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Sample records for age-related nuclear cataract

  1. Risk factors associated with age-related nuclear and cortical cataract : a case-control study in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, AREDS Report No. 5.

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    2001-08-01

    To investigate possible risk factors for age-related nuclear and cortical cataracts in participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). Case-control study. Of the 4757 persons enrolled in AREDS, 4477 age 60 to 80 years are included in the study. Slit-lamp lens photographs were used to classify participants into one of three nuclear opacity groups (moderate nuclear, mild nuclear, and controls), ignoring cortical opacities. Retroillumination lens photographs were used to classify participants into one of three cortical opacity groups (moderate cortical, mild cortical, and controls), ignoring nuclear opacities. Persons with moderate nuclear opacities were more likely to be female, nonwhite, and smokers and to have large drusen. Moderate nuclear opacities were less common in persons with higher educational status, a history of diabetes, and among those taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Moderate cortical opacities were associated with dark iris color, large drusen, weight change, and, at a borderline level of significance, higher levels of sunlight exposure and use of thyroid hormones. Moderate cortical opacities were less common in persons with higher educational status. Consistent findings have now been reported across many studies for gender, educational status, sunlight exposure, and smoking. Our findings that use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs is inversely associated with nuclear cataract and that dark iris color and use of thyroid hormones may increase cortical cataract risk are less well substantiated and require further investigation.

  2. Mie light scattering calculations for an Indian age-related nuclear cataract with a high density of multilamellar bodies.

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    Gilliland, Kurt O; Johnsen, Sonke; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Costello, M Joseph; Ramamurthy, Balasubramanya; Krishna, Pravin V; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2008-03-24

    Multilamellar bodies (MLBs) are lipid-coated spheres (1-4 microm in diameter) found with greater frequency in the nuclear region of human age-related cataracts compared with human transparent lenses. Mie light scattering calculations have demonstrated that MLBs are potential sources of forward light scattering in human age-related nuclear cataracts due to their shape, size, frequency, and cytoplasmic contents, which often differ in refractive index from their surroundings. Previous studies have used data from several non-serial tissue sections viewed by light microscopy to extrapolate a volume and have assumed that MLBs are random in distribution. Currently, confocal microscopy is being used to examine actual tissue volumes from age-related nuclear cataracts and transparent lenses collected in India to confirm MLB shape, size, frequency, and randomness. These data allow Mie scattering calculations to be done with directly observed MLBs in intact tissue. Whole Indian donor lenses and Indian lens nuclei after extracapsular cataract extraction were immersion-fixed in 10% formalin for 24 h and in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 h before sectioning with a Vibratome. The 160 microm thick sections were stained for 24 h in the lipid dye DiI (1,1'-dilinoleyl-3,3,3',3' tetramethylindocarbocyanine, 4-chlorobenzenesulfonate), washed, stabilized in Permount under coverslips and examined with a Zeiss LSM 510 confocal microscope. Individual volumes of tissue (each typically 500,000 microm(3)) were examined using a plan-apochromat 63X oil (NA=1.4) lens. Other lenses were prepared for electron microscopy and histological examination using previously described procedures. Analysis of tissue volumes within Indian age-related nuclear cataracts and transparent lenses has confirmed that most MLBs are 1-4 microm in diameter and typically spherical with some occurring as doublets or in clusters. Most Indian cataracts and transparent lenses are similar to samples obtained in the United States

  3. A silent mutation in human alpha-A crystallin gene in patients with age-related nuclear or cortical cataract

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    Bharani K Mynampati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A cataract is a complex multifactorial disease that results from alterations in the cellular architecture, i.e. lens proteins. Genes associated with the development of lens include crystallin genes. Although crystallins are highly conserved proteins among vertebrates, a significant number of polymorphisms exist in human population. In this study, we screened for polymorphisms in crystallin alpha A (CRYAA and alpha B (CRYAB genes in 200 patients over 40 years of age, diagnosed with age-related cataract (ARC; nuclear and cortical cataracts. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood. The coding regions of the CRYAA and CRYAB gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and subjected to restriction digestion. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP was performed using known restriction enzymes for CRYAA and CRYAB genes. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing were performed to detect sequence variation in CRYAA gene. In silico analysis of secondary CRYAA mRNA structure was performed using CLC RNA Workbench. RFLP analysis did not show any changes in the restriction sites of CRYAA and CRYAB genes. In 6 patients (4 patients with nuclear cataract and 2 with cortical cataract, sequence analysis of the exon 1 in the CRYAA gene showed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism [D2D] (CRYAA: C to T transition. One of the patients with nuclear cataract was homozygous for this allele. The in silico analysis revealed that D2D mutation results in a compact CRYAA mRNA secondary structure, while the wild type CRYAA mRNA has a weak or loose secondary structure. D2D mutation in the CRYAA gene may be an additional risk factor for progression of ARC.

  4. Predicted light scattering from particles observed in human age-related nuclear cataracts using mie scattering theory.

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    Costello, M Joseph; Johnsen, Sönke; Gilliland, Kurt O; Freel, Christopher D; Fowler, W Craig

    2007-01-01

    To employ Mie scattering theory to predict the light-scattering from micrometer-sized particles surrounded by lipid shells, called multilamellar bodies (MLBs), reported in human age-related nuclear cataracts. Mie scattering theory is applicable to randomly distributed spherical and globular particles separated by distances much greater than the wavelength of incident light. With an assumed refractive index of 1.40 for nuclear cytoplasm, particle refractive indices from 1.33 to 1.58 were used to calculate scattering efficiencies for particle radii 0.05 to 3 microm and incident light with wavelengths (in vacuo) of 400, 550, and 700 nm. Surface plots of scattering efficiency versus particle radius and refractive index were calculated for coated spherical particles. Pronounced peaks and valleys identified combinations of particle parameters that produce high and low scattering efficiencies. Small particles (scattering efficiency over a wide range of particle refractive indices. Particles with radii 0.6 to 3 microm and refractive indices 0.08 to 0.10 greater (or less) than the surrounding cytoplasm had very high scattering efficiencies. This size range corresponds well to MLBs in cataractous nuclei (average MLB radius, 1.4 microm) and, at an estimated 4000 particles/mm(3) of tissue, up to 18% of the incident light was scattered primarily within a 20 degrees forward cone. The calculated size of spherical particles that scatter efficiently was close to the observed dimensions of MLBs in cataractous nuclei. Particle refractive indices only 0.02 units different from the surrounding cytoplasm scatter a significant amount of light. These results suggest that the MLBs observed in human age-related nuclear cataracts may be major sources of forward light scattering that reduces contrast of fine details, particularly under dim light.

  5. Distribution, spherical structure and predicted Mie scattering of multilamellar bodies in human age-related nuclear cataracts.

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    Gilliland, Kurt O; Freel, Christopher D; Johnsen, Sonke; Craig Fowler, W; Costello, M Joseph

    2004-10-01

    To characterize multilamellar bodies (MLBs), determine their distribution along the optic axis and predict their potential Mie scattering within human age-related nuclear cataracts. Previous studies restricted to the equatorial plane have shown that MLBs are rare spherical objects that are 1-4 microm in diameter and covered by multiple layers of thin lipid-rich membranes. Eight human aged transparent lenses were obtained from eye bank donors and eight human age-related nuclear cataracts were obtained immediately after extracapsular extraction. Each sample was Vibratome sectioned fresh into 200 microm thick sections that were fixed and embedded for light or electron microscopy. Light micrograph montages of the optic axis containing the juvenile, fetal and embryonic nuclei were examined. Mie scattering for random coated spherical particles was calculated based on assumed and measured particle parameters. Cells along the optic axis of the cataract contained approximately 7.5 times more MLBs as similar regions of the aged transparent lens, although these MLBs occurred with extremely low frequency. Cells of the aged transparent lens contained 1.3 MLBs mm(-2), while those of the cataract contained 9.6 MLBs mm(-2), which are equivalent to calculated densities of 5.6 x 10(2) and 4.1 x 10(3)mm(-3), respectively. While some MLBs were located within the cytoplasm near cell membranes, others were found away from membranes. The MLBs are distinct from circular profiles resulting from finger-like projections between adjacent cells. MLBs displayed varying geometries and cytoplasmic textures, although predominately spherical with interiors similar to adjacent fiber cell cytoplasm. These results are in agreement with previous theoretical analysis of light scattering from human lenses and with previous morphological studies examining the equatorial plane of the lens. Potential Mie scattering of spherical particles with the average properties of the observed MLBs and assumed

  6. Smoking, socioeconomic factors, and age-related cataract: The Singapore Malay Eye study.

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    Wu, Renyi; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Zheng, Yingfeng; Rochtchina, Elena; Tan, Ava G; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-08-01

    To describe the relationship of smoking, sex, and socioeconomic factors with age-related cataract in Malay adults in Singapore. In a population-based study, 3280 Malay individuals aged 40 to 80 years participated (78.7% response rate). All had interviews, systemic examination, and laboratory investigations. Lens opacity was graded from slitlamp and retroillumination photographs using the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System. Smoking-cataract associations were compared with the Blue Mountains Eye Study in Australia. Of 2927 participants (89.2%) with gradable lens photographs, 1338 (45.7%) had cataract. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes, current smokers had a higher prevalence of nuclear cataract (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-2.98), cortical cataract (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.02-1.74), posterior subcapsular cataract (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02-1.91), or any cataract (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-1.99). These associations were not seen in the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Primary or lower education (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.06-2.64) and low monthly income (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09-1.87) were both associated with nuclear cataract, while small-sized public housing was associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.28-2.25). Among men, 43.5% currently smoked compared with only 3.2% of women. The population attributable risk of nuclear cataract due to smoking was estimated to be 17.6% in men. Smoking and indicators of low socioeconomic status were associated with cataract in Malay persons, with 1 in 6 nuclear cataract cases in men attributable to smoking. Smoking-cataract associations were stronger in Malay than in white persons.

  7. Myopia, axial length, and age-related cataract: the Singapore Malay eye study.

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    Pan, Chen-Wei; Boey, Pui Yi; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tay, Wan Ting; Wang, Jie Jin; Tan, Ava Grace; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-07-02

    To describe the associations of myopia and axial length (AL) with age-related cataract in an Asian population in Singapore. A population-based cross-sectional study that examined 3280 (78.7% response) adults of Malay ethnicity aged 40 to 80 years. Refractive error was determined by subjective refraction and AL was measured using the Zeiss IOL-Master. Digital slit lamp and retroillumination lens photographs were taken and graded for age-related nuclear, cortical, and posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract following the Wisconsin system. After excluding eyes with prior refractive or cataract surgery, 5474 eyes with gradable lens photographs were analyzed. In multivariate analyses adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking status, and education, myopia (spherical equivalent less than -0.5 diopter [D]) was associated with an increased prevalence of nuclear (OR: 4.99, 95% CI: 3.72–6.69) and PSC cataract (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.30-1.39) but not with cortical cataract (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.68-1.08) compared with emmetropia. Per-millimeter increase in AL was not associated with any of the three cataract subtypes. When myopia was defined as spherical equivalent of less than -5.0 D to -6.0 D, the OR of myopia for PSC cataract increased dramatically. Our study shows that myopia, but not AL, was associated with nuclear cataract, supporting the concept of index myopia with aging. Myopia, especially high myopia, may predispose to PSC cataract formation. Clinically, ophthalmologists should be aware that risk of PSC cataract appears to vary by refractive status.

  8. Association of vitamin C with the risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis.

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    Wei, Lin; Liang, Ge; Cai, Chunmei; Lv, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Whether vitamin C is a protective factor for age-related cataract remains unclear. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies of vitamin C and the risk of age-related cataract. Pertinent studies were identified by searching in PubMed and in Webscience. The random effect model was used to combine the results. Meta-regression and subgroups analyses were used to explore potential sources of between-study heterogeneity. Publication bias was estimated using Egger's regression asymmetry test. Finally, 15 articles with 20 studies for vitamin C intake and eight articles with 10 studies for serum ascorbate were included in this meta-analysis. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval of cataract for the highest versus the lowest category of vitamin C intake was 0.814 (0.707-0.938), and the associations were significant in America and Asia. Significant association of cataract risk with highest versus the lowest category of serum ascorbate was found in general [0.704 (0.564-0.879)]. Inverse associations were also found between serum ascorbate and nuclear cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract. Higher vitamin C intake and serum ascorbate might be inversely associated with risk of cataract. Vitamin C intake should be advocated for the primary prevention of cataract. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The aqueous humour antioxidative capacity in different types and color of the age-related cataract

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    Žorić Lepša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Oxidative stress results from increased oxidative processes, decreased antioxidative protection, or both processes simultaneously. Photooxidative stress, as a form of oxidative stress, induced by the energy of solar radiation, today is considered as crucial in the age-related cataractogenesis. Other known and unknown, endogenous and egsogenous factors that contribute to the oxidative stress intensity, can influence the cataract type and brunescence. Thus the oxidative stress intensity and its form might determine the cataract type and brunescence, and also make the efforts in cataract prevention more complex. Hence, the objective of the present paper was to investigate the current amount of antioxidative capacity in aqueous humour during the cataract genesis of different types and pigmentation of cataract. Methods. Transversal review of 80 samples of humour aqueous obtained during extracapsular cataract extraction. Aqueouses were analyzed by tiobarbituric acid (TBA method for the total antioxidant activity estimation, expressed as %iMDA, and by using 0.1 ml of aqueous. Results. The mixed type of cataract showed the statistically significantly lower values of the intensities of antioxidative protection in aqueous humour compared to cortical and nuclear cataracts (p < 0.001, respectively. Between pure nuclear and cortical cataracts we found the small differences of the investigated parameter, but they pointed to the decreased level of antioxidative protection, i.e. the increased intensity of the aqueous humour oxidative stress in the cortical cataract type. A significant correlation between the cortical cataract maturation and the %iMDA (p < 0.05 was found. Conclusions. The role of the oxidative stress, here expressed as the antioxidative capacity of aqueous humour, could not be the same for all the cataract types. The lower level of antioxidative protection of aqueous in brunescent and mixed cataracts may point to the higher

  10. Cataract surgery and age-related macular degeneration. An evidence-based update

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    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataract often coexist in patients and concerns that cataract surgery is associated with an increased risk of incidence or progression of existing AMD has been raised. This systematic review and meta-analysis is focused on presenting the evidence...

  11. Ancestry, Socioeconomic Status, and Age-Related Cataract in Asians: The Singapore Epidemiology of Eye Diseases Study.

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    Chua, Jacqueline; Koh, Jia Yu; Tan, Ava Grace; Zhao, Wanting; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of age-related cataract and its ancestral and socioeconomic risk factors in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Population-based, cross-sectional study. A total of 10 033 adults (3353 Chinese, 3280 Malays, and 3400 Indians) aged >40 years in the Singapore Epidemiology of Eye Diseases Study. Study participants were invited for a structured interview and received a standardized comprehensive eye examination. Digital lens photographs were taken from eyes of each participant and graded for nuclear, cortical, and posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract, following the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System. Prevalence data were compared with the Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) in Australia. Information on medical and lifestyle factors was collected using questionnaires and blood samples. To increase the precision of racial definition, genetic ancestry was derived from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism markers using principal component analysis. Regression models were used to investigate the association of cataract with socioeconomic factors (education and income) and genetic ancestry. Age-related cataract. A total of 8750 participants (94.0%) had gradable lens photographs. The age-standardized prevalence of cataract surgery in Chinese (16.0%), Malays (10.6%), and Indians (20.2%) was higher than in white subjects (4.1%). We found the age-standardized cataract prevalence in Chinese (30.4%), Malays (37.8%), and Indians (33.1%) was higher than in whites (18.5%). Cataract was 1.5 to 2 times more common in Asians and began 10 years earlier than in white subjects. Malays had significantly higher age-standardized prevalence of nuclear, cortical, and PSC cataract than Chinese (PChinese and Indians but not Malays. The presence of visual impairment associated with cataract was higher in people aged ≥60 years and Malays. We showed that people of different Asian ethnicities had a higher prevalence and earlier age of onset of cataract than Europeans. People

  12. [Clinical evaluation of quality of vision with age-related cataract of different morphologies].

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    Peng, Cheng; Zhao, Jiang-yue; Ma, Li-wei; Qu, Bo; Zhang, Jin-song

    2011-11-01

    To investigate influence of cataract morphology on quality of vision in measurement of straylight and contrast sensitivity (CS), and to determine which type of cataract presents higher impairment of quality of vision. In a cross-sectional study, 76 eyes of 76 age-related cataract patients who treated in the Eye Hospital of China Medical University from February 2010 to December 2010 with a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 or better, were classified into 3 groups: cortical cataract group (33 eyes of 33 subjects), nuclear cataract group (20 eyes of 20 subjects), posterior cataract group (23 eyes of 23 subjects), as well as normal control group (26 eyes of 26 subjects). BCVA, CS and intraocular straylight were respectively measured with phoropter, C-Quant straylight meter and CSV-1000E contrast sensitivity tester. Subjective quality of vision was examined with visual function index-14 (VF-14). Age, BCVA, straylight levels and CS at 3, 6, 12 and 18 c/d were 66.1 ± 6.7, 0.58 ± 0.10, 1.50 ± 0.24, 1.33 ± 0.19, 1.21 ± 0.18, 1.01 ± 0.19, and 0.50 ± 0.09 in the cortical group, 67.6 ± 5.0, 0.62 ± 0.11, 1.46 ± 0.11, 1.38 ± 0.19, 1.28 ± 0.19, 1.09 ± 0.18, and 0.54 ± 0.09 in the nuclear group, 60.6 ± 7.1, 0.57 ± 0.09, 1.85 ± 0.26, 1.11 ± 0.12, 1.04 ± 0.13, 0.89 ± 0.13, 0.34 ± 0.11 in the posterior group, and 63.9 ± 7.3, 1.00 ± 0.11, 1.28 ± 0.17, 1.58 ± 0.19, 1.72 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.19, and 0.71 ± 0.11 in the normal eyes, respectively (F = 9.983, F = 103.925, F = 31.760, F = 28.871, F = 65.889, F = 66.453, F = 61.540; P = 0.000). In SNK-q test, BCVA, levels of straylight and CS at each spatial frequency in the normal eyes were significantly different from that in cataracts of different morphologies (P 0.05); age, straylight levels and CS at each spatial frequency in posterior cataract had significant differences compared with that in cortical and nuclear cataracts (P 0.05). The mean visual function index-14 (VF-14) showed significantly

  13. Cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

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    Kessel, Line; Theil, Pernille Koefoed; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcome after cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections in routine clinical practice. Methods We extracted information about patients recorded...... in electronic databases managing anti-VEGF injections and cataract surgery. We compared Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) visual acuity and frequency of anti-VEGF injections before and after cataract surgery. Results We identified 89 eyes from 89 patients who had cataract surgery after being...... with an average of 1.5 in the 6 months before surgery versus 1.7 in the 6 months after surgery (p = 0.25). Visual improvement was greater in patients when the time from latest injection to cataract surgery was lower. Conclusions Cataract surgery improves vision in patients undergoing treatment for neovascular AMD...

  14. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

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    Dong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, conjugated diene (CD, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl (PC, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P<0.05. The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P<0.05, P<0.01. Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P<0.01. And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis.

  15. Intraoperative performance and longterm outcome of phacoemulsification in age-related cataract.

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    Dholakia Sheena

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate intraoperative performance and longterm surgical outcome after phacoemulsification of age-related cataracts. METHODS: Prospective, observational, non-comparative study of 165 consecutive eyes undergoing phacoemulsification with nuclear sclerosis Grade I to III (Scale I to V. Preoperative evaluation included specular microscopy. Phacoemulsification was performed by a single surgeon using a standardised surgical technique under topical anaesthesia. Intraoperatively, effective phaco time (EPT, wound site thermal injury (WSTI, serious complications (eg. vitreous loss, posterior capsule rupture, zonulolysis and intraoperative posterior capsule opacification (plaque were evaluated. Postoperatively, posterior capsule opacification (PCO, Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy rate, corneal endothelial count, best corrected visual acuity and cystoid macular oedema were evaluated. Eyes were examined at 6 months and then yearly for 3 years. RESULTS: Mean ages of 78 males and 87 females were 59.12 +/- 8.56 and 58.34 +/- 7.45 years respectively. EPT was 36 +/- 19 seconds and WSTI occurred in 7 eyes (4.7%. No serious intraocular complications occurred. Intraoperative posterior capsule opacification (plaque was present in 21 eyes (13.93%. Postoperatively, PCO occurred in 8 eyes (4.84% and Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy was performed in 3 eyes (1.8%. Endothelial cell loss was 7.1% at 3 years follow-up. At the end of 3 years follow-up, 146 eyes (88.89% maintained a best corrected visual acuity of > or = 6/12. Cystoid macular oedema did not occur in any eye at 1 and 6 months′ follow-up. CONCLUSION: PCO rates and endothelial cell loss were acceptable. Consistent and reproducible outcome can be obtained after phacoemulsification of age related cataracts (grade I to III.

  16. Discrepant expression of cytokines in inflammation- and age-related cataract patients.

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    Wan Chen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Inflammatory cataracts secondary to Behcet's disease (BD or Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH are thought to result from a pathological dysregulation of cytokines that is different from that of age-related (AR cataracts. However, little is known about the function of cytokines in the development of inflammatory cataracts. The purpose of this study was to identify possible differences in cytokine expression in inflammation- and age-related cataract patients. METHODS: Analysis techniques involving the concomitant use of a cocktail of antibody-coated non-magnetic beads were used to determine the cytokine expression profiles of BD, VKH and AR cataract patients. Furthermore, anterior chamber aqueous flares and inflammatory cells were quantitatively measured with a laser flare cell meter (LFCM. RESULTS: The expressions of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ were analyzed in aqueous humor (AqH, phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated and non-PHA-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from the three types of cataract patients. IL-6 and IFN-γ were identified above the detection limits, but, among the BD and VKH cataract patients, only the levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in both the AqH and PBMC non-PHA cultures compared with the levels observed in the AR cataract patients. In contrast, IFN-γ was significantly elevated in the AqH of the BD cataract patients compared with the VKH and AR cataract patients. In the PHA-stimulated PBMC cultures, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17A were significantly increased, and the IL-6 level was significantly higher in the VKH patients than in the BD and AR cataract patients. The correlation analyses of the cytokines and inflammation indexes of the AqH obtained with the LFCM revealed that only IL-6 was significantly correlated with the inflammation index. CONCLUSION: Distinct expression profiles of cytokines and the correlations of these profiles

  17. Risk factors for visually disabling age-related cataracts in Ibadan ...

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    Objective: To assess the risk factors for visually disabling age related cataracts. Methods: A hospital based case-control study carried out at the university College Hospital Ibadan between May 1996 and March 1997. Three hundred and eighty three cases were matched for age and sex with five hundred and ninety nine ...

  18. Risk factors for endophthalmitis in age-related cataract patients undergoing phacoemulsification

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    Lei Ge

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the risk factors for endophthalmitis in age-related cataract patients undergoing phacoemulsification, in order to provide reasonable intervention countermeasures to reduce the incidence of eddophthalmitis after phacoemulsification, increase the surgery efficacy. METHODS: The 4 500 cases(6 180 eyesof age-related cataract patients with phacoemulsification in our hospital were analyzed, and cases of endopathalmitis needed to have vitreous puncture to collect the sample for analysis, the infectious bacteria, funfal distribution and the operation time, patients age, complications, surgical incision were analyzed for the risk factors of endophthalmitis in senile cataract patients. Data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 18.0.RESULTS: In our study, among the 4500 cases(6180 eyeswith phacoemulsification, the endophthalmitis infection rate was 0.19%(12/6180, the incidence of endophthalmitis was significantly higher in patients with age ≥75 years, with diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease history, and the temporal transparent corneal tunnel incision surgery(PPCONCLUSION: For the cataract patients over 75 years old or with diabetes, interventions should be done well before surgery. Surgical incision should be selected in the surgical procedure and avoid complications such as vitreous overflow and posterior capsular rupture in order to reduce the incidence of intraocular infection and improve the postoperative recovery.

  19. Visual acuity outcomes after cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration: age-related eye disease study report no. 27.

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    Forooghian, Farzin; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate visual acuity outcomes after cataract surgery in patients with varying degrees of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Cohort study. A total of 4757 participants enrolled in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), a prospective, multicenter, epidemiological study of the clinical course of cataract and AMD and a randomized controlled trial of antioxidants and minerals. Standardized lens and fundus photographs, performed at baseline and annual visits, were graded by a centralized reading center using standardized protocols for severity of AMD and lens opacities. History of cataract surgery was obtained every 6 months. Analyses were conducted using multivariate logistic regression. The change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after cataract surgery compared with preoperative BCVA. Visual acuity results were analyzed for 1939 eyes that had cataract surgery during AREDS. The mean time from cataract surgery to measurement of postoperative BCVA was 6.9 months. After adjustment for age at surgery, gender, type, and severity of cataract, the mean change in visual acuity at the next study visit after the cataract surgery was as follows: Eyes without AMD gained 8.4 letters of acuity (P<0.0001), eyes with mild AMD gained 6.1 letters of visual acuity (P<0.0001), eyes with moderate AMD gained 3.9 letters (P<0.0001), and eyes with advanced AMD gained 1.9 letters (P = 0.04). The statistically significant gain in visual acuity after cataract surgery was maintained an average of 1.4 years after cataract surgery. On average, participants with varying severity of AMD benefited from cataract surgery with an increase in visual acuity postoperatively. This average gain in visual acuity persisted for at least 18 months.

  20. The Association of Outdoor Activity and Age-Related Cataract in a Rural Population of Taizhou Eye Study: Phase 1 Report.

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    Yating Tang

    Full Text Available To study the relationship between outdoor activity and risk of age-related cataract (ARC in a rural population of Taizhou Eye Study (phrase 1 report.A population-based, cross-sectional study of 2006 eligible rural adults (≥45 years old from Taizhou Eye Study was conducted from Jul. to Sep. 2012. Participants underwent detailed ophthalmologic examinations including uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, intraocular pressure (IOP, slit lamp and fundus examinations as well as questionnaires about previous outdoor activity and sunlight protection methods. ARC was recorded by LOCSⅢ classification system. The prevalence of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract were assessed separately for the risk factors and its association with outdoor activity.Of all 2006 eligible participants, 883 (44.0% adults were diagnosed with ARC. The prevalence rates of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract per person were 41.4%, 30.4% and 1.5%, respectively. Women had a higher tendency of nuclear and cortical cataract than men (OR = 1.559, 95% CI 1.204-2.019 and OR = 1.862, 95% CI 1.456-2.380, respectively. Adults with high myopia had a higher prevalence of nuclear cataract than adults without that (OR = 2.528, 95% CI 1.055-6.062. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that age was risk factor of nuclear (OR = 1.190, 95% CI 1.167-1.213 and cortical (OR = 1.203, 95% CI 1.181-1.226 cataract; eyes with fundus diseases was risk factor of posterior subcapsular cataract (OR = 6.529, 95% CI 2.512-16.970. Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor of cortical cataract (OR = 1.043, 95% CI 1.004-1.083. The risk of cortical cataract increased 4.3% (95% CI 0.4%-8.3% when outdoor activity time increased every one hour. Furthermore, the risk of cortical cataract increased 1.1% (95% CI 0.1%-2.0% when cumulative UV-B exposure time increased every one year.Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor for cortical

  1. The Association of Outdoor Activity and Age-Related Cataract in a Rural Population of Taizhou Eye Study: Phase 1 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yating; Ji, Yinghong; Ye, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Cai, Lei; Xu, Jianming; Lu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between outdoor activity and risk of age-related cataract (ARC) in a rural population of Taizhou Eye Study (phrase 1 report). A population-based, cross-sectional study of 2006 eligible rural adults (≥45 years old) from Taizhou Eye Study was conducted from Jul. to Sep. 2012. Participants underwent detailed ophthalmologic examinations including uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), slit lamp and fundus examinations as well as questionnaires about previous outdoor activity and sunlight protection methods. ARC was recorded by LOCSⅢ classification system. The prevalence of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract were assessed separately for the risk factors and its association with outdoor activity. Of all 2006 eligible participants, 883 (44.0%) adults were diagnosed with ARC. The prevalence rates of cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular cataract per person were 41.4%, 30.4% and 1.5%, respectively. Women had a higher tendency of nuclear and cortical cataract than men (OR = 1.559, 95% CI 1.204-2.019 and OR = 1.862, 95% CI 1.456-2.380, respectively). Adults with high myopia had a higher prevalence of nuclear cataract than adults without that (OR = 2.528, 95% CI 1.055-6.062). Multivariable logistic regression revealed that age was risk factor of nuclear (OR = 1.190, 95% CI 1.167-1.213) and cortical (OR = 1.203, 95% CI 1.181-1.226) cataract; eyes with fundus diseases was risk factor of posterior subcapsular cataract (OR = 6.529, 95% CI 2.512-16.970). Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor of cortical cataract (OR = 1.043, 95% CI 1.004-1.083). The risk of cortical cataract increased 4.3% (95% CI 0.4%-8.3%) when outdoor activity time increased every one hour. Furthermore, the risk of cortical cataract increased 1.1% (95% CI 0.1%-2.0%) when cumulative UV-B exposure time increased every one year. Outdoor activity was an independent risk factor for cortical

  2. Intraocular lenses for the treatment of age-related cataracts: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the report is to examine the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of various intraocular lenses (IOLs) for the treatment of age-related cataracts. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION A cataract is a hardening and clouding of the normally transparent crystalline lens that may result in a progressive loss of vision depending on its size, location and density. The condition is typically bilateral, seriously compromises visual acuity and contrast sensitivity and increases glare. Cataracts can also affect people at any age, however, they usually occur as a part of the natural aging process. The occurrence of cataracts increases with age from about 12% at age 50 years, to 60% at age 70. In general, approximately 50% of people 65 year of age or older have cataracts. Mild cataracts can be treated with a change in prescription glasses, while more serious symptoms are treated by surgical removal of the cataract and implantation of an IOL. In Ontario, the estimated prevalence of cataracts increased from 697,000 in 1992 to 947,000 in 2004 (35.9% increase, 2.4% annual increase). The number of cataract surgeries per 1,000 individuals at risk of cataract increased from 64.6 in 1992 to 140.4 in 1997 (61.9% increase, 10.1% annual increase) and continued to steadily increase to 115.7 in 2004 (10.7% increase, 5.2% increase per year). IOLs are classified either as monofocal, multifocal, or accommodative. Traditionally, monofocal (i.e.. fixed focusing power) IOLs are available as replacement lenses but their implantation can cause a loss of the eye's accommodative capability (which allows variable focusing). Patients thus usually require eyeglasses after surgery for reading and near vision tasks. Multifocal IOLs aim to improve near and distant vision and obviate the need for glasses. Potential disadvantages include reduced contrast sensitivity, halos around lights and glare. Accommodating IOLs are designed to move with ciliary body contraction during

  3. Epigenetic Regulation of Werner Syndrome Gene in Age-Related Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the promoter methylation and histone modification of WRN (Werner syndrome gene, a DNA repair gene, and their relationship with the gene expression in age-related cataract (ARC lens. Methods. We collected the lenses after cataract surgery from 117ARC patients and 39 age-matched non-ARC. WRN expression, DNA methylation and histone modification around the CpG island were assessed. The methylation status of Human-lens-epithelium cell (HLEB-3 was chemically altered to observe the relationship between methylation and expression of WRN. Results. The WRN expression was significantly decreased in the ARC anterior lens capsules comparing with the control. The CpG island of WRN promoter in the ARC anterior lens capsules displayed hypermethylation comparing with the controls. The WRN promoter was almost fully methylated in the cortex of ARC and control lens. Acetylated H3 was lower while methylated H3-K9 was higher in ARC anterior lens capsules than that of the controls. The expression of WRN in HLEB-3 increased after demethylation of the cells. Conclusions. A hypermethylation in WRN promoter and altered histone modification in anterior lens capsules might contribute to the ARC mechanism. The data suggest an association of altered DNA repair capability in lens with ARC pathogenesis.

  4. Glutathione S-transferase omega-2 polymorphism Asn142Asp modifies the risk of age-related cataract in smokers and subjects exposed to ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenkovic, Miroslav; Radic, Tanja; Stefanovic, Ivan; Coric, Vesna; Sencanic, Ivan; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Matic, Marija; Jaksic, Vesna; Simic, Tatjana; Savic-Radojevic, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and 2 have a unique range of enzymatic activities, including the regeneration of ascorbate by their dehydroascorbate reductase activities. Because these enzymes could have a protective role from oxidative damage in the lens, the question of whether the two coding glutathione S-transferase omega polymorphisms confer the risk of age-related cataract was addressed. rs4925 (Ala140Asp) of glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and rs156697 (Asn142Asp) of glutathione S-transferase omega-2 polymorphisms in 100 patients with age-related cataract and 130 controls were assessed. Presence of one mutant GSTO1*Asp or GSTO2*Asp allele did not contribute independently towards the risk of cataract; however, homozygous carriers of GSTO1*Asp/GSTO2*Asp haplotype demonstrated 3.42-fold enhanced risk of cataract development (95% confidence interval = 0.84-13.93; P = 0.086). When GSTO genotype was analysed in association with smoking or professional exposure to ultraviolet irradiation, carriers of at least one mutant GSTO2*Asp allele had increased risk of cataract development in comparison with individuals with wild-type GSTO2*Asn/Asn with no history of smoking or ultraviolet exposure (odds ratio = 6.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.81-16.21, P = 0.005; odds ratio = 4.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.23-13.74, P = 0.022, respectively). Regarding the distribution of particular glutathione S-transferase omega genotype and cataract type, the highest frequency of mutant GSTO2*Asp allele was found in patients with nuclear cataract. The results indicate that mutant GSTO2*Asp genotype is associated with increased risk of age-related cataract in smokers and ultraviolet-exposed subjects, suggesting a role of inefficient ascorbate regeneration in cataract development. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  5. Lutein/zeaxanthin for the treatment of age-related cataract: AREDS2 randomized trial report no. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Ferris, Frederick L; Wong, Wai T; Agron, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Sperduto, Robert; Danis, Ronald; Chandra, Suresh R; Blodi, Barbara A; Domalpally, Amitha; Elman, Michael J; Antoszyk, Andrew N; Ruby, Alan J; Orth, David; Bressler, Susan B; Fish, Gary E; Hubbard, George B; Klein, Michael L; Friberg, Thomas R; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Toth, Cynthia A; Bernstein, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Age-related cataract is a leading cause of visual impairment in the United States. The prevalence of age-related cataract is increasing, with an estimated 30.1 million Americans likely to be affected by 2020. To determine whether daily oral supplementation with lutein/zeaxanthin affects the risk for cataract surgery. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), a multicenter, double-masked clinical trial, enrolled 4203 participants, aged 50 to 85 years, at risk for progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration. Participants were randomly assigned to daily placebo; lutein/zeaxanthin, 10mg/2mg; omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, 1 g; or a combination to evaluate the effects on the primary outcome of progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration. Cataract surgery was documented at annual study examination with the presence of pseudophakia or aphakia, or reported during telephone calls at 6-month intervals between study visits. Annual best-corrected visual acuity testing was performed. A secondary outcome of AREDS2 was to evaluate the effects of lutein/zeaxanthin on the subsequent need for cataract surgery. A total of 3159 AREDS2 participants were phakic in at least 1 eye and 1389 of 6027 study eyes underwent cataract surgery during the study, with median follow-up of 4.7 years. The 5-year probability of progression to cataract surgery in the no lutein/zeaxanthin group was 24%. For lutein/zeaxanthin vs no lutein/zeaxanthin, the hazard ratios for progression to cataract surgery was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.84-1.10; P = .54). For participants in the lowest quintile of dietary intake of lutein/zeaxanthin, the hazard ratio comparing lutein/zeaxanthin vs no lutein/zeaxanthin for progression to cataract surgery was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48-0.96; P = .03). The hazard ratio for 3 or more lines of vision loss was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.93-1.13; P = .61 for lutein/zeaxanthin vs no lutein/zeaxanthin). Daily supplementation with lutein/zeaxanthin had no statistically

  6. Visual acuity after cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration: age-related eye disease study 2 report number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nancy; Nicholson, Benjamin P; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Bressler, Susan B; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Chew, Emily Y

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate visual acuity outcomes after cataract surgery in persons with varying degrees of severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Cohort study. A total of 1232 eyes of 793 participants who underwent cataract surgery during the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2, a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial of nutritional supplements for treatment of AMD. Preoperative and postoperative characteristics of participants who underwent cataract extraction during the 5-year trial were analyzed. Both clinical data and standardized red-reflex lens and fundus photographs were obtained at baseline and annually. Photographs were graded by a centralized reading center for cortical and posterior subcapsular lens opacities and for AMD severity. Cataract surgery was documented at annual study visits or by history during the 6-month telephone calls. Analyses were conducted using multivariate repeated-measures regression. Change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after cataract surgery compared with preoperative BCVA. Adjusting for age at time of surgery, gender, interval between preoperative and postoperative visits, and type and severity of cataract, the mean changes in visual acuity were as follows: eyes with mild AMD (n = 30) gained 11.2 letters (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-15.5), eyes with moderate AMD (n = 346) gained 11.1 letters (95% CI, 9.1-13.2), eyes with severe AMD (n = 462) gained 8.7 letters (95% CI, 6.7-10.7), eyes with noncentral geographic atrophy (n = 70) gained 8.9 letters (95% CI, 5.8-12.1), and eyes with advanced AMD (central geographic atrophy, neovascular disease, or both; n = 324) gained 6.8 letters (95% CI, 4.9-8.8). The visual acuity gain across all AMD severity groups was statistically significant from preoperative values (P < 0.0001). Mean visual acuities improved significantly after cataract surgery across varying degrees of AMD severity. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier

  7. Patient Awareness of Cataract and Age-related Macular Degeneration among the Korean Elderly: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankil; Jang, Yong Jung; Lee, Hyung Keun; Kang, Hye Young

    2017-12-01

    Age-related eye disease is often considered part of natural aging. Lack of awareness of eye conditions can result in missed treatment. We investigated the rates of awareness of cataract and age-related macular degeneration, the most common age-related eye-diseases, and the associated factors among elderly Koreans. We identified 7,403 study subjects (≥40 years old) with cataract or age-related macular degeneration based on ophthalmic examination results during the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2010 and 2012. We assessed whether patients were aware of their eye condition based on a previous diagnosis by a physician. The average awareness rate over the 3-year study period was 23.69% in subjects with cataract and 1.45% in subjects with age-related macular degeneration. Logistic regression analysis showed that patients with cataract were more likely to recognize their condition if they had myopia (odds ratio, 2.08), hyperopia (odds ratio, 1.33), family history of eye disease (odds ratio, 1.44), or a past eye examination (odds ratio, 4.07-29.10). The presence of diabetes mellitus was also a significant predictor of patient awareness of cataract (odds ratio, 1.88). Poor patient recognition of eye disease among the Korean elderly highlights the seriousness of this potential public health problem in our aging society. Pre-existing eye-related conditions and diabetes were significant predictors of awareness; therefore, patients in frequent contact with their doctors have a greater chance of detecting eye disease. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  8. The Correlation of Age and Postoperative Visual Acuity for Age-Related Cataract

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    Xiaochun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Clinically, what is the best time for age-related cataract (ARC patients to receive surgeries and get the most benefits is important. We explored the relationship between age and presenting postoperative visual acuity (POVA in patients from rural China. Methods. Three Lifeline Express Hospital Eye-Train missions of Peking University People’s Hospital were chosen. At the first day after surgery, 3452 ARC eyes with the presenting POVA ≥ 6/60 were enrolled. The relationship between age and POVA was analyzed statistically. Results. In these three missions, there were more female patients than males; the ratio of females to males was 1.71. The average age of females was older than males. Overall, the percentages of patients with good visual outcomes (≥6/18 were significantly decreased with aging. Different regions had variations, but the trends were the same. There was weak linear correlation between age and POVA. The correlations of females were stronger than males in Yuncheng and Sanmenxia and weaker than males in Zhoukou. Conclusion. The good visual outcomes of presenting POVA were significantly decreased with aging and there were weak linear correlations between age and POVA in rural China. The linear correlation might be influenced by the difference of gender and region.

  9. Vitamin E and risk of age-related cataract: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufei; Jiang, Wenjie; Xie, Zhutian; Wu, Wenlong; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between vitamin E and age-related cataract (ARC). The fixed- or random-effect model was selected based on heterogeneity. Meta-regression was used to explore potential sources of between-study heterogeneity. Publication bias was evaluated using Begg's test. The dose-response relationship was assessed by a restricted cubic spline model. Relevant studies were identified by a search of PubMed and the Cochrane Library to May 2014, without language restrictions. Studies involved samples of people of all ages. Dietary vitamin E intake, dietary and supplemental vitamin E intake, and high serum tocopherol levels were significantly associated with decreased risk of ARC, the pooled relative risk was 0·73 (95% CI 0·58, 0·92), 0·86 (95% CI 0·75, 0·99) and 0·77 (95% CI 0·66, 0·91), respectively. Supplemental vitamin E intake was non-significantly associated with ARC risk (relative risk=0·92; 95% CI 0·78, 1·07). The findings from dose-response analysis showed evidence of a non-linear association between dietary vitamin E intake and ARC. The risk of ARC decreased with dietary vitamin E intake from 7 mg/d (relative risk=0·94; 95% CI 0·90, 0·97). The findings of the meta-analysis indicated that dietary vitamin E intake, dietary and supplemental vitamin E intake, and high level of serum tocopherol might be significantly associated with reduced ARC risk.

  10. Antioxidant content and cytological examination of aqueous fluid from patients with age-related cataracts at different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Sun, J; Dang, G F; Gao, Y; Duan, L; Wu, X Y

    2015-06-11

    We investigated the antioxidant content and conducted a cytological examination of the aqueous fluid and lenses of patients with age-related cataracts at different stages. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) in the aqueous fluid and lenses were determined by the xanthine oxidase method, the colorimetric method, and the improved reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion method, respectively. SOD, CAT, and GSH-PX content in the aqueous fluid and lenses decreased significantly with increasing lenticular nucleus hardness grading. However, the number of white blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils did not vary significantly with varying lenticular nucleus hardness. Antioxidant content examination is an important quantitative indicator for clinical diagnosis and treatment of age-related cataracts. Antioxidant content in the aqueous fluid and lenses decreased significantly with increasing lenticular nucleus hardness grading. Lenses at hardness level V had the lowest content of antioxidants.

  11. The Gender-Dependent Association between Obesity and Age-Related Cataracts in Middle-Aged Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Soon; Han, Kyungdo; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Sae-Young; Park, Young-Hoon; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Kang-Sook; Lee, Won-Chul; Park, Yong Gyu; Na, Kyung-Sun; Park, Yong-Moon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of central and abdominal obesity with the prevalence of cataracts in a middle-aged Korean population. This retrospective cross-sectional study was based on the data collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2009, in which 4,914 subjects were examined. Ophthalmological examinations were performed to determine the presence of a nuclear, cortical, or posterior subcapsular cataract. Both general obesity (a body mass index ≥25 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (a waist circumference ≥90 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women) were significantly associated with the occurrence of cataracts among middle-aged women [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.69; and aOR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.06-1.85, respectively], while abdominal obesity was significantly inversely associated with the occurrence of cataracts among middle-aged men (aOR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58-1.01; and aOR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49-0.89, respectively). We report a difference in the association between obesity and the prevalence of cataracts based on gender.

  12. Lens aging in relation to nutritional determinants and possible risk factors for age-related cataract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Broekmans, W.M.R.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Poppel, G. van; Norren, D. van

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether nutritional factors and possible risk factors for cataract influence the lens optical density (LOD). Design: Three hundred seventy-six subjects, aged 18 to 75 years, were recruited. In a cross-sectional design, serum was analyzed for lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C,

  13. Risk factors for visually disabling age-related cataracts in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A risk was seen to exist between visually disabling cataract and ultraviolet exposure (O.R 1.45; P 0.05) and topical steroid use (O.R 1.57; p>0.05). Exposure to alcohol was found to be protective (O.R 0.66; P < 0.05) while no risk was observed with severe diarrhoea (O.R 0.85; ...

  14. Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 in Combination and Age-Related Cataract in a Randomized Trial of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, William G; Glynn, Robert J; Chew, Emily Y; Albert, Christine M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2016-01-01

    To examine the incidence of cataract and cataract extraction in a trial of folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12. In a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial, 5442 female health professionals aged 40 years or older with preexisting cardiovascular disease (CVD) or three or more CVD risk factors were randomly assigned to receive a combination of folic acid (2.5 mg/day), vitamin B6 (50 mg/day), and vitamin B12 (1 mg/day), or placebo. A total of 3925 of these women did not have a diagnosis of cataract at baseline and were included in this analysis. The primary endpoint was age-related cataract, defined as an incident age-related lens opacity, responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity to 20/30 or worse, based on self-report confirmed by medical record review. Extraction of incident age-related cataract was a secondary endpoint of the trial. During an average of 7.3 years of treatment and follow-up, 408 cataracts and 275 cataract extractions were documented. There were 215 cataracts in the combination treatment group and 193 in the placebo group (hazard ratio, HR, 1.10, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.90-1.33; p = 0.36). For the secondary endpoint of cataract extraction, there were 155 in the combination treatment group and 120 in the placebo group (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.01-1.63; p = 0.04). In this large-scale randomized trial of women at high risk of CVD, daily supplementation with a combination of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 had no significant effect on cataract, but may have increased the risk of cataract extraction.

  15. Some parameters of the oxidative stress in lens, humour aqueous and serum of patients with diabetes and age-related cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žorić Lepša

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary hypothesis considers the oxidative stress as a crucial event in age-related processes in the body, as well as in the age-related cataract formation. The secondary aging factors accelerate ageing processes. One of them is diabetes. With the aim of investigation of the noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type II influence on cataract genesis here were analyzed contents of the lipid oxidation products (lipid peroxides - LP and total sulfhydryle groups (TSH in the lens’ corticonuclear blocks and antioxidative capacity in their humour aqueous expressed as percent of induced malondyaldehyde (% iMDA in 14 samples obtained from patients with cataract and diabetes mellitus type II (without diabetic complications and compared to 66 samples of patients with cataract without diabetes, as well as some parameters of the oxidative stress in serums (content of vitamin C, acrobat - A dehydroascorbate - DA and their relation, vitamin E, glutathione - GSH peroxidase - P and catalase - Cat activity, content of malondyaldehyde - MDA and % iMDA of 27 patients with age-related cataract and diabetes mellitus type II (without complications, and compared to the other 135 age-related cataract patients. Also were analyzed frequencies of the secondary senium diseases in a clinical group of 162 patients with cataract and sex and age matched 55 examined people without cataract, as a control group. Patients with diabetes and cataract have lower values of almost all investigated parameters of antioxidative defense in their serum and higher level of the lipid peroxidation products. Level of glutathione in their serums is significantly lower (p<0.05. Intensity of lipid peroxidation in corticonuclear lens blocks is higher in patients with diabetes, whereas their total sulfhydryle groups and % iMDA in humour aqueous shows lower antioxidant capacity in the same group, probably because of higher intensity of oxidative stress. Also, by investigation of frequencies of the

  16. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Prevalence Rates for Cataract by Age, and Race/Ethnicity The risk of cataract increases with each ... Race/Ethnicity 2010 Prevalence Rates of Cataract by Race In 2010, white Americans age 40 and older ...

  17. Anterior internal lenticonus accompanied by congenital nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Sun, Chuan-Bin; Yao, Ke

    2011-12-01

    Internal lenticonus is a very rare morphologic abnormality of crystalline lens which has been reported in only several cases in the literature. We herein reported the clinical characteristics and surgical findings of the anterior internal lenticonus accompanied by congenital nuclear cataract. Cataract extraction accompanied with intraocular lens implantation was uneventfully performed, and a good visual outcome was achieved in this case. Viral infection during embryonal and fetal period might account for the formation of the anterior internal lenticonus and congenital nuclear cataract in our case.

  18. Age-related differences in signaling efficiency of human lens cells underpin differential wound healing response rates following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Lucy Jean; Duncan, George; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2013-01-14

    Cataract surgery is blighted by posterior capsule opacification (PCO), which is more severe and frequent in the young than the elderly (>60 years). Our aim was to understand the biological basis for these age-related differences in PCO/wound healing rates. Human capsular bags were prepared by cataract surgery on donor lenses (young [60 years] groups) and maintained in serum-free Eagle's minimum essential medium. Cell growth was determined using the MTS assay. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) levels were determined using ELISA. Protein synthesis rates were elucidated by 35S-methionine incorporation. U0126, SB203580, and SP600125 were used to disrupt ERK-, p38-, and JNK-mediated signaling, respectively. Level of total and phospho-ERK, -c-jun, -P38, and -JNK plus cytokines were detected using a BIOPLEX array system. Following a 2-day culture period, significant decreases in IL-1β and IL-6, and increases in IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, and VEGF in the >60 years group were observed compared with their younger counterparts. Capsular bags (cells and capsule) from aged donors contained greater than or equal levels of HGF and FGF than younger counterparts and had greater rates of protein synthesis. Inhibition of ERK, p38, and JNK signaling significantly suppressed cell coverage on the posterior capsule. pERK, p-c-jun, p-p38, and pJNK were consistently lower in aged cell populations; total signaling protein expression was unaffected by age. Serum stimulation increased pERK, p-c-jun, and pJNK levels in cells of all ages; p-p38 was significantly increased in the >60 years group only. Ligand availability to cells is not a limiting factor as we age, but the ability to convert this resource into signaling activity is. We therefore propose that overall signaling efficiency is reduced as a function of age, which consequently limits wound-healing response rates after injury.

  19. Impacts of age-related failures on nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.; Krantz, E.A.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Aging-related failure data from nine light water reactor safety, support, and power conversion systems have been extracted from an operational data base. Systems and components within the systems that are most affected by aging are identified. In addition, information on aging-related root causes of component failures has been extracted for service water and Class 1E electrical power distribution systems. Engineering insights are presented, and preliminary quantification of the importance of aging-related root causes for a service water system is provided

  20. TUG1 promotes lens epithelial cell apoptosis by regulating miR-421/caspase-3 axis in age-related cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoxing; Song, Huiyang; Chen, Lei; Yang, Weihua; Nan, Kaihui; Lu, Peirong

    2017-07-01

    Age-related cataract is among the most common chronic disorders of ageing and the apoptosis of lens epithelial cells contributes to non-congenital cataract development. We amid to explore the role of TUG1 and miR-421 in the age-related cataract. The expression level of TUG1, miR-421 and caspase-3 were detected by RT-qPCR. The apoptotic-related protein, caspase-3, Bax and blc-2 were analyzed by western blot. We performed ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to induce SAR01/04 cell apoptosis which was analyzed by flow cytometry. RIP pull-down and luciferase reporter assay were used to verified the combination and regulating among TUG1, miR-421 and caspase-3. Here, we observed that the expression level of TUG1 and caspase-3 in the anterior lens capsules of age-related cataract were significantly higher and miR-421 was significantly lower than that in the normal anterior lens capsules. The apoptosis-related protein, caspase-3, Bax and blc-2 were abnormal expression in the anterior lens capsules of age-related cataract tissue. Our data showed that the expression level of TUG1 and caspase-3 and cell apoptosis rate in SAR01/04 cells treated with UV irradiation was remarkably higher than that in the control. TUG1 negatively regulated miR-421 expression and promoted UV irradiation-induced SAR01/04 cell apoptosis. However, miR-421 inhibitor and pcDNA-caspase-3 could reverse the action of the SRA01/04 cell apoptosis by si-TUG1, which suggested TUG1 promoted UV irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulating miR-421 expression. Furthermore, this study confirmed TUG1 could been in combination with miR-421, and TUG1 and caspase-3 were both a directly target of miR-421. TUG1 modulated lens epithelial cell apoptosis through miR-421/caspase-3 axis. These findings will offer a novel insight into the pathogenesis of cataract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of age-related degradation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, Frank E.

    2004-01-01

    Life extension for nuclear power plants has been studied in the USA for the last six years, largely supported by EPRI, DOE and the USNRC. Though there are diverse opinions for the strategies and priorities of life extension and aging management, one common conclusion has been formulated regarding the need of current maintenance programs having to focus on aging and degradation management. Such program, called 'Maintenance Effectiveness Evaluation and Enhancement' or M3E for short, has been developed to assist plant operators to upgrade and enhance existing programs by integrating aging/degradation management activities for important or critical equipment and components. The key elements of the M3E program consist of the definition and selection of the critical components or commodities to be included in the scope, the survey/inventory of the current programs and their respective action steps, frequencies, corrective measures and extent of coverage, the component/commodity degradation mechanism, sites and severity, safety functions and service environments and lastly, the correlation of degradation/aging with the individual maintenance activities. The degree of correlation provides a measure of effectiveness and the opportunity to identify/specify needed enhancements, abandonment or generation of new maintenance activities. Implementation of the activities can then be prioritized at the option of the plant staff. (author)

  2. Public opinion on age-related degradation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to shed light on the public opinion on age-related degradation at nuclear power plants, namely, on how the general public recognizes or views age-related degradation, which is a safety-related issue and one of the factors contributing to accidents and failures which occur at nuclear power plants. The second objective is to look into the impacts of the accident at Mihama Unit 3, which was caused by a failure to check on the piping wall thickness, on the public opinion on age-related degradation. The first survey was conducted in August 2003, followed by the second survey in October 2004, two months after the accident. The surveys found that the age-related degradation is being perceived by people as one of the risk factors that affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The characteristics of the citizens' perceptions toward age-related degradation in the form of piping cracks are that: (a) many respondents feel uneasy but a relatively few people consider that nuclear operators are technologically capable of coping with this problem; (b) many people believe that radioactivity may be released; and (c) numerous respondents consider that signs of cracks must be thoroughly detected through inspections, while on the other hand, a large percentage of the respondents attribute the accident to improper inspections/maintenance. Based on these results, the government and nuclear operators are expected to give most illuminating explanation on the current situation of and remedial measures against age-related degradation at nuclear power plants. As for the effects of the Mihama-3 accident on the public opinion on age-related degradation, it was revealed that the accident has not so significantly affected the general view for the safety of nuclear power plants, but has newly or strongly aroused people's consciousness of two of the risk factors - improper inspections/maintenance and the age-related degradation of piping. (author)

  3. Clinical evaluation on the coaxial microincision cataract surgery in hard nuclear cataracts

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    Qing-Cheng Shi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess and compare the results of 2.2mm microincision coaxial cataract surgery(MCCSphacoemulsification with the conventional 3.0mm MCCS in hard nuclear cataracts. METHODS: Totally 132 eyes with hard cataract(Ⅳ level and abovewere randomized to two groups: 2.2mm MCCS(group 1:60 eyesand 3.0mm MCCS(group 2:72 eyes. All patients underwent standard phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation surgery by one experienced surgeon. The average ultrasound power(AVEwas recorded during the operation. The incidences of capsule rupture and postoperative corneal edema were compared.Visual acuity, surgically induced astigmatism(SIAand the descent rate of endothelial cell density were compared at intervals of 1 day, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. Statistic analysis was taken by Student's t test and Chi square test. RESULTS: There was no significant difference on the incidences of capsule rupture, postoperative corneal edema and AVE(P> 0.05between the two groups(3.3%, 10.0%, 65.09±20.15and(4.2%, 11.1%, 69.13±15.44. One day after the surgery, the 2.2mm MCCS group showed better uncorrected visual acuity as compared to the 3.0mm MCCS group(P < 0.05. There were no significant differences on best-corrected visual acuity on 1 month and 3 months after the surgery. There was no significant difference on the descent rate of endothelial cell density(16.54%±10.20%, 17.69%±10.65%3 months after the surgery. One day, 1 month and 3 months after the surgery, SIA was 0.77±0.31,0.66±0.29, 0.52±0.25D in the 2.2mm MCCS group, and 1.41±0.73,0.98±0.61D,0.82±0.35D in the 3.0mm MCCS group, respectively. The differences were statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The operative safety of the 2.2mm MCCS group were the same as 3.0mm MCCS group with the hard nuclear cataracts. The 2.2mm MCCS phacoemulsification could significantly reduce SIA and get better earlier visual rehabilitation.

  4. Relationship of 10-year change in refraction to nuclear cataract and axial length findings from an older population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotedar, Reena; Mitchell, Paul; Burlutsky, George; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-08-01

    To examine 10-year changes and other influences on spherical equivalent refraction (SER) in older persons. Prospective population-based study. Three thousand six hundred fifty-four Blue Mountains Eye Study participants 49 or older at baseline (1992-1994) were observed after 5 years (2335; 75% of survivors) and 10 years (1952; 76% of survivors). At each visit, subjective refraction was performed using modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocols. Spherical equivalent refraction was calculated as sphere + half cylinder power. Axial length was measured only at the 10-year examinations, using an IOL Master. Right phakic eyes with best-corrected visual acuity > 20/40 (n = 1340) at baseline and 10-year examinations were included. Temporal refractive change. Over the decade, a hyperopic shift was observed among persons or = 75, respectively. Apart from age, myopic refractive change was strongly associated with baseline nuclear cataract; mean changes of -0.96 and 0.26 D were observed in eyes with and without nuclear cataract, respectively (P or = 85-year-olds. After adjusting for age, education, and nuclear cataract, axial length measured 10 years later was not associated with change in SER (P = 0.34). This longitudinal study confirms a hyperopic shift in persons younger than 65 and a myopic shift for older ages. Although underlying causes for this age-related hyperopic shift are unknown, it does not appear related to axial length. The myopic shift, however, is most likely caused by increasing nuclear cataract.

  5. Noninvasive Keratograph assessment of tear film break-up time and location in patients with age-related cataracts and dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongxiang; Ye, Hongfei; Xu, Jianjiang; Lu, Yi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate tear-film break-up time and spatial distribution via noninvasive Keratograph 4 in patients with cataracts and dry eye syndrome (DES). Noninvasive first break-up time (NIKf-BUT) and average break-up time (NIKav-BUT) were evaluated via Keratograph 4 in patients with age-related cataracts and DES. The location and size of tear break regions were recorded and the distribution of first break-up areas was summarized. Patients also underwent conventional break-up time assessments (TBUT test and Schirmer's test). A total of 43 left and 43 right eyes were examined. There was no significant difference between TBUT and NIKav-BUT. NIKf-BUT was significantly shorter than TBUT. Both NIKf-BUT and NIKav-BUT correlated positively with TBUT. In both the left and right eye, the most common first break-up areas were the peripheral domain of the inferior precorneal surface and the central domain of the superior portion. The Keratograph 4 appears to provide an effective noninvasive method for assessing tear film, enabling effective preoperative evaluation of tear film break-up regularity, informing the location of the incision and reducing the probability of postoperative DES.

  6. Delayed presentation of retained nuclear fragment following phacoemulsification cataract extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Ali; Kaufman, Stephen C; Koozekanani, Dara D; Meduri, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    An 87-year-old woman presented 11 months after routine phacoemulsification cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in her left eye complaining of the abrupt onset of redness and decreased vision in that eye. Examination revealed a mild anterior chamber reaction and significant corneal edema. The eye was minimally responsive to topical steroid therapy, and initial serial slitlamp examinations with gonioscopy were unrevealing. After multiple head-positioning maneuvers were performed, a retained nuclear fragment was uncovered. The nuclear fragment was aspirated and liquefied by the phacoemulsification device in the anterior chamber. A retained nuclear fragment with an intact posterior capsule is a recognized cause of inflammation in the immediate postoperative presentation. Delayed presentation of symptoms is rare and presumably secondary to sequestration of the fragment behind the iris. We present a case and a review of the literature regarding sequestered retained nuclear fragments following what is initially thought to be uneventful cataract extraction. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of αA-crystallin in high myopia-induced dark nuclear cataract.

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    Xiang-Jia Zhu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the etiology of early-onset dark nucleus in high-myopic patients and its relationship with the epigenetic regulation of αA-crystallin (CRYAA. METHODS: We reviewed clinical data from patients who underwent cataract surgery at our center in 2012. Lens epithelial samples were collected during capsulorhexis, whereas young lens epithelium was donated. Cataract type and severity were graded according to the Lens Opacity Classification System III (LOCS III. DNA methylation was analyzed by pyrosequencing the CpG islands of the CRYAA promoter in the following groups: Age-Related Cataract (ARC Nuclear Color (NC 2-3; High-Myopic Cataract (HMC NC2-3; ARC NC5-6; HMC NC5-6; and in young lenses graded NC1. We analyzed CRYAA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcription PCR, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The odds ratio of dark nucleus in high-myopic patients was 5.16 (95% confidence interval: 3.98-6.69; p<0.001. CpG islands in lens epithelial CRYAA promoter in the HMC NC5-6 Group exhibited the highest methylation of all the groups, but no statistically significant differences were evident between the HMC NC2-3 and ARC NC2-3 Groups. Likewise, CRYAA mRNA and protein levels in the HMC NC5-6 Group were significantly lower than the ARC NC5-6 Group and high-myopic controls. CONCLUSIONS: High myopia is a risk factor for dark nucleus. Downregulation of CRYAA via the hypermethylation of CpG islands in its promoter could underlie the earlier onset of dark nucleus in high-myopic patients.

  8. Overview of the age-related degradation of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    License renewal of nuclear power plants is an issue of increasing interest to the U.S. nuclear industry and the U.S. NRC. This paper presents and evaluates the plausible age-related degradation mechanisms that may affect the concrete and steel containment structures and other Class I structures to continue to perform their safety functions. Preventive and/or mitigative options are outlined for managing degradation mechanisms that could significantly affect plant performance during the license renewal period. The provided technical information and the degradation management options may be used as references for comparison with plant specific conditions to ensure that age-related degradation is controlled during the license renewal term. Plausible degradation mechanisms described and analyzed as they may affect the concrete, reinforcing steel, containment steel shell, prestressed-tendon, steel liner and other structural components typically used in Class I structures. The significance of these age-related degradation mechanisms to the structural components are evaluated, giving consideration to the design basis and quality of construction; typical service conditions; operating and maintenance history; and current test, inspection and refurbishment practices for containment and Class I structures. Degradation mechanisms which cannot be generically dispositioned on the basis of the two-step approach: (1) they will not cause significant degradation, or (2) any potential degradation will be bounded by current test, inspection, analytical evaluation, and/or refurbishment programs are identified. Aging degradation management measures are recommended to address the remaining age-related degradation mechanisms. A three-phase approach for the management of the containment and Class I structures is introduced. Various techniques, testing tools and the acceptable criteria for each step of the evaluation of the structures status are provided. The preventive and mitigative

  9. Associations of Polymorphisms in MTHFR Gene with the Risk of Age-Related Cataract in Chinese Han Population: A Genotype-Phenotype Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-bin Wang

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a potential risk factor for age-related cataract (ARC. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is the key enzyme for Hcy metabolism, and variants of MTHFR may affect MTHFR enzyme activity. This study mainly evaluated the associations between variants in MTHFR gene, plasma MTHFR enzyme activity, total Hcy (tHcy levels and ARC risk in Chinese population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MTHFR gene were genotyped using the high-resolution melting (HRM method in 502 ARC patients (mean age, 70.2 [SD, 9.0], 46.0% male and 890 healthy controls (mean age, 67.1 [SD, 11.1], 47.6% male. The plasma MTHFR activity, folic acid (FA, vitamins B12 and B6 levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The plasma tHcy levels were measured by an automated enzymatic assay. After the Bonferroni correction, the minor allele T of SNP rs1801133 showed a significant association with an increased risk of overall ARC (OR = 1.26, P = 0.003. Consistent association was also found between SNP rs1801133 and cortical ARC risk (OR = 1.44, P = 0.003. Haplotype analyses revealed an adverse effect of the haplotype "C-A-T-C" (alleles in order of SNPs rs3737967, rs1801131, rs1801133 and rs9651118 on ARC risk (OR = 1.55, P = 0.003. Moreover, in a joint analysis of SNPs rs9651118 and rs1801133, subjects with two unfavorable genotypes had a 1.76-fold increased risk of ARC compared with the reference group, and a statistically significant dose-response trend (Ptrend = 0.001 was also observed. Further, in healthy controls and patients with cortical ARC, the allele T of SNP rs1801133 and the increasing number of unfavorable genotypes were significantly correlated with decreased MTHFR activity as well as increased tHcy levels. However, there was no significant association between FA, vitamins B12, B6 levels and MTHFR variants. Our data indicated that variants in MTHFR gene might individually and jointly influence susceptibility to ARC

  10. Microincision versus small-incision coaxial cataract surgery using different power modes for hard nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Chul; Byun, Yong Soo; Kim, Man Soo

    2011-10-01

    To compare the efficacy of microincision and small-incision coaxial phacoemulsification in treating hard cataracts using different ultrasound power modes. Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. Randomized clinical trial. Eyes with hard cataract were randomized to have an initial incision of 1.80 mm, 2.20 mm, or 2.75 mm. The eyes in each group were equally randomized to treatment with burst, pulse, or continuous mode. Ultrasound time (UST), mean cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), surgically induced corneal astigmatism, incisional and central corneal thickness (CCT), and endothelial cell counts were evaluated. The study enrolled 180 eyes, 60 in each group. Two months postoperatively, there were no statistically significant differences in UST, CDE, CDVA, CCT, or percentage endothelial cell loss between the 3 incision groups. The 2.75 mm incision induced more astigmatism at 2 months and less incisional corneal edema at 1 week than the 1.80 mm or 2.20 mm incision (Phard cataract. The intraoperative energy use and ocular damage was less with the pulse and burst modes than with the continuous mode. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-12-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction θ=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens.

  12. Functional Visual Improvement After Cataract Surgery in Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Results of the Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michael V; Vollman, David E; Baze, Elizabeth F; Chomsky, Amy S; Daly, Mary K; Lawrence, Mary G

    2015-04-01

    To determine if cataract surgery on eyes with AMD confers as much functional visual improvement as surgery on eyes without retinal pathology. This is a retrospective analysis of 4924 cataract surgeries from the Veterans Healthcare Administration Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data Project (OSOD). We included cases of eyes with AMD that had both preoperative and postoperative NEI-VFQ-25 questionnaires submitted and compared their outcomes with controls without retinal pathology. We excluded patients with other retinal pathologies (740 patients). The analyses compared changes in visual acuity and overall functional visual improvement and its subscales using t-tests, multivariate logistic regressions, and linear regression modeling. Preoperative and postoperative questionnaires were submitted by 58.3% of AMD and 63.8% of no retinal pathology cases (controls). Analysis of overall score showed that cataract surgery on eyes with AMD led to increased visual function (13.8 ± 2.4 NEI-VFQ units, P < 0.0001); however, increases were significantly less when compared with controls (-6.4 ± 2.9 NEI-VFQ units, P < 0.0001). Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (preBCVA) in AMD was predictive of postoperative visual function (r = -0.38, P < 0.0001). In controls, postoperative visual function was only weakly associated with preBCVA (r = -0.075, P = 0.0002). Patients with AMD with vision of 20/40 or better had overall outcomes similar to controls (-2.2 ± 4.7 NEI-VFQ units, P = 0.37). Cataract surgery on eyes with AMD offers an increase in functional visual improvement; however, the amount of benefit is associated with the eye's preBCVA. For eyes with preBCVA of 20/40 or greater, the improvement is similar to that of patients without retinal pathology. However, if preBCVA is less than 20/40, the amount of improvement was shown to be significantly less and decreased with decreasing preBCVA.

  13. Decreased erythrocyte superoxide dismutase in elderly men with early nuclear cataract

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    Rose Rose

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Imbalance between oxidative processes and antioxidant defenses has been considered to play a role in cataractogenesis, particularly in diabetes patients. Superoxide dismutase (SOD is an important precursor for oxidative stress in the human lens, and its activity is mainly dependent on the copper and zinc levels in the body. The aim of this study was to compare erythrocyte SOD, erythrocyte zinc and total serum testosterone levels in male patients with early senile nuclear cataract and evaluate the correlations between the parameters in all subjects. METHODS A community-based study of cross-sectional design was conducted at Cilandak District Primary Health Center where 52 adult and 17 elderly men with early senile nuclear cataract were chosen as the study subjects. Erythrocyte SOD, erythrocyte zinc, serum testosterone, and fasting blood glucose (FBG levels were measured in all subjects. Nuclear cataract stage was assessed with the Pentacam® instrument (Oculus, Germany. Independent Student t test and Pearson’s correlation were used to analyze the results. RESULTS Erythrocyte SOD level was significantly decreased in elderly men compared to adult men (p=0.014. Erythrocyte zinc, serum testosterone and FBG did not differ significantly in adult and elderly males (at p=0.304; p=0.145;and p=0.376, respectively. Erythrocyte SOD activity was significantly associated with erythrocyte zinc level (r=0.486; p=0.048. CONCLUSIONS Lower erythrocyte SOD activity was found in elderly males than in adult males with early nuclear cataract. There was a relationship between erythrocyte SOD and erythrocyte zinc level in elderly males with early nuclear cataract.

  14. Nuclear management in manual small incision cataract surgery by snare technique

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    Bhattacharya Debasish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual small incision cataract surgery has evolved into a popular method of cataract surgery in India. However, in supra hard cataract, bringing out the whole nucleus through the sclerocorneal flap valve incision becomes difficult. A bigger incision required in such cataracts loses its value action, as the internal incision and corneal valve slips beyond the limbus into sclera. Struggling with the supra hard cataracts through a regular small incision. Phacofracture in the anterior chamber becomes a useful option in these cases. In the snare technique, a stainless steel wire loop when lassoed around the nucleus in the anterior chamber constricts from the equator, easily dividing the hardest of the nuclei into two halves. The wire loop constricts in a controlled way when the second cannula of snare is pulled. The divided halves can easily be brought out by serrated crocodile forceps. This nuclear management can be safely performed through a smaller sclerocorneal flap valve incision where the corneal valve action is retained within the limbus without sutures, and the endothelium or the incision is not disturbed. However, the technique requires space in the anterior chamber to maneuver the wire loop and anterior chamber depth more than 2.5 mm is recommended. Much evidence to this wonderful technique is not available in literature, as its popularity grew through live surgical workshops and small interactive conferences.

  15. Automatic grading of nuclear cataracts from slit-lamp lens images using group sparsity regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanwu; Gao, Xinting; Lin, Stephen; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Liu, Jiang; Xu, Dong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cheung, Carol Y; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-01-01

    Cataracts, which result from lens opacification, are the leading cause of blindness worldwide. Current methods for determining the severity of cataracts are based on manual assessments that may be weakened by subjectivity. In this work, we propose a system to automatically grade the severity of nuclear cataracts from slit-lamp images. We introduce a new feature for cataract grading together with a group sparsity-based constraint for linear regression, which performs feature selection, parameter selection and regression model training simultaneously. In experiments on a large database of 5378 images, our system outperforms the state-of-the-art by yielding with respect to clinical grading a mean absolute error (epsilon) of 0.336, a 69.0% exact integral agreement ratio (R0), a 85.2% decimal grading error < or = 0.5 (Re0.5), and a 98.9% decimal grading error < or = 1.0 (Re1.0). Through a more objective grading of cataracts using our proposed system, there is potential for better clinical management of the disease.

  16. A novel mutation in CRYAB associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Ma, Junjie; Yan, Ming; Mothobi, Maneo Emily; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Fang

    2009-07-10

    To identify the genetic defects associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Clinical data were collected, and the phenotypes of the affected members in this family were recorded by slit-lamp photography. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. Mutations were screened in cataract-associated candidate genes through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses and sequencing. Structural models of the wild-type and mutant alphaB-crystallin were generated and analyzed by SWISS-MODEL. Mutation screening identified only one heterozygous G-->A transition at nucleotide 32 in the first exon of alphaB-crystallin (CRYAB), resulting in an amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 11 (R11H). This mutation segregated in all available affected family members but was not observed in any of the unaffected persons of the family. The putative mutation disrupted a restriction site for the enzyme, Fnu4HI, in the affected family members. The disruption, however, was not found in any of the randomly selected ophthalmologically normal individuals or in 40 unrelated senile cataract patients. Computer-assisted prediction suggested that this mutation affected the biochemical properties as well as the structure of alphaB-crystallin. These results supported the idea that the novel R11H mutation was responsible for the autosomal dominant nuclear congenital cataract in this pedigree.

  17. Grading nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataracts using an objective scatter index measured with a double-pass system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Romero, Maria José; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio Oscar; Ondategui, Juan Carlos; Salvador, Antoni; Güell, José L; Artal, Pablo; Pujol, Jaume

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate objectively intraocular scattering in eyes with nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataracts by means of an objective scatter index (OSI) obtained from double-pass images. To compare the results with those obtained using clinical conventional procedures. In this prospective, observational, cross-sectional, non-consecutive case series study, 188 eyes with cataracts of 136 patients were analysed (123 eyes had nuclear, 41 eyes had cortical and 24 eyes had posterior subcapsular cataracts). The control group consisted of 117 eyes of 68 healthy patients. Patient examination included subjective refraction, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), cataract grade using the lens opacities classification system III (LOCS III) and OSI. We found a decrease in the BSCVA and an increase in the OSI with increasing cataract grade. Statistically significant differences were observed when the OSI of eyes without cataracts and those with different LOCS III were compared. The comparison between the OSI and LOCS III reported good percentages of agreement regarding the number of eyes classified in equivalent levels: 72.4% (nuclear cataracts), 86.6% (cortical cataracts) and 84.3% (posterior subcapsular cataracts). A non-linear regression model was applied between OSI and BSCVA, which resulted in the following multiple correlation coefficients: r=0.878 (nuclear), r=0.843 (cortical) and r=0.844 (posterior subcapsular). The results of the study showed that OSI is a useful parameter for evaluating large amounts of intraocular scattering that can be used, in combination with other conventional procedures, as a valuable tool in clinical practice to grade cataracts objectively.

  18. Evaluation of antioxidants and argpyrimidine in normal and cataractous lenses in north Indian population

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    Bharani K Mynampati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the level of glutathione, thioltransferase, and argpyrimidine in nuclear and cortical cataractous lenses as well as in the clear lenses in the north Indian population. METHODS: Human cataractous lenses were collected from the patients who underwent extracapsular cataract extraction surgery; clear lenses were collected from the freshly donated eye bank eyes. Antioxidant molecules such as glutathione and thioltransferase enzyme activity were measured; simultaneously in these lenses a blue fluorophore argpyrimidine, an advanced glycation end (AGE product level was assessed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. RESULTS: The protein concentration was found to be present at higher levels in the control lenses compared to cataract lenses. A significant decrease in the glutathione level was observed in the nuclear cataractous lenses compared to cortical cataractous (P=0.004 and clear lenses (P≤0.005, but no significant change in the level of antioxidant enzyme thioltransferase was observed. Further, argpyrimidine a blue fluorophore (AGE was found to be significantly higher in the nuclear cataract (P=0.013 compared to cortical cataract lenses. CONCLUSION: Antioxidants such as glutathione significantly decrease in age-related nuclear and cortical cataract and an AGE, argpyrimidine are present at significantly higher levels in nuclear cataract.

  19. Joint Analysis of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Variants in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Novel Loci TRPM1 and ABHD2/RLBP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persad, P.J.; Heid, I.M.; Weeks, D.E.; Baird, P.N.; Jong, E.K.; Haines, J.L.; Pericak-Vance, M.A.; Scott, W.K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Presently, 52 independent nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (nSNPs) have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but their effects do not explain all its variance. Genetic interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genome may unearth additional genetic

  20. Identification and Assessment of Material Models for Age-Related Degradation of Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, I-K.

    2009-04-27

    When performing seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants (NPPs), the potential effects of age-related degradation on structures, systems, and components (SSCs) should be considered. To address the issue of aging degradation, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has embarked on a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which will include the consideration of aging of structures and components in NPPs. Three specific areas that are included in the KAERI research project, related to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), are probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and a plant seismic risk analysis. To support the development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components, KAERI entered into a collaboration agreement with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 2007. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period with the goal of developing seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of SSCs, and using these results as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations that will be performed in the subsequent evaluations in the years that follow. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. This report

  1. Relationship between blood-retinal barrier development and formation of selenite nuclear cataract in rat

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    Ping Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between development of blood-retinal barrier and formation of selenite nuclear cataract in rat. METHODS: Activity of GPx, MDA level in lens and selenium content in the eyeballs of different ages rats were determined. Besides, lanthanum hydroxide \\〖La(OH3\\〗 tracer method was used to detect development status of blood-retina barrier at different ages. RESULTS: The result showed that the enzyme activity of GPx was highest in young rats before open eyes, but then decreased gradually with age. Distribution of La(OH3 in retinal pigment epithelial layer of 20-day-old rats was significantly less than 11-day-old rats. Injecting sodium selenite to 9-day-old rats, lanthanum hydroxide increased obviously and extended to the inner layers of the retina after 48h, and the retinal pigment epithelial layer was damaged seriously; while injecting sodium selenite to 18-day-old rats with the same dose, number of lanthanum hydroxide decreased significantly and did not extend to the inner layer after 48h.Before opening eyes, the content of MDA in the lens of rats was the highest, and decreased significantly after opening eyes. The Se group was 5 times as that of the control group. Besides, in these groups of rats, selenium content in the eyeballs and MDA level in the lens were in agreement with the change of La(OH3 distribution. CONCLUSION: These results indicated that antioxidant capacity in the eyelid unopened rats is not the main reason for selenite induced cataract formation. The real reason is that blood-retina barrier development is not mature in the eyelid unopened rats.

  2. Validity of a new computer-aided diagnosis imaging program to quantify nuclear cataract from slit-lamp photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol Yim-lui; Li, Huiqi; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Tan, Ava Grace; Johari, Lily K; Liu, Jiang; Lim, Joo Hwee; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien Yin

    2011-03-10

    To validate a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) imaging program for the assessment of nuclear lens opacity. Slit-lamp lens photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES) were graded using both the CAD imaging program and manual assessment method by a trained grader using the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System. Cataract was separately assessed clinically during the study using Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III). The repeatability of CAD and Wisconsin grading methods were assessed using 160 paired images. The agreement between the CAD and Wisconsin grading methods, and the correlations of CAD with Wisconsin and LOCS III were assessed using the SiMES sample (5547 eyes from 2951 subjects). In assessing the repeatability, the coefficient of variation (CoV) was 8.10% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.21-8.99), and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93-0.96) for the CAD method. There was high agreement between the CAD and Wisconsin methods, with a mean difference (CAD minus Wisconsin) of -0.02 (95% limit of agreement, -0.91 and 0.87) and an ICC of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.80-0.82). CAD parameters were also significantly correlated with LOCS III grading (all P program assesses nuclear lens opacity with results comparable to the manual grading using the Wisconsin System. This study shows that an automated, precise, and quantitative assessment of nuclear cataract is possible.

  3. Congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both eyes. Moderate to severe cataracts that affect vision, or a cataract that is in only 1 eye, will need to be treated with cataract removal surgery. In most (noncongenital) cataract surgeries, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted into the eye. ...

  4. Review: Femtosecond Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS): An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age-related cataract is one of the most important causes of visual impairment, and cataract surgery is one of the commonest surgeries performed worldwide. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a new and promising technology in the arena of cataract operations. Femtosecond lasers (FSL) are used in ...

  5. The effect of cataract surgery on salivary melatonin and sleep quality in aging people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenshen, Yan; Minshu, Wang; Qing, Yuan; Yang, Liu; Suodi, Zhai; Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Blue light plays an important role in circadian photoentrainment by stimulating the melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Age-related cataract causes progressive loss of blue light transmission, which may lead to changes in circadian rhythm and sleep quality. In theory, increased light transmission by cataract surgery may improve circadian misalignment and sleep quality, while the effect of cataract surgery on circadian rhythm is not well understood. In this study, we assessed 30 binocular age-related nuclear cataract patients (aged 72.5 ± 7.2, 16 female) who were eligible for cataract surgery. All the patients underwent phacoemulsification cataract extraction and neutral ultraviolet-only blocking intraocular lens (IOLs) implantation. Visual functions including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), color perception and dark adaptation were assessed. Salivary samples were collected at 1-hour interval from 19:00 to 23:00 48 hours before and after surgery. Salivary melatonin concentration was measured and dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was calculated subsequently. Sleep quality and daytime alertness were assessed before and a month after surgery using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). All the operated eyes demonstrated significant improvements in BCVA, color perception and dark adaptation after cataract surgery. Salivary melatonin concentration at 23:00 was significantly increased after surgery (P melatonin concentration and improvement in sleep quality as well as daytime alertness.

  6. Association between Lutein and Zeaxanthin Status and the Risk of Cataract: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Liu, Rong; Hao, Zhen-Xuan; Han, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Zhong-Hai; Ma, Le

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentration and the risk of age-related cataract (ARC). MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI and Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant studies up to April 2013. Meta-analysis was conducted to obtain pooled relative risks (RRs) for the highest-versus-lowest categories of blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations. One cohort study and seven cross-sectional studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant inverse associations between nuclear cataract and blood lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, with the pooled RRs ranging from 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.77) for zeaxanthin to 0.73 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.87) for lutein. A stronger association between nuclear cataract and blood zeaxanthin might be noted for the studies conducted in the European Nations. Blood lutein and zeaxanthin were also noted to lead towards a decrease in the risk of cortical cataract and subcapsular cataract; however, these pooled RRs were not statistically significant, with the exception of a marginal association between lutein and subcapsular cataract. Our results suggest that high blood lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly associated with a decrease in the risk of nuclear cataract. However, no significant associations were found for ARC in other regions of the lens. PMID:24451312

  7. Treating Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bright lights at night. I even saw three moons. It was very disturbing. Even though I'd ... the NIH's National Eye Institute, performs cataract surgery. Photo courtest of Dr. Rachel Bishop A cataract is ...

  8. Cataract removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better. The procedure almost always includes placing an artificial lens (IOL) in the eye. Description Cataract surgery ... the old lens (cataract). It helps improve your vision. The doctor may close the incision with very ...

  9. Formation of hydroxyl radicals in the human lens is related to the severity of nuclear cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2000-01-01

    . formation and not DMPO-OOH degradation. The metal ion chelator, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, also inhibited HO. formation, indicating that lenticular metal ions play a key role in HO. formation. Cataractous lens homogenates also stimulated ascorbyl radical production, further suggesting the presence...

  10. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-12-01

    Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured on aspirated lens material from eyes undergoing femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) and was compared to a preoperative optical grading of cataract using Scheimpflug imaging. The preoperative optical grading allocated the cataracts to 1 of 4 categories according to the density of the cataract. All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.9) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R 2  = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may correlate to measures of tryptophan and non-tryptophan fluorescence in human lenses. Based on our results we find that measuring the ratio between tryptophan- and non-tryptophan fluorescence may be a future tool for grading cataracts, but further research is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Age-related changes in skeletal muscle composition: A pilot nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Anatoly P; Mannina, Luisa; Costanzo, Manuela; Cisterna, Barbara; Malatesta, Manuela; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2017-06-01

    The composition of skeletal muscle was investigated in the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscle of 13-month-old (n=15) and 23-month-old (n=19) mice by means of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Muscle specimens were dissected out, frozen in liquid nitrogen and extracted in chloroform/methanol, and proton NMR spectra of the resulting aqueous and organic fractions were obtained at 600MHz. Several metabolites were unambiguously identified and quantified. Multivariate ANOVA (factor: age, muscle, age×muscle) showed a significant main effect of age (P=0.031) on the amount of muscle metabolites, suggesting that the aging process affects the composition of skeletal muscle. Univariate tests showed significant differences for lactate, acetate, taurine, and uridine in 13- and 23-month-old mice. A trend for the effect of muscle (quadriceps vs. gastrocnemius; P=0.128) was also found. No significant muscle x age interaction was present. When the same data were used in principal component analysis, the first two principal components separated muscles (quadriceps and gastrocnemius) and ages (13- and 23-month-old), explaining 66.7% of total variance. The results of this pilot study show that high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is able to detect age-associated changes in skeletal muscle metabolites, thereby paving the way to future detailed metabolomics investigation in sarcopenia of aging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Advances in hard nucleus cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Security and perfect vision and fewer complications are our goals in cataract surgery, and hard-nucleus cataract surgery is always a difficulty one. Many new studies indicate that micro-incision phacoemulsification in treating hard nucleus cataract is obviously effective. This article reviews the evolution process of hard nuclear cataract surgery, the new progress in the research of artificial intraocular lens for microincision, and analyse advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods.

  14. Lutein and cataract: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manayi, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Raman, Thiagarajan; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Cataract is one of the most important leading causes of blindness in the world. Extensive research showed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the initiation and progression of a cataract and other age-related eye diseases. Extra-generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the eye tissue has been shown as one of the most important risk factors for cataracts and other age-related eye diseases. With respect to this, it can be hypothesized that dietary antioxidants may be useful in the prevention and/or mitigation of cataract. Lutein is an important xanthophyll which is widely found in different vegetables such as spinach, kale and carrots as well as some other foods such as eggs. Lutein is concentrated in the macula and suppresses the oxidative stress in the eye tissues. A plethora of literature has shown that increased lutein consumption has a close correlation with reduction in the incidence of cataract. Despite this general information, there is a negligible number of review articles considering the beneficial effects of lutein on cataracts and age-related eye diseases. The present review is aimed at discussing the role of oxidative stress in the initiation and progression of a cataract and the possible beneficial effects of lutein in maintaining retinal health and fighting cataract. We also provide a perspective on the chemistry, sources, bioavailability and safety of lutein.

  15. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specimens of the anterior lens capsule with an attached monolayer of lens epithelial cells (LECs) were obtained from patients (=52) undergoing cataract surgery. Specimens were divided into three groups based on the type of cataract: nuclear cataract, cortical cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC).

  16. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specimens of the anterior lens capsule with an attached monolayer of lens epithelial cells (LECs) were obtained from patients (=52) undergoing cataract surgery. Specimens were divided into three groups based on the type of cataract: nuclear cataract, cortical cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC).

  17. Activating the AKT2-nuclear factor-κB-lipocalin-2 axis elicits an inflammatory response in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayan; Shang, Peng; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Bhutto, Imran; Hose, Stacey; Montezuma, Sandra R; Luo, Tianqi; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Qian, Jiang; Lutty, Gerard A; Ferrington, Deborah A; Zigler, J Samuel; Sinha, Debasish

    2017-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex and progressive degenerative eye disease resulting in severe loss of central vision. Recent evidence indicates that immune system dysregulation could contribute to the development of AMD. We hypothesize that defective lysosome-mediated clearance causes accumulation of waste products in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), activating the immune system and leading to retinal tissue injury and AMD. We have generated unique genetically engineered mice in which lysosome-mediated clearance (both by phagocytosis and autophagy) in RPE cells is compromised, causing the development of features of early AMD. Our recent data indicate a link between lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) and the inflammatory responses induced in this mouse model. We show that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and STAT-1 may function as a complex in our animal model system, together controlling the upregulation of LCN-2 expression in the retina and stimulating an inflammatory response. This study revealed increased infiltration of LCN-2-positive neutrophils in the choroid and retina of early AMD patients as compared with age-matched controls. Our results demonstrate that, both in our animal model and in human AMD, the AKT2-NF-κB-LCN-2 signalling axis is involved in activating the inflammatory response, making this pathway a potential target for AMD treatment. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Cataract Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Vision Simulator Leer en Español: Simulador: Catarata Jun. 11, 2014 How do cataracts affect your vision? A cataract is a clouding of the eye's ...

  19. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    . All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.......9) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R2 = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may......Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured...

  20. αA-crystallin R49Cneo mutation influences the architecture of lens fiber cell membranes and causes posterior and nuclear cataracts in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andley Usha P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background αA-crystallin (CRYAA/HSPB4, a major component of all vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein responsible for maintaining lens transparency. The R49C mutation in the αA-crystallin protein is linked with non-syndromic, hereditary human cataracts in a four-generation Caucasian family. Methods This study describes a mouse cataract model generated by insertion of a neomycin-resistant (neor gene into an intron of the gene encoding mutant R49C αA-crystallin. Mice carrying the neor gene and wild-type Cryaa were also generated as controls. Heterozygous knock-in mice containing one wild type gene and one mutated gene for αA-crystallin (WT/R49Cneo and homozygous knock-in mice containing two mutated genes (R49Cneo/R49Cneo were compared. Results By 3 weeks, WT/R49Cneo mice exhibited large vacuoles in the cortical region 100 μm from the lens surface, and by 3 months posterior and nuclear cataracts had developed. WT/R49Cneo mice demonstrated severe posterior cataracts at 9 months of age, with considerable posterior nuclear migration evident in histological sections. R49Cneo/R49Cneo mice demonstrated nearly complete lens opacities by 5 months of age. In contrast, R49C mice in which the neor gene was deleted by breeding with CreEIIa mice developed lens abnormalities at birth, suggesting that the neor gene may suppress expression of mutant R49C αA-crystallin protein. Conclusion It is apparent that modification of membrane and cell-cell interactions occurs in the presence of the αA-crystallin mutation and rapidly leads to lens cell pathology in vivo.

  1. Joint Analysis of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Variants in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Novel Loci TRPM1 and ABHD2/RLBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Patrice J; Heid, Iris M; Weeks, Daniel E; Baird, Paul N; de Jong, Eiko K; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Scott, William K

    2017-08-01

    Presently, 52 independent nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (nSNPs) have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but their effects do not explain all its variance. Genetic interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genome may unearth additional genetic loci previously unassociated with AMD risk. Joint effects of nSNPs and selected mtSNPs were analyzed by two degree of freedom (2df) joint tests of association in the International AMD Genomics Consortium (IAMDGC) dataset (17,832 controls and 16,144 advanced AMD cases of European ancestry). Subjects were genotyped on the Illumina HumanCoreExome array. After imputation using MINIMAC and the 1000 Genomes Project Phase I reference panel, pairwise linkage disequilibrium pruning, and quality control, 3.9 million nSNPs were analyzed for interaction with mtSNPs chosen based on association in this dataset or publications: A4917G, T5004C, G12771A, and C16069T. Novel locus TRPM1 was identified with genome-wide significant joint effects (P < 5.0 × 10-8) of two intronic TRPM1 nSNPs and AMD-associated nonsynonymous MT-ND2 mtSNP A4917G. Stratified analysis by mt allele identified an association only in 4917A (major allele) carriers (P = 4.4 × 10-9, odds ratio [OR] = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87-0.93). Intronic and intergenic ABHD2/RLBP1 nSNPs demonstrated genome-wide significant joint effects (2df joint test P values from 1.8 × 10-8 to 4.9 × 10-8) and nominally statistically significant interaction effects with MT-ND5 synonymous mtSNP G12771A. Although a positive association was detected in both strata, the association was stronger in 12771A subjects (P = 0.0020, OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.34-3.60). These results show that joint tests of main effects and gene-gene interaction reveal associations at some novel loci that were missed when considering main effects alone.

  2. PROGNOSIS, PREVENTION, AND TREATMENT OF DIABETIC CATARACT SURGERY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kovalevskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study immune and antioxidant status of diabetic cataract patients and to assess the efficacy of preoperative preparation for diabetic cataract surgery to prevent intra- and postoperative complications and the efficacy of cataract treatment in metabolic syndrome patients. Patients and methods. 136 cataract patients (272 eyes were examined (mean age 62±3.2 years. Among these patients, women predominated (n = 74. Control group included 25 healthy volunteers (10 men and 15 women aged 32‑56 (mean age 44.3±2.4 years without ocular diseases (50 eyes. Two patient groups were examined. Group 1 included 78 patients (mean age 54±1.5 younger than 60 (52.5 % with similar lens morphological changes and metabolic disorders who were diagnosed with complicated (diabetic cataract. Group 2 included 58 patients with age-related cataract. Tear, anterior chamber (AC humor, and blood tests were performed. Immune status, lipid peroxidation parameters in tear fluid and blood, active peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 and / or its breakdown fragments in tear fluid and AC humor were studied. In group 1 (age-related cataracts, somatic disorders were diagnosed in 4.5 % of cases, in group 2 (complicated cataracts, somatic disorders were diagnosed in 100 % of cases. Expression of protective enzymes against oxidative stress in tear fluid was studied. Activity of tear antioxidant enzymes under oxidative stress conditions in therapy and after cataract surgery was evaluated. Results. Postoperatively, increase in PRDX6 level was revealed in age-related cataract patients. The absence of phaco complications confirms these findings. In complicated (diabetic cataracts, PRDX6 level was 6‑times less than in age-related cataracts. Conclusions. Prophylaxis of inflammatory complications in age-related cataract patients can be performed using the following schedule: 0.5 % levofloxacin 4 times daily, bromfenac once daily. 

  3. Formation of hydroxyl radicals in the human lens is related to the severity of nuclear cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2000-01-01

    was significantly more intense in the nuclear region of the type IV compared to the type II lenses. The ability of individual lens nuclei and cortices to stimulate HO. production was positively correlated. The DMPO-HO. signal was competitively inhibited by ethanol, confirming that the DMPO-HO. signal was due to HO...... of redox-active metal ions in the tissue. Analysis of lenses for total Fe and Cu (using atomic absorption spectrometry) showed that the more advanced type IV lenses tended to have higher Fe, but similar Cu, levels compared to the type II lenses. The levels of both metals were lower in non...

  4. Inner nuclear layer cystoid spaces are a poor prognostic factor in typical age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eui Chun; Choi, Seonghee; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2017-11-01

    To investigate predictive factors for changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 24 months after intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR) for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). This retrospective study included 55 eyes of 55 consecutive patients (32 men and 23 women) with nAMD who received three consecutive monthly IVR injections and were re-treated as needed over a 24-month period. We used the mean changes in logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) BCVA at 24 months as the dependent variable in regression analysis. The presence of intraretinal cystoid spaces in the inner nuclear layer (INLc, P = 0.004) and baseline subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT, P = 0.013) predicted BCVA changes from baseline to 24 months. The presence of INLc and thinning of SFCT were associated with decreased BCVA at 24 months. Thirty-five eyes without INLc showed improved logMAR BCVA, from 0.550 ± 0.273 to 0.368 ± 0.274 (P = 0.045); however, 20 eyes with INLc showed decreased logMAR BCVA, from 0.708 ± 0.347 to 0.971 ± 0.523 (P < 0.001) through the 24-month follow-up. The mean number of IVR injections during the follow-up period was 8.74 ± 4.76 in eyes without INLc and 10.63 ± 4.72 in eyes with INLc, without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.144). Eyes with INLc or thinned SFCT showed worse visual outcomes compared with eyes without the INLc or with thick SFCT. Furthermore, eyes without INLc showed improved BCVA; however, eyes with INLc showed decreased BCVA with an as-needed regimen.

  5. Facts about Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cataract in their 40s and 50s. But during middle age, most cataracts are small and do not affect ... symptoms of early cataract may be improved with new eyeglasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses, or magnifying ...

  6. Aging and Health: Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Glaucoma Macular Degeneration Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Cataracts Basic Facts & Information ... Are Cataracts? Cataracts are a common result of aging and occur frequently in older people. About one ...

  7. Microbiota bacteriana da conjuntiva no pré-operatório de injeção intravítrea de antiangiogênico por degeneração macular relacionada à idade comparada com a de cirurgia de catarata Preoperative conjunctival bacterial microbiota of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration compared to cataract surgery preoperative microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Diniz

    2010-06-01

    pacientes no pré-operatório de cirurgia de catarata.Purpose: To evaluate the conjunctival bacterial microbiota and antibiogram profile in the preoperative of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration, and compare to the preoperative microbiota of patients submitted to cataract surgery. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational, case series study. Two groups were organized: group I (macular degeneration with 26 eyes from 26 patients (12 men/14 women with mean age of 69.2 ± 11.5 years; group II (cataract with 27 eyes from 27 patients (9 men/18 women with mean age of 67.6 ± 7.9 years. The groups were similar regarding age (p=0.538 and gender (p=0.787. The lower conjunctival sac was swabbed and the obtained material was immediately put in a tube filled with liquid culture media BHI ("brain heart infusion". Samples were processed according to standard laboratory techniques and antibiogram was determined for each bacterial colony. Results: Twenty-six bacterial colonies growth in group I, with 2 eyes showing no growth and 30 colonies growth in group II. Gram positive bacteria were more prevalent in both groups: 23/26 colonies (88.4% in group I and 29/30 colonies (96.7% in group II, with a Staphylococcus aureus predominance in both groups, with 16 samples (61.5% and 17 (56.7%, respectively. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the second most common identified bacteria, with 19.2% in group I and 20.0% in group II. No differences between the groups reached statistical significance. No statistically significant difference was noted on the antibiotic sensibility between both groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in the distribution of bacteria and antibiogram profile of the conjunctival microbiota in the preoperative of intravitreous injection of antiangiogenic for macular degeneration compared to the preoperative of cataract surgery.

  8. [Age-related changes of sensory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Hanyu, Haruo; Umahara, Takahiko

    2013-10-01

    Pathological processes usually superimpose on physiological aging even in the sensory system including visual, hearing, olfactory, taste and somatosensory functions. Representative changes of age-related changes are presbyopia, cataracts, and presbyacusis. Reduced sense of smell is seen in normal aging, but the prominent reduction detected by the odor stick identification test is noticed especially in early stage of Alzheimer or Parkinson disease. Reduced sense of taste is well-known especially in salty sense, while the changes of sweet, bitter, and sour tastes are different among individuals. Finally, deep sensation of vibration and proprioception is decreased with age as well as superficial sensation (touch, temperature, pain). As a result, impaired sensory system could induce deterioration of the activities of daily living and quality of life in the elderly.

  9. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  10. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  11. [A heterozygous transversion of connexin 50 in a family with congenital nuclear cataract in the northeast of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-qiu; Ma, Zhi-wei; Sun, Hui-min

    2005-02-01

    To identify the genetic defect causing autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) in a five-generation family in the northeast of China. Linkage analysis was carried out with polymorphic microsatellites on the Human MapPairs marker set, special known loci. Mutation analysis of the candidate gene in the critical region was performed to detect the potential mutation. The maximum Lod score (2.44 at recombination fraction theta=0) was obtained for markers D1S498,D1S305, and D1S2844. The cataract locus in this family constellation was mapped to 1q21.1 and 21.44 cM interval between D1S2344 and D1S2844, which were known to flank the gene coding Connexin 50 (Cx50) or gap junction protein alpha-8 (GJA8). Sequencing of the coding region of GJA8 gene showed a heterozygous transversion T>G in exon 2, which resulted in the substitution of glycine for valine at amino acid 64, and this position was in the first connexin signature region that characterized this protein. This is the first report on a mutation in the first connexin signature region of the GJA8 and a different mutation within Cx50 revealed in this family, which might account for the phenotypic differences observed. Furthermore, this study confirmed that GJA8 plays a vital role in the maintenance of human lens transparency.

  12. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  13. Effect of Age-Related Human Lens Sutures Growth on Its Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ho-Ting D; Howse, Louisa A; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Age-related nuclear cataract is the opacification of the clear ocular lens due to oxidative damage as we age, and is the leading cause of blindness in the world. A lack of antioxidant supply to the core of ever-growing ocular lens could contribute to the cause of this condition. In this project, a computational model was developed to study the sutural fluid inflow of the aging human lens. Three different SOLIDWORKS computational fluid dynamics models of the human lens (7 years old; 28 years old; 46 years old) were created, based on available literature data. The fluid dynamics of the lens sutures were modelled using the Stokes flow equations, combined with realistic physiological boundary conditions and embedded in COMSOL Multiphysics. The flow rate, volume, and flow rate per volume of fluid entering the aging lens were examined, and all increased over the 40 years modelled. However, while the volume of the lens grew by ∼300% and the flow rate increased by ∼400%, the flow rate per volume increased only by very moderate ∼38%. Here, sutural information from humans of 7 to 46 years of age was obtained. In this modelled age range, an increase of flow rate per volume was observed, albeit at very slow rate. We hypothesize that with even further increasing age (60+ years old), the lens volume growth would outpace its flow rate increases, which would eventually lead to malnutrition of the lens nucleus and onset of cataracts.

  14. [Epidemiology of the age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolár, P

    2010-07-01

    The age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of severe decrease of the visual acuity in industrial countries. The epidemiological data published in last 30 years are very alarming. They document that the age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of blindness in industrial countries in the population of patients older than 65 years. The signs of beginning disease may be diagnosed as early as in the patients older than 45 years. The disease is strictly age-related and its prevalence and incidence is markedly increasing according to the older age. The basic risk factors of the disease are smoking, untreated hypertension, atherosclerosis, cataract surgery, and appearance of the disease in the family. Among further possible risk factors we count diabetes mellitus and the light color of the iris. Equivocal is the negative influence of ultraviolet rays.

  15. Visual impairment, age-related eye diseases, and cognitive function: the Singapore Malay Eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Shin Yeu; Cheung, Carol Y; Li, Xiang; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Ikram, M Kamran; Ding, Jie; Cheng, Ching Yu; Haaland, Benjamin Adam; Saw, Seang Mei; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher P L; Wong, Tien Yin

    2012-07-01

    To describe the associations of visual impairment and major age-related eye diseases with cognitive function in an older Asian population. A population-based, cross-sectional study of 1179 participants aged 60 to 80 years from the Singapore Malay Eye study was conducted. Visual acuity was measured using the logMAR vision chart. Cataract and age-related macular degeneration were graded using the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System and the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System, respectively. Glaucoma was diagnosed using the International Society Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology criteria. Diabetic retinopathy was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Cognitive dysfunction was defined as a locally validated Abbreviated Mental Test using education-based cutoff scores. After adjusting for age, sex, education level, income, and type of housing, persons with visual impairment before refractive correction (odds ratio [OR]=2.59; 95% CI, 1.89-3.56) or after refractive correction (OR=1.96; 95% CI, 1.27-3.02) and those with visual impairment due to cataract (OR=2.75; 95% CI, 1.35-5.63) were more likely to have cognitive dysfunction. Only moderate to severe diabetic retinopathy was independently associated with cognitive dysfunction (OR=5.57; 95% CI, 1.56-19.91) after controlling for concurrent age-related eye diseases. No significant independent associations were observed between cataract, age-related macular degeneration, or glaucoma and cognitive dysfunction. Older persons with visual impairment, particularly those with visual impairment due to cataract, were more likely to have cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, among the major age-related eye diseases, only diabetic retinopathy was associated with cognitive dysfunction.

  16. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian...

  17. Age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjiku Mathenge

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a disease of the retina that usually develops in people aged 60 years and older. It affects about 8.7% of the world’s population and is the leading cause of blindness among people aged 50 and older in industrialised countries.

  18. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Prevalence of Age-Related Eye Diseases and Visual Impairment in Aging: Current Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To examine prevalence of five age-related eye conditions (age-related cataract, AMD, open-angle glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy [DR], and visual impairment) in the United States. Methods. Review of published scientific articles and unpublished research findings. Results. Cataract, AMD, open-angle glaucoma, DR, and visual impairment prevalences are high in four different studies of these conditions, especially in people over 75 years of age. There are disparities among racial/ethnic groups with higher age-specific prevalence of DR, open-angle glaucoma, and visual impairment in Hispanics and blacks compared with whites, higher prevalence of age-related cataract in whites compared with blacks, and higher prevalence of late AMD in whites compared with Hispanics and blacks. The estimates are based on old data and do not reflect recent changes in the distribution of age and race/ethnicity in the United States population. There are no epidemiologic estimates of prevalence for many visually-impairing conditions. Conclusions. Ongoing prevalence surveys designed to provide reliable estimates of visual impairment, AMD, age-related cataract, open-angle glaucoma, and DR are needed. It is important to collect objective data on these and other conditions that affect vision and quality of life in order to plan for health care needs and identify areas for further research. PMID:24335069

  20. Childhood Cataract: Home to Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Muhit MBBS MSc(Ophth MSc(CEH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there are 190,000 children who are blind from cataract.1 Cataract in children may be present at birth (congenital cataract or may appear anytime during the first few years of life (developmental cataract. Childhood cataract is the most common treatable cause of childhood blindness, being responsible for 10-30% of all childhood blindness. A recent national study in Bangladesh showed that 1 in every 3 blind children is unnecessarily blind from congenital/developmental cataract.

  1. Childhood cataract: home to hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Muhit, MA

    2004-01-01

    Globally, there are 190,000 children who are blind from cataract.1 Cataract in children may be present at birth (congenital cataract) or may appear anytime during the first few years of life (developmental cataract). Childhood cataract is the most common treatable cause of childhood blindness, being responsible for 10-30% of all childhood blindness. A recent national study in Bangladesh showed that 1 in every 3 blind children is unnecessarily blind from congenital/developmental cataract.

  2. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  3. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraeda, Kanji

    1992-01-01

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  4. Silent information regulator T1 in aqueous humor of patients with cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondo A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aki Kondo,1 Mari Goto,2 Tatsuya Mimura,1 Masao Matsubara1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Women’s Medical University Medical Center East, 2Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center, Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, a member of the sirtuin family, has a preventive role in various ocular diseases. We evaluated the relations between the aqueous humor level of SIRT1 and age, sex, systemic diseases, the severity of lens opacity, and other factors. Setting: This study was conducted at a university teaching hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Design: This study was designed based on the consecutive case series. Methods: Aqueous humor samples were obtained from 29 eyes of the 21 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for age-related cataract (ARC. SIRT1 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Aqueous humor levels of SIRT1 showed a positive correlation with visual acuity (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution and with the severity of nuclear cataract (r=0.32 and 0.30, respectively, P<0.05. However, only visual acuity was correlated with SIRT1 according to the stepwise multiple regression analysis (P<0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggest that SIRT1 may have an effect on the formation of ARC, acting as a defensive factor against ARC. Keywords: SIRT1, sirtuin, cataract surgery, oxidative stress, resveratrol, ocular aging

  5. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  6. Age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Querques G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Querques¹, Fernando Onofrio Avellis1,2, Lea Querques1,3, Francesco Bandello³, Eric H Souied¹ ¹Service d'Ophtalmologie, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal Créteil, Université Paris-Est Créteil, Créteil, France; ²Parma Eye Clinic University Hospital, Università degli Studi di Parma, Parma, Italy; ³Department of Ophthalmology, Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele Milano, Milano, Italy Date of preparation: March 3, 2011 Conflict of interest: None declaredClinical question: Is there any new knowledge about the pathogenesis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD?Results: We now understand better the biochemical and pathological pathways involved in the genesis of AMD. Treatment of exudative AMD is based on intravitreal injection of new antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs for which there does not yet exist a unique recognized strategy of administration. No therapies are actually available for atrophic AMD, despite some experimental new pharmacological approaches.Implementation: strategy of administration, safety of intravitreal injectionKeywords: age-related macular degeneration, antivascular endothelial growth factor, choroidal neovascularization, drusen, geographic atrophy

  7. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Keratomycosis after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicute, J; Orbegozo, J; Ruiz, M; Sáiz, A; Eder, F; Aramberri, J

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate cases and results of keratomycosis that developed after cataract surgery. Hospital de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián, Spain. This retrospective study comprised 8 patients who developed keratomycosis soon after cataract surgery. Culture analysis revealed 7 cases of Aspergillus fumigatus and 1 of Aspergillus flavus. After medical treatment with antifungal agents, 6 cases resolved and 2 required evisceration. The presence of fungi in corneal ulcers that develop after cataract surgery should be considered. Initiation of early treatment determines the prognosis. Among the therapeutic options, collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B may be effective.

  9. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    cause of blindness among Caucasian individuals in developed countries. Blindness resulting from AMD rarely occurs before age 70, and most cases occur after age 80. The age-standardised 1-year incidence of legal blindness resulting from AMD is 212 cases per million. Two-thirds of AMD cases have CNV......Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian...... individuals than in pigmented races. In predominantly Caucasian populations, the age-standardised prevalence of AMD in at least one eye is 7760 cases per million. The age-standardised cumulated 1-year incidence of AMD in at least one eye is 1051 cases per million individuals. AMD is the most important single...

  10. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  11. Routine preoperative medical testing for cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Lindsley, Kristina; Tielsch, James; Katz, Joanne; Schein, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Background Cataract surgery is practiced widely and substantial resources are committed to an increasing cataract surgical rate in developing countries. With the current volume of cataract surgery and the increases in the future, it is critical to optimize the safety and cost-effectiveness of this procedure. Most cataracts are performed on older individuals with correspondingly high systemic and ocular comorbidities. It is likely that routine preoperative medical testing will detect medical conditions, but it is questionable whether these conditions should preclude individuals from cataract surgery or change their perioperative management. Objectives (1) To investigate the evidence for reductions in adverse events through preoperative medical testing, and (2) to estimate the average cost of performing routine medical testing. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to December 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to December 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 December 2011. We used reference lists and the Science Citation Index to search for additional studies. Selection criteria We included randomized clinical trials in which routine preoperative medical testing was compared to no preoperative or selective preoperative testing prior to age-related cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed abstracts to identify possible trials for inclusion. For each included study, two review authors

  12. Atypical case of ocular hemosiderosis: leopard cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masket, Samuel; Ceran, Basak Bostanci

    2011-10-01

    We present an interventional case report of an 83-year-old woman who developed ocular hemosiderosis secondary to massive retinal and intravitreal bleeding associated with a choroidal neovascular membrane as a result of age-related macular degeneration. Anterior segment manifestations included low-grade inflammation, posterior synechiae, reversible hyperchromic heterochromia, and a mature cataract with "leopard spots." The longstanding vitreous hemorrhage was thought to be the etiology of these findings. At the request of the vitreoretinal surgeon, cataract surgery was performed to provide visualization of the posterior segment. However, the patient's visual potential was limited by her underlying retinal pathology. Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Additional disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Cataract surgery in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Cataract extraction in children has improved and became more popular over the past few decades but, due to particular features of children's eyes, still remains controversial--especially regarding the intraocular lens implantation. In contrast to adults, indications for cataract surgery in children are much more difficult to determine. Since subjective visual acuity cannot be obtained, greater reliance must be placed on the morphology and location of the lens opacity, and the behavior of the child. Forced preferential looking and visual evoked potentials can be helpful, but they should not be the only criteria. In management of pediatric cataract, correction of postoperative aphakia is still an incompletely resolved problem. Conventionally, optical correction is achieved by spectacles or contact lenses. The power of both spectacles and contact lenses can be readily adjusted to compensate for ocular growth. The success of both depends significantly on parental compliance and the child's acceptance. Hutchinson reported that 44% children with aphakia stopped wearing glasses or contact lenses 2 months after surgery. Contact lens wearing can also result in a number of corneal complications, including infectious keratitis, corneal vascularization and hypoxic corneal ulceration. IOL implantation is theoretically superior to glasses and contact lenses since it provides almost immediate optical correction which is much more reliable because it does not depend on parental or child's compliance. Still, there are many controversies about IOL implantation in infants and young children like IOL-size, material, IOL power calculation, prevention and management of secondary cataract, as well as long term safety of IOLs in children's eyes. Although short-term anatomic results after cataract extraction and primary IOL implantation in children are excellent and stable, long-term follow-up is necessary to answer questions about the long-term safety of implants in children's eyes. A

  14. Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    non-governmental organization (Amen Foundation) to commence a free cataract surgery programme in January. 2008. Since its inception, the patient turnout for cataract surgery has increased. The World Health Organization (WHO) categorizes the outcome of cataract surgeries into 3 groups: good (visual acuity of 6/ 6-6/ ...

  15. Unexpected potential protective associations between outdoor air pollution and cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Park, Su Jin; Paik, Hae Jung; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2018-02-01

    Air pollution is one of the biggest public health issues, and the eye is continuously exposed to multiple outdoor air pollution. However, to date, no large-scale study has assessed the relationship between air pollutants and cataracts. We investigated associations between outdoor air pollution and cataracts in the Korean population. A population-based cross-sectional study was performed using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, including 18,622 adults more than 40 years of age. The presence of cataracts and their subtypes were evaluated by ophthalmologists. Air pollution data (levels of particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide) for the 2 years prior to the ocular examinations were collected from national monitoring stations. The associations of multiple air pollutants with cataracts were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Sociodemographic factors and previously known risk factors for cataracts were controlled as covariates (model 1 included sociodemographic factors, sun exposure, and behavioral factors, while model 2 further included clinical factors). Higher ozone concentrations were protectively associated with overall cataract which included all subtypes [single pollutant model: 0.003 ppm increase-model 1 (OR 0.89, p = 0.014), model 2 (OR 0.87, p = 0.011); multi-pollutant model: 0.003 ppm increase-model 1 (OR 0.80, p = 0.002), model 2 (OR 0.87, p = 0.002)]. Especially, higher ozone concentrations showed deeply protective association with nuclear cataract subtype [0.003 ppm increase-single pollutant model: model 2 (OR 0.84, p = 0.006), multi-pollutant model: model 2 (OR 0.73, p < 0.001)]. Higher tropospheric ozone concentrations showed protective associations with overall cataract and nuclear cataract subtype in the Korean population.

  16. MODERN POSSIBILITIES FOR PROPHYLAXIS OF CATARACT PROGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Polunina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is one of the  most  common  diseases, especially in the  elderly. Despite  the  fact that  the  share of elderly people  in economically developed countries is higher than  in developing countries, the incidence  of cataract in people over 50 years  in Western countries is 15% and it is about  40%  in developing countries. The reasons are  unbalanced nutrition,  lack of specialized ophthalmic  care  at the initial stages of the disease, the impact of adverse environmental conditions,  etc.  Surgical treatment is the only curative method. However, there are  not always enough indications for this treatment on the one hand, and it is not always possible due to patient’s unfavorable physical status, on the other  hand.  The supportive anti-cataract therapy  should be provided with the dynamic follow-up in such  cases. The pharmaceutical industry offers anti-cataract drugs  with a different composition  and properties, they are  based on the  mechanisms of the  onset  and development of the  disease. “Oxidative stress” is one  of the  main factors, which can  be the  cause of both  nuclear  and  cortical  cataracts. There  are scattering zones in the mature nucleus  of the lens, an increase in extracellular  spaces between corrugated membrane protein-like deposits in case of cataract. It is generally believed that  the  basis  of these deposits are  denatured, initially water-soluble  proteins, which turn  into opaque  substances due to the action of quinoids products formed through  the disturbed metabolism of aromatic aminoacids (tryptophan, tyrosine,  etc..  Based  on this theory, an anti-cataract substance — pirenoxine was developed.  It inhibits the action of quinoids and prevents the formation of the len’s opacities  and the cataracts progression.

  17. Cytomegalovirus Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus congenital infection is an infection caused by the the subfamily â Herpesviridae, during pregnancy. The incidence of infections among newborn infants is 1 %. One of the effects of congenitally acquired infection is the congenital cataract. A 6-year-old child complained to have a blurred vision diagnosed with cytomegalovirus congenital cataract. The diagnosis was confirmed by a positive serology testing for Ig M and Ig G CMV. The laboratory test using Giemsa staining to find inclusion bodies and a faster PCR could not be carried out (Sains Medika, 3(1:84-88.

  18. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery followed by coaxial phacoemulsification or microincisional cataract surgery: differences and advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alio, Jorge L; Soria, Felipe; Abdou, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the advantages and the differences of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) following a coaxial or microincision cataract surgery phacoemulsification in the surgical outcome and greater control of cataract surgery. FLACS offers minimal tissue damage and extreme precision during corneal incision creation, continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) and nuclear fragmentation. It also allows diminishing the mean average ultrasound power to emulsify the nucleus followed by a coaxial or a biaxial procedure. The impact of reduced phacoemulsification energy on the corneal endothelium is an interesting topic that is being investigated. Despite its benefits, this technology has relevant financial issues and a high learning curve. FemtoMICS appears to be surgically and statistically more efficient than the FemtoCoaxial technique and Femtoincisions prove to be stable and do not change the corneal high order aberration significantly with favorable results of the triplanar configuration.

  19. Exome Array Analysis of Nuclear Lens Opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Stephanie J; Klein, Alison P; Lee, Kristine E; Chen, Fei; Bomotti, Samantha; Truitt, Barbara; Iyengar, Sudha K; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Duggal, Priya

    2018-06-01

    Nuclear cataract is the most common subtype of age-related cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide. It results from advanced nuclear sclerosis, or opacity in the center of the optic lens, and is affected by both genetic and environmental risk factors, including smoking. We sought to understand the genetic factors associated with nuclear sclerosis through interrogation of rare and low frequency coding variants using exome array data. We analyzed Illumina Human Exome Array data for 1,488 participants of European ancestry in the Beaver Dam Eye Study who were without cataract surgery for association with nuclear sclerosis grade, controlling for age and sex. We performed single-variant regression analysis for 32,138 variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.003. In addition, gene-based analysis of 11,844 genes containing at least two variants with MAF nuclear sclerosis, the possible association with the RNF149 gene highlights a potential candidate gene for future studies that aim to understand the genetic architecture of nuclear sclerosis.

  20. Age-Related Eye Disease and Participation in Cognitive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Melanie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Belleville, Sylvie; Li, Gisele; Rousseau, Jacqueline; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Moghadaszadeh, Solmaz; Freeman, Ellen E

    2017-12-21

    Studies have found a benefit to living a cognitively active life in older age. Our goal was to quantify participation in cognitively stimulating activities in adults with and without age-related eye disease. We conducted a cross-sectional hospital-based study in Montreal, Canada of older adults (n = 303) having either age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (n = 96), glaucoma (n = 93), or normal vision (n = 114). To be eligible, the AMD group had to have bilateral late stage AMD with a better eye visual acuity of 20/30 or worse. The glaucoma group had to have a diagnosis of bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma with visual field mean deviation Cognitive activities were measured using the Victoria Longitudinal Study Activity Questionnaire. Linear regression was used. Patients with AMD (β = -4.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) -6.0, -2.4) and glaucoma (β = -1.8, 95% CI -3.3, -0.3) participated in fewer cognitive activities per month compared to those with normal vision after adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes, number of comorbidities, cognition, and cataract. People with AMD and glaucoma participated in fewer cognitive activities, which could put them at risk for future cognitive impairment.

  1. cataract surgical services

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin. America (3,4). With an estimated 12,000 bilaterally blind people ... (OMA's). 1 general medical practitioner. Loptometry technician. 1 general nurse and. 3 health assistants. Ocular morbidities cataract and aphakia corneal scarring/phthisis glaucoma refractive errors others. Percent. 52.4.

  2. Phacoemulsificatıon in eyes wıth cataract and high myopia

    OpenAIRE

    Cetinkaya,Servet; Acir,Nursen Oncel; Cetinkaya,Yasemin Fatma; Dadaci,Zeynep; Yener,Halil İbrahim; Saglam,Faik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate the outcomes and complications following phacoemulsification surgery in eyes with cataract and high myopia.Methods:We retrospectively evaluated the data of 43 eyes of 28 consecutive patients (12 males, 16 females) with cataract and high myopia who had undergone phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. The mean [± standard deviation (range)] age of the patients was 59.20 ± 11.08 (39-77) years.Results:The frequency of nuclear cataract was signific...

  3. Combined surgery versus cataract surgery alone for eyes with cataract and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjuan Lisa; Hirunyachote, Phenpan; Jampel, Henry

    2015-07-14

    publications that cited the studies included in the review. We also contacted investigators and experts in the field to identify additional trials. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of participants who had open-angle, pseudoexfoliative, or pigmentary glaucoma and age-related cataract. The comparison of interest was combined cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) and any type of glaucoma surgery versus cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) alone. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data, and judged risk of bias for included studies. We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. We included nine RCTs, with a total of 655 participants (657 eyes), and follow-up periods ranging from 12 to 30 months. Seven trials were conducted in Europe, one in Canada and South Africa, and one in the United States. We graded the overall quality of the evidence as low due to observed inconsistency in study results, imprecision in effect estimates, and risks of bias in the included studies.Glaucoma surgery type varied among the studies: three studies used trabeculectomy, three studies used iStent® implants, one study used trabeculotomy, and two studies used trabecular aspiration. All of these studies found a statistically significant greater decrease in mean IOP postoperatively in the combined surgery group compared with cataract surgery alone; the mean difference (MD) was -1.62 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.61 to -0.64; 489 eyes) among six studies with data at one year follow-up. No study reported the proportion of participants with a reduction in the number of medications used after surgery, but two studies found the mean number of medications used postoperatively at one year was about one less in the combined surgery group than the cataract surgery alone group (MD -0.69, 95% CI -1.28 to -0.10; 301 eyes). Five studies showed that participants in the combined surgery group were about 50% less likely

  4. Reviewing fluid systems for age-related degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company has developed the component degradation assessment tool (CoDAT), an expert system, that aids in handling and evaluating the large amounts of data required to support the license renewal process for nuclear power station fluid systems. In 1990, CoDAT evaluated the Yankee Nuclear Power Station fluid systems for age-related degradation. Its results are now being used to help focus the plant's maintenance programs and manage the expected degradation. CoDAT uses 'If-Then' rules, developed from industry codes, standards and publications, to determine the potential for 19 age-related degradation mechanisms. Other nuclear utilities pursuing the license renewal option also could use CoDAT. (author)

  5. Phacoemulsification in subluxated cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of phacoemulsification in eyes with subluxated cataract. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised 22 eyes of 20 consecutive patients with subluxated cataracts of varying aetiology operated between March 1998 and March 2001. Detailed preoperative assessment included visual acuity (VA, slitlamp examination, presence of vitreous in anterior chamber, extent of subluxation, intraocular pressure (IOP and detailed fundus examination. Phacoemulsification was done to retain the natural bag support and all patients had acrylic foldable Acrysof IOL implantation either in-the-bag or by scleral fixation. Postoperative observations included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, IOP, pupillary reaction and the IOL position. Results: The aetiology of the subluxation was traumatic in 11 patients and non-traumatic in 9 patients. Fifteen were males and 5 were females. Mean follow-up was 11.7 ± 9.71 months (range 4-39. The average age was 39.15 ± 16.33 (range 5 - 74. A 2-port anterior chamber vitrectomy was performed in 6 eyes (27.2%. Capsule tension ring (CTR was implanted in 15 eyes (68.18%. Twelve eyes (54.5% had in-the-bag implants, while 5 (22.72% had scleral fixation. The remaining 5 eyes (22.72% had one haptic in-the-bag and another sutured to sclera. No major intraoperative complications were noted. Twelve eyes (54.5% had clinically and geometrically well centered IOLs while 9 eyes (40.9% had geometrically decentered IOLs. One patient was lost to follow-up. Fifteen eyes (55.55% had postoperative BCVA of 6/12 - 6/6 while 2 eyes (7.40% had BCVA of 6/18. The remaining 4 eyes (14.81% had less than 6/24 BCVA due to pre-existing posterior segment pathology. Postoperative complications included rise in IOP in 1 eye (4.54%, pupillary capture of the IOL optic in 2 eyes (9.09%; the same 2 eyes (9.09% required redialing of IOL. One eye (4.54% had to undergo refixation (one haptic was fixed to sclera year after cataract

  6. Cataract surgery output and cost of hospitalization for cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Si nous devons réussir à éliminer les arrièrs problèmes des cataracts de plus de ½ million cas, nos efforts sur la chirurgie de cataracte devraient porter principalement sur des programmes visant sur des measures preventives contre les incidences de la cécité. 106 cas des chirurgies cataracts avaient été opérées Durant la ...

  7. Deficiency of circadian protein CLOCK reduces lifespan and increases age-related cataract development in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dubrovsky, Yuliya V.; Samsa, William E.; Kondratov, Roman V.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clock is implicated in the regulation of aging. The transcription factor CLOCK, a core component of the circadian system, operates in complex with another circadian clock protein BMAL1. Recently it was demonstrated that BMAL1 deficiency results in premature aging in mice. Here we investigate the aging of mice deficient for CLOCK protein. Deficiency of the CLOCK protein significantly affects longevity: the average lifespan of Clock−/− mice is reduced by 15% compared with wild type mi...

  8. Cataract and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  9. Paediatric cataract: challenges and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr P Vijayalakshmi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amblyopia should always be anticipated in children with unilateral cataract, asymmetrical bilateral cataracts (or where there is a delay between the first and second eye operation, or a delay of more than a year between diagnosis/ detection and surgery, cataracts with anisometropia or traumatic cataracts with corneal scars. When amblyopia is detected, occlusion therapy (eye patching must be instituted at the earliest opportunity. The patching regimen is the same with any strabismic amblyopia and sometimes needs to be aggressive at the start. It is crucial to explain the need for patching to the parents, since compliance is the greatest obstacle to the success of amblyopia treatment.

  10. Electrical cataract and optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Z; Pamer, Z

    1994-01-01

    We report on a 20 year old male, who developed mature cataract (Electrical Cataract) on both eyes after a severe electric shock from high voltage. Both of his hands and the left foot had to be amputated, because of the severe injury. Although electrical cataract due to high voltage or lightning is rare, they may still occur after industrial or home electric accidents. Even if extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation is successfully performed, the final visual acuity will depend on other ocular damage due to the electric current.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and senile cataract in a Sardinian male population, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Antonio; Pes, Adele; Zinellu, Angelo; Carta, Arturo; Solinas, Giuliana

    2009-01-01

    There is still no general agreement on the role of G6PD deficiency in the pathogenesis of cataract. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in men with senile cataract from Northern Sardinia, Italy, and to compare it with the prevalence rate of G6PD deficiency in the general population of the same area. G6PD activity was determined by using a quantitative method. G6PD blood levels were measured in 1,620 men with cataract. The control group consisted of 1,646 apparently healthy male subjects from the same area. All patients were of Sardinian origin. The Z or Student's t test was used, when appropriate, to determine differences between groups. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval was used to evaluate the association between age-related cataract and G6PD deficiency. G6PD deficiency was found in 133 (8.2%) out of 1,620 patients with cataract and in 120 (7%) out of 1,646 control subjects. Differences in G6PD prevalence between cataract patients and controls were not statistically significant (P=0.64). There was no age-related statistical difference between G6PD deficient and normal patients with cataract. No statistically significant association between age-related cataract and G6PD deficiency was found (OR=1.14; 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.47). The results of this large study suggest that male patients with G6PD deficiency in the Sardinian population do not have a higher risk of developing presenile cataract. G6PD deficiency does not represent a pathogenetic factor for early cataract formation, at least not in the Northern part of Sardinia.

  12. The activity of superoxide dismutase in the aqueous humour of the patients with senile cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is a dysfunction of the lens of the eye caused by clouding. By far the most common type of cataract is the senile cataract. The immediate cause of the occurrence of cataract is unknown, but oxidative stress is considered important in its etiopathogenesis. The aim: to examine the intensity of oxidative stress, depending on the type and maturity of senile cataract, through the activity of the superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD in the aqueous humor of the patients diagnosed with senile cataract. The average activity of the superoxide dismutase enzyme in the aqueous humor of the patients with early nuclear cataract was 41.16 U/mL, which is a significantly higher value (p<0.01 when compared with that of the patients with other types of early cataract, as well as with that of the patients with total cataract (33.88 U/mL. With aging the activity of the superoxide dismutase enzyme decreases, hence the average activity of the enzyme was significantly lower (p<0.05 in the group of patients over 75 years of age (36.28 U/mL vs. 28.91 U/mL.

  13. An epigenetic hypothesis of aging-related cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha R Penner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This brief review will focus on a new hypothesis for the role of epigenetic mechanisms in aging-related disruptions of synaptic plasticity and memory. Epigenetics refers to a set of potentially self-perpetuating, covalent modifications of DNA and post-translational modifications of nuclear proteins that produce lasting alterations in chromatin structure. These mechanisms, in turn, result in alterations in specific patterns of gene expression. Aging-related memory decline is manifest prominently in declarative/episodic memory and working memory, memory modalities anatomically based largely in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, respectively. The neurobiological underpinnings of age-related memory deficits include aberrant changes in gene transcription that ultimately affect the ability of the aged brain to be “plastic”. The molecular mechanisms underlying these changes in gene transcription are not currently known, but recent work points toward a potential novel mechanism, dysregulation of epigenetic mechanisms. This has led us to hypothesize that dysregulation of epigenetic control mechanisms and aberrant epigenetic “marks” drive aging-related cognitive dysfunction. Here we focus on this theme, reviewing current knowledge concerning epigenetic molecular mechanisms, as well as recent results suggesting disruption of plasticity and memory formation during aging. Finally, several open questions will be discussed that we believe will fuel experimental discovery.

  14. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  15. Nutrition and Age-Related Eye Diseases: The ALIENOR (Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition et Maladies Oculaires) Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Delcourt , Cécile; Korobelnik , Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau , Pascale; Delyfer , Marie-Noëlle; Marie-Bénédicte , Rougier; Le Goff , Mélanie; Malet , Florence; Joseph , Colin; Dartigues , Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Background: Worldwide, degenerative eye diseases (age-related maculopathy (ARM), cataract, glaucoma) are the main causes of visual impairment and blindness, which contribute to disability in the elderly. Mainly three types of nutritional factors are investigated for their potential protection against eye ageing: antioxidants; lutein and zeaxanthin (carotenoids which accumulate specifically in the eye); omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Few epidemiological studies ha...

  16. Neuromuscular contributions to age-related weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related physiological change of neuromuscular function is not a linear process and is likely influenced by various biological and behavioral factors (e.g., genetics, nutrition, physical activity level, comorbidities, etc.). These factors contribute to heterogeneity among older adults, which chal...

  17. Epidemiology of age-related maculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Vingerling (Hans)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn 1875, Pagenstecher and Gentll provided the first description of age-related maculopathy (ARM). Nowadays, hundred and twenty years after the first description, ARM is one of the major causes of severe irreversible visual loss in the elderly in western countries. It has been estimated

  18. Folate and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders and an increase in their risk factors, such as decreased concentrations of folate and increased concentrations of homocysteine. The association of folate and homocysteine with age-related disease and, most

  19. Preliminary observation of refractive cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the differences of visual acuity and corneal astigmatism postoperatively between conventional refractive cataract surgery and that assisted by femtosecond laser.METHODS:Sixty patients(60 eyeswith age-related cataract and cornea astigmatism were divided into femtosecond group and conventional group randomly or voluntarily. The flat shaft, steep shaft and diopter of corneal astigmatism in patients in femtosecond group were inputted into the online vector calculators to get the location and width of the incision. Then femtosecond laser was used to make corneal releasing incision, the main and auxiliary incision. Phacoemulsification and aspheric multifocal intraocular lens implantation were undergone. Patients in conventional group received full-thickness relaxing incision by cornea paracentesis knife at the steepest meridian axis during phacoemulsification. Then aspheric multifocal intraocular lenses were implanted. Uncorrected distance visual acuity(UCDVA, uncorrected near visual acuity(UCNVAand cornea astigmatism were observed at 1d,1wk and 1mo postoperative. RESULTS:UCVA of patients in both groups was improved after the surgeries. UCDVA and UCNVA of femtosecond group were higher than those of conventional group, while the cornea astigmatism of femtosecond group was lower than that of conventional group.CONCLUSION:Refractile cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser canoffer better visual quality than conventional refractive cataract surgery because of lower cornea astigmatism and better visual acuity.

  20. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  1. Age and Smoking Related Changes in Metal Ion Levels in Human Lens: Implications for Cataract Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Langford-Smith

    Full Text Available Age-related cataract formation is the primary cause of blindness worldwide and although treatable by surgical removal of the lens the majority of sufferers have neither the finances nor access to the medical facilities required. Therefore, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cataract may identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or slow its progression. Cataract incidence is strongly correlated with age and cigarette smoking, factors that are often associated with accumulation of metal ions in other tissues. Therefore this study evaluated the age-related changes in 14 metal ions in 32 post mortem human lenses without known cataract from donors of 11 to 82 years of age by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; smoking-related changes in 10 smokers verses 14 non-smokers were also analysed. A significant age-related increase in selenium and decrease in copper ions was observed for the first time in the lens tissue, where cadmium ion levels were also increased as has been seen previously. Aluminium and vanadium ions were found to be increased in smokers compared to non-smokers (an analysis that has only been carried out before in lenses with cataract. These changes in metal ions, i.e. that occur as a consequence of normal ageing and of smoking, could contribute to cataract formation via induction of oxidative stress pathways, modulation of extracellular matrix structure/function and cellular toxicity. Thus, this study has identified novel changes in metal ions in human lens that could potentially drive the pathology of cataract formation.

  2. A locus for isolated cataract on human Xp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P J; Berry, V; Hardcastle, A J; Maher, E R; Moore, A T; Bhattacharya, S S

    2002-02-01

    To genetically map the gene causing isolated X linked cataract in a large European pedigree. Using the patient registers at Birmingham Women's Hospital, UK, we identified and examined 23 members of a four generation family with nuclear cataract. Four of six affected males also had complex congenital heart disease. Pedigree data were collated and leucocyte DNA extracted from venous blood. Linkage analysis by PCR based microsatellite marker genotyping was used to identify the disease locus and mutations within candidate genes screened by direct sequencing. The disease locus was genetically refined to chromosome Xp22, within a 3 cM linkage interval flanked by markers DXS9902 and DXS999 (Zmax=3.64 at theta=0 for marker DXS8036). This is the first report of a locus for isolated inherited cataract on the X chromosome. The disease interval lies within the Nance-Horan locus suggesting allelic heterogeneity. The apparent association with congenital cardiac anomalies suggests a possible new oculocardiac syndrome.

  3. αA crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy-meta-analysis of cataract vs. cataract surgery for geographic atrophy and experimental studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataract and geographic atrophy (GA, also called advanced "dry" age-related macular degeneration are the two major causes of visual impairment in the developed world. The association between cataract surgery and the development of GA was controversial in previous studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis by pooling the current evidence in literature and found that cataract is associated with an increased risk of geographic atrophy with a summary odds ratio (OR of 3.75 (95% CI: 95% CI: 1.84-7.62. However, cataract surgery is not associated with the risk of geographic atrophy (polled OR=3.23, 95% CI: 0.63-16.47. Further experiments were performed to analyze how the αA-crystallin, the major component of the lens, influences the development of GA in a mouse model. We found that theαA-crystallin mRNA and protein expression increased after oxidative stress induced by NaIO(3 in immunohistochemistry of retinal section and western blot of posterior eyecups. Both functional and histopathological evidence confirmed that GA is more severe in αA-crystallin knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, αA-crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between cataract, cataract surgery, and GA.

  4. Feasibility and Complications between Phacoemulsification and Manual Small Incision Surgery in Subluxated Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchi; Kamal, Saurabh; Kumar, Sushil; Kishore, Jugal; Malik, K. P. S.; Angmo Bodh, Sonam; Bansal, Smriti; Singh, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the feasibility of cataract surgery with implantation of endocapsular supporting devices and intraocular lens (IOL) in subluxated cataract in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design. Prospective randomized intervention case series consisting of 60 eyes with visually significant subluxated cataract. Method. The patients were randomly distributed between the two groups equally. The main outcome measure was implantation of in-the-bag IOL, requirement of additional procedure and complications, if any. Results. Capsular bag retention in subluxated lenses is possible in 90% cases in phacoemulsification versus 76.67% cases in MSICS (P = 0.16). Both groups, achieved similar best corrected visual acuity (P = 0.73), although additional procedures, intraoperative, and postoperative complications were more common in MSICS. Conclusions. Achieving intact capsulorhexis and nuclear rotation in MSICS may be difficult in cases with large nucleus size and severe subluxation, but subluxated cataracts can be effectively managed by both phacoemuslification and MSICS. PMID:22523646

  5. Feasibility and Complications between Phacoemulsification and Manual Small Incision Surgery in Subluxated Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Goel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the feasibility of cataract surgery with implantation of endocapsular supporting devices and intraocular lens (IOL in subluxated cataract in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS. Design. Prospective randomized intervention case series consisting of 60 eyes with visually significant subluxated cataract. Method. The patients were randomly distributed between the two groups equally. The main outcome measure was implantation of in-the-bag IOL, requirement of additional procedure and complications, if any. Results. Capsular bag retention in subluxated lenses is possible in 90% cases in phacoemulsification versus 76.67% cases in MSICS (=0.16. Both groups, achieved similar best corrected visual acuity (=0.73, although additional procedures, intraoperative, and postoperative complications were more common in MSICS. Conclusions. Achieving intact capsulorhexis and nuclear rotation in MSICS may be difficult in cases with large nucleus size and severe subluxation, but subluxated cataracts can be effectively managed by both phacoemuslification and MSICS.

  6. Prevention of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niharika; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Muralidharan, Vinata; Roy, Rupak; V, Jayprakash; Raman, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compromises quality of life. However, the available therapeutic options are limited. This has led to the identification of modifiable risk factors to prevent the development or alter the natural course and prognosis of AMD. The identification and modification of risk factors has the potential for greater public health impact on reducing morbidity from AMD. Likewise, identifying the imaging clues and genetic clues could serve as a guide to recognizing the propensity for progression to severe and end stages of the disease. Several attempts, both successful and unsuccessful, have been made for interventions that could delay the progression of AMD. Of these, pharmacological interventions have shown promising results. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 1 and 2 have shown the beneficial role of antioxidants in a selected group of patients. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  7. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  8. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Shier, W.; MacDougall, E.

    1990-07-01

    An aging assessment of Westinghouse DS-series low-voltage air circuit breakers was performed as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. The objectives of this study are to characterize age-related degradation within the breaker assembly and to identify maintenance practices to mitigate their effect. Since this study has been promulgated by the failures of the reactor trip breakers at the McGuire Nuclear Station in July 1987, results relating to the welds in the breaker pole lever welds are also discussed. The design and operation of DS-206 and DS-416 breakers were reviewed. Failure data from various national data bases were analyzed to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and mechanisms. Additional operating experiences from one nuclear station and two industrial breaker-service companies were obtained to develop aging trends of various subcomponents. The responses of the utilities to the NRC Bulletin 88-01, which discusses the center pole lever welds, were analyzed to assess the final resolution of failures of welds in the reactor trips. Maintenance recommendations, made by the manufacturer to mitigate age-related degradation were reviewed, and recommendations for improving the monitoring of age-related degradation are discussed. As described in Volume 2 of this NUREG, the results from a test program to assess degradation in breaker parts through mechanical cycling are also included. The testing has characterized the cracking of center-pole lever welds, identified monitoring techniques to determine aging in breakers, and provided information to augment existing maintenance programs. Recommendations to improve breaker reliability using effective maintenance, testing, and inspection programs are suggested. 13 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Co-morbidity of depression and anxiety in common age-related eye disease: a population-based study of 662 adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranmalee eEramudugolla

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of co-morbid age-related eye disease and symptoms of depression and anxiety in late life, and the relative roles of visual function and disease in explaining symptoms of depression and anxiety. A community-based sample of 662 individuals aged over 70 years was recruited through the electoral roll. Vision was measured using a battery of tests including high and low contrast visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, motion sensitivity, stereoacuity, Useful Field of View and visual fields. Depression and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Goldberg scales. The prevalence of self-reported eye disease (cataract, glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration in the sample was 43.4%, with 7.7% reporting more than one form of ocular pathology. Of those with no eye disease, 3.7% had clinically significant depressive symptoms. This rate was 6.7% among cataract patients, 4.3% among those with glaucoma, and 10.5% for age-related macular degeneration. Generalized linear models adjusting for demographics, general health, treatment and disability examined self-reported eye disease and visual function as correlates of depression and anxiety. Depressive symptoms were associated with cataract only, age-related macular degeneration, comorbid eye diseases and reduced low contrast visual acuity. Anxiety was significantly associated with self-reported cataract, and reduced low contrast visual acuity, motion sensitivity and contrast sensitivity. We found no evidence for elevated rates of depressive or anxiety symptoms associated with self-reported glaucoma. The results support previous findings of high rates of depression and anxiety in cataract and age-related macular degeneration, and in addition show that mood and anxiety are associated with objective measures of visual function independently of self-reported eye disease. The findings have implications for the assessment and treatment of mental health in the context of late

  10. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataract Surgery vs. Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Pictures and Videos: What Do ... Mar. 27, 2018 An intraocular lens (or IOL) is a tiny, artificial lens for the eye. It replaces the eye's ...

  11. Analyses of cataract surgery performed by the Unified Health System in Brazil, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligaris, Ligia Santos Abreu; Medina, Norma Helen; Lansingh, Van C; Waldman, Eliseu Alves; Yaacov-Peña, Fernando

    2011-06-01

    Estimate cataract surgical rates (CSR) for Brazil and each federal unit in 2006 and 2007 based on the number of surgeries performed by the Unified Health System to help plan a comprehensive ophthalmology network in order to eliminate cataract blindness in compliance with the target set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 3,000 cataract surgeries per million inhabitants per year. This descriptive study calculates CSR by using the number of cataract surgeries carried out by the Brazilian Unified Health System for each federal unit and estimates the need for cataract surgery in Brazil for 2006-2007, with official population data provided by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. The number of cataract surgeries was compared with the WHO target. To reach the WHO goal for eliminating age-related cataract blindness in Brazil, 560,312 cataract surgeries in 2006 and 568,006 surgeries in 2007 needed to be done. In 2006, 179,121 cataract surgeries were done by the Unified Health System, corresponding to a CSR of 959 per million population; in 2007, 223,317 were performed, with a CSR of 1,179. With the Brazilian Council of Ophthalmology estimation of 165,000 surgeries each year by the non-public services, the CSR for Brazil would be 1,842 for 2006 and 2,051 for 2007. The proportions needed to achieve the proposed target were 38.6% in 2006 and 31.6% in 2007. Human resources, technical expertise, and equipment are crucial to reach the WHO goal. Brazil has enough ophthalmologists but needs improved planning and infrastructure in order to eliminate the problem, aspects that require greater financial investment and stronger political commitment.

  12. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Tanigawa

    Full Text Available Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG, one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV, which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  13. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    , influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

  14. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Psychophysical function in age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neelam, Kumari

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the late stage of age-related maculopathy (ARM), is the leading cause of blind registration in developed countries. The visual loss in AMD occurs due to dysfunction and death of photoreceptors (rods and cones) secondary to an atrophic or a neovascular event. The psychophysical tests of vision, which depend on the functional status of the photoreceptors, may detect subtle alterations in the macula before morphological fundus changes are apparent ophthalmoscopically, and before traditional measures of visual acuity exhibit deterioration, and may be a useful tool for assessing and monitoring patients with ARM. Furthermore, worsening of these visual functions over time may reflect disease progression, and some of these, alone or in combination with other parameters, may act as a prognostic indicator for identifying eyes at risk for developing neovascular AMD. Lastly, psychophysical tests often correlate with subjective and relatively undefined symptoms in patients with early ARM, and may reflect limitation of daily activities for ARM patients. However, clinical studies investigating psychophysical function have largely been cross-sectional in nature, with small sample sizes, and lack consistency in terms of the grading and classification of ARM. This article aims to comprehensively review the literature germane to psychophysical tests in ARM, and to furnish the reader with an insight into this complex area of research.

  16. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  17. Blindness, cataract surgery and mortality in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin J; Sanders, David S; Oliva, Matthew S; Orrs, Mark S; Glick, Peter; Ruit, Sanduk; Chen, Wei; Luoto, Jill; Tasfaw, Alemu Kerie; Tabin, Geoffrey C

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationships between blindness, the intervention of cataract surgery and all-cause mortality in a rural Ethiopian population. Population-based, interventional prospective study. Community-based detection methods identified blind Ethiopian persons from two selected kebeles in Amhara region, Ethiopia. Data from 1201 blind patients were collected-628 cataract-blind and 573 blind from other conditions. Free cataract surgery was provided for consenting, cataract-blind patients. Follow-up surveys were conducted after 12 months (±1 month)-the main outcome measure for this report is all-cause mortality at 1 year. During the follow-up period, 110 persons died from the selected population (mortality 9.2%), which consisted of those cataract-blind patients who received cataract surgery (N=461), cataract-blind patients who did not receive surgery (N=167) and all non-cataract-blind patients (N=573). Of the 461 patients who received cataract surgery, 44 patients died (9.5%). Of the 740 patients who did not receive surgery, 66 died (8.9%)-28 patients from the cohort of cataract-blind patients who did not receive surgery (16.8%) and 38 patients from the cohort of non-cataract blind (6.6%). Subgroup analysis revealed significantly increased odds of mortality for cataract-blind patients over 75 years of age who did not receive surgery and for unmarried patients of all age groups. In this population, mortality risk was significantly elevated for older cataract-blind patients when compared with non-cataract-blind patients-an elevation of risk that was not noted in an age-matched cohort of cataract-blind patients who underwent cataract surgery as early as 1-year follow-up. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to examine the benefits and harms associated with immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) with specific emphasis on the rate of complications, postoperative anisometropia, and subjective visual function in order to formulate evidence......-based national Danish guidelines for cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central databases identified three randomized controlled trials that compared outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or bilateral cataract surgery on two different dates. Meta-analyses were...... performed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE method (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation). We did not find any difference in the risk of complications or visual outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or surgery...

  19. Simulation-based certification for cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Kjaerbo, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the EyeSi(™) simulator in regard to assessing competence in cataract surgery. The primary objective was to explore all simulator metrics to establish a proficiency-based test with solid evidence. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether the skill assessment was specific...... to cataract surgery. METHODS: We included 26 ophthalmic trainees (no cataract surgery experience), 11 experienced cataract surgeons (>4000 cataract procedures) and five vitreoretinal surgeons. All subjects completed 13 different modules twice. Simulator metrics were used for the assessments. RESULTS: Total...

  20. The morphology and natural history of childhood cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Luis; Taylor, David; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Nischal, Ken K; Lengyel, Dora

    2003-01-01

    The morphology of congenital cataract reflects a combination of the timing and nature of the cause, the anatomy of the lens including its capsule, its development, and changes that take place with time. Morphology may variably affect prognosis, give a clue to the etiology and the age of onset and, in an isolated case, sometimes suggest heritability. The spectrum of morphological variations is enormous and can be complex. A comprehensive approach is to classify the variations according to the area of the lens involved, and sub-dividing them by a detailed description of the shape and appearance. Each specific morphological type is then analyzed determining the etiology, visual prognosis, and management. The use of gene markers has allowed many of these variations to be identified and categorized. Cataracts in childhood can involve the whole lens, in which case they are called total, Morgagnian, or disk-like. They can affect only the center of the lens: lamellar, nuclear, oil droplet, cortical, or coronary. They can be anterior: anterior polar, anterior subcapsular, or anterior lenticonus. The posterior aspect of the lens can also be affected in different fashions: Mittendorf's dot, posterior lenticonus, posterior cortical cataracts, or posterior subcapsular. There are five more forms that must be described separately: punctuate lens opacities, sutural cataracts, coralliform or crystalline, wedge-shaped, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  1. Pediatric cataract surgery in Madagascar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-28

    the‑world‑factbook/geos/ma.html. [Cited 2010 Oct 31]. 11. Nkumbe HE, Randrianotahina HC. Meeting the need for childhood cataract surgical services in Madagascar. Afr J Paediatr Surg 2011;8:182‑4. 12. Muhit MA. Childhood ...

  2. The Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika

    2015-01-01

    examination with a pencil light at age 5 weeks, whereas newborn red reflex examination using a handheld ophthalmoscope is routine protocol in Swedish maternity wards. Data regarding age of referral were derived from the Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE). All children operated on before 1 year of age...

  3. Age-related changes in mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, M A; Woda, A; Bourdiol, P; Hennequin, M

    2017-04-01

    The paper reviews human mastication, focusing on its age-related changes. The first part describes mastication adaptation in young healthy individuals. Adaptation to obtain a food bolus ready to be swallowed relies on variations in number of cycles, muscle strength and volume of emitted saliva. As a result, the food bolus displays granulometric and rheological properties, the values of which are maintained within the adaptive range of deglutition. The second part concerns healthy ageing. Some mastication parameters are slightly modified by age, but ageing itself does not impair mastication, as the adaptation possibilities remain operant. The third part reports on very aged subjects, who display frequent systemic or local diseases. Local and/or general diseases such as tooth loss, salivary defect, or motor impairment are then indistinguishably superimposed on the effects of very old age. The resulting impaired function increases the risk of aspiration and choking. Lastly, the consequences for eating behaviour and nutrition are evoked. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Radiotherapy in age-related macula degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripp, Stephan; Stammen, Johannes; Petersen, Claudia; Hartmann, Axel; Willers, Reinhart; Althaus, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the benefit from radiotherapy in age-related macula degeneration in a single-arm longitudinal study. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 1998, 39 patients with occult and 33 patients with classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) were irradiated with 16 Gy. Fluorescein angiography and measurements of visual acuity were performed before and 3, 6, and 12 months after irradiation. Results: Complete follow-up data for 1 year were available from 69 patients. The mean patient age was 72 years (range 49-92). Vision decreased in 43, was stable in 18, and improved in 8 cases. The mean vision deteriorated significantly (p=0.02, Wilcoxon test), particularly within the first 3 months. Patients with occult CNV did significantly better than did those with classic CNV (p=0.03). The proportion of patients retaining vision ≥0.2 fell from 65% to 42% (p <0.01), for classic and occult CNV from 50% to 23%, and for occult CNV from 77% to 56% (p<0.02), respectively. CNV size increased in 30 patients and was stable in 38. Neither age (p=0.17) nor gender (p=0.21, chi-square test) influenced prognosis. Four patients reported transitional complaints. Conclusion: Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy with 16 Gy is well tolerated. However, vision and reading ability were not preserved in most patients

  5. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  6. Age-related hearing loss or presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Tang, Jianguo

    2010-08-01

    Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. Although many adults retain good hearing as they aging, hearing loss related with age-presbycusis which can vary in severity from mild to substantial is common among elderly persons. There are a number of pathophysiological processes underlying age-related changes in the auditory system as well as in the central nervous systems. Many studies have been dedicated to the illustration of risk factors accumulating presbycusis such as heritability, environment factors, medical conditions, free radical (reactive oxygen species, ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA. Left untreated, presbycusis can not only lead sufferers to reduced quality of life, isolation, dependence and frustration, but also affect the healthy people around. These can be partly corrected using hearing aids, but it is not enough, more and more strategies of treatment based on the findings associating with presbycusis should be added rather than using single hearing aids. We review here the pathophysiology; heritability, susceptibility genes and other risk factors including environmental, medical, especially free radical (ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA; and some strategies of treatment, as well as promising rehabilitations associating with presbycusis.

  7. Age-related retinopathy in NRF2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyang Zhao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative oxidative damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 is a transcription factor that plays key roles in retinal antioxidant and detoxification responses. The purposes of this study were to determine whether NRF2-deficient mice would develop AMD-like retinal pathology with aging and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Eyes of both wild type and Nrf2(-/- mice were examined in vivo by fundus photography and electroretinography (ERG. Structural changes of the outer retina in aged animals were examined by light and electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence labeling. Our results showed that Nrf2(-/- mice developed age-dependent degenerative pathology in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Drusen-like deposits, accumulation of lipofuscin, spontaneous choroidal neovascularization (CNV and sub-RPE deposition of inflammatory proteins were present in Nrf2(-/- mice after 12 months. Accumulation of autophagy-related vacuoles and multivesicular bodies was identified by electron microscopy both within the RPE and in Bruch's membrane of aged Nrf2(-/- mice.Our data suggest that disruption of Nfe2l2 gene increased the vulnerability of outer retina to age-related degeneration. NRF2-deficient mice developed ocular pathology similar to cardinal features of human AMD and deregulated autophagy is likely a mechanistic link between oxidative injury and inflammation. The Nrf2(-/- mice can provide a novel model for mechanistic and translational research on AMD.

  8. Factors associated with strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation in congenital cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jung Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate factors associated with the development of strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation.METHODS: The medical records of 122 patients, aged 1.5mo to 9y, who had undergone cataract extraction with primary intraocular lens implantation between January 1993 and August 2011 were reviewed. Fourteen patients (17 eyes with strabismus before cataract surgery were excluded. Patients were divided into those with congenital bilateral cataracts (64 patients, 128 eyes and those with unilateral cataracts (44 patients, 44 eyes. The associations between the development of strabismus and age at cataract surgery, pre- and post-cataract extraction corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, interocular CDVA difference, nystagmus, surgical method, and secondary cataract were evaluated.RESULTS: Factors significantly associated with the development of strabismus included age at cataract surgery (≤1y, preoperative mean CDVA ≤20/100, presence of nystagmus in the bilateral cataract group and postoperative interocular CDVA difference >20/70 in the unilateral group. Postoperative CDVA ≤20/100 and preservation of posterior capsule, and presence of secondary cataract were significant factors in both groups.CONCLUSION: Children with congenital cataracts should be monitored carefully after cataract surgery for the development of strabismus, especially when they underwent surgery at age ≤1y, and they have nystagmus, large postoperative interocular CDVA difference, poor preoperative and postoperative CDVA, preservation of the posterior capsule, or secondary cataract.

  9. Cognitive impairment in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: AREDS report no. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Traci E; Rankin, Molly W; McBee, Wendy L

    2006-04-01

    To investigate potential associations between cognitive function and/or impairment and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and visual impairment in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). The AREDS is an 11-center natural history study of AMD and age-related cataract. The AREDS Cognitive Function Battery was administered to 2946 participants. The battery consists of 6 neuropsychological tests measuring performance in several cognitive domains. The Dunnett multiple comparison test was used to identify differences by AMD and visual acuity severity. The relationship with cognitive impairment was also assessed using logistic regression. Mean scores of instruments in the AREDS Cognitive Function Battery declined with increased macular abnormalities and reduced visual acuity. After adjustment for age, sex, race, education, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and depression, increased macular abnormalities (trend P value cognitive function scores as measured by the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and the Wechsler Logical Memory Scale. Reduced vision was found to be associated with reduced mean cognitive function scores as measured by the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and letter and verbal fluency tasks. Persons with vision worse than 20/40 OU were more likely to be cognitively impaired (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score cognitive impairment in older persons.

  10. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  11. [Age-related decline of immune function and age-related diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Ken-ichi; Nishio, Naomi; Ito, Sachiko

    2009-07-01

    Effects of aging on immune system are widespread. The development of T and B cells declines with age. The functions of matured T and B cell also decline with age. Consequently, infections present major clinical problems for elderly patients. Many of age-related diseases are related to innate immunity. For example, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and Alzheimer disease are related to macrophages (microglia). The Ox-LDL or A-beta induces macrophages or microglia to produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Recently neutrophils have been shown to be an important immune cells in atherosclerosis. Neutrophils secrete inflammatory cytokines. In wound healing neutrophils also work as first important immune cells, which affect age-related decline of wound repair.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Description Age-related hearing loss (also known as presbycusis) is a decrease in hearing ability that happens ... age-related old-aged sensorineural hearing impairment presbyacusia presbycusis Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes ...

  14. Significant improvement in dynamic visual acuity after cataract surgery: a promising potential parameter for functional vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mingxin; Li, Xuemin; Huang, Chen; Hou, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Weiqiang; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is a relatively independent parameter for evaluating the ability to distinguish details of a moving target. The present study has been designed to discuss the extent to which age-related cataract impacts DVA in elderly individuals and to determine whether it could be restored after bilateral phacoemulsification combined with intraocular lens implantation surgery. Twenty-six elderly cataract patients scheduled for binocular cataract surgery and 30 elderly volunteers without cataract were enrolled in the study. DVA at 15, 30, 60 and 90 degree per second (dps) was assessed, and velocity-dependent visual acuity decreases between consecutive speed levels were calculated. Compared with the control group, the patient group exhibited significantly worse DVA performance at all speed levels (pDVA performance at every speed level in the patient group clearly improved (pDVA was more pronounced than the improvement in static visual acuity (p15 dps = 0.001 and pDVA was more severe than its effects on static visual acuity. After cataract surgery, not only static vision of the patients was restored markedly, but also the dynamic vision. DVA could be an important adjunct to the current evaluation system of functional vision, thereby meriting additional attention in clinical assessment.

  15. Adrenomyeloneuropathy associated with congenital cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Tetsuo; Nagashima, Toshiko; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Hitoshi; Tsubaki, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) in a family and the results of their MRI study are reported. Case 1, a 24-year-old male proband, was admitted to our hospital because of gait disturbance for three years. Bilateral cataracts were pointed out at birth, which required left side lenticotomy at age four. Neurological examinations on admission revealed a marked spastic paraparesis with pathological reflexes and a mild hypesthesia in the distal part of the left leg. No abnormal findings were detected in X-ray studies on the spine and spinal cord, electromyography and nerve conduction test. Serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) levels were apparently elevated, and the serum cortisol response to ACTH was low. Case 2, a 53-year-old woman, is the mother of Case 1 having a complaint of gait disturbance since age 51. She presented a mild spastic paraparesis with localized hypesthesia in the distal part of the both legs. She also had bilateral congenital cataracts. Her serum VLCFAs analysis indicated the intermediate levels between that of AMN and the normal control. Adrenal functions were normal. Cranial MRI (TR 2,000 msec/TE 80 msec) study disclosed high signal intensity areas in bilateral internal capsules in Case 1. These findings, suggesting the pathological change of dysmyelination, seemed to be well compatible with the clinical pictures. With these clinical findings and the laboratory data, these two cases were diagnosed as AMN. In addition, association of congenital cataract with AMN in both cases was characteristic in this family, which hasn't been reported in the literature. On regarding the genetic background of these two disorders, AMN and congenital cataract, it was speculated that each gene could be closely located on the same or very adjacent locus, possibly on Xq. (author)

  16. Heterochromia after pediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenart, T D; Drack, A V; Tarnuzzer, R W; Fernandes, A; Lambert, S R

    2000-02-01

    Changes in iris color have been noted anecdotally after cataract surgery in infants, but they have not been studied systematically. The mechanism for these iris color changes has not previously been reported in the biomedical literature. Photographs were taken of both eyes of 15 children and 11 rhesus monkeys who had undergone unilateral cataract surgery. Masked examiners reviewed the photographs and compared the iris color of the eyes that were operated on with the eyes that were not operated on. Between 4 and 6 weeks postoperatively, the level of prostaglandin F(2alpha) in the aqueous humor (n = 4) and vitreous humor (n = 2) was measured in both the operated and nonoperated eyes of 4 monkeys that had undergone a neonatal lensectomy during the first 5 days of life. Thirteen of 15 children had a darker iris color in the operated eye in relation to the nonoperated (control) eye. Four of 11 monkeys had a uniformly darker iris in the operated eye; the other 7 monkeys had regional darkening or patches of darker iris in the eye that was operated on. The prostaglandin F(2alpha) levels in neonatal monkeys were higher in the aqueous humor and in the vitreous humor of the operated eye in relation to the nonoperated eye. In some children, cataract surgery is associated with a darkening of the iris color in the operated eye. We speculate that this darkening results from an exuberant prostaglandin release stimulated by the cataract surgery and may occur through the same or a similar mechanism by which latanoprost causes the darkening of iris color.

  17. Patient satisfaction with cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasfi Ehab I

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Measuring the patient satisfaction is a very important issue that will help very much in improving the service provided to patients and improve the level of satisfaction. Aim To evaluate patient satisfaction with the cataract surgery service and identify any areas for improvement, determination of patient satisfaction with referral, out-patient consultation, pre-assessment clinic, surgery and post-operative care, also to report patients' comments relating to improvement in service provision. Methodology A retrospective study was undertaken for 150 patients underwent cataract surgery at Barrow General Hospital, UK, the survey sample was by postal questionnaires. We collected our data from the theatre lists for a period of 4 month. Results This study included 150 patients; the response rate was (72% 108 patients, Most patients were referred from their general practitioner 86.1%, 93 (86.1% patients were happy with the time interval from seeing their GP to eye clinic. In the eye out patient department many factors significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction, in general the more information provided for the patient the more the satisfaction. Conclusion Patient satisfaction is on important health outcome old understanding both the domains of satisfaction as well as their relative importance to patients is necessary to improve the overall quality of patient care. Meeting the doctor, presenting all relevant information and giving printed information are very important factors in improving the patient's satisfaction with cataract surgery.

  18. Medicolegal pitfalls of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bryan S

    2015-01-01

    To provide a general overview of medicolegal issues that may arise before, during, and after cataract surgery. The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has designated ophthalmology as an auditing target, an unusual step to take for an entire specialty. Ongoing False Claims Act litigation may provide greater clarity on billing Medicare for a premium intraocular lens patient's return to the operating room and charging for an intervening exam when performing cataract surgery on both eyes. Ophthalmologists should continue to follow basic principles that help decrease medicolegal risk. These include a thorough informed consent discussion before surgery and accurate and contemporaneous documentation. When complications arise, surgeons should handle them in accordance with best practices and refer patients appropriately. Problems can arise from inattentive postoperative care, so ophthalmologists should train staff members on handling of patient calls. Implementing safety protocols for intraocular lens implantation and asking for legal advice when considering certain types of financial arrangements are also prudent. Cataract surgeons also should follow guidelines for billing noncovered services carefully.

  19. Cognitive impairment and age-related vision disorders: their possible relationship and the evaluation of the use of aspirin and statins in a 65 years-and-over Sardinian population

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella eMandas; Antonella eMandas; Giulia eCaminiti

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer’s disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurologic...

  20. Cognitive Impairment and Age-Related Vision Disorders: Their Possible Relationship and the Evaluation of the Use of Aspirin and Statins in a 65 Years-and-Over Sardinian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mandas, Antonella; Mereu, Rosa Maria; Catte, Olga; Saba, Antonio; Serchisu, Luca; Costaggiu, Diego; Peiretti, Enrico; Caminiti, Giulia; Vinci, Michela; Casu, Maura; Piludu, Stefania; Fossarello, Maurizio; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Dessí, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer’s disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging, which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly, and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurolo...

  1. Prevalence of myopic shifts among patients seeking cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Iribarren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern cataract surgery by phacoemulsification is a widely accepted procedure with a rapid recovery time. The prescription of specific intraocular lens, implanted during surgery, makes it possible to anticipate whether the patient will need reading glasses after the procedure. The present study analyses a sample of cataract surgery patients to show the frequency of myopic shifts related to nuclear opacity, which can result in clear near vision before surgery. A non-selected sample of consecutive patients who underwent elective cataract surgery in a private clinic was studied retrospectively. The myopic shift in refraction was assessed by comparing the old prescription with the spectacle correction at the time of interviewing.The mean age of the 229 subjects studied was 71.5 ± 10.4 years (109, 47.6%, males. A myopic shift in refraction, defined as at least - 0.5 diopters, was present in 37.1% of subjects (95% CI: 30.8%-43.4%. The mean change in refraction in these subjects was -2.52 ± 1.52 diopters. The percentage of subjects who had developed a myopic shift was significantly greater in those who presented greater nuclear opalescence. There were also differences in the mean myopic shift by refractive group, with the emmetropes having the greatest myopic shift. In this study of patients seeking cataract surgery in a clinical setting, more than one third had myopic shifts in refraction. This must be taken into account in order that patients maintain the benefit of clear near vision after surgery.

  2. Flicker electroretinograms recorded with mydriasis-free RETeval system before and after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, G; Sato, E; Yamamoto, S

    2017-11-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to compare the amplitudes and peak times of the flicker electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded before and after cataract surgery with the RETeval system (LKC Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD, USA) from eyes without dilation.Patients and methodsThirty-two eyes of 32 patients (77.3±6.5 years) that had grade 2 Emery-Little nuclear or cortical cataract without any other abnormalities were studied. Flicker ERGs were recorded with the RETeval system under mydriatic-free conditions. Skin electrodes were used to pick-up the ERGs that were elicited by white light delivered at a rate of 28.3 Hz and intensity of 2, 8, and 32 Td-s. The amplitudes and peak times of the flicker ERGs before and after cataract surgery were compared.ResultsThe mean amplitudes were significantly increased after the removal of the cataractous lenses at the three stimulus intensities (2 Td-s, Pflicker ERGs elicited by 2 and 8 Td-s were significantly shortened after the surgery (2 td-s, Pflicker ERGs even if the cataract is mild. In addition, the results indicate that as stimulus intensity increases, the peak times is less affected by a cataract. The clarity of the crystalline lens should be considered when interpreting the flicker ERGs recorded with the RETeval system.

  3. Axial Length Measurement Failure Rates with the IOLMaster and Lenstar LS 900 in Eyes with Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlinden, Colm; Wang, Qinmei; Pesudovs, Konrad; Yang, Xin; Bao, Fangjun; Yu, Ayong; Lin, Shishi; Feng, Yifan; Huang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate axial length (AL) measurement failure rate with the IOLMaster (Carl Zeiss AG, Germany) and Lenstar LS 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Switzerland) in eyes with cataract. Two hundred and ninety-six eyes of 170 patients with cataract were enrolled. Cataract type and severity were graded using the Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III) and AL measurements were attempted with IOLMaster (version 5.4) and Lenstar LS 900 (version 1.1). Chi-squared analysis was used to assess if the difference in AL measurement acquisition rate was statistically significant between the two devices. The association of the different cataract types and severity with the AL measurement acquisition rate was evaluated with logistic regression analysis. AL measurements were obtained in 184 eyes (62.16%) using the IOLMaster and 191 eyes (64.53%) using the Lenstar, which corresponds to a failure rate of 37.84% and 35.47% respectively. Chi-square analysis indicated no significant difference between the Lenstar and IOLMaster for AL measurement failure rate (x2 = 0.356, P = 0.550). Logistic regression analysis indicated no association between acquisition rates and cortical or nuclear cataracts with either device. There was a statistically significant association between acquisition rates and increasing severity of posterior subcapsular cataracts with the IOLMaster (β = -1.491, PLS 900 (β = -1.507, PLS 900 have similar AL measurement failure rates (35-38%) for Chinese public hospital cataract patients. Increasing severity of posterior subcapsular cataracts was problematic for both devices.

  4. An overview on age related macular degeneration and recent advances in its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOBIA N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a condition characterized, in the early stages, by slow development and progression, absence of symptoms over a number of years, and extensive retinal deposits called drusen, often associated with pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD.There is strong and consistent evidence that increasing age, family history, obesity/high body mass index, and cataract surgery are associated with late AMD. Smoking is the strongest and most consistently found modifiable risk factor for late AMD.Age-related macular degeneration remains one of the most severe and profound disabilities encountered in medicine, particularly due to the loss of the central vision and the high economic burden it places on patients and societies.Recent advances in management of AMD is anti-angiogenic drugs. The identification of the crucial role played by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the pathogenesis of wet AMD hasallowed the development of VEGF-blocking agents such as bevacizumab, pegaptanib and ranibizumab.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration in Indians: a comparative study in Singapore and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Li, Xiang; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zheng, Yingfeng; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B; Nangia, Vinay; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-04-01

    To compare the prevalence and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 2 Indian populations, 1 living in urban Singapore and 1 in rural central India. Population-based, cross-sectional studies of Indians aged 40+ years. Our analysis included 3337 Singapore-residing participants and 3422 India-residing participants. All participants underwent comprehensive systemic and ocular examinations and retinal photography. AMD was graded from retinal photographs according to the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Systemic and ocular risk factors were assessed for association with AMD. Singapore-residing participants were older (mean age 57.8 years vs 53.8 years) and, after adjusting for age and sex, were more likely to have previous cataract surgery, higher body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, previous myocardial infarction, higher cholesterol, and lower creatinine levels, but less likely to be current smokers, than India-residing participants. The age-standardized prevalence of early and late AMD was 4.45% and 0.34%, respectively, in Singapore and 5.80% and 0.16%, respectively, in India. Shorter axial length was associated with early AMD in both Singapore and India, whereas previous cataract surgery, higher body mass index, hypertension, and lower cholesterol were associated with early AMD in Singapore but not in India. The prevalence of AMD was similar among Indian adults living in urban Singapore and rural India, despite differences in cardiovascular risk factor profile and demographics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Flicker electroretinograms of eyes with cataract recorded with RETeval system before and after mydriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Gen; Baba, Takayuki; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of pupil size of eyes with cataracts on the flicker electroretinograms (ERGs) elicited and recorded with the RETeval system. Forty-one eyes of 41 patients (mean age, 76.5±7.3 years) that had grade 2 nuclear or cortical cataract without any other abnormalities were studied. Flicker ERGs were recorded before and after mydriatic drops instillation. The ERGs were elicited by the white light delivered at the frequency of 28.3 Hz and intensities of 2, 8, and 32 Td-s. The amplitudes and the implicit times of the flicker ERGs before and after mydriasis were compared. There were no significant differences between the amplitudes before and after mydriasis ( P =0.35, 2 Td-s; P =0.31, 8 Td-s; P =0.50, 32 Td-s). There were also no significant differences between the implicit times before and after mydriasis ( P =0.86, 2 Td-s; P =0.98, 8 Td-s; P =0.95, 32 Td-s). The mean amplitudes and implicit times of the nuclear and cortical cataracts groups before the mydriasis were also not significantly different from those after mydriasis for all stimulus intensities. The lack of significant differences in the amplitudes and the implicit times of the flicker ERG of cataractous eyes before and after mydriasis indicated that the RETeval flicker ERGs in cataractous eyes is less affected by the pupil diameter. With our earlier study, it was assumed that the effect of cataracts on the RETeval flicker ERGs was due to the opacity of the crystalline lens, and the influence of the cataract would not be reduced or increased by mydriasis.

  7. Retrobulbar versus subconjunctival anesthesia for cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness, in terms of pain relief and akinesia of retrobulbar and subconjunctival an aesthesia during cataract surgery and also to compare the degree of postoperative ptosis associated with each technique. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients undergoing cataract surgery ...

  8. Dexmedetomidine premedication in cataract surgery under topical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: cataract surgery, dexmedetomidine, intraocular pressure, patient and surgeon satisfaction, topical anesthesia. Introduction. Traditionally, cataract surgeries are performed under regional anaesthesia with either a peribulbar or retrobulbar block. With the anaesthesia has also evolved from painful regional blocks to ...

  9. Survey of Cataract Surgical Techniques in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF SABE NWOSU

    polymethylmethacrylate. DISCUSSION. The results of this survey suggest that all practicing ophthalmologists in Nigeria perform cataract surgery with wide incision extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implant (ECCE/IOL) as the most frequently employed technique. Although pseudophakic technology in ...

  10. Prevalence of Cataract Blindness in Rural Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Background: Over three-quarter of all blindness worldwide are preventable and usually caused by cataract and trachoma. Objective: To assess the ... Ophthalmologists from other areas conduct cataract operations once or twice each ... Some patients may have two eyes disorder causing visual impairment. The accepted ...

  11. Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgery | Ukponmwan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the visu al ou tcome of cataract su rgery in a tertiary hosp ital in Nigeria. Methods: Three hu nd red and seventy eyes (370) that had cataract su rgery in the op hthalmology d ep artment of University of Benin Teaching Hosp ital (UBTH) from July 2007 to December 2008 were includ ed in the stu d y.

  12. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    taught to residents. Since ECCE is the basic cataract surgery taught in developing countries, it is important to evaluate the complication rate of a trainee as a guide to the learning curve. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular. Cataract Extraction Performed by Trainees. Ezegwui IR, Aghaji AE, Okpala NE1, Onwasigwe ...

  13. Pediatric cataract surgery in Madagascar | Randrianotahina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: In Madagascar, presentation for congenital and developmental cataract is very late, visual outcome poor and follow‑up inadequate. There is an urgent need for a childhood blindness program to effectively deal with pediatric cataract, an avoidable cause of blindness and visual disability in children on the island ...

  14. Economic Constraints in Managing Complicated Cataracts | Ogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Failure to perceive light, inaccurate light projection, or sonographic evidence of retinal detachment are all reasons to avoid cataract surgery, as there is no hope of visual recovery. However, when a patient already accepts a blind eye, but wants cataract surgery to remove the cosmetic blemish of leukocoria, they may ...

  15. Audit of cataract surgery in Cadiz: visual outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo-Dujardin, L; Alcalde-Vílchez, E; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, E; Novalbos-Ruiz, J P

    2018-02-09

    To publish the outcomes and complications of age-related cataract surgery in Cadiz (Spain). Due to the lack of national audits, a comparison was made between the results obtained here and those of the most recent European audit, EUREQUO (2013), and the British audit RCOphth NOD (2015). A prospective, longitudinal, before-after study of 312 patients undergoing cataract surgery in the University Hospitals of Puerta del Mar and Puerto Real (Cadiz), in 2013-14. Outcome measurements included sociodemographic characteristics, visual acuity (VA), symptoms secondary to cataract, ocular comorbidity, waiting time, expertise of surgeon (consultant vs. trainee), rate and type of surgical complications. The median age at surgery was 73.92±7.31. Almost all (98.3%) of patients at consultation had a VA ≥0.60logMAR, with a mean pre-surgical VA of 1.01logMAR (0.92-1.10). There was a 6.7% complication rate, with 3.8% posterior capsule ruptures and 2.8% corneal decompensations. No cases of endophthalmitis occurred. The mean post-operative VA was 0.28logMAR (0.22-0.33). More than three-quarters (78.8%) of cases achieved a post-operative VA ≤0.3logMAR, and 27.6% of cases achieved a VA ≤0.0logMAR. Our success rate was inferior to the EUREQUO and RCOphth NOD studies, with the percentage of patients acquiring a postoperative VA ≤0.3logMAR being 98% and 89%, respectively. However, the populations were not comparable. It is hoped that this study will encourage other public hospitals in Spain to undertake audits and share their results, in order to provide a tool for constructive criticism and quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medsinge A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anagha Medsinge,1,2 Ken K Nischal1,2 1Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, and Adult Motility, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, (UPMC 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. Keywords: children, pediatric cataract, infantile

  17. Clinical risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western countries. Numerous risk factors have been reported but the evidence and strength of association is variable. We aimed to identify those risk factors with strong levels of evidence which could be easily assessed by physicians or ophthalmologists to implement preventive interventions or address current behaviours. Methods A systematic review identified 18 prospective and cross-sectional studies and 6 case control studies involving 113,780 persons with 17,236 cases of late AMD that included an estimate of the association between late AMD and at least one of 16 pre-selected risk factors. Fixed-effects meta-analyses were conducted for each factor to combine odds ratio (OR and/or relative risk (RR outcomes across studies by study design. Overall raw point estimates of each risk factor and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results Increasing age, current cigarette smoking, previous cataract surgery, and a family history of AMD showed strong and consistent associations with late AMD. Risk factors with moderate and consistent associations were higher body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and higher plasma fibrinogen. Risk factors with weaker and inconsistent associations were gender, ethnicity, diabetes, iris colour, history of cerebrovascular disease, and serum total and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Conclusions Smoking, previous cataract surgery and a family history of AMD are consistent risk factors for AMD. Cardiovascular risk factors are also associated with AMD. Knowledge of these risk factors that may be easily assessed by physicians and general ophthalmologists may assist in identification and appropriate referral of persons at risk of AMD.

  18. Identification of cataract and post-cataract surgery optical images using artificial intelligence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Rajendra Udyavara; Yu, Wenwei; Zhu, Kuanyi; Nayak, Jagadish; Lim, Teik-Cheng; Chan, Joey Yiptong

    2010-08-01

    Human eyes are most sophisticated organ, with perfect and interrelated subsystems such as retina, pupil, iris, cornea, lens and optic nerve. The eye disorder such as cataract is a major health problem in the old age. Cataract is formed by clouding of lens, which is painless and developed slowly over a long period. Cataract will slowly diminish the vision leading to the blindness. At an average age of 65, it is most common and one third of the people of this age in world have cataract in one or both the eyes. A system for detection of the cataract and to test for the efficacy of the post-cataract surgery using optical images is proposed using artificial intelligence techniques. Images processing and Fuzzy K-means clustering algorithm is applied on the raw optical images to detect the features specific to three classes to be classified. Then the backpropagation algorithm (BPA) was used for the classification. In this work, we have used 140 optical image belonging to the three classes. The ANN classifier showed an average rate of 93.3% in detecting normal, cataract and post cataract optical images. The system proposed exhibited 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity, which indicates that the results are clinically significant. This system can also be used to test the efficacy of the cataract operation by testing the post-cataract surgery optical images.

  19. Protection against UV and X-ray cataracts using dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering (SLS and DLS) analysis was used to investigate the aggregation of lens proteins in a hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)/guinea pig in vivo model for nuclear cataract. Nuclear cataract, an opacity which occurs in the center of the lens, is a major type of human maturity-onset cataract for which the cause is not well-understood. HBO is commonly used in major hospitals for treating complications such as poor wound healing due to impaired blood circulation. It is known that treatment of human patients with HBO for extended periods of time can produce nuclear cataract. Guinea pigs, initially 18 months old, were treated with HBO (2.5 atm of 100% O2 for 2.5 hr) 3x per week for 7 months to increase tie level of lens nuclear light scattering. Age-matched animals were used for controls. The eyes of the animals were analyzed in vivo using an integrated static and DLS fiber optic probe in collaboration with the NASA group. DLS in vivo was used to measure the size of lens proteins at 50 different locations across the optical axis of the guinea pig lens.

  20. Topical‑intracameral anesthesia in manual small incision cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cataract remains a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) is currently practiced as the technique of choice in Sub‑Saharan Africa to reduce the backlog of cataract blindness. Optimal pain control during surgery remains a challenge to cataract surgeons. Aim: To ...

  1. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  2. Childhood Cataract: Magnitude, Management, Economics and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BR Shamanna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of blindness among children in different regions varies from 0.2/1000 children to over 1.5/1000 children with a global figure estimated at 0.7/1000. This means that there are an estimated 1.4 million blind children worldwide.1 The proportion of blindness in children due to cataract varies considerably between regions from 10%-30% with a global average estimated at 14%, giving 190,000 children blind from cataract. 2 While the magnitude of childhood cataracts varies from place to place, it is a priority within all blindness control programmes for children. Children who are blind have to overcome a lifetime of emotional, social and economic difficulties which affect the child, the family and society.3 Loss of vision in children influences their education, employment and social life. The numbers blind with cataract do not reflect the years of disability and lost quality of life. Childhood blindness is second only to adult cataract as a cause of blind-person years. Approximately 70 million blind-person years are caused by childhood blindness of which about 10 million blind-person years (14% is due to childhood cataract. Timely recognition and intervention can eliminate blind-years due to childhood cataract, as the condition is treatable.

  3. Evaluation of advanced glycation end-products in diabetic and inherited canine cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, I Dineli; Colitz, Carmen M H; Kusewitt, Donna F; Chandler, Heather; Lu, Ping; Gemensky-Metzler, Anne J; Wilkie, David A

    2007-02-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) increases in the human cataract and should correlate with increased DNA damage and proliferation of lens epithelial cells (LECs). The purpose of this study was to measure and immunolocalize RAGE in normal and cataractous canine LECs, and to determine whether there was a correlation between RAGE and DNA damage (gadd45), cell-cycle regulation (p21), and LEC proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA). Thirty-two anterior lens capsules from 22 dogs that underwent cataract surgery and 10 lenses from dogs with normal eyes were evaluated. Eleven of the cataractous lenses were from diabetic patients (n=16), and eleven were from patients with inherited cataracts (n=16). Standard immunohistochemical staining was performed using antibodies against RAGE, gadd45, p21, PCNA, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and TGF-beta. Immunostaining intensity for each antibody was given a score of 0-4+. Standard Western blot analysis on normal and cataractous lens capsules was performed using the same antibodies as in the immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons were also made based on age and sex. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed for RAGE. There was an increase in RAGE expression with age in normal LECs, but no significant difference was seen when normal adult LECs were compared to cataractous LECs. The stage of the cataract and the presence of LIU were not associated with a significant increase in RAGE expression. There was no age-dependent difference in the normal lenses for gadd45, p21, or PCNA. Significant up-regulation of p21 (P RAGE and PCNA expression did not increase with cataractogenesis, possibly due to overexpression associated with normal aging and constant exposure to oxidative stress from sunlight-related ultraviolet irradiation, respectively. However, p21 and PCNA increased in diabetic cataractogenesis suggesting cell cycle and proliferation dysregulation. This may

  4. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  5. Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities such as driving, reading, or looking at computer or video screens, even with glasses. Some people ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Sutureless Cataract Surgery: Principles and Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandford-Smith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cataracts cause about 50% of world blindness. There is little likelihood of effective prevention becoming available in the next few years and so the only treatment will remain surgical. For many of the other major causes of world blindness, like trachoma, xerophthalmia and onchocerciasis, the remedy is community-based, not hospital-based, and requires prevention rather than treatment. The prevalence of blinding cataract will only increase as people live longer, so cataract will continue to be, by far, the most important treatable cause of blindness.

  7. Incidence of intraoperative complications in cataract surgery performed by left-handed residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Yong; Ali, Rasha; Cremers, Sandra Lora; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Henderson, Bonnie An

    2009-06-01

    To compare the incidence of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery performed by left-handed and right-handed residents and to find predictor variables for complications in resident-performed surgery. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. This retrospective chart review comprised cataract extractions performed by postgraduate fourth-year residents from July 1, 2001, to June 30, 2006. The incidence of posterior capsule tear and vitreous loss were the main outcomes. Univariate and multivariate logistic analyses incorporated the variables of patient age and sex; laterality of surgical eye; presence of diabetes mellitus, glaucoma, or age-related macular degeneration; history of vitrectomy; axial length; pseudoexfoliation; small pupils; white cataract; posterior polar cataract; handedness of resident; and academic quarter during which surgery occurred. Left-handed residents performed 170 (9.8%) of the 1730 surgeries. The incidence of posterior capsule tear and vitreous loss was significantly lower in surgeries performed by left-handed residents than in those performed by right-handed residents (P = .03 and Pleft-handed residents. Handedness and patient age were significant predictor variables for these complications.

  8. Comparison of the prediction error in cataract surgery with Lenstar and conventional ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Cheng Liang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the prediction errors(PEin cataract surgery with Lenstar and conventional ultrasound. METHODS: The data of age-related cataract patients were retrospectively analyzed from March, 2013 to June, 2013 in our hospital. Preoperative measurements of ocular biological parameters and calculation of intraocular lens(IOLdegree using SRK/T's formula with ultrasound, keratometry and Lenstar were performed. Cataract extraction combined with IOL implantation in capsule was taken in every patient. Retinoscopy was taken postoperatively after 3 months. Comparison of the two inspection methods for measuring axial length, mean corneal curvature and postoperative refractive PE and absolute value of PE(APE. RESULTS: Preoperative axial length was 24.68±1.70mm and 24.42±1.65mm with Lenstar and ultrasound, respectively, and there was significant difference(t=-12.688, Pr=0.992, Pt=-1.241, P=0.217, but was the significant correlation(r=0.963, Pt=-5.494, Pt=6.379, PCONCLUSION: Accurate ocular biological parameters can be achieved with Lenstar, and postoperative PE is more precise with Lenstar compared with conventional ultrasound. Lenstar can be used for precise calculation of IOL degree in cataract operation.

  9. The effect of blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses on circadian photoentrainment and sleep one year after cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Haargaard, Birgitte; Sander, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the long-term effect on circadian photoentrainment and sleep in patients implanted with neutral and blue-blocking intraocular lenses 1 year after cataract surgery. METHODS: Randomized, controlled trial involving 67 patients with age-related cataract. Intervention was cataract......; the latter was also used to determine objective sleep quality. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index determined subjective sleep quality. RESULTS: One year after surgery, peak melatonin concentration was 3.3 pg/ml (95% CI, 2-5.5) corresponding to 50% lower for the participants allocated to blue-blocking IOLs...... compared with participants allocated to neutral IOLs. Compared with preoperative levels, the ipRGC response had increased by 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2-22.6) 1 year after surgery. Objective sleep quality was also improved as the time of wakefulness after sleep onset had improved by 5 min (95...

  10. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can hold as many as 4,500 iron atoms inside its spherical structure. This storage capacity allows ... with congenital cataracts University of Arizona College of Medicine Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (1 link) National ...

  12. Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALVIS, Virgilio; TELLO, Alejandro; M. RANGEL, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anterior megalophthalmos is characterized by megalocornea associated with a very broad anterior chamber and ciliary ring elongation. It is also called X-linked megalocornea. It is accompanied by early development of cataracts, zonular anomalies, and, rarely, vitreoretinal disorders. Subluxation of a cataract can occur in cataract surgery because of zonular weakness. In addition, in most patients, standard intraocular lens (IOL) decentration is a risk because of the enlarged sulcus and capsular bag. These unique circumstances make cataract surgery challenging. To date, several approaches have been developed. Implantation of a retropupillary iris-claw aphakic intraocular lens may be a good option because it is easier than suturing the IOL and can have better and more stable anatomic and visual outcomes, compared to other techniques. PMID:27350950

  13. Galactose intolerance and the risk of cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, A. F.; Fells, P.; Jones, R. B.; Kissun, R. D.; Menzies, I. S.; Mount, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    Cataracts may arise in association with various major and minor disorders restricting galactose metabolism, and the risk is broadly associated with the degree of galactose intolerance. A family is described in which a girl presented at the age of 7 3/4 years with cataracts, galactosuria, and partial deficiencies of the enzymes galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase. Galactose intolerance as determined by an oral test was impaired and fluctuated with variation in activity o...

  14. Fluorometholone-induced cataract after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Gürelik, G; Akata, F; Hasanreisoglu, B

    1997-01-01

    The use of topical corticosteroids following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is widespread. The major complications of potent corticosteroids are glaucoma and cataract formation; in order to decrease these complications, 0.1% fluorometholone administration is usually preferred after PRK. We report here a case of lens opacification which was induced by 0.1% fluorometholone administration after PRK in a period of 4 months. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of 0.1% fluorometholone-induced cataract after PRK.

  15. Surgical interventions for bilateral congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, V; Chen, S

    2001-01-01

    Congenital cataracts are opacities of the lens in one or both eyes of children, causing a reduction in vision bad enough to require surgery. Cataract is the largest preventable cause of visual loss in childhood. Paediatric cataracts provide different challenges to those in adults. Intense inflammation, amblyopia and posterior capsule opacification can affect results of treatment. Two treatments commonly considered for congenital cataract are lensectomy and lens aspiration. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of surgical treatments for bilateral symmetrical congenital cataracts. Success is measured according to the vision attained and occurrence of adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register - CENTRAL (which includes the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group specialised register), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Science Citation Index and the reference list of the included study. We also contacted trial investigators and experts in the field for details of further studies. We included all prospective, randomised controlled trials that compared one type of cataract surgery to another or to no surgery, in children aged 15 years or younger with bilateral congenital cataracts. Two reviewers extracted data. No meta-analysis was performed. One trial met the inclusion criteria. This trial randomised 130 eyes of 65 children. Follow up of 56 children at three years found no difference in visual acuity between lensectomy and lens aspiration with primary capsulotomy. Secondary opacification developed at a higher rate in the lens aspiration group (66%) compared to the lensectomy group (2%). The two methods of surgery for bilateral congenital cataracts in this review have good visual results but the incidences of side effects differ. Further randomised trials are required to inform modern practice.

  16. Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / Summer ... learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. This ...

  17. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Cataract, visual impairment and long-term mortality in a rural cohort in India: the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study.

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    Rohit C Khanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large-scale prevalence survey of blindness and visual impairment (The Andhra Pradesh Eye Diseases Study [APEDS1] was conducted between 1996-2000 on 10,293 individuals of all ages in three rural and one urban clusters in Andhra Pradesh, Southern India. More than a decade later (June 2009-March 2010, APEDS1 participants in rural clusters were traced (termed APEDS2 to determine ocular risk factors for mortality in this longitudinal cohort. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mortality hazard ratio (HR analysis was performed for those aged >30 years at APEDS1, using Cox proportional hazard regression models to identify associations between ocular exposures and risk of mortality. Blindness and visual impairment (VI were defined using Indian definitions. 799/4,188 (19.1% participants had died and 308 (7.3% had migrated. Mortality was higher in males than females (p<0.001. In multivariable analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, smoking and education status the mortality HR was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.5-2.5 for blindness; 1.4 (95% CI: 1.2-1.7 for VI; 1.8 (95% CI: 1.4-2.3 for pure nuclear cataract, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1-2.1 for pure cortical cataract; 1.96 (95% CI: 1.6-2.4 for mixed cataract, 2.0 (95% CI: 1.4-2.9 for history of cataract surgery, and 1.58 (95% CI: 1.3-1.9 for any cataract. When all these factors were included in the model, the HRs were attenuated, being 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1-2.0 for blindness and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9-1.5 for VI. For lens type, the HRs were as follows: pure nuclear cataract, 1.6 (95% CI: 1.3-2.1; pure cortical cataract, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.1-2.1; mixed cataract, 1.8 (95% CI: 1.4-2.2, and history of previous cataract surgery, 1.8 (95% CI: 1.3-2.6. CONCLUSIONS: All types of cataract, history of cataract surgery and VI had an increased risk of mortality that further suggests that these could be potential markers of ageing.

  19. Age-related disease association of endogenous γ-H2AX foci in mononuclear cells derived from leukapheresis.

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    Shepherd H Schurman

    Full Text Available The phosphorylated form of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX forms immunohistochemically detectable foci at DNA double strand breaks. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from leukapheresis from patients enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, γ-H2AX foci increased in a linear fashion with regards to age, peaking at ~57 years. The relationship between the frequency of γ-H2AX foci and age-related pathologies was assessed. We found a statistically significant (p = 0.023 50% increase in foci in PBMCs derived from patients with a known history of vitamin D deficiency. In addition, there were trends toward increased γ-H2AX foci in patients with cataracts (34% increase, p<0.10 and in sleep apnea patients (44%, p<0.10. Among patients ≥57 y/o, we found a significant (p = 0.037 36% increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci/cell for patients with hypertension compared to non-hypertensive patients. Our results support a role for increased DNA damage in the morbidity of age-related diseases. γ -H2AX may be a biomarker for human morbidity in age-related diseases.

  20. Mitochondrial-targeted plastoquinone derivatives. Effect on senescence and acute age-related pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, M V; Antonenko, Y N; Anisimov, V N; Chernyak, B V; Cherepanov, D A; Chistyakov, V A; Egorov, M V; Kolosova, N G; Korshunova, G A; Lyamzaev, K G; Plotnikov, E Y; Roginsky, V A; Savchenko, A Y; Severina, I I; Severin, F F; Shkurat, T P; Tashlitsky, V N; Shidlovsky, K M; Vyssokikh, M Y; Zamyatnin, A A; Zorov, D B; Skulachev, V P

    2011-06-01

    Plastoquinone, a very effective electron carrier and antioxidant of chloroplasts, was conjugated with decyltriphenylphosphonium to obtain a cation easily penetrating through membranes. This cation, called SkQ1, is specifically targeted to mitochondria by electrophoresis in the electric field formed by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The respiratory chain also regenerates reduced SkQ1H(2) from its oxidized form that appears as a result of the antioxidant activity of SkQ1H(2). SkQ1H(2) prevents oxidation of cardiolipin, a mitochondrial phospholipid that is especially sensitive to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In cell cultures, SkQ1 and its analog plastoquinonyl decylrhodamine 19 (SkQR1) arrest H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. When tested in vivo, SkQs (i) prolong the lifespan of fungi, crustaceans, insects, fish, and mice, (ii) suppress appearance of a large number of traits typical for age-related senescence (cataract, retinopathies, achromotrichia, osteoporosis, lordokyphosis, decline of the immune system, myeloid shift of blood cells, activation of apoptosis, induction of β-galactosidase, phosphorylation of H2AX histones, etc.) and (iii) lower tissue damage and save the lives of young animals after treatments resulting in kidney ischemia, rhabdomyolysis, heart attack, arrhythmia, and stroke. We suggest that the SkQs reduce mitochondrial ROS and, as a consequence, inhibit mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, an obligatory step of execution of programs responsible for both senescence and fast "biochemical suicide" of an organism after a severe metabolic crisis.

  1. A randomized, single-center study of equivalence of 2 intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Marios; Jhanji, Vishal; Jing, Xie; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Boffa, Umberto; Taylor, Hugh R; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2013-03-01

    To compare the outcomes of 2 intraocular lenses (IOLs) for the treatment of age-related cataracts. Prospective, randomized trial. Patients with age-related cataracts were recruited and randomized to receive phacoemulsification and implantation of either the AcrySof SA60AT lens (Alcon, Inc, Fort Worth, TX) or the low-cost Tecsoft Flex lens (Fred Hollows Foundation, Tilganga, Nepal). A total of 300 patients were available for description and analysis (148 in the AcrySof group and 152 in the Tecsoft group). Patients underwent phacoemulsification and implantation of the AcrySof SA60AT lens or the Tecsoft Flex lens. They were followed up and examined at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months after cataract surgery. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), best-corrected distance visual acuity (BDVA), incidence of posterior capsule opacification (PCO), Visual Function Index questionnaire results, and safety of the implanted IOLs. No significant difference (P>0.05) was found in UDVA and BDVA after surgery between the 2 groups. The equivalence test of the 95% confidence intervals showed that both lenses had an equal improvement of UDVA and BDVA as well as similar rates of PCO after cataract surgery. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to visual functioning or the incidence of adverse surgical events during (P>0.05) or after (P>0.05) the surgery. The Tecsoft Flex IOL is a low-cost suitable alternative that is similar to the AcrySof IOL in terms of safety and visual outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  3. Clinical genetics and gene mapping studies on a family in the area of northeast with hereditary cataract

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    Tian-Xiao Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To map the causal gene of congenital nuclear cataract in a family in the area of northeast.METHODS: We investigated there generations of a Chinese family affected with hereditary cataract. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all of the family members, and genomic DNA was then extracted from the blood samples. Linkage analysis was performed using 62microsatellite markers. Two-point LOD scores(Zwere calculated using the LINKAGE programs(ver. 5.2. Haplotypes were constructed according to the allele information.RESULTS: The affected members in this family showed classic phenotype of autosomal dominant congenital cataract. The maximum two-point LOD score of 2.71 was obtained for marker D22S689(θ = 0. Haplotype analysis traced the disease gene on chromosome 22q11.2-12.1, containing CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, CRYBA4 genes. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of congenital nuclear cataract consistents with the autosomal dominant inherited regular, and the causal gene of congenital nuclear cataract localize at 22q11.2-12.1 in this family.

  4. Significant improvement in dynamic visual acuity after cataract surgery: a promising potential parameter for functional vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Ao

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Dynamic visual acuity (DVA is a relatively independent parameter for evaluating the ability to distinguish details of a moving target. The present study has been designed to discuss the extent to which age-related cataract impacts DVA in elderly individuals and to determine whether it could be restored after bilateral phacoemulsification combined with intraocular lens implantation surgery. METHODS: Twenty-six elderly cataract patients scheduled for binocular cataract surgery and 30 elderly volunteers without cataract were enrolled in the study. DVA at 15, 30, 60 and 90 degree per second (dps was assessed, and velocity-dependent visual acuity decreases between consecutive speed levels were calculated. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the patient group exhibited significantly worse DVA performance at all speed levels (p<0.001, and the decreases in velocity-dependent visual acuity were more serious in the patient group at the intervals of 0-15 dps (p<0.001, 15-30 dps (p = 0.007 and 30-60 dps (p = 0.008. Postoperatively, DVA performance at every speed level in the patient group clearly improved (p<0.001 and recovered to levels compatible to the control group. The decrease in visual acuity with increasing speed was less pronounced than during the preoperative phase (p0-15 dps = 0.001, p15-30 dps<0.001 and p30-60 dps = 0.001 and became similar to that of the control group. The postoperative visual benefit regarding DVA was more pronounced than the improvement in static visual acuity (p15 dps = 0.001 and p<0.001 at 30 dps, 60 dps and 90 dps. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of age-related cataract on DVA was more severe than its effects on static visual acuity. After cataract surgery, not only static vision of the patients was restored markedly, but also the dynamic vision. DVA could be an important adjunct to the current evaluation system of functional vision, thereby meriting additional attention in clinical assessment.

  5. Flicker electroretinograms of eyes with cataract recorded with RETeval system before and after mydriasis

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    Miura G

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gen Miura, Takayuki Baba, Toshiyuki Oshitari, Shuichi Yamamoto Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of pupil size of eyes with cataracts on the flicker electroretinograms (ERGs elicited and recorded with the RETeval system.Patients and methods: Forty-one eyes of 41 patients (mean age, 76.5±7.3 years that had grade 2 nuclear or cortical cataract without any other abnormalities were studied. Flicker ERGs were recorded before and after mydriatic drops instillation. The ERGs were elicited by the white light delivered at the frequency of 28.3 Hz and intensities of 2, 8, and 32 Td-s. The amplitudes and the implicit times of the flicker ERGs before and after mydriasis were compared.Results: There were no significant differences between the amplitudes before and after mydriasis (P=0.35, 2 Td-s; P=0.31, 8 Td-s; P=0.50, 32 Td-s. There were also no significant differences between the implicit times before and after mydriasis (P=0.86, 2 Td-s; P=0.98, 8 Td-s; P=0.95, 32 Td-s. The mean amplitudes and implicit times of the nuclear and cortical cataracts groups before the mydriasis were also not significantly different from those after mydriasis for all stimulus intensities.Conclusion: The lack of significant differences in the amplitudes and the implicit times of the flicker ERG of cataractous eyes before and after mydriasis indicated that the RETeval flicker ERGs in cataractous eyes is less affected by the pupil diameter. With our earlier study, it was assumed that the effect of cataracts on the RETeval flicker ERGs was due to the opacity of the crystalline lens, and the influence of the cataract would not be reduced or increased by mydriasis. Keywords: electroretinogram, ERG, flicker ERG, cataract, RETeval

  6. Applications in Bioastronautics and Bioinformatics: Early Radiation Cataracts Detected by Noninvasive, Quantitative, and Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars is a key goal in NASA's exploration planning in the next 20 years. Maintaining crew health and good vision is certainly an important aspect of achieving a successful mission. Continuous radiation exposure is a risk factor for radiation-induced cataracts in astronauts because radiation exposure in space travel has the potential of accelerating the aging process (ref. 1). A patented compact device (ref. 2) based on the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) was designed for monitoring an astronaut's ocular health during long-duration space travel. This capability of early diagnosis, unmatched by any other clinical technique in use today, may enable prompt initiation of preventive/curative therapy. An Internet web-based system integrating photon correlation data and controlling the hardware to monitor cataract development in vivo at a remote site in real time (teleophthalmology) is currently being developed. The new technology detects cataracts very early (at the molecular level). Cataract studies onboard the International Space Station will be helpful in quantifying any adverse effect of radiation to ocular health. The normal lens in a human eye, situated behind the cornea, is a transparent tissue. It contains 35 wt % protein and 65 wt % water. Aging, disease (e.g., diabetes), smoking, dehydration, malnutrition, and exposure to ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation can cause agglomeration of the lens proteins. Protein aggregation can take place anywhere in the lens, causing lens opacity. The aggregation and opacification could produce nuclear (central portion of the lens) or cortical (peripheral) cataracts. Nuclear and posterior subcapsular (the membrane's capsule surrounds the whole lens) cataracts, being on the visual optical axis of the eye, cause visual impairment that can finally lead to blindness. The lens proteins, in their native state, are small in size. As a cataract develops, this size grows from a few nanometers

  7. Bimanual microincision phacoemulsification in treating hard cataracts using different power modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhi; Jiang, Yuzhen; Wu, Mingxing; Liu, Yuhua; Zhang, Tieying

    2008-07-01

    To compare the performance of the Multiburst mode, the Shortpulse mode and the Whitestar technology of the Sovereign platform in treating hard cataracts with bimanual microincision phacoemulsification. 101 eyes with hard cataracts (nuclear density Grade 3 and Grade 4 or above) were randomized into three groups. Bimanual microincision phacoemulsification was performed using the Multiburst mode, the Shortpulse mode and the Whitestar technology of the Sovereign phacoemulsification machine respectively. The average power, total duration of ultrasonic power release (US Time), effective phaco time, complications, best-corrected visual acuity and rate of corneal endothelial cell loss were measured and compared among the study groups. For hard cataracts of various nuclear densities, average ultrasonic power was highest in the Whitestar group followed by the Shortpulse group. The Multiburst group had the highest US Time, effective phaco time and rate of corneal endothelial cell loss whereas the Whitestar Group had the lowest.The differences between the groups were found to be statistically significant by variation analysis and the Fisher's least significant difference procedure. However, there were no significant differences between the USTime values of the Shortpulse Group and the Whitestar Group (P = 0.051). In the Multiburst Group, wound burn occurred in one eye, and three eyes had abnormal fluctuations in the anterior chamber depth. The Whitestar technology showed the best performance in this study.The Multiburst mode was proved to be a relatively unsuitable ultrasonic power mode in treating hard cataracts with bimanual microincision phacoemulsification.

  8. Improvement of circular capsulorhexis technique during huge hardcore small incision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze huge hardcore cataract surgery with the diameter of the circular capsulorhexis size, discuss circular capsulorhexis technique improvement and evaluate the application advantages of anterior capsule continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis combined with anterior capsule opening radial multi-point cutting surgery in huge hardcore cataract surgery. METHODS: Sixty-nine cases(80 eyeswith huge hardcore cataract, successfully underwent anterior capsule continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis combined with anterior capsule opening radial multi-point cutting surgery, and delivered nuclear smoothly. RESULTS: Seventy-eight eyes(98%successfully completed surgery. Two eyes occurred capsular rupture or part of the suspensory ligament rupture caused by squeezing huge hardcore. Intraoperative, nuclear was spun into the anterior chamber by hands, or dragged into the anterior chamber using circle key and delivered. Pupil vitreous was cleaned up, then suspensory intraocular lens was implanted at second stage.CONCLUSION: As the improvement surgery of anterior capsule continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis combined with anterior capsule opening radial multi-point cutting method is safe and effective in huge hardcore cataract surgery.

  9. The carbon footprint of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D S; Wright, T; Somner, J E A; Connor, A

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to be one of the largest global health threats of the 21st century. Health care itself is a large contributor to carbon emissions. Determining the carbon footprint of specific health care activities such as cataract surgery allows the assessment of associated emissions and identifies opportunities for reduction. To assess the carbon footprint of a cataract pathway in a British teaching hospital. This was a component analysis study for one patient having first eye cataract surgery in the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Activity data was collected from three sectors, building and energy use, travel and procurement. Published emissions factors were applied to this data to provide figures in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq). The carbon footprint for one cataract operation was 181.8 kg CO2eq. On the basis that 2230 patients were treated for cataracts during 2011 in Cardiff, this has an associated carbon footprint of 405.4 tonnes CO2eq. Building and energy use was estimated to account for 36.1% of overall emissions, travel 10.1% and procurement 53.8%, with medical equipment accounting for the most emissions at 32.6%. This is the first published carbon footprint of cataract surgery and acts as a benchmark for other studies as well as identifying areas for emissions reduction. Within the procurement sector, dialogue with industry is important to reduce the overall carbon footprint. Sustainability should be considered when cataract pathways are designed as there is potential for reduction in all sectors with the possible side effects of saving costs and improving patient care.

  10. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. Can DRYAD explain age-related associative memory deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Andrea C; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    A recent interesting theoretical account of aging and memory judgments, the DRYAD (density of representations yields age-related deficits; Benjamin, 2010; Benjamin, Diaz, Matzen, & Johnson, 2012), attributes the extensive findings of disproportional age-related deficits in memory for source, context, and associations, to a global decline in memory fidelity. It is suggested that this global deficit, possibly due to a decline in attentional processes, is moderated by weak representation of contextual information to result in disproportional age-related declines. In the current article, we evaluate the DRYAD model, comparing it to specific age-related deficits theories, in particular, the ADH (associative deficit hypothesis, Naveh-Benjamin, 2000). We question some of the main assumptions/hypotheses of DRYAD in light of data reported in the literature, and we directly assess the role of attention in age-related deficits by manipulations of divided attention and of the instructions regarding what to pay attention to in 2 experiments (one from the literature and a new one). The results of these experiments fit the predictions of the ADH and do not support the main assumption/hypotheses of DRYAD. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Uptake of cataract surgery in Sava Region, Madagascar: role of cataract case finders in acceptance of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafinimpanana, Narivony; Nkumbe, Henry; Courtright, Paul; Lewallen, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The number of people coming for cataract surgery in Madagascar remains low and most ophthalmologists could do many more surgeries than currently done. Knowing why people identified with cataract do not accept surgery will help to design programs that use existing resources more effectively. The study was carried out in Sava Region of Madagascar. People with blinding (acceptance were proximity to hospital (people from Sambava district were twice as likely to present as people from more distant districts) and perceived price of transport and food (being higher for people not accepting). The actual price of surgery was not the main barrier to acceptance of surgery; instead it appears that distance to the hospital and the willingness to pay are important predictors. Strategies to improve uptake need to be revised in order to ensure that people have access to and use cataract surgical services.

  13. Robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Tristan; Chammas, Jimmy; Becmeur, Pierre-Henri; Sauer, Arnaud; Gaucher, David; Liverneaux, Philippe; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery. Institut de Recherche Contre les Cancers de l'Appareil Digestif, European Institute of Telesurgery, and Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France. Experimental study. Cataract surgeries were performed on a Kitaro cataract wet-lab training system simultaneously using the Da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system and the Whitestar Signature phacoemulsification system. For each procedure, the duration and successful completion of the surgery with or without ocular complications were assessed. Procedures were successfully performed on 25 lens nuclei. The feasibility of robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery was confirmed. The robotic surgical system provided the intraocular dexterity and operative field visualization necessary to perform the main steps of the phacoemulsification procedure; that is, corneal incisions, capsulorhexis, grooving, cracking, quadrant removal, and irrigation/aspiration of the ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD). The intervention of a second surgeon was required for the intraocular injections of OVD, balanced salt solution, and intraocular lenses. The mean operative time was 26.44 minutes ± 5.15 (SD). All lens nuclei were removed. Inadvertent enlargement of the main corneal incision caused by the phaco handpiece was observed in 2 cases. Experimental robot-assisted cataract surgery was technically feasible using the new robotic surgical system combined with a phacoemulsification machine. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CREB Overexpression Ameliorates Age-related Behavioral and Biophysical Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wen

    Age-related cognitive deficits are observed in both humans and animals. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are not yet fully elucidated. In aged animals, a decrease in intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons from the CA1 sub-region of hippocampus is believed to contribute to age-related cognitive impairments, but the molecular mechanism(s) that modulate both these factors has yet to be identified. Increasing activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in young adult rodents has been shown to facilitate cognition, and increase intrinsic excitability of their neurons. However, how CREB changes with age, and how that impacts cognition in aged animals, is not clear. Therefore, we first systematically characterized age- and training-related changes in CREB levels in dorsal hippocampus. At a remote time point after undergoing behavioral training, levels of total CREB and activated CREB (phosphorylated at S133, pCREB) were measured in both young and aged rats. We found that pCREB, but not total CREB was significantly reduced in dorsal CA1 of aged rats. Importantly, levels of pCREB were found to be positively correlated with short-term spatial memory in both young and aged rats i.e. higher pCREB in dorsal CA1 was associated with better spatial memory. These findings indicate that an age-related deficit in CREB activity may contribute to the development of age-related cognitive deficits. However, it was still unclear if increasing CREB activity would be sufficient to ameliorate age-related cognitive, and biophysical deficits. To address this question, we virally overexpressed CREB in CA1, where we found the age-related deficit. Young and aged rats received control or CREB virus, and underwent water maze training. While control aged animals exhibited deficits in long-term spatial memory, aged animals with CREB overexpression performed at levels comparable to young animals. Concurrently, aged neurons

  15. Age-Related Eye Disease and Participation in Cognitive Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Varin, Melanie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Belleville, Sylvie; Li, Gisele; Rousseau, Jacqueline; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Moghadaszadeh, Solmaz; Freeman, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Studies have found a benefit to living a cognitively active life in older age. Our goal was to quantify participation in cognitively stimulating activities in adults with and without age-related eye disease. We conducted a cross-sectional hospital-based study in Montreal, Canada of older adults (n = 303) having either age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (n = 96), glaucoma (n = 93), or normal vision (n = 114). To be eligible, the AMD group had to have bilateral late stage AMD with a better ...

  16. Results of an aging-related failure survey of light water safety systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The collection and evaluation of operating experience data are necessary in determining the effects of aging on the safety of operating nuclear plants. This paper presents the final results of a two-year research effort evaluating aging impacts on components in light water reactor systems. This research was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two unique types of data analyses were performed. In the first, an aging-survey study, aging-related failure data for fifteen light water reactor systems were obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). These included safety, support, and power conversion systems. A computerized sort of these records classified each record into one of five generic categories, based on the utility's choice of the failure's NPRDS cause category. Systems and components within the systems that were most affected by aging were identified. In the second analysis, information on aging-related reported causes of failures was evaluated for component failures reported to NPRDS for auxiliary feedwater, high pressure injection, service water, and Class 1E electrical power distribution systems. 3 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  17. [The denominations cataract and glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornquist, R

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times a grey or white pupil in an nearly blind eye was thought to be caused by a mucous substance in front of the lens. It was called "hypochysis" or "hypochyma" in Greece and "suffusio" in Rome. Later the term "cataract" (=waterfall) was the most popular denomination. A surgical method was tried very early with usually good effect, when with a thin needle, introduced into the eye, the opaque material was removed from the pupillary area. In the middle of the 17th century more careful investigations showed that there was no membrane in front of the lens, but the lens itself was opaque. The final proof was delivered when an extraction of the lens was performed with good effect. In ancient times incurable blindness, which was called glaucoma, was thought to be located to the lens, which probably had a very important role in the seeing process. The name (of Greek orgin) is translated "green" or "blue-green", which was sometimes notified to be the color of the lens, seen through the pupil, in these cases. A period of great confusion followed when the removal of this very important part of the eye did not lead to blindness but rather an improved vision. As there were significant difficulties in identifying the specific color of the pupil the name glaucoma seemed to be very inadequate. In the beginning of the 19th century a disease entity (which is to-day called acute closed-angle glaucoma) seemed to eventually fullfill the demand of a greenlooking pupil. The most characteristic symptoms are pain and a high intraocular pressure causing a corneal edema and a change of the blackness of the pupil to hazy grey (and maybe a little green?).

  18. The Paediatric Cataract Register (PECARE): an overview of operated childhood cataract in Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Haargaard, Birgitte; Basit, Saima; Lundvall, Anna; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika; Tornqvist, Kristina

    2018-02-01

    To report basic epidemiological data concerning surgically treated childhood cataract in Sweden and Denmark. Data were derived from the Paediatric Cataract Register (PECARE), a binational, web-based surgical register representing Sweden and Denmark. All children operated before 8 years of age between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013 were included. Age-specific prevalence per 100 000 population was calculated. A total 574 operations in 213 boys (51.7%) and 199 girls (48.3%), altogether 412 children, were registered, the vast majority (n = 395/412; 95.9%) being individuals with congenital/infantile cataract. Of these 412, a total of 294 (147 boys and 147 girls) were Swedish and 118 (66 boys and 52 girls) were Danish. The age-specific prevalence of operated cataract in Sweden was 31/100 000 and in Denmark 28/100 000. In 454 of 574 eyes (79.1%), the cataract was dense. Altogether, 266 of 574 (46.3%) were operated during the first year of life, 193 during the first 12 weeks representing 33.6% of all operations. A primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was done in altogether 411 of 574 eyes (71,6%). In total, 210 unilateral cataract operations (210/574; 36.6%) were performed. Persistent fetal vasculature (PFV) was present in 64 of 193 (33.1%) of those with a congenital unilateral cataract. In 84 individuals (84/395; 21.3%) with congenital or infantile cataract, a coexisting disorder was found. The age-specific binational prevalence of operated congenital/infantile cataract in Sweden and Denmark is 30/100 000. About half of the operations are performed within the first year of life, one-third within the first 3 months. In our study population, a primary IOL was implanted in the majority of cases. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Use of Cooking Fuels and Cataract in a Population-Based Study: The India Eye Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravilla, Thulasiraj D; Gupta, Sanjeev; Ravindran, Ravilla D; Vashist, Praveen; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Maraini, Giovanni; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2016-12-01

    Biomass cooking fuels are commonly used in Indian households, especially by the poorest socioeconomic groups. Cataract is highly prevalent in India and the major cause of vision loss. The evidence on biomass fuels and cataract is limited. To examine the association of biomass cooking fuels with cataract and type of cataract. We conducted a population-based study in north and south India using randomly sampled clusters to identify people ≥ 60 years old. Participants were interviewed and asked about cooking fuel use, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors and attended hospital for digital lens imaging (graded using the Lens Opacity Classification System III), anthropometry, and blood collection. Years of use of biomass fuels were estimated and transformed to a standardized normal distribution. Of the 7,518 people sampled, 94% were interviewed and 83% of these attended the hospital. Sex modified the association between years of biomass fuel use and cataract; the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for a 1-SD increase in years of biomass fuel use and nuclear cataract was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.23) for men and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.48) for women, p interaction = 0.07. Kerosene use was low (10%). Among women, kerosene use was associated with nuclear (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.97) and posterior subcapsular cataract (OR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.64). There was no association among men. Our results provide robust evidence for the association of biomass fuels with cataract for women but not for men. Our finding for kerosene and cataract among women is novel and requires confirmation in other studies. Citation: Ravilla TD, Gupta S, Ravindran RD, Vashist P, Krishnan T, Maraini G, Chakravarthy U, Fletcher AE. 2016. Use of cooking fuels and cataract in a population-based study: the India Eye Disease Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:1857-1862; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP193.

  20. Clinical application of capsular tension ring on cataract surgery in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome after trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the safety and efficacy of capsular tension ring(CTRinsertion combined with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens(IOLimplantation in patient with pseudoexfoliation syndrome after anti-glaucoma surgery.METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of 10 eyes from 10 cataract patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome following trabeculectomy surgery, and who underwent CTR insertion combined with phacoemulsification and IOL implantation between January, 2012 and June, 2013. All cases had nuclear cataracts(nuclear hardness Ⅱ 1 eye, nuclear hardness Ⅲ 4 eyes, nuclear hardness Ⅳ 5 eyes. One case with Ⅳ nuclear hardness cataract had iridodonesis and lens subluxation. Postoperative visual acuity, intra- and post-operative complications, anterior capsular opening, IOL position, and postoperative intraocular pressure(IOPwere assessed. Follow-ups ranged from 3 to 14mo. The t test was used to analyze the variables studied.RESULTS: All patients had a successful CTR insertion combined with phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. A modified CTR insertion was performed in one case, the others underwent a standard CTR insertion. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas ≥0.5 in 3 eyes and 0.3-t=1.9955, P>0.05. The most common intrao- and post-operative complications were corneal edema, small pupil, residual cortex, spontaneous zonular dialysis.CONCLUSION: Suitable CTR insertion in appropriate occasion may be beneficial to patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome after trabeculectomy during cataract surgery. It prevents the IOL decentration and decrease the surgical complication. Less complication occurs at the early stage.

  1. Methylphenidate (Ritalin)-associated cataract and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao-Kung; Kuang, Tung-Mei; Chou, Joe Ching-Kuang

    2006-12-01

    Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP) of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  2. Space radiation and cataracts in astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Manuel, F. K.; Jones, J.; Iszard, G.; Murrey, J.; Djojonegro, B.; Wear, M.

    2001-01-01

    For over 30 years, astronauts in Earth orbit or on missions to the moon have been exposed to space radiation comprised of high-energy protons and heavy ions and secondary particles produced in collisions with spacecraft and tissue. Large uncertainties exist in the projection of risks of late effects from space radiation such as cancer and cataracts due to the paucity [corrected] of epidemiological data. Here we present epidemiological [corrected] data linking an increased risk of cataracts for astronauts with higher lens doses (>8 mSv) of space radiation relative to other astronauts with lower lens doses (astronauts participating in NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) and individual occupational radiation exposure data. These results, while preliminary because of the use of subjective scoring methods, suggest that relatively low doses of space radiation may predispose crew to [corrected] an increased incidence and early appearance of cataracts.

  3. Anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in developing countries - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric cataracts are now the leading cause of treatable childhood blindness in developing countries. Cataract in children is typically removed under general anaesthesia. To provide an overview of methods of anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in resource-limited countries. We conducted a systematic literature review ...

  4. functional and psychological outcome of cataract surgeries in platea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perpetua

    the quality of life for many cataract-blind patients. Key words: cataract, blindness, outcome, Plateau State. INTRODUCTION. Up to 75% of blindness worldwide is a result of five preventable and treatable conditions. Cataract, an avoidable. 1 cause of blindness, is the leading cause of blindness and low vision worldwide.

  5. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  6. Complement factor d in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanton, C.M.; Yates, J.R.W.; Hollander, A.I. den; Seddon, J.M.; Swaroop, A.; Stambolian, D.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Yu, Y.; Atsuhiro, K.; Branham, K.; Othman, M.; Chen, W.; Kortvely, E.; Chalmers, K.; Hayward, C.; Moore, A.T.; Dhillon, B.; Ueffing, M.; Wright, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by

  7. Age-related effects in the neocortical organization of chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrey, Michelle M; Reamer, Lisa A; Mareno, Mary Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Among primates, humans exhibit the most profound degree of age-related brain volumetric decline in particular regions, such as the hippocampus and the frontal lobe. Recent studies have shown that our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, experience little to no volumetric decline in gray and...

  8. Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armanios, M.; Cabo, R. de; Mannick, J.; Partridge, L.; Deursen, J. van; Villeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing

  9. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E.; Hoyer, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Examines adaptation strategies used by hearing-impaired listeners and considers the implications of age-related hearing loss for counseling, intervention, and self-management. Outlines information on hearing aids and on practical communication strategies and the growing importance of these strategies as the population grows increasingly older.…

  10. Current surgical treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos de Carvalho, J. Emanuel; Willig, A. J. H. E.; Chung, R.; Peiretti, E.; Mura, M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe, irreversible central vision loss in individuals over 65 years of age throughout much of the developed world. The advent of anti-VEGF therapy has had a great impact in the long-term natural history of this condition, more

  11. Nutritional influences on epigenetics and age-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional epigenetics has emerged as a novel mechanism underlying gene–diet interactions, further elucidating the modulatory role of nutrition in aging and age-related disease development. Epigenetics is defined as a heritable modification to the DNA that regulates chromosome architecture and modu...

  12. Extrinsic Mechanisms Involved in Age-Related Defective Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    of fractures. Studies in rodents and humans revealed that, independent of sex hormone deficiency, the age-related decline in bone formation is characterized by decreased osteoblast number and lifespan and reduced bone-forming capacity of individual osteoblasts. An important clinical question is to identify...

  13. Age-related decrements in cycling and running performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine ... This study examined age-related decrements in athletic performance during running and cycling activities. ... These findings establish a trend that there is 'accelerated' aging during running which can perhaps be attributed to the increased weight-bearing stress on the muscles ...

  14. Age-related macular degeneration in Onitsha, Nigeria | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, pattern and ocular morbidity associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at the Guinness Eye Center Onitsha Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all new patients aged 50 years and above seen between January 1997 and December 2004 were reviewed.

  15. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian...

  16. Age-related differences in muscular capacity among workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg-van Reenen, H.H.; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the age-related changes in muscular capacity in a working population, and to investigate whether these changes are dependent on sports participation. Methods: Data were used from the longitudinal study on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, stress and health (n = 1,800). At

  17. AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION -AN EMERGING AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    associatedwithwetmaculardegeneration . : Whites are much more at risk than Blacks . Age-related accumulation of low-molecular-weight phototoxic, pro-toxic melanin oligomers within the lysosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium are suspected of decreasing the digestive rate of photoreceptors of the outer rod segments ...

  18. Age-related decrements in cycling and running perfor- mance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    This study examined age-related decrements in athletic performance during running and cycling activi- ties. Design. The age group winning times for males aged between 18 and 70 years competing in the 1999 Argus cycle tour (103 km) and 1999 Comrades running marathon (90 km), South Africa's premier endurance.

  19. Age-related differences in women's foot shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansuategui Echeita, Jone; Hijmans, Juha M.; Smits, Sharon; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Postema, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Describe age-related differences in women's foot shape using a wide range of measurements and ages. Study design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Main outcome measurements: Six foot-shape measurements of each foot: foot lengths, ball widths, ball circumferences, low instep

  20. Review Article Therapeutic Potential of Statins in Age-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-09

    Aug 9, 2011 ... ABSTRACT. Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss, affecting one in three people aged 75 and above. Although exciting new pharmaceuticals to treat ARMD such as endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, are now available, they are effective only in ...

  1. Neuroimaging explanations of age-related differences in task performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffener, Jason; Barulli, Daniel; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Advancing age affects both cognitive performance and functional brain activity and interpretation of these effects has led to a variety of conceptual research models without always explicitly linking the two effects. However, to best understand the multifaceted effects of advancing age, age differences in functional brain activity need to be explicitly tied to the cognitive task performance. This work hypothesized that age-related differences in task performance are partially explained by age-related differences in functional brain activity and formally tested these causal relationships. Functional MRI data was from groups of young and old adults engaged in an executive task-switching experiment. Analyses were voxel-wise testing of moderated-mediation and simple mediation statistical path models to determine whether age group, brain activity and their interaction explained task performance in regions demonstrating an effect of age group. Results identified brain regions whose age-related differences in functional brain activity significantly explained age-related differences in task performance. In all identified locations, significant moderated-mediation relationships resulted from increasing brain activity predicting worse (slower) task performance in older but not younger adults. Findings suggest that advancing age links task performance to the level of brain activity. The overall message of this work is that in order to understand the role of functional brain activity on cognitive performance, analysis methods should respect theoretical relationships. Namely, that age affects brain activity and brain activity is related to task performance. PMID:24672481

  2. Neuroimaging explanations of age-related differences in task performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eSteffener

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advancing age affects both cognitive performance and functional brain activity and interpretation of these effects has led to a variety of conceptual research models without always explicitly linking the two effects. However, to best understand the multifaceted effects of advancing age, age differences in functional brain activity need to be explicitly tied to the cognitive task performance. This work hypothesized that age-related differences in task performance are partially explained by age-related differences in functional brain activity and formally tested these causal relationships. Functional MRI data was from groups of young and old adults engaged in an executive task-switching experiment. Analyses were voxel-wise testing of moderated-mediation and simple mediation statistical path models to determine whether age group, brain activity and their interaction explained task performance in regions demonstrating an effect of age group. Results identified brain regions whose age-related differences in functional brain activity significantly explained age-related differences in task performance. In all identified locations, significant moderated-mediation relationships resulted from increasing brain activity predicting worse (slower task performance in older but not younger adults. Findings suggest that advancing age links task performance to the level of brain activity. The overall message of this work is that in order to understand the role of functional brain activity on cognitive performance, analysis methods should respect theoretical relationships. Namely, that age affects brain activity and brain activity is related to task performance.

  3. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. AMD; epidemiology; genes; polymorphism; risk. Abstract. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder of the eye and the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. With a multifactorial etiology, AMD results in progressive loss of central vision affecting the macular region of the eye in elderly.

  4. Gene-diet interactions in age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50% of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation...

  5. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  6. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Statins in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss, affecting one in three people aged 75 and above. Although exciting new pharmaceuticals to treat ARMD such as endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, are now available, they are effective only in selected group of patients, and ...

  8. on visual acuity in age related macular degeneration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    marine origin) in the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD). In a randomized double blind clinical trial 280 eyes of 280 (157 F, 123 M) patients with wet and dry AMD were randomly assigned in treatment or placebo groups. Patients in ...

  9. The current pattern of gestational age-related anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current pattern of gestational age-related anthropometric parameters of term Nigerian neonates. O Oluwafemi,1 FWACP; F Njokanma,2 FWACP; E Disu,2 ... Weight and length at birth reflect the quality of intra-uterine growth and exert a strong influence on postnatal survival. ..... Neonatal anthropometry: The thin-fat.

  10. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colijn, Johanna M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Prokofyeva, Elena; Alves, Dalila; Cachulo, Maria L.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korb, Christina; Erke, Maja G.; Bron, Alain; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Segato, Tatiana; Piermarocchi, Stefano; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Topouzis, Fotis; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bertelsen, Geir; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Foster, Paul J.; Silva, Rufino; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Ajana, Soufiane; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Arndt, Verena; Bhatia, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Biarnés, Marc; Borrell, Anna; Bühren, Sebastian; Calado, Sofia M.; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Dammeier, Sascha; de Jong, Eiko K.; de la Cerda, Berta; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Diether, Sigrid; Emri, Eszter; Endermann, Tanja; Ferraro, Lucia L.; Garcia, Míriam; Heesterbeek, Thomas J.; Honisch, Sabina; Hoyng, Carel B.; Kersten, Eveline; Kilger, Ellen; Langen, Hanno; Lengyel, Imre; Luthert, Phil; Maugeais, Cyrille; Meester-Smoor, Magda; Monés, Jordi; Nogoceke, Everson; Peto, Tunde; Pool, Frances M.; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Ueffing, Marius; Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Verzijden, Timo; Zumbansen, Markus; Acar, Niyazi; Anastosopoulos, Eleftherios; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto; Bergen, Arthur; Binquet, Christine; Bird, Alan; Brétillon, Lionel; Buitendijk, Gabrielle; Cachulo, Maria Luz; Chakravarthy, Usha; Chan, Michelle; Chang, Petrus; Colijn, Johanna; Cumberland, Philippa; Cunha-Vaz, José; Daien, Vincent; Deak, Gabor; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; den Hollander, Anneke; Dietzel, Martha; Erke, Maja Gran; Fauser, Sascha; Finger, Robert; Fletcher, Astrid; Foster, Paul; Founti, Panayiota; Göbel, Arno; Gorgels, Theo; Grauslund, Jakob; Grus, Franz; Hammond, Christopher; Helmer, Catherine; Hense, Hans-Werner; Hermann, Manuel; Hoehn, René; Hogg, Ruth; Holz, Frank; Hoyng, Carel; Jansonius, Nomdo; Janssen, Sarah; Khawaja, Anthony; Klaver, Caroline; Lamparter, Julia; Le Goff, Mélanie; Leal, Sergio; Lechanteur, Yara; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lotery, Andrew; Leung, Irene; Mauschitz, Matthias; Merle, Bénédicte; Meyer Zu Westrup, Verena; Midena, Edoardo; Miotto, Stefania; Mirshahi, Alireza; Mohan-Saïd, Sadek; Mueller, Michael; Muldrew, Alyson; Nunes, Sandrina; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo; Raitakari, Olli; Ribeiro, Luisa; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Sahel, José; Salonikiou, Aggeliki; Sanchez, Clarisa; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Schweitzer, Cédric; Shehata, Jasmin; Silvestri, Giuliana; Simader, Christian; Souied, Eric; Springelkamp, Henriet; Tapp, Robyn; Verhoeven, Virginie; Von Hanno, Therese; Vujosevic, Stela; Williams, Katie; Wolfram, Christian; Yip, Jennifer; Zerbib, Jennyfer; Zwiener, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD in

  11. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colijn, Johanna M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Prokofyeva, Elena

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD...

  12. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Ext...

  13. Age Related Variations in The Architecture of Caprine Haemal Nodes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age related variations in the architecture of caprine haemal nodes were studied in West African dwarf goats aged between 1-24 months. Variations were observed in the thickness of the capsule, the content and organization of the cortical and medullary parenchyma as well as the stroma. In young goats age between 1-4 ...

  14. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references

  15. Seismic response of base isolated auxiliary building with age related degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Hee; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil

    2012-01-01

    The aging of an isolator affects not only the mechanical properties of the isolator but also the dynamic properties of the upper structure, such as the change in stiffness, deformation capacity, load bearing capacity, creep, and damping. Therefore, the seismic response of base isolated structures will change with time. The floor response in the base isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) can be particularly changed because of the change in stiffness and damping for the isolator. The increased seismic response due to the aging of isolator can cause mechanical problems for many equipment located in the NPPs. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the seismic response of base isolated NPPs with age related degradation. In this study, the seismic responses for a base isolated auxiliary building of SHIN KORI 3 and 4 with age related degradation were investigated using a nonlinear time history analysis. Floor response spectrums (FRS) were presented with time for identifying the change in seismic demand under the aging of isolator

  16. Aging-related limit of exercise efficacy on motor decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jennifer C.; Cantu, Mark A.; Kasanga, Ella A.; Nejtek, Vicki A.; Papa, Evan V.; Bugnariu, Nicoleta; Salvatore, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying lifestyle strategies and allied neurobiological mechanisms that reduce aging-related motor impairment is imperative, given the accelerating number of retirees and increased life expectancy. A physically active lifestyle prior to old age can reduce risk of debilitating motor decline. However, if exercise is initiated after motor decline has begun in the lifespan, it is unknown if aging itself may impose a limit on exercise efficacy to decelerate further aging-related motor decline. In Brown-Norway/Fischer 344 F1 hybrid (BNF) rats, locomotor activity begins to decrease in middle age (12–18 months). One mechanism of aging-related motor decline may be decreased expression of GDNF family receptor, GFRα-1, which is decreased in substantia nigra (SN) between 12 and 30 months old. Moderate exercise, beginning at 18 months old, increases nigral GFRα-1 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression within 2 months. In aged rats, replenishing aging-related loss of GFRα-1 in SN increases TH in SN alone and locomotor activity. A moderate exercise regimen was initiated in sedentary male BNF rats in a longitudinal study to evaluate if exercise could attenuate aging-related motor decline when initiated at two different ages in the latter half of the lifespan (18 or 24 months old). Motor decline was reversed in the 18-, but not 24-month-old, cohort. However, exercise efficacy in the 18-month-old group was reduced as the rats reached 27 months old. GFRα-1 expression was not increased in either cohort. These studies suggest exercise can decelerate motor decline when begun in the latter half of the lifespan, but its efficacy may be limited by age of initiation. Decreased plasticity of GFRα-1 expression following exercise may limit its efficacy to reverse motor decline. PMID:29176896

  17. Risks of age related macular degeneration and led lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spectral structure of environmental light can have significant influence on risks of various eye diseases which can evolve quite early. The paper dwells on how age-related macular degeneration evolves and on a part which eye age pigment plays in the process. We discuss predictive models for age pigment accumulation and methodology of their creation. We created a predictive mathematical model for accumulated A2E age pigment quantity allowing for LED lighting peculiarities and its age-related perception. The model encompasses active oxygen forms generation evolving due to decrease in antioxidant cellular protection efficiency in a lighting environment with a higher blue light dose. It is shown that superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GRX 1 efficiency within 445 (plus minus 10 nanometers range drops substantially in blue light; it increases risks of lower cellular resistance to effects exerted by non-compensated active oxygen forms. These processes which are rather long-term can lead to early age-related macular degeneration. Mathematical calculations prove that in the nearest future a share of patients aged 30–40 who suffer from age-related macular degeneration will grow drastically; it will eventually lead to an increased number of disabled people aged 50–60 whose disability is caused by eyesight disorders. It is shown that if we fail to discover any mechanisms aimed at lowering risks of early age-related macular degeneration evolvement in the nearest future, total costs required for solving eyesight disorders issue will grow substantially. Thus, in 2012 about 140 billion dollars were spent on the eyesight disorders issue all over the world; the sum is likely to reach 377 billion dollars in 2050.

  18. Outsourced cataract surgery and postoperative endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solborg Bjerrum, Søren; Kiilgaard, Jens F; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby

    2013-01-01

    To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk.......To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk....

  19. Metabolism and serum levels of tryptophan in senile cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C; Angi, M R; De Carli, M; Vanzan, S; Allegri, G

    1982-03-30

    In order to clarify the role of tryptophan in the patogenesis of senile cataract, we have studied the serum total and free levels of tryptophan in cataract patients as compared with age and sex-matched controls, and the urinary excretion of 10 metabolites after oral load of the amino acid. This excretion increases in the cataract group both as total per cent and as kynurenine. No difference has been found in the free and total serum tryptophan between normal subjects and cataract patients. A possible role of the kynurenines in the pathogenesis of senile cataract is suggested.

  20. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva Olga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes, for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. Results The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO annotations; (c GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80 protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. Conclusions The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  1. The prevalence of alcohol misuse in patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A R; Wilkins, M; Dew, T; Sherwood, R; Coakes, R; Peters, T J

    1998-04-01

    If a factor could be identified which delayed the onset of cataract by 10 years, the number of annual cataract operations worldwide has been estimated to decrease by 45%. A case-control study compared alcohol consumption in 78 patients attending for routine cataract surgery in South East London with data from a large population-based survey. Male cataract patients had a significantly greater risk of being harmful drinkers (odds ratio = 8, p = 0.007) than the controls. The harmful male drinkers were significantly younger than the non-drinkers with cataract (mean difference 15 years, p < 0.007). Female cataract patients were not more likely to be excessive drinkers than controls. The female drinkers with cataract were of a similar age to the non-drinking female patients with cataract. Haematological and biochemical indices of alcohol toxicity indicated five patients who were likely to be harmful drinkers, but who had denied this on direct questioning. Seven (26%) of the male patients had a low serum 25 hydroxycholecalciferol although the levels were normal in the female patients. These results support the view that excess alcohol consumption is related to cataract formation and suggest that alcohol causes premature cataract formation in male, but not female patients. Alcohol consumption is amenable to intervention and suggests that such intervention could have a significant impact on the need for cataract surgery.

  2. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system.

  3. Age-related changes of monoaminooxidases in rat cerebellar cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FM Tranquilli Leali

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related changes of the monoaminoxidases, evaluated by enzymatic staining, quantitative analysis of images, biochemical assay and statistical analysis of data were studied in cerebellar cortex of young (3-month-old and aged (26- month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The enzymatic staining shows the presence of monoamino-oxidases within the molecular and granular layers as well as within the Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum of young and aged animals. In molecular layer, and in Purkinje neurons the levels of monoaminooxidases were strongly increased in old rats. The granular layer showed, on the contrary, an age-dependent loss of enzymatic staining. These morphological findings were confirmed by biochemical results. The possibility that age-related changes in monoaminooxidase levels may be due to impaired energy production mechanisms and/or represent the consequence of reduced energetic needs is discussed.

  4. Heart Failure as an Aging-Related Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei

    2018-01-27

    The molecular pathophysiology of heart failure, which is one of the leading causes of mortality, is not yet fully understood. Heart failure can be regarded as a systemic syndrome of aging-related phenotypes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway, both of which are key regulators of aging, have been demonstrated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Circulating C1q was identified as a novel activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, promoting systemic aging-related phenotypes including sarcopenia and heart failure. On the other hand, p53 induces the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in the failing heart. In these molecular mechanisms, the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes (e,g,. endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, macrophages) deserves mentioning. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology underlying heart failure, focusing on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway.

  5. Radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Tomoko; Mandai, Michiko; Honjo, Megumi; Matsuda, Naoko; Miyamoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Fifteen eyes of age-related macular degeneration were treated by low-dose radiation. All the affected eyes had subfoveal neovascular membrane. Seventeen nontreated eyes with similar macular lesion served as control. Radiation was performed using photon beam at 6MV. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 consecutive days. When evaluated 9 to 12 months after treatment, the size of neovascular membrane had decreased in 47% of treated eyes and 7% of control eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 13% of treated eyes and in none of control eyes. When the initial neovascular membrane was less than 1.5 disc diameter in size, the visual acuity had improved or remained stationary in 90% of treated eyes and in 36% of control eyes. The findings show the potential beneficial effect of radiation for age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  6. Age-related percutaneous penetration part 1: skin factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, S; Meier-Davis, S R; Cayme, B; Shudo, J; Maibach, H I

    2012-05-01

    Changes in the skin that occur in the elderly may put them at increased risk for altered percutaneous penetration from pharmacotherapy along with potential adverse effects. Skin factors that may have a role in age-related percutaneous penetration include blood flow, pH, skin thickness, hair and pore density, and the content and structure of proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), water, and lipids. Each factor is examined as a function of increasing age along with its potential impact on percutaneous penetration. Additionally, topical drugs that successfully overcome the barrier function of the skin can still fall victim to cutaneous metabolism, thereby producing metabolites that may have increased or decreased activity. This overview discusses the current data and highlights the importance of further studies to evaluate the impact of skin factors in age-related percutaneous penetration.

  7. Humanin and age-related diseases: a new link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Tas, Emir; Muzumdar, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    Humanin (HN) is 24-amino acid mitochondria-associated peptide. Since its initial discovery over a decade ago, a role for HN has been reported in many biological processes such as apoptosis, cell survival, substrate metabolism, inflammatory response, and response to stressors such as oxidative stress, ischemia, and starvation. HN and its potent analogs have been shown to have beneficial effects in many age-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, diabetes, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, atherosclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and certain types of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. More recently, an association between HN levels, growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF axis), and life span was demonstrated using various mouse models with mutations in the GH/IGF axis. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of HN in aging and age-related diseases.

  8. Humanin and Age-related diseases: A new link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei eGong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Humanin (HN is 24-amino acid mitochondria-associated peptide. Since its initial discovery over a decade ago, a role for HN has been reported in many biological processes such as apoptosis, cell survival, substrate metabolism, inflammatory response and response to stressors such as oxidative stress, ischemia and starvation. HN and its potent analogs have been shown to have beneficial effects in many age-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, stroke, diabetes, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (MI-R, atherosclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and certain types of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. More recently, an association between HN levels, growth hormone/ insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF axis and life span was demonstrated using various mouse models with mutations in the GH/IGF axis. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of HN in aging and age-related diseases.

  9. Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon B. Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. While excellent treatment has emerged for neovascular disease, treatment for early AMD is lacking due to an incomplete understanding of the early molecular events. A prominent age-related change is the accumulation of neutral lipid in normal Bruch's membrane (BrM throughout adulthood and also disease-related BrM accumulations called basal deposits and drusen. AMD lesion formation has thus been conceptualized as sharing mechanisms with atherosclerotic plaque formation, where low-density lipoprotein (LDL retention within the arterial wall initiates a cascade of pathologic events. However, we do not yet understand how lipoproteins contribute to AMD. This paper explores how systemic and local production of lipoproteins might contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  10. Cataract surgery following KAMRA presbyopic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tien-En Tan,1,2 Jodhbir S Mehta2–4 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore; 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Abstract: Intrastromal corneal inlays are an emerging treatment for presbyopic patients. The KAMRA™ small aperture inlay was the first such inlay to receive Conformité Européenne (CE marking in 2005. It has been shown to improve uncorrected near and intermediate visual acuity without adversely affecting uncorrected distance visual acuity. Due to the age of presbyopic patients, they may eventually develop cataracts. In two such cases, we found that cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in place was not technically more difficult, and that the surgical procedure could be improved by additional ocular rotations to improve visualization. Biometry readings were reliable, and it appeared that the SRK/T formula was accurate for calculation of intraocular lens power. Cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in situ is a viable option for patients. Keywords: cataract surgery, KAMRA, corneal inlay, AcuTarget, presbyopia

  11. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Connexin 46 (Cx46) is important for gap junction channels formation which plays crucial role in the preservation of lens homeostasis and transparency. Previously, we have identified a missense mutation. (p.V44M) of Cx46 in a congenital cataract family. This study aims at dissecting the potential.

  12. Economic Constraints in Managing Complicated Cataracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intraocular pressures. While it is a standard practice to request for an ocular ultrasound scan in patients with traumatic cataracts when the fundus cannot be seen, the rationale is to determine the possible cause of visual loss and give the patient an idea of visual prognosis before surgery. However, where there is no hope of.

  13. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ...

  14. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  15. Hhip haploinsufficiency sensitizes mice to age-related emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Yun, Jeong; Qiu, Weiliang; Guo, Feng; Huang, Chunfang; Mancini, John Dominic; Gupta, Kushagra; Laucho-Contreras, Maria E; Naing, Zun Zar Chi; Zhang, Li; Perrella, Mark A; Owen, Caroline A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-08-09

    Genetic variants in Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) have consistently been associated with the susceptibility to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function levels, including the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), in general population samples by genome-wide association studies. However, in vivo evidence connecting Hhip to age-related FEV1 decline and emphysema development is lacking. Herein, using Hhip heterozygous mice (Hhip(+/-)), we observed increased lung compliance and spontaneous emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice starting at 10 mo of age. This increase was preceded by increases in oxidative stress levels in the lungs of Hhip(+/-) vs. Hhip(+/+) mice. To our knowledge, these results provide the first line of evidence that HHIP is involved in maintaining normal lung function and alveolar structures. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine treatment in mice starting at age of 5 mo improved lung function and prevented emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice, suggesting that N-acetyl cysteine treatment limits the progression of age-related emphysema in Hhip(+/-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung function and age-related spontaneous emphysema development in Hhip(+/-) mice may be caused by increased oxidative stress levels in murine lungs as a result of haploinsufficiency of Hhip.

  16. Senescent cells: SASPected drivers of age-related pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadya, Yossi; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2014-12-01

    The progression of physiological ageing is driven by intracellular aberrations including telomere attrition, genomic instability, epigenetic alterations and loss of proteostasis. These in turn damage cells and compromise their functionality. Cellular senescence, a stable irreversible cell-cycle arrest, is elicited in damaged cells and prevents their propagation in the organism. Under normal conditions, senescent cells recruit the immune system which facilitates their removal from tissues. Nevertheless, during ageing, tissue-residing senescent cells tend to accumulate, and might negatively impact their microenvironment via profound secretory phenotype with pro-inflammatory characteristics, termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Indeed, senescent cells are mostly abundant at sites of age-related pathologies, including degenerative disorders and malignancies. Interestingly, studies on progeroid mice indicate that selective elimination of senescent cells can delay age-related deterioration. This suggests that chronic inflammation induced by senescent cells might be a main driver of these pathologies. Importantly, senescent cells accumulate as a result of deficient immune surveillance, and their removal is increased upon the use of immune stimulatory agents. Insights into mechanisms of senescence surveillance could be combined with current approaches for cancer immunotherapy to propose new preventive and therapeutic strategies for age-related diseases.

  17. Identification of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using OCT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Punal M., Dr; Krishna, Nanditha; Ashwini, V.; Prathibha, H. M.

    2018-02-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration is the most leading retinal disease in the recent years. Macular degeneration occurs when the central portion of the retina, called macula deteriorates. As the deterioration occurs with the age, it is commonly referred as Age-related Macular Degeneration. This disease can be visualized by several imaging modalities such as Fundus imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique and many other. Optical Coherence Tomography is the widely used technique for screening the Age-related Macular Degeneration disease, because it has an ability to detect the very minute changes in the retina. The Healthy and AMD affected OCT images are classified by extracting the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) layer of the images using the image processing technique. The extracted layer is sampled, the no. of white pixels in each of the sample is counted and the mean value of the no. of pixels is calculated. The average mean value is calculated for both the Healthy and the AMD affected images and a threshold value is fixed and a decision rule is framed to classify the images of interest. The proposed method showed an accuracy of 75%.

  18. Age-related differences in working memory updating components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Rocío; Bajo, M Teresa; Pelegrina, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible age-related changes throughout childhood and adolescence in different component processes of working memory updating (WMU): retrieval, transformation, and substitution. A set of numerical WMU tasks was administered to four age groups (8-, 11-, 14-, and 21-year-olds). To isolate the effect of each of the WMU components, participants performed different versions of a task that included different combinations of the WMU components. The results showed an expected overall decrease in response times and an increase in accuracy performance with age. Most important, specific age-related changes in the retrieval component were found, demonstrating that the effect of retrieval on accuracy was larger in children than in adolescents or young adults. These findings indicate that the availability of representations from outside the focus of attention may change with age. Thus, the retrieval component of updating could contribute to the age-related changes observed in the performance of many updating tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cataract-free interval and severity of cataract after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation: influence of treatment parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van; Struikmans, Henk; Kal, Henk B.; Tweel, Ingeborg van der; Mourits, Maarten; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schipper, Jan; Battermann, Jan J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine prospectively the cataract-free interval (latency time) after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and to assess accurately the final severity of the cataract. Methods and Materials: Ninety-three of the patients who received TBI as a part of their conditioning regimen for BMT between 1982 and 1995 were followed with respect to cataract formation. Included were only patients who had a follow-up period of at least 23 months. TBI was applied in one fraction of 8 Gy or two fractions of 5 or 6 Gy. Cataract-free period was assessed and in 56 patients, who could be followed until stabilization of the cataract had occurred, final severity of the cataract was determined using a classification system. With respect to final severity, two groups were analyzed: subclinical low-grade cataract and high-grade cataract. Cataract-free period and final severity were determined with respect to type of transplantation, TBI dose, and posttransplant variables such as graft versus host disease (GVHD) and steroid treatment. Results: Cataract incidence of the analyzed patients was 89%. Median time to develop a cataract was 58 months for autologous transplanted patients. For allogeneic transplanted patients treated or not treated with steroids, median times were 33 and 46 months, respectively. Final severity was not significantly different for autologous or allogeneic patients. In allogeneic patients, however, final severity was significantly different for patients who had or had not been treated with steroids for GVHD: 93% versus 35% high-grade cataract, respectively. Final severity was also different for patients receiving 1 x 8 or 2 x 5 Gy TBI, from patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy as conditioning therapy: 33% versus 79% high-grade cataract, respectively. The group of patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy comprised, however, more patients with steroid treatment for GVHD. So the high percentage of high-grade cataract in the 2 x 6 Gy group might also

  20. Cataract surgery practices in the United States Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnaer, Annika G; Greenberg, Paul B; Cockerham, Glenn C; Clark, Melissa A; Chomsky, Amy

    2017-04-01

    To describe current cataract surgery practices within the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Veterans Health Administration hospitals in the U.S. Retrospective data analysis. An initial e-mail containing a link to an anonymous 32-question survey of cataract surgery practices was sent to participants in May 2016. Two reminder e-mails were sent to nonresponders 1 week and 2 weeks after the initial survey was sent; the remaining nonresponders were called twice over a 2-week period. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The response rate was 75% (67/89). Cataract surgeons routinely ordered preoperative testing in 29 (45%) of 65 sections and preoperative consultations in 26 (39%) of 66 sections. In 22 (33%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons administered intracameral antibiotics. In 61 (92%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). In 20 (30%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used multifocal IOLs. Cataract surgeons in 6 (9%) of 66 sections performed femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. In 6 (9%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons performed immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Forty-nine (74%) ophthalmology chiefs reported a high level of satisfaction with Veterans Affairs ophthalmology. The survey results indicate that in cataract surgery in the VHA, routine preoperative testing is commonly performed and emerging practices, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery, have limited roles. The results of this survey could benchmark future trends in U.S. cataract surgery practices, especially in teaching hospital settings. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cataract surgery in patients with ocular pseudoexpholiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Mirjana Janicijevic; Vulovic, Tatjana Sarenac; Vulovic, Dejan; Janicijevic, Katarina; Petrovic, Marko; Vujic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective 5-year study based on general and ophthalmic history records, and including 268 eyes (174 patients), aged 50 years and over. Ophthalmological examination involved visual acuity, measuring of intraocular pressure, slit lamp examination and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Type of surgical treatment was tailored for each patient (extra capsular cataract extraction, phaco-emulsiphication). Preoperative slit lamp examination showed phacodonesis in 17.91% (47), iridodonesis in 2.98% (8), pigment dispersion in 6.72% (18), lens subluxation in 4.85% (13) on the total. Extra capsular cataract extraction was performed in 36.94% (99) and phaco-emulsiphication in the others. Analysis of intra operative complications showed: posterior capsular rupture 17.91% (48), zonular dialysis or break 5.97% (16), lens subluxation 1.86% (5), intraocular bleeding 2.98% (8), vitreous loss 13.80% (37). Postoperative complications include: anterior chamber reaction 45.90% (123), intraocular lens tilt 15.67% (42), endothelial decompensation 21.64% (58), subluxation/luxation IOL 3.73% (10), secondary cataract 21.46% (58), pigment dispersion 37.68% (101), increased IOP 13.80% (37), residual lens matter 13.80% (37), hyphema 3.73% (10), posterior synechiae 6.72% (18), iris prolapsus 2.73% (8). Cataract surgery in PES will frequently encounter small pupils, shallow anterior chambers, posterior adhesions, weak zonular support, partial subluxation or complete dislocation of lens. Authors presented the best possible approach on PES and surgical methods for patients with cataract with special accent of possible surgical complications.

  2. Prevalence of cataract surgery and visual outcomes in Indian immigrants in Singapore: the Singapore Indian eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Preeti; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ting, Tay Wan; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cataract surgery and factors associated with post-surgical visual outcomes in migrant Indians living in Singapore. We conducted a population-based study in 3,400 Indian immigrants residing in Singapore-the Singapore Indian Eye Study (SINDI). All participants underwent comprehensive medical eye examination and a standardized interview. Post-operative visual impairment (VI) was defined as best-corrected or presenting visual acuity (BCVA or PVA) of 20/60 or worse. The age- and gender-standardized prevalence of cataract surgery was 9.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9%, 10.7%) in Singapore resident Indians. Post-operative VI defined by BCVA occurred in 10.9% eyes (87/795). The main causes of post-operative VI were diabetic retinopathy (20.7%), posterior capsular opacification (18.4%), and age-related macular degeneration (12.6%). Undercorrected refractive error doubled the prevalence of post-operative VI when PVA was used. The rate of cataract surgery is about 10% in Indian residents in Singapore. Socioeconomic variables and migration had no significant impact on the prevalence of cataract surgery. Diabetic retinopathy was a major cause of post-operative VI in migrant Indians living in Singapore. Uncorrected postoperative refractive error remains an efficient way to improve vision.

  3. Age-related epigenetic drift and phenotypic plasticity loss: implications in prevention of age-related human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-12-01

    Aging is considered as one of the most important developmental processes in organisms and is closely associated with global deteriorations of epigenetic markers such as aberrant methylomic patterns. This altered epigenomic state, referred to 'epigenetic drift', reflects deficient maintenance of epigenetic marks and contributes to impaired cellular and molecular functions in aged cells. Epigenetic drift-induced abnormal changes during aging are scantily repaired by epigenetic modulators. This inflexibility in the aged epigenome may lead to an age-related decline in phenotypic plasticity at the cellular and molecular levels due to epigenetic drift. This perspective aims to provide novel concepts for understanding epigenetic effects on the aging process and to provide insights into epigenetic prevention and therapeutic strategies for age-related human disease.

  4. [Long-term course of visual acuity in patients with cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiseliţă, Dorin; Huţuleac, Alexandra; Cantemir, Alina; Irod, Alexandra; Obadă, Otilia; Juverdeanu, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    To compare immediate and 5 years postoperatively visual acuity (VA), after uncomplicated cataract surgery and emphasizing the main causes of visual acuity loss. This is a retrospective study that included 475 eyes that underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery between 2003-2007 by the same surgeon. 51 patients (73 eyes) returned to the last followup visit, 5 years postoperatively. Of 73 eyes, 18 eyes (24.66%) had VA 1, 5 years postoperatively. 26% (19 eyes) revealed reduced best corrected visual acuity in comparison to that from 6 weeks postoperatively Causes that led to reduced VA are: posterior capsular opacification (46.57%), age related macular degeneration (26.02%), glaucoma (10.95%), diabetic retinopathy (9.58%). Approximately a quarter of patients showed reduced VA after more than 5 years postoperatively; more than three quarters had VA > 0.5 on the last follow-up visit. The most frequent causes of reduced VA are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, appearence or worsening of diabetic retinopathy, posterior capsular opacification.

  5. [Long-term clinical course after cataract surgery in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiseliţă, D; Irod, Alexandra; Huţuleac, Alexandra; Juverdeanu, Raluca; Obada, Otilia; Cantemir, Alina

    2012-01-01

    To determine the visual outcome at 5 years postoperatively in patients operated for cataract associated with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective study on a group of 41 eyes in patients with diabetes, who were operated for cataract (the same surgeon) by facoemulsification and IOL implantation in the capsular bag, without intraoperative complications, for 60 months (during 2003-2007). 27 patients with diabetes were included in the study, the average duration of diabetes was 10, 3 years. Average postoperative visual acuity (VA) was 0.5 at six weeks postoperatively. Preoperative VA improvement was observed in 78%. There was a decrease in VA of 85% at more than 5 years after surgery and 15% of eyes had preserved VA. VA decrease was due to the occurrence, progression and worsening of retinopathy (69%) and diabetic maculopathy, posterior capsular opacification (34%), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (12%). Visual acuity was maintained in 15% and decreased in 85% of patients due to diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration.

  6. [Incremental cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, N; Dick, H B; Krummenauer, F

    2007-02-01

    Supplementation of cataract patients with multifocal intraocular lenses involves an additional financial investment when compared to the corresponding monofocal supplementation, which usually is not funded by German health care insurers. In the context of recent resource allocation discussions, however, the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery could become an important rationale. Therefore an evidence-based estimation of its cost effectiveness was carried out. Three independent meta-analyses were implemented to estimate the gain in uncorrected near visual acuity and best corrected visual acuity (vision lines) as well as the predictability (fraction of patients without need for reading aids) of multifocal supplementation. Study reports published between 1995 and 2004 (English or German language) were screened for appropriate key words. Meta effects in visual gain and predictability were estimated by means and standard deviations of the reported effect measures. Cost data were estimated by German DRG rates and individual lens costs; the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery was then computed in terms of its marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER) for each clinical benefit endpoint; the incremental costs of multifocal versus monofocal cataract surgery were further estimated by means of their respective incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). An independent meta-analysis estimated the complication profiles to be expected after monofocal and multifocal cataract surgery in order to evaluate expectable complication-associated additional costs of both procedures; the marginal and incremental cost effectiveness estimates were adjusted accordingly. A sensitivity analysis comprised cost variations of +/- 10 % and utility variations alongside the meta effect estimate's 95 % confidence intervals. Total direct costs from the health care insurer's perspective were estimated 3363 euro, associated with a visual meta benefit in best corrected visual

  7. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for development approach in childhood cataract case finding. The delay in identification and referral of children with cataract at an appropriate age for surgical intervention and optical rehabilitation is the main cause of poor vision following surgery for the condition as amblyopia results. Therefore early presentation, identification, referral and surgical intervention as well as appropriate optical rehabilitation is the key to successful surgical outcome of childhood cataract and good visual prognosis. The theater for development (TfD approach methodology was implemented in a community in Akpabuyo local government are of Cross River state, Nigeria as a means to enhance community participation, health promotion and education and to complement the key informant methodology in case finding for childhood cataract. Three children with cataracts were referred by the community following the TfD intervention, for cataract surgery and uptake of follow up care after surgery. The TfD approach appears to be a useful method for encouraging community participation in the case finding of childhood cataract.

  8. A and B mode ultrasonography in preoperative evaluation of lens and posterior segment of dogs eyes with cataract

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    Bianca C. Martins

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography of the lens and posterior segment is an indispensable step in the preoperative evaluation of dogs with cataracts, since ophthalmoscopy is not feasible when there is opacification of the lens. This study evaluated the echographic conditions of cataractous lens and fundus of the eye in dogs affected by cataracts. The study was conducted in 30 dogs (56 eyes, 10 males and 20 females, with different types of cataracts at different stages of development. Echography in A and B modes, simultaneously, was carried out for the examination of the lens and posterior segment. The examinations revealed anterior cortical, posterior cortical and nuclear cataract in 12 eyes (21.4%, anterior cortical, posterior cortical, nuclear and posterior capsular in 23 eyes (41%, anterior cortical, posterior cortical and posterior capsular cataract in one eye (1.7%, anterior cortical and nuclear cataract in one eye (1.7%, anterior cortical, nuclear and posterior capsular cataract in five eyes (8.9%, and anterior cortical cataract in seven eyes (12.5%. Abnormal ultrasonographic alterations were observed in the posterior segment in 26 eyes evaluated (46.4%. Vitreal degeneration was detected in 12 eyes (21.4%, images of vitreal exudate or hemorrhage in seven eyes (12.5%, persistence of hyaloid artery in four eyes (7.1% and lens subluxation in three eyes (5.3%. The results obtained reiterate the importance of ultrasonography in canine patients presented for cataract surgery given that alterations of the posterior segment are difficult to identify in a clinical examination when the lens is opacified.A ultrassonografia do segmento posterior do bulbo do olho é etapa indispensável na avaliação de cães com catarata que serão submetidos à facectomia, uma vez que a oftalmoscopia não é factível quando há opacificação da lente, notadamente nas cataratas maduras. Este estudo avaliou as condições ecográficas da lente cataratogênica e do fundo de olho de c

  9. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    the efficacy and safety of reduced frequency dosing for aflibercept, relative to other approved and marketed vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors for wet AMD, over 12 months. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Based on a systematic literature review performed according to a pre-specified protocol......OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  10. Age-related decline in perception of prosodic affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I; Ennis, T

    2001-01-01

    Perception of affect in speech is an important aspect of language, often conveying more about the intent of the speaker than semantic content. Impairment of perception of affect is seen in patients with right-hemisphere lesions. Nevertheless, little attention is paid to perception of emotional prosody in clinical neuropsychology. We present data concerning a revised version of the Emotional Perception Test (EPT-R), which indicates that older participants are significantly worse in prosodic perception than IQ-matched younger participants. The apparent age-related differences in perception of prosody are similar in magnitude to those seen on memory tests.

  11. Research status of conbercept treating age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the major reasons of blindness among the elderly in the developed countries. As AMD patients are increasing year by year, AMD has become one of the important topics of ophthalmic research to prevent blindness. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood, but many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFplays an important role in the pathogenesis. With the development and application of anti-VEGF drugs, there are a variety of drugs applied to the disease. This article introduces conbercept for the treatment of AMD.

  12. NSAIDs may protect against age-related brain atrophy

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    Barbara B Bendlin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in humans is associated with brain differences including decreased number of activated microglia. In animals, NSAIDs are associated with reduced microglia, decreased amyloid burden, and neuronal preservation. Several studies suggest NSAIDs protect brain regions affected in the earliest stages of AD, including hippocampal and parahippocampal regions. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the protective effect of NSAID use on gray matter volume in a group of middle-aged and older NSAID users (n = 25 compared to non-user controls (n = 50. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Non-user controls showed smaller volume in portions of the left hippocampus compared to NSAID users. Age-related loss of volume differed between groups, with controls showing greater medial temporal lobe volume loss with age compared to NSAID users. These results should be considered preliminary, but support previous reports that NSAIDs may modulate age-related loss of brain volume.

  13. The DrugAge database of aging-related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barardo, Diogo; Thornton, Daniel; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Walsh, Michael; Sharifi, Samim; Ferreira, Susana; Anžič, Andreja; Fernandes, Maria; Monteiro, Patrick; Grum, Tjaša; Cordeiro, Rui; De-Souza, Evandro Araújo; Budovsky, Arie; Araujo, Natali; Gruber, Jan; Petrascheck, Michael; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Moskalev, Alexey; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2017-06-01

    Aging is a major worldwide medical challenge. Not surprisingly, identifying drugs and compounds that extend lifespan in model organisms is a growing research area. Here, we present DrugAge (http://genomics.senescence.info/drugs/), a curated database of lifespan-extending drugs and compounds. At the time of writing, DrugAge contains 1316 entries featuring 418 different compounds from studies across 27 model organisms, including worms, flies, yeast and mice. Data were manually curated from 324 publications. Using drug-gene interaction data, we also performed a functional enrichment analysis of targets of lifespan-extending drugs. Enriched terms include various functional categories related to glutathione and antioxidant activity, ion transport and metabolic processes. In addition, we found a modest but significant overlap between targets of lifespan-extending drugs and known aging-related genes, suggesting that some but not most aging-related pathways have been targeted pharmacologically in longevity studies. DrugAge is freely available online for the scientific community and will be an important resource for biogerontologists. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Age-related changes in crowding and reading speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Patel, Bhavika N; Kwon, MiYoung

    2017-08-15

    Crowding, the inability to recognize objects in clutter, is known to play a role in developmental changes in reading speed. Here, we investigated whether crowding also plays a role in age-related changes in reading speed. We recruited 18 young (mean age: 22.6 ± 3.5; range: 18~31) and 21 older adults (mean age: 58.2 ± 7.0; range: 50~73) with normal vision. Reading speed was measured with short blocks of text. The degree of crowding was determined by measuring crowding zone (the distance between a target and flankers required to yield a criterion recognition accuracy) and the size of the visual span (an uncrowded window in the visual field within which letters can be recognizable reliably). Measurements were made across the central 16-degree visual field using letter-recognition tasks. Our results showed that, compared to young adults, older adults exhibited significantly slower reading speed (a decrease by 30%) and larger crowding: an enlargement of crowding zone (an increase by 31%) and shrinkage of the visual span (a decrease by 6.25 bits). We also observed significant correlations between reading speed and each of the crowding measures. Our results suggest that crowding increases with age. Age-related changes in crowding may in part explain slower reading in older adults.

  15. Age-related changes in the knee meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Akira; Nakamura, Norimasa; Horibe, Shuji

    2017-12-01

    Aging is the most prominent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA), which affects knees and causes major health burdens. Meniscal dysfunction mostly based on degeneration contributes to the development and progression of knee OA. Meniscal degeneration is caused by various extrinsic factors, such as repetitive trauma or leg malalignment, while meniscal aging is considered as internal changes, such as molecular or cellular changes. Little is known about age-related changes in the meniscus. Therefore, this review aimed to summarize and clarify the understanding of the aged meniscus. There are few articles about natural aging in the meniscus, because most reports only demonstrate the effects of OA on the meniscus. We searched PubMed (1948 to November 2016) to identify and summarize all English-language articles evaluating natural aging in the meniscus. There is evidence of compositional change in the meniscus with aging, involving cells, collagens, and proteoglycans. In addition, as recent reports on the natural aging of cartilage have indicated, senescence of the meniscal cells may also lead to disruption of meniscal cells and tissue homeostasis. Due to the low turnover rate of collagen, accumulation of advanced glycation end-products largely contributes to tissue stiffness and vulnerability, and finally results in degenerative changes or tears. Furthermore, environmental factors such as joint fluid secreted by inflamed synovium could also contribute to meniscal tissue deterioration. Age-related changes induce meniscal tissue vulnerability and finally lead to meniscal dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Chikako; Mori, Hideo; Akuta, Keizou [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    1998-04-01

    We evaluated the effect of low-dose radiation on age-related macular degeneration in 8 affected eyes. Radiation was applied using photons at 4 MV. Each eye received 10 fractions of 2 Gy per day over 2 weeks. At 6 months after treatment, funduscopic or angiographic findings had either improved or remained unchanged in all the eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 5 eyes (63%) and deteriorated in 1 eye (13%). At the last examination, fundus findings had improved in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 1 eye (13%) and deteriorated in 5 eyes (63%). The visual acuity had improved or unchanged in 2 eyes each (25%) and deteriorated in 4 eyes (50%). There has been no negative side effects of radiation. Above findings show that low-dose radiation is potentially beneficial for subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularizations in age-related macular degeneration on a short term basis. (author)

  17. Auditory white noise reduces age-related fluctuations in balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J M; Will, O J; McGann, Z; Balasubramaniam, R

    2016-09-06

    Fall prevention technologies have the potential to improve the lives of older adults. Because of the multisensory nature of human balance control, sensory therapies, including some involving tactile and auditory noise, are being explored that might reduce increased balance variability due to typical age-related sensory declines. Auditory white noise has previously been shown to reduce postural sway variability in healthy young adults. In the present experiment, we examined this treatment in young adults and typically aging older adults. We measured postural sway of healthy young adults and adults over the age of 65 years during silence and auditory white noise, with and without vision. Our results show reduced postural sway variability in young and older adults with auditory noise, even in the absence of vision. We show that vision and noise can reduce sway variability for both feedback-based and exploratory balance processes. In addition, we show changes with auditory noise in nonlinear patterns of sway in older adults that reflect what is more typical of young adults, and these changes did not interfere with the typical random walk behavior of sway. Our results suggest that auditory noise might be valuable for therapeutic and rehabilitative purposes in older adults with typical age-related balance variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. KCNQ channels regulate age-related memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available In humans KCNQ2/3 heteromeric channels form an M-current that acts as a brake on neuronal excitability, with mutations causing a form of epilepsy. The M-current has been shown to be a key regulator of neuronal plasticity underlying associative memory and ethanol response in mammals. Previous work has shown that many of the molecules and plasticity mechanisms underlying changes in alcohol behaviour and addiction are shared with those of memory. We show that the single KCNQ channel in Drosophila (dKCNQ when mutated show decrements in associative short- and long-term memory, with KCNQ function in the mushroom body α/βneurons being required for short-term memory. Ethanol disrupts memory in wildtype flies, but not in a KCNQ null mutant background suggesting KCNQ maybe a direct target of ethanol, the blockade of which interferes with the plasticity machinery required for memory formation. We show that as in humans, Drosophila display age-related memory impairment with the KCNQ mutant memory defect mimicking the effect of age on memory. Expression of KCNQ normally decreases in aging brains and KCNQ overexpression in the mushroom body neurons of KCNQ mutants restores age-related memory impairment. Therefore KCNQ is a central plasticity molecule that regulates age dependent memory impairment.

  19. Age-Related Deficits in Reality Monitoring of Action Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Lyle, Keith B.; Butler, Karin M.; Dornburg, Courtney C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe three theoretical accounts of age-related increases in falsely remembering that imagined actions were performed (Thomas & Bulevich, 2006). To investigate these accounts and further explore age-related changes in reality monitoring of action memories, we used a new paradigm in which actions were (a) imagined-only (b) actually performed, or (c) both imagined and performed. Older adults were more likely than younger adults to misremember the source of imagined-only actions, with older adults’ more often specifying that the action was imagined and also that it was performed. For both age groups, as repetitions of the imagined-only events increased, illusions that the actions were only performed decreased. These patterns suggest that both older and younger adults utilize qualitative characteristics when making reality-monitoring judgments and that repeated imagination produces richer records of both sensory details and cognitive operations. However, sensory information derived from imagination appears to be more similar to that derived from performance for older than younger adults. PMID:18808253

  20. Age Related Changes in Hematological Values of Myanmar Local Puppies

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    Thandar Oo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The hematological parameters were used to monitor the health status and its components also changed according to the ages. However, there were no reports for this issues in Myanmar local dogs. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate the age-related changes on the hematological parameters of local puppies in Myanmar. Ten local puppies with the age of 2-3 month old were used in this experiment, which was lasted for 8 weeks.The daily clinical examinations were conducted throughout the entire experimental period for general health check-up. Haematological parameters (Total WBC count and its differential counts, and RBC, HCT, MCV, HGB, MCH, MCHC and platelets were measured bi-weekly with Abacus Vet-5 automate haematology analyser. According to the results, the total WBC and eosinophil counts were not significantly different (P>0.05, while lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and basophils were significantly different (P0.05 throughout the experimental periods. Thus, the age-related changes were observed on cell counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, basophils in Myanmar local puppies.

  1. KCNQ channels regulate age-related memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Sonia; Malik, Bilal R; Hodge, James J L

    2013-01-01

    In humans KCNQ2/3 heteromeric channels form an M-current that acts as a brake on neuronal excitability, with mutations causing a form of epilepsy. The M-current has been shown to be a key regulator of neuronal plasticity underlying associative memory and ethanol response in mammals. Previous work has shown that many of the molecules and plasticity mechanisms underlying changes in alcohol behaviour and addiction are shared with those of memory. We show that the single KCNQ channel in Drosophila (dKCNQ) when mutated show decrements in associative short- and long-term memory, with KCNQ function in the mushroom body α/βneurons being required for short-term memory. Ethanol disrupts memory in wildtype flies, but not in a KCNQ null mutant background suggesting KCNQ maybe a direct target of ethanol, the blockade of which interferes with the plasticity machinery required for memory formation. We show that as in humans, Drosophila display age-related memory impairment with the KCNQ mutant memory defect mimicking the effect of age on memory. Expression of KCNQ normally decreases in aging brains and KCNQ overexpression in the mushroom body neurons of KCNQ mutants restores age-related memory impairment. Therefore KCNQ is a central plasticity molecule that regulates age dependent memory impairment.

  2. Melatonin: Protection against age-related cardiac pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Gaia; Franceschetti, Lorenzo; Buffoli, Barbara; Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Reiter, Russel J; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita

    2017-05-01

    Aging is a complex and progressive process that involves physiological and metabolic deterioration in every organ and system. Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity among elderly subjects worldwide. Most age-related cardiovascular disorders can be influenced by modifiable behaviours such as a healthy diet rich in fruit and vegetables, avoidance of smoking, increased physical activity and reduced stress. The role of diet in prevention of various disorders is a well-established factor, which has an even more important role in the geriatric population. Melatonin, an indoleamine with multiple actions including antioxidant properties, has been identified in a very large number of plant species, including edible plant products and medical herbs. Among products where melatonin has been identified include wine, olive oil, tomato, beer, and others. Interestingly, consumed melatonin in plant foods or melatonin supplementation may promote health benefits by virtue of its multiple properties and it may counteract pathological conditions also related to cardiovascular disorders, carcinogenesis, neurological diseases and aging. In the present review, we summarized melatonin effects against age-related cardiac alterations and abnormalities with a special focus on heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury and myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximal mydriasis evaluation in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Tony

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the Maximal Mydriasis Test (MMT as a simple and safe means to provide the cataract surgeon with objective and dependable pre-operative information on the idiosyncratic mydriatic response of the pupil. The MMT results of a consecutive series of 165 eyes from 100 adults referred for cataract evaluation are presented to illustrate its practical applications and value. The results of the MMT allows the surgeon to anticipate problem eyes pre-operatively so that he can plan his surgical strategy more appropriately and effectively. Conversely, the surgeon can also appropriately and confidently plan surgical procedures where wide pupillary dilation is important. The MMT has also helped improve our cost-effectiveness by cutting down unnecessary delays in the operating room and enabling better utilisation of restricted costly resources.

  4. [Correlation between Alzheimer disease and cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S S; Zhu, S Q

    2017-04-11

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is a leading cause of dementia among elders. In the early phase of AD, even if neuropathological changes presented, but little to none clinical symptoms were found. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose AD in the beginning of the disease. It is vital to find a noninvasive way for both diagnose and prognosis of AD. Studies have found that β-amyloid (Aβ) works as a connection between AD and cataract. This review will discuss AD and its associated markers which may be present in the lens and cataract related AD to provide more basis for early diagnosis of AD. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 314-316) .

  5. Influence factors of visual quality after phacoemulsification for cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Lin Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cataract refers to the degenerative changes in lens quality caused by various causes of reduced transparency or color change. Surgical treatment is the main treatment modality at present. Among them, phacoemulsification has become the main surgical treatment for cataract because of its advantages such as short operation time, small incision and quicker healing. Today, cataract surgery has gradually shift to refractive surgery, and is no longer simply as cataract surgery. But after cataract phacoemulsification, the symptoms and visual quality are different. The main causes include refractive error, postoperative dry eyes and postoperative corneal astigmatism. This article reviews the factors that influence the visual quality of cataract phacoemulsification and its future trends.

  6. Bilateral cataracts associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, V; Hasan, S U; Romanchuk, K; Al Awad, E; Mansoor, A; Yusuf, K

    2013-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) has an essential role in the defense against cellular oxidative injury. In neonates, the most common manifestation of G6PD deficiency is jaundice and hemolysis due to factors causing oxidative stress. Less known are the ocular associations described with G6PD deficiency, including cataracts. Oxidative injury is involved in the pathogenesis of almost all forms of cataracts, causing the lens proteins to undergo modifications, denaturation and form insoluble aggregates resulting in cataracts. Although cataracts in adult males have been reported in several studies, there are few reports of cataracts in infants with G6PD deficiency. We describe a preterm male neonate with G6PD deficiency who developed bilateral cataracts following an episode of neonatal sepsis and severe hemolysis necessitating an exchange blood transfusion.

  7. The Effect of Cataract Surgery on Circadian Photoentrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    of cataract surgery on circadian photoentrainment and to determine any difference between blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses (IOLs). DESIGN: The study was a single-center, investigator-driven, double-masked, block-randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: One eye in 76 patients with bilateral age......PURPOSE: Cataract decreases blue light transmission. Because of the selective blue light sensitivity of the retinal ganglion cells governing circadian photoentrainment, cataract may interfere with normal sleep-wake regulation and cause sleep disturbances. The purpose was to investigate the effect......-related cataract eligible for cataract surgery was included. METHODS: Intervention was cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. Patients were randomized to receive a blue-blocking or neutral IOL. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was activation of intrinsic photosensitive ganglion cells using post...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown CJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PSC were assessed.Results: In all 175 PSC patients, mean 25-OH D levels were low (24 ng/mL ±11 SD compared with age/sex-matched standards. Significant differences in 25-OH D levels were noted between PSC subjects taking/not taking calcium supplements, systemic steroids, osteoporosis medications, etc. Alone, smoking status and calcium channel blockers and/or topical steroids use made no significant difference in PSC subjects 25-OH D levels, but two or more of these factors were associated with lowered levels of 25-OH D (P<0.001. Low vitamin D was correlated with female sex, autoimmune disease, and non-skin cancer diagnosis, but not with age, or other comorbidities or medication use. In five early-stage PSC patients taking 5,000 IU of 25-OH D daily for vitamin D deficiency, there was resolution of their cataracts during the 2-year follow-up period.Conclusion: Vitamin D levels for most PSC patients fell below the 30 ng/mL calcium homeostasis threshold. Some comorbidities and non-ophthalmic interventions are associated with the development of PSC at less depressed levels of 25-OH D. In this series, vitamin D deficiency was associated with PSC cataract, suggesting that raising the level of vitamin D intake may reduce PSC incidence.Keywords: posterior subcapsular, cataracts, vitamin D deficiency, risk factors, hypocalcemia, case report

  9. Cataract and its surgery in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Garry; Ramke, Jacqueline; Szetu, John; Qoqonokana, Mundi Qalo

    2011-07-01

    To characterize cataract and its surgery among adults aged ≥40 years in Fiji. Population-based cross-sectional survey using multistage cluster random sampling. 1381 (= 73.0% participation); eight provinces on Viti Levu. Interview-based questionnaire; visual acuity measured; autorefraction; dilated ocular examination. Prevalence; predictors; surgical outcomes. Being Indian (P = 0.001), elderly (P Fiji population aged ≥40 years, prevalence of cataract-induced low vision and blindness were each 1.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-2.4%). At least one eye of 4.6% and both of 1.8% participants had surgery (86.4% extracapsular). Gender (P = 0.213), age (P = 0.472) and rural/urban domicile (P = 0.895) were not predictors of surgery among those who required it in at least one eye. After intraocular lens surgery: 50.7% had pupillary posterior capsular opacification; mean spherical equivalent was -1.37 ± 1.95D (range, -6.38 to +2.25D); mean cylindrical error was 2.31 ± 1.75D (range, 0.0 to 8.75D); ≥N8 for 39.5%; ≥6/18 for 56.6%; Fiji population aged ≥40 years, Cataract Surgical Coverage (Person) was 47.5% (95%CI 29.2-65.8%) at Fiji cataract services and outcomes compare favourably with those of neighbouring Papua New Guinea and Timor Leste. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  11. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  12. MiRNAs regulate oxidative stress related genes via binding to the 3' UTR and TATA-box regions: a new hypothesis for cataract pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changrui; Liu, Zhao; Ma, Le; Pei, Cheng; Qin, Li; Gao, Ning; Li, Jun; Yin, Yue

    2017-08-14

    Age-related cataracts are related to oxidative stress. However, the genome-wide screening of cataract related oxidative stress related genes are not thoroughly investigated. Our study aims to identify cataract regulated miRNA target genes that are related to oxidative stress and to propose a new possible mechanism for cataract formation. Microarrays were used to determine the mRNA expression profiles of both transparent and cataractous lenses. The results were analyzed by significance analyses performed by the microarray software, and bioinformatics analysis was further conducted using Molecular Annotation System. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) was used to retrieve promoter sequences and identify TATA-box motifs. Online resource miRWalk was exploited to screen for validated miRNAs targeting mRNAs related to oxidative stress. RNAhybrid online tool was applied to predict the binding between significantly regulated miRNAs in cataract lenses and target mRNAs. Oxidative stress pathway was significantly regulated in cataractous lens samples. Pro-oxidative genes were half up-regulated (11/20), with a small number of genes down-regulated (4/20) and the rest of them with no significant change (5/20). Anti-oxidative genes were partly up-regulated (17/69) and partly down-regulated (17/69). Four down-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-1207-5p, has-miR-124-3p, has-miR-204-3p, has-miR-204-5p) were found to target 3' UTR of pro-oxidative genes and could also bind to the TATA-box regions of anti-oxidative genes (with the exception of has-miR-204-3p), whilst two up-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-222-3p, has-miR-378a-3p) were found to target 3' UTR of anti-oxidative genes and could simultaneously bind to the TATA-box regions of pro-oxidative genes. We propose for the first time a hypothesis that cataract regulated miRNAs could contribute to cataract formation not only by targeting 3' UTR but also by targeting TATA-box region of oxidative stress related genes. This results in the

  13. Methylphenidate (Ritalin-associated Cataract and Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Kung Lu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  14. [Computer-assisted phacoemulsification for hard cataracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, M; Papadatu, Adriana-Camelia; Sîrbu, Laura-Nicoleta; Avram, Corina

    2012-01-01

    to evaluate the efficiency of new torsional phacoemulsification software (Ozil IP system) in hard nucleus cataract extraction. 45 eyes with hard senile cataract (degree III and IV) underwent phacoemulsification performed by the same surgeon, using the same technique (stop and chop). Infiniti (Alcon) platform was used, with Ozil IP software and Kelman phaco tip miniflared, 45 degrees. The nucleus was split into two and after that the first half was phacoemulsificated with IP-on (group 1) and the second half with IP-off (group 2). For every group we measured: cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), numbers of tip closure that needed manual desobstruction the amount of BSS used. The mean CDE was the same in group 1 and in group 2 (between 6.2 and 14.9). The incidence of occlusion that needed manual desobstruction was lower in group 1 (5 times) than in group 2 (13 times). Group 2 used more BSS compared to group 1. The new torsional software (IP system) significantly decreased occlusion time and balanced salt solution use over standard torsional software, particularly with denser cataracts.

  15. Principles and paradigms of pediatric cataract management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basti Surendra

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Propensity for increased postoperative inflammation and capsular opacification, a refractive state that is constantly in a state of flux due to growth of the eye, difficulty in documenting anatomic and refractive changes due to poor compliance, and a tendency to develop amblyopia, makes management of cataract in the child different from that in the adult. The recent past has unraveled several caveats of pediatric cataract management - the importance of atraumatic surgery and complete removal of lens matter, benefits of in-the-bag intraocular lens(IOL implantation, role of titrating IOL power to counter refractive changes due to growth of the eye, prudery of continuously following these eyes for early detection of aphakic glaucoma and benefits of some surgical innovations. Although these promise to significantly improve our management of pediatric cataract, their long-term benefits are yet to be determined. We will also have to harness newer techniques, especially in the areas of wound construction and capsule management, and will have to develop effective strategies for the refractive management of infantile aphakia.

  16. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

    OpenAIRE

    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-01-01

    The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for developmen...

  17. Elevated Frequency of Cataracts in Birds from Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Møller, Anders Pape

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804), which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials. PMID:23935827

  18. Editorial: Improving cataract outcomes through good postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Astbury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery is one of the most successful and frequently performed operations worldwide, and yet cataract remains the commonest cause of global blindness. This is in part due to the shortage and uneven distribution of trained personnel in some countries. More worryingly, a high rate of cataract blindness also reflects poor visual outcomes after surgery, as has been documented in many RAAB (rapid assessment of avoidable blindness studies.

  19. Elevated frequency of cataracts in birds from chernobyl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Alexander Mousseau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804, which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials.

  20. Prevalence of age-related maculopathy and age-related macular degeneration among the inuit in Greenland. The Greenland Inuit Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Varis Nis; Rosenberg, Thomas; la Cour, Morten

    2008-01-01

    To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland.......To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland....

  1. Rapid Assessment of Age-Related Differences in Standing Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kalisch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As life expectancy continues to rise, in the future there will be an increasing number of older people prone to falling. Accordingly, there is an urgent need for comprehensive testing of older individuals to collect data and to identify possible risk factors for falling. Here we use a low-cost force platform to rapidly assess deficits in balance under various conditions. We tested 21 healthy older adults and 24 young adults during static stance, unidirectional and rotational displacement of their centre of pressure (COP. We found an age-related increase in postural sway during quiet standing and a reduction of maximal COP displacement in unidirectional and rotational displacement tests. Our data show that even low-cost computerized assessment tools allow for the comprehensive testing of balance performance in older subjects.

  2. Redox control of senescence and age-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Chandrasekaran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The signaling networks that drive the aging process, associated functional deterioration, and pathologies has captured the scientific community's attention for decades. While many theories exist to explain the aging process, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS provides a signaling link between engagement of cellular senescence and several age-associated pathologies. Cellular senescence has evolved to restrict tumor progression but the accompanying senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP promotes pathogenic pathways. Here, we review known biological theories of aging and how ROS mechanistically control senescence and the aging process. We also describe the redox-regulated signaling networks controlling the SASP and its important role in driving age-related diseases. Finally, we discuss progress in designing therapeutic strategies that manipulate the cellular redox environment to restrict age-associated pathology.

  3. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  5. Age-related associative deficits and the isolation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badham, Stephen P; Maylor, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    If all but one of the items in a list are similar (e.g., all black except one red), memory for the different item is enhanced (the isolation effect). Older adults generally show similar or smaller isolation effects compared to young adults, which has been attributed to age-related deficits in associative memory whereby older adults are less able to associate an isolated stimulus to its isolating feature. Experiment 1 examined the isolation effect for isolation based on spatial position, modality and color; in Experiment 2, the criterion for isolation was the associative relation between stimuli. The results consistently showed no differences between young and older participants in the magnitude of the isolation effect. Whilst age deficits in associative memory may act to reduce the isolation effect in older adults, age deficits in self-initiated processing and inhibitory functionality may counteract this reduction by enhancing the isolation effect in older adults.

  6. [Future methods of treatment in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    In the present time the treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) begins to develop. Many medical therapies are presently tested in the two types of ARMD, geographic atrophy and exudative ARMD. In atrophic ARMD, new drugs are aimed to spare photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium, to prevent oxidative damage on the retina and to suppress the inflammation process. In exudative ARMD, new therapies are already in use and in progress, especially the anti-VEGF factors, and others try to improve visual prognosis in targeting other mechanism or cells involved in the angiogenesis process. This article reviews and summarizes the available data, presented in several scientific meetings, congresses or given directly by the companies involved.

  7. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    cause of blindness among Caucasian individuals in developed countries. Blindness resulting from AMD rarely occurs before age 70, and most cases occur after age 80. The age-standardised 1-year incidence of legal blindness resulting from AMD is 212 cases per million. Two-thirds of AMD cases have CNV......Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian...... individuals than in pigmented races. In predominantly Caucasian populations, the age-standardised prevalence of AMD in at least one eye is 7760 cases per million. The age-standardised cumulated 1-year incidence of AMD in at least one eye is 1051 cases per million individuals. AMD is the most important single...

  8. Cognitive dysfunction and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzini, Luca; Riva, Maddalena; Ghilardi, Nausica; Facchinetti, Paola; Forbice, Eliana; Semeraro, Francesco; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Several previous studies showed that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share common risk factors and histopathology changes, and there is epidemiological evidence linking AMD to cognitive impairment. We tested this theory in 51 patients with late-stage AMD and 24 controls by analyzing their neuropsychological profiles. In this study, data showed that patients affected by late-stage AMD have a worse global cognitive function than those of the controls and, in particular, show worse performances in memory tasks. Moreover, patients affected by the dry form of AMD are significantly impaired in executive functions in addition to memory. Data support the hypothesis of a possible association between AMD and cognitive impairment. In particular, patients affected by the dry form of AMD may be at greater risk of developing subsequent dementia.

  9. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  10. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Garcia Layana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  11. Redox control of senescence and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Idelchik, Maria Del Pilar Sosa; Melendez, J Andrés

    2017-04-01

    The signaling networks that drive the aging process, associated functional deterioration, and pathologies has captured the scientific community's attention for decades. While many theories exist to explain the aging process, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) provides a signaling link between engagement of cellular senescence and several age-associated pathologies. Cellular senescence has evolved to restrict tumor progression but the accompanying senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) promotes pathogenic pathways. Here, we review known biological theories of aging and how ROS mechanistically control senescence and the aging process. We also describe the redox-regulated signaling networks controlling the SASP and its important role in driving age-related diseases. Finally, we discuss progress in designing therapeutic strategies that manipulate the cellular redox environment to restrict age-associated pathology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Age-related decline in global form suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Iris Michaela; Finke, Kathrin; Töllner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    differences in the subsequent (250–500 ms) posterior contralateral negativity (PCN) indicated that attentional resources were allocated faster to Kanisza, as compared to non-Kanisza, targets in both age groups, while the allocation of spatial attention seemed to be generally delayed in older relative...... to younger age. Our results suggest that the enhanced global-local asymmetry in the older age group originated from less effective suppression of global distracter forms on early processing stages – indicative of older observers having difficulties with disengaging from a global default selection mode....... Selective attention, i.e., the ability to focus on relevant and ignore irrelevant information, declines with increasing age; however, how this deficit affects selection of global vs. local configurations remains unknown. On this background, the present study examined for age-related differences in a global...

  13. Age-related differences in multiple task monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Todorov

    Full Text Available Coordinating multiple tasks with narrow deadlines is particularly challenging for older adults because of age related decline in cognitive control functions. We tested the hypothesis that multiple task performance reflects age- and gender-related differences in executive functioning and spatial ability. Young and older adults completed a multitasking session with four monitoring tasks as well as separate tasks measuring executive functioning and spatial ability. For both age groups, men exceeded women in multitasking, measured as monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of young adults' monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability was related to sex differences. For older adults, age and executive functioning, but not spatial ability, predicted multitasking performance. These results suggest that executive functions contribute to multiple task performance across the adult life span and that reliance on spatial skills for coordinating deadlines is modulated by age.

  14. Age-related differences in multiple task monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Ivo; Del Missier, Fabio; Mäntylä, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Coordinating multiple tasks with narrow deadlines is particularly challenging for older adults because of age related decline in cognitive control functions. We tested the hypothesis that multiple task performance reflects age- and gender-related differences in executive functioning and spatial ability. Young and older adults completed a multitasking session with four monitoring tasks as well as separate tasks measuring executive functioning and spatial ability. For both age groups, men exceeded women in multitasking, measured as monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of young adults' monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability was related to sex differences. For older adults, age and executive functioning, but not spatial ability, predicted multitasking performance. These results suggest that executive functions contribute to multiple task performance across the adult life span and that reliance on spatial skills for coordinating deadlines is modulated by age.

  15. Age-related changes in contextual associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Trinh T; Pirogovsky, Eva; Gilbert, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a critical role in processing contextual information. Although age-related changes in the hippocampus are well documented in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents, few studies have examined contextual learning deficits in old rats. The present study investigated age-related differences in contextual associative learning in young (6 mo) and old (24 mo) rats using olfactory stimuli. Stimuli consisted of common odors mixed in sand and placed in clear plastic cups. Testing was conducted in two boxes that represented two different contexts (Context 1 and Context 2). The contexts varied based on environmental features of the box such as color (black vs. white), visual cues on the walls of the box, and flooring texture. Each rat was simultaneously presented with two cups, one filled with Odor A and one filled with Odor B in each context. In Context 1, the rat received a food reward for digging in the cup containing Odor A, but did not receive a food reward for digging in the cup containing Odor B. In Context 2, the rat was rewarded for digging in the cup containing Odor B, but did receive a reward for digging in the cup containing Odor A. Therefore, the rat learned to associate Context 1 with Odor A and Context 2 with Odor B. The rat was tested for eight days using the same odor problem throughout all days of testing. The results showed no significant difference between young and old rats on the first two days of testing; however, young rats significantly outperformed old rats on Day 3. Young rats continued to maintain superior performance compared to old rats on Days 4-8. The results suggest that aging results in functional impairments in brain regions that support memory for associations between specific cues and their respective context.

  16. Age-related changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Gu

    Full Text Available Age-related changes in the retina are often accompanied by visual impairment but their mechanistic details remain poorly understood.Proteomic studies were pursued toward a better molecular understanding of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE aging mechanisms. RPE cells were isolated from young adults (3-4 month-old and old (24-25 month-old F344BN rats, and separated into subcellular fractions containing apical microvilli (MV and RPE cell bodies (CB lacking their apical microvilli. Proteins were extracted in detergent, separated by SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Select proteins detected in young and old rat RPE were further studied using immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis.A total of 356 proteins were identified in RPE MV from young and 378 in RPE MV from old rats, 48% of which were common to each age group. A total of 897 proteins were identified in RPE CB from young rats and 675 in old CB, 56% of which were common to each age group. Several of the identified proteins, including proteins involved in response to oxidative stress, displayed both quantitative and qualitative changes in overall abundance during RPE aging. Numerous proteins were identified for the first time in the RPE. One such protein, collectrin, was localized to the apical membrane of apical brush border of proximal tubules where it likely regulates several amino acid transporters. Elsewhere, collectrin is involved in pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin secretion. In the RPE, collectrin expression was significantly modulated during RPE aging. Another age-regulated, newly described protein was DJ-1, a protein extensively studied in brain where oxidative stress-related functions have been described.The data presented here reveals specific changes in the RPE during aging, providing the first protein database of RPE aging, which will facilitate future studies of age-related retinal diseases.

  17. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; MacDougall, E.; Kochis, S.; Wilhelm, W.; Lee, B.S.

    1990-11-01

    After the McGuire event in 1987 relating to failure of the center pole weld in one of its reactor trip breakers, activities were initiated by the NRC to investigate the probable causes. A review of operating experience suggested that the burning of coils, jamming of the operating mechanism, and deterioration of the contacts dominated the breakers failures. Although failures of the pole shaft weld were not included as one of the generic problems, the NRC augmented inspection team had suspected that these welds were substandard which led them to crack prematurely. A DS-416 low voltage air circuit breaker manufactured by Westinghouse was mechanically cycled to identify age-related degradations. This accelerated aging test was conducted for over 36,000 cycles during nine months. Three separate pole shafts, one with a 60 degree weld, one with a 120 degree and one with a 180 degree were used to characterize the cracking in the pole level welds. In addition, three different operating mechanisms and several other parts were replaced as they became inoperable. The testing yielded many useful results. The burning of the closing coils was found to be the effect of binding in the linkages that are connected to this device. Among the seven welds on the pole shaft, number-sign 1 and number-sign 3 were the critical ones which cracked first to cause misalignment of the pole levers, which, in turn, had led to many problems with the operating mechanism including the burning of coils, excessive wear in certain parts, and overstressed linkages. Based on these findings, a maintenance program is suggested to alleviate the age-related degradations that occur due to mechanical cycling of this type of breaker. 3 refs., 39 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery ? unusual complication of cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare.Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsul...

  19. A CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF PAEDIATRIC CATARACT, OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish D. Shet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Control of childhood blindness is one of the priorities identified for achieving the goals of Vision-2020 by WHO. This is considered a priority because blind-years (number of years that a blind person lives after going blind due to childhood blindness are second only to cataract and half of childhood blindness is avoidable (treatable/preventable. Paediatric cataract accounts for 12% of the 1.4 million blind children globally. The prevalence of childhood cataract has been reported as 1 to 15 cases in 10,000 children in developing countries. Compared to industrialised countries, this figure is 10 times higher. Early detection and timely treatment of various childhood disorders such as congenital cataract are the most crucial factors for successful outcome. A suitable measure to address amblyopia and posterior capsule opacification post operatively is imperative for successful visual rehabilitation of such children. The objectives of this study were- 1 To study the clinical profile of paediatric cataract. 2 To evaluate the visual outcome after cataract surgery in these patients. 3 To evaluate different causes of visual impairment following management. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study conducted at Karnataka institute of medical sciences department of ophthalmology from October 2015 to September 2016. All children below 14 years of age presenting with cataract will undergo thorough ophthalmologic examination and cataract surgery. RESULTS The results of the present study with 25 paediatric patients (36 eyes indicates that excellent vision can be expected after cataract surgery and posterior chamber IOL implantation coupled with appropriate amblyopia therapy. CONCLUSION The paediatric cataract patients are referred from primary health centers, and district hospital from north Karnataka to KIMS Hubli. All paediatric patients are from lower socio economic status. Early detection of cataracts and referrals to the ophthalmologist can

  20. The Relationship of age, attitude, knowladge, cost to cataract surgery

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    Aminatul Fitria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is the leading cause of 51% blindness case in the world. Cataract can only be cured trough surgery, but most people with cataract in Indonesia is not in undergoing surgery due to several factors. The increasing number of cataract victim whose not undergoing any treatment to cure them will resulting in increasing number of blindness case, so blindness cause by cataracts can be a public health problem. This research was conducted to determine the relationship of age, attitudes, knowledge and the cost of the action to perform cataract surgery. This research was an observational analytic study with cross sectional design. The samples were cataract patients in Undaan Eye Hospital Surabaya who were randomly selected using a simple random sampling based on medical records of 60 people. Data collection was done by taking secondary data and interviews to patients. Those variables was analyzed with chi square or Fisher’s exact with significancy level at 95%. The result showed that there were correlation between knowledge (p = 0.017, operating costs (p = 0.001 and attitude (0.000 while age was not related (p = 1.000, the actions to perform cataract surgery. The conclusion from this research was the attitude, knowledge and operating costs related to the actions to perform cataract surgery, while age was not related to the actions to perform cataract surgery. It is recommended to give through leaflets or other media in the lobby for improving patient education, counseling to the patient family, the doctor’s advice to convince patient for surgery. Keywords: practice, surgery, cataract, attitudes, costs

  1. [Clinical study of the auxiliary management with iris retractor for subluxated lens combined with cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Liu-Xueying; Zheng, Dan-Ying; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    To study the clinical effects and safety of the auxiliary management with iris retractor for subluxated lens combined with cataract. Thirty-one eyes lens subluxation with cataract come from 27 patients were reviewed, all of them were 30 - 78 years old and III - IV grade of nuclear. Among these patients, 14 were traumatic cataracts, 12 Marfan syndromes, two over-mature phase of cataracts, one caused suspensory ligament broken during phacoemulsification, and one unclear reason. 1 to 4 iris retractors were used during surgeries, according to the extension of zonular loss and nuclear hardness. Anterior vitrectomy would be taken if vitreous prolapsed. Visual acuities and reactions post-operative were observed, too. And correlation analysis would be used to study the relationship of those objections. There were no serious complications during the surgeries such as tearing of capsular, falling of nuclear, bleeding of intraocular, and so on. Only 9 of 31 eyes (29.0%) had vitreous prolapsed interoperation, which appeared a significant correlated with range of zonular loss (Spearman r = 0.453, P = 0.010). However, none of them happened during the phacoemulsification for lens nucleus and only 6 eyes took the anterior vitrectomy. The best corrected postoperative visual acuity of these patients attended to 0.2 - 1.2 at a half to 1 month, increased by 1 - 12 lines [average of (6.0 ± 2.7) lines] compared with preoperative. Twenty-three eyes visual acuity of them were no less than 0.5. Corneal edema postoperatively appeared a significant correlated with vitrectomy (Spearman r = 0.398, P = 0.026), while seemed no associated with the range of zonular loss, the number of iris retractors, energy and duration of ultrasound burst or type of intraocular lens (IOL) (P > 0.05). Phacoemulsification assists with iris retractor can simplify the process of cataract surgery of subluxated lens. Individualized surgical planning and flexible and decisive measures intra-operative achieved good

  2. Progress on retinal image analysis for age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Abràmoff, Michael D; Smith, R Theodore; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in those over the age of 50 years in the developed countries. The number is expected to increase by ∼1.5 fold over the next ten years due to an increase in aging population. One of the main measures of AMD severity is the analysis of drusen, pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) from imaging based on color fundus photograph, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and other imaging modalities. Each of these imaging modalities has strengths and weaknesses for extracting individual AMD pathology and different imaging techniques are used in combination for capturing and/or quantification of different pathologies. Current dry AMD treatments cannot cure or reverse vision loss. However, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed that specific anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation reduces the risk of progression from intermediate stages (defined as the presence of either many medium-sized drusen or one or more large drusen) to late AMD which allows for preventative strategies in properly identified patients. Thus identification of people with early stage AMD is important to design and implement preventative strategies for late AMD, and determine their cost-effectiveness. A mass screening facility with teleophthalmology or telemedicine in combination with computer-aided analysis for large rural-based communities may identify more individuals suitable for early stage AMD prevention. In this review, we discuss different imaging modalities that are currently being considered or used for screening AMD. In addition, we look into various automated and semi-automated computer-aided grading systems and related retinal image analysis techniques for drusen, geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization detection and/or quantification for measurement of AMD severity using these imaging modalities. We also review the existing telemedicine studies which

  3. Small-incision cataract extraction combined trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract

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    Yu-Feng Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the curative effect of treating small-incision cataract extraction by intraocular lens implantation combined with trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract. METHODS: Totally 44 cases(52 eyesof primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract were selected to undergo the combined surgery, in order to observe the patients' pre- and postoperative eyesights, intraocular pressures and the postoperative complications.RESULTS: The postoperative eyesight was improved significantly as compared with the preoperative eyesight. The intraocular pressure was declined dramatically. The result was of statistical significance(P0.05. All the 52 cases' surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. The surgeries were processed smoothly, with 6 postoperative eyes of anterior chamber inflammation cell response, 3 eyes of anterior chamber fibrinoid exudate, 2 eyes of shallow anterior chamber through mydriasis and treatment with glucocorticoids and non-steroidal eyedrops before absorption, and no complications like malignant glaucoma, cyclodialysis, etc. were reported through mydriasis and pressure bandaging before recovery.CONCLUSION: Treating the primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract through the combined surgery has high reliability and desirable curative effect. The surgical method is simple to learn and applicable for promotion on the basic level.

  4. The age-related positivity effect in electronic gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Phoebe E; Gonsalvez, Craig J; Maiuolo, Michelle; Leon, Tarren; Benedek, Gülten

    2018-01-01

    Older adults are increasingly spending time and money playing electronic gambling machines (EGMs). The current study assessed whether the age-related positivity effect influences responding to various EGM outcomes, including wins and losses of equivalent magnitude and frequency. We also explored cognitive mechanisms potentially underpinning the positivity effect. We recorded the skin conductance response (SCR) of healthy older and younger adults while they played for wins, losses, and fake wins (losses disguised as wins). After every win and fake win, participants were forced to choose red or black to either double their win or lose it. They also provided ratings of enjoyment and excitement, estimated number of wins and losses, and completed measures of cognitive function. Young and older adults demonstrated larger SCRs to wins relative to losses. When these wins and losses were of equivalent magnitude and frequency following a double-or-nothing scenario, only older adults responded more to a win than a loss. There were no age group differences in excitement and enjoyment, but older adults were more accurate than young adults in their recall of wins and losses. During EGM play, young and older adults demonstrate similar patterns on autonomic arousal. However, young adults' responding suggests generalized excitement, whereas older adults respond more to the prospect of financial gain.

  5. [Risk factors for age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzycka, M; Słomska, J; Górniak-Bednarz, A; Ortyl, E

    1997-01-01

    To present the results of examinations of the risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) carried out in the last 3 years. Our clinical material comprised 119 patients, 69 women and 50 men, aged 43-85, mean age 70 years. Using classification according to the worse eye, there were 20 patients with drusen, 27 with atrophic changes and 72 with exudative form and AMD. The following risk factors were evaluated: age, sex, body mass index, history of general medical conditions, cigarette smoking, sun exposure, family history of AMD and ocular conditions such as iris color, lens opacities, hyperopia, gerontoxon and changes in retinal vessels. The significant relationships were found between the development of AMD and the age of patients, as well as between the advanced forms of AMD and the history of cardiovascular diseases and sclerotic changes in retinal vessels, 87% of examined patients have light iris and 52% body mass index above 26. The studies confirmed the role of age in the development of AMD and indicated cardiovascular disturbances, increased body mass index and light iris as the possible risk factors for AMD that are most worth further studying. The special attention should be also paid to drusen as the risk factor of AMD.

  6. Bioactive Nutrients and Nutrigenomics in Age-Related Diseases

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    Tania Rescigno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased life expectancy and the expansion of the elderly population are stimulating research into aging. Aging may be viewed as a multifactorial process that results from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors, which include lifestyle. Human molecular processes are influenced by physiological pathways as well as exogenous factors, which include the diet. Dietary components have substantive effects on metabolic health; for instance, bioactive molecules capable of selectively modulating specific metabolic pathways affect the development/progression of cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. As bioactive nutrients are increasingly identified, their clinical and molecular chemopreventive effects are being characterized and systematic analyses encompassing the “omics” technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being conducted to explore their action. The evolving field of molecular pathological epidemiology has unique strength to investigate the effects of dietary and lifestyle exposure on clinical outcomes. The mounting body of knowledge regarding diet-related health status and disease risk is expected to lead in the near future to the development of improved diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies targeting processes relevant to nutrition. The state of the art of aging and nutrigenomics research and the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of bioactive nutrients on the main aging-related disorders are reviewed herein.

  7. Age-related neuroinflammatory changes negatively impact on neuronal function

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    Marina A Lynch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammatory changes, characterized by an increase in microglial activation and often accompanied by upregulation of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1β (IL-1β, are common to many, if not all, neurodegenerative diseases. Similar, though less dramatic neuroinflammatory changes are also known to occur with age. Among the consequences of these changes is an impairment in synaptic function and the evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines may be the primary contributory factor responsible for the deficits in synaptic plasticity which have been identified in aged rodents. Specifically a decrease in the ability of aged rats to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP in perforant path-granule cells of the hippocampus is associated with increased microglial activation. This review considers the evidence which suggests a causal relationship between these changes and the factors which contribute to the age-related microglial activation, and reflects on data which demonstrate that agents which inhibit microglial activation also improve ability of rats to sustain LTP.

  8. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  9. Age related changes in steroid receptors on cultured lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, F.A.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The number of high affinity glucocorticoid receptors (Ro) on human fetal lung fibroblasts decreases as the cells age in vitro, and it has been suggested that these cell systems may be useful models of age-related changes in vivo. They examined the relation between change in Ro with in vitro aging and donor age. Confluent monolayers of lung fibroblasts at various population doubling levels (PDL), were incubated with ( 3 H)-dexamethasone (( 3 H)Dex) either alone or with excess (.01 mM) Dex. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between radioactivity in cells incubated with and without unlabeled Dex; Scatchard plots were used to analyze the data. Ro, measured as fmol ( 3 H)Dex/10 6 cells, for two lines of human fetal cells (HFL-1 and MRC-5) decreased with increasing age in vitro. However, human newborn (CRL-1485) and adult (CCL-201) cells and fetal rabbit cells (FAB-290), showed increases in Ro with continuous passage. For each cell line, the affinity constant (K/sub d/) did not change significantly with passage. They conclude that the direction of changes in steroid receptor levels on cells aging in vitro is influenced by donor age and species. Caution should be used in applying results obtained from model systems to aging organisms

  10. Proinflammatory cytokines, aging, and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Balardy, Laurent; Moulis, Guillaume; Gaudin, Clement; Peyrot, Caroline; Vellas, Bruno; Cesari, Matteo; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process that repairs tissues in response to endogenous or exogenous aggressions. Nevertheless, a chronic state of inflammation may have detrimental consequences. Aging is associated with increased levels of circulating cytokines and proinflammatory markers. Aged-related changes in the immune system, known as immunosenescence, and increased secretion of cytokines by adipose tissue, represent the major causes of chronic inflammation. This phenomenon is known as "inflamm-aging." High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein are associated in the older subject with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In particular, cohort studies have indicated TNF-α and IL-6 levels as markers of frailty. The low-grade inflammation characterizing the aging process notably concurs at the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sarcopenia. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines (through a variety of mechanisms, such as platelet activation and endothelial activation) may play a major role in the risk of cardiovascular events. Dysregulation of the inflammatory pathway may also affect the central nervous system and be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders (eg, Alzheimer disease).The aim of the present review was to summarize different targets of the activity of proinflammatory cytokines implicated in the risk of pathological aging. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multisite Assessment of Aging-Related Tau Astrogliopathy (ARTAG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Edward B; Robinson, John L; Caswell, Carrie; Irwin, David J; Toledo, Jon B; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Bencze, Janos; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W; Dugger, Brittany N; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ferrer, Isidro; Forrest, Shelley L; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Grinberg, Lea T; Halliday, Glenda M; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Ironside, James W; King, Andrew; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Mao, Qinwen; Matej, Radoslav; McLean, Catriona; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Neltner, Janna; Nelson, Peter T; Ritchie, Diane; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rohan, Zdenek; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Sakai, Kenji; Schultz, Christian; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Vanessa; Tacik, Pawel; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takao, Masaki; Rudolf Thal, Dietmar; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Trojanowski, John Q

    2017-07-01

    Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG) is a recently introduced terminology. To facilitate the consistent identification of ARTAG and to distinguish it from astroglial tau pathologies observed in the primary frontotemporal lobar degeneration tauopathies we evaluated how consistently neuropathologists recognize (1) different astroglial tau immunoreactivities, including those of ARTAG and those associated with primary tauopathies (Study 1); (2) ARTAG types (Study 2A); and (3) ARTAG severity (Study 2B). Microphotographs and scanned sections immunostained for phosphorylated tau (AT8) were made available for download and preview. Percentage of agreement and kappa values with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each evaluation. The overall agreement for Study 1 was >60% with a kappa value of 0.55 (95% CI 0.433-0.645). Moderate agreement (>90%, kappa 0.48, 95% CI 0.457-0.900) was reached in Study 2A for the identification of ARTAG pathology for each ARTAG subtype (kappa 0.37-0.72), whereas fair agreement (kappa 0.40, 95% CI 0.341-0.445) was reached for the evaluation of ARTAG severity. The overall assessment of ARTAG showed moderate agreement (kappa 0.60, 95% CI 0.534-0.653) among raters. Our study supports the application of the current harmonized evaluation strategy for ARTAG with a slight modification of the evaluation of its severity. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  13. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Honda, Kaoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of low-dose radiation on choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since Chakravarthy reported the benefits from administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for CNV, many studies have demonstrated that irradiation could have a beneficial treatment effect, whereas several reports have not. In our hospital, 12 eyes with AMD received 10 Gy of 4 MV photons and the other 9 eyes received 20 Gy. Another 4 eyes were untreated as control. After 6 months of treatment, visual acuity was maintained in 11 eyes, improved in 5 eyes, and deteriorated in 5 eyes of treated patients. In control group, visual acuity was maintained in 1 eye and deteriorated in 3 eyes. The size of CNV regressed in 10 eyes, remained stationary in 2 eyes and progressed in 2 eyes of treated patients, while in control group CNV regressed in 2 eyes and remained stationary in 1 eye. After 12 months some CNV progressed. Although the present result seems to be better than those in previous reports, whether or not the treatment is beneficial has to be awaited. (author)

  14. Age-related cerebral white matter changes on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Koide, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Shimote, Kouichi; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1989-01-01

    Changes of cerebral white matter on computed cranial tomography related to aging were studied in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. The subjects had no histories of cerebrovascular accidents and no abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown by physical examinations and CT scans. We measured the average attenuation values (CT numbers) of each elliptical region (165 pixels, 0.39cm 2 ) in the bilateral thalamus and twelve areas of deep white matter. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effects of age, cranial size and cranial bone CT numbers on the brain CT numbers. We also studied the association between brain CT numbers and brain atrophy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus. CT numbers of frontal white matter surrounding anterior horns decreased with aging in 70 subjects aged 30 to 94 years. No significant correlation between age and brain CT numbers was found in any other region by multivariate analysis, because of the prominent effect of cranial bone CT numbers on brain CT numbers. Although no age-related changes of white matter CT numbers was found in 41 subjects aged 30 to 65 years, there were significant negative correlations between age and white matter CT numbers at all regions in 29 subjects aged 66 to 94 years. Brain atrophy was associated with brain CT numbers. No association was found for hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Brain CT numbers decreased with aging even in neurologically healthy persons in older age. Brain CT numbers also decreased as cerebral atrophy advanced. (author)

  15. The theory behind the age-related positivity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The positivity effect refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather & Carstensen, 2005 scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision-making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people.

  16. Targeting Mitochondria to Counteract Age-Related Cellular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina T. Madreiter-Sokolowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Senescence is related to the loss of cellular homeostasis and functions, which leads to a progressive decline in physiological ability and to aging-associated diseases. Since mitochondria are essential to energy supply, cell differentiation, cell cycle control, intracellular signaling and Ca2+ sequestration, fine-tuning mitochondrial activity appropriately, is a tightrope walk during aging. For instance, the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS ensures a supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, but is also the main source of potentially harmful levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Moreover, mitochondrial function is strongly linked to mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial shape, which undergo various alterations during aging. Since mitochondria play such a critical role in an organism’s process of aging, they also offer promising targets for manipulation of senescent cellular functions. Accordingly, interventions delaying the onset of age-associated disorders involve the manipulation of mitochondrial function, including caloric restriction (CR or exercise, as well as drugs, such as metformin, aspirin, and polyphenols. In this review, we discuss mitochondria’s role in and impact on cellular aging and their potential to serve as a target for therapeutic interventions against age-related cellular dysfunction.

  17. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  18. Assessment of Age-Related Changes in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Anil R; Edginton, Andrea N; Fotaki, Nikoletta

    2016-01-01

    Compound solubility serves as a surrogate indicator of oral biopharmaceutical performance. Between infancy and adulthood, marked compositional changes in gastrointestinal (GI) fluids occur. This study serves to assess how developmental changes in GI fluid composition affects compound solubility. Solubility assessments were conducted in vitro using biorelevant media reflective of age-specific pediatric cohorts (i.e., neonates and infants). Previously published adult media (i.e., FaSSGF, FeSSGF, FaSSIF.v2, and FeSSIF.v2) were employed as references for pediatric media development. Investigations assessing age-specific changes in GI fluid parameters (i.e., pepsin, bile acids, pH, osmolality, etc.) were collected from the literature and served to define the composition of neonatal and infant media. Solubility assessments at 37 °C were conducted for seven BCS Class II compounds within the developed pediatric and reference adult media. For six of the seven compounds investigated, solubility fell outside an 80-125% range from adult values in at least one of the developed pediatric media. This result indicates a potential for age-related alterations in oral drug performance, especially for compounds whose absorption is delimited by solubility (i.e., BCS Class II). Developmental changes in GI fluid composition can result in relevant discrepancies in luminal compound solubility between children and adults.

  19. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  20. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  1. The Role of Inflammation in Age-Related Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Dalle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many physiological changes occur with aging. These changes often, directly or indirectly, result in a deterioration of the quality of life and even in a shortening of life expectancy. Besides increased levels of reactive oxygen species, DNA damage and cell apoptosis, another important factor affecting the aging process involves a systemic chronic low-grade inflammation. This condition has already been shown to be interrelated with several (subclinical conditions, such as insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Recent evidence, however, shows that chronic low-grade inflammation also contributes to the loss of muscle mass, strength and functionality, referred to as sarcopenia, as it affects both muscle protein breakdown and synthesis through several signaling pathways. Classic interventions to counteract age-related muscle wasting mainly focus on resistance training and/or protein supplementation to overcome the anabolic inflexibility from which elderly suffer. Although the elderly benefit from these classic interventions, the therapeutic potential of anti-inflammatory strategies is of great interest, as these might add up to/support the anabolic effect of resistance exercise and/or protein supplementation. In this review, the molecular interaction between inflammation, anabolic sensitivity and muscle protein metabolism in sarcopenic elderly will be addressed.

  2. Imaging Polarimetry in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E.; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques—scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)—and investigate how they complement each other. METHODS The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. RESULTS Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD. PMID:18515594

  3. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates age-related hearing impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, T; Shibata, R; Ouchi, N; Kondo, K; Ishii, M; Katahira, N; Kambara, T; Inoue, Y; Takahashi, R; Ikeda, N; Kihara, S; Ueda, H; Murohara, T

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-related disorders are closely associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Adiponectin (APN) exerts protective effects against obesity-related conditions including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the impact of APN on ARHI. APN-knockout (APN-KO) mice developed exacerbation of hearing impairment, particularly in the high frequency range, compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Supplementation with APN prevented the hearing impairment in APN-KO mice. At 2 months of age, the cochlear blood flow and capillary density of the stria vascularis (SV) were significantly reduced in APN-KO mice as compared with WT mice. APN-KO mice also showed a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells in the organ of Corti in the cochlea at 2 months of age. At the age of 6 months, hair cells were lost at the organ of Corti in APN-KO mice. In cultured auditory HEI-OC1 cells, APN reduced apoptotic activity under hypoxic conditions. Clinically, plasma APN levels were significantly lower in humans with ARHI. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified APN as a significant and independent predictor of ARHI. Our observations indicate that APN has an important role in preventing ARHI. PMID:24763046

  4. Age related prolactin secretion in men after fentanyl anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti, Giuseppe; Pulignano, Isabella; Schiappoli, Angelo; Cigognetti, Leonilde; Tritapepe, Luigi; Proietta, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of age in the hormonal response to opiate anaesthetic fentanyl. In 90 patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass, 59.6 +/- 9.2 years mean age, 35-81 age range, prolactin (PRL), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), human growth hormone (HGH), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I), glucagon and insulin were measured in venous blood samples drawn from fasting patients immediately before, at 8 h in the morning, and 60 min after the induction of anaesthesia with 30 microg/kg intravenous fentanyl bolus, 30 min after a second 7 microg/kg fentanyl bolus. Results showed a higher 60 min PRL peak in older, >65 years, in respect to younger, 65 and in 51-65-year-olds than in younger patients (for the basal values, respectively, P65 in respect to < or =50 (P<0.02) and to 51-65-year-old patients (P<0.05), with a significant negative correlation with age (r=-0.33; P<0.005). The study shows an age related increase of PRL concentrations after fentanyl administration. It may be due to the reduction of the hypothalamic dopaminergic tone with aging. IGF I levels have been confirmed to be inversely correlated with age.

  5. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE AMOUNT OF ASTIGMATISM FOLLOWING CONVENTIONAL EXTRACAPSULAR CATARACT EXTRACTION AND MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumari Bigyabati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cataract is the principal cause of avoidable blindness in India and throughout the world. Surgical removal of the cataractous lens remains the only effective treatment for management of cataract blindness. The success of cataract surgery is determined by best and earliest visual recovery. But the occurrence of postoperative astigmatism has become a major hurdle in achieving this goal. AIMS The study was designed to compare the amount of astigmatism following conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE and manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out in 100 eyes of 75 patients aged between 50 and 80 years admitted for cataract surgery. Out of these, 50 eyes were operated by conventional extracapsular cataract extraction and 50 eyes by manual small incision cataract surgery. The patients were followed up at 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th and 8 th weeks. At each follow-up visual acuity, refraction and acceptance and keratometry were recorded and the findings analysed for astigmatism. RESULTS In the current study, the mean (SD astigmatism developed at the end of the 2 nd , 4 th and 6 th of follow-up was significantly lower in the SICS group as compared to the ECCE group (P<0.000. At the end of 8 weeks of follow-up, the mean (SD astigmatism of the SICS group was 0.64±0.56 D as compared to the mean (SD of the ECCE group of 1.39±86 D and the difference was found to be significant (p<0.014. CONCLUSION The current study concludes that manual small incision cataract surgery is a better technique to control postoperative astigmatism than conventional extracapsular cataract extraction.

  6. Challenges to the Elimination of Cataract Blindness in Nigeria as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ophthalmic manpower for primary health centers is lacking. Equipments for modern cataract surgery is lacking as only 45.2% of practitioners have them for practice in their institutions. Institutional cataract surgery output is low; averaging 50-92 a year, ...

  7. Cataract Extraction With Intraocular Lens Implant: Early Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -surgery was good (>/= 6/18.) confirming that Cataract surgery with IOL implant is safe and effective in restoring vision to the cataract blind in this part of the world. Most of the cases of postoperative astigmatism were corrected with refraction.

  8. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... (74.1%), effective primary eye care- 25 (92.6%) and marketing of cataract surgical services- 23 (85.2%). However, only 16 ... gouvernement local (74.1%), 20 efficace principal Eye Care 25 (92.6%), et 23 (85.2%), services de marketing de la cataracte .... attractive rural allowance (10-20% of basic salary).

  9. a comparative study between manual small incision cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... October 2012 to October 2014 for cataract surgery were followed up for 6 weeks after surgery. They were divided into two groups based on the type of surgical procedure opted by the patients. Group A consisted of 50 patients who underwent Manual Small Incision Cataract. Surgery with rigid Polymethyl Methacrylate IOL ...

  10. Delay in Surgical Uptake for Cataract Services in a Pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    (19%). These differences were statistically significant. (P = 0.027). Regarding laterality, out of 34, 27 (79%) children with bilateral cataracts were presented for surgery and that of 42, 29 (69%) children with unilateral cataracts were presented for the examination, however, the differences were statistically insignificant (P = 0.3) ...

  11. Poor cataract surgical output: Eye care workers perspective in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-25

    Jan 25, 2012 ... Background: Cataract remains a disease of priority being the leading cause of blindness globally. Although surgically curable, cataract surgical output has remained low in Nigeria, Kwara state inclusive. A study was carried out to investigate the perception of eye care workers (ECW) on low surgical output ...

  12. Barriers to up take cataract surgery in Gandaki Zone, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Y D; Pokharel, G P; Dulal, S; Byanju, R N; Maharjan, I M

    2004-01-01

    Cataract though avoidable remains as leading cause of blindness in Nepal. Though, Himalaya Eye Hospital rendering high quality surgical service through its base hospital and out reach service in Gandaki Zone having cataract surgical rate is below 1500 per million. Therefore, it is mater of interest to investigate the reason and the finding would be helpful to plan the future cataract programme to CSR to desirable level, if we know the reason(s) that forced them living as blind in community and not seeking available surgical services. All person with cataract affecting their visual acuity to financial 24.1% and other clinical reason were found to be 12% as a reason for not seeking available surgical service. The cataract service marketing, eye health education disseminating the information on cataract and its curability is not found to be adequate. Therefore, the future cataract programme should give more concentration on creating awareness on cataract and subsidizing the available surgical service and service need to be brought to more proximity for the needy poor people.

  13. Phacoemulsification of bilateral cataracts in two pet rabbits | Gomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two 3 year-old, healthy, client-owned Lop rabbits presented with bilateral cataracts. After performing a physical examination, bloodwork, ocular ultrasonography and electroretinography, both animals were deemed good surgical candidates for phacoemulsification. Bilateral cataract surgery was performed and both rabbits ...

  14. Rapid assessment of cataract surgical coverage in rural Zululand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    562 old-age pensioners. Method. Subjects found to be ?lind (visual acuity < 3/60) and those reporting a history of eye surgery were examined using a torch and direct ophthalmoscop~by an ophthalmologist. Outcome measures. Cases of blindness due to operable cataract and post-cataract surgical subjects were identified.

  15. Carbon footprint and cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; van Landingham, Suzanne W; Khodifad, Ashish M; Haripriya, Aravind; Thiel, Cassandra L; Ramulu, Pradeep; Robin, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    This article raises awareness about the cost-effectiveness and carbon footprint of various cataract surgery techniques, comparing their relative carbon emissions and expenses: manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS), phacoemulsification, and femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. As the most commonly performed surgical procedure worldwide, cataract surgery contributes significantly to global climate change. The carbon footprint of a single phacoemulsification cataract surgery is estimated to be comparable to that of a typical person's life for 1 week. Phacoemulsification has been estimated to be between 1.4 and 4.7 times more expensive than MSICS; however, given the lower degree of postoperative astigmatism and other potential complications, phacoemulsification may still be preferable to MSICS in relatively resource-rich settings requiring high levels of visual function. Limited data are currently available regarding the environmental and financial impact of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery; however, in its current form, it appears to be the least cost-effective option. Cataract surgery has a high value to patients. The relative environmental impact and cost of different types of cataract surgery should be considered as this treatment becomes even more broadly available globally and as new technologies are developed and implemented.

  16. Cataract surgery in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome: current updates

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana,Luigi; Coassin,Marco; Iovieno,Alfonso; Moramarco,Antonio; Cimino,Luca

    2017-01-01

    Luigi Fontana, Marco Coassin, Alfonso Iovieno, Antonio Moramarco, Luca Cimino Ophthalmology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova – IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy Abstract: Pseudoexfoliation is a ubiquitous syndrome of multifactorial origin affecting elderly people by increasing the risk of cataract and secondary glaucoma development. Despite modern techniques and technologies for cataract surgery, pseudoexfoliation syndrome represents a challenge for surgeons because of the increased ...

  17. Visual outcome after cataract surgery at the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the visual outcome of patients who had cataract surgery in the University College Hospital Ibadan. Methodology: This is an observational descriptive, longitudinal study of consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery at the University College Hospital conducted between May ...

  18. The Impact of Cataract Surgery on Subjective Visual Functions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Purpose: To determine the impact of cataract surgery on visual functions (VFs) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with cataract at the. National Eye Center ... Correlation was assessed among subjective VF, QoL, and visual acuity (VA). The preoperative ..... Financial support and sponsorship. The study was ...

  19. The Impact of Cataract Surgery on Subjective Visual Functions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the impact of cataract surgery on visual functions (VFs) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with cataract at the National Eye Center, Kaduna. Methods: VFs and QoL questionnaires were administered to the patients preoperatively and 6 weeks postoperatively. Correlation was assessed among ...

  20. Outcomes of Cataract Surgery Following Treatment for Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Min; Lee, Byung Joo; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes and complications of cataract surgery in eyes previously treated for retinoblastoma. We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation at Seoul National University Children's Hospital for a secondary cataract that developed after retinoblastoma treatment. During the period between 1990 and 2014, 208 eyes of 147 patients received eye-salvaging treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and local therapy) for retinoblastoma at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. Among these eyes, a secondary cataract was detected in 17 eyes of 14 patients, and five eyes of five patients underwent cataract surgery. The median age of cataract formation was 97 months (range, 38 to 153 months). The medial interval between the diagnosis of retinoblastoma and cataract formation was 79 months (range, 29 to 140 months). All patients received posterior chamber intraocular lens insertion after irrigation and aspiration of the lens through a scleral tunnel incision. Anterior vitrectomy and posterior capsulotomy were performed in two eyes and a laser capsulotomy was subsequently performed in one eye. No intraoperative and postoperative complications occurred. The median follow-up after surgery was 36 months (range, 14 to 47 months). The final best corrected visual acuities were improved in all five eyes. No intraocular tumor recurrences or metastases occurred. After retinoblastoma regression, cataract extraction in our series was not associated with tumor recurrence or metastasis. Visual improvement was noted in every patient.

  1. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; La Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-09-01

    There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding increases the risk of cataract. We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987-2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders' cohort, information on welding was collected from questionnaires and, for both cohorts, information about cataract diagnosis and operation was gathered from Danish national registers. Using Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for cataract diagnosis and/or operation was calculated in the follow-up period adjusted for baseline data regarding age, diabetes, and social group. There were 266 welders and 29 007 referents with a diagnosis and/or operation for cataract. The unadjusted HR for cataract comparing ever-welders with referents was 1.07 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.95-1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95-1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950-1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment.

  2. Solar cataract: A clinical report | Ahuama | Journal of Health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar Ultraviolet radiation is caractogenic, as there is increasing evidence implicating ultraviolet radiation as a risk factor in the aetiology of cataracts. Through absorption from sunlight exposure especially into the violet and of the visible range of the solar spectrum, cataract formation may occur due to physiochemical ...

  3. related cataract in the rural areas of South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The Bureau for the Prevention of Blindness is responsible for the provision of cataract surgery to the rural indigent population of South Africa. It is important for the Bureau to know both the prevalence and the incidence of cataract blindness in the population. Design, setting and subjects. Blindness prevalence.

  4. Meeting the need for childhood cataract surgical services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cataract has emerged as the most important cause of blindness in children worldwide, and has been one of the priorities of VISION 2020, the global initiative to eliminate avoidable blindness by 2020. More than 2500 children are estimated to be blind from cataract in Madagascar. The aim of this study was to ...

  5. Comprehensive management of pediatric cataract in Africa | Adio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide, childhood blindness is 0.75/1000 children giving an estimated number of 1.4 million suffering from blindness worldwide. Of the blind children worldwide, congenital cataract is the major cause in African countries. The management of cataract in children poses a challenge to the African ophthalmologist, and the ...

  6. Exploiting ensemble learning for automatic cataract detection and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Jiang; Li, Jianqiang; Shen, Ruifang; Zeng, Yang; He, Jian; Bi, Jing; Li, Yong; Zhang, Qinyan; Peng, Lihui; Wang, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as a lenticular opacity presenting usually with poor visual acuity. It is one of the most common causes of visual impairment worldwide. Early diagnosis demands the expertise of trained healthcare professionals, which may present a barrier to early intervention due to underlying costs. To date, studies reported in the literature utilize a single learning model for retinal image classification in grading cataract severity. We present an ensemble learning based approach as a means to improving diagnostic accuracy. Three independent feature sets, i.e., wavelet-, sketch-, and texture-based features, are extracted from each fundus image. For each feature set, two base learning models, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Back Propagation Neural Network, are built. Then, the ensemble methods, majority voting and stacking, are investigated to combine the multiple base learning models for final fundus image classification. Empirical experiments are conducted for cataract detection (two-class task, i.e., cataract or non-cataractous) and cataract grading (four-class task, i.e., non-cataractous, mild, moderate or severe) tasks. The best performance of the ensemble classifier is 93.2% and 84.5% in terms of the correct classification rates for cataract detection and grading tasks, respectively. The results demonstrate that the ensemble classifier outperforms the single learning model significantly, which also illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between neovascular age-related macular degeneration and dementia: a population-based case-control study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Dong Chung

    Full Text Available Most available studies focusing on the association between neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD and dementia have conflicting results. This study aimed to investigate the association between previously diagnosed AMD and dementia using a population-based dataset in Taiwan.Data for this case-control study were retrospectively collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 13,402 subjects who had a diagnosis of dementia as cases, and 40,206 subjects without dementia as controls. A conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association of dementia with previously diagnosed neovascular AMD.We found that of the study sample of 53,608 subjects, 1.01% had previously diagnosed neovascular AMD, 1.35% and 0.90% for cases and the controls, respectively (p<0.001. The conditional logistic regression analysis suggested that the odds ratio of prior neovascular AMD for cases was 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.14~1.65 compared to the controls after adjusting for subjects' age, monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level, and hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and whether or not a subjects underwent cataract surgery prior to index date than controls.Dementia subjects were associated with a higher proportion of prior neovascular AMD than were the controls.

  8. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  9. The Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Condensate Storage Tank with Age-Related Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil; Nie, Jinsuo; Braverman, Joseph I.; Hofmayer, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The rate of age-related degradation in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is not significantly large but increasing as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of structures and passive components (SPCs) can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants. This paper investigates the seismic fragility capacity of the condensate storage tank (CST) for five cases: (1) a baseline analysis where the design condition (undegraded) is assumed, (2) a scenario with degraded stainless steel tank shell, (3) a scenario with degraded anchor bolts, (4) a scenario with anchorage concrete cracking, and (5) a perfect correlation of the above three degradation scenarios

  10. Cataract surgery in Knobloch syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni CS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Sílvia Bongiovanni1, Carla Cristina Serra Ferreira1, Ana Paula Silvério Rodrigues1, João Borges Fortes Filho2, Márcia Beatriz Tartarella11Department of Ophthalmology, Congenital Cataract Section, Medical School, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Knobloch syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with early-onset ocular abnormalities and central nervous system malformations. Ocular abnormalities are usually severe, and include high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, macular abnormalities, and cataract. The most frequent systemic changes are midline malformations of the brain, ventricular dilation, and occipital encephalocele. Cognitive delay may occur. We report a case of cataract in a child with Knobloch syndrome. Cataract surgery and follow-up are described.Keywords: Knobloch syndrome, cataract, phacoemulsification, vitreous, right eye, left eye, genetic

  11. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

  12. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  13. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  14. Aflibercept in exudative age related macular degeneration refractory to ranibizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Ramos, J; Pascual-Camps, I; Cuéllar-Monreal, M J; Dolz-Marco, R; Fenoll, M A; Font-Noguera, I; Poveda-Andrés, J L; Gallego-Pinazo, R

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness, safety and cost of aflibercept in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) refractory to ranibizumab. Retrospective observational study was conducted on patients diagnosed with wet ARMD, and previously treated with ranibizumab. Efficacy variables assessed were changes in visual acuity (BCVA) and anatomical improvements in the most affected eye. Factors associated with improvement of BCVA with aflibercept were also studied. Adverse events related to the aflibercept administration were recorded. Cost analysis data were collected from the hospital perspective, and only taking the direct medical costs into account. Cost-effectiveness analysis was calculated using the aflibercept treatment cost, and effectiveness calculated as BCVA gained. A total of 50 eyes corresponding to 46 patients were included. The median follow-up period was 4.6 months (range: 1.0-6.0). Improvement in visual acuity after the first 2 doses and at the end of the follow-up period was observed in 32.0 and 28.0% of treated eyes, respectively. None of the variables studied was associated with an improvement in the BCVA after treatment. No significant differences were found in the average monthly cost between treatments. Aflibercept is shown to be an effective treatment in a significant number of patients resistant to treatment with ranibizumab, presenting a cost similar to that generated during the final stages of treatment with ranibizumab. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaflik, Jacek P.; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika; Zaras, Magdalena; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  16. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  17. Age-related changes in oscillatory power affect motor action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqing Liu

    Full Text Available With increasing age cognitive performance slows down. This includes cognitive processes essential for motor performance. Additionally, performance of motor tasks becomes less accurate. The objective of the present study was to identify general neural correlates underlying age-related behavioral slowing and the reduction in motor task accuracy. To this end, we continuously recorded EEG activity from 18 younger and 24 older right-handed healthy participants while they were performing a simple finger tapping task. We analyzed the EEG records with respect to local changes in amplitude (power spectrum as well as phase locking between the two age groups. We found differences between younger and older subjects in the amplitude of post-movement synchronization in the β band of the sensory-motor and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. This post-movement β amplitude was significantly reduced in older subjects. Moreover, it positively correlated with the accuracy with which subjects performed the motor task at the electrode FCz, which detects activity of the mPFC and the supplementary motor area. In contrast, we found no correlation between the accurate timing of local neural activity, i.e. phase locking in the δ-θ frequency band, with the reaction and movement time or the accuracy with which the motor task was performed. Our results show that only post-movement β amplitude and not δ-θ phase locking is involved in the control of movement accuracy. The decreased post-movement β amplitude in the mPFC of older subjects hints at an impaired deactivation of this area, which may affect the cognitive control of stimulus-induced motor tasks and thereby motor output.

  18. Static and flicker perimetry in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Chi D; Dimitrov, Peter N; Wu, Zhichao; Ayton, Lauren N; Makeyeva, Galina; Aung, Khin-Zaw; Varsamidis, Mary; Robman, Luba; Vingrys, Algis J; Guymer, Robyn H

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between clinical severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and macular function has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the correlation between clinical severity and functional deficits as detected by static and flicker perimetry. This cross-sectional study consisted of 279 AMD subjects and 24 control participants. AMD subjects were allocated into 1 of 10 AMD severity groups depending on the status of the designated study eye and the fellow eye, as assessed by color fundus photographs. Visual acuity, and static and flicker perimetry were tested on one eye during the same session. The geometric means, SDs, and percentage of abnormal eyes of static and flicker sensitivity of each AMD severity group were determined and compared. The pattern of change in sensitivity and percentage of abnormal eyes for static perimetry across all AMD severity groups were similar to flicker perimetry. Eyes with drusen > 125 μm (P[static] = 0.018, P[flicker] = 0.024), drusenoid epithelial detachment (P[static and flicker] flicker] flicker sensitivities compared to normal eyes. Static (β-coefficient -1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] -4.78-1.60) and flicker (β-coefficient -1.29, 95% CI -4.66-2.08) sensitivities declined at a similar rate in eyes that showed clinical signs of progression. Static and flicker perimetry were affected similarly across the spectrum of AMD severity, and methods appeared to be valid techniques for assessing retinal sensitivity in AMD once drusen > 125 μm are present, but before the development of late AMD.

  19. Age-related changes in oscillatory power affect motor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqing; Rosjat, Nils; Popovych, Svitlana; Wang, Bin A; Yeldesbay, Azamat; Toth, Tibor I; Viswanathan, Shivakumar; Grefkes, Christian B; Fink, Gereon R; Daun, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    With increasing age cognitive performance slows down. This includes cognitive processes essential for motor performance. Additionally, performance of motor tasks becomes less accurate. The objective of the present study was to identify general neural correlates underlying age-related behavioral slowing and the reduction in motor task accuracy. To this end, we continuously recorded EEG activity from 18 younger and 24 older right-handed healthy participants while they were performing a simple finger tapping task. We analyzed the EEG records with respect to local changes in amplitude (power spectrum) as well as phase locking between the two age groups. We found differences between younger and older subjects in the amplitude of post-movement synchronization in the β band of the sensory-motor and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). This post-movement β amplitude was significantly reduced in older subjects. Moreover, it positively correlated with the accuracy with which subjects performed the motor task at the electrode FCz, which detects activity of the mPFC and the supplementary motor area. In contrast, we found no correlation between the accurate timing of local neural activity, i.e. phase locking in the δ-θ frequency band, with the reaction and movement time or the accuracy with which the motor task was performed. Our results show that only post-movement β amplitude and not δ-θ phase locking is involved in the control of movement accuracy. The decreased post-movement β amplitude in the mPFC of older subjects hints at an impaired deactivation of this area, which may affect the cognitive control of stimulus-induced motor tasks and thereby motor output.

  20. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J.; Crary, John F.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M.; Ironside, James W.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Munoz, David G.; Murray, Melissa E.; Nelson, Peter T.; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N.; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A.; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J.; Mann, David M.; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C.; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J.; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B.; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D.; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A.; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B.; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C.; Vinters, Harry V.; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B.; White, Charles L.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M.; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  1. Age-related effects in the EEG during propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A; Grouven, U; Zander, I; Beger, F A; Siedenberg, M; Schultz, B

    2004-01-01

    Age-related differences in the spectral composition of the EEG in induction and emergence times, and in drug consumption during propofol anaesthesia were investigated. The EEGs of 60 female patients between 22 and 85 years of age were monitored continuously during standardized induction of anaesthesia with 2 mg of propofol kg(-1)60 s(-1). The EEGs were visually assessed in 20-s epochs according to a scale from A (awake) to F (very deep hypnosis). Visual EEG classifications, spectral parameters, and induction times were compared between different age groups. Additionally, data of 546 patients included in a multicentre study with 4630 patients (EEG monitor Narcotrend, MT MonitorTechnik, Bad Bramstedt, Germany) were analyzed with regard to age-dependent changes of propofol consumption using target-controlled infusion (TCI). During induction, patients older than 70 years reached significantly deeper EEG stages than younger patients, needed a longer time to reach the deepest EEG stage, and needed more time until a light EEG stage was regained. In patients aged 70 years and older, the total power, mainly in deep EEG stages, was significantly smaller due to a distinctly smaller absolute power of the delta frequency band. No single spectral parameter was able to reliably distinguish all EEG stages. During the steady state of anaesthesia, older patients needed less propofol for the maintenance of a defined stage of hypnosis than younger patients. Older patients differ from younger ones regarding the hypnotic effect of propofol and the spectral patterns in the EEG. For an efficient automatic assessment of the EEG during anaesthesia a multivariable approach accounting for age-effects is indispensable.

  2. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  3. Macular pigment density variation after supplementation of lutein and zeaxanthin using the Visucam®200 pigment module: Impact of age-related macular degeneration and lens status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, G; Quaranta-El Maftouhi, M; Masella, J-J; Mauget-Faÿsse, M

    2017-04-01

    To assess the evolution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) following supplementation with various macular formulations obtained with the Visucam ® 200, and to study the factors affecting MPOD measurements. In this prospective, randomized, double-masked multicenter study, patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (patients without retinal pathology who underwent cataract surgery 1 month previously) and group B (patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration [AMD] in one eye). In each group, half of the patients were randomly assigned to receive a food supplementation either with or without carotenoids (5mg of Lutein and 1mg of Zeaxanthin). Outcome measures included MPOD responses obtained with the Visucam ® 200 for one year. In total, 126 subjects (52 men, 74 women) with a mean age of 75.3±7.61 years were enrolled. Mean MPOD values at the time of inclusion were statistically lower in group A (0.088 density unit [DU]) compared to group B (0.163 DU, P<0.05). No statistically significant increase in MPOD was noted in either group, even after discontinuation of the supplementation. By multiple regression analysis, age, female gender, lens status and the presence of AMD seemed to significantly affect MPOD measurements. No significant improvement in MPOD seems to be detected with the Visucam ® 200 after carotenoid supplementation. The MPOD measurement seems to be highly affected by cataract extraction and the presence of AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cataract in Latin America: findings from nine recent surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limburg, Hans; Silva, Juan C; Foster, Allen

    2009-05-01

    To review recent data on blindness and low vision due to cataract in Latin America. Presentation of findings from population-based prevalence surveys conducted between 1999 and 2006 in nine Latin American countries covering 30,544 people aged 50 years and older. Prevalence of cataract blindness in people 50 years and older ranged from 0.5% in Buenos Aires to 2.3% in four provinces of Guatemala. Low vision from cataract ranged from 0.9% in Buenos Aires to 10.7% in Piura and Tumbes Districts in Peru. Cataract surgical coverage (CSC) was good in Campinas, Brazil; low in Paraguay, Peru, and Guatemala; and moderate in the other areas. Good visual outcome after cataract surgery nearly conformed to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines in Buenos Aires (more than 80% of operated eyes able to see 20/60 or better), but ranged from 60% to 79% in most of the other settings, and was less than 60% in Guatemala and Peru. "Unaware that treatment is possible," "contraindications," "cannot afford," and "fear of operation" were the most common explanations for failure to come forward for surgery. In Campinas, Brazil, cataract is fairly well controlled. In Buenos Aires, the visual outcomes after cataract surgery nearly meet WHO standards. In most countries in Latin America, however, cataract intervention needs to be intensified and visual outcome improved. Reducing the costs of cataract surgery and providing effective health education and adequate program management are essential to combat the expected increase in visual impairment due to cataract in the region.

  5. Racemisation and human cataract. D-Ser, D-Asp/Asn and D-Thr are higher in the lifelong proteins of cataract lenses than in age-matched normal lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, Michelle Yu Sung; Truscott, Roger J W

    2011-06-01

    ASTRACT: Several amino acids were found to undergo progressive age-dependent racemisation in the lifelong proteins of normal human lenses. The two most highly racemised were Ser and Asx. By age 70, 4.5% of all Ser residues had been racemised, along with >9% of Asx residues. Such a high level of inversion, equivalent to between 2 and 3 D- amino acids per polypeptide chain, is likely to induce significant denaturation of the crystallins in aged lenses. Thr, Glx and Phe underwent age-dependent racemisation to a smaller degree. In model experiments, D- amino acid content could be increased simply by exposing intact lenses to elevated temperature. In cataract lenses, the extent of racemisation of Ser, Asx and Thr residues was significantly greater than for age-matched normal lenses. This was true, even for cataract lenses removed from patients at the earliest ages where age-related cataract is observed clinically. Racemisation of amino acids in crystallins may arise due to prolonged exposure of these proteins to ocular temperatures and increased levels of racemisation may play a significant role in the opacification of human lenses.

  6. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  7. Diastolic pressure underestimates age-related hemodynamic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, C R; Alfie, J; Waisman, G D; Mayorga, L M; Cámera, L A; del Río, M; Vasvari, F; Limansky, R; Farías, J; Tessler, J; Cámera, M I

    1997-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that as large arteries become more rigid with age, the pattern of hypertension changes from diastolic to systolic. Thus, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) may lose its ability to reflect the increase in vascular resistance with age. To assess this, we studied the age-related changes in blood pressure pattern and its steady-state and pulsatile determinants. We performed an epidemiological analysis based on a national survey of 10,462 subjects from Argentina. A hemodynamic analysis (impedance cardiography) was then carried out in 636 consecutive hypertensive patients (age, 25 to 74 years). Whereas the rate of increment in the prevalence of mild to moderate hypertension (MMH) reached a plateau after the sixth decade, isolated and borderline systolic forms of hypertension began a steep and sustained rise. Among patients with MMH, DBP remained stable from the third to the seventh decade, whereas SBP maintained a sustained increase. Despite similar DBP, the systemic vascular resistance index increased 47% (P<.01) and the cardiac index decreased 27% (P<.01), whereas the ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure, an index of arterial compliance, decreased 45% (P<.01). However, there were no significant differences between older patients with MMH and those with isolated systolic hypertension in the level of SBP, vascular resistance, stroke volume, and cardiac index. Compared with age-matched normotensive control subjects, the ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure was much more reduced in isolated systolic hypertension (48%) than in MMH (30%). In summary, the present study, carried out in a large sample of hypertensive subjects with a wide age range, showed a simultaneous impairment in vascular resistance and arterial compliance associated with aging in different patterns of hypertension. The magnitude of these changes, with opposite effects on DBP but additive effects on SBP, suggests that a hemodynamic mechanism could determine the transition in the

  8. Interleukin-13 and age-related macular degeneration

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    Bo Fu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the effects of interleukin (IL-13 on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and the IL-13 level in aqueous humor of age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients. METHODS: IL-13 levels in aqueous humor specimens from AMD patients were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. ARPE-19 cells were treated with 10 ng/mL IL-13 for 12, 24, and 48h. The cell proliferaton was evaluated by the MTS method. The mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA and ZO-1 were evaluated with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were assessed by ELISA. RESULTS: IL-13 levels in the aqueous humor of patients with AMD were significantly higher than those in the control (167.33±17.64 vs 27.12±5.65 pg/mL; P<0.01. In vitro, IL-13 of high concentrations (10, 15, and 20 ng/mL inhibited ARPE-19 cell proliferation. α-SMA mRNA in ARPE-19 cell were increased (1.017±0.112 vs 1.476±0.168; P<0.001 and ZO-1 decreased (1.051±0.136 vs 0.702±0.069; P<0.001 after treated with 10 ng/mL IL-13 for 48h. The protein expression of α-SMA and ZO-1 also showed the same tendency (α-SMA: P=0.038; ZO-1: P=0.008. IL-13 significantly reduced the level of TNF-α (44.70±1.67 vs 31.79±3.53 pg/mL; P=0.005 at 48h, but the level of TGF-β2 was significantly increased from 34.44±2.92 to 57.61±6.31 pg/mL at 24h (P=0.004 and from 61.26±1.11 to 86.91±3.59 pg/mL at 48h (P<0.001. While expressions of VEGF didn’t change after IL-13 treatment. CONCLUSION: IL-13 in vitro inhibit ARPE-19 cell proliferation and expression in the aqueous may be associated with AMD.

  9. Age-related changes in the cognitive function of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2011-01-01

    Healthy aging is characterized by a diminished quality of sleep with decreased sleep duration and increased time awake after sleep onset. Older adults awaken more frequently and tend to awaken less from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and more from non-REM (nREM) sleep than young adults. Sleep architecture also begins changing in middle age leading to a dramatic decrease in the deepest stage of nREM-slow wave sleep (SWS)-as aging progresses. Other less marked nREM changes include reduced numbers of sleep spindles and K-complexes. In contrast, the amount of REM diminishes only slightly. Both circadian and homeostatic sleep-regulatory processes are affected by aging. Circadian rhythms of temperature, melatonin, and cortisol are phase advanced and their amplitude diminished. An increased number of nocturnal awakenings and diminished daytime sleepiness suggest diminished homeostatic sleep pressure. A variety of endocrine and neuromodulatory changes (e.g., reduced growth hormone and dopamine levels) also accompany healthy aging. Healthy aging is characterized by declines in working memory and new episodic memory performance with relative sparing of semantic memory, recognition memory, and priming. Memory systems impacted by aging are associated with volumetric and functional changes in fronto-striatal circuits along with more limited changes in medial temporal structures (in which larger aging-related changes suggest neuropathology). Cross-sectional studies generally associate poorer sleep quality with poorer neuropsychological functioning. However, paradoxically, older adults appear to be more resistant to the cognitive effects of sleep deprivation, restriction, and fragmentation than younger adults. A new and expanding field examines the interaction between aging and sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Among forms of learning displaying prominent sleep-dependent consolidation in young adults, motor-sequence learning displays loss of sleep-dependent consolidation with

  10. Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS with Clear Corneal Incision and SICS with Scleral Incision – A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shafiqul Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age related cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. With the advent of microsurgical facilities simple cataract extraction surgery has been replaced by small incision cataract surgery (SICS with posterior chamber intra ocular lens implant, which can be done either with clear corneal incision or scleral incision. Objective: To compare the post operative visual outcome in these two procedures of cataract surgery. Materials and method: This comparative study was carried out in the department of Ophthalmology, Delta Medical College & Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh, during the period of January 2010 to December 2012. Total 60 subjects indicated for age related cataract surgery irrespective of sex with the age range of 40-80 years with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomly and equally distributed in 2 groups; Group A for SICS with clear corneal incision and group B for SICS with scleral incision. Post operative visual out come was evaluated by determining visual acuity and astigmatism in different occasions and was compared between groups. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS for windows version12. Results: The highest age incidence (43.3% was found between 61 to 70 years of age group. Among study subjects 40 were male and 20 were female. Preoperative visual acuity and astigmatism were evenly distributed between groups. Regarding postoperative unaided visual outcome, 6/12 or better visual acuity was found in 19.98% cases in group A and 39.6% cases in group B at 1st week. At 6th week 6/6 vision was found in 36.3% in Group A and 56.1% in Group B and 46.2% in group A and 66% in group B without and with correction respectively. With refractive correction, 6/6 vision was attained in 60% subjects of group A and 86.67% of group B at 8th week. Post operative visual acuity was statistically significant in all occasions. Postoperative astigmatism of

  11. NASA study of cataract in astronauts (NASCA). Report 1: Cross-sectional study of the relationship of exposure to space radiation and risk of lens opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylack, Leo T; Peterson, Leif E; Feiveson, Alan H; Wear, Mary L; Manuel, F Keith; Tung, William H; Hardy, Dale S; Marak, Lisa J; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-07-01

    The NASA Study of Cataract in Astronauts (NASCA) is a 5-year longitudinal study of the effect of space radiation exposure on the severity/progression of nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular (PSC) lens opacities. Here we report on baseline data that will be used over the course of the longitudinal study. Participants include 171 consenting astronauts who flew at least one mission in space and a comparison group made up of three components: (a) 53 astronauts who had not flown in space, (b) 95 military aircrew personnel, and (c) 99 non-aircrew ground-based comparison subjects. Continuous measures of nuclear, cortical and PSC lens opacities were derived from Nidek EAS 1000 digitized images. Age, demographics, general health, nutritional intake and solar ocular exposure were measured at baseline. Astronauts who flew at least one mission were matched to comparison subjects using propensity scores based on demographic characteristics and medical history stratified by gender and smoking (ever/never). The cross-sectional data for matched subjects were analyzed by fitting customized non-normal regression models to examine the effect of space radiation on each measure of opacity. The variability and median of cortical cataracts were significantly higher for exposed astronauts than for nonexposed astronauts and comparison subjects with similar ages (P=0.015). Galactic cosmic space radiation (GCR) may be linked to increased PSC area (P=0.056) and the number of PSC centers (P=0.095). Within the astronaut group, PSC size was greater in subjects with higher space radiation doses (P=0.016). No association was found between space radiation and nuclear cataracts. Cross-sectional data analysis revealed a small deleterious effect of space radiation for cortical cataracts and possibly for PSC cataracts. These results suggest increased cataract risks at smaller radiation doses than have been reported previously.

  12. Isomerization of aspartyl residues in crystallins and its influence upon cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Noriko; Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Norihiko; Aki, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cataracts, which probably form due to insolubilization of lens proteins, can lead to loss of vision. Although the exact reason is unknown, lens protein aggregation may be triggered by increases in PTMs such as D-β-, L-β- and D-α-Asp isomers. These isomers have been observed in aged lens; however, there have been few quantitative and site-specific studies owing to the lack of a quick and precise method for distinguishing between D- and L-Asp in a peptide or protein. We describe a new method for detecting peptides containing Asp isomers at individual sites in any protein by using an LC-MS/MS system combined with commercial enzymes that specifically react with different isomers. We also summarize current data on the effect of Asp isomerization on lens crystallins. The new technique enabled the analysis of isomers of Asp residues in lens proteins precisely and quickly. An extensive proportion of Asp isomerization was observed at all Asp sites of crystallins in the insoluble fraction of aged lens. In addition, d-amino acid substitutions in crystallin-mimic peptides showed altered structural formation and function. These results indicate that isomerization of Asp residues affects the stability, structure and inter-subunit interaction of lens crystallins, which will induce crystallin aggregation and insolubilization, disrupt the associated functions, and ultimately contribute to the onset of senile cataract formation. The mechanism underlying the onset of age-related diseases may involve isomerization, whereby D-amino acids are incorporated in the L-amino acid world of life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Crystallin Biochemistry in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical observation on different nucleus delivery methods in small incision cataract surgery with non-phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kui Ke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical effect and characteristics of lens loop extracting nucleus method, water irrigation and nucleus fragmentation within anterior chamber in small incision cataract surgery with non-phacoemulsification. METHODS:There were 324 cases(324 eyeswith senile cataract randomly divided into three groups, by the lens loop extracting nucleus method(group A, water irrigation(group Band nucleus fragmentation within anterior chamber(group C, to complete the process of nucleus division. The time of nuclear removal, complication during operation, the degree of edema of corneal endothelium on the first day after the surgery and visual acuity after surgery were observed and recorded.RESULTS:The average extracting nucleus time was 45s in lens loop(group A; 34s in water irrigation(group Band 65s in manual fragmentation(group C.The differences of average time are statistically significant(PPP>0.05.Regarding the visual acuity on the first day after surgery, the difference between group A and group C, group B and group C were statistically significant(PPP>0.05.CONCLUSION:Manual fragmentation has obvious advantages in removing nuclear above Ⅳ grade; The water irrigation method has fewer complications with low incidence of corner edema, which is more preferable in removing the nuclear below Ⅳ grade.

  14. Down-Regulation of MicroRNA-133b Suppresses Apoptosis of Lens Epithelial Cell by Up-Regulating BCL2L2 in Age-Related Cataracts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Feng; Meng, Weizhe; Tong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNA-133b (miR-133b) has been reported to be involved in many diseases, including ovarian cancer and osteosarcoma. Accumulating evidence suggests that miR-133b plays important roles in human disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism, including the potential regulator and signaling pathways, of BCL2L2. Material/Methods We first searched the online miRNA database ( www.mirdb.org ) using the ?seed sequence? located within the 3?-UTR of the target gene...

  15. The Effect of Cataract on Eye Movement Perimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thepass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine how different grades of cataract affect sensitivity threshold and saccadic reaction time (SRT in eye movement perimetry (EMP. Methods. In EMP, the visual field is tested by assessing the saccades that a subject makes towards peripheral stimuli using an eye tracker. Forty-eight cataract patients underwent pre- and postoperative EMP examination in both eyes. The subjects had to fix a central stimulus presented on the eye tracker monitor and to look at any detected peripheral stimulus upon its appearance. A multilevel mixed model was used to determine the factors that affected the sensitivity threshold and the SRT as a function of cataract grade. Results. We found no effect of cataract severity (LOCS III grades I through IV on SRT and the sensitivity thresholds. In cataract of LOCS III grade V, however, we found an increase by 27% and 21% (p<0.001, respectively, compared to the SRT and the sensitivity threshold in LOCS III grade I. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery showed no change in mean SRTs and sensitivity thresholds after surgery in LOCS III grade IV and lower. Conclusion. The present study shows that EMP can be readily used in patients with cataract with LOCS III grade IV and below.

  16. Evaluation of the macula prior to cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeague, Marta; Sharma, Priya; Ho, Allen C

    2018-01-01

    To describe recent evidence regarding methods of evaluation of retinal structure and function prior to cataract surgery. Studies in patients with cataract but no clinically detectable retinal disease have shown that routine use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) prior to cataract surgery can detect subtle macular disease, which may alter the course of treatment or lead to modification of consent. The routine use of OCT has been especially useful in patients being considered for advanced-technology intraocular lenses (IOLs) as subtle macular disease can be a contraindication to the use of these lenses. The cost-effectiveness of routine use of OCT prior to cataract surgery has not been studied. Other technologies that assess retinal function rather than structure, such as microperimetry and electroretinogram (ERG) need further study to determine whether they can predict retinal potential in cataract patients. There is growing evidence for the importance of more detailed retinal evaluation of cataract patients even with clinically normal exam. OCT has been the most established and studied method for retinal evaluation in cataract patients, but other technologies such as microperimetry and ERG are beginning to be studied.

  17. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezana, Milacic

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ 2 =65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  18. Ginkgo biloba extract for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer R

    2013-01-31

    Ginkgo is used in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease and 'cerebral insufficiency'. It is thought to have several potential mechanisms of action including increased blood flow, platelet activating factor antagonism, and prevention of membrane damage caused by free radicals. Vascular factors and oxidative damage are thought to be two potential mechanisms in the pathology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The objective of this review was to determine the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on the progression of AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to October 2012), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 October 2012. We searched the reference lists of identified reports and the Science Citation Index. We also contacted investigators of included studies for additional information. All randomised trials in people with AMD where Ginkgo biloba extract had been compared to control were included. The review author extracted data using a standardised form. The data were verified with the trial investigators. Trial quality was assessed. Two published trials were identified that randomised a total of 119 people. In one study conducted in France, 20 people were randomly allocated to Gingko biloba extract EGb 761 80 mg twice daily or placebo. In

  19. Vision rehabilitation for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W

    1999-01-01

    Though the numbers of patients with ARMD are high, associated referrals for vision rehabilitation are not. Practitioners need to refer patients with age-related maculopathy when medical and surgical treatment are no longer possible, and patients need to be educated to that fact. The impact of improving activities of daily living may be monumental and benefits society as a whole. People who are visually impaired are often ill-prepared to deal with the substantial adjustment involved, further stressing their entire support system. It may not be safe for visual and systemic reasons for older adults to cook, clean, and maintain their home. Poor vision contributes to the already increased risk of falls and subsequent fractures in these patients. Individuals who may have already been told they can no longer drive now face the possibility of being unable to live in their houses. Their independence may be threatened dramatically and abruptly. All these circumstances contribute to anxiety and depression. Patients with ARMD need to be educated about their disease process (teaching that can never be assumed to have been initiated). They need to be educated that they will not go completely blind and that, with assistance, they can accomplish a great deal. With today's technology, it is not difficult to help visually impaired individuals with ARMD, unless they are not referred or lack motivation. The primary complaint of an individual with ARMD is recognition of central detail. This affects all activities of daily living, and patient performance is subject to the duration and severity of the disease (including the size, density, and location of the central scotoma) and to their understanding of the disease. Rubin and coworkers, found that slow reading performance of patients with a dense central scotoma might reflect inherent limitations of peripheral retina for complex visual tasks. ARMD in most cases lends itself to magnification that enlarges the object beyond the blind spot

  20. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy in a 14-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Vinding, Troels; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    To examine the association between potential risk factors and the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM).......To examine the association between potential risk factors and the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM)....

  1. 14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Nielsen, Niels V; Vinding, Troels

    2005-01-01

    To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss.......To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss....

  2. Age-related compaction of lens fibers affects the structure and optical properties of rabbit lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ghoul Walid M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this investigation was to correlate particular age-related structural changes (compaction to the amount of scatter in rabbit lenses and to determine if significant fiber compaction occurred in the nuclear and inner cortical regions. Methods New Zealand White rabbits at 16–20 months old (adult; n = 10 and at 3.5–4 years old (aged; n = 10 were utilized for this study. Immediately after euthanising, scatter was assessed in fresh lenses by low power helium-neon laser scan analysis. Scatter data was analyzed both for whole lenses and regionally, to facilitate correlation with morphometric data. After functional analysis, lenses were fixed and processed for scanning electron microcopy (SEM; right eyes and light microscopy (LM; left eyes. Morphometric analysis of SEM images was utilized to evaluate compaction of nuclear fibers. Similarly, measurements from LM images were used to assess compaction of inner cortical fibers. Results Scatter was significantly greater in aged lenses as compared to adult lenses in all regions analyzed, however the difference in the mean was slightly more pronounced in the inner cortical region. The anterior and posterior elliptical angles at 1 mm (inner fetal nucleus were significantly decreased in aged vs. adult lenses (anterior, p = 0.040; posterior, p = 0.036. However, the average elliptical angles at 2.5 mm (outer fetal nucleus were not significantly different in adult and aged lenses since all lenses examined had comparable angles to inner fetal fibers of aged lenses, i.e. they were all compacted. In cortical fibers, measures of average cross-sectional fiber area were significantly different at diameters of both 6 and 7 mm as a function of age (p = 0.011 and p = 0.005, respectively. Accordingly, the estimated fiber volume was significantly decreased in aged as compared to adult lenses at both 6 mm diameter (p = 0.016 and 7 mm diameter (p = 0.010. Conclusion Morphometric data indicates

  3. Cataract surgery: factors influencing decision to treat and implications for training (south-east Scotland 2008–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sniatecki JJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jan J Sniatecki, Caroline Styles, Natalie Boyle, Roshini Sanders Cataract Unit, Queen Margaret Hospital, Dunfermline, Fife, UK Purpose: To describe the population referred for cataract surgery, identify factors that influenced decision to treat, and patients suitable for ophthalmic training. Patients and methods: A total of 2,693 consecutive referrals over 6 years were interrogated using Business Objects software on cataract electronic patient records. Results: A total of 2,693 patients were referred for cataract surgery (group A. Of these patients 2,132 (79% had surgery (group B and 561 (21% did not (group C. Age for group B vs group C: 672 (32% vs 115 (20% ≤69 years, P<0.001; 803 (38% vs 225 (40% 70–79 years, P=0.48; 586 (27% vs 203 (36% 80–89 years, P<0.05; 71 (3% vs 18 (3% ≥90 years, P=1.0. Visual acuity, group B vs group C: 556 (26% vs 664 (59% 6/12 or better; 1,275 (60% vs 367 (33% 6/18–6/60; 266 (12% vs 64 (6% counting fingers or worse, P<0.05. Medical history for group B vs C: cognitive impairment: 55 (2.6% vs 29 (5.2%, P<0.05; cardiovascular accident: 158 (7.4% vs 60 (10.7%, P<0.05; diabetes: 372 (17.4% vs 96 (17.1%, P=0.87; COPD/asthma: 382 (17.9% vs 93 (16.6%, P=0.53; heart disease: 535 (25.1% vs 155 (27.6%, P=0.35; hypertension: 971 (45.5% vs 263 (46.9%, P=0.73. Ocular history for group B vs C was significant (P<0.05 for age-related macular degeneration 255 (12.0% vs 93 (16.6%, other macular pathology 38 (1.8% vs 25 (4.5%, corneal pathology 92 (4.3% vs 36 (6.4%, amblyopia 37 (1.7% vs 22 (3.9%. Detailed data on presenting complaint, ophthalmic history, and social status is discussed. Conclusion: We observed that surgery at a younger age with good levels of visual acuity was a factor in deferring cataract surgery. Cognitive impairment, cardiovascular accident, amblyopia, corneal and macular pathology significantly affected decision not to operate. We estimate that 80% of patients would be suitable for ophthalmic training

  4. [The progress of studies on intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Wan, Xiuhua

    2015-07-01

    With development of the technology of cataract surgery, combined phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia has been widely carried out in clinical treatment. Due to the particularity of high myopia, phacoemulsification in patients with cataract and high myopia is difficult and has recently received a lot of attentions. In this paper, preoperative examinations, the selection of intraocular lenses, surgery methods and surgical complications of cataract surgery in patients with cataract and high myopia are briefly reviewed.

  5. The Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Subgroups in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger; Subhi, Yousif

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis.......To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis....

  6. Recent status on femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ming Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery performs the anterior capsulotomy, lens fragmentation, corneal incisions making and astigmatic limbal relaxing incision with femtosecond laser, which effectively reduces the complications of conventional phacoemulsification surgery and improves the postoperative visual quality of patients. It further improves the technology and effect of cataract surgery and has broad clinical application prospects. This paper compares pros and cons as well as the clinical values of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with conventional phacoemulsification surgery based on the overview of published articles.

  7. Unilateral, Isolated, Paediatric Lightning-Induced Cataract: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Rogers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A six-year-old girl presented with gradual loss of vision in the left eye a year after sustaining a lightning strike while in her home. Examination revealed healed burns to her cheek, left arm, and right leg and a dense left cataract. There was no evidence of other ocular sequelae, and her right eye was normal. Cataract surgery and lens implantation were performed on the left eye with good results. Isolated, unilateral, paediatric cataract due to lightning is discussed.

  8. The Analysis of Intracellular and Intercellular Calcium Signaling in Human Anterior Lens Capsule Epithelial Cells with Regard to Different Types and Stages of the Cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Gosak

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated how modifications of the Ca2+ homeostasis in anterior lens epithelial cells (LECs are associated with different types of cataract (cortical or nuclear and how the progression of the cataract (mild or moderate affects the Ca2+ signaling. We systematically analyzed different aspects of intra- and inter-cellular Ca2+ signaling in the human LECs, which are attached to surgically isolated lens capsule (LC, obtained during cataract surgery. We monitored the temporal and spatial changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration after stimulation with acetylcholine by means of Fura-2 fluorescence captured with an inverted microscope. In our analysis we compared the features of Ca2+ signals in individual cells, synchronized activations, spatio-temporal grouping and the nature of intercellular communication between LECs. The latter was assessed by using the methodologies of the complex network theory. Our results point out that at the level of individual cells there are no significant differences when comparing the features of the signals with regard either to the type or the stage of the cataract. On the other hand, noticeable differences are observed at the multicellular level, despite inter-capsule variability. LCs associated with more developed cataracts were found to exhibit a slower collective response to stimulation, a less pronounced spatio-temporal clustering of LECs with similar signaling characteristics. The reconstructed intercellular networks were found to be sparser and more segregated than in LCs associated with mild cataracts. Moreover, we show that spontaneously active LECs often operate in localized groups with quite well aligned Ca2+ activity. The presence of spontaneous activity was also found to affect the stimulated Ca2+ responses of individual cells. Our findings indicate that the cataract progression entails the impairment of intercellular signaling thereby suggesting the functional importance of altered Ca2

  9. Age-Related Differences in Quality of Standing Balance Using a Composite Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasma, J.H.; Bijlsma, A.Y.; van der Bij, M.D.W.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Maier, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Age-related differences in standing balance are not detected by testing the ability to maintain balance. Quality of standing balance might be more sensitive to detect age-related differences. Objective: To study age-related differences in quality of standing balance, center of pressure

  10. Role of the mitochondrial DNA replication machinery in mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis, aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBalsi, Karen L; Hoff, Kirsten E; Copeland, William C

    2017-01-01

    As regulators of bioenergetics in the cell and the primary source of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), dysfunctional mitochondria have been implicated for decades in the process of aging and age-related diseases. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated and repaired by nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) and several other associated proteins, which compose the mtDNA replication machinery. Here, we review evidence that errors caused by this replication machinery and failure to repair these mtDNA errors results in mtDNA mutations. Clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations results in mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased electron transport chain (ETC) enzyme activity and impaired cellular respiration. We address the literature that mitochondrial dysfunction, in conjunction with altered mitochondrial dynamics, is a major driving force behind aging and age-related diseases. Additionally, interventions to improve mitochondrial function and attenuate the symptoms of aging are examined. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Condensate Storage Tank with Age-Related Degradations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Braverman, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hofmayer, C [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Choun, Y-S [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, MK [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Choi, I-K [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is conducting a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The KAERI research project includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA): (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. Since 2007, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has entered into a collaboration agreement with KAERI to support its development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period. The goal of this collaboration endeavor is to assist KAERI to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The research results of this multi-year collaboration will be utilized as input to seismic PRAs. This report describes the research effort performed by BNL for the Year 4 scope of work. This report was developed as an update to the Year 3 report by incorporating a major supplement to the Year 3 fragility analysis. In the Year 4 research scope, an additional study was carried out to consider an additional degradation scenario, in which the three basic degradation scenarios, i.e., degraded tank shell, degraded anchor bolts, and cracked anchorage concrete, are combined in a non-perfect correlation manner. A representative operational water level is used for this effort. Building on the same CDFM procedure implemented for the Year 3 Tasks, a simulation method was applied using optimum Latin Hypercube samples to characterize the deterioration behavior of the fragility capacity as a function of age-related degradations. The results are summarized in Section 5

  12. INTRACORNEAL AND SCLERAL CYST FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel van Rij

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. A six-year-old boy presented with a large progressive intracorneal and scleral cyst. Two years before, bilateral cataract surgery through a 6.5-mm corneal incision was performed elsewhere.Methods. The posterior wall of the cyst could be excised, as well as the anterior wall in the sclera. Upon histo-pathology the cyst wall was lined by epithelium. The epithelial cells of the anterior side in the cornea were removed with a curette and a corpus alienum drill. Three and a half years after removal of the cyst, there was no recurrence. Visual acuity was 0.8. Conclusions. An intracorneal and scleral inclusion cyst was successfully removed by surgical excision and the removal of epithelial cells by a curette and a corpus alienum drill.

  13. Corneal sensation after cataract and refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, M

    1998-10-01

    Most surgical procedures involving the anterior segment of the eye disrupt the normal organization of corneal innervation. Since denervation of the cornea results in impaired epithelial wound healing, increased epithelial permeability, decreased epithelial metabolic activity, and loss of cytoskeletal structures associated with cellular adhesion, it is important to identify the factors that determine the extent of neural regeneration. Mechanisms of corneal nerve damage and studies of corneal nerve fiber loss and reinnervation after cataract and refractive surgery--epikeratophakia, cryokeratomileusis, keratomileusis in situ, photorefractive keratectomy, laser in situ keratomileusis, and phacoemulsification--are reviewed and the decrease in corneal sensitivity, as a measure of corneal destruction and corneal metabolism, after these surgical procedures is compared.

  14. The Tear Osmolarity Changes After Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Öncel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To determine the tear osmolarity changes in patients who had undergone phacoemulsification surgery. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Tear osmolarity measurements were performed in 30 eyes of 30 patients who had undergone cataract surgery without any complication. Measurements were performed before surgery and consecutively at 1st month, 3rd month, and 6th month after the surgery. TearLab osmometer (TearLab Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA device was used for the measurements and paired ttest was used for statistical analysis. Re sults: The mean age of the patients was 72.3±3.7 (67-78 years. Thirteen patients were men and 17 patients were women. The mean osmolarity values were 305.8±6.5 mOsm/L before the surgery and 312.3±6.4 mOsm/L at 1st month, 307.5±5.1 mOsm/L at 3rd month and 305.1±5.7 at 6th month after the surgery. The difference between the values before surgery and at 1st month was found statistically significant (p=0.001. Dis cus si on: The tear osmolarity increases at the first month after surgery but decreases to the levels measured before surgery at the 3rd month. The increase at the first month may be due to the corneal incisions and medication used after the surgery. We think that we have to take into account this similarity increase in all cataract patients, especially in those who also have dry eye disease. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 35-7

  15. Phacoemulsificatıon in eyes wıth cataract and high myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Cetinkaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate the outcomes and complications following phacoemulsification surgery in eyes with cataract and high myopia.Methods:We retrospectively evaluated the data of 43 eyes of 28 consecutive patients (12 males, 16 females with cataract and high myopia who had undergone phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL implantation. The mean [± standard deviation (range] age of the patients was 59.20 ± 11.08 (39-77 years.Results:The frequency of nuclear cataract was significantly higher than that of other cataract types (P=0.003. The mean axial length was 28.97 ± 1.99 (26-33 mm and the mean IOL power was 5.09 ± 4.78 (-3.0 to +14.0 diopters (D. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE was -16.48 ± 5.23 (-8.00 to -25.00 D and the mean postoperative SE was -1.46 ± 0.93 (0.00 to -3.00 D (P=0.00. The mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 0.91 ± 0.37 (0.30 to -1.50 logMAR and the mean postoperative BCVA was 0.29 ± 0.25 (0.00-1.00 logMAR (P=0.00. Twenty-two eyes (51.2% achieved the target postoperative refraction (±1.0 D. The eyes were divided into 3 groups according to the axial length. The mean biometric error was significantly higher in the group with the greatest axial length than in the other groups (P=0.007. Preoperative argon laser photocoagulation was performed in 7 eyes (16% on account of retinal tears, retinal holes, or lattice degeneration. Postoperatively, retinal tears developed in 2 eyes (4% and were treated with photocoagulation. One eye (2% developed retinal detachment postoperatively, with the patient consequently referred for retinal surgery. Postoperatively, posterior capsule opacities developed in 11 eyes (25%, with all cases treated by laser capsulotomy.Conclusions:Good postoperative outcomes following phacoemulsification surgery were observed in patients with cataract and high myopia. However, clinicians should be aware of the risk of postoperative retinal tears and rhegmatogenous

  16. Phacoemulsificatıon in eyes wıth cataract and high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkaya, Servet; Acir, Nursen Oncel; Cetinkaya, Yasemin Fatma; Dadaci, Zeynep; Yener, Halil İbrahim; Saglam, Faik

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and complications following phacoemulsification surgery in eyes with cataract and high myopia. We retrospectively evaluated the data of 43 eyes of 28 consecutive patients (12 males, 16 females) with cataract and high myopia who had undergone phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. The mean [± standard deviation (range)] age of the patients was 59.20 ± 11.08 (39-77) years. The frequency of nuclear cataract was significantly higher than that of other cataract types (P=0.003). The mean axial length was 28.97 ± 1.99 (26-33) mm and the mean IOL power was 5.09 ± 4.78 (-3.0 to +14.0) diopters (D). The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) was -16.48 ± 5.23 (-8.00 to -25.00) D and the mean postoperative SE was -1.46 ± 0.93 (0.00 to -3.00) D (P=0.00). The mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.91 ± 0.37 (0.30 to -1.50) logMAR and the mean postoperative BCVA was 0.29 ± 0.25 (0.00-1.00) logMAR (P=0.00). Twenty-two eyes (51.2%) achieved the target postoperative refraction (±1.0 D). The eyes were divided into 3 groups according to the axial length. The mean biometric error was significantly higher in the group with the greatest axial length than in the other groups (P=0.007). Preoperative argon laser photocoagulation was performed in 7 eyes (16%) on account of retinal tears, retinal holes, or lattice degeneration. Postoperatively, retinal tears developed in 2 eyes (4%) and were treated with photocoagulation. One eye (2%) developed retinal detachment postoperatively, with the patient consequently referred for retinal surgery. Postoperatively, posterior capsule opacities developed in 11 eyes (25%), with all cases treated by laser capsulotomy. Good postoperative outcomes following phacoemulsification surgery were observed in patients with cataract and high myopia. However, clinicians should be aware of the risk of postoperative retinal tears and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Preoperative

  17. Evaluation of anticataract potential of Triphala in selenite-induced cataract: In vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Triphala (TP is composed of Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. The present study was undertaken to evaluate its anticataract potential in vitro and in vivo in a selenite-induced experimental model of cataract. In vitro enucleated rat lenses were maintained in organ culture containing Dulbecco′s Modified Eagles Medium alone or with the addition of 100΅M selenite. These served as the normal and control groups, respectively. In the test group, the medium was supplemented with selenite and different concentrations of TP aqueous extract. The lenses were incubated for 24 h at 37°C. After incubation, the lenses were processed to estimate reduced glutathione (GSH, lipid peroxidation product, and antioxidant enzymes. In vivo selenite cataract was induced in 9-day-old rat pups by subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (25 μmole/kg body weight. The test groups received 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg of TP intraperitoneally 4 h before the selenite challenge. At the end of the study period, the rats′ eyes were examined by slit-lamp. TP significantly (P < 0.01 restored GSH and decreased malondialdehyde levels. A significant restoration in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05, catalase (P < 0.05, glutathione peroxidase (P < 0.05, and glutathione-s-transferase (P < 0.005 was observed in the TP-supplemented group compared to controls. In vivo TF 25mg/kg developed only 20% nuclear cataract as compared to 100% in control. TP prevents or retards experimental selenite-induced cataract. This effect may be due to antioxidant activity. Further studies are warranted to explore its role in human cataract.

  18. Six year Trend in Cataract Surgical Techniques in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Hassan; Alipour, Fatemeh; Mehravaran, Shiva; Rezvan, Farhad; Alaeddini, Farshid; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the cataract surgery techniques performed in Iran from 2000 to 2005. Materials and Methods This study was part of the Iranian Cataract Surgery Survey (ICSS) which was a retrospective cross-sectional study. All major ocular surgery units and 10% of randomly selected minor units throughout Iran were included. Excluding the 2 week Iranian New Year holiday, 1 week per season between 2000 and 2005 (a total of 24 weeks) was selected for each center, and data on all cataract surgeries performed during these weeks were collected by reviewing patient records. The ANOVA repeated measure test was performed to determine longitudinal changes with a P0.05). Conclusion Phacoemulsification with IOL implantation has become the preferred cataract surgery method in Iran during recent years. PMID:21731326

  19. Expert System Diagnosis of Cataract Eyes Using Fuzzy Mamdani Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, I.; Romla, L.; Herawati, S.

    2018-01-01

    Cataracts are eye diseases characterized by cloudy or opacity of the lens of the eye by changing the colour of black into grey-white which slowly continues to grow and develop without feeling pain and pain that can cause blindness in human vision. Therefore, researchers make an expert system of cataract eye disease diagnosis by using Fuzzy Mamdani and how to care. The fuzzy method can convert the crisp value to linguistic value by fuzzification and includes in the rule. So this system produces an application program that can help the public in knowing cataract eye disease and how to care based on the symptoms suffered. From the results of the design implementation and testing of expert system applications to diagnose eye disease cataracts, it can be concluded that from a trial of 50 cases of data, obtained test results accuracy between system predictions with expert predictions obtained a value of 78% truth.

  20. Treating Cataracts: Dr. Rachel Bishop's Top Tips for Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Treating Cataracts Dr. Rachel Bishop's Top Tips for Your Eyes Past Issues / ... exams, a healthy lifestyle, and eye protection. Dr. Rachel Bishop, chief of consult services at the National ...

  1. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding...... increases the risk of cataract. Method: We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987–2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders’ cohort.......95–1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95–1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. Conclusion: We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950–1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment....

  2. Detection of TORCH pathogens in children with congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yabo

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between infection rates with TORCH pathogens including toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) I and II and congenital cataracts. In total, the data from 69 children with congenital cataract treated at the Children's Hospital of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine between May 2006 and September 2013 were examined, including the complete serum test results for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM that target TORCH pathogenic antibodies. These results were compared with the antibody levels of 5,914 children in a control group. Using SPSS 19.0 software, variance equation Levene tests, mean equation t tests, and completely randomized design of four tables χ 2 tests were applied. The HSV II IgG positivity rates significantly differed between the cataract and control groups. These results suggested that HSV may be one of the pathogenic viruses that leads to congenital cataracts.

  3. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Haytham I Salti11Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, 2Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant ­Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation. Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients.Keywords: cataract, infection, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, phacoe­mulsification

  4. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF.

  5. Serum Paraoxonase activity in relation to lipid profile in Age-related Macular Degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AnandBabu, Kannadasan; Bharathidevi, S R; Sripriya, Sarangapani; Sen, Parveen; Prakash, Vadivelu Jaya; Bindu, Appukuttan; Viswanathan, Natarajan; Angayarkanni, Narayanasamy

    2016-11-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease causing visual impairment in old age. Oxidative stress is one of the main contributors for the disease progression. Paraoxonase (PON), a HDL-resident antioxidant enzyme which removes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL), which is not studied much in AMD. This study assesses the PON activities in relation to the lipid status and genetic variants in AMD patients. In this prospective case-control study, a total of 48 AMD patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls were recruited. The serum oxLDL and Plasma Homocysteine (Hcy) levels were estimated by ELISA. Plasma Homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL) was estimated by HPLC. Serum PON activities were estimated by spectrophotometry. PON gene expression was assessed by qPCR and protein expression by western blot, immunofluorescence and FACS analysis. Two known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region of PON1, Q192R and L55M variants were checked in the AMD patients and controls and their association with PON activity and lipid levels were determined. Serum paraoxonase (PONase) and thiolactonase (PON-HCTLase) activities were significantly elevated in AMD patients than in controls apart from elevated serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), oxLDL. While serum LDL levels in AMD patients correlate positively with PON HCTLase activity, the serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) correlates with both PONase and PON-HCTLase activities. However, multiple regression analysis showed that, amongst the parameters, only serum TG was a significant risk factor for AMD, after adjusting for demographic parameters as well as cataract. PON2 was significantly increased at the level of gene expression (p = 0.03) as seen in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AMD patients possibly mediated by the transcription factor SP1, that showed 2-fold increase. PON1 and 2 protein expressions also showed significant increase in the PBMC

  6. A sensory origin for color-word stroop effects in aging: simulating age-related changes in color-vision mimics age-related changes in Stroop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Schneider, Bruce A

    2010-11-01

    An increase in Stroop effects with age can be interpreted as reflecting age-related reductions in selective attention, cognitive slowing, or color-vision. In the present study, 88 younger adults performed a Stroop test with two color-sets, saturated and desaturated, to simulate an age-related decrease in color perception. This color manipulation with younger adults was sufficient to lead to an increase in Stroop effects that mimics age-effects. We conclude that age-related changes in color perception can contribute to the differences in Stroop effects observed in aging. Finally, we suggest that the clinical applications of Stroop take this factor into account.

  7. Randomised, single-masked non-inferiority trial of femtosecond laser-assisted versus manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery for adults with visually significant cataract : the FACT trial protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, Alexander C; Burr, Jennifer M; Bunce, Catey; Doré, Caroline J; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Wormald, Richard P L; Round, Jeff; McCudden, Victoria; Rubin, Gary; Wilkins, Mark R; Schilder, Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/09110906X

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cataract is one of the leading causes of low vision in the westernised world, and cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed operations. Laser platforms for cataract surgery are now available, the anticipated advantages of which are broad and may include better visual

  8. Cataract Surgery with a Refractive Corneal Inlay in Place

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic, N. R.; Panagopoulou, S. I.; Pallikaris, I. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case of cataract surgery performed in a patient with a refractive corneal inlay in place. Methods. A 48-year-old female patient presented to our institute with bilateral cataract. The patient had undergone refractive corneal inlay implantation three years ago in her right, nondominant eye for presbyopia correction. Biometry and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation were performed without removing the inlay. Phacoemulsification and IOL insertion were carried out in bot...

  9. Choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting with cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoaib, K.K.; Haq, I.; Zafar, N.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of rare involvement of the eye with choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting 08 years after the primary tumor was removed. The patient initially presented with cataract most probably induced by the tumor. After cataract extraction, tumor was detected when it induced vitreous involvement and retinal detachment. Enucleation was performed and an extraocular mass was also excised. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of metastasis from renal cell carcinoma in the ocular tumor, extraocular mass and the vitreous. (author)

  10. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical treatment can complicate cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Facio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonists for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH regarding potential risks of complications in the setting of cataract surgery. AIM: To address recommendations, optimal control therapy, voiding symptoms and safety within the setting of cataract surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive literature review was performed using MEDLINE with MeSH terms and keywords "benign prostatic hyperplasia", "intraoperative floppy iris syndrome", "adrenergic alpha-antagonist" and "cataract surgery". In addition, reference lists from identified publications were reviewed to identify reports and studies of interest from 2001 to 2009. RESULTS: The first report of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS was observed during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-1 AR antagonists in 2005. It has been most commonly seen related to use of tamsulosin. Changes of medication and washout periods of up to 2 weeks have been attempted to reduce the risk of complications in the setting of cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Patients under clinical treatment for BPH should be informed about potential risks of this drug class so that it can be discuss with their healthcare providers, in particular urologist and ophthalmologist, prior to cataract surgery.

  11. Genetic background influences age-related decline in visual and nonvisual retinal responses, circadian rhythms, and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Gareth; Heise, Ines; Starbuck, Becky; Osborne, Tamzin; Wisby, Laura; Potter, Paul; Jackson, Ian J; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N; Nolan, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system is entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via retinal photoreceptors and regulates numerous aspects of physiology and behavior, including sleep. These processes are all key factors in healthy aging showing a gradual decline with age. Despite their importance, the exact mechanisms underlying this decline are yet to be fully understood. One of the most effective tools we have to understand the genetic factors underlying these processes are genetically inbred mouse strains. The most commonly used reference mouse strain is C57BL/6J, but recently, resources such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium have started producing large numbers of mouse mutant lines on a pure genetic background, C57BL/6N. Considering the substantial genetic diversity between mouse strains we expect there to be phenotypic differences, including differential effects of aging, in these and other strains. Such differences need to be characterized not only to establish how different mouse strains may model the aging process but also to understand how genetic background might modify age-related phenotypes. To ascertain the effects of aging on sleep/wake behavior, circadian rhythms, and light input and whether these effects are mouse strain-dependent, we have screened C57BL/6J, C57BL/6N, C3H-HeH, and C3H-Pde6b+ mouse strains at 5 ages throughout their life span. Our data show that sleep, circadian, and light input parameters are all disrupted by the aging process. Moreover, we have cataloged a number of strain-specific aging effects, including the rate of cataract development, decline in the pupillary light response, and changes in sleep fragmentation and the proportion of time spent asleep. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The alpha and gamma crystallin content in aqueous humor of eyes with clear lenses and with cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, H.O.; Closs, O.

    1979-01-01

    Specific radioimmunoassays were used to measure the concentration of α- and γ-crystallins in human aqueous humor. It was demonstrated that these crystallins are normally present in aqueous humor from healthy eyes. The crystallin concentration did not seem to increase with age. The normal upper limit for the α-crystallin concentration was found to be 10 ng/ml and for the γ-crystallin concentration 60 ng/ml. In the aqueous humor of eyes with cortical cataract the concentration of both crystallins was increased. With nuclear cataracts the α-crystallin concentration was increased while the γ-crystallin concentration was decreased. Experiments in rabbits showed that the crystallins in the aqueous humor left the anterior chamber at the same rate as the aqueous bulk flow. The demonstration of lens crystallins in the aqueous humor is compatible with the hypothesis that they leak from the lens. (author)

  13. Investigation of cataract surgery in Leshan, Sichuan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To comprehensively investigate the current status of cataract surgery in Leshan city, and find the existing problems according to the survey results as a guide to cataract prevention and treatment in future. METHODS: We surveyed the status of cataract surgery containing equipments, surgeons and surgery conditions in 17 ophthalmology departments of general hospitals from Leshan including 6 counties, 1 county-level city and 4 districts during 2012. Cataract surgery methods, according to various surgery financial resources, surgical performances and surgical incision, were divided into phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation(Phaco+IOL, extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation(ECCE+IOL, and each method contained 2 groups. We analyzed the outcomes following preoperative examination, surgeons, surgical methods, surgical equipments, types of IOL, surgical quantity, surgical results, and intraoperative complication. RESULTS: In whole city there were 16 operating microscopes, 43 slit lamp microscopes, 12 non-contact tonometers, 1 intraocular lens Master, 8 optical A/B type ultrasonic examination systems, 4 YAG lasers and 12 phacoemulsification instruments. There 15 doctors could complete cataract surgery independently, and 5 of them were phacoemulsification surgeons. The total number of completed cataract surgeries reached 6 211 eyes, containing 3 564 eyes for Phaco+IOL(57%(preoperative visual acuity ≥0.3 in Phaco+IOL1 were 1 520 eyes, 24%and 2 647 eyes for ECCE+IOL(43%(1 533 eyes in ECCE+IOL1, 25%. In various groups, off-blindness rate was 94.80%-100%, off-disability rate was 90.41%-100%, and 94.96%-100% received intraocular lens implantation, intraoperative complication rate was 1.00%-15.10%. CONCLUSION: The distribution of surgeons and equipments in the whole city is unbalanced, and the utilization rate of phaco equipment is low. The levels are different in various hospitals on surgical technique

  14. A lifelong competitive training practice attenuates age-related lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Casals, Cristina; Aragón-Vela, Jerónimo; Rosillo, Silvia; Gomes, Silvana N; Rivas-García, Ana; Guisado, Rafael; Huertas, Jesús R

    2017-02-01

    The effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on health and aging is not clearly explained. This study examined the effects of habitual sport practice, age, and submaximal exercise on the blood markers of oxidative stress, muscle damage, and antioxidant response. Seventy-two healthy men were grouped by their habitual sport practice: inactive (8 h/week), and further divided by age: young (18-25 years), adult (40-55 years), and senior (>55 years). Blood samples were collected at rest and after submaximal effort. Hydroperoxides and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities were measured by spectrophotometry. Nuclear DNA damage was analyzed by comet assay. The alpha-actin release was analyzed by Western blot. Alpha-tocopherol, retinol, and coenzyme-Q10 were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Data was analyzed through a factorial ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test. Lipid peroxidation increased significantly with age and submaximal effort (p < 0.05). However, the trained athlete group presented lower lipid peroxidation compared with the recreational group (MD = 2.079, SED = 0.58, p = 0.002) and inactive group (MD = 1.979, SED = 0.61, p = 0.005). Trained athletes showed significant higher alpha-actin levels (p < 0.001) than the other groups. Recreational group showed lower nuclear DNA damage than trained athletes (MD = 3.681, SED = 1.28, p = 0.015). Nevertheless, the inactive group presented significantly higher superoxide dismutase and catalase (p < 0.05) than the other groups. Data suggested that habitual competitive training practice could prevent age-related increases of plasma lipid peroxidation, which, according with our results, cannot be entirely attributed to blood antioxidant defense systems.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT : Bone loss that results from age- related and post- menopausal osteoporosis , and...5 References……………………………………………………………………………. 10 4 Introduction Osteoporosis , both age- related and post- menopausal ...a novel and highly innovative therapeutic approach to age- related osteoporosis . Body On July 27, 2012 we requested a 6 month extension without

  16. Therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent mobility decline and enhance physical performance in older adults. Several modalities, in addition to traditional strengthening programs, have been designed to manage age-related functional decline more effectively. In this study, we reviewed the current relevant literatures to assess the therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia). Age-related changes in human skeletal muscle, ...

  17. Non cancerous diseases following a chronic intern contamination by caesium 137: cataracts and cardiac arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landon, G.

    2008-07-01

    This work of thesis joins within the framework of an analysis of the sanitary consequences of the nuclear accident of Chernobylsk. Since 2005, the I.R.S.N. is interested in the not cancerous pathologies (cataracts, and cardiac arrhythmias) observed among the children living on the contaminated territories after the fallout of Chernobylsk and has in this aim implemented a research programme called E.P.I.C.E. (Evaluation of the pathologies induced by a chronicle contamination by cesium) whom objective is to show an eventual link between the chronicle ingestion of contaminated food and these pathologies emergence. An exploitation of the results of the pilot study,first phase of the E.P.I.C.E. program was realized. The analysis was completed by two bibliographical reviews relative to the knowledge available on these diseases. The results of this pilot study suggest: on one hand, an absence of link between the activity in cesium 137 at the level of the heart, of the whole body and the emergence of disorder of the heart rhythm; on the other hand, for the cases of cataract, a link between the load in cesium 137 at the neck level and the emergence of the disease in 40 % of the cases. However, these results must be considered with caution because several limits and, in particular, a way of selection affect this study. concerning the scientific literature, this one stays rather poor because only thee articles make reference to a relationship between cesium 137 and the emergence of these non cancerous pathologies. After having exposed the context, this thesis draws up the situation of knowledge relative to cataracts and to cardiac arrhythmias and their possible relationship with ionizing radiations, collect the results stemming from the analysis of the pilot study and envisages future epidemiological studies. (N.C.)

  18. Age-related synaptic loss of the medial olivocochlear efferent innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrader Angela

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related functional decline of the nervous system is consistently observed, though cellular and molecular events responsible for this decline remain largely unknown. One of the most prevalent age-related functional declines is age-related hearing loss (presbycusis, a major cause of which is the loss of outer hair cells (OHCs and spiral ganglion neurons. Previous studies have also identified an age-related functional decline in the medial olivocochlear (MOC efferent system prior to age-related loss of OHCs. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that this functional decline of the MOC efferent system is due to age-related synaptic loss of the efferent innervation of the OHCs. To this end, we used a recently-identified transgenic mouse line in which the expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, under the control of neuron-specific elements from the thy1 gene, permits the visualization of the synaptic connections between MOC efferent fibers and OHCs. In this model, there was a dramatic synaptic loss between the MOC efferent fibers and the OHCs in older mice. However, age-related loss of efferent synapses was independent of OHC status. These data demonstrate for the first time that age-related loss of efferent synapses may contribute to the functional decline of the MOC efferent system and that this synaptic loss is not necessary for age-related loss of OHCs.

  19. Age-Related Sex-Specific Changes in Brain Metabolism and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Ito, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2016-02-01

    With a large database, we aimed to evaluate sex-specific distinctive changes in brain glucose metabolism and morphology during normal aging using MRI and (18)F-FDG PET. A total of 963 cognitively healthy adults were included in this study. All subjects completed a medical questionnaire, took the mini-mental state examination, and underwent brain MRI and whole-body (18)F-FDG PET. The MR and PET images were statistically analyzed using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection. All images were corrected for whole-brain pixel value to identify the brain regions with significant changes, and regions of interest were set up with reference to Brodmann areas. We evaluated morphologic and glucose metabolic changes by cross-sectional analysis. The baseline database consisted of subjects from 30 to 40 y old, and the age-step for comparison was 5-y ranges. We also compared sex-specific differences in MR and PET images in each age group. Regarding age-related changes, in both sexes brain atrophy was observed in the lateral frontal and parietal regions and glucose hypometabolism in the medial frontal regions. There were significant differences in these parameters between the sexes; parallel changes in volume and metabolism were manifested in the medial frontal cortex in men and in the lateral and medial temporal cortex in women. By contrast, metabolism-dominant reductions were manifested in the lateral and medial parietal cortex in men and in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, including the Broca area, in women. These differences became insignificant in individuals 66 y or older. Our brain mapping study with a large number of reference human brain data demonstrated age-related parallel changes between morphology and metabolism in the medial frontal regions and sex-specific hypometabolism in the parietal (male) and ventrolateral prefrontal (female) cortices. These findings may suggest an aging vulnerability in sex-specific brain regions: the parietal cortex for

  20. Looking the Cow in the Eye: Deletion in the NID1 Gene Is Associated with Recessive Inherited Cataract in Romagnola Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Calderoni, Valerio; Joechler, Monika; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is a known condition leading to opacification of the eye lens causing partial or total blindness. Mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant or recessive inherited forms of cataracts in humans, mice, rats, guinea pigs and dogs. The use of large-sized animal models instead of those using mice for the study of this condition has been discussed due to the small size of rodent lenses. Four juvenile-onset cases of bilateral incomplete immature nuclear cataract were recently observed in Romagnola cattle. Pedigree analysis suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. In addition to the cataract, one of the cases displayed abnormal head movements. Genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping and subsequent whole genome sequencing of a single case identified two perfectly associated sequence variants in a critical interval of 7.2 Mb on cattle chromosome 28: a missense point mutation located in an uncharacterized locus and an 855 bp deletion across the exon 19/intron 19 border of the bovine nidogen 1 (NID1) gene (c.3579_3604+829del). RT-PCR showed that NID1 is expressed in bovine lenses while the transcript of the second locus was absent. The NID1 deletion leads to the skipping of exon 19 during transcription and is therefore predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.1164fs27X). The truncated protein lacks a C-terminal domain essential for binding with matrix assembly complexes. Nidogen 1 deficient mice show neurological abnormalities and highly irregular crystal lens alterations. This study adds NID1 to the list of candidate genes for inherited cataract in humans and is the first report of a naturally occurring mutation leading to non-syndromic catarct in cattle provides a potential large animal model for human cataract. PMID:25347398

  1. Laser-assisted cataract surgery: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Kathryn M; Talamo, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    The use of the femtosecond laser (FSL) in cataract surgery may represent the largest advancement in the field since the inception of phacoemulsification. The goal of this review is to outline the benefits of and barriers to this technology. There are several significant potential benefits of the FSL in cataract surgery over conventional manual cataract surgery: precise capsulotomy formation, clear corneal and limbal relaxing incision construction, lens fragmentation, and lens softening. Evidence suggests that refractive benefits include more precise effective lens position as well as reduced effective phacoemulsification time with the use of FSL compared with manual surgery. Patients with conditions such as Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy, pseudoexfoliation, history of trauma, or brunescent cataracts may particularly benefit from this technology. There are significant financial and logistical issues to consider prior to the purchase of a FSL, including the cost of the laser, and charges to patients, and how the laser affects the patient flow in the operating room. The FSL may significantly change the current approach to cataract surgery.

  2. Nanotechnology for the Prevention and Treatment of Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review recent advances in the applications of nanotechnology in cataract treatment and prevention strategies. A literature review on the use of nanotechnology for the prevention and treatment of cataract was done. Research articles about nanotechnology-based treatments and prevention technologies for cataract were searched on Web of Science, and the most recent advances were reported. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, natural antioxidants, biologic and chemical chaperones, and chaperones such as molecules have found great application in preventing and treating cataracts. Current scientific research on new treatment strategies, which focuses on the biochemical basis of the disease, will likely result in new anticataract agents. However, none of the drug formulations will be approved for use unless efficient delivery is promised. Nanoparticle engineering together with biomimetic strategies enable the development of next-generation, more efficient, less complex, and personalized treatments. The only currently available treatment for cataracts, surgical replacement of the opacified lens, is not an easily accessible option in developing countries. New treatment strategies based on topical drugs would enable treatment to reach massive populations facing the threat of blindness and more effectively deal with the postsurgical complications. Nanotechnology plays a key role in improving drug delivery systems with enhanced controlled release, targeted delivery, and bioavailability to overcome diffusion limitations in the eye.

  3. Improvement in cognitive impairment after cataract surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Mukai, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoko; Minamoto, Atsushi; Ohno, Yuko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Mishima, Hiromu K

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate whether cognitive impairment improves in elderly patients who have cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Kouki Hospital, Yamaguchi, Japan. A prospective observational study evaluated patients' scores on the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS-R) and the HDS-R minus 1 item regarding immediate regeneration (ie, function of vision and memory). Twenty patients (6 men, 14 women) with cognitive impairment had cataract surgery in 1 eye between March 1996 and July 2001 at Kouki Hospital, Japan. The mean age of the patients was 81.8 years (range 61 to 90 years). Twenty patients (4 men, 16 women) with cognitive impairment who did not have cataract surgery were selected as a control. The mean age in the control group was 84.3 years (range 70 to 93 years). The HDS-R was administered twice between March 1996 and July 2001. The mean HDS-R scores in the cataract surgery group improved from 12.5 points +/- 5.3 (SD) preoperatively to 16.6 +/- 6.2 points postoperatively; the improvement was significant (t = -5.02; Pcognitive impairment improved in 12 patients (60%), was unchanged in 7 (35%), and was worse in 1 (5%). Cataract surgery improved cognitive impairment in elderly Japanese patients.

  4. Impact of cataract surgery in reducing visual impairment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Sudhan, Anand; Jain, B K; Deshpande, Madan; Dole, Kuldeep; Shah, Mahul; Shah, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the impact of cataract surgeries in reducing visual disabilities and factors influencing it at three institutes of India. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2013. Data of 4 years were collected on gender, age, residence, presenting a vision in each eye, eye that underwent surgery, type of surgery and the amount the patient paid out of pocket for surgery. Visual impairment was categorized as; absolute blindness (no perception of light); blind (visual impairment (SVI) (visual impairment (6/18-6/60) and; normal vision (≥6/12). Statistically analysis was performed to evaluate the association between visual disabilities and demographics or other possible barriers. The trend of visual impairment over time was also evaluated. We compared the data of 2011 to data available about cataract cases from institutions between 2002 and 2009. There were 108,238 cataract cases (50.6% were female) that underwent cataract surgery at the three institutions. In 2011, 71,615 (66.2%) cases underwent surgery. There were 45,336 (41.9%) with presenting vision visual disability. The goal of improving vision related quality of life for cataract patients during the early stages of visual impairment that is common in industrialized countries seems to be non-attainable in the rural India.

  5. Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Philipp; Boraty?ski, Zbyszek; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; M?ller, Anders P.

    2016-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glare...

  6. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  7. Incidence and progression rates of age-related maculopathy: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. Willemse-Assink (Jacqueline); R. van Leeuwen (Redmer); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Th. Stijnen (Theo); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To describe the incidence rate of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the progression rates of early stages of age-related maculopathy (ARM), and to study the hierarchy of fundus features that determine progression. METHODS: A group of 4953 subjects

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in neovascular versus nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itty, Sujit; Day, Shelley; Lyles, Kenneth W; Stinnett, Sandra S; Vajzovic, Lejla M; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi

    2014-09-01

    To compare 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) with patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration and control patients. Medical records of all patients diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration and tested for serum 25OHD level at a single medical center were reviewed. Control patients were selected from patients diagnosed with pseudophakia but without age-related macular degeneration. The lowest 25OHD level available for each patient was recorded. Two hundred sixteen patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration, 146 with NVAMD, and 100 non-age-related macular degeneration control patients were included. The levels of 25OHD (mean ± SD) were significantly lower in NVAMD patients (26.1 ± 14.4 ng/mL) versus nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (31.5 ± 18.2 ng/mL, P = 0.003) and control (29.4 ± 10.1 ng/mL, P = 0.049) patients. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (age-related macular degeneration. Mean 25OHD levels were lower and vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in NVAMD patients. These associations suggest that further research is necessary regarding vitamin D deficiency as a potentially modifiable risk factor for the development of NVAMD.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Attenuating Age-Related Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation towards the bone forming osteoblastic lineage decreases as a function of age and may contribute to age-related...problem of age-related reduced availability of MSC we propose to examine the bone anabolic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) derived MSC

  10. Verteporfin plus ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.......To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration....

  11. Subfoveal fibrosis in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis.......To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis....

  12. Age-related attitudes: the influence on relationships and performance at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Franz Josef Gellert; R. Schalk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: – This paper aims to examine the influence of age and age-related attitudes on relationship factors. In addition, it seeks to assess how both factors affect care service work performance. Design/methodology/approach: – The paper explores the influence of age and age-related attitudes on the

  13. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-19

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight.

  14. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Kara-Junior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30 and a control (n=30 group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications in both the groups. At 1-month postoperative follow-up, 90.0% of patients presented spectacle-corrected visual acuity of at least 20/40. Conclusion: Cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia can be successfully conducted without discontinuing warfarin.

  15. Visual outcome of traumatic cataract surgery in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekibele, C O; Fasina, O

    2008-12-01

    To review the visual outcome of traumatic cataracts operated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan with the view to making recommendations for improved outcome. All patients operated at the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria between May 1999 and April 2004 with traumatic cataract were reviewed retrospectively to determine visual outcome and main causes of poor visual outcome notes of patients 32 patients, age range 2 to 71 years, mean age 25.6 +/- SD 16.1 years were reviewed. 22 (68.8%) were males while 10 (31.2%) were females. Causes of traumatic cataract included wood/stick splinters in 7 (21.9%), cane/whiplash injury 6 (18.8%), and propelled missile injuries, 5 (15.6%). Less important cause of injuries were gun shot, road traffic accident and fist injuries. 11 (35.6%) of the patients had best corrected post operative visual acuity of >6/18, 10 (32.2%) noted.

  16. Outcomes of Surgery for Posterior Polar Cataract Using Torsional Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Sızmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to report outcomes of surgery for posterior polar cataract using torsional ultrasound. Material and Method: Medical records of 26 eyes of 21 consecutive patients with posterior polar cataract who had cataract surgery using the torsional phacoemulsification were evaluated retrospectively. The surgical procedure used, phacoemulsification parameters, intraoperative complications, and postoperative visual outcome were recorded. Results: Of the 26 eyes, 24 (92.3% had small to medium posterior polar opacity. Two eyes had large opacity. All surgeries were performed using the torsional handpiece. Posterior capsule rupture occurred in 4 (15.3% eyes. The mean visual acuity improved significantly after surgery (p<0.001. The postoperative visual acuity was worse than 20/20 in 5 eyes. The cause of the low acuity was amblyopia. Discussion: Successful surgical results and good visual outcome can be achieved with phacoemulsification using the torsional handpiece. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 345-7

  17. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ting Horng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from −3.0 D to −9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one’s eyesight.

  18. Incidence and risk factors for chronic uveitis following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Kim, Stephen Jae; Chomsky, Amy; Saboori, Mazeyar

    2013-04-01

    To determine the incidence of and associated risk factors for uveitis after cataract surgery. A total of 17,757 eyes were identified and records of 42 eyes that developed uveitis and 2320 eyes that did not were reviewed. Postsurgical uveitis was defined as persistent inflammation for ≥ 6 months after surgery. Forty-two eyes of 35 patients developed uveitis (0.24%). Eleven patients underwent consecutive cataract surgery but developed unilateral uveitis, and intraoperative complications occurred in 55% of uveitic eyes compared to 0% in fellow eyes (p < 0.05). Median duration of inflammation was 8 and 11.5 months in eyes with and without vitrectomy (p < 0.05). Intraocular complications occurred in 44 and 8.3% of eyes that did and did not develop uveitis, respectively (p = 0.01). Postsurgical uveitis developed after approximately 1 in 400 cataract surgeries and occurred more frequently in eyes experiencing intraoperative complications.

  19. The congenital "ant-egg" cataract phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in connexin46

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Yao, Wenliang; Eiberg, Hans

    2006-01-01

    "Ant-egg" cataract is a rare, distinct variety of congenital/infantile cataract that was reported in a large Danish family in 1967. This cataract phenotype is characterized by ant-egg-like bodies embedded in the lens in a laminar configuration and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We...

  20. Audit of visual outcome of cataract surgeries in a private eye hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim was to determine the quality of cataract surgeries in Port Harcourt, and ascertain the difference in the outcome, if any, between small incision cataract surgery (SICS) and extra capsular cataract extraction (ECCE). Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out in a Private Eye Hospital in Port ...