is critical for accurate drought prediction, flood forecasting, climate modeling, prediction of crop yields and water budgeting. However, soil moisture data are collected by many agencies and organizations in the United States using a variety of instruments and methods for varying applications. These data are often distributed and represented in disparate formats, posing significant challenges for use. In recognition of these challenges, the President's Climate Action Plan articulated the need for a coordinated national soil moisture network. In response to this action plan, a team led by the National Integrated Drought Information System has begun to develop a framework for this network and has instituted a proof-of-concept pilot study. This pilot is located in the south-central plains of the US, and will serve as a reference architecture for the requisite data systems and inform the design of the national network. The pilot comprises both in-situ and modeled soil moisture datasets (historical and real-time) and will serve the following use cases: operational drought monitoring, experimental land surface modeling, and operational hydrological modeling. The pilot will be implemented using a distributed network design in order to serve dispersed data in real-time directly from data providers. Standard service protocols will be used to enable future integration with external clients. The pilot network will additionally contain a catalog of data sets and web service endpoints, which will be used to broker web service calls. A mediation and aggregation service will then intelligently request, compile, and transform the distributed datasets from their native formats into a standardized output. This mediation framework allows data to be hosted and maintained locally by the data owners while simplifying access through a single service interface. These data services will then be used to create visualizations, for example, views of the current soil

  3. 32 CFR 621.1 - Loan of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned property for use at national and State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Loan of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned... Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN AND SALE OF PROPERTY § 621.1 Loan of Army/Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) owned property for use at national and State conventions....

  4. National automatic network of environmental radiological monitoring (RENAMORA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside the programs of Environmental Radiological Surveillance that it carries out the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS), it develops an National Automatic Network of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA), where it is carried out a registration of speed of environmental dose in continuous and simultaneous forms with the same moment of the measurement. This net allows to account with the meticulous and opportune information that will help to characterize, in dynamics form, the radiological conditions of diverse geographical zones of the country, including the sites that by normative require bigger surveillance, like its are the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV), the Nuclear Center of Mexico (ININ) and the Radioactive waste storage center (CADER). This net is in its first development stage; three points inside the state of Veracruz, in the surroundings of the CNLV, already its are operating; the obtained data of rapidity of environmental dose are being stored in a database inside a primary data center located in the facilities of the CNSNS in Mexico city and its will be analyzed according to the project advances. At the moment, its are installing the first ten teams corresponding to the first phase of the RENAMORA (three stages); its are carried out operation tests, transmission, reception and administration of data. The obtained data will be interpreted, analyzed and inter compared to evaluate the risk levels to that it would be hold the population and to determine thresholds that allow to integrate the alarm systems that its had considered for emergency situations. (Author)

  5. The USA-National Phenology Network Biophysical Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losleben, M. V.; Crimmins, T. M.; Weltzin, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    On January 1, 2009, the USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN, www.usanpn.org) launched the USA-NPN Biophysical Program. The overarching goal of the Biophysical Program (BP) is to link phenology, the study of recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, with climate through the integration of phenology observations, meteorological, and spectral remote sensing measurements at sites across a broad a spectrum of environments. Phenology is critical for understanding a changing world. Many of the recurring plant and animal life cycle stages such as leafing and flowering of plants, maturation of agricultural crops, emergence of insects, and migration of birds are sensitive to climatic variation and change, and are simple to observe and record. Such changes can effect, for example, timing mismatches between the emergence of food sources and the arrival of migrating populations, or create new disease and invasive species vectors via increasingly suitable growing seasons relative to the climatic life cycle requirements of hosts or the organisms themselves. New vectors or crashing populations can have major repercussions on entire ecosystems and regional economics. Thus, to track phenology and build a national database, the USA-NPN is providing standard phenology monitoring protocols. Further, the integration of weather stations with phenological data provides an opportunity to understand how a changing climate is altering phenology. Thus, the USA-NPN Biophysical Program is developing an integrative biology-climate site template for widespread dissemination, in collaboration with the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (RMBL, http://rmbl.org/rockymountainbiolab/). This poster presents the USA-NPN Biophysical Program, and the results of the collaboration with RMBL during the summer of 2009, including the installation of an elevational network of climate stations. The National Science Foundation’s Major Research Instrumentation (NSF’s MRI) program provides funding

  6. Engage the Public in Phenology Monitoring: Lessons Learned from the USA National Phenology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Lebuhn, G.; Miller-Rushing, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) is a recently established network that brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. Though a handful of observers participated in the USA-NPN monitoring program in 2008, 2009 was the first truly operational year for the program. With a goal of 100,000 observers for this nationwide effort, we are working to engage participants both directly and through established organizations and agencies. The first year of operational monitoring and program advertisement has yielded many insights that are shaping how we move forward. In this presentation, we will highlight some of our most prominent “lessons learned” from our experience engaging participants, mainly through partnerships with organizations and agencies. One successful partnership that the USA-NPN established in 2009 was with the Great Sunflower Project, a citizen science effort focused on tracking bee activity. By piggy-backing on this established program, we were able to invite tens of thousands of self-selected individuals to learn about plant phenology and to contribute to the program. A benefit to the Great Sunflower Project was that monitoring phenology of their sunflowers gave observers something to do while waiting for the plant to attract bees. Observers’ experiences, data, and comments from the 2009 season are yielding insights into how this partnership can be strengthened and USA-NPN and GSP goals can more effectively be met. A second partnership initiated in 2009 was with the US National Park Service (NPS). Partnering with federal and state agencies offers great opportunities for data collection and education. In return, agencies stand to gain information that can directly influence management decisions. However, such efforts necessitate careful planning and execution. Together the USA-NPN and NPS drafted

  7. National Privacy Research Strategy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — On July 1, NITRD released the National Privacy Research Strategy. Research agencies across government participated in the development of the strategy, reviewing...

  8. Enhancing Outreach using Social Networks at the National Seismological Network of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkimer, L.; Lücke, O. H.

    2014-12-01

    Costa Rica has a very high seismicity rate and geological processes are part of everyday life. Traditionally, information about these processes has been provided by conventional mass media (television and radio). However, due to the new trends in information flow a new approach towards Science Education is necessary for transmitting knowledge from scientific research for the general public in Costa Rica. Since 1973, the National Seismological Network of Costa Rica (RSN: UCR-ICE) studies the seismicity and volcanic activity in the country. In this study, we describe the different channels to report earthquake information that the RSN is currently using: email, social networks, and a website, as well as the development of a smartphone application. Since the RSN started actively participating in Social Networks, an increase in awareness in the general public has been noticed particularly regarding felt earthquakes. Based on this trend, we have focused on enhancing public outreach through Social Media. We analyze the demographics and geographic distribution of the RSN Facebook Page, the growth of followers, and the significance of their feedback for reporting intensity data. We observe that certain regions of the country have more Facebook activity, although those regions are not the most populated nor have a high Internet connectivity index. We interpret this pattern as the result of a higher awareness to geological hazards in those specific areas. We noticed that the growth of RSN users on Facebook has a strong correlation with the seismic events as opposed to Twitter that displays a steady growth with no clear correlations with specific seismic events. We see the Social Networks as opportunities to engage non-science audiences and encourage the population to participate in reporting seismic observations, thus providing intensity data. With the increasing access to Internet from mobile phones in Costa Rica, we see this approach to science education as an opportunity

  9. 77 FR 38833 - Job Accommodation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Job Accommodation Network AGENCY: Office of Disability Employment Policy, Department of Labor. Announcement Type... operate its Job Accommodation Network (JAN), a national technical assistance center that facilitates...

  10. Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) is a national air quality monitoring network designed to provide data to assess trends in air quality, atmospheric...

  11. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-07-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems operated five distinct programs to provide external quality assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s (NADP) National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network during 2013–14. The National Trends Network programs include (1) a field audit program to evaluate sample contamination and stability, (2) an interlaboratory comparison program to evaluate analytical laboratory performance, and (3) a colocated sampler program to evaluate bias from precipitation sampler upgrades. The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the (4) system blank program and (5) an interlaboratory comparison program. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends for chemical constituents in wet deposition.

  12. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems operated five distinct programs to provide external quality assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s (NADP) National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network during 2013–14. The National Trends Network programs include (1) a field audit program to evaluate sample contamination and stability, (2) an interlaboratory comparison program to evaluate analytical laboratory performance, and (3) a colocated sampler program to evaluate bias from precipitation sampler upgrades. The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the (4) system blank program and (5) an interlaboratory comparison program. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends for chemical constituents in wet deposition.

  13. Automatic national network of radiation environmental monitoring in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Direccion de Vigilancia Radiologica (DVR) of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) de Mexico, performs several function for environmental radiation monitoring. One of these functions is the permanent monitoring of the environmental gamma radiation. For this, it implemented the Red Nacional Automatica de Monitoreo Radiologico Ambiental (RENAMORA) - the National Automated Network for Environmental Radiation Monitoring,which currently comprises 60 detector probes for gamma radiation which with a programmable system that includes information technologies, data transmission and software can send the information in real time to a primary center of data located in the facilities of CNSNS. - When the data are received, the system performs the verification and extraction of the information organized in Tables and charts, and generates a report of environmental gamma radiation dose rate average for each of the probes and for each period of time determined bu CNSNS. The RENAMORA covers the main cities and allows to establish the bases of almost the entire country, as well as to warn about abnormal situations caused by incidents or natural events generated by human activities inside or outside the country which involves radioactive materials; paying special attention to main radiological sites, such as the surroundings of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plants, research centers and the radioactive waste disposal sites

  14. Repertoire Networks among National Board-Certified Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Jesse Lee; Woods, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Nearly three decades after its publication, "A Nation at Risk" continues to impact our educational establishment. Most notably, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards was established as a result of "A Nation Prepared," Carnegie's response to "A Nation at Risk." Some contend that the national board has…

  15. 78 FR 29731 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; CPSC National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... consumer behavior. The CPSC's activities aim to serve a broad range of consumers with differing needs... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... Awareness Survey AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Consumer...

  16. Government Agency and Trust in the Formation and Transformation of Interorganizational Entrepreneurial Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the role of trust and government agency in the creation and evolution of interoganizational cooperation among entrepreneurial ventures in general and the influence of trust on development trajectories in particular. The multiple-case approach used draws on five in-depth case...

  17. Analysis of the National Modernizers Network for the Support of the Public Administration Reform Process from Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina PROFIROIU

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The reform process of the state and implicitly of the public administration was a priority for the past governments of Romania. During 2004- 2009, within the reform process, the main actors involved in the coordination, implementation and monitoring of reform measures were: the Prime Minister, the Superior Council for Public Administration Reform, Public Policy Coordination and Structural Adjustment, the Ministry of Public Finance, the General Secretariat of Government, Ministry of Administration and Interior (renamed for a short time Ministry of Interior and Administrative Reform, the Central Unit for Public Administration Reform, National Institute of Administration, the National Agency of Civil Servants, and the National Modernizers Network. For evaluation of aspects related to the reform process it was designed a selective research within the members of the National Modernizers Network, for assessing their perception of the public administration reform undertaken by the institutions presented above. Evaluating their opinion can be an important point in the revitalization of the area of the administration reform process. Also, the research conducted aimed at assessing the degree of modernizers’ involvement in activities related to important aspects of the reform process: strategic planning, formulating and evaluating public policies, financial management, human resources management, decentralization, introduction of new information and communication technologies and administrative simplification.

  18. 78 FR 71665 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Youth...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ...; National Youth Gang Survey ACTION: 60-Day Notice. The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice... of a currently approved collection. 2. Title of the Form/Collection: National Youth Gang Survey. 3... will gather information related to youth and their activities for research and assessment purposes....

  19. 76 FR 39900 - Agency Information Collection Activities: A National Repository for the Collection and Inventory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... relating to arson and the criminal misuse of explosives in a national repository database maintained by the... Repository for the Collection and Inventory of Information Related to Arson and the Criminal Misuse of... currently approved collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: A National Repository for the...

  20. A statistical summary of data from the U.S. Geological Survey's national water quality networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.A.; Alexander, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Operates two nationwide networks to monitor water quality, the National Hydrologic Bench-Mark Network and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN). The Bench-Mark network is composed of 51 stations in small drainage basins which are as close as possible to their natural state, with no human influence and little likelihood of future development. Stations in the NASQAN program are located to monitor flow from accounting units (subregional drainage basins) which collectively encompass the entire land surface of the nation. Data collected at both networks include streamflow, concentrations of major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and trace metals. The goals of the two water quality sampling programs include the determination of mean constituent concentrations and transport rates as well as the analysis of long-term trends in those variables. This report presents a station-by-station statistical summary of data from the two networks for the period 1974 through 1981. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Beyond the Myth of Nationality: A Study on the Networks of European Commission Officials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suvarierol, S.

    2007-01-01

    Working and communicating with and across nations and nationalities makes cultural differences a permanent part of everyday reality in multinational organisations like the European Commission. It has been frequently argued that nationality forms an important basis for forming networks in and around

  2. Payload operations management of a planned European SL-Mission employing establishments of ESA and national agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensson, Rolf; Mueller, Karl L.

    1994-01-01

    Spacelab (SL)-missions with Payload Operations (P/L OPS) from Europe involve numerous space agencies, various ground infrastructure systems and national user organizations. An effective management structure must bring together different entities, facilities and people, but at the same time keep interfaces, costs and schedule under strict control. This paper outlines the management concept for P/L OPS of a planned European SL-mission. The proposal draws on the relevant experience in Europe, which was acquired via the ESA/NASA mission SL-1, by the execution of two German SL-missions and by the involvement in, or the support of, several NASA-missions.

  3. 75 FR 55360 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information Technology Research.... EDT on October 11, 2010. SUMMARY: With this notice, the National Coordination Office for...

  4. 78 FR 8686 - Establishment of the National Freight Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... of the primary freight network: Factor Data source Parameters Major intermodal connectors. NHS......... Consider current/future border crossing impacts on freight patterns ] Planned unbuilt NHS...

  5. National networks of corporate power : an Irish perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Canna, Leo; Brennan, Niamh; O'Higgins, Eleanor

    1999-01-01

    This paper maps the network of interlocking directorships formed by the boards of the top 50 financial and 200 non-financial companies in Ireland. The Irish network is compared with those in ten countries, based on the same sample size and selection criteria as used in this paper, using the methods and theory of Social Network Analysis (SNA). Fundamental to the paper is the idea that the network of interlocking directorates is in some way structured, and not the result of random processes. ...

  6. Mammal Inventory of the Mojave Network Parks-Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Parks, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Manzanar National Historic Site, and Mojave National Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Charles A.; Hart, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the results of a mammal inventory study of National Park Service units in the Mojave Desert Network, including Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Manzanar National Historic Site, and Mojave National Preserve. Fieldwork for the inventory focused on small mammals, primarily rodents and bats. Fieldwork for terrestrial small mammals used trapping with Sherman and Tomahawk small- and medium-sized mammal traps, along with visual surveys for diurnal species. The majority of sampling for terrestrial small mammals was carried out in 2002 and 2003. Methods used in field surveys for bats included mist-netting at tanks and other water bodies, along with acoustic surveys using Anabat. Most of the bat survey work was conducted in 2003. Because of extremely dry conditions in the first two survey years (and associated low mammal numbers), we extended field sampling into 2004, following a relatively wet winter. In addition to field sampling, we also reviewed, evaluated, and summarized museum and literature records of mammal species for all of the Park units. We documented a total of 59 mammal species as present at Death Valley National Park, with an additional five species that we consider of probable occurrence. At Joshua Tree, we also documented 50 species, and an additional four 'probable' species. At Lake Mead National Recreation Area, 57 mammal species have been positively documented, with 10 additional probable species. Manzanar National Historic Site had not been previously surveyed. We documented 19 mammal species at Manzanar, with an additional 11 probable species. Mojave National Preserve had not had a comprehensive list previously, either. There are now a total of 50 mammal species documented at Mojave, with three additional probable species. Of these totals, 23 occurrences are new at individual park units (positively documented for the first time), with most of these being at Manzanar

  7. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan--URL Correction AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information... Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD)...

  8. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input;...

  9. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information Technology AGENCY: National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research... ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

  10. 77 FR 58416 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government...

  11. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments:...

  12. 34 CFR 412.1 - What is the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in Vocational and Technical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the National Network for Curriculum... EDUCATION NATIONAL NETWORK FOR CURRICULUM COORDINATION IN VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION General § 412.1 What is the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in Vocational and Technical Education?...

  13. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Greene, Shannon M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used five programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) and two programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the NADP/Mercury Deposition Network (NADP/MDN) during 2004. An intersite-comparison program was used to estimate accuracy and precision of field-measured pH and specific-conductance. The variability and bias of NADP/NTN data attributed to field exposure, sample handling and shipping, and laboratory chemical analysis were estimated using the sample-handling evaluation (SHE), field-audit, and interlaboratory-comparison programs. Overall variability of NADP/NTN data was estimated using a collocated-sampler program. Variability and bias of NADP/MDN data attributed to field exposure, sample handling and shipping, and laboratory chemical analysis were estimated using a system-blank program and an interlaboratory-comparison program. In two intersite-comparison studies, approximately 89 percent of NADP/NTN site operators met the pH measurement accuracy goals, and 94.7 to 97.1 percent of NADP/NTN site operators met the accuracy goals for specific conductance. Field chemistry measurements were discontinued by NADP at the end of 2004. As a result, the USGS intersite-comparison program also was discontinued at the end of 2004. Variability and bias in NADP/NTN data due to sample handling and shipping were estimated from paired-sample concentration differences and specific conductance differences obtained for the SHE program. Median absolute errors (MAEs) equal to less than 3 percent were indicated for all measured analytes except potassium and hydrogen ion. Positive bias was indicated for most of the measured analytes except for calcium, hydrogen ion and specific conductance. Negative bias for hydrogen ion and specific conductance indicated loss of hydrogen ion and decreased specific conductance from contact of the sample with

  14. Institutional change and political decision-making in the creation of the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Márcia Franke; Labra, Maria Eliana

    2007-06-01

    This article examines the decision-making process that led to the creation of the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in 1999. The authors begin by discussing the history of the Agency's predecessor, the Health Surveillance Secretariat, and the need for its modernization to adjust the quality of the products under its control to domestic and international demands. From the theoretical perspective of neo-institutionalism, the article goes on to analyze the social and political context surrounding the debate on the proposed alternatives to adjust Health Surveillance to new rules in line with such requirements, focusing especially on the formulation of the new policy, the decision-making arena, and the actors with specific interests in the sector. The research drew on extensive documentary and media material, plus interviews with key actors. The article concludes that a determinant factor for the creation of ANVISA was the favorable domestic political context, fostering a positive correlation of forces that (in an extremely short timeframe, 1998-1999) allowed the creation of the first regulatory agency in the social policies area in Brazil.

  15. Institutional change and political decision-making in the creation of the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Márcia Franke; Labra, Maria Eliana

    2007-06-01

    This article examines the decision-making process that led to the creation of the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in 1999. The authors begin by discussing the history of the Agency's predecessor, the Health Surveillance Secretariat, and the need for its modernization to adjust the quality of the products under its control to domestic and international demands. From the theoretical perspective of neo-institutionalism, the article goes on to analyze the social and political context surrounding the debate on the proposed alternatives to adjust Health Surveillance to new rules in line with such requirements, focusing especially on the formulation of the new policy, the decision-making arena, and the actors with specific interests in the sector. The research drew on extensive documentary and media material, plus interviews with key actors. The article concludes that a determinant factor for the creation of ANVISA was the favorable domestic political context, fostering a positive correlation of forces that (in an extremely short timeframe, 1998-1999) allowed the creation of the first regulatory agency in the social policies area in Brazil. PMID:17546328

  16. Regional cross national networks for education and training in health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Christian; Bygholm, Ann; Hejlesen, Ole;

    The paper argues that the education activities in health informatics should be established in net-works covering regions with comparable health care systems involving one or more comparable countries.......The paper argues that the education activities in health informatics should be established in net-works covering regions with comparable health care systems involving one or more comparable countries....

  17. Collaboration Nation: The Building of the Welsh Repository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to disseminate information about the Welsh Repository Network (WRN), innovative work being undertaken to build an integrated network of institutional digital repositories. A collaborative approach, in particular through the provision of centralised technical and organisational support, has demonstrated…

  18. 78 FR 24154 - Notice of Availability of a National Animal Health Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Network Reorganization Concept Paper AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... Plant Health Inspection Service is making available a concept paper that describes a revised structure... paper we are making available for comment presents a structure we believe will give the NAHLN...

  19. Bureau of Transportation Statistics U.S. Road Networks - Cape Hatteras National Seashore

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This data set portrays a Bureau of Transportation Statistics overview of the road networks for all fifty States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

  20. Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary: Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network (SIMoN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network (SIMoN) is an integrated, long-term program that takes an ecosystem approach to identify and understand changes to the...

  1. 77 FR 59410 - Agency Information Collection Activities: National Interest Waivers, Supplemental Evidence to I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... published in the Federal Register on June 1, 2012, at 77 FR 32660, allowing for a 60-day public comment... Interest Waivers, Supplemental Evidence to I-140 and I-485, Form Number No Form; Extension, Without Change... Collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: National Interest Waivers, Supplemental Evidence to I-140 and...

  2. National advanced drilling and excavation technologies program: Summary of third meeting of interested Federal agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-07

    The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to discuss a proposal by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) outlining a National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, and (3) to hear about drilling research activities funded by the Department of Energy. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  3. 78 FR 61251 - The National Public Transportation Safety Plan, the Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... April 11, 2000, at 65 FR 19477-8 or http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Safety... performance through a positive safety culture founded on four key priorities: safety policy, safety risk... definition of state of good repair developed through the implementation of the National TAM System; (3)...

  4. Integrated Network Responsibility in the Gambling Industry:Camelot and the UK National Lottery

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, Laura; Bourlakis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Integrated Network Responsibility which extends existing theory (stakeholder theory, supply chain responsibility and network theory) in order better to understand the context of a highly regulated controversial industry. Using the empirical example of the UK National Lottery and the lottery provider, Camelot, Integrated Network Responsibility explains the dynamics of social responsibility in this context. Because – among other things - of th...

  5. DHS Fuses Texas Expertise Into National Intelligence Network

    OpenAIRE

    Issvoran, Heather

    2014-01-01

    For Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) Captain Jaeson Jones the concepts of multi-agency partnering often taught at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security provide the necessary ingredients for a successful information-sharing program – an effort the Department of Homeland Security would like to see replicated.

  6. Speech Quality Monitoring in Czech National Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Voznak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with techniques of measuring and assessment of the voice transmitted in IP networks and describes design of quality measurement, which can be used for Cisco Gateways. Cisco gateways send Calculated Planning Impairment Factor in every CDR (Call Detail Record. Our design is based on collection of CDR's, their storing into SQL database and their visualization through web page. This design was implemented and successfully tested in CESNET network.

  7. Comparison of practice based research network based quality improvement technical assistance and evaluation to other ongoing quality improvement efforts for changes in agency culture

    OpenAIRE

    Livingood, William C.; Peden, Angela H.; Gulzar H. Shah; Marshall, Nandi A.; Gonzalez, Ketty M.; Toal, Russell B.; Alexander, Dayna S.; Wright, Alesha R.; Woodhouse, Lynn D

    2015-01-01

    Background Public health agencies in the USA are increasingly challenged to adopt Quality Improvement (QI) strategies to enhance performance. Many of the functional and structural barriers to effective use of QI can be found in the organizational culture of public health agencies. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of public health practice based research network (PBRN) evaluation and technical assistance for QI interventions on the organizational culture of public health agen...

  8. Bias and precision of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated a blind audit sample program during 1974 to test the effects of the sample handling and shipping procedures used by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network on the quality of wet deposition data produced by the combined networks. Blind audit samples, which were dilutions of standard reference water samples, were submitted by network site operators to the central analytical laboratory disguised as actual wet deposition samples. Results from the analyses of blind audit samples were used to calculate estimates of analyte bias associated with all network wet deposition samples analyzed in 1984 and to estimate analyte precision. Concentration differences between double blind samples that were submitted to the central analytical laboratory and separate analyses of aliquots of those blind audit samples that had not undergone network sample handling and shipping were used to calculate analyte masses that apparently were added to each blind audit sample by routine network handling and shipping procedures. These calculated masses indicated statistically significant biases for magnesium, sodium , potassium, chloride, and sulfate. Median calculated masses were 41.4 micrograms (ug) for calcium, 14.9 ug for magnesium, 23.3 ug for sodium, 0.7 ug for potassium, 16.5 ug for chloride and 55.3 ug for sulfate. Analyte precision was estimated using two different sets of replicate measures performed by the central analytical laboratory. Estimated standard deviations were similar to those previously reported. (Author 's abstract)

  9. winderosionnetwork.org - Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; Herrick, J. E.; Clingan, S.; Cooper, B.; Courtright, E.; LaPlante, V.; Van Zee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its controlling factors. Data will be used to support model development and identification of improved land management strategies that have global applications. By applying standard methods, the Network will overcome the common challenge of synthesizing independent studies to assess local-to-national scale wind erosion and dust emission. Twelve intensively instrumented Network sites will be operational by spring 2016, providing high-resolution measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions and soil and vegetation properties. These initial sites are located across rangelands and croplands in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, California, Nevada, Colorado, Utah, North Dakota, Idaho and Washington. A primary objective of the Network is to facilitate collaboration among Network sites and the wider research community to address basic research questions about aeolian processes, model development, and evaluate practical management options. In support of Network activities, winderosionnetwork.org was developed to serve as a Network data portal, and provide online information about the National Wind Erosion Research Network including protocols and results. The website provides a comprehensive resource for scientists and managers interested in engaging with the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides exciting opportunities to engage in a national long-term wind erosion research program that promises significant impact for our understanding and ability to predict and evaluate aeolian processes across land cover types and land use systems.

  10. Location Accuracy of the China National Seismograph Network Estimated by Repeating Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Changsheng; Wu Zhongliang

    2006-01-01

    Regionalized location accuracy of the China National Seismograph Network was estimated using the results obtained by studying "repeating earthquakes" or "doublets" in and around China by Schaffand Richards (2004). It is assumed that the "repeating events" or "doublets" are separated by no more than 1 km, and the network measured apparent distance X of "doublets"indicates the order of magnitudes of the location error. It is observed that the average location accuracy of the China National Seismograph Network, as represented by average X value, is in the order of magnitudes of 10km, and is larger in the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau, western and northern Xinjiang, and eastern Inner Mongolia.

  11. Training tissue bank operators: the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/National University of Singapore (NUS) 10 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, A; Phillips, G O; Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Lee, Chris C W

    2009-05-01

    National University of Singapore (NUS) was appointed by IAEA to become IAEA/NUS Regional Training Centre (RTC) for Asia and the Pacific region in September 1996. The Government of Singapore (represented by the Ministry of Environment) with the National Science and Technology Board as the funding agency awarded a grant of S$225,500 to build a new purpose-built tissue bank to be the Regional Training Centre. National University Hospital provided a space of 2,000 square feet for this purpose. The first Diploma Course was launched on 3 November 1997 with 17 candidates with the first NUS Diploma Examination being held in October 1998. Between November 1997 and April 2007, a total of nine courses were conducted by RTC with a total of 180 tissue bank operators, 133 from Asia and the Pacific region (13 countries including 2 from Iran), 14 from Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Egypt, South Africa and Zambia), 6 from Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru and Uruguay), 9 from Europe (Greece, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine) and 2 from Australia. The last batch (ninth batch) involved twenty students registered in April 2007 and will be due to sit for the terminal examination only in April 2008.

  12. Project UNIFY. National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Newsletter. Volume 22, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckenfield, Marty, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Dropout Prevention Newsletter" is published quarterly by the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Special Olympics Project UNIFY (Andrea Cahn); (2) The Impact of Project UNIFY; (3) Project UNIFY Brings Youth Together to Learn and Graduate (William H. Hughes); (4) Physical…

  13. Argonne National Lab deploys Force10 networks' massively dense ethernet switch for supercomputing cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks, Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has successfully deployed Force10 E-Series switch/routers to connect to the TeraGrid, the world's largest supercomputing grid, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF)" (1/2 page).

  14. Monitoring activities in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network in 2000 and 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakker BG van; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML in Dutch) is one of the responsibilities of the Air Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment. The main objectives of the LML are to monitor ambient air quality, facilitate implementation of air quality s

  15. The Ilisu Dam in Turkey and the Role of Export Credit Agencies and NGO Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Eberlein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Commission on Dams (WCD report focused attention on the question of how those displaced by large dams can be adequately compensated and properly resettled. An important debate from the Dams and Development Forum concerned the appropriate roles of different stakeholders, and the question as to how governments and 'external stakeholders' such as international institutions, financial investors and non-government organisations (NGOs can be encouraged to implement the WCD recommendations and international standards on resettlement and environmental protection. This article analyses the actions of three European Export Credit Agencies (ECAs aimed at improving the outcomes of the Ilisu Dam and hydroelectric power project in Kurdish-populated southeast of Turkey. It also explores the role of NGOs within the process of achieving best practice and preventing poor outcomes. Even though the ECAs’ efforts to meet World Bank project standards were unsuccessful and ended in July 2009 with their withdrawal, this was the first case in history where ECAs tried to implement specified social and environmental project conditions. This article aims ultimately to analyse the reasons for the failure to meet the ECAs’ conditions, and the lessons to be learned from this process.

  16. The International Postal Network and Other Global Flows As Proxies for National Wellbeing

    CERN Document Server

    Hristova, Desislava; Anson, Jose; Luengo-Oroz, Miguel; Mascolo, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The digital exhaust left by flows of physical and digital commodities provides a rich measure of the nature, strength and significance of relationships between The digital exhaust left by flows of physical and digital commodities provides a rich measure of the nature, strength and significance of relationships between countries in the global network. With this work, we examine how these traces and the network structure can reveal the socioeconomic profile of different countries. We take into account multiple international networks of physical and digital flows, including the previously unexplored international postal network. By measuring the position of each country in the Trade, Postal, Migration, International Flights, IP and Digital Communications networks, we are able to build proxies for a number of crucial socioeconomic indicators such as GDP per capita and the Human Development Index ranking along with twelve other indicators used as benchmarks of national wellbeing by the United Nations and other int...

  17. Total cylindrospermopsins, microcystins/nodularins, and saxitoxins data for the 2007 United States Environmental Protection Agency National Lake Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Maksimowicz, Megan M.; Toyne, Kathryn D.

    2016-05-26

    Phytoplankton communities in freshwater lakes, ponds, and reservoirs may be dominated by cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae) under certain environmental conditions. Cyanobacteria may cause a range of water-quality impairments, including the potential for toxin production. Cyanobacteria toxins (cyanotoxins) may adversely impact human and ecological health. Microcystins are considered to be one of the most commonly found classes of cyanotoxins in freshwater ecosystems, and as such were selected as a recreational indicator of water quality for the 2007 United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Lakes Assessment. However, much less is known about the occurrence of other classes of cyanotoxins in fresh surface water such as anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins, nodularins, and saxitoxins.

  18. Differences across payors in charges for agency-based home health services: evidence from the National Home and Hospice Care Survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Freedman, V A; Reschovsky, J D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate charge and payment differentials for home health services across different payors. DATA SOURCES: The 1992 National Home and Hospice Care Survey, a nationally representative survey of home and hospice care agencies and their patients, collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. STUDY DESIGN: We compare the average charge for a Medicare home health visit to the average charge for patients with other sources of payment. In making such comparisons, we control...

  19. Building National Capacity for Climate Change Interpretation: The Role of Leaders, Partnerships, and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI enables teams of informal science interpreters across the country to serve as "communication strategists" - beyond merely conveying information they can influence public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. We provide in-depth training as well as an alumni network for ongoing learning, implementation support, leadership development, and coalition building. Our goals are to achieve a systemic national impact, embed our work within multiple ongoing regional and national climate change education networks, and leave an enduring legacy. Our project represents a cross-disciplinary partnership among climate scientists, social and cognitive scientists, and informal education practitioners. We have built a growing national network of more than 250 alumni, including approximately 15-20 peer leaders who co-lead both in-depth training programs and introductory workshops. We have found that this alumni network has been assuming increasing importance in providing for ongoing learning, support for implementation, leadership development, and coalition building. As we look toward the future, we are exploring potential partnerships with other existing networks, both to sustain our impact and to expand our reach. This presentation will address what we have learned in terms of network impacts, best practices, factors for success, and future directions.

  20. Methodology for identifying vulnerable sections in a National Road Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tampere, C.M.J.; Stada, J.; Immers, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    Under the authority of the Flemish Traffic Centre a study was carried out aiming at the identification of road sections that are vulnerable to major incidents. The primary objective of the study was to develop a methodology capable of rapidly scanning a large network for the most vulnerable sections

  1. Lidar vegetation mapping in national parks: Gulf Coast Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Segura, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) is an active remote sensing technique used to collect accurate elevation data over large areas. Lidar provides an extremely high level of regional topographic detail, which makes this technology an essential component of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science strategy. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) has collaborated with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Park Service (NPS) to acquire dense topographic lidar data in a variety of coastal environments.

  2. Currencies, National Images and National Identities: Public Relations for and against Currencies – Historical Experiences from Germany, the Case of the Euro and the Role of Rating Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kunczik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available My thesis is that, in the “age of markets” in Europe the Euro is of central importance for creating (or destroying already established structures of European identity (at least in parts of Europe – with Great Britain taking a very remote position. I emphasize the theoretical aspects (Aftalion´s Psychological Theory of Exchange Rates; Simmel: Philosophie des Geldes to emphasize the importance of PR. I concentrate on historical cases – mainly German experiences – e.g. the campaign against the Rubel; the ideas of Ivy Lee; the PR-campaigns of the Nazi-government to fight inflation. The introduction of the German Mark (“die Deutsche Mark”, which became a central aspect of German national identity, and the campaign to give up this currency (“harte Währung” in order to introduce the “weak” Euro. In this context I discuss campaigns against the Euro (“only idiots want the Euro”. In the final remarks I refer to the role of rating agencies and trust in currencies and countries. It is my thesis that the analysts of the rating agencies live in a “world of literary images” and are acting in a completely irresponsible way (but even more incompetent are the politicians accepting the ratings without knowing anything about the problem of commensuration.

  3. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica andColombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  4. Assessment of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in selected surface water of the National Park Service Northern Colorado Plateau Network, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, from 1972 through 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliane B.; Thoma, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrients are a nationally recognized concern for water quality of streams, rivers, groundwater, and water bodies. Nutrient impairment is documented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a primary cause of degradation in lakes and reservoirs, and nutrients are related to organic enrichment and oxygen depletion, which is an important cause of degradation in streams. Recently (2011), an effort to develop State-based numeric nutrient criteria has resulted in renewed emphasis on nutrients in surface water throughout the Nation. In response to this renewed emphasis and to investigate nutrient water quality for Northern Colorado Plateau Network streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, assessed total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentration data for 93 sites in or near 14 National Park units for the time period 1972 through 2007.

  5. A state-based national network for effective wildlife conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meretsky, Vicky J.; Maguire, Lynn A.; Davis, Frank W.; Stoms, David M.; Scott, J. Michael; Figg, Dennis; Goble, Dale D.; Griffith, Brad; Henke, Scott E.; Vaughn, Jacqueline; Yaffee, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    State wildlife conservation programs provide a strong foundation for biodiversity conservation in the United States, building on state wildlife action plans. However, states may miss the species that are at the most risk at rangewide scales, and threats such as novel diseases and climate change increasingly act at regional and national levels. Regional collaborations among states and their partners have had impressive successes, and several federal programs now incorporate state priorities. However, regional collaborations are uneven across the country, and no national counterpart exists to support efforts at that scale. A national conservation-support program could fill this gap and could work across the conservation community to identify large-scale conservation needs and support efforts to meet them. By providing important information-sharing and capacity-building services, such a program would advance collaborative conservation among the states and their partners, thus increasing both the effectiveness and the efficiency of conservation in the United States.

  6. The national improvement partnership network: state-based partnerships that improve primary care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Judith S; Norlin, Chuck; Gillespie, R J; Weissman, Mark; McGrath, Jane

    2013-01-01

    . Since 2008, IPs have offered credit toward Part 4 of Maintenance of Certification for participants in some of their projects. To date, IPs have focused on achieving improvements in care delivery through individual projects. Rigorous measurement and evaluation of their efforts and impact will be essential to understanding, spreading, and sustaining state/regional child health care QI programs. We describe the origins, evolution to date, and hopes for the future of these partnerships and the National Improvement Partnership Network (NIPN), which was established to support existing and nurture new IPs.

  7. "It Takes a Network": Building National Capacity for Climate Change Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. More than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks) are visited annually by 61% of the U.S. population. These visitors expect reliable information about environmental issues and solutions. NNOCCI enables teams of informal science interpreters across the country to serve as "communication strategists" - beyond merely conveying information they can influence public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. Beyond providing in-depth training, we have found that our "alumni network" is assuming an increasingly important role in achieving our goals: 1. Ongoing learning - Training must be ongoing given continuous advances in climate and social science research. 2. Implementation support - Social support is critical as interpreters move from learning to practice, given complex and potentially contentious subject matter. 3. Leadership development - We rely on a national cadre of interpretive leaders to conduct workshops, facilitate study circle trainings, and support alumni. 4. Coalition building - A peer network helps to build and maintain connections with colleagues, and supports further dissemination through the informal science community. We are experimenting with a variety of online and face to face strategies to support the growing alumni network. Our goals are to achieve a systemic national

  8. Landbird Monitoring Protocol for National Parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Rodney B.; Wilkerson, Robert L.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Kuntz, Robert C.; Boetsch, John R.; Schaberl, James P.; Happe, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    This protocol narrative outlines the rationale, sampling design and methods for monitoring landbirds in the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) during the breeding season. The NCCN, one of 32 networks of parks in the National Park System, comprises seven national park units in the Pacific Northwest, including three large, mountainous, natural area parks (Mount Rainier [MORA] and Olympic [OLYM] National Parks, North Cascades National Park Service Complex [NOCA]), and four small historic cultural parks (Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve [EBLA], Lewis and Clark National Historical Park [LEWI], Fort Vancouver National Historical Park [FOVA], and San Juan Island National Historical Park [SAJH]). The protocol reflects decisions made by the NCCN avian monitoring group, which includes NPS representatives from each of the large parks in the Network as well as personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (USGS-FRESC) Olympic Field Station, and The Institute for Bird Populations, at meetings held between 2000 (Siegel and Kuntz, 2000) and 2005. The protocol narrative describes the monitoring program in relatively broad terms, and its structure and content adhere to the outline and recommendations developed by Oakley and others (2003) and adopted by NPS. Finer details of the methodology are addressed in a set of standard operating procedures (SOPs) that accompany the protocol narrative. We also provide appendixes containing additional supporting materials that do not clearly belong in either the protocol narrative or the standard operating procedures.

  9. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  10. Using Network Centrality Measures to Improve National Journal Classification Lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Repiso, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    In countries like Denmark and Spain classified journal lists are now being produced and used in the calculation of nationwide performance indicators. As a result, Danish and Spanish scholars are advised to contribute to journals of high 'authority' (as in the former) or those within a high class...... mismatches of journal categories and implementing list revisions....... (as in the latter). This can create a few problems. Based on a sample of Library and Information Science publications, the aim of this paper is to examine both the Danish and Spanish classification lists, and determine the potential use of network centrality measures for identifying possible...

  11. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  12. Anticipated Ethics and Regulatory Challenges in PCORnet: The National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Califf, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, seeks to establish a robust national health data network for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. This article reports the results of a PCORnet survey designed to identify the ethics and regulatory challenges anticipated in network implementation. A 12-item online survey was developed by leadership of the PCORnet Ethics and Regulatory Task Force; responses were collected from the 29 PCORnet networks. The most pressing ethics issues identified related to informed consent, patient engagement, privacy and confidentiality, and data sharing. High priority regulatory issues included IRB coordination, privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, and data sharing. Over 150 IRBs and five different approaches to managing multisite IRB review were identified within PCORnet. Further empirical and scholarly work, as well as practical and policy guidance, is essential if important initiatives that rely on comparative effectiveness research are to move forward.

  13. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  14. Global models of networked organization, the positional power of nations and economic development

    OpenAIRE

    Mahutga, MC

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary literature on global commodity chains (GCCs)/global value chains (GVCs) and global production networks (GPNs) contends that inter-firm power differentials within globally networked forms of economic organization have implications for the developmental trajectories of nation-states. In this article, I advance these literatures in three ways. First, I bridge the two approaches by elaborating an exchange-theoretic conceptualization of inter-firm power that is latent in the two ...

  15. Proactive compliance? Repercussions of national product regulation in standards of transnational business networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dilling, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    This paper ('Sfb-Arbeitspapier') illustrates the links between the self-regulation of transnational business networks and the law by analysing the management of chemical substance risks in the electric and electronic equipment industry. National product regulation (and to some extent regulation of production processes) can influence standards employed globally by leading corporations within their network of suppliers and contract manufacturers. However, it is also shown that the diffusion of ...

  16. Argonne National Lab gets Linux network teraflop cluster

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    "Linux NetworX, Salt Lake City, Utah, has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP). The cluster, named "Jazz" by Argonne, is designed to provide optimum performance for multiple disciplines such as chemistry, physics and reactor engineering and will be used by the entire scientific community at the Lab" (1 page).

  17. Design and initial deployment of the wireless local area networking infrastructure at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, John P.; Hamill, Michael J.; Mitchell, M. G.; Miller, Marc M.; Witzke, Edward L.; Wiener, Dallas J

    2006-11-01

    A major portion of the Wireless Networking Project at Sandia National Laboratories over the last few years has been to examine IEEE 802.11 wireless networking for possible use at Sandia and if practical, introduce this technology. This project team deployed 802.11a, b, and g Wireless Local Area Networking at Sandia. This report examines the basics of wireless networking and captures key results from project tests and experiments. It also records project members thoughts and designs on wireless LAN architecture and security issues. It documents some of the actions and milestones of this project, including pilot and production deployment of wireless networking equipment, and captures the team's rationale behind some of the decisions made. Finally, the report examines lessons learned, future directions, and conclusions.

  18. The International Postal Network and Other Global Flows as Proxies for National Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Desislava; Rutherford, Alex; Anson, Jose; Luengo-Oroz, Miguel; Mascolo, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The digital exhaust left by flows of physical and digital commodities provides a rich measure of the nature, strength and significance of relationships between countries in the global network. With this work, we examine how these traces and the network structure can reveal the socioeconomic profile of different countries. We take into account multiple international networks of physical and digital flows, including the previously unexplored international postal network. By measuring the position of each country in the Trade, Postal, Migration, International Flights, IP and Digital Communications networks, we are able to build proxies for a number of crucial socioeconomic indicators such as GDP per capita and the Human Development Index ranking along with twelve other indicators used as benchmarks of national well-being by the United Nations and other international organisations. In this context, we have also proposed and evaluated a global connectivity degree measure applying multiplex theory across the six networks that accounts for the strength of relationships between countries. We conclude by showing how countries with shared community membership over multiple networks have similar socioeconomic profiles. Combining multiple flow data sources can help understand the forces which drive economic activity on a global level. Such an ability to infer proxy indicators in a context of incomplete information is extremely timely in light of recent discussions on measurement of indicators relevant to the Sustainable Development Goals.

  19. The International Postal Network and Other Global Flows as Proxies for National Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Desislava; Rutherford, Alex; Anson, Jose; Luengo-Oroz, Miguel; Mascolo, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The digital exhaust left by flows of physical and digital commodities provides a rich measure of the nature, strength and significance of relationships between countries in the global network. With this work, we examine how these traces and the network structure can reveal the socioeconomic profile of different countries. We take into account multiple international networks of physical and digital flows, including the previously unexplored international postal network. By measuring the position of each country in the Trade, Postal, Migration, International Flights, IP and Digital Communications networks, we are able to build proxies for a number of crucial socioeconomic indicators such as GDP per capita and the Human Development Index ranking along with twelve other indicators used as benchmarks of national well-being by the United Nations and other international organisations. In this context, we have also proposed and evaluated a global connectivity degree measure applying multiplex theory across the six networks that accounts for the strength of relationships between countries. We conclude by showing how countries with shared community membership over multiple networks have similar socioeconomic profiles. Combining multiple flow data sources can help understand the forces which drive economic activity on a global level. Such an ability to infer proxy indicators in a context of incomplete information is extremely timely in light of recent discussions on measurement of indicators relevant to the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27248142

  20. Monitoring activities in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network in 2000 and 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Elzakker BG van; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML in Dutch) is one of the responsibilities of the Air Research Laboratory of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment. The main objectives of the LML are to monitor ambient air quality, facilitate implementation of air quality standards, alert authorities and the public to pollution episodes, support validation of model results, support diagnosis using model simulation, support short-term model prognosis and assist in qua...

  1. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  2. NETWORK RELATIONSHIPS FOR BUSINESS SUSTAINABILITY: A CASE STUDY IN NATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Hamrila A. Latip; Kosmas X Smyrnios

    2012-01-01

    The present case study examines social capital from the perspective of a national entrepreneurship development centre. Considering that one role of the Malaysian government is to develop long-term competitiveness of entrepreneurial firms at a national level, social capital is recognized as providing a platform for connectedness among entrepreneurs within related business sectors. Based upon a case study of Perbadanan Usahawan Nasional Berhad (PUNB), the present paper proposes a causal network...

  3. The Sky is the Limit: Benefits from Partnering with the Project ASTRO National Network!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Zevin, D.; van der Veen, W.; Fraknoi, A.; Wilson, R.; Gurton, S.; White, V.; Clemens, C.; Harvey, J.

    2006-12-01

    As a partner for EPO programs, the Project ASTRO National Network offers access to hundreds of trained educators and astronomer-educator partnerships across the country. This makes the Network extremely suitable for dissemination and/or testing of new science education products, in particular those that benefit from support by scientists and/or (through Family ASTRO) those that target families/communities. For example, the Network is currently being leveraged (through NASA funding) to create and disseminate nationally new hands-on classroom activities on solar physics. Project ASTRO is a national program that partners professional and amateur astronomers with local educators at regional sites around the country. Developed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Project ASTRO provides training for astronomer-educator partnerships in hands-on, inquiry-based science activities while emphasizing the importance of student preconceptions as a starting point for learning. During an intensive two-day training workshop, a partnership is forged that blends the teacher's knowledge of instructional methods and classroom management with the astronomer's knowledge of and passion for science and astronomy. Nationwide, over 500 active astronomer-educator partnerships bring the excitement of astronomy to over 20,000 students annually. All Project ASTRO sites follow the same model for partnership training and support and meet annually to discuss common strategies and share new ideas. Many sites also target families/communities through the Family ASTRO sister program. Each site (there are 15 total in the Network) is managed by a Lead Institution supported by a Local Coalition of scientific and educational organizations who help with recruiting of new participants, programming, and fund-raising. This poster will detail why the Project ASTRO National Network is an ideal partner for EPO programs. For more information on various ways your organization can partner with the Project

  4. Building Capacity for a Long-Term, in-Situ, National-Scale Phenology Monitoring Network: Successes, Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J. F.; Browning, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) is a national-scale science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology - the study of seasonal life-cycle events such as leafing, flowering, reproduction, and migration - as a tool to understand the response of biodiversity to environmental variation and change. USA-NPN provides a hierarchical, national monitoring framework that enables other organizations to leverage the capacity of the Network for their own applications - minimizing investment and duplication of effort - while promoting interoperability. Network participants can leverage: (1) Standardized monitoring protocols that have been broadly vetted, tested and published; (2) A centralized National Phenology Database (NPDb) for maintaining, archiving and replicating data, with standard metadata, terms-of-use, web-services, and documentation of QA/QC, plus tools for discovery, visualization and download of raw data and derived data products; and/or (3) A national in-situ, multi-taxa phenological monitoring system, Nature's Notebook, which enables participants to observe and record phenology of plants and animals - based on the protocols and information management system (IMS) described above - via either web or mobile applications. The protocols, NPDb and IMS, and Nature's Notebook represent a hierarchy of opportunities for involvement by a broad range of interested stakeholders, from individuals to agencies. For example, some organizations have adopted (e.g., the National Ecological Observatory Network or NEON) -- or are considering adopting (e.g., the Long-Term Agroecosystems Network or LTAR) -- the USA-NPN standardized protocols, but will develop their own database and IMS with web services to promote sharing of data with the NPDb. Other organizations (e.g., the Inventory and Monitoring Programs of the National Wildlife Refuge System and the National Park Service) have elected to use Nature's Notebook to support their phenological monitoring

  5. The human immunodeficiency virus preventive vaccine research at the French National Agency for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fischer

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS epidemic is of unprecedented gravity and is spreading rapidly, notably in the most disadvantaged regions of the world. The search for a preventive vaccine is thus an absolute priority. For over 10 years the French National Agency for AIDS research (ANRS has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research. The HIV preventive vaccine research program run by the ANRS covers upstream research for the definition of immunogens, animal models, and clinical research to evaluate candidate vaccines. Most researchers in 2004 believe that it should be possible to obtain partial vaccine protection through the induction of a strong and multiepitopic cellular response. Since 1992, the ANRS has set up 15 phases I and II clinical trials in order to evaluate the safety and the capacity of the candidate vaccines for inducing cellular immune responses. The tested candidate vaccines were increasingly complex recombinant canarypox viruses (Alvac containing sequences coding for certain viral proteins, utilized alone or combined with other immunogens (whole or truncated envelope proteins. ANRS has also been developing an original strategy based on the utilization of lipopeptides. These comprise synthetic fragments of viral proteins associated with lipids that facilitate the induction of a cellular immune response. These approaches promptly allowed the assessment of a prime-boost strategy combining a viral vector and lipopeptides.

  6. Nucleus and Nation: Scientists, International Networks, and Power in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most awaited books narrating the story of development of science and technology (S&T in India in the post-independence era, Robert Anderson’s effort is commendable. This book maps not only the history of diverse efforts in the field of nuclear science in India, but also tells the social and political history of evolution of a strong scientific culture in the country. The author has presented a comprehensive sketch of networks of science and scientists in and outside India, and the way they manage the affairs of science. Rather than tracing a linear history of science and technology in India, the book is a thick and rich description of various events that happened at different points of time and their relation with other events in past and future. Anderson’s work also makes a relevant contribution by presenting a detailed narrative of history of S&T in India. An account of events which not only gives an insight into those times but is also relevant in today’s context in terms of understanding the country’s scientific culture. Read more. . .

  7. Contaminant exposure and potential effects on terrestrial vertebrates residing in the National Capital Region network and Mid-Atlantic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Ackerson, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Part of the mission of the National Park Service is to preserve the natural resources, processes, systems, and associated values of its units in an unimpaired condition. Environmental contamination and pollution processes are well recognized stressors addressed by its management policies and plans. A recent study indicates that contemporary terrestrial vertebrate ecotoxicological data are lacking for 59 of 126 Park Service units located in coastal watersheds exhibiting serious water quality problems or high vulnerability to pollution. Based upon these findings, a more in-depth evaluation of contaminant threats and ecotoxicological data gaps related to terrestrial vertebrates was undertaken at 23 Inventory and Monitoring National Park units in National Capital Region and Mid-Atlantic Networks.

  8. The Continuing Growth of Global Cooperation Networks in Research: A Conundrum for National Governments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Global collaboration continues to grow as a share of all scientific cooperation, measured as coauthorships of peer-reviewed, published papers. The percent of all scientific papers that are internationally coauthored has more than doubled in 20 years, and they account for all the growth in output among the scientifically advanced countries. Emerging countries, particularly China, have increased their participation in global science, in part by doubling their spending on R&D; they are increasingly likely to appear as partners on internationally coauthored scientific papers. Given the growth of connections at the international level, it is helpful to examine the phenomenon as a communications network and to consider the network as a new organization on the world stage that adds to and complements national systems. When examined as interconnections across the globe over two decades, a global network has grown denser but not more clustered, meaning there are many more connections but they are not grouping into exclusive 'cliques'. This suggests that power relationships are not reproducing those of the political system. The network has features an open system, attracting productive scientists to participate in international projects. National governments could gain efficiencies and influence by developing policies and strategies designed to maximize network benefits-a model different from those designed for national systems.

  9. Technical Agency in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    The paper combines the discussion of technical agency and hybrid networks of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) with an ethnomethodological/conversation analytical (EMCA) perspective on situated practices in which participants ascribe agency to technical artefacts. While ANT works with (ethnographic......) description of hybrid networks in which human and non-human actants are granted agency without differentiating different kinds of agency, EMCA focuses on the member's perspectives and the situated construction of technical agency that is made relevant within an ongoing interaction. Based on an EMCA analysis...... of three video recordings of situations in which technical agency is made relevant by the human participants, the paper demonstrates different ways in which agency is granted to technical artefacts. Human participants can treat a technology as communication partner, as an active part (and actant...

  10. 75 FR 50987 - Privacy Act System of Records; National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... information about the owner of or person having primary responsibility for an animal undergoing testing in a... responsibility for an animal undergoing testing in a networked laboratory, the following information ] will be... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Privacy Act System of Records; National Animal...

  11. U.S. Geological Survey external quality-assurance project report to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2007-08. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples, and a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL), Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL), and 12 other participating laboratories. A blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in HAL total Hg concentration data. A co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and prototype precipitation collectors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the U.S. NADP data-quality objectives continued to be achieved during 2007-08. Results also indicate that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new E-gages is not likely to create step-function type shifts in NADP precipitation-depth records, except for sites where annual precipitation depth is dominated by snow because the E-gages tend to catch more snow than the original NADP rain gages. Evaluation of prototype precipitation collectors revealed no difference in sample volumes and analyte concentrations between the original NADP collectors and modified, deep-bucket collectors, but the Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc. (YES) collector obtained samples of significantly higher volumes and analyte concentrations than the standard NADP collector.

  12. External quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn; Rhodes, Mark F.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2009–2010. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) and Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL). The blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in total Hg concentration data produced by the HAL. The co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and precipitation collectors that use optical sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Results also suggest that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause –8 to +14 percent shifts in NADP annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations and total deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen ion, and larger shifts (+13 to +74 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector is more efficient in the catch of precipitation in winter than Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector, especially for light snowfall.

  13. National Cultural Heritage Networks: Access and Context in the Digital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori McCay-Peet

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available With advances in digital technology, museums, archives, and libraries have faced challenges in presenting their collections of primary source material online. This paper discusses the potential for national federated search engines to further the goals of local and national cultural institutions and benefit users by creating a single access point to authoritative sources, formats, and subjects. The challenges associated iwth providing context at the item and collection level to make digital items valuable ot the user are also explored. A search for mourning customs on the Picture Australia, Images Canada, and American Memory national cultural heritage networks is used to highlight issues related to access and context throughout the paper. Finally, challenges to greater contextualization due to the diversity of users and the mandates of the networks themselves are examined.

  14. Implementing Virtual Private Networking for Enabling Lower Cost, More Secure Wide Area Communications at Sandia National Laboratories; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtual Private Networking is a new communications technology that promises lower cost, more secure wide area communications by leveraging public networks such as the Internet. Sandia National Laboratories has embraced the technology for interconnecting remote sites to Sandia's corporate network, and for enabling remote access users for both dial-up and broadband access

  15. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and the National Trends Network during 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Randolph B.; Schroder, LeRoy J.; Willoughby, Timothy C.

    1988-01-01

    During 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey operated three programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network. An intersite-comparison program was used to assess the accuracy of onsite pH and specific-conductance determinations at quarterly intervals. The blind-audit program was used to assess the effect of routine sample handling on the precision and bias of program and network wet-deposition data. Analytical results from four laboratories, which routinely analyze wet-deposition samples, were examined to determine if differences existed between laboratory analytical results and to provide estimates of the analytical precision of each laboratory. An average of 78 and 89 percent of the site operators participating in the intersite-comparison met the network goals for pH and specific conductance. A comparison of analytical values versus actual values for samples submitted as part of the blind-audit program indicated that analytical values were slightly but significantly (a = 0.01) larger than actual values for pH, magnesium, sodium, and sulfate; analytical values for specific conductance were slightly less than actual values. The decreased precision in the analyses of blind-audit samples when compared to interlaboratory studies indicates that a large amount of uncertainty in network deposition data may be a result of routine field operations. The results of the interlaboratory comparison study indicated that the magnitude of the difference between laboratory analyses was small for all analytes. Analyses of deionized, distilled water blanks by participating laboratories indicated that the laboratories had difficulty measuring analyte concentrations near their reported detection limits. (USGS)

  16. Representation of global and national conservation priorities by Colombia's Protected Area Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Forero-Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How do national-level actions overlap with global priorities for conservation? Answering this question is especially important in countries with high and unique biological diversity like Colombia. Global biodiversity schemes provide conservation guidance at a large scale, while national governments gazette land for protection based on a combination of criteria at regional or local scales. Information on how a protected area network represents global and national conservation priorities is crucial for finding gaps in coverage and for future expansion of the system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the agreement of Colombia's protected area network with global conservation priorities, and the extent to which the network reflects the country's biomes, species richness, and common environmental and physical conditions. We used this information to identify priority biomes for conservation. We find the dominant strategy in Colombia has been a proactive one, allocating the highest proportion of protected land on intact, difficult to access and species rich areas like the Amazon. Threatened and unique areas are disproportionately absent from Colombia's protected lands. We highlight six biomes in Colombia as conservation priorities that should be considered in any future expansion of Colombia's protected area network. Two of these biomes have less than 3% of their area protected and more than 70% of their area transformed for human use. One has less than 3% protected and high numbers of threatened vertebrates. Three biomes fall in both categories. CONCLUSIONS: Expansion of Colombia's Protected Area Network should consider the current representativeness of the network. We indicate six priority biomes that can contribute to improving the representation of threatened species and biomes in Colombia.

  17. Supporting Multidisciplinary Networks through Relationality and a Critical Sense of Belonging: Three "Gardening Tools" and the "Relational Agency Framework"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhn, Iris; Fleer, Marilyn; Harrison, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the "Relational Agency Framework" (RAF), an analytical tool developed for an Australian review and evaluation study of an early years' policy initiative. We explore Anne Edward's concepts of "relational expertise", "building common knowledge" and "relational agency" to explore how…

  18. Map images portraying flight paths of low-altitude transects over the Arctic Network of national park units and Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, July 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Maps portraying the flight paths for low altitude transects conducted from small aircraft over the National Park Service’s Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge...

  19. National Rail Network: 1:100,000 (line), Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [us_rail_network_100k_lin_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Rail Network is a comprehensive database of the nation's railway system at the 1:100,000 scale. The data set covers all 50 States plus the District of Columbia.

  20. National Rail Network 1:2,000,000 (node), Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [us_rail_network_100k_nd_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Rail Network is a comprehensive database of the nation's railway system at the 1:100,000 scale. The data set covers all 50 States plus the District of Columbia.

  1. Effects of equipment performance on data quality from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and the Mercury Deposition Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Rhodes, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems operates the Precipitation Chemistry Quality Assurance project (PCQA) to provide independent, external quality-assurance for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). NADP is composed of five monitoring networks that measure the chemical composition of precipitation and ambient air. PCQA and the NADP Program Office completed five short-term studies to investigate the effects of equipment performance with respect to the National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) data quality: sample evaporation from NTN collectors; sample volume and mercury loss from MDN collectors; mercury adsorption to MDN collector glassware, grid-type precipitation sensors for precipitation collectors, and the effects of an NTN collector wind shield on sample catch efficiency. Sample-volume evaporation from an NTN Aerochem Metrics (ACM) collector ranged between 1.1–33 percent with a median of 4.7 percent. The results suggest that weekly NTN sample evaporation is small relative to sample volume. MDN sample evaporation occurs predominantly in western and southern regions of the United States (U.S.) and more frequently with modified ACM collectors than with N-CON Systems Inc. collectors due to differences in airflow through the collectors. Variations in mercury concentrations, measured to be as high as 47.5 percent per week with a median of 5 percent, are associated with MDN sample-volume loss. Small amounts of mercury are also lost from MDN samples by adsorption to collector glassware irrespective of collector type. MDN 11-grid sensors were found to open collectors sooner, keep them open longer, and cause fewer lid cycles than NTN 7-grid sensors. Wind shielding an NTN ACM collector resulted in collection of larger quantities of precipitation while also preserving sample integrity.

  2. Building Capacity: The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.

    2014-12-01

    In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change, and expect these institutions to provide reliable information about environmental issues and solutions. These informal science venues play a critical role in shaping public understanding. Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. After two years of project implementation, key findings include: 1. Importance of adaptive management - We continue to make ongoing changes in training format, content, and roles of facilitators and participants. 2. Impacts on interpreters - We have multiple lines of evidence for changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors. 3. Social radiation - Trained interpreters have a significant influence on their friends, family and colleagues. 4. Visitor impacts - "Exposure to "strategically framed" interpretation does change visitors' perceptions about climate change. 5. Community of practice - We are seeing evidence of growing participation, leadership, and sustainability. 6. Diffusion of innovation - Peer networks are facilitating dissemination throughout the informal science education community. Over the next five years, NNOCCI will achieve a systemic national impact across the ISE community, embed its work within multiple ongoing regional and national climate change education

  3. BLM National Surface Management Agency: Area Polygons, Withdrawal Area Polygons, and Special Public Purpose Withdrawal Area Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Geographic Data Committee — The SMA implementation is comprised of one feature dataset, with several polygon feature classes, rather than a single feature class. SurfaceManagementAgency: The...

  4. Transforming the Roles of a Public Extension Agency to Strengthen Innovation: Lessons from the National Agricultural Extension Project in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhury, A.H.; Odame, H.H.; Leeuwis, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The rapidly evolving nature of agricultural innovation processes in low-income countries requires agricultural extension agencies to transform the classical roles that previously supported linear information dissemination and adoption of innovation. In Bangladesh, strengthening agricultural

  5. Development of a Domain Map for Nodes of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hayden, B. P.; Urban, D. L.; MacMahon, J. A.; Franklin, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be the first ecological measurement system designed both to answer regional- to national-scale scientific questions and to have the interdisciplinary participation necessary to achieve credible ecological forecasting and prediction. Capabilities provided by this infrastructural investment will transform the science of ecology by enabling the integration of research and education from natural and human systems. A National Network Design Committee (NNDC) of 15 individuals has been tasked with providing a baseline design for NEON, including the continental-scale deployment of NEON network resources. A system of identical nodes, each representing environments within a mother geographic "domain" was envisioned. Each node would itself consist of sub-node components, and all nodes would be focused in unison on a few transformational ecological questions of national relevance. The NNDC adopted a strategy of pre-stratification to help determine an optimum number of nodes and to maximize node representativeness. To better sample a phenomenon as diverse as the ecological environments of the United States, those environments were first divided into a set of more homogeneous "strata." Samples could then be arrayed within each stratum, ensuring that NEON nodes are representative of the entire range of environments within the United States. Ecoregions have classically been used by ecologists for such national stratification. Ecoregions have historically been drawn using human expertise in a qualitative, weight-of-evidence approach. To construct NEON domains, a more transparent and repeatable process was needed. Multivariate clustering based on national maps of 9 ecologically relevant climatic "state" variables was used to repeatably define 25 national climatic zones. These 25 climate zones were combined with dynamic air mass seasonality data to create 20 NEON domains, each having similar climate. Such domains are defensible

  6. The national network of measurements of radioactivity in the environment. Management report - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the objectives and challenges of the French national network for the measurement of radioactivity in the environment, its legal and regulatory context, its operation, its actors (ASN, IRSN and other actors). It proposes the moral report on the steering committee and work-groups. It describes the development of the information system: main stages, synthetic description, process from data transmission to edition on Internet sites, exploitation of the public Internet site, of the requester internet site, of hosting platforms, harmonization of transmitted data, planning for 2011. It presents the exploitation assessment for 2011: technical support activities, interactions between the IRSN and the national network information system host, and so on. The last part deals with communication and publication activities

  7. Evaluation of the results of acute viral gastroenteritis data in Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory in 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Albayrak, Nurhan; Dilek YAĞCI-ÇAĞLAYIK; Ayşe Başak ALTAŞ; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Ertek, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Norovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Astrovirus are responsible for most non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis. The incidence of these viral agents in Turkey is not well known. In this study, it was aimed to document the viral etiology of the stool samples which were send to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency (RSNPHA), Virology Reference and Research Laboratory for investigation of viral acute gastroenteritis agents. Method: A total of 147 stool samples from 11 different ...

  8. Energy saving techniques applied over a nation-wide mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Eva; Frank, Philipp; Micallef, Gilbert;

    2014-01-01

    Traffic carried over wireless networks has grown significantly in recent years and actual forecasts show that this trend is expected to continue. However, the rapid mobile data explosion and the need for higher data rates comes at a cost of increased complexity and energy consumption of the mobile...... on the energy consumption based on a nation-wide network of a leading European operator. By means of an extensive analysis, we show that with the proposed techniques significant energy savings can be realized....... networks. Although base station equipment is improving its energy efficiency by means of new power amplifiers and increased processing power, additional techniques are required to further reduce the energy consumption. In this paper, we evaluate different energy saving techniques and study their impact...

  9. Research Notes ~ Development of a Defense Learning Network for the Canadian Department of National Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Margueratt

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The idea of an online learning network for members of the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND has surfaced several times over the past decade and a half, but has never reached the level of development seen in the current Defence Learning Network (DLN initiative. Past attempts at creating a learning network failed primarily because of the lack of a champion within DND’s senior leadership, and the ability of traditional residential learning to meet the training and education needs of the Department. Recently, however, the rising cost of residential learning, coupled with recognition of the benefits afforded by distance learning, particularly learning flexibility and the ability of learners to engaged in requisite learning at their home base rather than at dispersed locations across Canada, have greatly enhanced the attractiveness of distance learning as a viable learning delivery option.

  10. Building A National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change, and expect these institutions to provide reliable information about environmental issues and solutions. Given that we spend less than 5% of our lifetime in a classroom, informal science venues play a critical role in shaping public understanding. Since 2007, the New England Aquarium (NEAq) has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science education institutions (ISEIs) to effectively communicate about the impacts of climate change on the oceans. NEAq is now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI's design is based on best practices in informal science learning, cognitive/social psychology, community and network building: Interpreters as Communication Strategists - Interpreters can serve not merely as educators disseminating information, but can also be leaders in influencing public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. Communities of Practice - Learning is a social activity that is created through engagement in a supportive community context. Social support is particularly important in addressing a complex, contentious and distressing subject. Diffusion of Innovation - Peer networks are of primary importance in spreading innovations. Leaders serve as 'early adopters' and influence others to achieve a critical mass of implementation. Over the next five years, NNOCCI will achieve a

  11. National Nuclear Regulatory Portal (NNRP) – A Useful Regulatory Knowledge Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusions: → The main advantage of developing and operation of NNRP is that the most relevant information in the field, obtained from various granted data sources, will be internationally accessible from one place; → NNRP can be used as a platform for more effective international cooperation between MS or for national information and cooperation activities and information exchange; → NNRP is an inclusive concept that brings together, links and complements all existing networks and initiatives

  12. Hourly use profiles for solar domestic hot water heaters in the National Solar Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barvir, E. J.; Doak, L. G.; Waterman, R. E.; Gervasio, C.

    Daily hot water rates of consumption and the Hourly Profiles of Daily Hot Water Consumption for single and multiple family dwellings are provided in this paper. These new statistics obtained from the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) are significantly different from the statistics currently being used in TRNSYS, SOLCOST and F-Chart. The NSDN statistics suggest that both the daily demand and hourly use profiles used in performance models should be revised.

  13. Nurses in emotional competence: exploratory study on population of continued care national network

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Tânia; Veiga-Branco, Augusta; Baptista, Gorete

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of this study - the first empirical research (to our knowledge) in Continued Care National Network (RCNN) context - emerge to understand the role of emotions in workplace behaviour (Côté, 2005; Austin, Dore & Donovan, 2008; Liu et al. 2008; Barsade, Ramarajan, Burack, 2008), but here, with terminally ill people and great physical and psychological weakness. Recent scientific literature is exposing a significatly negative correlations between Emotional Intelligence...

  14. Nursing emotional competence profile: exploratory study in continued care national network

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga-Branco, Augusta; Lopes, Tânia

    2012-01-01

    The relevance of this study—the first empirical research (to our knowledge) in Continued Care National Network (RCNN) context—emerge to understand the role of emotions in workplace behaviour (Coˆte´, 2005; Austin, Dore & Donovan, 2008; Liu et al. 2008; Barsade, Ramarajan, Burack, 2008), but here, with terminally ill people and great physical and psychological weakness. Recent scientific literature is exposing a significatly negative correlations between Emotional Intellig...

  15. Care of burns in Scotland: 3-year data from the managed clinical network national registry

    OpenAIRE

    Gilhooly, Charlotte; Kinsella, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Managed Clinical Network for Care of Burns in Scotland (COBIS) was launched in April 2007. Primary aims included establishing and maintaining a registry of complex burn injury in Scotland and setting mechanisms to regularly audit outcome of burn treatment against nationally agreed standards of care. On behalf of COBIS, we present 3-year incidence and mortality data of Scottish patients admitted with a complex burn injury in this abstract. Methods From January 2010 o...

  16. TSUNAMI HAZARD MITIGATION AND THE NOAA NATIONAL WATER LEVEL OBSERVATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Hubbard

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in regional Tsunami Warning Systems and the potential tsunami threats throughout the Caribbean and West coast of the United States, the National Ocean Service (NOS, National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON consisting of 175 primary stations, is well situated to play a role in the National Hazard Mitigation effort. In addition, information regarding local mean sea level trends and GPS derived geodetic datum relationships at numerous coastal locations is readily available for tsunami hazard assessment and mapping applications.Tsunami inundation maps and modeling are just two of the more important products which may be derived from NWLON data. In addition to the seven water level gauges that are hardwired into the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WClATWC, NOS has a significant number of gauges with real-time satellite telemetry capabilities located along the Pacific Northwest coastline, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. These gauges, in concert with near shore buoy systems, have the potential for increasing the effectiveness of the existing tsunami warning system.The recent expansion of the Caribbean Sea Level Gauge Network through the NOS regional partnerships with Central American and Caribbean countries have opened an opportunity for a basin-wide tsunami warning network in a region which is ill prepared for a major tsunami event.

  17. The Network Attributes of Independent Directors and Firm's Agency Costs%独立董事的网络特征与公司代理成本

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈运森

    2012-01-01

    Feature" and assumes thatdirectors make their decisions solely. However, as a part of economic society, directors are among different network relations, and this network can influence their governance role ( Larcker et al. , 2011 ) ; Secondly, most previousstudies use proportion of independent directors as the proxy variable. But according to our statistics,the p25 /mean/ median /p75 of the proportion is around 33% , which justly conforms the regulation policy. So it's not a surprise that the evidences is mixed. Because board network can represent directors' governance incentive and capacity (Xie and Chen,2012 ), in- dependent directors with more network centrality have more encourage to monitor the management and large share- holders, and effectively reduce the agency problem. So different from previous studies, this paper defines the boardnetwork as the directors' connections based on sitting at least in one same board, and figure out its boundary from the"node"and"relation" perspectives. Based on the definition, and based on the network analysis method,this pa- per investigates how the network attributes of directors affect the role of independent directors on reducing firm'sagency cost. In order to construct a firm-level network measure,we compute the median and mean value of firm's in- dependent directors' network centrality (degree, between, close and eigenvector) as the firm's network centrali-ty. Similar as Ang et al. (2000) and Luo and Zhu (2010), we use the management cost to represent the Type I agency cost, and use the cash occupation as the Type II agency cost (Jiang et al. ,2010). Like Li (2007) ,we useturnover ratio to measure the agency efficiency of the firm. Empirical evidence shows that the higher network central- ity of independent directors, the less of both the executives-shareholders' Type I agency cost and large shareholders- minority shareholders' Type II agency cost. However, firm's ownership can partly play a decreasing effect of board network

  18. The USA National Phenology Network; taking the pulse of our planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, Jake F.

    2011-01-01

    People have tracked phenology for centuries and for the most practical reasons: it helped them know when to hunt and fish, when to plant and harvest crops, and when to navigate waterways. Now phenology is being used as a tool to assess climate change and its effects on both natural and modified ecosystems. How is the timing of events in plant and animal life cycles, like flowering or migration, responding to climate change? And how are those responses, in turn, affecting people and ecosystems? The USA National Phenology Network (the Network) is working to answer these questions for science and society by promoting a broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and their relationship to environmental change. The Network is a consortium of organizations and individuals that collect, share, and use phenology data, models, and related information to enable scientists, resource managers, and the public to adapt in response to changing climates and environments. In addition, the Network encourages people of all ages and backgrounds to observe and record phenology as a way to discover and explore the nature and pace of our dynamic world. The National Coordinating Office (NCO) of the Network is a resource center that facilitates and encourages widespread collection, integration, and sharing of phenology data and related information (for example, meteorological and hydrological data). The NCO develops and promotes standardized methods for field data collection and maintains several online user interfaces for data upload and download, as well as data exploration, visualization, and analysis. The NCO also facilitates basic and applied research related to phenology, the development of decision-support tools for resource managers and planners, and the design of educational and outreach materials

  19. Partnership disengagement from primary community care networks (PCCNs: A qualitative study for a national demonstration project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cheng-Chieh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Primary Community Care Network (PCCN Demonstration Project, launched by the Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI in 2003, is still in progress. Partnership structures in PCCNs represent both contractual clinic-to-clinic and clinic-to-hospital member relationships of organizational aspects. The partnership structures are the formal relationships between individuals and the total network. Their organizational design aims to ensure effective communication, coordination, and integration across the total network. Previous studies have focused largely on how contractual integration among the partnerships works and on its effects. Few studies, however, have tried to understand partnership disengagement in PCCNs. This study explores why some partnerships in PCCNs disengage. Methods This study used a qualitative methodology with semi-structured questions for in-depth interviews. The semi-structured questions were pre-designed to explore the factors driving partnership disengagement. Thirty-seven clinic members who had withdrawn from their PCCNs were identified from the 2003-2005 Taiwan Primary Community Care Network Lists. Results Organization/participant factors (extra working time spend and facility competency, network factors (partner collaboration, and community factors (health policy design incompatibility, patient-physician relationship, and effectiveness are reasons for clinic physicians to withdraw or change their partnerships within the PCCNs. Conclusions To strengthen partnership relationships, several suggestions are made, including to establish clinic and hospital member relationships, and to reduce administrative work. In addition, both educating the public about the concept of family doctors and ensuring well-organized national health policies could help health care providers improve the integration processes.

  20. Watersheds for U.S Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) sampling sites 1996-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital representation of the watersheds of 43 sites on large river systems sampled by the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) of the U. S....

  1. Cahaba River and Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge Nightjar Survey Network survey map, field procedures, and completed data sheet (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Cahaba River and Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge Nightjar Survey Network survey map, field procedures, and completed data sheet (2010)

  2. Holding-based network of nations based on listed energy companies: An empirical study on two-mode affiliation network of two sets of actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Gao, Xiangyun; Yan, Lili

    2016-05-01

    Economic networks in the real world are not homogeneous; therefore, it is important to study economic networks with heterogeneous nodes and edges to simulate a real network more precisely. In this paper, we present an empirical study of the one-mode derivative holding-based network constructed by the two-mode affiliation network of two sets of actors using the data of worldwide listed energy companies and their shareholders. First, we identify the primitive relationship in the two-mode affiliation network of the two sets of actors. Then, we present the method used to construct the derivative network based on the shareholding relationship between two sets of actors and the affiliation relationship between actors and events. After constructing the derivative network, we analyze different topological features on the node level, edge level and entire network level and explain the meanings of the different values of the topological features combining the empirical data. This study is helpful for expanding the usage of complex networks to heterogeneous economic networks. For empirical research on the worldwide listed energy stock market, this study is useful for discovering the inner relationships between the nations and regions from a new perspective.

  3. Environmental Media Systems: Innovations at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe-Kuehn, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    This multi-sited ethnography analyzes challenges and opportunities in the design and development of digital media systems in the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Drawing heavily from interviews conducted over the course of three years, primarily with scientists at the ORD's…

  4. The USA National Phenology Network's Model for Collaborative Data Generation and Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemartin, A.; Lincicome, A.; Denny, E. G.; Marsh, L.; Wilson, B. E.

    2010-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) serves science and society by promoting a broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and the relationships among phenological patterns and all aspects of environmental change. The Network was founded as an NSF-funded Research Coordination Network, for the purpose of fostering collaboration among scientists, policy-makers and the general public to address the challenges posed by global change and its impact on ecosystems and human health. With this mission in mind, the USA-NPN has developed an Information Management System (IMS) to facilitate collaboration and participatory data collection and digitization. The IMS includes components for data storage, such as the National Phenology Database, as well as a Drupal website for information-sharing and data visualization, and a Java application for collection of contemporary observational data. The National Phenology Database is designed to efficiently accommodate large quantities of phenology data and to be flexible to the changing needs of the network. The database allows for the collection, storage and output of phenology data from multiple sources (e.g., partner organizations, researchers and citizen observers), as well as integration with legacy data sets. Participants in the network can submit records (as Drupal content types) for publications, legacy data sets and phenology-related festivals. The USA-NPN’s contemporary phenology data collection effort, Nature’s Notebook also draws on the contributions of participants. Citizen scientists around the country submit data through this Java application (paired with the Drupal site through a shared login) on the life cycle stages of plants and animals in their yards and parks. The North American Bird Phenology Program, now a part of the USA-NPN, also relies on web-based crowdsourcing. Participants in this program are transcribing 6 million scanned paper cards that were collected by observers across the United States

  5. Annual report 1999 of the air pollution monitoring network of the German Federal Environmental Agency; Jahresbericht 1999 aus dem Messnetz des Umweltbundesamtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilke, S.; Uhse, K. [comps.

    2000-12-01

    In this annual report the results of the air pollution monitoring network of the German Federal Environmental Agency (FEA) are presented for the year 1999. The network consists of 23 stations (9 stations with personnel and 14 automatically working container stations) which are situated in rural areas. As the data set was thoroughly quality controlled reliable statements on trends can be made. (orig.) [German] Im vorliegenden Jahresbericht werden die Ergebnisse aus dem Messnetz des Umweltbundesamtes fuer das Jahr 1999 vorgestellt, interpretiert und mit den Messungen aus frueheren Jahren verglichen. Das UBA-Messnetz besteht heute aus insgesamt 23 in laendlichen Regionen gelegenen Stationen, wovon 9 Messstellen personell besetzt und 14 automatisch arbeitende Containerstationen sind. Die Datensaetze sind in sich homogen, d.h. es wurden im Verlauf der Jahre keine gravierenden Veraenderungen an den Messbedingungen vorgenommen, weder bei der Probenahme noch bei der Analytik. Die Daten wurden einer eingehenden Qualitaetspruefung unterzogen, sowohl intern als auch bei internationalen Ringvergleichen der Analysenverfahren. (orig.)

  6. Embedded, Emboldened, and (Net)Working for Change: Support-Seeking and Teacher Agency in Urban, High-Needs Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Lauren Anderson takes an inductive approach to the study of teacher agency, specifically considering who supports teachers, and how, in their efforts to advance equity in urban, high-needs schools. Drawing from a larger research project, Anderson focuses on a multiyear case study of one early-career teacher and incorporates social…

  7. From planning to practice: building the national network for the surveillance of severe maternal morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes Maria V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving maternal health is one of the Millennium Development Goals for 2015. Recently some progress has been achieved in reducing mortality. On the other hand, in developed regions, maternal death is a relatively rare event compared to the number of cases of morbidity; hence studying maternal morbidity has become more relevant. Electronic surveillance systems may improve research by facilitating complete data reporting and reducing the time required for data collection and analysis. Therefore the purpose of this study was to describe the methods used in elaborating and implementing the National Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Brazil. Methods The project consisted of a multicenter, cross-sectional study for the surveillance of severe maternal morbidity including near-miss, in Brazil. Results Following the development of a conceptual framework, centers were selected for inclusion in the network, consensus meetings were held among the centers, an electronic data collection system was identified, specific software and hardware tools were developed, research material was prepared, and the implementation process was initiated and analyzed. Conclusion The conceptual framework developed for this network was based on the experience acquired in various studies carried out in the area over recent years and encompasses maternal and perinatal health. It is innovative especially in the context of a developing country. The implementation of the project represents the first step towards this planned management. The system online elaborated for this surveillance network may be used in further studies in reproductive and perinatal health.

  8. [The inter-university learning website: a national university network for online teaching of pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchotte, Guillaume; Ameisen, David; Boutonnat, Jean; Battistella, Maxime; Copie, Christiane; Garcia, Stéphane; Rigau, Valérie; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Terris, Benoit; Vergier, Béatrice; Wendum, Dominique; Bertheau, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Building online teaching materials is a highly time and energy consuming task for teachers of a single university. With the help of the Collège des pathologistes, we initiated a French national university network for building mutualized online teaching pathology cases, tests and other pedagogic resources. Nineteen French universities are associated to this project, initially funded by UNF3S (http://www.unf3s.org/). One national e-learning Moodle platform (http://virtual-slides.univ-paris7.fr/moodle/) contains texts, medias and URL pointing toward decentralized virtual slides. The Moodle interface has been explained to the teachers since september 2011 using web-based conferences with screen-sharing. The following contents have been created: 20 clinical cases, several tests with multiple choices and short answer questions, and gross examination videos. A survey with 16 teachers and students showed a 94 % satisfaction rate, most of the 16 participants being favorable to the development of e-learning, in parallel with other courses in classroom. These tools will be further developed for the different study levels of pathology. In conclusion, these tools offer very interesting perspectives for pathology teaching. The organization of a national inter-university network is a useful way to create and share numerous and good-quality pedagogic resources. PMID:23790654

  9. Final report on the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint-Source Task Force and recommended national nonpoint source policy. Appendix B. Agency strategies. Report for March 1984-January 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The Appendix presents the full text of agency implementation strategies developed by each Federal and some State and local agencies participating on the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convened a Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force in March 1984 in recognition of the many agencies involved in managing nonpoint source (NPS) pollution and the need for coordination among these agencies. The Task Force developed a recommended National Nonpoint Source Policy and implementation strategies to carry out the goals of the Policy. The Appendix contains copies of these implementation strategies which outline agency-specific activities to be undertaken in implementing the National Nonpoint Source Policy.

  10. A national plan for assisting states, federal agencies, and tribes in managing white-nose syndrome in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; U.S. Forest Service; Department of the Army - Corps of Engineers; Bureau of Land Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. Geological Survey; National Park Service; St. Regis Mohawk Tribe; Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources; Missouri Department of Conservation; New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; Pennsylvania Game Commission; Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife; Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a disease responsible for unprecedented mortality in hibernating bats in the northeastern U.S. This previously unrecognized disease has spread very rapidly since its discovery in January 2007, and poses a considerable threat to hibernating bats throughout North America. As WNS spreads, the challenges for understanding and managing the disease continue to increase. Given the escalating complexity of these challenges, a highly coordinated effort is required for State, Federal, and Tribal wildlife agencies, and private partners to respond effectively to WNS and conserve species of bats. The plan proposed herein details the elements that are critical to the investigation and management of WNS, identifies key action items to address stated goals, and outlines the role(s) of agencies and entities involved in this continental effort.

  11. The role of state public health agencies in genetics and disease prevention: results of a national survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, M. A.; Lindenmayer, J. M.; Lengerich, E. J.; Pass, K.A.; Brown, W. G.; Crowder, W. B.; Khoury, M.J.; Baker, T. G.; Lloyd-Puryear, M. A.; Bryan, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The onset and severity of the clinical expression of most diseases that are of public health importance are influenced by genetic predisposition. The ability to assess human genetic predisposition for many diseases is increasing rapidly. Therefore, state public health agencies should be incorporating new developments in genetics and disease prevention into their core functions of assessment, policy development, and assurance. The authors assessed the status of this process. METHOD...

  12. Implementation of a national metrology network of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) in Brazil routinely use radionuclide calibrators to measure the activity of solutions containing radiopharmaceuticals. These solutions are administered to the patients with the intention to diagnose or treat illnesses. However, for the accomplishment of an optimized examination, the activity of these radiopharmaceuticals must be determined as accurately as possible. The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI), of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, of the National Commission on Nuclear Energy (IRD/CNEN), comes leading, since 1998, a comparison program for activity measurements of radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients in the Nuclear Medicine Services with the purpose to promote the quality control. In Rio de Janeiro the program has been carried through successfully, but there is the need to implement it all around the country. This problem comes being resolved through the implementation of a reference laboratories network in various points of the national territory. For the establishment of this network, the following factors must be observed: the radionuclide calibrators located in the reference laboratories must be traceable to the LNMRI; the operators must be trained by a specialized LNMRI staff; the quality control must be assured through a comparison program. Currently, is actively working the second node point, located in Brasilia, covering the demand of all the Center-West Region and the third node point, located in Porto Alegre. This work presents the results of the comparisons for the radiopharmaceuticals 131I and 99mTc and proves that the implementation of a radionuclide metrology network is viable, important and feasible. (author)

  13. The Network Attributes of Independent Directors and Firm's Agency Costs%独立董事的网络特征与公司代理成本

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈运森

    2012-01-01

    Feature" and assumes thatdirectors make their decisions solely. However, as a part of economic society, directors are among different network relations, and this network can influence their governance role ( Larcker et al. , 2011 ) ; Secondly, most previousstudies use proportion of independent directors as the proxy variable. But according to our statistics,the p25 /mean/ median /p75 of the proportion is around 33% , which justly conforms the regulation policy. So it's not a surprise that the evidences is mixed. Because board network can represent directors' governance incentive and capacity (Xie and Chen,2012 ), in- dependent directors with more network centrality have more encourage to monitor the management and large share- holders, and effectively reduce the agency problem. So different from previous studies, this paper defines the boardnetwork as the directors' connections based on sitting at least in one same board, and figure out its boundary from the"node"and"relation" perspectives. Based on the definition, and based on the network analysis method,this pa- per investigates how the network attributes of directors affect the role of independent directors on reducing firm'sagency cost. In order to construct a firm-level network measure,we compute the median and mean value of firm's in- dependent directors' network centrality (degree, between, close and eigenvector) as the firm's network centrali-ty. Similar as Ang et al. (2000) and Luo and Zhu (2010), we use the management cost to represent the Type I agency cost, and use the cash occupation as the Type II agency cost (Jiang et al. ,2010). Like Li (2007) ,we useturnover ratio to measure the agency efficiency of the firm. Empirical evidence shows that the higher network central- ity of independent directors, the less of both the executives-shareholders' Type I agency cost and large shareholders- minority shareholders' Type II agency cost. However, firm's ownership can partly play a decreasing effect of board network

  14. Design for mosquito abundance, diversity, and phenology sampling within the National Ecological Observatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekman, D.; Springer, Yuri P; Barker, C.M.; Barrera, R.; Blackmore, M.S.; Bradshaw, W.E.; Foley, D. H.; Ginsberg, Howard; Hayden, M. H.; Holzapfel, C. M.; Juliano, S. A.; Kramer, L. D.; LaDeau, S. L.; Livdahl, T. P.; Moore, C. G.; Nasci, R.S.; Reisen, W.K.; Savage, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) intends to monitor mosquito populations across its broad geographical range of sites because of their prevalence in food webs, sensitivity to abiotic factors and relevance for human health. We describe the design of mosquito population sampling in the context of NEON’s long term continental scale monitoring program, emphasizing the sampling design schedule, priorities and collection methods. Freely available NEON data and associated field and laboratory samples, will increase our understanding of how mosquito abundance, demography, diversity and phenology are responding to land use and climate change.

  15. Use and benefits of public access defibrillation in a nation-wide network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are known to increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to examine the use and benefit of public-access defibrillation (PAD) in a nation-wide network. We primarily sought to assess survival at 1 month...... to an OHCA victim prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in 48 instances. Ten percent of bystanders were off-duty healthcare professionals. Shockable arrests (N=31, 70%) were significantly more likely to be witnessed (94% vs. 54%) to occur at sports facilities (74% vs. 31%), in relation...

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory Northern New Mexico Seismic Network and seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cash, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Northern New Mexico Seismic Network (NNMSN) is described and the research conducted there briefly discussed. Its purpose is to: (1) monitor seismic activity that can pose a risk to the Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) monitor induced seismicity that might result from the Laboratory's experimental activities, such as the Hot Dry Rock project; (3) provide data for research in test ban verification; and (4) provide data for fundamental research in seismology, tectonics, and geologic structure of the Rio Grande Rift and the Jemez Mountains. (ACR)

  17. Characterization of national food agency shrimp and plaice reference materials for trace elements and arsenic species by atomic and mass spectrometric techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; McLaren, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The National Food Agency (NFA) of Denmark has produced and characterized NFA Plaice and NFA Shrimp reference materials (RMs) for the control of the accuracy of trace element and arsenic species determinations in similar seafood samples, The physical preparation of the materials included dissection...... mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for qualitative verification, Based on a rigorous statistical analysis of the analytical data using the DANREF software, it was decided to assign certified values for mercury, cadmium and arsenic in the NFA Shrimp, and mercury, selenium and arsenic in the NFA Plaice...

  18. Entrepreneurs’ growth-expectations: Enhanced by their networking and by national growth-policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøtt, Thomas; Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh

    condition in focus in this study. Our contribution is to account for entrepreneurs’ expectations by their networking and by national policy for growth-entrepreneurship. More broadly, our contribution is to show how an entrepreneurial outcome is shaped by individual behavior in the context of societal......Our study aims at accounting for entrepreneurial outcomes as shaped by individual behaviors and societal conditions. Expectation for growth or change of a business is the outcome in focus in this study. Expectation for growth is formed and modified in the mind of the entrepreneur starting...... conditions. Our methodology uses a research design with two hierarchical levels, entrepreneurs nested in countries. Such data are collected in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor survey of individuals and survey of nations, providing a sample of 42 societies with 19560 entrepreneurs. Effects upon individual...

  19. The Sky is the Limit!: The Benefits from Partnering with the Project ASTRO National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, D.; Walker, C.; Wilson, R.; van der Veen, W.; Moody, T. R.; Fraknoi, A.; Gurton, S.; White, V.; Harvey, J.; Cooper, L.; Regas, D.; Guttman, P.; Smith, R.

    2008-06-01

    Project ASTRO is a national program that partners professional and amateur astronomers with local educators at regional sites around the country. Developed by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Project ASTRO provides training for astronomer-educator partnerships in hands-on, inquiry-based science activities while emphasizing the importance of student preconceptions as a starting point for learning. During an intensive two-day training workshop, a partnership is forged that blends the teacher's knowledge of instructional methods and classroom management with the astronomer's knowledge of and passion for science and astronomy. The regional sites' directors and coordinators are part of a ``National Network'' whose aims are to foster communication and cooperation among its members and with other science education and research communities. Nationwide, over 500 active astronomer-educator partnerships bring the excitement of astronomy to over 20,000 students annually.

  20. Indirect economic impact of landslide hazards by disruption to national road transportation networks; Scotland, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2016-04-01

    The failure of engineered or natural slopes which support or are adjacent to transportation systems often inflicts costly direct physical damage and indirect system disruption. The consequences and severity of indirect impacts vary according to which links, nodes or network facilities are physically disrupted. Moreover, it is often the case that multiple slope failure disruptions are triggered simultaneously following prolonged or intense precipitation events due to a degree of local homogeneity of slope characteristics and materials. This study investigates the application of national commuter statistics and network agent simulation to evaluate indirect impacts of landslide events disrupting the Scottish trunk road transportation network (UK). Previous studies often employ shortest pathway analysis whereas agent simulation has received relatively little attention. British Geological Survey GeoSure landslide susceptibility data is used to select 35 susceptible trunk road segments by means of neighbouring total area at risk. For each of the candidate 35 segments the network and zonal variation in travel time is calculated for a single day of disruption, economic impact is approximated using established governmental and industry transport planning and appraisal values. The results highlight that a number of trunk road segments incur indirect economic losses in the order of tens of thousands of pounds for each day of closure. Calculated losses at the A83 Rest and Be Thankful are 50% greater than previous estimates at £75 thousand per day of closure. Also highlighted are events in which economic impact is relatively minor, yet concentrating on particular communities that can become substantially isolated as a consequence of a single event. The findings of this study are of interest and support wider investigations exploring cost considerations for decision makers and mitigation strategies, in addition to identifying network topological and demand indicators conducive

  1. WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK (WSN) BASED AUTOMATIC FIRING PRACTICE SYSTEM (AFPS) FOR TRAINING OF LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES (LEAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Jattala; Junaid Farooqi; Shakeel Durrani; Nassar Ikram; Irfan Hussian; Muazzam A. Goraya; Obaid B. Zakria

    2014-01-01

    The critical importance of an efficient infantryman in special operations force, tactical paramilitary and Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) is insurmountable. One of the many vital aspects of an effective solider is excellent marksmanship which requires extensive training at sophisticated firing ranges. Modern firing ranges are supported by Automatic Firing Practice Systems (AFPS) and this paper presents the design and development of such a system based on WSN. AFPS provide an automatic bullet...

  2. Influence of university network structures on forming the network environment of regional economy (on the example of national research universities of Tatarstan Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya-Anna Alekseevna Kaibiyainen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to elaborate theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of forming the new network institutional environment of the Russian regional economy under the influence of the developing integral educational network structures basing on the study of the experience of national research universities of Tatarstan Republic Methods general scientific logical methods of analysis and synthesis induction and deduction scientific abstraction as well as the method of systemicfunctional analysis. Results the practical examples are revealed and analyzed of introducing the new network integral principles into the functioning of national research universities which have a real economic effect and influencing such indicators of regional economy as the growth of employment reduction of unemployment etc. Scientific novelty problems of network structures development in the Russian education have not been thoroughly studied yet. The article analyzes the experience reveals and describes the methods and techniques of forming the network educational structures in the functioning of national research universities in Tatarstan Republic Practical value the author shows the ability of network university structures not only to play a significant role forming the new institutional environment of the regional economy but also to influence the macro and microeconomic indicators of development of the region and the country. nbsp

  3. A quality-assurance assessment for constituents reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and the National Trends Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, R.B.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    A continuing quality-assurance program has been operated by the U.S. Geographical Survey to evaluate any bias introduced by routine handling, shipping, and laboratory analyses of wet-deposition samples collected in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and National Trends Network (NTN). Blind-audit samples having a variety of constituent concentrations and values were selected. Only blind-audit samples with constituent concentrations and values less than the 95th-percentile concentration for natural wet-deposition samples were included in the analysis. Of the major ions, there was a significant increase of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ SO42+ and Cl- in samples handled according to standard protocols and shipped in NADP/NTN sample-collection buckets. For 1979-1987, graphs of smoothed data showing the estimated contaminations in blind-audit samples indicate a decrease in the median concentration and ranges of Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42- contamination of blind-audit samples shipped in sample-collection buckets. Part of the contamination detected in blind-audit samples can be attributed to contact with the sample-collection bucket and lid; however, additional sources also seem to contaminate the blind-audit sample. Apparent decreases in the magnitude and range of sample contamination may be caused by differences in sample-collection bucket- and lid-washing procedures by the NADP/NTN Central Analytical Laboratory. Although the degree of bias is minimal for most constituents, summaries of the NADP/NTN data base may contain overestimates of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na-, K+, SO42- and Cl- concentrations, and underestimates of H+ concentrations.

  4. 49 CFR Attachment 3 - Offices Within Federal Agencies and Federal-State Agencies for Information Regarding the Agencies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Attachment 3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC.... Attachment 3—Offices Within Federal Agencies and Federal-State Agencies for Information Regarding...

  5. Assessment of the capacity of the national ecological network elements for road construction and operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kicošev Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Road construction and usage have a wide range of direct and indirect negative effects on protected areas. The impact of state roads on protected areas in Vojvodina was reviewed in this article, based on the orientation values of habitat loss and secondary negative effects originating from traffic functioning. Results of the assessment indicate that the use of existing roads constructed on habitats within the national ecological network exceeded the capacity of individual PA-protected areas (e.g., in case of Straža Natural Monument. Recorded capacity overflow on other PAs occurs solely as a consequence of overlapping between protected areas and areas of influence of roads routed along the borders of protected areas (which is the case with Slano Kopovo Special Nature Reserve and Selevenjske pustare Special Nature Reserve. The aim of this article is to show that even with the smallest values of the parameters related to the width of roads and critical distance from the habitat, the vulnerability of certain core areas of the national ecological network is evident.

  6. Toward a national animal telemetry network for aquatic observations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Barbara A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Simmons, Samantha E; Holland, Kim N; Ault, Jerald S.; Costa, Daniel P.; Mate, Bruce R; Seitz, Andrew C; Arendt, Michael D.; Payne, John; Mahmoudi, Behzad; Moore, Peter L.; Price, James; J. J. Levenson,; Wilson, Doug; Kochevar, Randall E

    2016-01-01

    Animal telemetry is the science of elucidating the movements and behavior of animals in relation to their environment or habitat. Here, we focus on telemetry of aquatic species (marine mammals, sharks, fish, sea birds and turtles) and so are concerned with animal movements and behavior as they move through and above the world’s oceans, coastal rivers, estuaries and great lakes. Animal telemetry devices (“tags”) yield detailed data regarding animal responses to the coupled ocean–atmosphere and physical environment through which they are moving. Animal telemetry has matured and we describe a developing US Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) observing system that monitors aquatic life on a range of temporal and spatial scales that will yield both short- and long-term benefits, fill oceanographic observing and knowledge gaps and advance many of the U.S. National Ocean Policy Priority Objectives. ATN has the potential to create a huge impact for the ocean observing activities undertaken by the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and become a model for establishing additional national-level telemetry networks worldwide.

  7. Design of the National Trends Network for monitoring the chemistry of atmospheric precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J.K.; Wilson, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Long-term monitoring (10 years minimum) of the chemistry of wet deposition will be conducted at National Trends Network (NTN) sites across the United States. Precipitation samples will be collected at sites that represent broad regional characteristics. Design of the NTN considered four basic elements during construction of a model to distribute 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 sites. The modeling oriented design was supplemented with guidance developed during the course of the site selection process. Ultimately, a network of 151 sites was proposed. The basic elements of the design are: (1) Assurance that all areas of the country are represented in the network on the basis of regional ecological properties (96 sites); (2) Placement of additional sites east of the Rocky Mountains to better define high deposition gradients (27 sites); (3) Placement of sites to assure that potentially sensitive regions are represented (15 sites); (4) Placement of sites to allow for other considerations, such as urban area effects (5 sites), intercomparison with Canada (3 sites), and apparent disparities in regional coverage (5 sites). Site selection stressed areas away from urban centers, large point sources, or ocean influences. Local factors, such as stable land ownership, nearby small emission sources (about 10 km), and close-by roads and fireplaces (about 0.5 km) were also considered. All proposed sites will be visited as part of the second phase of the study.

  8. The Climate Voices Speakers Network: Collaborating with Nontraditional, National Networks to Develop Climate Literacy on a Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K.; Schmidt, C.; Herrin, S.

    2015-12-01

    How can we leverage the successes of the numerous organizations in the climate change communication arena to build momentum rather than reinvent the wheel? Over the past two years, Climate Voices (climatevoices.org) has established a network of nearly 400 speakers and established partnerships to scale programs that address climate change communication and community engagement. In this presentation, we will present how we have identified and fostered win-win partnerships with organizations, such as GreenFaith Interfaith Partners for the Environment and Rotary International, to reach the broader general public. We will also share how, by drawing on the resources from the National Climate Assessment and the expertise of our own community, we developed and provided our speakers the tools to provide their audiences access to basic climate science - contributing to each audience's ability to understand local impacts, make informed decisions, and gain the confidence to engage in solutions-based actions in response to climate change. We will also discuss how we have created webinar coaching presentations by speakers who aren't climate scientists- and why we have chosen to do so.

  9. A new matrix for scoring the functionality of national laboratory networks in Africa: introducing the LABNET scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Ondoa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional national laboratory networks and systems are indispensable to the achievement of global health security targets according to the International Health Regulations. The lack of indicators to measure the functionality of national laboratory network has limited the efficiency of past and current interventions to enhance laboratory capacity in resourcelimited-settings.Scorecard for laboratory networks: We have developed a matrix for the assessment of national laboratory network functionality and progress thereof, with support from the African Society of Laboratory Medicine and the Association of Public Health Laboratories. The laboratory network (LABNET scorecard was designed to: (1 Measure the status of nine overarching core capabilities of laboratory network required to achieve global health security targets, as recommended by the main normative standards; (2 Complement the World Health Organization joint external evaluation tool for the assessment of health system preparedness to International Health Regulations (2005 by providing detailed information on laboratory systems; and (3 Serve as a clear roadmap to guide the stepwise implementation of laboratory capability to prevent, detect and act upon infectious threats.Conclusions: The application of the LABNET scorecard under the coordination of the African Society of Laboratory Medicine and the Association of Public Health Laboratories could contribute to the design, monitoring and evaluation of upcoming Global Health Security Agenda-supported laboratory capacity building programmes in sub Saharan-Africa and other resource-limited settings, and inform the development of national laboratory policies and strategic plans. Endorsement by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa is foreseen.

  10. 75 FR 25870 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National... accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), CDC and BSC, NCEH... being; and (3) train State and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice...

  11. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  12. National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) future role in US carbon cycling and budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a National Science Foundation investment designed to observe the impacts of large-scale environment changes on the nation's ecosystems for 30 years with rigorous consistency. NEON does this through the construction (and operations) of new physical infrastructure and data infrastructure distributed across the North American Continent. This includes 47 terrestrial and 32 aquatic sites. Key to its design is its ability to provide ecosystem-scale carbon measurements of carbon stores, fluxes, processes—and the means to scale them from the local-to regional scales via remote sensed aircraft. NEON design NEON will be collecting these carbon data as a facility and providing openly providing them. NEON will not preform any high-level synthesis, rather the carbon data is an open resource for research, private and public communities, alike. Overall, these data are also harmonized with other international carbon-based infrastructures to facilitate cross-continental understanding and global carbon syntheses. Products, engagement and harmonization of data to facilitate syntheses will be discussed.

  13. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network during 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, M.A.; Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Paulin, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey used four programs in 1991 to provide external quality assurance for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). An intersite-comparison program was used to evaluate onsite pH and specific-conductance determinations. The effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping of wet-deposition samples on analyte determinations and an estimated precision of analyte values and concentrations were evaluated in the blind-audit program. Differences between analytical results and an estimate of the analytical precision of four laboratories routinely measuring wet deposition were determined by an interlaboratory-comparison program. Overall precision estimates for the precipitation-monitoring system were determined for selected sites by a collocated-sampler program. Results of the intersite-comparison program indicated that 93 and 86 percent of the site operators met the NADP/NTN accuracy goal for pH determinations during the two intersite-comparison studies completed during 1991. The results also indicated that 96 and 97 percent of the site operators met the NADP/NTN accuracy goal for specific-conductance determinations during the two 1991 studies. The effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping, determined in the blind-audit program indicated significant positive bias (a=.O 1) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate. Significant negative bias (or=.01) was determined for hydrogen ion and specific conductance. Only ammonium determinations were not biased. A Kruskal-Wallis test indicated that there were no significant (*3t=.01) differences in analytical results from the four laboratories participating in the interlaboratory-comparison program. Results from the collocated-sampler program indicated the median relative error for cation concentration and deposition exceeded eight percent at most sites, whereas the median relative error for sample volume

  14. External quality-assurance results for the national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network, 2000-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Gordon, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Five external quality-assurance programs were operated by the U.S. Geological Survey for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) from 2000 through 2001 (study period): the intersite-comparison program, the blind-audit program, the field-audit program, the interlaboratory-comparison program, and the collocated-sampler program. Each program is designed to measure specific components of the total error inherent in NADP/NTN wet-deposition measurements. The intersite-comparison program assesses the variability and bias of pH and specific-conductance determinations made by NADP/NTN site operators with respect to accuracy goals. The accuracy goals are statistically based using the median of all of the measurements obtained for each of four intersite-comparison studies. The percentage of site operators responding on time that met the pH accuracy goals ranged from 84.2 to 90.5 percent. In these same four intersite-comparison studies, 88.9 to 99.0 percent of the site operators met the accuracy goals for specific conductance. The blind-audit program evaluates the effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping on the chemistry of weekly precipitation samples. The blind-audit data for the study period indicate that sample handling introduced a small amount of sulfate contamination and slight changes to hydrogen-ion content of the precipitation samples. The magnitudes of the paired differences are not environmentally significant to NADP/NTN data users. The field-audit program (also known as the 'field-blank program') was designed to measure the effects of field exposure, handling, and processing on the chemistry of NADP/NTN precipitation samples. The results indicate potential low-level contamination of NADP/NTN samples with calcium, ammonium, chloride, and nitrate. Less sodium contamination was detected by the field-audit data than in previous years. Statistical analysis of the paired differences shows that contaminant ions

  15. Conflict and Astroturfing in Niyamgiri: The Importance of National Advocacy Networks in Anti-Corporate Social Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Kraemer, R.; Whiteman, G; Banerjee, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional models of transnational advocacy networks (TANs) and stakeholder management do not capture the nuance and dynamics of (counter-)organising processes around anti-corporate mobilisation. Based on the case of a resistance movement against a planned bauxite mine on tribal land in India, we develop a process theory of interactions between local, national and international actors within transnational advocacy networks. These encounters are not always friendly and are often characterised...

  16. Demonstrating the use of web analytics and an online survey to understand user groups of a national network of river level data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit; Braga, Joao; Arts, Koen; Ioris, Antonio; Han, Xiwu; Sripada, Yaji; van der Wal, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The number of local, national and international networks of online environmental sensors are rapidly increasing. Where environmental data are made available online for public consumption, there is a need to advance our understanding of the relationships between the supply of and the different demands for such information. Understanding how individuals and groups of users are using online information resources may provide valuable insights into their activities and decision making. As part of the 'dot.rural wikiRivers' project we investigated the potential of web analytics and an online survey to generate insights into the use of a national network of river level data from across Scotland. These sources of online information were collected alongside phone interviews with volunteers sampled from the online survey, and interviews with providers of online river level data; as part of a larger project that set out to help improve the communication of Scotland's online river data. Our web analytics analysis was based on over 100 online sensors which are maintained by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). Through use of Google Analytics data accessed via the R Ganalytics package we assessed: if the quality of data provided by Google Analytics free service is good enough for research purposes; if we could demonstrate what sensors were being used, when and where; how the nature and pattern of sensor data may affect web traffic; and whether we can identify and profile these users based on information from traffic sources. Web analytics data consists of a series of quantitative metrics which capture and summarize various dimensions of the traffic to a certain web page or set of pages. Examples of commonly used metrics include the number of total visits to a site and the number of total page views. Our analyses of the traffic sources from 2009 to 2011 identified several different major user groups. To improve our understanding of how the use of this national

  17. Performance enhancements of the CMCC"s national mesh network using the intelligent optical cross-connect switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Xu, Rong; Lin, JinTong L.

    2004-04-01

    In the last five years, the traffic growth rate in China has been extremely fast. By 2005, the number of wired telephone customers is estimated to reach 220 to 260 million, while the number of expected cellular customers will reach 260 to 290 million. To meet these challenges, we will continue evolving with more wavelengths and higher speed. By evolving point-to-point WDM systems to OTN/ASON systems, we can eliminate the throughput bottleneck of network nodes caused by electronics, provide optical-layer bandwidth- management capability, provide scalability (which allows continuous traffic growth and network expansion), and provide reconfigurability (which allows semi-dynamic and dynamic optical networking). We can also simplify and speed up provisioning of high-speed circuits and services and offer fast network protection and restoration on the order of tens or hundreds of milliseconds to guarantee excellent network and service survivability. The CMCC (China Mobile Communication Company) will build its OTN network towards the ASON. The CMCC"s long-haul national network utilizing OXC has clearly becomes an intelligent network. It offers end-to-end point-and-click provisioning, shared mesh restoration with a few tens to a couple of hundred msec restoration times, re-provisioning of connections in the event of double failures and network capacity that is not optimally used. In this paper, first we present the CMCC network situation, The network planning tool will be introduced, Then we compare ring with mesh solution in terms of the cost, network performance, protection and restoration, network re-optimization. At last we derive a desired conclusion.

  18. National network of measurement of radioactivity in the environment - 2014 management report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report aims at presenting evolutions of the regulation of the French National network of measurement of radioactivity in the environment (the RNM), of its organisation, of the operation of its steering committee and various work groups. It also presents evolutions implemented in its information system and Internet web-site which gives public access to radioactivity measurements. After presentation of the RNM objectives and challenges, of the legal context, and a description of the RNM operation, the report presents the involved actors (ASN, IRSN, members of the RNM). The operation of the steering committee and work-groups is assessed. A chapter addresses the information system: description, data harmonisation and new information exchange protocol, technical support by the IRSN to data producers, interaction between the IRSN and system host, application management and third-party applications acceptance. Next parts propose an overview of laboratories certification, and activities related to communication and publications

  19. Information system evolution at the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, F.; Grunberg, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aging information system of the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS), located in Strasbourg (EOST), needed to be updated to satisfy new practices from Computer science world. The latter means to evolve our system at different levels : development method, datamining solutions, system administration. The new system had to provide more agility for incoming projects. The main difficulty was to maintain old system and the new one in parallel the time to validate new solutions with a restricted team. Solutions adopted here are coming from standards used by the seismological community and inspired by the state of the art of devops community. The new system is easier to maintain and take advantage of large community to find support. This poster introduces the new system and choosen solutions like Puppet, Fabric, MongoDB and FDSN Webservices.

  20. Dissemination of data from the National Science Foundation's UV monitoring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Germar; Booth, Charles R.; Ehramjian, James C.; Quang V., Vi

    2009-08-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitoring Network (UVSIMN) has been measuring global UV irradiance at seven locations in Antarctica, South America, Southern California, and the Arctic, starting in 1988. Data products include spectra of global (sun and sky) irradiance, sampled quarter-hourly between 280 and 600 nm; integrated irradiance (e.g., UV-B, UV-A); biologically effective dose-rates (e.g., the UV Index); total ozone; effective albedo; cloud optical depth; actinic flux; photoloysis rates; and complementing spectra calculated with a radiative transfer model. Data are disseminated via the project's website www.biospherical.com/NSF. During the last year, data have also been submitted to international data repositories, including (1) the World Ozone and UV Data Center (WOUDC), which is part of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) program; (2) the Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (CADIS), which supports the Arctic Observing Network (AON), an NSF initiative for the International Polar Year (IPY); and (3) the SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS), which serves NASA's calibration and validation activities for ocean-viewing satellites. We also plan to submit a subset of the dataset to (4) the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The main objective of NDACC is to further understanding of stratospheric changes to the troposphere. UVSIMN data have been adjusted to better serve the needs of these diverse research communities. This paper details the background, format, and volume of these new datasets.

  1. The Engineering Strong Ground Motion Network of the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Miranda, J. M.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Aguilar Calderon, L. A.; Almora Mata, D.; Ayala Hernandez, M.; Castro Parra, G.; Molina Avila, I.; Mora, A.; Torres Noguez, M.; Vazquez Larquet, R.

    2014-12-01

    The coverage, design, operation and monitoring capabilities of the strong ground motion program at the Institute of Engineering (IE) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) is presented. Started in 1952, the seismic instrumentation intended initially to bolster earthquake engineering projects in Mexico City has evolved into the largest strong ground motion monitoring system in the region. Today, it provides information not only to engineering projects, but also to the near real-time risk mitigation systems of the country, and enhances the general understanding of the effects and causes of earthquakes in Mexico. The IE network includes more than 100 free-field stations and several buildings, covering the largest urban centers and zones of significant seismicity in Central Mexico. Of those stations, approximately one-fourth send the observed acceleration to a processing center in Mexico City continuously, and the rest require either periodic visits for the manual recovery of the data or remote interrogation, for later processing and cataloging. In this research, we document the procedures and telecommunications systems used systematically to recover information. Additionally, we analyze the spatial distribution of the free-field accelerographs, the quality of the instrumentation, and the recorded ground motions. The evaluation criteria are based on the: 1) uncertainty in the generation of ground motion parameter maps due to the spatial distribution of the stations, 2) potential of the array to provide localization and magnitude estimates for earthquakes with magnitudes greater than Mw 5, and 3) adequacy of the network for the development of Ground Motion Prediction Equations due to intra-plate and intra-slab earthquakes. We conclude that the monitoring system requires a new redistribution, additional stations, and a substantial improvement in the instrumentation and telecommunications. Finally, we present an integral plan to improve the current network

  2. The collaborative experience of creating the National Capital Region Disease Surveillance Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sheri H; Holtry, Rekha S; Loschen, Wayne A; Wojcik, Richard; Hung, Lang; Lombardo, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) implemented state and district surveillance nodes in a central aggregated node in the National Capital Region (NCR). Within this network, de-identified health information is integrated with other indicator data and is made available to local and state health departments for enhanced disease surveillance. Aggregated data made available to the central node enable public health practitioners to observe abnormal behavior of health indicators spanning jurisdictions and view geographical spread of outbreaks across regions.Forming a steering committee, the NCR Enhanced Surveillance Operating Group (ESOG), was key to overcoming several data-sharing issues. The committee was composed of epidemiologists and key public health practitioners from the 3 jurisdictions. The ESOG facilitated early system development and signing of the cross-jurisdictional data-sharing agreement. This agreement was the first of its kind at the time and provided the legal foundation for sharing aggregated health information across state/district boundaries for electronic disease surveillance.Electronic surveillance system for the early notification of community-based epidemics provides NCR users with a comprehensive regional view to ascertain the spread of disease, estimate resource needs, and implement control measures. This article aims to describe the creation of the NCR Disease Surveillance Network as an exceptional example of cooperation and potential that exists for regional surveillance activities.

  3. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are: PMID:18434256

  4. Meteorology and hydrology in Yosemite National Park: A sensor network application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, J.D.; Cayan, D.R.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Over half of California's water supply comes from high elevations in the snowmelt-dominated Sierra Nevada. Natural climate fluctuations, global warming, and the growing needs of water consumers demand intelligent management of this water resource. This requires a comprehensive monitoring system across and within the Sierra Nevada. Unfortunately, because of severe terrain and limited access, few measurements exist. Thus, meteorological and hydrologic processes are not well understood at high altitudes. However, new sensor and wireless communication technologies are beginning to provide sensor packages designed for low maintenance operation, low power consumption and unobtrusive footprints. A prototype network of meteorological and hydrological sensors has been deployed in Yosemite National Park, traversing elevation zones from 1,200 to 3,700 m. Communication techniques must be tailored to suit each location, resulting in a hybrid network of radio, cell-phone, land-line, and satellite transmissions. Results are showing how, in some years, snowmelt may occur quite uniformly over the Sierra, while in others it varies with elevation. ?? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003.

  5. Landbird trends in national parks of the North Coast and Cascades Network, 2005-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, James F.; Holmgren, Amanda L.; Wilkerson, Robert L.; Siegel, Rodney B.; Kuntz, Robert C.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Boetsch, John R.; Huff, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    National parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) can fulfill vital roles as refuges for bird species dependent on late-successional forest conditions and as reference sites for assessing the effects of land-use and land-cover changes on bird populations throughout the larger Pacific Northwest region. Additionally, long-term monitoring of landbirds throughout the NCCN provides information that can inform decisions about important management issues in the parks, including visitor impacts, fire management, and the effects of introduced species. In 2005, the NCCN began implementing a network-wide Landbird Monitoring Project as part of the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program. In this report, we discuss 8-year trends (2005–12) of bird populations in the NCCN, based on a sampling framework of point counts established in three large wilderness parks (Mount Rainier, North Cascades, and Olympic National Parks), 7-year trends at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park (sampled in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012), and 5-year trends at San Juan Islands National Historical Park (sampled in 2007, 2009, and 2011). Our analysis encompasses a fairly short time span for this long-term monitoring program. The first 2 years of the time series (2005 and 2006) were implemented as part of a limited pilot study that included only a small subset of the transects. The subsequent 6 years (2007–12) represent just a single cycle through 5 years of alternating panels of transects in the large parks, with the first of five alternating panels revisited for the first time in 2012. Of 204 transects that comprise the six sampling panels in the large parks, only 68 (one-third) have thus been eligible for revisit surveys (34 during every year after 2005, and an additional 34 only in 2012) and can contribute to our current trend estimates. We therefore initiated the current analysis with a primary goal of testing our analytical procedures rather than detecting trends that might be strong

  6. The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

  7. WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK (WSN BASED AUTOMATIC FIRING PRACTICE SYSTEM (AFPS FOR TRAINING OF LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES (LEAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Jattala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The critical importance of an efficient infantryman in special operations force, tactical paramilitary and Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs is insurmountable. One of the many vital aspects of an effective solider is excellent marksmanship which requires extensive training at sophisticated firing ranges. Modern firing ranges are supported by Automatic Firing Practice Systems (AFPS and this paper presents the design and development of such a system based on WSN. AFPS provide an automatic bullet-impact count during firing training session and is modular scalable in design for multiple of eight concurrent shooters. The system is versatile and flexible allowing for different small-arms and firing training modes and supports night firing exercise. AFPS comprises of two major components, the automatic target-box and a commander console. Automatic target-box has a motor & gear assembly, target sheet, bullet-impact sensor, control board, and WiFi communication module. Commander console is a ruggedized sunlight readable 10.4” Tablet PC, which with a built-in WiFi acts an access point. The automatic target-boxes equipped with embedded WiFi modules form sensor nodes of a WSN. The paper presents the complete System Development Life Cycle (SDLC of the firing practice system and associated WSN. The AFPS and bullet-impact sensor was extensively tested on Firing Ranges for accuracy of bullet-impact count. The results showed a bullet-impact count accuracy of over 97 percent.

  8. A national internet-linked based database for pediatric interstitial lung diseases: the French network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Nadia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs in children represent a heterogeneous group of rare respiratory disorders that affect the lung parenchyma. After the launch of the French Reference Centre for Rare Lung Diseases (RespiRare®, we created a national network and a web-linked database to collect data on pediatric ILD. Methods Since 2008, the database has been set up in all RespiRare® centres. After patient's parents' oral consent is obtained, physicians enter the data of children with ILD: identity, social data and environmental data; specific aetiological diagnosis of the ILD if known, genetics, patient visits to the centre, and all medical examinations and tests done for the diagnosis and/or during follow up. Each participating centre has a free access to his own patients' data only, and cross-centre studies require mutual agreement. Physicians may use the system as a daily aid for patient care through a web-linked medical file, backed on this database. Results Data was collected for 205 cases of ILD. The M/F sex ratio was 0.9. Median age at diagnosis was 1.5 years old [0–16.9]. A specific aetiology was identified in 149 (72.7% patients while 56 (27.3% cases remain undiagnosed. Surfactant deficiencies and alveolar proteinosis, haemosiderosis, and sarcoidosis represent almost half of the diagnoses. Median length of follow-up is 2.9 years [0–17.2]. Conclusions We introduce here the French network and the largest national database in pediatric ILDs. The diagnosis spectrum and the estimated incidence are consistent with other European databases. An important challenge will be to reduce the proportion of unclassified ILDs by a standardized diagnosis work-up. This database is a great opportunity to improve patient care and disease pathogenesis knowledge. A European network including physicians and European foundations is now emerging with the initial aim of devising a simplified European database/register as a first step to

  9. National automatic network of environmental radiological monitoring (RENAMORA); Red Nacional automatica de monitoreo radiologico ambiental (RENAMORA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Sanchez H, L. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlgonzalez@cnsns.gob.mx

    2003-07-01

    Inside the programs of Environmental Radiological Surveillance that it carries out the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS), it develops an National Automatic Network of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (RENAMORA), where it is carried out a registration of speed of environmental dose in continuous and simultaneous forms with the same moment of the measurement. This net allows to account with the meticulous and opportune information that will help to characterize, in dynamics form, the radiological conditions of diverse geographical zones of the country, including the sites that by normative require bigger surveillance, like its are the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV), the Nuclear Center of Mexico (ININ) and the Radioactive waste storage center (CADER). This net is in its first development stage; three points inside the state of Veracruz, in the surroundings of the CNLV, already its are operating; the obtained data of rapidity of environmental dose are being stored in a database inside a primary data center located in the facilities of the CNSNS in Mexico city and its will be analyzed according to the project advances. At the moment, its are installing the first ten teams corresponding to the first phase of the RENAMORA (three stages); its are carried out operation tests, transmission, reception and administration of data. The obtained data will be interpreted, analyzed and inter compared to evaluate the risk levels to that it would be hold the population and to determine thresholds that allow to integrate the alarm systems that its had considered for emergency situations. (Author)

  10. Treatment programs in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dennis; Fuller, Bret; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Wendt, William W; Nunes, Edward V; Miller, Michael; Forman, Robert; Magruder, Kathryn M; Arfken, Cynthia; Copersino, Marc; Floyd, Anthony; Sindelar, Jody; Edmundson, Eldon

    2008-01-01

    Drug abuse treatment programs and university-based research centers collaborate to test emerging therapies for alcohol and drug disorders in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Programs participating in the CTN completed Organizational Surveys (n=106 of 112; 95% response rate) and Treatment Unit Surveys (n=348 of 384; 91% response rate) to describe the levels of care, ancillary services, patient demographics, patient drug use and co-occurring conditions. Analyses describe the corporations participating in the CTN and provide an exploratory assessment of variation in treatment philosophies. A diversity of treatment centers participate in the CTN; not for profit organizations with a primary mission of treating alcohol and drug disorders dominate. Compared to National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS), programs located in medical settings are over-represented and centers that are mental health clinics are under-represented. Outpatient, methadone, long-term residential and inpatient treatment units differed on patients served and services provided. Larger programs with higher counselor caseloads in residential settings reported more social model characteristics. Programs with higher social model scores were more likely to offer self-help meetings, vocational services and specialized services for women. Conversely, programs with accreditation had less social model influence. The CTN is an ambitious effort to engage community-based treatment organizations into research and more fully integrate research and practice.

  11. [Optimising care structures for severe hand trauma and replantation and chances of launching a national network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, E M; Volkmer, E; Holzbach, T; Wallmichrath, J; Engelhardt, T O; Giunta, R E

    2013-12-01

    Severe hand traumata have a significant impact on our health system and on insurance companies, respectively. It is estimated that 33% of all occupational injuries and 9% of all invalidity pensions are due to severe hand trauma. Unfortunately, these high numbers are not only due to the severity of the trauma but to organisational deficiencies. Usually, the patient is treated at the general surgical emergency in the first place and only then forwarded to a microsurgeon. This redirection increases the time that is required for the patient to finally arrive at an expert for hand surgery. On the one hand, this problem can be explained by the population's lack of awareness for distinguished experts for hand and microsurgery, on the other hand, the emergency network, or emergency doctors in particular are not well informed about where to take a patient with a severe hand trauma - clearly a problem of communication between the hospitals and the ambulance. It is possible to tackle this problem, but put participating hand trauma centres have to work hand in hand as a network and thus exploit synergy effects. The French system "FESUM" is a good example for such a network and even comprises centres in Belgium and Switzerland. To improve the treatment of severe hand trauma, a similar alliance was initiated in Germany just recently. The pilot project "Hand Trauma Alliance" (www.handverletzung.com) was started in April 2013 and currently comprises two hospitals within the region of upper Bavaria. The network provides hand trauma replantation service on a 24/7 basis and aims at shortening the way from the accident site to the fully qualified hand surgeon, to improve the therapy of severe hand injuries and to optimise acute patient care in general. In order to further increase the alliance's impact it is intended to extend the project's scope from regional to national coverage - nevertheless, such an endeavour can only be done in collaboration with the German Society for Hand

  12. 3D Multi-Channel Networked Visualization System for National LambdaRail Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — National LambdaRail (NLR) offers unprecedented communication capabilities on the National and possibly International levels. Physical Optics Corporation (POC)...

  13. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network, 2002-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Burke, Kevin P.

    2005-01-01

    Six external quality-assurance programs were operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) External Quality-Assurance (QA) Project for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) from 2002 through 2003. Each program measured specific components of the overall error inherent in NADP/NTN wet-deposition measurements. The intersite-comparison program assessed the variability and bias of pH and specific conductance determinations made by NADP/NTN site operators twice per year with respect to accuracy goals. The percentage of site operators that met the pH accuracy goals decreased from 92.0 percent in spring 2002 to 86.3 percent in spring 2003. In these same four intersite-comparison studies, the percentage of site operators that met the accuracy goals for specific conductance ranged from 94.4 to 97.5 percent. The blind-audit program and the sample-handling evaluation (SHE) program evaluated the effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping on the chemistry of weekly NADP/NTN samples. The blind-audit program data indicated that the variability introduced by sample handling might be environmentally significant to data users for sodium, potassium, chloride, and hydrogen ion concentrations during 2002. In 2003, the blind-audit program was modified and replaced by the SHE program. The SHE program was designed to control the effects of laboratory-analysis variability. The 2003 SHE data had less overall variability than the 2002 blind-audit data. The SHE data indicated that sample handling buffers the pH of the precipitation samples and, in turn, results in slightly lower conductivity. Otherwise, the SHE data provided error estimates that were not environmentally significant to data users. The field-audit program was designed to evaluate the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NADP/NTN precipitation samples. Field-audit results indicated that exposure of NADP/NTN wet-deposition samples

  14. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 and by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993

  15. The StreamCat Dataset: Accumulated Attributes for NHDPlusV2 Catchments (Version 2.1) for the Conterminous United States: National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network - Nitrogen Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset represents deposition estimates of nutrients within individual local NHDPlusV2 catchments and upstream, contributing watersheds based on the National...

  16. Precision and bias of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1983; and January 1980 through September 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Blind-audit samples with known analyte concentrations have been prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and distributed to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program 's Central Analytical Laboratory. The difference between the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network reported analyte concentrations and known analyte concentrations have been calculated, and the bias has been determined. Calcium, magnesium , sodium, and chloride were biased at the 99-percent confidence limit; potassium and sulfate were unbiased at the 99-percent confidence limit, for 1983 results. Relative-percent differences between the measured and known analyte concentration for calcium , magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate have been calculated for 1983. The median relative percent difference for calcium was 17.0; magnesium was 6.4; sodium was 10.8; potassium was 6.4; chloride was 17.2; and sulfate was -5.3. These relative percent differences should be used to correct the 1983 data before user-analysis of the data. Variances have been calculated for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate determinations. These variances should be applicable to natural-sample analyte concentrations reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network for calendar year 1983. (USGS)

  17. Diplomatic agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    and advocacy. It analyzes how professionalization, legalization, personalization and popularization of diplomacy have shaped diplomatic agency including how international law, bureaucracy, public diplomacy and new information technologies have impacted the scope and content of diplomatic agency. Finally...

  18. Medical device assessment: scientific evidence examined by the French national agency for health – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huot Laure

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientific evidence supports decision-making on the use of implantable medical devices (IMDs in clinical practice, but IMDs are thought to be far less investigated than drugs. In the USA, studies have shown that approval process of high-risk medical devices was often based on insufficiently robust studies, suggesting that evidence prior to marketing may not be adequate. This study aimed to ascertain level of evidence available for IMDs access to reimbursement in France. Methods The objective was to examine the scientific evidence used for IMDs assessment by the French National Authority for Health. We collected all public documents summarising supportive clinical data and opinions concerning IMDs issued in 2008. An opinion qualifies the expected benefit (EB of the IMD assessed as sufficient or insufficient, and if sufficient, the level of improvement of the expected benefit (IEB on a scale from major (level I to no improvement (level V. For each opinion, the study with the highest level of evidence of efficacy data, and its design were collected, or, where no studies were available, any other data sources used to establish the opinion. Results One hundred and two opinions were analysed, with 72 reporting at least one study used for assessment (70.6%. When considering the study with the highest level of evidence: 34 were clinical non-comparative studies (47.2%; 29 were clinical comparative studies of which 25 randomised controlled trials (40.3%; 5 were meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials (6.9%; and 4 were systematic literature reviews (5.6%. The opinions were significantly different according to the study design (p  Conclusions This study confirmed that level of evidence of clinical evaluation of IMDs is low and needs to be improved.

  19. Geological disposal of radioactive waste: national commitment, local and regional involvement - A Collective Statement of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Radioactive Waste Management Committee Adopted March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference solution for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, meaning that it is not dependent on human presence or intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. Selecting the site of a waste repository brings up a range of issues involving scientific knowledge, technical capacity, ethical values, territorial planning, community well-being and more. Bringing to fruition the multi-decade task of siting and developing a repository demands a strong national commitment and significant regional and local involvement. This collective statement by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency recognises the advances made towards greater transparency and dialogue among the diverse stakeholders concerned and identifies the fundamental elements needed to support national commitment and to foster territorial involvement. It concludes that technical and societal partners can develop shared confidence in the safety of geological repositories and jointly carry these projects forward

  20. [The external quality assessment schemes for lead in blood organized by the French national agency for medicine and health product safety: a synthesis of 15 years of activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Alain; Otz, Jocelyne; Guillard, Olivier; Fauconneau, Bernard; Dumont, Gilles; François-Burg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of the French labor ministry following questions on the ability of medical biology laboratories to satisfactorily measure blood lead level (PbB), a national PbB quality control came into being. Only in 1996 did this external quality control include a number of laboratories sufficient to allow for a significant retrospective evaluation. After fifteen years (1996-2011), The French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety wished to exploit the database collected. The number of participating laboratories went down from 73 to 41. On the other hand, the key finding pertained to the highly improved performance of the laboratories, which was associated with a spread decrease of the results over the entire range of tested PbBs (9 to 700 μg/L). Since 2006, we have observed increasing use of the inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometry and decreasing use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Provided that they rely on identical metrology expertise, the two analytical techniques lead to results on all the tested concentrations that are not statistically different.

  1. Performance of the INGV National Seismic Network from 1997 to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mele

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Seismic monitoring in Italy has strongly improved since the 1997 Umbria-Marche earthquake sequence. This has made the National Seismic Network (RSN a powerful tool both to rapidly locate and quantify thousands of earthquakes occurring in Italy every year, and to study the seismic activity in detail, accumulating an impressive high quality data set that will be exploited in the coming years to understand earthquake processes and to investigate the deep structure. This paper summarizes and compares the basic features of the seismicity recorded in 2000 and 2006, before and after the implementation of the new RSN, showing that the number of well located earthquakes has more than doubled and that the completeness magnitude has dropped from ~2.3 to ~1.7. In addition, we concentrate on the evaluation of the current automatic location and magnitudes versus the revised ones, published routinely in the INGV bulletins. We show that the rapid estimates of locations and magnitudes are robust and reliable for most regions in Italy: more than 75% of the earthquakes are located in real time within 10km from the «true» locations, whereas the rapid magnitudes ML are within ±0.4 from the revised values in 90% of cases. The comparison between real-time and revised locations shows that there are a few regions in Italy where a further network improvement is still desirable. These include all the off-shore regions, Calabria, western Sicily, the Alpine and Po Plain region, and some small areas along the peninsula.

  2. The plant phenology monitoring design for the National Ecological Observatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmendorf, Sarah C; Jones, Katherine D; Cook, Benjamin I.; Diez, Jeffrey M.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Hufft, Rebecca A.; Jones, Matthew O.; Mazer, Susan J.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Moore, David J. P.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Weltzin, Jake

    2016-01-01

    Phenology is an integrative science that comprises the study of recurring biological activities or events. In an era of rapidly changing climate, the relationship between the timing of those events and environmental cues such as temperature, snowmelt, water availability or day length are of particular interest. This article provides an overview of the plant phenology sampling which will be conducted by the U.S. National Ecological Observatory Network NEON, the resulting data, and the rationale behind the design. Trained technicians will conduct regular in situ observations of plant phenology at all terrestrial NEON sites for the 30-year life of the observatory. Standardized and coordinated data across the network of sites can be used to quantify the direction and magnitude of the relationships between phenology and environmental forcings, as well as the degree to which these relationships vary among sites, among species, among phenophases, and through time. Vegetation at NEON sites will also be monitored with tower-based cameras, satellite remote sensing and annual high-resolution airborne remote sensing. Ground-based measurements can be used to calibrate and improve satellite-derived phenometrics. NEON’s phenology monitoring design is complementary to existing phenology research efforts and citizen science initiatives throughout the world and will produce interoperable data. By collocating plant phenology observations with a suite of additional meteorological, biophysical and ecological measurements (e.g., climate, carbon flux, plant productivity, population dynamics of consumers) at 47 terrestrial sites, the NEON design will enable continentalscale inference about the status, trends, causes and ecological consequences of phenological change.

  3. The Plant Phenology Monitoring Design for the National Ecological Observatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Jones, Katherine D.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Diez, Jeffrey M.; Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Hufft, Rebecca A.; Jones, Matthew O.; Mazer, Susan J.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Moore, David J. P.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2016-01-01

    Phenology is an integrative science that comprises the study of recurring biological activities or events. In an era of rapidly changing climate, the relationship between the timing of those events and environmental cues such as temperature, snowmelt, water availability, or day length are of particular interest. This article provides an overview of the observer-based plant phenology sampling conducted by the U.S. National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), the resulting data, and the rationale behind the design. Trained technicians will conduct regular in situ observations of plant phenology at all terrestrial NEON sites for the 30-yr life of the observatory. Standardized and coordinated data across the network of sites can be used to quantify the direction and magnitude of the relationships between phenology and environmental forcings, as well as the degree to which these relationships vary among sites, among species, among phenophases, and through time. Vegetation at NEON sites will also be monitored with tower-based cameras, satellite remote sensing, and annual high-resolution airborne remote sensing. Ground-based measurements can be used to calibrate and improve satellite-derived phenometrics. NEON's phenology monitoring design is complementary to existing phenology research efforts and citizen science initiatives throughout the world and will produce interoperable data. By collocating plant phenology observations with a suite of additional meteorological, biophysical, and ecological measurements (e.g., climate, carbon flux, plant productivity, population dynamics of consumers) at 47 terrestrial sites, the NEON design will enable continental-scale inference about the status, trends, causes, and ecological consequences of phenological change.

  4. Low-altitude photographic transects of the Arctic Network of National Park Units and Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, July 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcot, Bruce G.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; DeGange, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    During July 16–18, 2013, low-level photography flights were conducted (with a Cessna 185 with floats and a Cessna 206 with tundra tires) over the five administrative units of the National Park Service Arctic Network (Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, Kobuk Valley National Park, and Noatak National Preserve) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Alaska, to provide images of current conditions and prevalence of land-cover types as a baseline for measuring future change, and to complement the existing grid-based sample photography of the region. Total flight time was 17 hours, 46 minutes, and total flight distance was 2,590 kilometers, at a mean altitude of about 300 meters above ground level. A total of 19,167 photographs were taken from five digital camera systems: 1. A Drift® HD-170 (focal length 5.00 mm);

  5. Ionosphere Threat Model Investigations by Using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köroǧlu, Meltem; Arikan, Feza; Koroglu, Ozan

    2016-07-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) signal realibity may decrease significantly due to the variable electron density structure of ionosphere. In the literature, ionospheric disturbance is modeled as a linear semi-definite wave which has width, gradient and a constant velocity. To provide precise positioning, Ground Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) are used. GBAS collects all measurements from GPS network receivers and computes an integrity level for the measurement by comparing the network GPS receivers measurements with the threat models of ionosphere. Threat models are computed according to ionosphere gradient characteristics. Gradient is defined as the difference of slant delays between the receivers. Slant delays are estimated from the STEC (Slant Total Electron Content) values of the ionosphere that is given by the line integral of the electron density between the receiver and GPS satellite. STEC can be estimated over Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals by using IONOLAB-STEC and IONOLAB-BIAS algorithms. Since most of the ionospheric disturbance observed locally, threat models for the GBAS systems must be extracted as locally. In this study, an automated ionosphere gradient estimation algorithm was developed by using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN-Active) data for year 2011. The GPS receivers are grouped within 150 km radius. For each region, for each day and for each satellite all STEC values are estimated by using IONOLAB-STEC and IONOLAB-BIAS softwares (www.ionolab.org). In the gradient estimation, station-pair method is used. Statistical properties of the valid gradients are extracted as tables for each region, day and satellite. By observing the histograms of the maximum gradients and standard deviations of the gradients with respect to the elevation angle for each day, the anomalies and disturbances of the ionosphere can be detected. It is observed that, maximum gradient estimates are less than 40 mm/km and maximum standard

  6. Internet-facilitated commercial sexual exploitation of children: findings from a nationally representative sample of law enforcement agencies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Jones, Lisa M; Finkelhor, David; Wolak, Janis

    2011-03-01

    This article explores the variety of ways in which the Internet is used to facilitate the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) and provides national incidence estimates for the number of arrests involving such technology-facilitated crimes in 2006. The National Juvenile Online Victimization Study is a nationally representative longitudinal study of more than 2,500 local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies across the United States. The current article utilizes Wave 2 data, which surveyed arrests in 2006 for Internet-related sex crimes against minors. Detailed data were collected via telephone interviews with investigators about 1,051 individual arrest cases. Findings show that an estimated 569 arrests for Internet-facilitated commercial sexual exploitation of children (IF-CSEC) occurred in the United States in 2006. Offenders in IF-CSEC cases fell into two main categories: (1) those who used the Internet to purchase or sell access to identified children for sexual purposes including child pornography (CP) production (36% of cases), and (2) those who used the Internet to purchase or sell CP images they possessed but did not produce (64% of cases). Offenders attempting to profit from child sexual exploitation were more likely than those who were purchasing to have (a) prior arrests for sexual and nonsexual offenses, (b) a history of violence, (c) produced CP, (d) joined forces with other offenders, and (e) involved female offenders. Although the number of arrests for IF-CSEC crimes is relatively small, the victims of these crimes are a high-risk subgroup of youth, and the offenders who try to profit from these crimes are particularly concerning from a child welfare perspective. PMID:20852011

  7. Advertising Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Advertising agencies are the most significant organizations in the development of advertising and marketing worldwide. An advertising agency is an independent service company, composed of business, marketing and creative people, who develop, prepare, and place advertising in advertising media...... for their clients, the advertisers, who are in search of customers for their goods and services. Agencies thus mediate between three different but interlocking social groups: industry, media, and consumers. The history of advertising is largely the history of the advertising agencies that have served the needs....... This article is concerned with the origins, early developments, organization, compensation arrangements, and accounts of contemporary full-service advertising agencies....

  8. 77 FR 66588 - Development of the Nationwide Interoperable Public Safety Broadband Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... other network design and business plan considerations. Notice of Inquiry, 77 FR 60680 (Oct. 4, 2012... Interoperable Public Safety Broadband Network AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information Administration... meeting of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) as well as to invite input on other...

  9. Developing a national health research system: participatory approaches to legislative, institutional and networking dimensions in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda-Kapata Pascalina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For many sub-Saharan African countries, a National Health Research System (NHRS exists more in theory than in reality, with the health system itself receiving the majority of investments. However, this lack of attention to NHRS development can, in fact, frustrate health systems in achieving their desired goals. In this case study, we discuss the ongoing development of Zambia’s NHRS. We reflect on our experience in the ongoing consultative development of Zambia’s NHRS and offer this reflection and process documentation to those engaged in similar initiatives in other settings. We argue that three streams of concurrent activity are critical in developing an NHRS in a resource-constrained setting: developing a legislative framework to determine and define the system’s boundaries and the roles all actors will play within it; creating or strengthening an institution capable of providing coordination, management and guidance to the system; and focusing on networking among institutions and individuals to harmonize, unify and strengthen the overall capacities of the research community.

  10. Estimated variability of National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network measurements using collocated samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, G.A.; Gay, D.A.; Brunette, R.C.; Sweet, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) provides long-term, quality-assured records of mercury in wet deposition in the USA and Canada. Interpretation of spatial and temporal trends in the MDN data requires quantification of the variability of the MDN measurements. Variability is quantified for MDN data from collocated samplers at MDN sites in two states, one in Illinois and one in Washington. Median absolute differences in the collocated sampler data for total mercury concentration are approximately 11% of the median mercury concentration for all valid 1999-2004 MDN data. Median absolute differences are between 3.0% and 14% of the median MDN value for collector catch (sample volume) and between 6.0% and 15% of the median MDN value for mercury wet deposition. The overall measurement errors are sufficiently low to resolve between NADP/MDN measurements by ??2 ng??l-1 and ??2 ????m-2?? year-1, which are the contour intervals used to display the data on NADP isopleths maps for concentration and deposition, respectively. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  11. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network, 1995-96

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated four external quality-assurance programs for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) in 1995 and 1996: the intersite-comparison program, the blind-audit program, the interlaboratory- comparison program, and the collocated-sampler program. The intersite-comparison program assessed the precision and bias of pH and specific-conductance determinations made by NADP/NTN site operators. The analytical bias introduced during routine handling, processing, and shipping of wet-deposition samples and precision of analyte values was estimated using a blind-audit program. An interlaboratory-comparison program was used to evaluate differences between analytical results and to estimate the analytical precision of five North American laboratories that routinely analyzed wet deposition. A collocated-sampler program estimated the precision of the overall precipitation collection and analysis system from initial sample collection through final storage of the data. Results of two intersite-comparison studies completed in 1995 indicated 94.6 and 94.4 percent of the onsite pH determinations met the NADP/NTN accuracy goals, whereas 97.2 and 98.3 percent of the specific-conductance determinations were within the established limits. The percentages of onsite determinations that met the accuracy goals in 1996 were slightly less for both pH and specific-conductance than in 1995. In 1996, 93.2 and 87.5 percent of onsite pH determinations met the accuracy goals, whereas the percentage of onsite specific-conductance measurements that met the goals was 93.9 and 94.9 percent.The blind audit program utilizes a paired sample design to evaluate the effects of routine sample handling, processing and shipping on the chemistry of weekly precipitation samples. The portion of the blind audit sample subject to all of the normal onsite handling and processing steps of a regular weekly precipitation sample is referred to as the bucket

  12. External quality-assurance results for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network, 1997-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lindholm, Sandy J.

    2003-01-01

    Five external quality-assurance programs were operated by the U.S. Geological Survey for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/ National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) during 1997 through 1999: the intersite-comparison program, the blind-audit program, the field- audit program, the interlaboratory-comparison program, and the collocated-sampler program. The intersite-comparison program assesses the accuracy of pH and specific-conductance determinations made by NADP/NTN site operators. In two 1997 intersite-comparison studies, 83.7 and 85.8 percent of the pH determinations met the NADP/NTN accuracy goals, whereas 97.3 and 92.4 percent of the specific-conductance determinations met the NADP/NTN accuracy goals. The percentage of pH and specific-conductance determinations that met the accuracy goals in 1998 were, for the most part, higher than in 1997. In two 1998 studies, 90.9 and 90.3 percent of the pH determinations met the accuracy goals compared to 94.7 and 96.0 percent of the specific- conductance measurements meeting the accuracy goals. In one 1999 intersite-comparison study, 89.5 percent and 99.4 percent of pH and specific- conductance determinations, respectively, met the NADP/NTN accuracy goals. The blind-audit program evaluates the effects of routine sample handling, processing, and shipping on the analytical bias and precision of weekly precipitation samples. A portion of the blind-audit sample subject to the normal onsite handling and processing of a weekly precipitation sample is referred to as the bucket portion, whereas the portion receiving only minimal handling is referred to as the bottle portion. Positive bias in regard to blind-audit results indicates that the bucket portion has a higher concentration than the bottle portion. The paired t-test for the 1997 through 1999 blind- audit data indicates that routine sample handling, processing, and shipping introduced a positive bias (a=0.05) for calcium and chloride and a negative bias (cz=0.05) for

  13. THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-01-09

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a

  14. National and international interlocking directorates within Europe : Corporate networks within and among fifteen European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.; Kratzer, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the structural aspects of interlocking directorate networks within and among fifteen European countries. The results show large quantitative differences in network densities within countries. These differences are strongly and significantly related to the 'variety of capitali

  15. Social Network Type and Subjective Well-Being in a National Sample of Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Howard; Shiovitz-Ezra, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The study considers the social networks of older Americans, a population for whom there have been few studies of social network type. It also examines associations between network types and well-being indicators: loneliness, anxiety, and happiness. Design and Methods: A subsample of persons aged 65 years and older from the first wave of…

  16. Lessons learnt from an international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez-Vergara, J.C.; Thompson, I.M.G.; Funck, E.;

    2003-01-01

    and at the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. The network systems are used continuously to monitor radiation levels throughout a country in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary...... implications. The radiation levels measured are used to estimate the radiation risks to people arising from the accident. Seven European countries participated in the intercomparison with detector systems used in their national network systems as well as with detectors being developed for future use. Since...

  17. An informatics system to support knowledge management in the health sector--the South African National Health Knowledge Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, J A; Seebregts, C J; Makgoba, W M; Fouché, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the planning and development of a South African national health knowledge network. The methodology is in essence based on the principles of knowledge management and the drivers of a system of innovation. The knowledge network, SA HealthInfo, aims to provide a one-stop interactive forum/resource, for quality-controlled and evidence-based health research information, to a wide spectrum of users, at various levels of aggregation, with the necessary security arrangements and facilities for interaction among users to promote explicit (codified) and tacit knowledge flow. It will therefore stimulate the process of innovation within the South African health system.

  18. Reference hydrologic networks I. The status and potential future directions of national reference hydrologic networks for detecting trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Paul H.; Burn, Donald H.; Hannaford, Jamie; Higgins, Hélène; Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Marsh, Terry; Looser, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Identifying climate-driven trends in river flows on a global basis is hampered by a lack of long, quality time series data for rivers with relatively undisturbed regimes. This is a global problem compounded by the lack of support for essential long-term monitoring. Experience demonstrates that, with clear strategic objectives, and the support of sponsoring organizations, reference hydrologic networks can constitute an exceptionally valuable data source to effectively identify, quantify and interpret hydrological change—the speed and magnitude of which is expected to a be a primary driver of water management and flood alleviation strategies through the future—and for additional applications. Reference hydrologic networks have been developed in many countries in the past few decades. These collections of streamflow gauging stations, that are maintained and operated with the intention of observing how the hydrology of watersheds responds to variations in climate, are described. The status of networks under development is summarized. We suggest a plan of actions to make more effective use of this collection of networks.

  19. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  20. Teacher agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Robinson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    with their environments (Biesta & Tedder, 2007). In this chapter, we outline the latter conception of agency, developing a conceptual model for teacher agency that emphasizes the temporal and relational dimension of the achievement of agency. Why does this matter? Recent curriculum policy in many countries heralds a [re......]turn to the centrality of the teacher in school-based curriculum development. In many cases, this renewed emphasis on teachers is explicitly tied to change agendas, with teachers described as agents of change. And yet such change agentry (Fullan, 2003) and teacher agency more broadly are often circumscribed by features...

  1. Computational control of networks of dynamical systems: Application to the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, Alexandre M.

    The research presented in this thesis is motivated by the need for efficient analysis, automation, and optimization tools for the National Airspace System (NAS). A modeling framework based on hybrid system theory is developed, which captures congestion propagation into the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. This model is validated against Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS) data and used for analyzing low level actuation of the human Air Traffic Controller. This model enables us to quantify the capacity limit of the airspace in terms of geometry and traffic patterns, as well as the speed of propagation of congestion in the system. Once this setting is in place, maneuver assignment problems are posed as Mixed Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). Problem specific algorithms are designed to show that certain MILPs can be solved exactly in polynomial time. These algorithms are shown to run faster than CPLEX (the leading commercial software to solve MILPs). For other problems, approximation algorithms are designed, with guaranteed bounds on running time and performance. Flow control problems in the NAS are modeled using an Eulerian framework. A partial differential equation (PDE) model of high altitude traffic is derived, using a modified Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) PDE. High altitude traffic is modeled as a network of LWR PDEs linked through their boundary conditions. An adjoint-based method is developed for controlling network flow problems and applied to scenarios for the airspace between Chicago and the east coast. Accurate numerical analysis schemes are used and run very fast on this set of coupled one dimensional problems. The resulting simulations provide NAS-wide ATC control strategies in the form of flow patterns to apply to streams of aircraft. Finally, tactical control problems at the level of the dynamics of individual aircraft are studied. The problem of proving safety of conflict avoidance protocols is posed in the Hamilton-Jacobi framework. A proof

  2. Statement to the 34th session of the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990. Statement to the 45th session of the United Nations general assembly, 23 October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 34th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990; Statement to the 45th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 23 October 1990. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  3. Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly 21 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly, 21 October 1991. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  4. Statement to the 40th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1996; Statement to the 51st session of the United Nations General Assembly 28 October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Statement to the 40th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency main directions of the IAEA activities and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 51th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenge facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed

  5. Meeting information needs in health policy and public health: priorities for the National Library of Medicine and The National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, B L

    1998-12-01

    Those seeking information in health policy and public health are not as well served as those seeking clinical information. Problems inhibiting access to health policy and public health information include the heterogeneity of professionals seeking the information, the distribution of relevant information across disciplines and information sources, scarcity of synthesized information useful to practitioners, lack of awareness of available services or training in their use, and lack of access to information technology or to knowledgeable librarians and information specialists. Since 1990, the National Library of Medicine and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine have been working to enhance information services in health policy and public health through expanding the coverage of the NLM collection, building new databases, and engaging in targeted outreach and training initiatives directed toward segments of the health policy and public health communities. Progress has been made, but more remains to be done. Recommendations arising from the meeting, Accessing Useful Information: Challenges in Health Policy and Public Health, will help NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to establish priorities and action plans for the next several years.

  6. Coastal meteorological and water temperature data from National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON) and Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) stations of the NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON) is a network of long-term water level stations operated and maintained by CO-OPS. NWLON stations are located on...

  7. SU-E-P-19: A National Collaborative Academic Medical Physics Network: Structure, Activity and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A national Australian inter-university medical physics (MP) group was formed in 2011/12, supported by Department of Health Better Access to Radiation Oncology BARO) seed funding. Core membership includes the six universities providing postgraduate MP courses. Objectives include increasing capacity, development and efficiency of national academic MP structures/systems and hence supporting education, clinical training and research, for the MP workforce support. Although the BARO scheme focuses on Radiation Oncology, the group has wider MP interests. Methods: Two further BARO seed grants were achieved: 1) for networked academic activities, including shared-resource teaching, eg using virtual reality systems; MP outreach to schools and undergraduates; developing web-based student and registrar education/resources, etc.; and 2) for conjoint ‘translational research’ posts between universities and partner hospitals, to clinically progress advanced RT technologies and to support students and registrars. Each university received 0.5 FTE post from each grant over 2 years (total: $1.75M) and leveraged local additional partner funds. Results: Total funding: $4–5M. Overall there have been 35 (mainly overseas) postholders bringing specific expertise, beginning in early 2013. Periods in Australia have been from 0.25–2 years (median=1). As well as the education activities, research projects include lung/spine SBRT, 4D RT, FFF beams, technology assessment, complex treatment planning, imaging for radiation oncology, DIR, adaptive breast, datamining, radiomics,etc. Observed positive impacts include: increased interest in MP courses, training support, translational research infrastructure and/or clinical practice in the hospitals involved, plus increased collaboration and effectiveness between the universities. Posts are continuing beyond grant end using leveraged funds, providing the basis for sustainability of some posts. Conclusion: The BARO-funded projects have

  8. SU-E-P-19: A National Collaborative Academic Medical Physics Network: Structure, Activity and Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A national Australian inter-university medical physics (MP) group was formed in 2011/12, supported by Department of Health Better Access to Radiation Oncology BARO) seed funding. Core membership includes the six universities providing postgraduate MP courses. Objectives include increasing capacity, development and efficiency of national academic MP structures/systems and hence supporting education, clinical training and research, for the MP workforce support. Although the BARO scheme focuses on Radiation Oncology, the group has wider MP interests. Methods: Two further BARO seed grants were achieved: 1) for networked academic activities, including shared-resource teaching, eg using virtual reality systems; MP outreach to schools and undergraduates; developing web-based student and registrar education/resources, etc.; and 2) for conjoint ‘translational research’ posts between universities and partner hospitals, to clinically progress advanced RT technologies and to support students and registrars. Each university received 0.5 FTE post from each grant over 2 years (total: $1.75M) and leveraged local additional partner funds. Results: Total funding: $4–5M. Overall there have been 35 (mainly overseas) postholders bringing specific expertise, beginning in early 2013. Periods in Australia have been from 0.25–2 years (median=1). As well as the education activities, research projects include lung/spine SBRT, 4D RT, FFF beams, technology assessment, complex treatment planning, imaging for radiation oncology, DIR, adaptive breast, datamining, radiomics,etc. Observed positive impacts include: increased interest in MP courses, training support, translational research infrastructure and/or clinical practice in the hospitals involved, plus increased collaboration and effectiveness between the universities. Posts are continuing beyond grant end using leveraged funds, providing the basis for sustainability of some posts. Conclusion: The BARO-funded projects have

  9. The European Judicial Training Network and its Role in the Strategy for the Europeanization of National Judges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Benvenuti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the building of a European Judicial Training Framework (EJT, notably the establishment, organization and functioning of the European Judicial Training Network (EJTN. After describing the EJTN and retracing its distinctive features – co-operation, decentralization, complementarity, targeting –, the article underlines its peculiar function within EJT, which reflects the role of EJT itself in the strategy for Europeanization of national judges. It then concludes by pointing out and situating other strategic areas where important synergies with EJT for the purpose of judicial Europeanization can be strengthened, notably enhancement of transnational judicial networks and introduction of knowledge management tools in national systems. The article is based on the analysis of documents and scientific literature as well as on empirical research and semi-structured interviews conducted by the author in 2013 and 2014.

  10. Trauma histories among justice-involved youth: findings from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly B. Dierkhising

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 90% of justice-involved youth report exposure to some type of traumatic event. On average, 70% of youth meet criteria for a mental health disorder with approximately 30% of youth meeting criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Justice-involved youth are also at risk for substance use and academic problems, and child welfare involvement. Yet, less is known about the details of their trauma histories, and associations among trauma details, mental health problems, and associated risk factors. Objective: This study describes detailed trauma histories, mental health problems, and associated risk factors (i.e., academic problems, substance/alcohol use, and concurrent child welfare involvement among adolescents with recent involvement in the juvenile justice system. Method: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set (NCTSN-CDS is used to address these aims, among which 658 adolescents report recent involvement in the juvenile justice system as indexed by being detained or under community supervision by the juvenile court. Results: Age of onset of trauma exposure was within the first 5 years of life for 62% of youth and approximately one-third of youth report exposure to multiple or co-occurring trauma types each year into adolescence. Mental health problems are prevalent with 23.6% of youth meeting criteria for PTSD, 66.1% in the clinical range for externalizing problems, and 45.5% in the clinical range for internalizing problems. Early age of onset of trauma exposure was differentially associated with mental health problems and related risk factors among males and females. Conclusions: The results indicate that justice-involved youth report high rates of trauma exposure and that this trauma typically begins early in life, is often in multiple contexts, and persists over time. Findings provide support for establishing trauma-informed juvenile justice systems that can respond to the needs of traumatized youth.

  11. An Investigation Into Bayesian Networks for Modeling National Ignition Facility Capsule Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J

    2008-08-18

    Bayesian networks (BN) are an excellent tool for modeling uncertainties in systems with several interdependent variables. A BN is a directed acyclic graph, and consists of a structure, or the set of directional links between variables that depend on other variables, and conditional probabilities (CP) for each variable. In this project, we apply BN's to understand uncertainties in NIF ignition experiments. One can represent various physical properties of National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosions as variables in a BN. A dataset containing simulations of NIF capsule implosions was provided. The dataset was generated from a radiation hydrodynamics code, and it contained 120 simulations of 16 variables. Relevant knowledge about the physics of NIF capsule implosions and greedy search algorithms were used to search for hypothetical structures for a BN. Our preliminary results found 6 links between variables in the dataset. However, we thought there should have been more links between the dataset variables based on the physics of NIF capsule implosions. Important reasons for the paucity of links are the relatively small size of the dataset, and the sampling of the values for dataset variables. Another factor that might have caused the paucity of links is the fact that in the dataset, 20% of the simulations represented successful fusion, and 80% didn't, (simulations of unsuccessful fusion are useful for measuring certain diagnostics) which skewed the distributions of several variables, and possibly reduced the number of links. Nevertheless, by illustrating the interdependencies and conditional probabilities of several parameters and diagnostics, an accurate and complete BN built from an appropriate simulation set would provide uncertainty quantification for NIF capsule implosions.

  12. Producing remote sensing-based emission estimates of prescribed burning in the contiguous United States for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2011 National Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J. L.; Pouliot, G. A.; Soja, A. J.; Miller, M. E.; Rao, T.

    2013-12-01

    Prescribed fires in agricultural landscapes generally produce smaller burned areas than wildland fires but are important contributors to emissions impacting air quality and human health. Currently, there are a variety of available satellite-based estimates of crop residue burning, including the NOAA/NESDIS Hazard Mapping System (HMS) the Satellite Mapping Automated Reanalysis Tool for Fire Incident Reconciliation (SMARTFIRE 2), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Official Burned Area Product (MCD45A1)), the MODIS Direct Broadcast Burned Area Product (MCD64A1) the MODIS Active Fire Product (MCD14ML), and a regionally-tuned 8-day cropland differenced Normalized Burn Ratio product for the contiguous U.S. The purpose of this NASA-funded research was to refine the regionally-tuned product utilizing higher spatial resolution crop type data from the USDA NASS Cropland Data Layer and burned area training data from field work and high resolution commercial satellite data to improve the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The final product delivered to the EPA included a detailed database of 25 different atmospheric emissions at the county level, emission distributions by crop type and seasonality, and GIS data. The resulting emission databases were shared with the U.S. EPA and regional offices, the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWGC) Smoke Committee, and all 48 states in the contiguous U.S., with detailed error estimations for Wyoming and Indiana and detailed analyses of results for Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Oregon. This work also provided opportunities in discovering the different needs of federal and state partners, including the various geospatial abilities and platforms across the many users and how to incorporate expert air quality, policy, and land management knowledge into quantitative earth observation-based estimations of prescribed fire emissions. Finally, this work

  13. Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linder, Stefan; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2015-01-01

    Agency theory studies the problems and solutions linked to delegation of tasks from principals to agents in the context of conflicting interests between the parties. Beginning from clear assumptions about rationality, contracting, and informational conditions, the theory addresses problems of ex...... agency theory to enjoy considerable scientific impact on social science; however, it has also attracted considerable criticism....

  14. Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linder, Stefan; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Agency theory studies the problems and solutions linked to delegation of tasks from principals to agents in the context of conflicting interests between the parties. Beginning from clear assumptions about rationality, contracting and informational conditions, the theory addresses problems of ex...... agency theory to enjoy considerable scientific impact on social science; however, it has also attracted considerable criticism....

  15. Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). A short report on recorded earthquakes during the third quarter of the year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedvarsson, Reynir (Uppsala University, Department of Earth Sciences (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    According to an agreement with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and Uppsala University, the Department of Earth Sciences has continued to carry out observation and additional construction of new seismic stations within the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). This short report gives brief information about the recorded seismicity during July through September 2011. The Swedish National Seismic Network now consists of 64 stations after that two additional stations were constructed in August this year. During July through September, 2,096 events were located whereof 137 are estimated as real earthquakes, 1,250 are estimated as explosions, 488 are induced earthquakes in the vicinity of the mines in Kiruna and Malmberget and 221 events are still considered as uncertain but these are most likely explosions and are mainly located outside the network. Four earthquakes located by the network had magnitudes above M{sub L} = 2.0 during the period. In July an earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.9 was located in Oppland-Hedmark in Norway. In August three earthquakes were located, one with a magnitude of M{sub L} = 2.4 located 13 km north of Laimoluokta, 66 km north of Kiruna, one earthquake with a magnitude of M{sub L} = 2.3 was located in Finland, 125 km north of Pajala and one earthquake with a magnitude of M{sub L} = 2.1 was located in the North Sea offshore Denmark

  16. Anti-social networking: crowdsourcing and the cyber defence of national critical infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris W

    2014-01-01

    We identify four roles that social networking plays in the 'attribution problem', which obscures whether or not cyber-attacks were state-sponsored. First, social networks motivate individuals to participate in Distributed Denial of Service attacks by providing malware and identifying potential targets. Second, attackers use an individual's social network to focus attacks, through spear phishing. Recipients are more likely to open infected attachments when they come from a trusted source. Third, social networking infrastructures create disposable architectures to coordinate attacks through command and control servers. The ubiquitous nature of these architectures makes it difficult to determine who owns and operates the servers. Finally, governments recruit anti-social criminal networks to launch attacks on third-party infrastructures using botnets. The closing sections identify a roadmap to increase resilience against the 'dark side' of social networking.

  17. Extensive monitoring of Italian forests: integration of the National Forest Inventory with the European Network of Level I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparini P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive monitoring of Italian forests: integration of the National Forest Inventory with the European Network of Level I. Forest monitoring is important for enhancing our knowledge on such ecosystems and their changes in order to enable actions helpful for their protection. At the European level, several monitoring programmes are carried out at present to pursue a better knowledge of specific characteristics of forests. Among those, national forest inventories are carried out to give a picture of their status (forest area, forest types, timber volume, growth and others, whereas health status of forests has been monitored over twenty years thanks to a specific programme, the ICP Forests. Under LIFE+ programme 2007, the FutMon project funded country-level studies aiming at evaluating the possibility to merge national forest inventory and Level I sample plots in a unique set of plots for forest monitoring and survey protocol. The underlying idea is that a common set of plots would enhance efficiency either in terms of costs or in terms of scientific results. However, an important issue is to preserve the validity of the twenty-years-long existing data series. For this reason in Italy, in 2009 and 2010, an experiment was carried out by measuring a common set of variables both in the Level I plots and in a subset of the inventory plots, in order to evaluate differences and similarities of surveying variables in the two different plot samples. More specifically, the integration between the two programmes would imply a change in the crown-condition sample-trees selection criteria and the shift of the Level I network to the inventory one. On the basis of the results, from 2012 the National Forest Inventory protocol for sample-trees selection has already been adopted on the Level I plots, whereas the feasibility of shifting the Level I plots from the ICP network to the National Forest Inventory one is still under evaluation.

  18. Networking strategies of the microscopy community for improved utilization of advanced instruments: (2) The national network for transmission electron microscopy and atom probe studies in France (METSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Épicier, Thierry; Snoeck, Étienne

    2014-02-01

    With the development, over the past ten years, of a new generation of electron microscopes with advanced performance, incorporating aberration correctors, monochromators, more sensitive detectors, and innovative specimen environments, quantitative measurements at the subnanometer and, in certain cases, at the unique atom level, are now accessible. However, an optimized use of these possibilities requires access to costly instruments and support by specialized trained experts. For these reasons, a national network (METSA) has been created in France with the support of CNRS and CEA in order to offer, in centres with complementary equipment and expertise, an open access to an enlarged and multidisciplinary community of academic and industrial users.

  19. 78 FR 52605 - Announcing the Twenty First Public Meeting of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... linked by a computer network. The current CIREN model utilizes two types of centers, medical and... Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... Meeting of members of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network. CIREN is a collaborative...

  20. How Can the USA National Phenology Network's Data Resource Benefit You? Recent Applications of the Phenology Data and Information Housed in the National Phenology Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) serves science and society by promoting a broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and the relationships among phenological patterns and all aspects of environmental change. The National Phenology Database, maintained by the USA-NPN, is experiencing steady growth in the number of data records it houses. Since 2009, over 5,500 participants in Nature's Notebook, the national-scale, multi-taxa phenology observation program coordinated by the USA-NPN, have contributed nearly 6 million observation records of plants and animals. The phenology data curated by the USA-NPN are being used in a rapidly growing number of applications for science, conservation and resource management. Data and data products generated by the USA-NPN have been used in 17 peer-reviewed publications to date. Additionally, phenology data collected via Nature's Notebook is actively informing decisions ranging from efficiently scheduling street-sweeping activities to keep dropped leaves from entering inland lakes, to timing the spread of herbicide or other restoration activities to maximize their efficacy. We demonstrate several types of questions that can be addressed with this observing system and the resultant data, and highlight several ongoing local- to national-scale projects as well as some recently published studies. Additional data-mining and exploration by interested researchers and resource managers will undoubtedly continue to demonstrate the value of these data.

  1. Workshop on Incomplete Network Data Held at Sandia National Labs – Livermore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soundarajan, Sucheta [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Wendt, Jeremy D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    While network analysis is applied in a broad variety of scientific fields (including physics, computer science, biology, and the social sciences), how networks are constructed and the resulting bias and incompleteness have drawn more limited attention. For example, in biology, gene networks are typically developed via experiment -- many actual interactions are likely yet to be discovered. In addition to this incompleteness, the data-collection processes can introduce significant bias into the observed network datasets. For instance, if you observe part of the World Wide Web network through a classic random walk, then high degree nodes are more likely to be found than if you had selected nodes at random. Unfortunately, such incomplete and biasing data collection methods must be often used.

  2. IAEA supported national thermoluminescence dosimetry audit networks for radiotherapy dosimetry: Summary of the posters presented in session 12b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has supported its Member States over many years by providing thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) based quality assurance audits for radiotherapy dosimetry. Over recent years it has extended this role by encouraging, supporting and assisting the development of national audit programmes, building on the IAEA's experience of operating a TLD system.Whenever possible, the IAEA establishes links between the national programmes and the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The IAEA disseminates its standardized TLD methodology and provides technical backup to national TLD networks, ensuring at the same time traceability to primary dosimetry standards. Several countries have established TLD programmes to audit radiotherapy beams in hospitals with assistance from the IAEA, and the paper presents an overview of the activities in Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Cuba, India, the Republic of Korea, the Philippines and Poland. (author)

  3. Evaluation of the results of acute viral gastroenteritis data in Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan ALBAYRAK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Norovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Astrovirus are responsible for most non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis. The incidence of these viral agents in Turkey is not well known. In this study, it was aimed to document the viral etiology of the stool samples which were send to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency (RSNPHA, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory for investigation of viral acute gastroenteritis agents. Method: A total of 147 stool samples from 11 different provinces were send to the Virology Laboratory for Reference and Research of RSNPHA in 2009. Samples were collected from patients admitted because of acute gastroenteritis and from the cases with the signs of illness at different times of the year and sent by the Provincial Health Directorates to our laboratory. The samples were examined in the laboratory using the commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit for norovirus genotype I, norovirus genotype II, rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus. Results: 65 (44.2 % samples were found to be positive at least for one viral agent and 10 (6.8 % samples for more than one viral agent. Norovirus (particularly genotype II infections were detected as the most prevalent viral agent in acute gastroenteritis patients in this period. Rotavirus infections were determined as the second most common infection after norovirus infections. Adenovirus infections have been found to be the least prevalent agent in the laboratory. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that norovirus genotype II has been more commonly responsible for acute diarrhea than the other viral pathogens. The viral agents we have studied should be considered as pathogens that can be seen in all seasons. Viral factors should not be underestimated as the cause of acute gastroenteritis; additionally it should be noted that acute gastroenteritis could be caused by coinfection of viral agents.

  4. An interpretation of differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, D.S.; Sisterson, D.L.; Schroder, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) monitoring program from 1984 through 1986 are investigated. Median differences in hydrogen ion concentration between laboratory and field pH determinations at sites averaged -4.6 ??equiv/L in natural precipitation samples on an annual basis. The median difference found in external quality assurance samples analyzed during the same time period was -11 ??equiv/L. The results suggest a systematic bias in pH values reported by the NADP/NTN network. The bias appears to have a fixed component of approximately -7 ??equiv/L, which can be attributed to the sampling bucket and lid, and a seasonal and regional component that ranges from +4 to -22 ??equiv/L at the 10th and 90th percentiles. Differences were found to be independent of sample pH and sample volume. The magnitude of the bias has implications for the interpretation of previously published pH and hydrogen ion concentration and deposition values in the western United States.

  5. Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Networking Integration Dept.

    1995-01-01

    Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

  6. Transformative Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    The purpose of this paper is to enhance the conceptual understanding of the mediatory relationship between paradoxes on an organizational and an individual level. It presents a concept of agency that comprises and mediates between a structural and individual pole. The constitution of this agency ...... is achieved through narrative activity that oscillates between the poles and transforms paradoxes through the configuration of plots and metaphors. Empirical cases are introduced in order to illustrate the implications of this understanding....

  7. Water-Quality Data for Selected National Park Units within the Southern Colorado Plateau Network, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Water Years 2005 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Jamie P.; Monroe, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    The National Park Service initiated a Level 1 Water-Quality Inventory program to provide water-quality data to park managers so informed natural resource management decisions could be made. Level 1 water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey Arizona Water Science Center at 57 sites in 13 National Park units located in the Southern Colorado Plateau Inventory and Monitoring network in water years 2005 and 2006. These data describe the current water-quality at selected sites within the park units and provide information for monitoring future trends. Water samples were collected three times at each type of site including wells, springs, seeps, tinajas, rivers, a lake, and an irrigation ditch. Field measurements were taken at each site and they included pH, specific conductance, temperature, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, turbidity, and discharge rates where applicable. Water samples collected were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory and analyzed for major ions, trace elements, and nutrients. The National Water Quality Laboratory also analyzed selected samples for mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons. Additional samples at selected sites were collected and analyzed for cyanide, radiochemistry, and suspended sediment by U.S. Geological Survey contract labs. Fecal-indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) were sampled for at selected sites as another indicator of water quality. Quality control for this study was achieved through proper training of field personnel, use of standard U.S. Geological Survey field and laboratory protocols, collection of sample blanks and replicates, and a thorough review of the water-quality analyses. Measured field pH ranged from 6.0 to 8.8, within normal range for springs and rivers, at most sites. Concentrations of dissolved solids ranged from 48 to 8,680 mg/L and the majority of samples had concentrations of dissolved solids below 900 mg/L. Trace-element concentrations at

  8. Nation-wide primary healthcare research network: a privacy protection assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Etienne; Van Casteren, Viviane; Bossuyt, Nathalie; Moreels, Sarah; Goderis, Geert; Bartholomeeusen, Stefaan; Bonte, Pierre; Bangels, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency and privacy protection are essential when setting up nationwide research networks. This paper investigates the extent to which basic services developed to support the provision of care can be re-used, whilst preserving an acceptable privacy protection level, within a large Belgian primary care research network. The generic sustainable confidentiality management model used to assess the privacy protection level of the selected network architecture is described. A short analysis of the current architecture is provided. Our generic model could also be used in other countries.

  9. Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). A short report on recorded earthquakes during the first quarter of the year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedvarsson, Reynir (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    2011-04-15

    According to an agreement with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and Uppsala Univ., the Dept. of Earth Sciences has continued to carry out observations of seismic events at seismic stations within the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). This short report gives brief information about the recorded seismicity during January through March 2011. The Swedish National Seismic Network consists of 62 stations. During January through March, 2,145 events were located whereof 116 are estimated as real earthquakes, 1,521 are estimated as explosions, 308 are induced earthquakes in the vicinity of the mines in Kiruna and Malmberget and 200 events are still considered as uncertain but these are most likely explosions and are mainly located outside the network. Four earthquakes had magnitudes equal to or above M{sub L} = 2.0 during the period. In January an earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.4 was located in Gulf of Bothnia, 74 km east of Umeaa. Three earthquakes with magnitudes of M{sub L} = 2.0 were located 20 km east of Boden, 2 km SW of Falkoeping and 18 km west of Robertsfors

  10. Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). A short report on recorded earthquakes during the second quarter of the year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedvarsson, Reynir (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Sciences (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    According to an agreement with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and Uppsala Univ., the Dept. of Earth Sciences has continued to carry out observations of seismic events at seismic stations within the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). This short report gives brief information about the recorded seismicity during April through June 2011. The Swedish National Seismic Network consists of 62 stations. During April through June, 2,160 events were located whereof 129 are estimated as real earthquakes, 1,502 are estimated as explosions, 310 are induced earthquakes in the vicinity of the mines in Kiruna and Malmberget and 219 events are still considered as uncertain but these are most likely explosions and are mainly located outside the network. Two earthquakes had magnitudes above M{sub L} = 2.0 during the period. In May one earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.8 was located in Kattegatt, 31 km SW of Falkenberg and in April an earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.0 was located 19 km NW of Robertsfors. Additional 16 earthquakes had magnitudes equal to or above M{sub L} = 1.0

  11. 76 FR 38124 - Applications for New Awards; Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... or for an individual consultation, contact either Lynn Medley or Marlene Spencer as follows: Lynn.... Telephone: (202) 245-7338 or by e-mail: Lynn.Medley@ed.gov . Marlene Spencer, U.S. Department of Education.... Agency Contacts For Further Information Contact: Either Lynn Medley or Marlene Spencer as follows:...

  12. Geodetic Networks, geodetic control points within the National Spatial Reference System, Published in unknown, NGS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geodetic Networks dataset, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of unknown. It is described as 'geodetic control points within the...

  13. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Nightjar Survey Network Survey Field Procedures and Completed Data Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Raw data and survey instructions from the Nightjar Survey Network's nighjar survey on Okefenokee NWR. Nightjar Surveys are standardized population counts conducted...

  14. Complications - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - national data. This data set includes national-level data the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  15. The Way Towards a Robust, Cost-Effective, and Future Proof National Mobile Network Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, Morten; Bergendal, Petter

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of mobile devices and the introduction of smartphones have changed the way people communicate. Over the last decade, mobile networks have become a critical infrastructure. Private individuals, governments and businesses rely on mobile networks to provide stable and robust services, both in everyday life and in crisis. There is also an increasing demand for capacity as new and more mobile broadband challenging services are being used. The society will rely o...

  16. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-03-08

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions.

  17. National and international agencies demands and the implementation of an integrated management system: advantages of certification; As demandas dos orgaos nacionais e internacionais e a implementacao do Sistema de Gestao Integrado - SGI: vantagens da certificacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Maria Eduarda C. [Queiroz Galvao Perfuracoes S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Meio Ambiente

    2004-07-01

    During the 80's, companies started to be concerned with more than their production processes. Due to the demands for products and services quality, in 1987, ISO 9000 (International Standards Organization) was established. Ten years later, ISO 14000 was established, regarding environmental management system, and in the same period BS 8800 (British Standards) and OHSAS 18001 (Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series) were also published, regarding occupational health and safety in the working environment. With the increasing demands for companies that participate with the country's economical and social development, SA 8000 was elaborated. In the present days, companies that do not incorporate these factors (quality, environment, occupational health, safety, and social responsibility), has its markets diminished. For several countries, especially European countries, environmental and social aspects are essential for companies and products to gain entry into their markets. The implementation of such systems therefore aids companies to manage their aspects, leading to continuous process improval and the opening of new markets. A company's success depends more of the demands of national and international agencies (financing or licensing agencies, for example). Financing agencies have to assure themselves that they are investing in environmentally and socially friendly projects. Licensing agencies require that specific projects take place with the smallest possible environmental impact. The existence of a management system in the company that incorporates environmental management facilitates the licensing process, as well as financing by multilateral national and international agencies. Certification therefore acts as an important tool to help companies as well as financing and licensing agencies, demonstrating the company's global commitment with such aspects. (author)

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-03 (NODC Accession 0104424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during February 2015 (NODC Accession 0126669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-01 (NCEI Accession 0070959)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0150816)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-05 (NODC Accession 0119474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-06 (NODC Accession 0120329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-11 (NODC Accession 0115123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-09 (NODC Accession 0113792)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-12 (NODC Accession 0101426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-10 (NODC Accession 0114407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0136935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-01 (NODC Accession 0116427)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-08 (NODC Accession 0095593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0153542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-02 (NODC Accession 0104259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during December 2014 (NODC Accession 0125264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-10 (NODC Accession 0079513)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-07 (NODC Accession 0095565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131704)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-11 (NODC Accession 0099948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-02 (NODC Accession 0086627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-05 (NODC Accession 0108385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-07 (NCEI Accession 0074922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-10 (NODC Accession 0099428)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during October 2014 (NODC Accession 0122591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2014 (NODC Accession 0122593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-12 (NODC Accession 0083918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0142963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-06 (NODC Accession 0092557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-12 (NODC Accession 0115760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during January 2015 (NODC Accession 0125752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-05 (NODC Accession 0090313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-04 (NCEI Accession 0072886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-03 (NODC Accession 0088199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-08 (NODC Accession 0112958)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-07 (NODC Accession 0121505)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-09 (NODC Accession 0078579)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during November 2014 (NODC Accession 0122594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0130916)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-03 (NCEI Accession 0072077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-09 (NODC Accession 0098547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-01 (NODC Accession 0085139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-01 (NODC Accession 0103632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during September 2014 (NCEI Accession 0122592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137949)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-05 (NCEI Accession 0073426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during March 2015 (NODC Accession 0127371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-08 (NCEI Accession 0077456)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-04 (NODC Accession 0106521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-03 (NODC Accession 0117682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0128073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2012-04 (NODC Accession 0090312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-06 (NCEI Accession 0074384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-08 (NODC Accession 0122005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  17. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-02 (NODC Accession 0117491)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  18. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-06 (NODC Accession 0110477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  19. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-02 (NCEI Accession 0071368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  20. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0146738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  1. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2013-07 (NODC Accession 0111971)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  2. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2011-11 (NODC Accession 0082371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  3. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-05 (NODC Accession 0002226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  4. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-04 (NODC Accession 0002176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-08 (NODC Accession 0002380)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-11 (NODC Accession 0002469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-10 (NODC Accession 0002436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-06 (NODC Accession 0002309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  10. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  11. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2005-07 (NODC Accession 0002372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  12. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0140790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  13. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys during 2014-04 (NODC Accession 0118539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  14. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  15. An international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident having transboundary implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, I.M.G.; Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2000-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident many countries now operate large national networks of radiation detectors that continuously monitor radiation levels in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary implications. The networks are used to provide data to assist in determining the...... action that should be implemented in that country. However, each country has its own unique system of detection. These are based either on Geiger-Muller counters, high pressure ionisation chambers, scintillation detectors, proportional counters, passive detectors or spectrometry systems; or mixtures of...... these detectors are used. During an accident the data produced by such systems will be exchanged between countries within the European Communities, (EC) and as required by the IAEA's Early Warning Convention between the rest of the world and Europe. It is therefore important to ensure that such data...

  16. International Energy Agency: state influence and transgovernmental politics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keohane, R.O.

    The policies of the International Energy Agency (IEA) are analyzed from the interstate and transgovernmental approach to test the thesis that interstate terms can describe decision making, but transgovernmental politics must be used to explain the politics of policy implementation. The author describes IEA's major issues and its organization into four defined standing groups. He concludes that state behavior adequately describes the decision-making process. While major IEA policy can be explained by national policies, transgovernmental politics plays a secondary role in the national review processes through coalitions and policy coordination. If transgovernmental influence should increase, the overall influence of the network could be reduced and the IEA weakened.

  17. Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Rauno Lindholm, Daniel; Boisen Devantier, Lykke; Nyborg, Karoline Lykke; Høgsbro, Andreas; de Fries, Louise Skovlund

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine what influencing factor that has had an impact on the presumed increasement of the use of networking among academics on the labour market and how it is expressed. On the basis of the influence from globalization on the labour market it can be concluded that the globalization has transformed the labour market into a market based on the organization of networks. In this new organization there is a greater emphasis on employees having social...

  18.  Fashion Mediators and Distributed Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

     This paper discusses agency in aesthetic and cultural settings. It takes as its premise, that agency is multiple and diverse, and may reside in non-humans as well as in humans, and that agency is an effect a network - not the other way around. Thus, the paper forms a part of a recent and growing...

  19. Will the introduction of the National Broadband Network change the face of preventive medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietrzak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging of the Australian population will increase the demand and provision of health services. Older Australians are significant users of healthcare, which is in disproportion to their number .1 A large proportion of health utilisation is devoted to managing chronic diseases,2 many of which are to a certain degree preventable. Some of the diseases are linked to unhealthy lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, excessive drinking, lack of physical activity and excess body weight. In some cases, the progress of the chronic diseases may be slowed and serious consequences (i.e. hospitalisations, moving to nursing home can be avoided or significantly delayed by timely access to care and/or good disease management.3 Thus, preventive measures may ease the burden on the overloaded healthcare system and decrease the health expenditure. There is considerable potential for internet-based solutions to play an increasing role in the provision of health services. Their role in the area of preventive medicine is less defined. There are two key factors that may revolutionise the delivery of health services in Australia in the immediate future. The first is the National Broadband Network (NBN rollout, delivering high-speed broadband fibre-optic connection to 93% of the Australian population, with the rest having access to wireless and satellite internet. The other is the recently announced health system reform, which will include the introduction and development of e-Health applications. At present, major metropolitan institutions are linked by fast internet connections. The introduction of the NBN will not greatly change the way they operate. However, many rural and remote areas currently lack fast and reliable internet connections and it is these areas which will most likely benefit from the “communication revolution”. The development of fast, cheap and reliable internet connections will allow good quality two-way interactive communication and will

  20. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  1. Environmental monitoring networks in Spain; Redes de vigilancia radiologica ambiental en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque Heredia, S.; Martin Matarranz, J. L.; Marugan Tovar, I.; Rey del Castillo, C.; Salas Collantes, R.; Sterling Carmona, A.; Ramos Salvador, L. M.

    2011-07-01

    Environmental monitoring in Spain is carried out by several networks with different objectives and scope, a monitoring network in the vicinity of nuclear facilities and radioactive nuclear fuel cycle and various monitoring networks nationally funded and managed by agencies public. The aim of this paper is to present a summary of all monitoring networks, including a series of figures with the stations that are, their geographical distribution and the programs in them.

  2. The first year of the Australian Seismometers in Schools Network: Inspiring Students to follow careers in science by participating in a national science experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first year of The Australian Seismometers in Schools program (AuSIS) has been filled with excitement as we completed installing pilot instruments in schools, launched the program nationally and received over 70 "Expressions of Interest" from schools around Australia. The data quality has exceeded expectations with schools recording local earthquakes down to magnitude 1, and large distant earthquakes. Some students participate in the program by looking up earthquake locations on maps and learning about geography, while other more advanced students have been investigating the frequency characteristics and sources of noise at their school. Both students and the schools are particularly proud that their instrument is contributing to the global scientific community and are actively incorporating seismology into the school curriculum. AuSIS is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System. Over the next four years we will build a network of 40 seismometers in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. This program is unique to other seismometers in schools programs as it uses professional seismometers to provide research quality data to the seismological community. The AuSIS project's educational aims are to: raise community awareness of earthquakes; raise awareness of seismology and geoscience, as a field of study; promote science as a possible career; and, provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments and will be stored at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. Data collected during the pilot program have provided clear recordings of

  3. ECONOMETRICS AND HEALTHCARE – THE MODEL OF THE GREEK NATIONAL PRIMARY HEALTHCARE NETWORK (PEDY)

    OpenAIRE

    Vassalos, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Nowadays, the development of econometric techniques has important applications in the health sector. Econometrics facilitates the understanding of the environment where health agencies function so that they can make decisions in order to improve their performance. Moreover, the evaluation of the efficiency of health organizations contributes to the health system. This study included searching on Greek and international electronic databases by using keywords such as ...

  4. Nation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    Nation er et gammelt begreb, som kommer af det latinske ord for fødsel, natio. Nationalisme bygger på forestillingen om, at mennesker har én og kun én national identitet og har ret til deres egen nationalstat. Ordet og forestillingen er kun godt 200 år gammel, og i 1900-tallet har ideologien bredt...... sig over hele verden. Nationalisme er blevet global....

  5. Enhancing Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Research Within the National Clinical Trials Network: Rationale, Progress, and Emerging Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Aaron R; Nichols, Craig R; Freyer, David R

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (AYAO, including patients 15-39 years of age) is an emerging discipline in the field of cancer treatment and research. Poorer survival outcomes for this population and characteristic age-related challenges in care have called attention to the need for increased AYAO research. This chapter outlines pressing questions and reviews recent progress in AYAO research within the current organizational structure of the federal clinical trials enterprise, emphasizing how the United States National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) has created novel opportunities for collaborative AYAO research among the pediatric and adult NCTN groups. Potential strategies for expanding AYAO research, both within the NCTN and with other partners in the federal and advocacy domains are identified. PMID:26433555

  6. Social Networks and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Cancer Survivors: Data From the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, BANG HYUN; WALLINGTON, SHERRIE F.; MAKAMBI, KEPHER H.; ADAMS-CAMPBELL, LUCILE L.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the relation between social networks and physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors. The authors examined 873 cancer survivors (596 women, 277 men) 50 years of age or older who participated in the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that survivors who talked about health with friends/family were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.89, CI [1.01, 8.33]). Female survivors were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.65, CI [1.55, 4.53]) and more likely to have seen, heard, or read physical activity/exercise and cancer information within the past 12 months (OR = 2.09, CI [1.13, 3.85]) compared with their male counterparts. For male survivors, those who were a member of at least one community organization were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity/exercise recommendations (OR = 5.31, CI [1.32, 21.22]) than the men who were not members. Overall, cancer survivors with a social network (i.e., talking to family/friends about health) were more likely to pay attention to new exercise recommendations compared with those who did not have a social network. Significant differences were also observed by gender with physical activity levels, knowledge, and attitudes. Social networking is an important component in cancer survivorship and further research is needed to encourage social networking strategies that might facilitate in increasing physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors. PMID:25978562

  7. Establishment of a National ecological network to conserve biodiversity. Pros and cons of ecological corridors Establishment of a National ecological network to conserve biodiversity. Pros and cons of ecological corridors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bergès, Philip Roche and Catherine Avon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological corridors are a fundamental element in the National ecological network approved by the Grenelle environmental agreement in order to reduce ecosystem damage caused by fragmentation of the natural habitat zones of species. How can their effectiveness be evaluated? This article sums up current knowledge on their pros and cons.Fragmentation of natural habitats is considered one of the main causes of biodiversity loss. One of the proposed solutions to limit the effects of fragmentation is to restore ecological connectivity by creating ecological corridors between zones containing natural habitats. The concept remains controversial among scientists, but now serves as the basis for one of the operational projects of the Grenelle environmental agreements in the form of the National ecological network. After examining the ecological concepts justifying the political goal and presenting the various ecological roles of corridors, we briefly discuss their overall advantages and disadvantages. Then, we look closely at the methodological difficulties in detecting a corridor effect. Finally, we recommend a close partnership between research and policy to design biodiversity monitoring and evaluation systems in the different land-management plans.

  8. Networking strategies of the microscopy community for improved utilization of advanced instruments: (2) The national network for transmission electron microscopy and atom probe studies in France (METSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development, over the past ten years, of a new generation of electron microscopes with advanced performance, incorporating aberration correctors, monochromators, more sensitive detectors, and innovative specimen environments, quantitative measurements at the sub-nanometer and, in certain cases, at the unique atom level, are now accessible. However, an optimized use of these possibilities requires access to costly instruments and support by specialized trained experts. For these reasons, a national network (METSA) has been created in France with the support of CNRS and CEA in order to offer, in centres with complementary equipment and expertise, an open access to an enlarged and multidisciplinary community of academic and industrial users. The eight METSA platforms offer an access to 3 atom probes and 17 electron microscopes, mainly aberration-corrected TEMs, but also one dedicated environmental SEM and 3 double-column SEM-FIB

  9. Expanding the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network to address the management of substance use disorders in general medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai, Steven Sparenborg, Udi E Ghitza, David Liu Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008 expand substance use disorder (SUD care services in the USA into general medical settings. Care offered in these settings will engage substance-using patients in an integrated and patient-centered environment that addresses physical and mental health comorbidities and follows a chronic care model. This expansion of SUD services presents a great need for evidence-based practices useful in general medical settings, and reveals several research gaps to be addressed. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse can serve an important role in this endeavor. High-priority research gaps are highlighted in this commentary. A discussion follows on how the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network can transform to address changing patterns in SUD care to efficiently generate evidence to guide SUD treatment practice within the context of recent US health care legislation. Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorders, practice-based research network, electronic health records

  10. Domestic Trade Impacts of the Expansion of the National Expressway Network in China

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    China's outstanding achievements in economic growth and poverty reduction over the last fifteen years have been well documented. A major element of that growth consisted of the development of its infrastructure, particularly transport. All modes of transport have seen their networks expanded, to provide the infrastructure needed to support the broader development goals. Among the surface m...

  11. Estimation of Credit Risk for Business Firms of Nationalized Bank by Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. A. R. Ghatge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Financial credit risk assessment has gained a great deal of attention. Many different parties have an interest in credit risk assessment. Banking authorities are interested because it helps them to determine the overall strength of the banking system and its ability to handle adverse conditions. Due to the importance of credit risk analysis, many methods were widely applied to credit risk measurement tasks, from that Artificial Neural Network plays an important role for analyzing the credit default problem. Artificial neural networks represent an easily customizable tool for modeling learning behavior of agents and for studying a lot of problems very difficult to analyze with standard economic models ANN has many advantages over conventional methods of analysis. According to Shachmurove (2002, they have the ability to analyze complex patterns quickly and with a high degree of accuracy.The focus of this paper is to determine that a neural network is a suitable modelling technique for predicting the business firm loan is satisfactory or not. This paper shows that an ANN approach will classify the applicant as a default or not and predict a credit default allowance amount more closely aligned with the credit default expenseincurred during the fiscal period than traditional management approaches to estimating the allowance. The results show that credit risk evaluation using Back propagation neural network and expert evaluation have the very good consistency

  12. Developing an Education Capability Assessment and Planning (E-CAP) Framework for Establishing National Educational Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NKM Programme Objectives: • to increase Member State understanding and application of nuclear knowledge management: - development and dissemination of methodology, guidance and tools; - implementation in national nuclear programmes; • providing knowledge management services and assistance

  13. 3D Multi-Channel Networked Visualization System for National LambdaRail Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multichannel virtual reality visualization is the future of complex simulation with a large number of visual channels rendered and transmitted over high-speed...

  14. 21 CFR 1404.645 - Do other Federal agencies know if the Office of National Drug Control Policy agrees to a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... National Drug Control Policy agrees to a voluntary exclusion? 1404.645 Section 1404.645 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General... Office of National Drug Control Policy agrees to a voluntary exclusion? (a) Yes, we enter...

  15. National Emission Inventory (NEI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data exchange allows states to submit data to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emissions Inventory (NEI). NEI is a national database of air...

  16. Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). A short report on recorded earthquakes during the fourth quarter of the year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedvarsson, Reynir (Uppsala University, Department of Earth Sciences (Sweden))

    2012-01-15

    According to an agreement with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and Uppsala University, the Department of Earth Sciences has continued to carry out observation and additional construction of new seismic stations within the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). This short report gives brief information about the recorded seismicity during October through December 2011. The Swedish National Seismic Network now consists of 65 stations. During October through December, 2,682 events were located whereof 165 are estimated as real earthquakes, 1,628 are estimated as explosions, 660 are induced earthquakes in the vicinity of the mines in Kiruna and Malmberget and 229 events are still considered as uncertain but these are most likely explosions and are mainly located outside the network. Seven earthquakes had magnitudes above M{sub L} = 2.0 during the period. In October two earthquakes had magnitudes above M{sub L} = 2.0. One with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.2 was located 24 km SE of Nikkaluokta and one earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.1 was located 28 km SW of Ludvika. In November an earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.2 was located 55 km north of Oevertorneaa and one with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.0 was located 6 km east of Grantraesk and 101 km NW of Umeaa. In December three earthquakes had magnitudes above M{sub L} = 2.0. One had a magnitude of M{sub L} = 2.8 and was located 22 km NW of Robertsfors and one earthquake with a magnitude of M{sub L} = 2.4 was located 25 km north of Robertsfors. One earthquake with magnitude M{sub L} = 2.2 was located 8 km west of Hudiksvall

  17. [A proposal for the prevention of ethical problems related to drug promotion: a national network for drug information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civaner, Murat

    2008-01-01

    The promotional activities of pharmaceutical companies are becoming an increasingly hot topic among healthcare workers and the general public. There are many studies in the literature claiming that drug promotion may lead to ethical problems, irrational use of medication, and increased costs, as well as negative effects on the patient-physician relationship and the medical profession. When considering that healthcare workers generally acquire their knowledge from the pharmaceutical industry, the problems mentioned, which are indeed of paramount importance, and the need for effective and sustainable interventions are clearly revealed. Many kinds of interventions have been recommended by various authorities and studies in order to prevent the kinds of problems mentioned above, including training healthcare workers, publishing professional codes to serve as guidelines about which professional values should be protected and how to cope with different situations in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry, or applying the business ethics codes of the pharmaceutical companies. Studies that assessed the effectiveness of different interventions, however, revealed that educating healthcare workers about marketing methods and state regulations are the only effective interventions. In this article, after defining the problem, a proposed national network for drug information is to decrease the negative effects of drug promotion and to promote the rational choice of medicines is described. According to the World Health Organization, rational use of medicine is the most effective, safe, applicable/suitable, and, lastly, the most cost effective option. A national network that will gather drug information by compiling evidence-based knowledge and taking rational use of medicine measures into account should be established. It should transmit information to all healthcare workers in a fast, equal, up to date, easily accessible, and free way. The network should also support

  18. The Incorporation of Agencies in Colombia’s National Administrative Structure: An Axiological Comparison between Two Organizational Models of Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Montaña

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of agencies into Colombia’s Administrative Structure has generated profound debates about the need to create administrative bodies that differ from traditional ones. Such incorporation is all the more problematic when these North American agencies are introduced without any real analysis of the local tradition and culture. The situation became more complicated as a consequence of the undisputed fact that the values and philosophies of the Public Administration Structure in Colombia are different from the predominant values in the United States. Hence, this paper provides a critical analysis of the institution and of its credulous and impulsive adoption of such instruments into our reality. 

  19. Explaining Communication Displacement and Large-Scale Social Change in Core Networks: A Cross-National Comparison of Why Bigger is Not Better and Less Can Mean More

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampton, Keith; Ling, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The size and diversity of Americans’ core social networks has declined. Some suggest that the replacement of face-to-face contact with new media, and combined with more insular core networks is detrimental to both individual and societal well-being. Based on a cross-national comparison...... of the United States, Norway, and Ukraine, we find that, while individual well-being is associated with large and diverse core networks, societal well-being predicts smaller and less diverse networks. Contrary to the replacement hypothesis, we find supplementation: mobile phone and Internet use are associated...... with larger core networks and more frequent in-person contact. However, while contact is generally associated with contact, frequent in-person interaction within the context of low societal well-being is associated with a smaller core network....

  20. Enhancing national Daily Landslide Hazard Assessments through inter-agency collaboration; lessons learned from storm Desmond (UK)/Synne (Norway), Dec 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boje, Søren; Devoli, Graziella; Sund, Monica; Freeborough, Katy; Dijkstra, Tom; Reeves, Helen; Banks, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) and the British Geological Survey (BGS) compile daily landslide hazard assessments (DLHA) in their respective countries. NVE DLHA has been operational since 2013 and provides national daily assessments based on quantitative thresholds related to daily hydro-meteorological forecasts coupled with qualitative expert analysis of these forecasts. The BGS DLHA has been operational since 2012 and this is predominantly based on expert evaluation of antecedent hydro-meteorological conditions and triggering rainfall across Great Britain (GB). In both cases, the hydro-meteorological evaluation is coupled with observations derived from proprietary datasets on landslide events and landslide potential in order to specify, and limit, the spatial extent of the potentially impacted area. However, the DLHA are strongly driven by hydro-meteorological forecasts. In December 2015, a large extra-tropical cyclone developed over the Atlantic and delivered record-breaking precipitation over parts of the UK and Norway. The meteorological services started naming these events to enhance public uptake and awareness and the storms were named as Desmond (the 4th large storm in 2015/16 in the UK) and Synne (the 5th storm in 2015 in Norway). Desmond arrived in earnest on the 5th of December and brought intense precipitation and strong winds over a 48-hour period. In Cumbria (NW-England) record precipitation was measured (341.4 mm in 24-hour at Honister Pass which is more than twice the monthly average), with 48-hour accumulations exceeding 400 mm. Synne arrived shortly after in Norway and was also characterised by excessive rainfall of 140 mm in 24-hour, 236 mm in 48-hour and 299 mm in 72-hour at Maudal, SW-Norway. Both organisations managed to issue appropriate advance warnings, operating individually. In Norway, warnings were issued some 2 days in advance with a yellow level communicated on Friday 4th and an orange warning the 5th and 6