WorldWideScience

Sample records for age-related macular disease

  1. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  3. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  4. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  5. Age-related macular disease : studies on incidence, risk factors, and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Leeuwen (Redmer)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular disease (AMD) is a new name, recently coined by Bird,25 for a progressive and degenerative disease in elderly persons affecting the macula lutea. Dysfunction of this part of the retina, and especially its centre, the fovea, results in the inability to read,

  6. Aging Is Not a Disease: Distinguishing Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD. PMID:23933169

  7. [Current concepts in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of central blindness in elderly population of the western world. The pathogenesis of this disease, likely multifactorial, is not well known, although a number of theories have been put forward, including oxidative stress, genetic interactions, hemodynamic imbalance, immune and inflammatory processes. The understanding of age-related macular degeneration pathogenesis will give rise to new approaches in prevention and treatment of the early and late stages of both atrophic and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  8. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  9. Dietary compound score and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Because foods provide many nutrients, which may interact with each other to modify risk for multifactorial diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sought to develop a composite scoring system to summarize the combined effect of multiple dietary nutrients on AMD risk. Th...

  10. Identification of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using OCT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Punal M., Dr; Krishna, Nanditha; Ashwini, V.; Prathibha, H. M.

    2018-02-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration is the most leading retinal disease in the recent years. Macular degeneration occurs when the central portion of the retina, called macula deteriorates. As the deterioration occurs with the age, it is commonly referred as Age-related Macular Degeneration. This disease can be visualized by several imaging modalities such as Fundus imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique and many other. Optical Coherence Tomography is the widely used technique for screening the Age-related Macular Degeneration disease, because it has an ability to detect the very minute changes in the retina. The Healthy and AMD affected OCT images are classified by extracting the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE) layer of the images using the image processing technique. The extracted layer is sampled, the no. of white pixels in each of the sample is counted and the mean value of the no. of pixels is calculated. The average mean value is calculated for both the Healthy and the AMD affected images and a threshold value is fixed and a decision rule is framed to classify the images of interest. The proposed method showed an accuracy of 75%.

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  12. Does eating particular diets alter risk of age-related macular degeneration in users of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Recent information suggests that the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) supplement, enhanced intake of omega-3 fatty acids, and diminishing dietary glycemic index (dGI) are protective against advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Dietary information was collected a...

  13. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Age-Related Macular Degeneration Sections What Is Macular Degeneration? How is AMD ... What Does Macular Degeneration Look Like? What Is Macular Degeneration? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la degeneración macular ...

  14. Recent advances in treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the important eye diseases of the WHO present three big blindness, is one of the main blinding eye disease in people over the age of 50, people over the age of 65, about 2% of the disease caused by monocular blindness, as the population ages, AMD prevalence is increasing in our country. AMD with respect to its clinical manifestations can be divided into dry AMD and wet AMD, wet AMD is the most harmful for the vision of patients, at present there are many treatments for AMD(mainly for wet age-related macular degeneration, mainly including laser treatment, drug therapy, surgical treatment, gene therapy,etc. The treatments of AMD would be illuminated in this article.

  15. Self-reported optometric practise patterns in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Angelica; Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Zangerl, Barbara; Assaad, Nagi; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The use of advanced imaging in clinical practice is emerging and the use of this technology by optometrists in assessing patients with age-related macular degeneration is of interest. Therefore, this study explored contemporary, self-reported patterns of practice regarding age-related macular degeneration diagnosis and management using a cross-sectional survey of optometrists in Australia and New Zealand. Practising optometrists were surveyed on four key areas, namely, demographics, clinical skills and experience, assessment and management of age-related macular degeneration. Questions pertaining to self-rated competency, knowledge and attitudes used a five-point Likert scale. Completed responses were received from 127 and 87 practising optometrists in Australia and New Zealand, respectively. Advanced imaging showed greater variation in service delivery than traditional techniques (such as slitlamp funduscopy) and trended toward optical coherence tomography, which was routinely performed in age-related macular degeneration by 49 per cent of respondents. Optical coherence tomography was also associated with higher self-rated competency, knowledge and perceived relevance to practice than other modalities. Most respondents (93 per cent) indicated that they regularly applied patient symptoms, case history, visual function results and signs from traditional testing, when queried about their management of patients with age-related macular degeneration. Over half (63 per cent) also considered advanced imaging, while 31 per cent additionally considered all of these as well as the disease stage and clinical guidelines. Contrary to the evidence base, 68 and 34 per cent rated nutritional supplements as highly relevant or relevant in early age-related macular degeneration and normal aging changes, respectively. These results highlight the emergence of multimodal and advanced imaging (especially optical coherence tomography) in the assessment of age-related macular degeneration

  16. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  17. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Max Damico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-07-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  20. Gene-diet interactions in age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent blinding disease, accounting for roughly 50% of blindness in developed nations. Very significant advances have been made in terms of discovering genetic susceptibilities to AMD as well as dietary risk factors. To date, nutritional supplementation...

  1. Precursors of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Linneberg, Allan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate associations of small, hard macular drusen and larger macular drusen with obesity-related risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 888 subjects aged 30-60 years characterized using anthropometric measurements and blood sample analyses. Physical activity was assessed...... by questionnaire. Digital grayscale fundus photographs were recorded in red-free illumination and graded for the presence of macular drusen >63µm in either eye and the presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen as a mean of both eyes. RESULTS: Macular drusen >63µm were associated with the level of physical...... activity, the age- and sex adjusted odds ratio being 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.13-0.82, P=0.016) for participants who were physically active more than 7 h/week compared with participants active 0-2 h/week. In women, macular drusen >63µm were associated with higher serum triglycerides (P=0...

  2. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colijn, Johanna M.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Prokofyeva, Elena; Alves, Dalila; Cachulo, Maria L.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M. J.; Korb, Christina; Erke, Maja G.; Bron, Alain; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Segato, Tatiana; Piermarocchi, Stefano; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Topouzis, Fotis; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bertelsen, Geir; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Foster, Paul J.; Silva, Rufino; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Ajana, Soufiane; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Arndt, Verena; Bhatia, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Biarnés, Marc; Borrell, Anna; Bühren, Sebastian; Calado, Sofia M.; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Dammeier, Sascha; de Jong, Eiko K.; de la Cerda, Berta; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Diether, Sigrid; Emri, Eszter; Endermann, Tanja; Ferraro, Lucia L.; Garcia, Míriam; Heesterbeek, Thomas J.; Honisch, Sabina; Bergen, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD in

  3. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colijn, Johanna M; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Prokofyeva, Elena

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a frequent, complex disorder in elderly of European ancestry. Risk profiles and treatment options have changed considerably over the years, which may have affected disease prevalence and outcome. We determined the prevalence of early and late AMD...

  4. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  5. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  6. MACULAR CHOROIDAL VOLUME CHANGES AFTER INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB FOR EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovits, Stefan; Seidel, Gerald; Pertl, Laura; Malle, Eva M; Hausberger, Silke; Makk, Johanna; Singer, Christoph; Osterholt, Julia; Herzog, Sereina A; Haas, Anton; Weger, Martin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on the macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness in treatment naïve eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration. The macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness were measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. After a screening examination, each patient received 3 monthly intravitreal injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab. One month after the third injection was a final assessment. Forty-seven patients with a mean age of 80 ± 6.4 years were included. The macular choroidal volume decreased significantly from median 4.1 mm (interquartile range 3.4-5.9) to median 3.9 mm (interquartile range 3.1-5.6) between the baseline and final examination (difference -0.46 mm, 95% confidence interval: -0.57 to 0.35, P macular choroidal volume at baseline and subfoveal choroidal thickness at baseline were not associated with the response to treatment. The macular choroidal volume and the subfoveal choroidal thickness decreased significantly after 3 monthly bevacizumab injections for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  7. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  8. Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and β-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Association of HTRA1 rs11200638 with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Tamires Prates; da Silva Costa, Sueli Matilde; Ananina, Galina; Hirata, Fábio Endo; Rim, Priscila Hae Hyun; Medina, Flávio MacCord; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease that can lead to vision impairment in older individuals. Although the etiology of age-related macular degeneration remains unknown, risk factors include age, ethnicity, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and genetic factors. Two main loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies, on chromosomes 1 and 10. Among the variants located at the 10q26 region, rs11200638, located at the HTRA1 gene promoter, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration in several populations and is considered the main polymorphism. We conducted a replication case-control study to analyze the frequency and participation of rs11200638 in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration in a sample of patients and controls from the State of São Paulo, Brazil, through polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion. The frequency of the A allele was 57.60% in patients with age-related macular degeneration and 36.45% in controls (p value age-related macular degeneration group compared to the control group (p = 1.21 e-07 and 0.0357, respectively). No statistically significant results were observed after stratification in dry versus wet types or advanced versus non-advanced forms. To our knowledge, this is the first time the association between rs11200638 and overall age-related macular degeneration has been reported in South America.

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly. AMD is diagnosed based on characteristic retinal findings in individuals older than 50. Early detection and treatment are critical in increasing the likelihood of retaining good and functional vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics of Unilateral and Bilateral Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severity Stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Altay, L.; Viehweger, E.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Felsch, M.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disease causing visual impairment and blindness. Various gene variants are strongly associated with late stage AMD, but little is known about the genetics of early forms of the disease. This study evaluated associations of genetic

  12. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian Yat Hin; Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula.

  13. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. PATTERNS OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE DEFECTS IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION SUBTYPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkok, Ahmet; Sigford, Douglas K; Tezel, Tongalp H

    2016-11-01

    To test define characteristic fundus autofluorescence patterns of different exudative age-related macular degeneration subtypes. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-two patients with choroidal neovascularization because of three different neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes were included in the study. Macular and peripheral fundus autofluorescence patterns of study subjects were compared in a masked fashion. Fundus autofluorescence patterns of all three neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes revealed similar patterns. However, peripapillary hypo-autofluorescence was more common among patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (88.2%) compared with patients with retinal angiomatous proliferation (12.5%) and patients without retinal angiomatous proliferation and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (21.1%) (P autofluorescence defects in neovascular age-related macular degeneration maybe suggestive of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy as a variant of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  15. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  16. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  17. Superior cervical gangliectomy induces non-exudative age-related macular degeneration in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán H. Dieguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, a prevalent cause of blindness, is a progressive and degenerative disease characterized by alterations in Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors exclusively localized in the macula. Although experimental murine models exist, the vast majority take a long time to develop retinal alterations and, in general, these alterations are ubiquitous, with many resulting from non-eye-specific genetic manipulations; additionally, most do not always reproduce the hallmarks of human age-related macular degeneration. Choroid vessels receive sympathetic innervation from the superior cervical ganglion, which, together with the parasympathetic system, regulates blood flow into the choroid. Choroid blood flow changes have been involved in age-related macular degeneration development and progression. At present, no experimental models take this factor into account. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of superior cervical gangliectomy (also known as ganglionectomy on the choroid, Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium and retina. Adult male C57BL/6J mice underwent unilateral superior cervical gangliectomy and a contralateral sham procedure. Although superior cervical gangliectomy induced ubiquitous choroid and choriocapillaris changes, it induced Bruch's membrane thickening, loss of retinal pigment epithelium melanin content and retinoid isomerohydrolase, the appearance of drusen-like deposits, and retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor atrophy, exclusively localized in the temporal side. Moreover, superior cervical gangliectomy provoked a localized increase in retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor apoptosis, and a decline in photoreceptor electroretinographic function. Therefore, superior cervical gangliectomy recapitulated the main features of human non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, and could become a new experimental model of dry age-related

  18. Radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Tomoko; Mandai, Michiko; Honjo, Megumi; Matsuda, Naoko; Miyamoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Masayo; Ogura, Yuichiro; Sasai, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Fifteen eyes of age-related macular degeneration were treated by low-dose radiation. All the affected eyes had subfoveal neovascular membrane. Seventeen nontreated eyes with similar macular lesion served as control. Radiation was performed using photon beam at 6MV. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 consecutive days. When evaluated 9 to 12 months after treatment, the size of neovascular membrane had decreased in 47% of treated eyes and 7% of control eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 13% of treated eyes and in none of control eyes. When the initial neovascular membrane was less than 1.5 disc diameter in size, the visual acuity had improved or remained stationary in 90% of treated eyes and in 36% of control eyes. The findings show the potential beneficial effect of radiation for age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  19. Degeneração macular relacionada à idade: novas perspectivas Age-related macular degeneration: new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Bittar Nehemy

    2006-12-01

    have proved to be very useful for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization associated to age-related macular degeneration, by reducing the risk of vision loss and, occasionally, by a temporary improvement of vision. Only a small subset of patients may benefit from other treatment modalities, such as laser photocoagulation, surgical removal of choroidal neovascularization and transpuppillary thermotherapy (TTT. Strategies to control and treat age-related macular degeneration may progress quickly as more is learned about its pathophysiology and the molecular events that contribute to the disease expression.

  20. Transcriptome changes in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitmore S Scott

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a debilitating, common cause of visual impairment. While the last decade has seen great progress in understanding the pathophysiology of AMD, the molecular changes that occur in eyes with AMD are still poorly understood. In the current issue of Genome Medicine, Newman and colleagues present the first systematic transcriptional profile analysis of AMD-affected tissues, providing a comprehensive set of expression data for different regions (macula versus periphery, tissues (retina versus retinal pigment epithelium (RPE/choroid, and disease state (control versus early or advanced AMD. Their findings will serve as a foundation for additional systems-level research into the pathogenesis of this blinding disease. Please see related article: http://genomemedicine.com/content/4/2/16

  1. A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of nutritional supplementation on visual function in normal, and age-related macular disease affected eyes: design and methodology [ISRCTN78467674

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eperjesi Frank

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular disease is the leading cause of blind registration in the developed world. One aetiological hypothesis involves oxidation, and the intrinsic vulnerability of the retina to damage via this process. This has prompted interest in the role of antioxidants, particularly the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, in the prevention and treatment of this eye disease. Methods The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to determine the effect of a nutritional supplement containing lutein, vitamins A, C and E, zinc, and copper on measures of visual function in people with and without age-related macular disease. Outcome measures are distance and near visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision, macular visual field, glare recovery, and fundus photography. Randomisation is achieved via a random number generator, and masking achieved by third party coding of the active and placebo containers. Data collection will take place at nine and 18 months, and statistical analysis will employ Student's t test. Discussion A paucity of treatment modalities for age-related macular disease has prompted research into the development of prevention strategies. A positive effect on normals may be indicative of a role of nutritional supplementation in preventing or delaying onset of the condition. An observed benefit in the age-related macular disease group may indicate a potential role of supplementation in prevention of progression, or even a degree reversal of the visual effects caused by this condition.

  2. New developments in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that over 3 million people (9% of global blindness are blinded by age-related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD affects people over the age of 55. There are two main types of AMD, dry and wet. In dry AMD, patients slowly lose vision through progressive atrophy of the macular tissue. Wet, or exudative, AMD, is associated with new blood vessels called subretinal neovascular membranes (or SRNVM and affected patients lose vision more rapidly due to fluid leakage and haemorrhage at the macula.

  3. Superior cervical gangliectomy induces non-exudative age-related macular degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Hernán H; Romeo, Horacio E; González Fleitas, María F; Aranda, Marcos L; Milne, Georgia A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Dorfman, Damián

    2018-02-07

    Non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, a prevalent cause of blindness, is a progressive and degenerative disease characterized by alterations in Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors exclusively localized in the macula. Although experimental murine models exist, the vast majority take a long time to develop retinal alterations and, in general, these alterations are ubiquitous, with many resulting from non-eye-specific genetic manipulations; additionally, most do not always reproduce the hallmarks of human age-related macular degeneration. Choroid vessels receive sympathetic innervation from the superior cervical ganglion, which, together with the parasympathetic system, regulates blood flow into the choroid. Choroid blood flow changes have been involved in age-related macular degeneration development and progression. At present, no experimental models take this factor into account. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of superior cervical gangliectomy (also known as ganglionectomy) on the choroid, Bruch's membrane, retinal pigment epithelium and retina. Adult male C57BL/6J mice underwent unilateral superior cervical gangliectomy and a contralateral sham procedure. Although superior cervical gangliectomy induced ubiquitous choroid and choriocapillaris changes, it induced Bruch's membrane thickening, loss of retinal pigment epithelium melanin content and retinoid isomerohydrolase, the appearance of drusen-like deposits, and retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor atrophy, exclusively localized in the temporal side. Moreover, superior cervical gangliectomy provoked a localized increase in retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor apoptosis, and a decline in photoreceptor electroretinographic function. Therefore, superior cervical gangliectomy recapitulated the main features of human non-exudative age-related macular degeneration, and could become a new experimental model of dry age-related macular degeneration, and

  4. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Polarization sensitive changes in the human macula associated with normal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean Allan, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    The human macula occupies a relatively small, but crucial retinal area, as it is the location responsible for our most acute spatial vision and best color discrimination. Localizing important landmarks in the retina is difficult even in normal eyes where morphological inter-individual variability is high. This becomes even more challenging in the presence of sight-threatening pathology. With respect to the human macula, there remains a significant gap in the understanding of normal structure and function. Even less is known about the pathological mechanisms that occur in sight-threatening diseases including age-related macular degeneration. Because relatively little is known about normal aging changes, it is also difficult to differentiate those changes from changes associated with retinal disease. To better understand normal and pathological changes in the macula, imaging techniques using specific optical signatures are required. Structural features in the macula can be distinguished based on their intrinsic properties using specific light/tissue interactions. Because of the high degree of structural regularity in the macula, polarization sensitive imaging is potentially a useful tool for evaluating the morphology and integrity of the cellular architecture for both normal individuals and those affected by disease. In our investigations, we used polarization sensitive imaging to determining normal landmarks that are important clinically and for research investigations. We found that precision and accuracy in localizing the central macula was greatly improved through the use of polarization sensitive imaging. We also found that specific polarization alterations can be used to demonstrate systematic changes as a function of age, disproportionately affecting the central macular region. When evaluating patients with age-related macular degeneration, we found that precision and accuracy of localizing the central macula was also improved, even when significant pathology

  6. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  7. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  8. [Vitreomacular adhesion in HD-OCT images in the age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalska, Małgorzata; Swiech-Zubilewicz, Anna; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an incidence of the vitreomacular adhesion in patients with age-related macular degeneration. We examined 472 eyes in 241 patients (136 W/ 105 M) in age of 54-92 years (mean 62.6 years +/- 8.5) with dry or wet age-related macular degeneration using Cirrus HD-OCT (Zeiss) macular cube 512x128 program or 5-line pro-gram. Vitreomacular adhesion was observed in 139 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (29.4%, p=0.000*), in 101 eyes with drusen (21.4%, p=0.000*), in 38 eyes with retinal pigment epithelium alterations (8%, p=0.202), in 278 eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (58.9%, p=0.001*), in 21 eyes with pigment epithelial detachment (4.4%, p=0.303), in 161 eyes with choroidal neovascularzation (34. 1%, p=0.031*/ and in 96 eyes with scar (20.4%, p=0.040*). Probably, vitreomacular adhesion alone is not able to induce age-related macular degeneration, but it may be associated with choroidal neovascularization development, it can contribute to exudate formation and choroidal neovascularization, it may induces or sustains a chronic low-grade inflammation in the macula region.

  9. Risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: Pooled findings from three continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.; Assink, J.; Klein, R.; Mitchell, P.; Klaver, C. C.; Klein, B. E.; Hofman, A.; Jensen, S.; Wang, J. J.; de Jong, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors for late age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in three racially similar populations from North America, Europe, and AUSTRALIA: Combined analysis of population-based eye disease prevalence data. There were 14,752 participants with gradable

  10. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Garcia Layana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  11. Vitamin D and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layana, Alfredo Garcia; Minnella, Angelo Maria; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Aslam, Tariq; Holz, Frank G; Leys, Anita; Silva, Rufino; Delcourt, Cécile; Souied, Eric; Seddon, Johanna M

    2017-10-13

    In recent years, the relationship between vitamin D and health has received growing attention from the scientific and medical communities. Vitamin D deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with various acute and chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Its active metabolite, 1α,25-dihydoxy vitamin D, acts as a modulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and cumulative data from experimental and observational studies suggest that relatively a lower vitamin D status could be a potential risk factor for the development of early and/or late AMD. Herein, we made a narrative review of the mechanisms linking a potential role of vitamin D with the current concepts of AMD pathophysiology.

  12. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analysis. setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES),

  13. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Cascella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old. AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension. In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2 that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines, immune cells (macrophages, and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression.

  14. SCARB1 rs5888 is associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration susceptibility and an impaired macular area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislovaitiene, Daiva; Zaliuniene, Dalia; Krisciukaitis, Algimantas; Petrolis, Robertas; Smalinskiene, Alina; Lesauskaite, Vita; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Lesauskaite, Vaiva

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), a progressive retinal disease, is responsible for an impaired central vision in about 180 million people worldwide. Current options for ARMD prevention and treatment are limited due to an incomplete understanding of disease etiopathogenesis. We aimed to test the hypothesis that the single nucleotide polymorphism rs5888 of SCARB1 gene reflecting lipid and antioxidant micronutrient metabolism pathways is associated with ARMD susceptibility and to evaluate if there is any relation between SCARB1 rs5888 and the macular lesion area. The prospective case-control study included patients with ARMD (n = 215) and the reference group (n = 238) drawn from a random sample of the Lithuanian population (n = 1436). The genotyping test of SCARB1 rs5888 was carried out using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Regression analysis adjusted by gender and age demonstrated that SCARB1 rs5888 TT genotype significantly decreased the odds for ARMD development (OR: 0.61, 95%; CI: 0.380-0.981, p = 0.04). A smoking habit and leading an outdoor life are associated with larger macular lesion areas in ARMD patients (0.54 (0.00-39.06) vs. 3.09 (0.02-19.30) and 0.27 (0.00-34.57) vs. 0.75 (0.00-39.06), respectively). In late stage ARMD subjects with CT genotype, the macular lesion area was larger than in TT carriers (7.64 (0.49-39.06) mm 2 vs. 5.02 (0.03-37.06) mm 2 , p = 0.006). SCARB1 rs5888 and environmental oxidative stress have a prominent role in ARMD susceptibility, early ARMD progression to advanced stage disease and even in the outcome of the disease-an area of macular lesion.

  15. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M.; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decrea...

  16. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research helps unravel the biology of ... rare, but powerful risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of vision loss in ...

  17. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  18. Prevalence of age-related maculopathy and age-related macular degeneration among the inuit in Greenland. The Greenland Inuit Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Varis Nis; Rosenberg, Thomas; la Cour, Morten

    2008-01-01

    To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland.......To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland....

  19. Risk assessment model for development of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael L; Francis, Peter J; Ferris, Frederick L; Hamon, Sara C; Clemons, Traci E

    2011-12-01

    To design a risk assessment model for development of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) incorporating phenotypic, demographic, environmental, and genetic risk factors. We evaluated longitudinal data from 2846 participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. At baseline, these individuals had all levels of AMD, ranging from none to unilateral advanced AMD (neovascular or geographic atrophy). Follow-up averaged 9.3 years. We performed a Cox proportional hazards analysis with demographic, environmental, phenotypic, and genetic covariates and constructed a risk assessment model for development of advanced AMD. Performance of the model was evaluated using the C statistic and the Brier score and externally validated in participants in the Complications of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial. The final model included the following independent variables: age, smoking history, family history of AMD (first-degree member), phenotype based on a modified Age-Related Eye Disease Study simple scale score, and genetic variants CFH Y402H and ARMS2 A69S. The model did well on performance measures, with very good discrimination (C statistic = 0.872) and excellent calibration and overall performance (Brier score at 5 years = 0.08). Successful external validation was performed, and a risk assessment tool was designed for use with or without the genetic component. We constructed a risk assessment model for development of advanced AMD. The model performed well on measures of discrimination, calibration, and overall performance and was successfully externally validated. This risk assessment tool is available for online use.

  20. Verteporfin plus ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.......To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration....

  1. Patient Awareness of Cataract and Age-related Macular Degeneration among the Korean Elderly: A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hankil; Jang, Yong Jung; Lee, Hyung Keun; Kang, Hye Young

    2017-12-01

    Age-related eye disease is often considered part of natural aging. Lack of awareness of eye conditions can result in missed treatment. We investigated the rates of awareness of cataract and age-related macular degeneration, the most common age-related eye-diseases, and the associated factors among elderly Koreans. We identified 7,403 study subjects (≥40 years old) with cataract or age-related macular degeneration based on ophthalmic examination results during the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2010 and 2012. We assessed whether patients were aware of their eye condition based on a previous diagnosis by a physician. The average awareness rate over the 3-year study period was 23.69% in subjects with cataract and 1.45% in subjects with age-related macular degeneration. Logistic regression analysis showed that patients with cataract were more likely to recognize their condition if they had myopia (odds ratio, 2.08), hyperopia (odds ratio, 1.33), family history of eye disease (odds ratio, 1.44), or a past eye examination (odds ratio, 4.07-29.10). The presence of diabetes mellitus was also a significant predictor of patient awareness of cataract (odds ratio, 1.88). Poor patient recognition of eye disease among the Korean elderly highlights the seriousness of this potential public health problem in our aging society. Pre-existing eye-related conditions and diabetes were significant predictors of awareness; therefore, patients in frequent contact with their doctors have a greater chance of detecting eye disease. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  2. Evaluation of an oral telomerase activator for early age-related macular degeneration - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dow CT

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coad Thomas Dow,1,2 Calvin B Harley3 1McPherson Eye Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; 2Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, WI, USA; 3Independent Telomere Biology Consultant, Murphys, CA, USA Purpose: Telomere attrition and corresponding cellular senescence of the retinal pigment epithelium contribute to the changes of age-related macular degeneration. Activation of the enzyme telomerase can add telomeric DNA to retinal pigment epithelium chromosomal ends and has been proposed as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. We report the use of a small molecule, oral telomerase activator (TA-65 in early macular degeneration. This study, focusing on early macular degeneration, provides a model for the use of TAs in age-related disease.Method: Thirty-eight (38 patients were randomly assigned to a 1-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled interventional study with arms for oral TA-65 or placebo. Macular functions via micro-perimetry were the primary measured outcomes.Results: The macular function in the arm receiving the TA-65 showed significant improvement relative to the placebo control. The improvement was manifest at 6 months and was maintained at 1 year: macular threshold sensitivity (measured as average dB [logarithmic decibel scale of light attenuation] improved 0.97 dB compared to placebo (P-value 0.02 and percent reduced thresholds lessened 8.2% compared to the placebo arm (P-value 0.04. Conclusion: The oral TA significantly improved the macular function of treatment subjects compared to controls. Although this study was a pilot and a larger study is being planned, it is noteworthy in that it is, to our knowledge, the first randomized placebo-controlled study of a TA supplement. Keywords: drusen, macular degeneration, micro-perimetry, senescence, telomerase activation, telomere

  3. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration-like retinopathy by rapamycin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Muraleva, Natalia A; Zhdankina, Anna A; Stefanova, Natalia A; Fursova, Anzhela Z; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration, a neurodegenerative and vascular retinal disease, is the most common cause of blindness in the Western countries. Evidence accumulates that target of rapamycin is involved in aging and age-related diseases, including neurodegeneration. The target of rapamycin inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses the senescent cell phenotype and extends life span in diverse species, including mice. Rapamycin decreases senescence-associated phenotypes in retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on spontaneous retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, an animal model of age-related macular degeneration. Rats were treated with either 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg rapamycin, which was given orally as a food mixture. In a dose-dependent manner, rapamycin decreased the incidence and severity of retinopathy. Rapamycin improved some (but not all) histological abnormalities associated with retinopathy. Thus, in retinal pigment epithelial cell layers, rapamycin decreased nuclei heterogeneity and normalized intervals between nuclei. In photoreceptor cells, associated neurons, and radial glial cells, rapamycin prevented nuclear and cellular pyknosis. More important, rapamycin prevented destruction of ganglionar neurons in the retina. Rapamycin did not exert any adverse effects on the retina in control disease-free Wistar rats. Taken together, our data suggest the therapeutic potential of rapamycin for treatment and prevention of retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Age related macular degeneration - modern diagnostic and therapeutic preventive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gogelová, Blanka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease associated with aging that gradually destroys sharp, central vision. Central vision is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving. AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that alows seeing of fine details. AMD occurs in two form: dry and wet. In dry AMD, the light sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. As fewer cells in the macula are able to function, people will see details less c...

  5. Hot Topics in Pharmacogenetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible visual loss and is primarily treated with nutritional supplementation as well as with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for certain patients with neovascular disease. AMD is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. In addition, treatment outcomes from nutritional supplementation and anti-VEGF agents vary considerably. Therefore, it is reasonable to suspect that there may be pharmacogenetic influences on these treatments. Many series have reported individual associations with variants in complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2), and other loci. However, at this time there are no validated associations. With respect to AMD, pharmacogenetics remains an intriguing area of research but is not helpful for routine clinical management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  7. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  8. Current knowledge and trends in age-related macular degeneration: today's and future treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Oliver, Scott C N; Olson, Jeffrey L; Fine, Stuart L; Mandava, Naresh; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2013-09-01

    To address the most dynamic and current issues concerning today's treatment options and promising research efforts regarding treatment for age-related macular degeneration. This review is aimed to serve as a practical reference for more in-depth reviews on the subject. An online review of the database PubMed and Ovid were performed, searching for the key words age-related macular degeneration, AMD, VEGF, treatment, PDT, steroids, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, VEGF-trap, radiation, combined therapy, as well as their compound phrases. The search was limited to articles published since 1985. All returned articles were carefully screened, and their references were manually reviewed for additional relevant data. The web page www.clinicaltrials.gov was also accessed in search of relevant research trials. A total of 363 articles were reviewed, including 64 additional articles extracted from the references. At the end, only 160 references were included in this review. Treatment for age-related macular degeneration is a very dynamic research field. While current treatments are mainly aimed at blocking vascular endothelial growth factor, future treatments seek to prevent vision loss because of scarring. Promising efforts have been made to address the dry form of the disease, which has lacked effective treatment.

  9. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research.

  10. Genetic association of apolipoprotein E with age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kliffen (Mike); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); M. Cruts (Marc); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common geriatric eye disorder leading to blindness and is characterized by degeneration of the neuroepithelium in the macular area of the eye. Apolipoprotein E (apoE), the major apolipoprotein of the CNS and an

  11. Nutritional supplements in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of blindness in the Western World. While with new therapies that are directed towards vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potentially efficient treatment option for the wet form of the disease has been introduced, a therapeutic regimen for dry AMD is still lacking. There is evidence from several studies that oral intake of supplements is beneficial in preventing progression of the disease. Several formulations of micronutrients are currently available. The present review focuses on the role of supplements in the treatment and prevention of AMD and sums up the current knowledge about the most frequently used micronutrients. In addition, regulatory issues are discussed, and future directions for the role of supplementation in AMD are highlighted. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Moshfeghi, Darius M; Moshfeghi, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy are important causes of visual impairment and blindness in the world. Because of recent advances and newly available treatment modalities along with the devastating consequences associated with late stages of these diseases, much attention has been paid to the importance of early detection and improving patient access to specialist care. Telemedicine or, more specifically, digital retinal imaging utilizing telemedical technology has been proposed as an important alternative screening and management strategy to help meet this demand. In this paper, we perform a literature review and analysis that evaluates the validity and feasibility of telemedicine in detecting diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Understanding both the progress and barriers to progress that have been demonstrated in these two areas is important for future telemedicine research projects and innovations in telemedicine technology.

  13. ALGORITHM OF DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF AN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION AT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIPHERAL UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Khoroshikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of clinical trial of various approaches in treatment the exudative forms of macular degenerations, including age-related, against chronic slow intensity inflammatory process on the extreme retinal periphery of an eye are described in represented material. There were 91 patients (105 eyes in the research with different types of an exudative macular degeneration. The general criteria of inclusion were: age of 18–80 years old, complaints to discomfort in eyes, a spot before an eye, distortions and decrease in the central sight, ophthalmoscopic symptoms of hypostasis in the central and peripheral areas of a retina. It is analyzed the general criteria of diagnostics and treatment of the disease in the article. Considering defeat of the chorioretinal structures located near the ora serrata at persons of young and advanced age. Practical recommendations to a choice of methods of diagnostics and treatment of various clinical and morphological forms of the disease are made. Screening methods of identification of patients with the peripheral uveitis are offered. The scheme of risk calculation of development the macular pathology at persons with changes on the extreme periphery of a retina, that can be used as a method of prevention of development predictively adverse of “wet" forms of an age-related macular degeneration, by means of timely sparing treatment at patients with chronic inflammatory diseases of eyes is given.

  14. Age-related macular degeneration in Onitsha, Nigeria | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, pattern and ocular morbidity associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at the Guinness Eye Center Onitsha Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all new patients aged 50 years and above seen between January 1997 and December 2004 were reviewed.

  15. A Deep Learning Algorithm for Prediction of Age-Related Eye Disease Study Severity Scale for Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Color Fundus Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Felix; Mengelkamp, Judith; Brandl, Caroline; Harsch, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Martina E; Linkohr, Birgit; Peters, Annette; Heid, Iris M; Palm, Christoph; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2018-04-10

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common threat to vision. While classification of disease stages is critical to understanding disease risk and progression, several systems based on color fundus photographs are known. Most of these require in-depth and time-consuming analysis of fundus images. Herein, we present an automated computer-based classification algorithm. Algorithm development for AMD classification based on a large collection of color fundus images. Validation is performed on a cross-sectional, population-based study. We included 120 656 manually graded color fundus images from 3654 Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) participants. AREDS participants were >55 years of age, and non-AMD sight-threatening diseases were excluded at recruitment. In addition, performance of our algorithm was evaluated in 5555 fundus images from the population-based Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg (KORA; Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) study. We defined 13 classes (9 AREDS steps, 3 late AMD stages, and 1 for ungradable images) and trained several convolution deep learning architectures. An ensemble of network architectures improved prediction accuracy. An independent dataset was used to evaluate the performance of our algorithm in a population-based study. κ Statistics and accuracy to evaluate the concordance between predicted and expert human grader classification. A network ensemble of 6 different neural net architectures predicted the 13 classes in the AREDS test set with a quadratic weighted κ of 92% (95% confidence interval, 89%-92%) and an overall accuracy of 63.3%. In the independent KORA dataset, images wrongly classified as AMD were mainly the result of a macular reflex observed in young individuals. By restricting the KORA analysis to individuals >55 years of age and prior exclusion of other retinopathies, the weighted and unweighted κ increased to 50% and 63%, respectively. Importantly, the algorithm

  16. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  17. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Chikako; Mori, Hideo; Akuta, Keizou [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    1998-04-01

    We evaluated the effect of low-dose radiation on age-related macular degeneration in 8 affected eyes. Radiation was applied using photons at 4 MV. Each eye received 10 fractions of 2 Gy per day over 2 weeks. At 6 months after treatment, funduscopic or angiographic findings had either improved or remained unchanged in all the eyes. The visual acuity improved by 2 lines or more in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 5 eyes (63%) and deteriorated in 1 eye (13%). At the last examination, fundus findings had improved in 2 eyes (25%), remained unchanged in 1 eye (13%) and deteriorated in 5 eyes (63%). The visual acuity had improved or unchanged in 2 eyes each (25%) and deteriorated in 4 eyes (50%). There has been no negative side effects of radiation. Above findings show that low-dose radiation is potentially beneficial for subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularizations in age-related macular degeneration on a short term basis. (author)

  18. Research status of conbercept treating age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis one of the major reasons of blindness among the elderly in the developed countries. As AMD patients are increasing year by year, AMD has become one of the important topics of ophthalmic research to prevent blindness. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood, but many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFplays an important role in the pathogenesis. With the development and application of anti-VEGF drugs, there are a variety of drugs applied to the disease. This article introduces conbercept for the treatment of AMD.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of disease progression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Ding, Ying; Liu, Yi; Sun, Tao; Fritsche, Lars G; Clemons, Traci; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Klein, Michael L; Cook, Richard J; Liu, Yu; Fan, Ruzong; Wei, Lai; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Family- and population-based genetic studies have successfully identified multiple disease-susceptibility loci for Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the first batch and most successful examples of genome-wide association study. However, most genetic studies to date have focused on case-control studies of late AMD (choroidal neovascularization or geographic atrophy). The genetic influences on disease progression are largely unexplored. We assembled unique resources to perform a genome-wide bivariate time-to-event analysis to test for association of time-to-late-AMD with ∼9 million variants on 2721 Caucasians from a large multi-center randomized clinical trial, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide association study of disease progression (bivariate survival outcome) in AMD genetic studies, thus providing novel insights to AMD genetics. We used a robust Cox proportional hazards model to appropriately account for between-eye correlation when analyzing the progression time in the two eyes of each participant. We identified four previously reported susceptibility loci showing genome-wide significant association with AMD progression: ARMS2-HTRA1 (P = 8.1 × 10-43), CFH (P = 3.5 × 10-37), C2-CFB-SKIV2L (P = 8.1 × 10-10) and C3 (P = 1.2 × 10-9). Furthermore, we detected association of rs58978565 near TNR (P = 2.3 × 10-8), rs28368872 near ATF7IP2 (P = 2.9 × 10-8) and rs142450006 near MMP9 (P = 0.0006) with progression to choroidal neovascularization but not geographic atrophy. Secondary analysis limited to 34 reported risk variants revealed that LIPC and CTRB2-CTRB1 were also associated with AMD progression (P < 0.0015). Our genome-wide analysis thus expands the genetics in both development and progression of AMD and should assist in early identification of high risk individuals.

  20. Comparison of Visual Function in Older Eyes in the Earliest Stages of Age-related Macular Degeneration to Those in Normal Macular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Clark, Mark E; Jackson, Gregory R; McGwin, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    To compare the ability of several visual functional tests in terms of the strength of their associations with the earliest phases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which bears on their potential to serve as functional endpoints in evaluating treatments for early AMD and prevention strategies. Eyes from adults ≥60 years old were identified as being in normal macular health or in the earliest stages of AMD (steps 2, 3 or 4) through grading of color stereo-fundus photos by an experienced grader masked to all other study variables who used the 9-step Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) classification system for AMD severity. Visual function was assessed using the following tests: best-corrected visual acuity, low luminance visual acuity, spatial contrast sensitivity, macular cone-mediated light sensitivity and rod-mediated dark adaptation. A total of 1260 eyes were tested from 640 participants; 1007 eyes were in normal macular health (defined as step 1 in AREDS system) and 253 eyes had early AMD (defined as steps 2, 3 or 4). Adjusting for age and gender, early AMD eyes had two times the odds of having delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation than eyes in normal macular health (p = 0.0019). Visual acuity, low luminance acuity, spatial contrast sensitivity and macular light sensitivity did not differ between normal eyes and early AMD eyes. Eyes in the earliest phases of AMD were two times more likely to have delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation, as assessed by the rod-intercept, as compared to older eyes in normal macular health, whereas there was no difference in early AMD versus normal eyes in tests of visual acuity, low luminance acuity, macular light sensitivity and spatial contrast sensitivity.

  1. Peripheral Retinal Changes Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2: Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 12 by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Optos PEripheral RetinA (OPERA) Study Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalpally, Amitha; Clemons, Traci E; Danis, Ronald P; Sadda, SriniVas R; Cukras, Catherine A; Toth, Cynthia A; Friberg, Thomas R; Chew, Emily Y

    2017-04-01

    To compare rates of peripheral retinal changes in Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) participants with at least intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with control subjects without intermediate age-related changes (large drusen). Cross-sectional evaluation of clinic-based patients enrolled in AREDS2 and a prospective study. Participants from prospective studies. The 200° pseudocolor and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images were captured on the Optos 200 Tx Ultrawide-field device (Optos, Dunfermline, Scotland) by centering on the fovea and then steering superiorly and inferiorly. The montaged images were graded at a reading center with the images divided into 3 zones (zone 1 [posterior pole], zone 2 [midperiphery], and zone 3 [far periphery]) to document the presence of peripheral lesions. Peripheral retinal lesions: drusen, hypopigmentary/hyperpigmentary changes, reticular pseudodrusen, senile reticular pigmentary changes, cobblestone degeneration, and FAF abnormalities. A total of 484 (951 eyes) AREDS2 participants with AMD (cases) and 89 (163 eyes) controls without AMD had gradable color and FAF images. In zones 2 and 3, neovascularization and geographic atrophy (GA) were present, ranging from 0.4% to 6% in eyes of cases, respectively, and GA was present in 1% of eyes of controls. Drusen were detected in 97%, 78%, and 64% of eyes of cases and 48%, 21%, and 9% of eyes of controls in zones 2 and 3 superior and 3 inferior, respectively (P < 0.001 for all). Peripheral reticular pseudodrusen were seen in 15%. Senile reticular pigmentary change was the predominant peripheral change seen in 48% of cases and 16% of controls in zone 2 (P < 0.001). Nonreticular pigment changes were less frequent in the periphery than in the posterior pole (46% vs. 76%) and negligible in controls. Peripheral retinal changes are more prevalent in eyes with AMD than in control eyes. Drusen are seen in a majority of eyes with AMD in both the mid and far periphery, whereas

  2. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  3. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  4. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neffendorf JE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available James E Neffendorf, Timothy L Jackson Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR is underway. Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, vascular endothelial growth factor

  5. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machalińska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology.

  6. Overview of clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Sheng Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD is to target the underlying cause of the disease and prevent, or at least slow down, the loss of vision, which requires the preservation of the choroid, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, and photoreceptors. At present, there is no proven drug treatment for dry AMD; however, the cessation of smoking and treatments based on the age-related eye diseases study vitamin formula combined with a healthy diet are considered the only options for slowing disease progression. A number of pharmaceutical agents are currently under evaluation for the treatment of dry AMD using strategies such as reduction RPE and photoreceptor loss, neuroprotection, visual cycle modulators, suppression of inflammation, prevention of oxidative damage, and choroidal perfusion enhancers. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition.

  7. Role of growth factors and the wound healing response in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factors (GF) are important in several stages of the pathogenesis of age-related macular disease (AMD). In choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative AMD, the GF involved are similar to those involved in wound healing of the skin. Like granulation tissue of skin, CNV is characterized by

  8. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  9. The Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Subgroups in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger; Subhi, Yousif

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis.......To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis....

  10. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  11. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  12. Subfoveal fibrosis in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis.......To assess baseline and follow-up characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions in age-related macular degeneration in relation to the development of subfoveal subretinal fibrosis....

  13. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  14. MACULAR ATROPHY FINDINGS BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY COMPARED WITH FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN TREATED EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasago, Yukari; Shiragami, Chieko; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Osaka, Rie; Ono, Aoi; Yamashita, Ayana; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Hirooka, Kazuyuki

    2017-11-28

    To compare the areas of choriocapillaris (CC) nonperfusion and macular atrophy (MA) in treated exudative age-related macular degeneration. This was a prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Forty-four eyes exhibiting MA (42 patients with age-related macular degeneration), with a dry macula, underwent fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography angiography. The area of MA detected by fundus autofluorescence and CC nonperfusion detected by optical coherence tomography angiography was measured using image analysis software. The rates of concordance between the MA and CC nonperfusion areas were calculated. We qualitatively and quantitatively compared the areas of MA and CC nonperfusion in age-related macular degeneration eyes. The mean areas of MA and CC nonperfusion were 5.95 ± 4.50 mm and 10.66 ± 7.05 mm, respectively (paired t-test, P autofluorescence matching optical coherence tomography angiography showed that the CC nonperfusion area was almost included in the MA area. The mean concordance rate for the MA area inside the CC nonperfusion area was 87.7 ± 13.9%. The MA and CC nonperfusion areas markedly overlapped. The area of CC nonperfusion correlated with the MA area. Choroidal ischemia might be involved in the pathogenesis of MA in treated age-related macular degeneration.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  15. Associations between genetic polymorphisms of insulin-like growth factor axis genes and risk for age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Our objective was to investigate if insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis genes affect the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: 864 Caucasian non-diabetic participants from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Genetic Repository were used in this case control st...

  16. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN VISUAL FUNCTION AND SUBRETINAL DRUSENOID DEPOSITS IN NORMAL AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION EYES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, David; Zarubina, Anna V; Clark, Mark E; Huisingh, Carrie E; Jackson, Gregory R; Zhang, Yuhua; McGwin, Gerald; Curcio, Christine A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDDs) identified by multimodal retinal imaging and visual function in older eyes with normal macular health or in the earliest phases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Age-related macular degeneration status for each eye was defined according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 9-step classification system (normal = Step 1, early AMD = Steps 2-4) based on color fundus photographs. Visual functions measured were best-corrected photopic visual acuity, contrast and light sensitivity, mesopic visual acuity, low-luminance deficit, and rod-mediated dark adaptation. Subretinal drusenoid deposits were identified through multimodal imaging (color fundus photographs, infrared reflectance and fundus autofluorescence images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography). The sample included 1,202 eyes (958 eyes with normal health and 244 eyes with early AMD). In normal eyes, SDDs were not associated with any visual function evaluated. In eyes with early AMD, dark adaptation was markedly delayed in eyes with SDDs versus no SDD (a 4-minute delay on average), P = 0.0213. However, this association diminished after age adjustment, P = 0.2645. Other visual functions in early AMD eyes were not associated with SDDs. In a study specifically focused on eyes in normal macular health and in the earliest phases of AMD, early AMD eyes with SDDs have slower dark adaptation, largely attributable to the older ages of eyes with SDD; they did not exhibit deficits in other visual functions. Subretinal drusenoid deposits in older eyes in normal macular health are not associated with any visual functions evaluated.

  17. Decreased Thickness and Integrity of the Macular Elastic Layer of Bruch’s Membrane Correspond to the Distribution of Lesions Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, N.H. Victor; Keonin, Jason; Luthert, Phil J.; Frennesson, Christina I.; Weingeist, David M.; Wolf, Rachel L.; Mullins, Robert F.; Hageman, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In its severest form, choroidal neovessels breach the macular Bruch’s membrane, an extracellular matrix compartment comprised of elastin and collagen laminae, and grow into the retina. We sought to determine whether structural properties of the elastic lamina (EL) correspond to the region of the macula that is predilected toward degeneration in AMD. Morphometric assessment of the macular and extramacular regions of 121 human donor eyes, with and without AMD, revealed a statistically significant difference in both the integrity (P macula than in the periphery. The integrity of the macular EL was significantly lower in donors with early-stage AMD (P = 0.028), active choroidal neovascularization (P = 0.020), and disciform scars (P = 0.003), as compared to unaffected, age-matched controls. EL thickness was significantly lower only in individuals with disciform scars (P = 0.008). The largest gaps in macular EL integrity were significantly larger in all categories of AMD (each P macula is more susceptible to degenerative events that occur in this disease. PMID:15632016

  18. Automated detection of age-related macular degeneration in OCT images using multiple instance learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a kind of macular disease which mostly occurs in old people,and it may cause decreased vision or even lead to permanent blindness. Drusen is an important clinical indicator for AMD which can help doctor diagnose disease and decide the strategy of treatment. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is widely used in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases, include AMD. In this paper, we propose a classification method based on Multiple Instance Learning (MIL) to detect AMD. Drusen can exist in a few slices of OCT images, and MIL is utilized in our method. We divided the method into two phases: training phase and testing phase. We train the initial features and clustered to create a codebook, and employ the trained classifier in the test set. Experiment results show that our method achieved high accuracy and effectiveness.

  19. Radiation therapy for subfoveal chroidal neovascularization complicating age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuko; Ohara, Masae; Ishii, Kentaro

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of low-dose external beam irradiation on the visual function of 14 eyes with subfoveal chroidal neovascularization complicating age-related macular degeneration. Patient received external beam irradiation at a dose of 20 Gy in 10 fraction of 2 Gy. After treatment the visual function improved in 2 eyes, remained stable in 8 eyes and deteriorated in 4 eyes. At the last examination visual function improved in 1 eyes, remained stable in 2 eyes and deteriorated in 5 eyes. The low-dose irradiation is potentially beneficial for subfoveal chroidal neovascularization complicating age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  20. RISK FACTORS AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF PRECHOROIDAL CLEFT IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Se Woong; Son, Dae Yong; Bae, Kunho

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors associated with prechoroidal cleft occurrence after treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to elucidate its clinical significance. Two hundred thirty-four subjects who were treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration were assessed to identify prechoroidal cleft on optical coherence tomography. Clinical variables were compared between patients manifesting a cleft (cleft group) and patients who did not (control group). Prechoroidal cleft was detected in 29 of 234 patients (8.1%). Although the baseline visual acuity was not different between the 2 groups, logMAR visual acuity at final visit was 0.89 ± 0.74 (with approximate Snellen equivalent of 20/160) in the cleft group and 0.65 ± 0.69 (with approximate Snellen equivalent of 20/100) in controls (P age-related macular degeneration (P age-related macular degeneration, and a submacular hemorrhage treated by pneumatic displacement were the independent risk factors for development of prechoroidal cleft. Eyes with a cleft, especially clefts that develop early, generally had worse prognoses than eyes without clefts.

  1. The Association of Statin Use with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Holou, Shaza N; Tucker, William R; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Cukras, Catherine; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the association of statin use with progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Preplanned, prospective cohort study within a controlled clinical trial of oral supplementation for age-related eye diseases. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) participants, aged 50 to 85 years. Factors, including age, gender, smoking status, aspirin use, and history of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, angina, and stroke-all known to be associated with statin use-were included in a logistic regression model to estimate propensity scores for each participant. Age-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, with and without propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the association of statin use with progression to late AMD. Analyses adjusting for the competing risk of death were also performed. Baseline and annual stereoscopic fundus photographs were assessed centrally by masked graders for the development of late AMD, either neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy (GA). Of the 3791 participants (2462 with bilateral large drusen and 1329 with unilateral late AMD at baseline), 1659 (43.8%) were statin users. The overall analysis, with no matching of propensity scores and no adjustment for death as a competing risk, showed that statin use was not associated with progression to late AMD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.41; P = 0.56). When matched for propensity scores and adjusted for death as a competing risk, the result was not statistically significant (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.55-1.20; P = 0.29). Furthermore, subgroup analyses of persons with or without late AMD at baseline and the various components of late AMD (neovascular AMD, central GA, or any GA) also showed no statistically significant association of statin use with progression to AMD. Statin use was not statistically significantly associated with progression to late AMD in the AREDS2 participants, and these findings are consistent with findings in the

  2. The Association of Statin Use with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Progression The Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Report Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Holou, Shaza N.; Tucker, William R.; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E.; Cukras, Catherine; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/purpose To evaluate the association of statin use with progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Preplanned, prospective cohort study within a controlled clinical trial of oral supplementation for age-related eye diseases. Subjects Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 participants, aged 50 to 85 years. Methods Factors, including age, gender, smoking status, aspirin use, and history of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, angina, and stroke, all known to be associated with statin use, were included in a logistic regression model to estimate propensity scores for each participant. Age-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, with and without propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the association of statin use with progression to late AMD. Analyses were also performed adjusting for the competing risk of death. Main Outcome Measures Baseline and annual stereoscopic fundus photographs were assessed centrally by masked graders for the development of late AMD, either neovascular AMD or geographic atrophy (GA). Results Of the 3791 participants (2462 with bilateral large drusen and 1329 with unilateral late AMD at baseline), 1659 (43.8%) were statin users. The overall analysis, with no matching of propensity scores and no adjustment for death as a competing risk, showed that statin use was not associated with progression to late AMD (hazard ratios [HR] of 1.08, 95% confidence intervals [CI] of 0.83–1.41, P=0.56). When matched for propensity scores and adjusted for death as a competing risk, the result was not statistically significant with HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.55–1.20, P=0.29. Further subgroup analyses of persons with or without late AMD at baseline to the various components of late AMD (neovascular, central geographic atrophy, or any geographic atrophy) also showed no statistically significant association of statin use with progression to AMD. Conclusions Statin use was not statistically significantly associated with the

  3. Assessment of serum lipids in patients with age related macular degeneration from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambreen, F.; Qureshi, I. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine serum lipids in patients with age related macular degeneration from Pakistani population. Methods: The study was a cross sectional, randomized and case-control. Selected subjects ages were >50 years and were normotensive, non-diabetic with no family history of any such disease and no complication of posterior ocular chamber other than age related macular degeneration (AMD). Controls were age matched healthy individuals with no symptoms of AMD. Diagnosis of AMD was done through conventional diagnostic techniques by professional ophthalmologists. Serum samples were analyzed for total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and HDL using commercially available kits. Data were compared with Student's t-test. Pearson correlation was calculated for relationship between different parameters. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Compared to controls, AMD patients had significantly greater total cholesterol concentration (p<0.041), and power HDL/LDL ratio (p<0.038), while serum triglycerides, HDL and LDL were non-significantly different from control subjects. Total cholesterol in AMD patients was significantly correlated with TG, LDL and HDL (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The study indicates that high cholesterol might be a predictor of AMD and can be a diagnostic parameter. (author)

  4. Individual Test Point Fluctuations of Macular Sensitivity in Healthy Eyes and Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration Measured With Microperimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Szepessy, Zsuzsanna; Ventura, Dora Fix; Németh, János

    2018-04-01

    To establish fluctuation limits, it was considered that not only overall macular sensitivity but also fluctuations of individual test points in the macula might have clinical value. Three repeated measurements of microperimetry were performed using the Standard Expert test of Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) in healthy subjects ( N = 12, age = 23.8 ± 1.5 years old) and in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ( N = 11, age = 68.5 ± 7.4 years old). A total of 37 macular points arranged in four concentric rings and in four quadrants were analyzed individually and in groups. The data show low fluctuation of macular sensitivity of individual test points in healthy subjects (average = 1.38 ± 0.28 dB) and AMD patients (average = 2.12 ± 0.60 dB). Lower sensitivity points are more related to higher fluctuation than to the distance from the central point. Fixation stability showed no effect on the sensitivity fluctuation. The 95th percentile of the standard deviations of healthy subjects was, on average, 2.7 dB, ranging from 1.2 to 4 dB, depending on the point tested. Point analysis and regional analysis might be considered prior to evaluating macular sensitivity fluctuation in order to distinguish between normal variation and a clinical change. S tatistical methods were used to compare repeated microperimetry measurements and to establish fluctuation limits of the macular sensitivity. This analysis could add information regarding the integrity of different macular areas and provide new insights into fixation points prior to the biofeedback fixation training.

  5. Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in treatment-naive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Møller, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. Purpose: To report the effects of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin((R))) in treatment-naive patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) assessed by visual acuity (VA), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and contrast sensitivity. Methods: A prospective, uncontrolled...... was not statistically significant. Mean macular thickness decreased significantly from baseline to all follow-up examinations (P Macular thickness improved significantly at all time...

  6. Ultra-widefield fundus autofluorescence in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Guduru

    Full Text Available Establish accuracy and reproducibility of subjective grading in ultra-widefield fundus autofluorescence (FAF imaging in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and determine if an association exists between peripheral FAF abnormalities and AMD.This was a prospective, single-blinded case-control study. Patients were consecutively recruited for the study. Patients were excluded if there was a history of prior or active ocular pathology other than AMD or image quality was insufficient for analysis as determined by two independent graders. Control patients were those without any evidence of AMD or other ophthalmic disease apart from cataract. Using the Optos 200Tx (Optos, Marlborough, MA, USA, a ResMax central macula and an ultra-widefield peripheral retina image was taken for each eye in both normal color and short wavelength FAF. Ultra-widefield photographs were modified to mask the macula. Each ResMax and ultra-widefield image was independently graded by two blinded investigators.There were 28 AMD patients and 11 controls. There was a significant difference in the average age between AMD patients and control groups (80 versus 64, respectively P<0.001. There was moderate, statistically significant agreement between observers regarding image interpretation (78.4%, K = 0.524, P<0.001, and 69.0% (K = 0.49, P<0.001 agreement between graders for FAF abnormality patterns. Patients with AMD were at greater risk for peripheral FAF abnormalities (OR: 3.43, P = 0.019 and patients with FAF abnormalities on central macular ResMax images were at greater risk of peripheral FAF findings (OR: 5.19, P = 0.017.Subjective interpretation of FAF images has moderate reproducibility and validity in assessment of peripheral FAF abnormalities. Peripheral FAF abnormalities are seen in both AMD and control patients. Those with AMD, poor visual acuity, and macular FAF abnormalities are at greater risk.

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, and the Role of Nutritional Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilita M. Moschos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness worldwide, mainly affecting people over 65 years old. Dry and wet ARDM are the main types of the disease, which seem to have a multifactorial background. The aim of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of ARMD pathogenesis and exhibit the role of diet and nutritional supplements in the onset and progression of the disease. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol, and, diet appear to interact with mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, contributing to the pathogenesis of ARMD. Inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, induced by the daily exposure of retina to high pressure of oxygen and light radiation, have been also associated with ARMD lesions. Other than medical and surgical therapies, nutritional supplements hold a significant role in the prevention and treatment of ARMD, eliminating the progression of macular degeneration.

  8. Nutrition and age-related macular degeneration: research evidence in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Laura Elizabeth; Keller, Peter Richard

    2014-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment in developed countries. In the absence of effective treatments to slow AMD progression, it is predicted that the prevalence of AMD will double over the next 20 years. One area of significant interest is the potential role that nutrition may play in preventing and/or delaying the progression of AMD. Specifically, is there any benefit in oral antioxidant and/or mineral supplementation? This review critically evaluates the currently available evidence relating to nutrition and AMD, with particular reference to the key findings of two large National Eye Institute-sponsored clinical studies, namely, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2. Topical controversies relating to nutrition and AMD are considered and analyzed in the context of the published literature to guide practitioners through assessing the merit, or otherwise, of common claims. This article provides a foundation for clinicians to provide informed advice to AMD patients based on available research evidence.

  9. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nathan G.; Singh, Malkit K.; ElShelmani, Hanan; Mansergh, Fiona C.; Wride, Michael A.; Padilla, Maximilian; Keegan, David; Hogg, Ruth E.; Ambati, Balamurali K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker can be a substance or structure measured in body parts, fluids or products that can affect or predict disease incidence. As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, much research and effort has been invested in the identification of different biomarkers to predict disease incidence, identify at risk individuals, elucidate causative pathophysiological etiologies, guide screening, monitoring and treatment parameters, and predict disease outcomes. To date, a host of genetic, environmental, proteomic, and cellular targets have been identified as both risk factors and potential biomarkers for AMD. Despite this, their use has been confined to research settings and has not yet crossed into the clinical arena. A greater understanding of these factors and their use as potential biomarkers for AMD can guide future research and clinical practice. This article will discuss known risk factors and novel, potential biomarkers of AMD in addition to their application in both academic and clinical settings. PMID:27156982

  10. A risk score for the prediction of advanced age-related macular degeneration: Development and validation in 2 prospective cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    We aimed to develop an eye specific model which used readily available information to predict risk for advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We used the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) as our training dataset, which consisted of the 4,507 participants (contributing 1,185 affected v...

  11. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress-related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Incidence of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration in denmark: year 2000 to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Larsen, Michael; Munch, Inger Christine

    2012-01-01

    To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older.......To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older....

  13. Clinical efficacy of Ranibizumab in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Jun Wei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the clinical efficacy of Ranibizumab in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration(ARMD.METHODS: Clinical data of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration received treatment of ranibizumab at our hospital from 2015 to 2017 were analyzed. At 1mo after treatment, the clinical efficacy, ocular hemodynamics and ocular inflammation were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 41 patients were analyzed. After treatment, patients got significantly increased in LogMAR(0.651±0.067 vs 0.321±0.049; t=25.460, Pvs 452.9±69.8μm; t=15.740, Pvs 16.1±3.5ng/L; t=3.563, Pvs 13.8±2.5ng/L; t=3.467, PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: In the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration, the ranibizumab shows a good therapeutic effect without serious adverse drug reactions.

  14. Gene Ontology and KEGG Enrichment Analyses of Genes Related to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes.

  15. Clinical Characteristics and Current Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial degeneration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. The societal impact is significant, with more than 2 million individuals in the United States alone affected by advanced stages of AMD. Recent progress in our understanding of this complex disease and parallel developments in therapeutics and imaging have translated into new management paradigms in recent years. However, there are many unanswered questions, and diagnostic and prognostic precision and treatment outcomes can still be improved. In this article, we discuss the clinical features of AMD, provide correlations with modern imaging and histopathology, and present an overview of treatment strategies. PMID:25280900

  16. The Impact of Supplemental Antioxidants on Visual Function in Nonadvanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Head-to-Head Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Beatty, Stephen; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Stringham, Jim; Kelly, David; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Nolan, John M

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of supplemental macular carotenoids (including versus not including meso-zeaxanthin) in combination with coantioxidants on visual function in patients with nonadvanced age-related macular degeneration. In this study, 121 participants were randomly assigned to group 1 (Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 formulation with a low dose [25 mg] of zinc and an addition of 10 mg meso-zeaxanthin; n = 60) or group 2 (Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 formulation with a low dose [25 mg] of zinc; n = 61). Visual function was assessed using best-corrected visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), glare disability, retinal straylight, photostress recovery time, reading performance, and the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25. Macular pigment was measured using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry. There was a statistically significant improvement in the primary outcome measure (letter CS at 6 cycles per degree [6 cpd]) over time (P = 0.013), and this observed improvement was statistically comparable between interventions (P = 0.881). Statistically significant improvements in several secondary outcome visual function measures (letter CS at 1.2 and 2.4 cpd; mesopic and photopic CS at all spatial frequencies; mesopic glare disability at 1.5, 3, and 6 cpd; photopic glare disability at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 cpd; photostress recovery time; retinal straylight; mean and maximum reading speed) were also observed over time (P 0.05, for all). Statistically significant increases in macular pigment at all eccentricities were observed over time (P 0.05). Antioxidant supplementation in patients with nonadvanced age-related macular degeneration results in significant increases in macular pigment and improvements in CS and other measures of visual function. (Clinical trial, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN13894787).

  17. Factors related to the effect of radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Matsumura, Miyo; Sasai, Keisuke; Honda, Yoshihito; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    We treated 31 eyes of 30 patients with age-related macular degeneration by 10 sessions of radiation totalling 20 Gy. One year after treatment, 21 eyes (68%) showed improvement in the score of fundus lesions based on funduscopic and fluorescein angiographic findings. The visual acuity, expressed as LogMAR, improved in 20% and remained stationary in 50% of eyes. Improvement in visual acuity was significantly better in eyes with greater amount of exudate before treatment (p<0.01). Posttreatment visual acuity was correlated neither with the amount of subretinal fluid, presence of retinal hemorrhage, the size of subfoveal vascular membrane, nor its type as classified into classic, mainly occult or occult type. Above findings show that radiation is more effective in eyes of age-related macular degeneration with massive exudate. (author)

  18. Factors related to the effect of radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Matsumura, Miyo; Sasai, Keisuke; Honda, Yoshihito [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Ogura, Yuichiro

    2000-04-01

    We treated 31 eyes of 30 patients with age-related macular degeneration by 10 sessions of radiation totalling 20 Gy. One year after treatment, 21 eyes (68%) showed improvement in the score of fundus lesions based on funduscopic and fluorescein angiographic findings. The visual acuity, expressed as LogMAR, improved in 20% and remained stationary in 50% of eyes. Improvement in visual acuity was significantly better in eyes with greater amount of exudate before treatment (p<0.01). Posttreatment visual acuity was correlated neither with the amount of subretinal fluid, presence of retinal hemorrhage, the size of subfoveal vascular membrane, nor its type as classified into classic, mainly occult or occult type. Above findings show that radiation is more effective in eyes of age-related macular degeneration with massive exudate. (author)

  19. Cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Theil, Pernille Koefoed; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the outcome after cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections in routine clinical practice. Methods We extracted information about patients recorded...

  20. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando; Zamora-Alvarado, Ruben; Ochoa-De la Paz, Lenin; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the “dry” and the “wet” form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD pro...

  1. European survey on the opinion and use of micronutrition in age-related macular degeneration: 10 years on from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tariq Aslam,1 Cécile Delcourt,2 Frank Holz,3 Alfredo García-Layana,4 Anita Leys,5 Rufino M Silva,6 Eric Souied7 1Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 3University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 4Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 5University Hospitals, Leuven, Belgium; 6University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; 7Université Paris Est Créteil, Créteil, FrancePurpose: To evaluate ophthalmologists’ opinion of, and use of, micronutritional dietary supplements 10 years after publication of the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS study.Methods: Participation was solicited from 4,000 European ophthalmologists. Responding physicians were screened, and those treating at least 40 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD per month and prescribing nutrition supplements at least 4 times per month were admitted and completed a 40-item questionnaire.Results: The surveyed sample included 112 general ophthalmologists and 104 retinal specialists. Most nutritional supplements (46% were initiated when early/intermediate AMD was confirmed, although 18% were initiated on confirmation of neovascular AMD. Clinical studies were well known: 90% were aware of AREDS, with 88% aware of AREDS1 and 36% aware of the, as-yet-unpublished, AREDS2 studies. Respondents considered lutein, zeaxanthin, zinc, omega-3, and vitamins to be the most important components of nutritional supplements, with the results of AREDS2 already having been taken into consideration by many. Ophthalmologists anticipate more scientific studies as well as improved product quality but identify cost as a barrier to wider uptake.Conclusion: Micronutrition is now part of the routine management of AMD for many ophthalmologists. Ophthalmologists choosing to use nutritional supplements are well-informed regarding current scientific studies. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, micronutrition, nutritional

  2. Genetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Concepts, Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Carr, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive degenerative disease which leads to blindness, affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. More than 1.75 million individuals in the United States are affected by the advanced form of AMD. The etiological pathway of AMD is not yet fully understood, but there is a clear genetic influence on disease risk. To date, the 1q32 (CFH) and 10q26 (PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1) loci are the most strongly associated with disease; however, the variation in these genomic regions alone is unable to predict disease development with high accuracy. Therefore, current genetic studies are aimed at identifying new genes associated with AMD and their modifiers, with the goal of discovering diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Moreover, these studies provide the foundation for further investigation into the pathophysiology of AMD by utilizing a systems-biology-based approach to elucidate underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:21609220

  3. Treatment of dry age-related macular degeneration with dobesilate

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Angulo, J; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2012-01-01

    The authors present anatomical and functional evidences of dry age-macular degeneration improvement, after intravitreal treatment with dobesilate. Main outcomes measures were normalisation of retinal structure and function, assessed by optical coherence tomography, fundus-monitored microperimetry, electrophysiology and visual acuity. The effect might be related to the normalisation of the outer retinal architecture.

  4. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  5. ROLE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION IN PREVENTING PROGRESSION OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Ermakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a chronic, progressive, degenerative eye disease affecting the central retina. It is the leading cause of blindness among individuals of 65 years and older. In the early stage patients have drusen and/or alterations of pigmentation in the macular region. This disease can progress to geographic atrophy and/or choroidal neovascularization. It has been shown that oxidative stress and hypoxia are important in the pathogenesis of AMD. Patients may gain some visual improvement with inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor, but complete restoration of visual function is achieved only in small cases. No effective therapies are known for atrophic AMD. Many large observational studies have shown that dietary antioxidant supplementation is beneficial in preventing the progression of AMD from early to late stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS demonstrated that daily oral supplementation with vitamins C (500 mg and E (400 IU, beta carotene (15 mg, zinc (80 mg and copper (2 mg reduced the risk of progression to advanced AMD by 25% at 5 years. In primary analyses AREDS II failed to show further reduce of this risk by addition of lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (2mg, or/and omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids [docosahexaenoic acid (350 mg DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid 650 mg (EPA] to the AREDS formulation. But there was no true placebo group. The simultaneous administration of beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin may suppress tissue level of the both laters because of competitive absorption of carotenoids. Subgroup analyses revealed that dietary supplementation with lutein, zeaxanthin and AREDS formulation without beta carotene may reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD.The LUNA (Lutein nutrition effects measured by autofluorescence study demonstrated that supplementation with lutein (12 mg, zeaxanthin (1 mg, vitamin C (120 mg, vitamin E (17,6 mg, zinc (10 mg, selenium (40 mg resulted

  6. Figure ground discrimination in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Ha Chau; Guyader, Nathalie; Guerin, Anne; Despretz, Pascal; Boucart, Muriel

    2011-03-01

    To investigate impairment in discriminating a figure from its background and to study its relation to visual acuity and lesion size in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Seventeen patients with neovascular AMD and visual acuity Figure/ground segregation is impaired in patients with AMD. A white space surrounding an object is sufficient to improve the object's detection and to facilitate figure/ground segregation. These results may have practical applications to the rehabilitation of the environment in patients with AMD.

  7. Results of Intravitreal Ranibizumab Treatment for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Karaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for exudative age-related macular degeneration. Ma te ri al and Met hod: In this study, we included forty-eight eyes of 43 age-related macular degeneration patients followed for at least twelve months. Mean age was 73.65±8.93 years and mean follow-up time was 14.2 months. All patients received three consecutive monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections and then were followed up with clinical examination and optic coherence tomography monthly. Re-injection was executed as needed. Re sults: Twenty patients were male (46.5% and twenty-three patients were female (53.5%. The average number of ranibizumab injection was 3.7 (3-7 per eye. Twenty-six lesions (54.2% were classic (predominantly and minimally and twenty-two (45.8% were occult. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 46.8 letters with ETDRS chart at the initial examination and 55.5 letters at twelfth month. Mean central foveal thickness decreased from 320 microns to 269 microns. There was a statistically significant improvement in visual acuity and central foveal thickness. On the other hand, this improvement was not significant between lesion types. During follow-up, there were no systemic or serious ocular complications determined. Dis cus si on: Intravitreal ranibizumab injection is safe and effective, both anatomically and functionally, for age-related macular degeneration. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 25-9

  8. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Forest

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD. A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease.

  9. Optical coherence tomography angiography in age-related macular degeneration: The game changer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupidi, Marco; Cerquaglia, Alessio; Chhablani, Jay; Fiore, Tito; Singh, Sumit Randhir; Cardillo Piccolino, Felice; Corbucci, Roberta; Coscas, Florence; Coscas, Gabriel; Cagini, Carlo

    2018-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography is one of the biggest advances in ophthalmic imaging. It enables a depth-resolved assessment of the retinal and choroidal blood flow, far exceeding the levels of detail commonly obtained with dye angiographies. One of the first applications of optical coherence tomography angiography was in detecting the presence of choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration and establishing its position in relation to the retinal pigmented epithelium and Bruch's membrane, and thereby classifying the CNV as type 1, type 2, type 3, or mixed lesions. Optical coherence tomography angiograms, due to the longer wavelength used by optical coherence tomography, showed a more distinct choroidal neovascularization vascular pattern than fluorescein angiography, since there is less suffering from light scattering or is less obscured by overlying subretinal hemorrhages or exudation. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of optical coherence tomography angiography findings in exudative and nonexudative age-related macular degeneration have been largely investigated within the past 3 years both in clinical and experimental settings. This review constitutes an up-to-date of all the potential applications of optical coherence tomography angiography in age-related macular degeneration in order to better understand how to translate its theoretical usefulness into the current clinical practice.

  10. Treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Norman; Loveman, Emma; Colquitt, Jill; Royle, Pamela; Yeong, Jian Lee; Hoad, Geraldine; Lois, Noemi

    2018-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual loss in older people. Advanced AMD takes two forms, neovascular (wet) and atrophic (dry). Stargardt disease (STGD) is the commonest form of inherited macular dystrophy. To carry out a systematic review of treatments for dry AMD and STGD, and to identify emerging treatments where future NIHR research might be commissioned. Systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and The Cochrane Library from 2005 to 13 July 2017 for reviews, journal articles and meeting abstracts. We looked for studies of interventions that aim to preserve or restore vision in people with dry AMD or STGD. The most important outcomes are those that matter to patients: visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, reading speed, ability to drive, adverse effects of treatment, quality of life, progression of disease and patient preference. However, visual loss is a late event and intermediate predictors of future decline were accepted if there was good evidence that they are strong predictors of subsequent visual outcomes. These include changes detectable by investigation, but not necessarily noticed by people with AMD or STGD. ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization search portal and the UK Clinical Trials gateway were searched for ongoing and recently completed clinical trials. The titles and abstracts of 7948 articles were screened for inclusion. The full text of 398 articles were obtained for further screening and checking of references and 112 articles were included in the final report. Overall, there were disappointingly few good-quality studies (including of sufficient size and duration) reporting useful outcomes, particularly in STGD. However we did identify a number of promising research topics, including drug treatments, stem cells, new forms of laser treatment, and implantable intraocular lens telescopes. In many cases, research is already under way, funded by industry or governments. In AMD

  11. The Age-Related Eye Disease 2 Study: Micronutrients in the Treatment of Macular Degeneration123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the elderly. With an increasingly aged population worldwide, the need for the prevention of AMD is rising. Multiple studies investigating AMD with the use of animal models and cell culture have identified oxidative stress–related retinal damage as an important contributing factor. In general, diet is an excellent source of the antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals necessary for healthy living; moreover, the general public is often receptive to recommendations made by physicians and health care workers regarding diet and supplements as a means of empowering themselves to avoid common and worrisome ailments such as AMD, which has made epidemiologists and clinicians enthusiastic about dietary intervention studies. A wide variety of nutrients, such as minerals, vitamins, ω-3 (n–3) fatty acids, and various carotenoids, have been associated with reducing the risk of AMD. Initial results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) indicated that supplementation with antioxidants (β-carotene and vitamins C and E) and zinc was associated with a reduced risk of AMD progression. The AREDS2 follow-up study, designed to improve upon the earlier formulation, tested the addition of lutein, zeaxanthin, and ω-3 fatty acids. In this review, we examine the science behind the nutritional factors included in these interventional studies and the reasons for considering their inclusion to lower the rate of AMD progression. PMID:28096126

  12. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novosel, J.; Wang, Ziyuan; De Jong, Henk; Vermeer, K.A.; van Vliet, L.J.; Styner, Martin A.; Angelini, Elsa D.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and

  13. Guidelines for the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Chong, Victor; Loewenstein, Anat

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is still referred to as the leading cause of severe and irreversible visual loss world-wide. The disease has a profound effect on quality of life of affected individuals and represents a major socioeconomic challenge for societies due...

  14. Retinal pigment epithelium, age-related macular degeneration and neurotrophic keratouveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Enrica; Scarinci, Fabio; Ripandelli, Guido; Feher, Janos; Pacella, Elena; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco; Plateroti, Rocco; Plateroti, Pasquale; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Artico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of impaired vision and blindness in the aging population. The aims of our studies were to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in mitochondria in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from AMD patients and controls and to test the protective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a known neurotrophic and antiangiogenic substance, against neurotrophic keratouveitis. Histopathological alterations were studied by means of morphometry, light and electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, morphometric data showed that the RPE alterations noted in AMD may also develop in normal aging, 10-15 years later than appearing in AMD patients. Reduced tear secretion, corneal ulceration and leukocytic infiltration were found in capsaicin (CAP)-treated rats, but this effect was significantly attenuated by PEDF. These findings suggest that PEDF accelerated the recovery of tear secretion and also prevented neurotrophic keratouveitis and vitreoretinal inflammation. PEDF may have a clinical application in inflammatory and neovascular diseases of the eye.

  15. Visual outcomes in relation to time to treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara Brandi; Fuchs, Josefine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between the interval from diagnosis to initiation of intravitreal injection therapy and visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to report changes over time in fellow-eye status. METHODS: Retrospective chart review. The study included...

  16. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Up-to-Date on Genetic Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of AMD. Proinflammatory effects secondary to chronic inflammation (e.g., alternative complement activation and heterogeneous types of oxidative stress (e.g., impaired cholesterol homeostasis can result in degenerative damages at the level of crucial macular structures, that is photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane. In the most recent years, the association of AMD with genes, directly or indirectly, involved in immunoinflammatory pathways is increasingly becoming an essential core for AMD knowledge. Starting from the key basic-research notions detectable at the root of AMD pathogenesis, the present up-to-date paper reviews the best-known and/or the most attractive genetic findings linked to the mechanisms of inflammation of this complex disease.

  17. Familial aggregation of age-related macular degeneration in the Utah population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ling; Harmon, Jennifer; Yang, Xian; Chen, Haoyu; Patel, Shrena; Mineau, Geraldine; Yang, Zhenglin; Constantine, Ryan; Buehler, Jeanette; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Ma, Xiang; Wong, Tien Y; Zhang, Maonian; Zhang, Kang

    2008-02-01

    We examined familial aggregation and risk of age-related macular degeneration in the Utah population using a population-based case-control study. Over one million unique patient records were searched within the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and the Utah Population Database (UPDB), identifying 4764 patients with AMD. Specialized kinship analysis software was used to test for familial aggregation of disease, estimate the magnitude of familial risks, and identify families at high risk for disease. The population-attributable risk (PAR) for AMD was calculated to be 0.34. Recurrence risks in relatives indicate increased relative risks in siblings (2.95), first cousins (1.29), second cousins (1.13), and parents (5.66) of affected cases. There were 16 extended large families with AMD identified for potential use in genetic studies. Each family had five or more living affected members. The familial aggregation of AMD shown in this study exemplifies the merit of the UPDB and supports recent research demonstrating significant genetic contribution to disease development and progression.

  18. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  19. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative. PMID:23820727

  20. Clinical study of Conbercept intravitreal injection for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ting He

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of conbercept intravitreal injection for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration.METHODS: Sixty patients with wet age related macular degeneration were randomly divided into treatment group 30 cases and control group 30 cases according to the random number table. The treatment group was injected with Conbercept 0.05mL, the control group was injected with triamcinolone acetonide 0.1mL. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas performed before and after 1d, 1 and 3mo after treatment, and the thickness of macular was detected by optical coherence tomography(OCT. The complications of patients were observed after 1d, 1 and 3mo,including inflammatory reaction, corneal edema, anterior chamber, high intraocular pressure, etc.RESULTS:In treatment group 1d, 1 and 3mo after treatment, eyesight was improved significantly better than the control group(PPCONCLUSION: Intravitreal injection of Conbercept in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration can improve the curative effect.

  1. Psychosocial Intervention for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Hans-Werner; Kammerer, Annette; Holz, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Becker, Stefanie; Kaspar, Roman; Himmelsbach, Ines

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated an emotion-focused and a problem-focused intervention designed for patients with age-related macular degeneration. It found a limited decrease in depression in the emotion-focused group and an increase in active problem orientation and in adaptation to vision loss in the problem-focused group.

  2. Pluripotent stem cells: A therapeutic source for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Parameswaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD leads to progressive loss of central vision in the elderly. At a cellular level, there is aging of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, and accumulation of lipofuscin that interferes with the proper functioning of RPE which eventually leads to apoptosis. Treatment depends on the stage of the disease. Wet AMD which has neovascularization is managed by local therapies such as laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy and is managed with injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor-based therapy. Unlike the wet AMD, an effective therapy does not exist for dry AMD and geographic atrophy. Cell replacement therapy has shown promise. This review discusses the opportunities in the various types of cell-based therapy, their limitations, and what is possible for India.

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: the Tromso Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, M. G.; Bertelsen, G.; Peto, T.

    2014-01-01

    PurposeTo examine associations between cardiovascular risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). MethodsA population-based, cross-sectional study of Caucasians aged 65-87years was conducted in Norway in 2007/2008. Retinal photographs were graded for AMD. Multivariable logistic...

  4. CLINICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION AFTER INTRAVITREAL ZIV-AFLIBERCEPT FOR EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Dias, João Rafael; de Andrade, Gabriel Costa; Kniggendorf, Vinicius Ferreira; Novais, Eduardo Amorim; Maia, André; Meyer, Carsten; Watanabe, Sung Eun Song; Farah, Michel Eid; Rodrigues, Eduardo Büchele

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the 6-month safety and efficacy of ziv-aflibercept intravitreal injections for treating exudative age-related macular degeneration. Fifteen patients with unilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration were enrolled. The best-corrected visual acuity was measured and spectral domain optical coherence tomography was performed at baseline and monthly. Full-field electroretinography and multifocal electroretinography were obtained at baseline and 4, 13, and 26 weeks after the first injection. All patients received three monthly intravitreal injections of ziv-aflibercept (1.25 mg) followed by as-needed treatment. Between baseline and 26 weeks, the mean logMAR best-corrected visual acuity improved (P = 0.00408) from 0.93 ± 0.4 (20/200) to 0.82 ± 0.5 (20/160) logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution, respectively; the central retinal thickness decreased significantly (P = 0.0007) from 490.3 ± 155.1 microns to 327.9 ± 101.5 microns; the mean total macular volume decreased significantly (P macular responses within the first central 15° showed significantly (P macular volume from baseline to 26 weeks. No retinal toxicity on full-field electroretinography or adverse events occurred during the follow-up period.

  5. [Combination surgery for wet age-related macular degeneration and chronic peripheral uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapuskalov, I V; Krivosheina, O I; Khoroshikh, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    To develop a combination surgery for wet age-related macular degeneration and concurrent chronic peripheral uveitis that would include intravitreal injection of Lucentis and cryocerclage of the peripheral retina. A total of 75 patients were examined and divided into 2 groups: the main group (37 patients) and the controls (38 patients). Patients from the main group underwent the new combination surgery, while the controls received intravitreal Lucentis alone (peripheral uveitis was managed therapeutically). It has been found that the new combination method provides a significant and stable improvement in visual acuity (by a factor of 10) and a decrease in the area of central scotoma (by a factor of 2.95) in the postoperative period. The period needed for recovery in the central retinal thickness is also 1.6 times shorter. The new combination surgery for wet age-related macular degeneration and concurrent chronic peripheral uveitis provides rapid reduction of inflammation in the extreme periphery of the fundus and a 1.5 times faster (as compared to traditional methods) primary restoration of topographic anatomy of the retina in the macular region.

  6. Imaging Polarimetry in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E.; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques—scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)—and investigate how they complement each other. METHODS The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. RESULTS Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD. PMID:18515594

  7. A STUDY TO COMPARE FUNDUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sujatha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To compare the diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography with Fundus Fluorescein Angiography in diagnosing Age related macular degeneration. METHODS A total 25 patients newly diagnosed as Age related macular degeneration were included in the study. The study was done during the time period between August 2013 to November 2015 this is a prospective randomized hospital based study. RESULTS Maximum no of patients affected belonged to the age group of 50-70 years and 60% were females. The most common symptom was defective vision accounting for 92%. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia were the most common risk factors. 12% of the cases had unilateral disease and 88% had bilateral disease. 6% of eyes were normal in both FFA and OCT. 62% of the eyes by FFA and 61% of the eyes by OCT had dry ARMD and 32 % of the eye by FFA and 33 % by OCT had wet ARMD. CONCLUSION Fundus Fluorescein Angiography is the gold standard tool for screening ARMD and OCT is more specific in detecting early subretinal neovascular membrane and also to assess the activity of the neovascular membranes. Hence OCT is superior to FFA in diagnosing early wet ARMD and thus helps in early management of patients with ARMD.

  8. Recent developments in age-related macular degeneration: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zamil, Waseem M; Yassin, Sanaa A

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual impairment in elderly people is a considerable health problem that significantly affects quality of life of millions worldwide. The magnitude of this issue is becoming more evident with an aging population and an increasing number of older individuals. Objective The objective of this article was to review the clinical and pathological aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diagnostic tools, and therapeutic modalities presently available or underway for both atrophic and wet forms of the disease. Methods An online review of the PubMed database was performed, searching for the key words. The search was limited to articles published since 1980 to date. Results Several risk factors have been linked to AMD, such as age (>60 years), lifestyle (smoking and diet), and family history. Although the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear, genetic factors have been implicated in the condition. Treatment for atrophic AMD is mainly close observation, coupled with nutritional supplements such as zinc and antioxidants, whereas treatment of wet AMD is based on targeting choroidal neovascular membranes. Conclusion Identification of modifiable risk factors would improve the possibilities of preventing the progression of AMD. The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents has transformed the therapeutic approach of the potentially blinding disease “wet AMD” into a more favorable outcome. PMID:28860733

  9. Prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration: an update for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leisa L; Roach, J Michael

    2013-11-01

    Review the current recommendations for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Articles indexed in PubMed (National Library of Medicine), the Cochrane Reviews and Trials, Dynamed, and Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS) in the last 10 years using the key words macular degeneration, agerelated macular degeneration (AMD), AMD and treatment, AMD and prevention. Sixty-nine published papers were reviewed, and criteria supporting the primary objective were used to identify useful resources. The literature included practice guidelines, original research articles, review articles, product prescribing information, and supplement product information for the prevention and treatment of AMD. AMD is a leading cause of visual impairment in older adults. At present there is no cure for advanced AMD, but intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors minimize and even reverse vision loss in patients with AMD of the neovascular type. In the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), participants with intermediate AMD who received a supplement combination of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc had a greater delay in progression to advanced AMD than those participants who received a portion of these supplements. In the second AREDS, AREDS2, the addition of lutein + zeaxanthin, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or lutein + zeaxanthin and DHA + EPA to the complete AREDS formulation did not further reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD. Subgroup analyses indicated that additional research with lutein + zeaxanthin supplementation is warranted as it was beneficial in participants with low dietary intake of lutein + zeaxanthin. A formulation without beta-carotene may be best for most patients, especially smokers or former smokers. Health care professionals will want to consider patient-specific information before recommending ocular health supplements.

  10. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  11. Influence of age-related macular degeneration on macular thickness measurement made with fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas, Anita; Papp, András; Holló, Gábor

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on macular thickness measurement made with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (RTVue-OCT) to detect glaucoma. : One nonglaucomatous eye of 79 white persons was imaged. This comprised 25 healthy eyes, 19 eyes with early/intermediate AMD (geographic atrophy excluded), 16 eyes with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and 19 CNV eyes after intravitreal antiangiogenic treatment [CNV-antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)]. Compared with the age-matched controls, no difference in any nerve fiber layer and optic disc parameter was seen for any AMD group. No macular retinal segmentation error was detected in the control group. Localized inner retinal image segmentation errors topographically related to AMD were detected in 8 eyes with drusen (42.1%), all 16 CNV eyes (100%) and 17 eyes in the CNV-anti-VEGF group (89.5%; χ test, P0.05). In contrast, all pattern-based ganglion cell complex (GCC) parameters were significantly higher (more abnormal) in the CNV and CNV-anti-VEGF group than in the control eyes (Mann-Whitney test, Bonferroni correction, P<0.001). For GCC focal loss volume, the only pattern-based parameter classified by the software, the frequency of "borderline" and "outside normal limits" classifications was significantly greater in each AMD group than in the control group (χ test, Bonferroni correction, P ≤0.03). In nonglaucomatous eyes, AMD significantly influences the pattern-based inner macular thickness parameters of the RTVue optical coherence tomograph and the software-provided classification of GCC focal loss volume, for detection of glaucoma.

  12. Pharmacologic Treatment of Wet Type Age-related Macular Degeneration; Current and Evolving Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams Najafabadi, Hoda; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2017-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration as the major cause of blindness in the elderly population has remained at the epicenter of clinical research in ophthalmology. This retinal disorder is characterized by the photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cells loss, occurring within the macula. The disease represents a spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a multifactorial disease resulting from a combination of genetic predispositions and environmental risk factors. AMD is classified into two different types, dry and wet. Wet AMD is in close relation with angiogenesis and inflammatory processes.A variety of anti-angiogenesis and anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed for the treatment of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review the pharmacological therapies of the wet form of AMD and focus on new drugs that are currently in different stages of research and development.

  13. Targeting modifiable risk factors in age-related macular degeneration in optometric practice in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lene Martin1,2 1School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; 2School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, London, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which ophthalmologists and optometrists in Sweden recommend the use of nutritional supplements, changes in diet, or smoking cessation to patients who are at risk of or with signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. In addition, this study also examined how these practitioners rate the strength of evidence for nutritional supplements in AMD management and which sources of information they consult to determine supplement recommendations for the prevention or treatment of AMD. Methods: This study implemented a cross-sectional design using data from a questionnaire. All Swedish optometrists and ophthalmologists who were registered in the membership databases of their respective professional organizations were invited to participate. The questionnaire contained 18 forced choice questions and one free text question and was organized into the following four sections: use of nutritional supplements, dietary advice, smoking and eye diseases, and strength of evidence and the sources of information regarding nutritional supplement interventions. Results: The response rate was 40.3% for optometrists and 5% for ophthalmologists. Optometrists were more likely than ophthalmologists to recommend nutritional supplements in AMD and provided significantly more advice about diet than did the ophthalmologists for both patients at risk for AMD and those with established disease. The ophthalmologists were more likely than the optometrists to rely on the findings from the age-related eye disease studies of AMD regarding treatment with and selection of supplements and to recommend smoking cessation. Conclusion: Common evidence-based strategies for AMD management among eye care professionals would presumably be beneficial for AMD

  14. VITRECTOMY FOR INTERMEDIATE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION ASSOCIATED WITH TANGENTIAL VITREOMACULAR TRACTION: A CLINICOPATHOLOGIC CORRELATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziada, Jean; Hagenau, Felix; Compera, Denise; Wolf, Armin; Scheler, Renate; Schaumberger, Markus M; Priglinger, Siegfried G; Schumann, Ricarda G

    2018-03-01

    To describe the morphologic characteristics of the vitreomacular interface in intermediate age-related macular degeneration associated with tangential traction due to premacular membrane formation and to correlate with optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings and clinical data. Premacular membrane specimens were removed sequentially with the internal limiting membrane from 27 eyes of 26 patients with intermediate age-related macular degeneration during standard vitrectomy. Specimens were processed for immunocytochemical staining of epiretinal cells and extracellular matrix components. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images and patient charts were evaluated in retrospect. Immunocytochemistry revealed hyalocytes and myofibroblasts as predominant cell types. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated evidence of vitreoschisis in all eyes. Myofibroblasts with contractile properties were observed to span between folds of the internal limiting membrane and vitreous cortex collagen. Retinal pigment epithelial cells or inflammatory cells were not detected. Mean visual acuity (Snellen) showed significant improvement from 20/72 ± 20/36 to 20/41 ± 20/32 (P age-related macular degeneration predominantly consists of vitreous collagen, hyalocytes, and myofibroblasts with contractile properties. Vitreoschisis and vitreous-derived cells appear to play an important role in traction formation of this subgroup of eyes. In patients with intermediate age-related macular degeneration and contractile premacular membrane, release of traction by vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling results in significantly functional and anatomical improvement.

  15. Evolving Knowledge in Pharmacologic Treatments of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubrane Daguet, Gisèle; Risard-Gasiorowski, Sarah; Massamba, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Modern retinal drug therapy is a result of the recent challenges and breakthroughs in chemistry, physics, genetics, cell biology and biotechnologies. Specific pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a drug are of major importance and contribute to its ability to penetrate targeted ocular tissues in order to result in effective therapeutic concentrations. In addition, the drugs should maintain a prolonged time of activity and be safe with minimal local and systemic toxicity. The transporter vehicle or drug delivery system is crucial in order to enhance ocular tissue penetration and establish controlled drug release. Administration methods should be local, thereby reducing systemic side effects, and, ideally, treatment should be noninvasive. Within the group of so-called classic therapies, the use of pharmacologic treatments has become widespread for most severe retinal diseases. Thereby, ocular therapy of diseases like exudative age-related macular degeneration has improved markedly. Moreover, new metabolic pathways have been identified, new molecules have emerged, new synthesis technologies have been discovered, and new formulae conceived. These developments have opened new avenues for limiting disease progression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Comparison of macular choroidal thickness among patients older than age 65 with early atrophic age-related macular degeneration and normals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, Eric J; Randolph, John C

    2013-09-19

    To compare macular choroidal thickness between patients older than 65 years with early atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and normals. This was a consecutive, cross-sectional observational study. Enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography using horizontal raster scanning at 12 locations throughout the macula was performed in one eye of consecutive patients presenting with large soft drusen alone, drusen with additional features of early AMD, or a normal fundus. Choroidal thickness was measured at 7 points for each raster scan in the central 3 mm of the macula (total 84 points per eye). In addition, a single subfoveolar measurement was obtained for each eye. One hundred fifty eyes of 150 patients were included. There was no significant difference between mean refractive error for each diagnosis category via one-way ANOVA (P = 0.451). Mean macular choroidal thickness (CT) was 235 ± 49 μm (range, 125-334 μm; median 222 μm) for normals, 161 ± 39 μm (range, 89-260 μm; median = 158 μm) for the drusen group, and 115 ± 40 μm (range, 22-256 μm; median = 112 μm) for patients with AMD. Mean macular CT was significantly different via one-way ANOVA among all diagnosis categories (P < 0.001). The presence of features of early AMD without geographic atrophy and/or soft drusen alone is associated with decreased mean macular CT in vivo compared to that in patients with no chorioretinal pathology. Using enhanced depth imaging, measurement of a single subfoveolar choroidal thickness is highly correlated to mean central macular CT.

  17. Cataract surgery and age-related macular degeneration. An evidence-based update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataract often coexist in patients and concerns that cataract surgery is associated with an increased risk of incidence or progression of existing AMD has been raised. This systematic review and meta-analysis is focused on presenting the evidence...

  18. Declines in arrestin and rhodopsin in the macula with progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethen, Cheryl M; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2005-03-01

    Biochemical analysis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) at distinct stages of the disease will help further understanding of the molecular events associated with disease progression. This study was conducted to determine the ability of a new grading system for eye bank eyes, the Minnesota Grading System (MGS), to discern distinct stages of AMD so that retinal region-specific changes in rod photoreceptor protein expression from donors could be determined. Donor eyes were assigned to a specific level of AMD by using the MGS. Expression of the rod photoreceptor proteins rhodopsin and arrestin was evaluated by Western immunoblot analysis in the macular and peripheral regions of the neurosensory retina from donors at different stages of AMD. A significant linear decline in both arrestin and rhodopsin content correlated with progressive MGS levels in the macula. In contrast, the peripheral region showed no significant correlation between MGS level and the content of either protein. The statistically significant relationship between decreasing macular rod photoreceptor proteins and progressive MGS levels of AMD demonstrates the utility of the clinically based MGS to correspond with specific protein changes found at known, progressive stages of degeneration. Future biochemical analysis of clinically characterized donor eyes will further understanding of the pathobiochemistry of AMD.

  19. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petrarca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Petrarca, Timothy L JacksonDepartment of Ophthalmology, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET. Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002, with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections.Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, neovascular, radiation therapy, epimacular brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, anti-VEGF

  20. A 4-Year Longitudinal Study of 555 Patients Treated with Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara B; Fuchs, Josefine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years.......To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years....

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  2. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  3. Can Vitamin A be Improved to Prevent Blindness due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Stargardt Disease and Other Retinal Dystrophies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Leonide; Washington, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how an imperfect visual cycle results in the formation of vitamin A dimers, thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various retinal diseases, and summarize how slowing vitamin A dimerization has been a therapeutic target of interest to prevent blindness. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of vitamin A dimerization, an alternative form of vitamin A, one that forms dimers more slowly yet maneuvers effortlessly through the visual cycle, was developed. Such a vitamin A, reinforced with deuterium (C20-D3-vitamin A), can be used as a non-disruptive tool to understand the contribution of vitamin A dimers to vision loss. Eventually, C20-D3-vitamin A could become a disease-modifying therapy to slow or stop vision loss associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease and retinal diseases marked by such vitamin A dimers. Human clinical trials of C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001) are underway.

  4. The complement system in age-related macular degeneration: A review of rare genetic variants and implications for personalized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M.J.; Jong, E.K.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal disease and the major cause of irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Numerous studies have found both common and rare genetic variants in the complement pathway to play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review we provide an

  5. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  6. Benefits, Potential Harms, and Optimal Use of Nutritional Supplementation for Preventing Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos H; Tyber, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    To briefly review age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the main findings from the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) report number 8 on the use of nutritional supplements for AMD, and to focus on data suggesting that supplement use should be guided using genetic testing of AMD risk genes. A literature search (January 2001 through October 26, 2016) was conducted using MEDLINE and the following MeSH terms: Antioxidants/therapeutic use, Genotype, Macular Degeneration/drug therapy, Macular degeneration/genetics, Dietary Supplements, Proteins/genetics, and Zinc Compounds/therapeutic use. Bibliographies of publications identified were also reviewed. English-language studies assessing AREDS supplement response in patients with AMD in relation to complement factor H gene ( CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene ( ARMS2) risk alleles were evaluated. Three of the 4 studies demonstrated a treatment interaction between ARMS2 and CFH genotypes and a differential response to supplements. The fourth study documented an interaction for the CFH genotype only. Reported response interactions included attenuated response, no response, and good response, whereas a subset showed increased progression of AMD. Conversely, one study reported no interactions between CFH and ARMS2 risk alleles and response to supplements. The weight of the evidence supports using genetic testing to guide selection of ocular vitamin use. This approach will avoid using supplements that could speed the progression of AMD in vulnerable patients, avoid using supplements that will have little to no effect in others, and result in appropriately using supplements in those that are likely to derive meaningful benefits.

  7. Systemic frequencies of T helper 1 and T helper 17 cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration: A case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Subhi, Yousif; Nielsen, Marie Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and a leading cause of irreversible vision loss. We investigated the systemic differences in the frequency of T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 cells in patients with non-exudative and exudative AMD and compared to age...

  8. The value of radiotherapy in the treatment of aged-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzycka, M.; Ziolkowska, E.; Slonina, A.

    2007-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in patients older then 65 years. There are two forms of AMD: exudative wet and nonexudative dry. Most of the lesions are not amenable to laser therapy because of their vicinity to the fovea. Earlier studies suggested that radiotherapy may inhibit further loss of visual acuity but following studies rendered contradictory results. In recent years, treatment of benign disease has again attracted the interest of the radiation oncology community in the Western part of the world. Radiotherapy has been given successfully to patients suffering from a wide variety diseases and AMD is one of them. The present article extensively reviews the clinical studies to define the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of AMD. (authors)

  9. Radiation therapy: age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carlos A Medina; Ehlers, Justis P

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe irreversible vision loss in patients over the age of 50 years in the developed world. Neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is responsible for 90% of the cases with severe visual loss. In the last decade, the treatment paradigm for NVAMD has been transformed by the advent of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Despite the excellent results of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, frequent injections remain a necessity for most patients. The burden of these frequent visits as well as the cumulative risks of indefinite intravitreal injections demand continued pursuit of more enduring therapy that provides similar functional results. Radiotherapy has been studied for two decades as a potential therapy for NVAMD. Because of its antiangiogenic properties, radiation therapy remains a promising potential adjunctive resource for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization secondary to NVAMD. This review considers the past, present and future of radiation as a treatment or combination treatment of NVAMD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. ASSOCIATION OF DRUSEN VOLUME WITH CHOROIDAL PARAMETERS IN NONNEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Siva; Lei, Jianqin; Nittala, Muneeswar G; Velaga, Swetha B; Haines, Jonathan; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Stambolian, Dwight; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2017-10-01

    The choroid is thought to be relevant to the pathogenesis of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration, but its role has not yet been fully defined. In this study, we evaluate the relationship between the extent of macular drusen and specific choroidal parameters, including thickness and intensity. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images were collected from two distinct, independent cohorts with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration: Amish (53 eyes of 34 subjects) and non-Amish (40 eyes from 26 subjects). All spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were obtained using the Cirrus HD-OCT with a 512 × 128 macular cube (6 × 6 mm) protocol. The Cirrus advanced retinal pigment epithelium analysis tool was used to automatically compute drusen volume within 3 mm (DV3) and 5 mm (DV5) circles centered on the fovea. The inner and outer borders of the choroid were manually segmented, and the mean choroidal thickness and choroidal intensity (i.e., brightness) were calculated. The choroidal intensity was normalized against the vitreous and nerve fiber layer reflectivity. The correlation between DV and these choroidal parameters was assessed using Pearson and linear regression analysis. A significant positive correlation was observed between normalized choroidal intensity and DV5 in the Amish (r = 0.42, P = 0.002) and non-Amish (r = 0.33, P = 0.03) cohorts. Also, DV3 showed a significant positive correlation with normalized choroidal intensity in both the groups (Amish: r = 0.30, P = 0.02; non-Amish: r = 0.32, P = 0.04). Choroidal thickness was negatively correlated with normalized choroidal intensity in both Amish (r = -0.71, P = 0.001) and non-Amish (r = -0.43, P = 0.01) groups. Normalized choroidal intensity was the most significant constant predictor of DV in both the Amish and non-Amish groups. Choroidal intensity, but not choroidal thickness, seems to be associated with drusen volume in Amish and non-Amish populations. These

  11. Removal of choroidal neovascular membrane in a case of macular hole after anti-VEGF therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akira; Hayashi, Ken; Murata, Kazuhisa; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2018-03-01

    The formation of macular hole after receiving anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is rare. We report a case of macular hole that occurred after intravitreal injection of an anti-VEGF agent for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a patient, who underwent vitrectomy combined with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) removal. A 64-year-old female with AMD affecting her right eye received an intravitreal injection of an anti-VEGF agent. After treatment, we identified a full thickness macular hole (MH) that was associated with the rapid resolution of the macular edema and contraction of the CNV. After performing vitrectomy combined with CNV removal, the MH closed and her visual acuity improved. Examination of the removed CNV revealed a network of microvessels devoid of pericytes. and Importance: The present findings suggest that rapid resolution of macular edema and contraction of the CNV and/or mild increase in the vitreous traction after anti-VEGF therapy could potentially cause MH. CNV removal via the MH may be an acceptable procedure, if the MH remains open, the CNV is of the classic type, and it spares a central portion of the fovea.

  12. Can innate and autoimmune reactivity forecast early and advance stages of age-related macular degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2017-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of central vision loss in persons over 55years of age in developed countries. AMD is a complex disease in which genetic, environmental and inflammatory factors influence its onset and progression. Elevation in serum anti-retinal autoantibodies, plasma and local activation of complement proteins of the alternative pathway, and increase in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines have been seen over the course of disease. Genetic studies of AMD patients confirmed that genetic variants affecting the alternative complement pathway have a major influence on AMD risk. Because the heterogeneity of this disease, there is no sufficient strategy to identify the disease onset and progression sole based eye examination, thus identification of reliable serological biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment by sampling patient's blood is necessary. This review provides an outline of the current knowledge on possible serological (autoantibodies, complement factors, cytokines, chemokines) and related genetic biomarkers relevant to the pathology of AMD, and discusses their application for prediction of disease activity and prognosis in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Obesity, lutein metabolism, and age-related macular degeneration: a web of connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of visual impairment in the United States. Currently there is no effective cure for this disease. Risk factors include decreased lutein and zeaxanthin status and obesity. Obesity is also an increasing public health concern. The alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity further exacerbates the public health concern of AMD. The mechanism by which obesity increases the risk of AMD may be related to the physiologic changes that occur with this condition. These include increased oxidative stress, changes in the lipoprotein profile, and increased inflammation. These changes would also result in an increased destruction and a decreased circulatory delivery of lutein and zeaxanthin to the macula of the eye. Therefore, the mechanism by which obesity is related to AMD risk may be through indirect effects on changes in lutein and zeaxanthin status and metabolism.

  14. Patient-reported utilities in bilateral visual impairment from amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Graaf, Elizabeth S; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Klaver, Caroline C W; Simonsz, Huibert J

    2016-05-17

    Utility of visual impairment caused by amblyopia is important for the cost-effectiveness of screening for amblyopia (lazy eye, prevalence 3-3.5 %). We previously measured decrease of utility in 35-year-old persons with unilateral persistent amblyopia. The current observational case-control study aimed to measure loss of utility in patients with amblyopia with recent decrease of vision in their better eye. As these patients are rare, the sample was supplemented by patients with bilateral age-related macular degeneration with similar decrease of vision. From our out-patient department, two groups of patients with recent deterioration to bilateral visual acuity less than Snellen 0.5 (bilateral visual impairment, BVI) were recruited, with either persistent amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration (AMB + AMD), or with bilateral age-related macular degeneration (BAMD). To measure utility, the time trade-off method and the standard gamble method were applied through interviews. Correlations were sought between utility values and visual acuity, age and Visual Function Questionnaire-25 scores. Seventeen AMB + AMD patients (mean age 72.9 years), and 63 BAMD patients (mean age 79.6 years) were included in the study. Among AMB + AMD, 80 % were willing to trade lifetime in exchange for cure. The overall mean time trade-off utility was 0.925. Among BAMD, 75 % were willing to trade, utility was 0.917. Among AMB + AMD, 38 % accepted risk of death in exchange for cure, overall mean standard gamble utility was 0.999. Among BAMD, 49 % accepted risk of death, utility was 0.998. Utility was not related to visual acuity but it was to age (p = 0.02). Elderly patients with BVI, caused by persistent amblyopia and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or by bilateral AMD, had an approximately 8 % loss of TTO utility. Notably, the 8 % loss in elderly with BVI differs little from the 3.7 % loss we found previously in 35-year-old persons with unilateral

  15. Immunological Factors in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, A.; Heij, La E.C.; Hendrikse, F.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that immunological factors are involved not only in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but also in its treatment. Earlier data showing the presence of inflammatory cells in affected areas of AMD retinas support this statement. Although a possible

  16. Study progress of CCR3 in wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Wei Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the study, chemokine receptor 3(CCR3in the eye is mainly distributed in retinal pigment epithelial cells, and also expressed in the choroidal vascular endothelial cells(CECs. The specificity of CCR3's high expression in wet age-related macular degeneration(AMDwas found, and it is proved that in wet-AMD patients, it plays an important role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization(CNV. In this paper, the structure, function, the problem of current research and the future direction of CCR3 were summarized. It is believed that with the further research on CCR3, it will not only help us to find a new method of wet-AMD diagnosis and treatment, but also may provide an important reference for other CNV disease research and new anti-CNV drugs.

  17. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P N Scholl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112 and controls (n = 67. Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH, factor B-C2 (BF-C2 and complement C3 (C3 genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001, were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  18. Macular degeneration - age-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMD occurs when the blood vessels under the macula become thin and brittle. Small yellow deposits, called drusen, form. Almost all people with macular degeneration start with the dry form. Wet AMD occurs ...

  19. Age-related macular degeneration—emerging pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    GEHRS, KAREN M.; ANDERSON, DON H.; JOHNSON, LINCOLN V.; HAGEMAN, GREGORY S.

    2014-01-01

    Today, the average life expectancy in developed nations is over 80 years and climbing. And yet, the quality of life during those additional years is often significantly diminished by the effects of age-related, degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. AMD is characterized by a progressive loss of central vision attributable to degenerative and neovascular changes in the macula, a highly specialized region of the ocular retina responsible for fine visual acuity. Estimates gathered from the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) global eye disease survey conservatively indicate that 14 million persons are blind or severely visually impaired because of AMD. The disease has a tremendous impact on the physical and mental health of the geriatric population and their families and is becoming a major public health burden. Currently, there is neither a cure nor a means to prevent AMD. Palliative treatment options for the less prevalent, late-stage ‘wet’ form of the disease include anti-neovascular agents, photodynamic therapy and thermal laser. There are no current therapies for the more common ‘dry’ AMD, except for the use of antioxidants that delay progression in 20%–25% of eyes. New discoveries, however, are beginning to provide a much clearer picture of the relevant cellular events, genetic factors, and biochemical processes associated with early AMD. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that the innate immune system and, more specifically, uncontrolled regulation of the complement alternative pathway plays a central role in the pathobiology of AMD. The complement Factor H gene—which encodes the major inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway—is the first gene identified in multiple independent studies that confers a significant genetic risk for the development of AMD. The emergence of this new paradigm of AMD pathogenesis should hasten the development

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography and the Development of Antiangiogenic Therapies in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explain the pivotal role optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging had in the development of antiangiogenic therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD). Methods A historical literature review was combined with personal perspectives from the introduction of OCT imaging and the early clinical use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Results At the time that OCT emerged, the gold standard for imaging of nvAMD was fluorescein angiography (FA), a time-consuming, dye-based, invasive technique that provided en face images of the retina and was used to characterize leakage, perfusion status, and the types of macular neovascularization (MNV). In comparison, OCT imaging was a fast, safe, noninvasive technique that complemented FA imaging by providing cross-sectional images of the macula. OCT was able to visualize and quantify the macular fluid that was associated with the presence of excess VEGF, which was identified by intraretinal fluid, subretinal fluid, and fluid under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Clinicians quickly appreciated the benefits of OCT imaging for following macular fluid after anti-VEGF therapy. By observing the qualitative and quantitative changes in macular fluid depicted by OCT imaging, clinicians were empowered to compare anti-VEGF drugs and move from fixed-dosing regimens to patient-specific dosing strategies requiring fewer injections. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography imaging was adopted as a VEGF-meter, a method to detect excess VEGF, and evolved to become the gold standard imaging strategy for diagnosing nvAMD, assessing treatment responses to anti-VEGF drugs, deciding when to re-treat, and evaluating disease progression. PMID:27409464

  1. Aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations after bimonthly intravitreal injections of aflibercept for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tomoko; Wang, Xiying; Sawada, Osamu; Saishin, Yoshitsugu; Ohji, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    Clinical evidence supports the efficacy of bimonthly aflibercept injection for age-related macular degeneration. The study aimed to evaluate aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations and the efficacy of bimonthly aflibercept in patients with age-related macular degeneration. This study is a prospective, interventional case series. Enrolled were 35 eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration from 35 patients. Patients received three bimonthly intravitreal aflibercept without loading doses. We collected the aqueous humor just before each injection, measured vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measured best-corrected visual acuity and central retinal subfield thickness before and after the injections. Aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations were measured. The vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was 135.4 ± 60.5 pg/mL (mean ± standard deviation, range 60.6-323.4) at baseline and below the lowest detectable limit in all eyes at month 2 and in 32 eyes at month 4 (P age-related macular degeneration. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  3. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaflik, Jacek P.; Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika; Zaras, Magdalena; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  4. Electrophysiological assessment of retinal function during 6 months of bevacizumab treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Møller, Flemming; Sjølie, Anne Katrin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the alteration of retinal function by multifocal electroretinography and full-field electroretinography in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with bevacizumab. METHODS: We performed a prospective pilot study of 26 eyes of 26...... previously treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration receiving intravitreal injections with 1.25 mg bevacizumab. Patients were examined with multifocal electroretinography, full-field electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity. Follow...

  5. Evaluation of the siRNA PF-04523655 versus ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (MONET Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  6. Modified Approach in Management of Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Roy, Sangeeta; Bansal, Mayank; Tinwala, Sana; Aron, Neelima; Temkar, Shreyas; Pujari, Amar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of a modified approach in the management of thick submacular hemorrhage in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration. This was a retrospective study. A retrospective chart review was performed on 10 eyes of 10 patients with submacular hemorrhage secondary to wet age-related macular degeneration treated with 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy, followed by submacular injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (12.5 μg/0.1 mL), bevacizumab (2.5 mg/0.1 mL), and air (0.3 mL). Gas tamponade was given with 20% SF6 and postoperative propped-up positioning. Patients were evaluated for displacement of hemorrhage, preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications, and recurrence of hemorrhage. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Displacement of the submacular bleed was achieved in all cases. Improvement of best-corrected visual acuity was seen in 8 of 10 patients. Rebleed was seen in 2 eyes that were retreated with intravitreal injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, bevacizumab, and 20% SF6 gas. This modified technique aids in the effective displacement of thick submacular hemorrhage with simultaneous treatment of the underlying choroidal neovascular membrane, which halts the disease progression resulting in significant improvement of visual acuity.

  7. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M. E. A. Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  8. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Yonekawa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  9. Dry age-related macular degeneration: mechanisms, therapeutic targets, and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A; Klingeborn, Mikael

    2013-12-13

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual dysfunction in individuals over 65 in Western Society. Patients with AMD are classified as having early stage disease (early AMD), in which visual function is affected, or late AMD (generally characterized as either "wet" neovascular AMD, "dry" atrophic AMD or both), in which central vision is severely compromised or lost. Until recently, there have been no therapies available to treat the disorder(s). Now, the most common wet form of late-stage AMD, choroidal neovascularization, generally responds to treatment with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies. Nevertheless, there are no current therapies to restore lost vision in eyes with advanced atrophic AMD. Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) or AREDS2 formulation (antioxidant vitamins C and E, lutein, zeaxanthin, and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD, although the impact was in neovascular rather than atrophic AMD. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated several features of early AMD that are likely to be druggable targets for treatment. Studies have established that much of the genetic risk for AMD is associated with complement genes. Consequently, several complement-based therapeutic treatment approaches are being pursued. Potential treatment strategies against AMD deposit formation and protein and/or lipid deposition will be discussed, including anti-amyloid therapies. In addition, the role of autophagy in AMD and prevention of oxidative stress through modulation of the antioxidant system will be explored. Finally, the success of these new therapies in clinical trials and beyond relies on early detection, disease typing, and predicting disease progression, areas that are currently being rapidly transformed by improving imaging modalities and functional assays.

  10. Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Mechanisms, Therapeutic Targets, and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A.; Klingeborn, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual dysfunction in individuals over 65 in Western Society. Patients with AMD are classified as having early stage disease (early AMD), in which visual function is affected, or late AMD (generally characterized as either “wet” neovascular AMD, “dry” atrophic AMD or both), in which central vision is severely compromised or lost. Until recently, there have been no therapies available to treat the disorder(s). Now, the most common wet form of late-stage AMD, choroidal neovascularization, generally responds to treatment with anti–vascular endothelial growth factor therapies. Nevertheless, there are no current therapies to restore lost vision in eyes with advanced atrophic AMD. Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) or AREDS2 formulation (antioxidant vitamins C and E, lutein, zeaxanthin, and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD, although the impact was in neovascular rather than atrophic AMD. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated several features of early AMD that are likely to be druggable targets for treatment. Studies have established that much of the genetic risk for AMD is associated with complement genes. Consequently, several complement-based therapeutic treatment approaches are being pursued. Potential treatment strategies against AMD deposit formation and protein and/or lipid deposition will be discussed, including anti-amyloid therapies. In addition, the role of autophagy in AMD and prevention of oxidative stress through modulation of the antioxidant system will be explored. Finally, the success of these new therapies in clinical trials and beyond relies on early detection, disease typing, and predicting disease progression, areas that are currently being rapidly transformed by improving imaging modalities and functional assays. PMID:24335072

  11. Absolute and estimated values of macular pigment optical density in young and aged Asian participants with or without age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yoko; Shigeno, Yuta; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Kurihara, Toshihide; Minami, Sakiko; Hirano, Eri; Shinoda, Hajime; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2017-08-29

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are suggested micronutrient supplements to prevent the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide. To monitor the levels of lutein/zeaxanthin in the macula, macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is measured. A commercially available device (MPSII®, Elektron Technology, Switzerland), using technology based on heterochromatic flicker photometry, can measure both absolute and estimated values of MPOD. However, whether the estimated value is applicable to Asian individuals and/or AMD patients remains to be determined. The absolute and estimated values of MPOD were measured using the MPSII® device in 77 participants with a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) > 0.099 (logMAR score). The studied eyes included 17 young (20-29 years) healthy, 26 aged (>50 years) healthy, 18 aged and AMD-fellow, and 16 aged AMD eyes. The mean BCVA among the groups were not significantly different. Both absolute and estimated values were measurable in all eyes of young healthy group. However, absolute values were measurable in only 57.7%, 66.7%, and 43.8%, of the aged healthy, AMD-fellow, and AMD groups, respectively, and 56.7% of the eyes included in the 3 aged groups. In contrast, the estimated value was measurable in 84.6%, 88.9% and 93.8% of the groups, respectively, and 88.3% of eyes in the pooled aged group. The estimated value was correlated with absolute value in individuals from all groups by Spearman's correlation coefficient analyses (young healthy: R 2  = 0.885, P = 0.0001; aged healthy: R 2  = 0.765, P = 0.001; AMD-fellow: R 2  = 0.851, P = 0.0001; and AMD: R 2  = 0.860, P = 0.013). Using the estimated value, significantly lower MPOD values were found in aged AMD-related eyes, which included both AMD-fellow and AMD eyes, compared with aged healthy eyes by Student's t-test (P = 0.02). Absolute, in contrast to estimated, value was measurable in a limited number of aged participants

  12. Physical activity patterns in patients with early and late age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to visual impairment that affects visual functioning and thereby the ability to be physically active. We investigated physical activity patterns in patients with AMD. METHODS: Patients with early and late AMD and elderly controls were...

  13. Relationship between macular pigment and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Nolan, John M; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Beatty, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between macular pigment (MP) and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). 121 subjects with early AMD enrolled as part of the Central Retinal Enrichment Supplementation Trial (CREST; ISRCTN13894787) were assessed using a range of psychophysical measures of visual function, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), letter contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic CS, mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD), photostress recovery time (PRT), reading performance and subjective visual function, using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI VFQ-25). MP was measured using customised heterochromatic flicker photometry. Letter CS, mesopic and photopic CS, photopic GD and mean reading speed were each significantly (p0.05, for all). MP relates positively to many measures of visual function in unsupplemented subjects with early AMD. The CREST trial will investigate whether enrichment of MP influences visual function among those afflicted with this condition. ISRCTN13894787. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Hypomethylation of the IL17RC Promoter Associates with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly population worldwide. Although recent studies have demonstrated strong genetic associations between AMD and SNPs in a number of genes, other modes of regulation are also likely to play a role in the etiology of this disease. We identified a significantly decreased level of methylation on the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients. Furthermore, we showed that hypomethylation of the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients led to an elevated expression of its protein and messenger RNA in peripheral blood as well as in the affected retina and choroid, suggesting that the DNA methylation pattern and expression of IL17RC may potentially serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of AMD and likely plays a role in disease pathogenesis.

  15. Estimated cases of blindness and visual impairment from neovascular age-related macular degeneration avoided in Australia by ranibizumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Paul; Bressler, Neil; Doan, Quan V; Dolan, Chantal; Ferreira, Alberto; Osborne, Aaron; Rochtchina, Elena; Danese, Mark; Colman, Shoshana; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, such as ranibizumab, have significantly improved the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. This study used patient-level simulation modelling to estimate the number of individuals in Australia who would have been likely to avoid legal blindness or visual impairment due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration over a 2-year period as a result of intravitreal ranibizumab injections. The modelling approach used existing data for the incidence of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Australia and outcomes from ranibizumab trials. Blindness and visual impairment were defined as visual acuity in the better-seeing eye of worse than 6/60 or 6/12, respectively. In 2010, 14,634 individuals in Australia were estimated to develop neovascular age-related macular degeneration who would be eligible for ranibizumab therapy. Without treatment, 2246 individuals would become legally blind over 2 years. Monthly 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab would reduce incident blindness by 72% (95% simulation interval, 70-74%). Ranibizumab given as needed would reduce incident blindness by 68% (64-71%). Without treatment, 4846 individuals would become visually impaired over 2 years; this proportion would be reduced by 37% (34-39%) with monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, and by 28% (23-33%) with ranibizumab given as needed. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, given either monthly or as needed, can substantially lower the number of cases of blindness and visual impairment over 2 years after the diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

  16. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration : The European Eye Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. PARTICIPANTS: Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged

  17. Side effects after radiotherapy of age-related macular degeneration with the Nijmegen technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyng, C.B.; Tromp, A.I.; Meulendijks, C.F.M.; Leys, A.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Deutman, A.F.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a randomized trial concerning radiotherapy for age-related macular degeneration, fluorescein angiograms were taken of controls and patients. In this study the frequency of side effects in eyes receiving radiotherapy with the Nijmegen technique is compared with the findings in the eyes

  18. Variability of disease activity in patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, P; Scholz, P; Muether, P S; Fauser, S

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo analyze choroidal neovasularization (CNV) activity and recurrence patterns in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) treated with ranibizumab, and the correlation with individual intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) suppression time (VST).MethodsPost-hoc analysis of data from a prospective, non-randomized clinical study. Patients with nAMD treated with ranibizumab on a pro re nata regimen. Disease activity was analyzed monthly by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and correlated with VSTs.ResultsOverall, 73 eyes of 73 patients were included in the study with a mean follow-up of 717 days (range: 412-1239 days). Overall, the mean CNV-activity-free interval was 76.5 days (range: 0-829 days). The individual range of the length of dry intervals was high. A total of 42% of patients had a range of more than 90 days. Overall, 16% of patients showed persistent activity. And 12% stayed dry after the initial ranibizumab treatment. No significant correlation was found between the CNV-recurrence pattern and VST (P=0.12).ConclusionsCNV activity in nAMD is irregular, which is reflected in the range of the duration of dry intervals and late recurrences. The biomarker VST solely seems not to be sufficient to explain recurrence pattern of CNV in all AMD patients.

  19. Quantitative analysis of cone photoreceptor distribution and its relationship with axial length, age, and early age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Obata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It has not been clarified whether early age-related macular degeneration (AMD is associated with cone photoreceptor distribution. We used adaptive optics fundus camera to examine cone photoreceptors in the macular area of aged patients and quantitatively analyzed its relationship between the presence of early AMD and cone distribution. METHODS: Sixty cases aged 50 or older were studied. The eyes were examined with funduscopy and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to exclude the eyes with any abnormalities at two sites of measurement, 2° superior and 5° temporal to the fovea. High-resolution retinal images with cone photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics fundus camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France. After adjusting for axial length, cone packing density was calculated and the relationship with age, axial length, or severity of early AMD based on the age-related eye disease study (AREDS classification was analyzed. RESULTS: Patient's age ranged from 50 to 77, and axial length from 21.7 to 27.5 mm. Mean density in metric units and that in angular units were 24,900 cells/mm2, 2,170 cells/deg2 at 2° superior, and 18,500 cells/mm2, 1,570 cels/deg2 at 5° temporal, respectively. Axial length was significantly correlated with the density calculated in metric units, but not with that in angular units. Age was significantly correlated with the density both in metric and angular units at 2° superior. There was no significant difference in the density in metric and angular units between the eyes with AREDS category one and those with categories two or three. CONCLUSION: Axial length and age were significantly correlated with parafoveal cone photoreceptor distribution. The results do not support that early AMD might influence cone photoreceptor density in the area without drusen or pigment abnormalities.

  20. [Potential of melatonin for prevention of age-related macular degeneration: experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, N A; Zhdankina, A A; Fursova, A Zh; Kolosova, N G

    2013-01-01

    Decline with age of the content of melatonin is considered as one of the leading mechanisms of aging and development of associated diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--the disease, which becomes the most common cause of blindness and acuity of vision deterioration in elderly. The prospects of the use of melatonin in the prevention of AMD is being actively discussed, but as a rule on the basis of the results of the experiments on cells in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We showed previously that the senescence-accelerated OXYS rat is an adequate animal model of AMD, already used for identifying the relevant therapeutic targets. Here we have investigated the effect of Melatonin (Melaksen, 0,004 mg per kg--a dose equivalent to the recommended one for people) on the development of retinopathy similar to AMD in OXYS rats. Ophthalmoscopic examinations show that Melatonin supplementation decreased the incidence and severity of retinopathy and improved some (but not all) histological abnormalities associated with retinopathy. Thus, melatonin prevented the structural and functional changes in RPE cells, reduced the severity of microcirculatory disorders. Importantly, Melatonin prevented destruction of neurosensory cells, associative and gangliolar neurons in the retina. Taken together, our data suggest the therapeutic potential of Melatonin for treatment and prevention of AMD.

  1. Issues in quantifying atrophic macular disease using retinal autofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunness, Janet S; Ziegler, Matthias D; Applegate, Carol A

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential and limits of autofluorescence imaging in identifying and delineating areas of atrophy. Fundus photographs and infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) imaging, SLO macular perimetry, and SLO autofluorescence imaging results were compared for two patients with geographic atrophy (GA) from age-related macular degeneration, one patient with pigmentary alteration of the retina, and two patients with Stargardt disease. The main outcome measure in this case series was the presence of reduced autofluorescence. Drusen may become undetectable during autofluorescence imaging for some patients, allowing simple identification of areas of GA with areas of reduced autofluorescence. In other patients, drusen themselves have decreased autofluorescence, despite having intact retinal function in the retina overlying them. Some patients may have areas of reduced autofluorescence that persist for many years, without evidence of the development of atrophy. In Stargardt disease, decreased autofluorescence can easily detect and delineate areas of scotoma. Areas with mottled autofluorescence may have overlying function, but the function may not be adequate to support a fixation locus in that area. Using decreased autofluorescence to delineate areas of atrophy may be helpful in atrophic macular disorders. For GA, correlation with fundus photographs or macular perimetry findings may be necessary to differentiate between drusen and atrophy. For Stargardt disease, the nature of areas of decreased autofluorescence may help explain visual function of those areas.

  2. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were...

  3. Omics in Ophthalmology: Advances in Genomics and Precision Medicine for Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-03-01

    The genomic revolution has had a huge impact on our understanding of the genetic defects and disease mechanisms underlying ophthalmic diseases. Two examples are discussed here. The first is Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal dystrophy leading to severe vision loss in children, and the second is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly. Twenty years ago, the genetic causes of these diseases were unknown. Currently, more than 20 LCA genes have been identified, and genetic testing can now successfully identify the genetic defects in at least 75% of all LCA cases. Gene-specific treatments have entered the clinical trial phase for three LCA genes, and for seven LCA genes gene-specific therapies have been tested in model systems. Age-related macular degeneration is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, more than 40 loci have been identified for AMD, accounting for 15%-65% of the total genetic contribution to AMD. Despite the progress that has been made so far, genetic testing is not yet recommended for AMD, but this may change if we move to clinical trials or treatments that are dependent on an individual's genotype. The identification of serum or plasma biomarkers using other "-omics" technologies may further improve predictive tests and our understanding of the disease mechanisms of AMD. Ultimately, it is anticipated that predictive tests will help to stratify patients for the most suitable therapy, which will enable the development of precision medicine, tailored to individual needs.

  4. Tear film proteome in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Kaarniranta, Kai; Winiarczyk, Stanisław; Adaszek, Łukasz; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2018-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main reason for blindness in elderly people in the developed countries. Current screening protocols have limitations in detecting the early signs of retinal degeneration. Therefore, it would be desirable to find novel biomarkers for early detection of AMD. Development of novel biomarkers would help in the prevention, diagnostics, and treatment of AMD. Proteomic analysis of tear film has shown promise in this research area. If an optimal set of biomarkers could be obtained from accessible body fluids, it would represent a reliable way to monitor disease progression and response to novel therapies. Tear films were collected on Schirmer strips from a total of 22 patients (8 with wet AMD, 6 with dry AMD, and 8 control individuals). 2D electrophoresis was used to separate tear film proteins prior to their identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and matching with functional databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified. Most of them were previously described in various proteomic studies concerning AMD. Shootin-1, histatin-3, fidgetin-like protein 1, SRC kinase signaling inhibitor, Graves disease carrier protein, actin cytoplasmic 1, prolactin-inducible protein 1, and protein S100-A7A were upregulated in the tear film samples isolated from AMD patients and were not previously linked with this disease in any proteomic analysis. The upregulated proteins supplement our current knowledge of AMD pathogenesis, providing evidence that certain specific proteins are expressed into the tear film in AMD. As far we are aware, this is the first study to have undertaken a comprehensive in-depth analysis of the human tear film proteome in AMD patients.

  5. Vitaminas e antioxidantes na degeneração macular relacionada à idade Vitamins and antioxidants in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Durães Serracarbassa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve os efeitos bioquímicos e estruturais das vitaminas e antioxidantes na retina. Apresenta as principais substâncias presentes na dieta alimentar e na suplementação vitamínica envolvidas na gênese da degeneração macular relacionada à idade. Relata ainda os resultados de estudos prospectivos multicêntricos relacionados ao assunto, por meio de revisão bibliográfica.The author describes biochemical and structural effects of vitamins and antioxidants on the retina. The main substances present in diet food and vitamin supplies involved in the genesis of age-related macular degeneration are shown. Also reports on the outcomes of prospective studies related to the subject, by literature review are presented.

  6. Maculoplasty for age-related macular degeneration: reengineering Bruch's membrane and the human macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Priore, Lucian V; Tezel, Tongalp H; Kaplan, Henry J

    2006-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the western world. Over the last decade, there have been significant advances in the management of exudative AMD with the introduction of anti-VEGF drugs; however, many patients with exudative AMD continue to lose vision and there are no effective treatments for advanced exudative AMD or geographic atrophy. Initial attempts at macular reconstruction using cellular transplantation have not been effective in reversing vision loss. Herein we discuss the current status of surgical attempts to reconstruct damaged subretinal anatomy in advanced AMD. We reinforce the concept of maculoplasty for advanced AMD, which is defined as reconstruction of macular anatomy in patients with advanced vision loss. Successful maculoplasty is a three-step process that includes replacing or repairing damaged cells (using transplantation, translocation or stimulation of autologous cell proliferation); immune suppression (if allografts are used to replace damaged cells); and reconstruction or replacement of Bruch's membrane (to restore the integrity of the substrate for proper cell attachment). In the current article we will review the rationale for maculoplasty in advanced AMD, and discuss the results of initial clinical attempts at macular reconstruction. We will then discuss the role of Bruch's membrane damage in limiting transplant survival and visual recovery, and discuss the effects of age-related changes within human Bruch's membrane on the initial attachment and subsequent proliferation of transplanted cells. We will discuss attempts to repair Bruch's membrane by coating with extracellular matrix ligands, anatomic reconstitution of the inner collagen layer, and the effects of Bruch's membrane reconstruction of ultrastuctural anatomy and subsequent cell behavior. Lastly, we will emphasize the importance of continued efforts required for successful maculoplasty.

  7. Macular xanthophylls and ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in age-related macular degeneration: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christin; Winter, Lisa; Fröhlich, Kati; Jentsch, Susanne; Dawczynski, Jens; Jahreis, Gerhard; Böhm, Volker

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that the functionality of the macula lutea depends on the nutritional uptake of lutein and zeaxanthin and that it is inversely associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Additionally, ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) may also be protective. To investigate the effect of a 12-month intervention with macular xanthophylls and ω-3 LC-PUFAs on xanthophylls and fatty acids in plasma, antioxidant capacity, and optical density of the macular pigment of patients with nonexudative AMD. The LUTEGA study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel clinical trial that was conducted for 12 months. University Eye Hospital and Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. A total of 172 individuals with nonexudative AMD. Individuals were enrolled and randomly divided as follows: placebo group, group 1 (a capsule containing 10 mg of lutein, 1 mg of zeaxanthin, 100 mg of docosahexaenoic acid, and 30 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid administered each day), and group 2 (same substances but twice the dose used in group 1). One hundred forty-five participants completed the study successfully. Plasma xanthophyll concentrations and fatty acid profiles, optical density of the macular pigment, and antioxidant capacity in plasma (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid [Trolox] equivalent antioxidant capacity and photochemiluminescence). The concentrations of the administered carotenoids in plasma as well as the optical density of the macular pigment increased significantly in the groups randomized to receive supplementary macular xanthophylls and ω-3 LC-PUFAs after 1 month of intervention and remained at this level through the end of the study. Use of the double dose resulted in a beneficial alteration of the fatty acid profile in the plasma of patients with AMD in comparison with the dose in group 1. The lipophilic antioxidant capacity in plasma was significantly elevated

  8. NATURAL COURSE OF PATIENTS DISCONTINUING TREATMENT FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH VISUAL PROGNOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hui; Chang, Young Suk; Kim, Jong Woo

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the 24-month natural course of visual changes in patients discontinuing treatment despite persistent or recurrent fluid and factors predictive of visual prognosis. This retrospective, observational study included 35 patients (35 eyes) who initially received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but discontinued treatment despite persistent or recurrent fluid. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at treatment discontinuation was determined and compared with the 24-month BCVA, which was then compared between polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and other neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes. Baseline characteristics predictive of visual outcome and the degree of visual change were also analyzed. The mean number of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections before treatment discontinuation was 4.0 ± 1.6. The mean logarithm of minimal angle of resolution of BCVA at treatment discontinuation and that at 24 months were 1.02 ± 0.20 (Snellen equivalents = 20/209) and 1.60 ± 0.56 (20/796), respectively (P age-related macular degeneration subtypes (P = 0.803). The type of fluid (intraretinal fluid vs. no intraretinal fluid) was predictive of 24-month BCVA (P = 0.004) and the degree of changes in BCVA (P = 0.043). Marked deterioration in visual acuity was noted in patients discontinuing treatment, regardless of neovascular age-related macular degeneration subtypes. The presence of intraretinal fluid was associated with worse visual prognosis, suggesting that patients with intraretinal fluid should be strongly warned about their poor prognosis before they decide to discontinue treatment.

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Age-related Macular Degeneration: Role of Inflammatory Mediators and Pyroptosis; A Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2017-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and pyroptosis cause irreversible vascular changes in the eyes leading to central vision loss in patients. It is the most common eye disease affecting millions of people aged 50years or older, and is slowly becoming a major health problem worldwide. The disease mainly affects macula lutea, an oval-shaped pigmented area surrounding fovea near the center of retina, a region responsible for visual acuity. It is fairly a complex disease as genetics of patients, environmental triggers as well as risk factors such as age, family history of CVDs, diabetes, gender, obesity, race, hyperopia, iris color, smoking, diabetes, exposure to sun light and pyroptosis have all been clubbed together as probable causes of macular degeneration. Among genes that are known to play a role include variant polymorphisms in the complement cascade components such as CFH, C2, C3, and CFB as potential genetic risk factors. So far, AMD disease hypothesized theories have not resulted into the anticipated impact towards the development of effective or preventive therapies in order to help alleviate patients' suffering because, as of today, it is still unclear what actually initiates or leads to this dreaded eye condition. Based upon our extensive work on the metabolism of homocysteine (Hcy) in various disease conditions we, therefore, are proposing a novel hypothesis for AMD pathogenesis as we strongly believe that Hcy and events such as pyroptosis make a greater contribution to the overall etiology of AMD disease in a target population of susceptible hosts by inciting and accelerating the inherent inflammatory changes in the retina of these patients (Fig. 2). In this context, we further state that Hcy and pyroptosis should be considered as legitimate and valuable markers of retinal dysfunction as they not only aid and abet in the development but also in the progression of AMD in older people as discussed in this paper. This discussion should open up new

  10. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina; Juel, Helene Baek

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...

  11. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Ersoy, L.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Saksens, N.T.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information

  12. NLRP3 Inflammasome: Activation and Regulation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Progression of AMD is characterized by an increase in the number and size of drusen, extracellular deposits, which accumulate between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch’s membrane (BM in outer retina. The major pathways associated with its pathogenesis include oxidative stress and inflammation in the early stages of AMD. Little is known about the interactions among these mechanisms that drive the transition from early to late stages of AMD, such as geographic atrophy (GA or choroidal neovascularization (CNV. As part of the innate immune system, inflammasome activation has been identified in RPE cells and proposed to be a causal factor for RPE dysfunction and degeneration. Here, we will first review the classic model of inflammasome activation, then discuss the potentials of AMD-related factors to activate the inflammasome in both nonocular immune cells and RPE cells, and finally introduce several novel mechanisms for regulating the inflammasome activity.

  13. Angiographic Cystoid Macular Edema and Outcomes in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neepa; Maguire, Maureen G; Martin, Daniel F; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Grunwald, Juan E; Toth, Cynthia A; Jaffe, Glenn J; Daniel, Ebenezer

    2016-04-01

    To describe morphologic and visual outcomes in eyes with angiographic cystoid macular edema (CME) treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. A total of 1185 CATT study subjects. Baseline fluorescein angiography (FA) images of all CATT study eyes were evaluated for CME. Grading of other characteristics on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photographic images at baseline and during 2-year follow-up was completed by readers at the CATT Reading Centers. Three groups were created on the basis of baseline CME and intraretinal fluid (IRF) status: (1) CME, (2) IRF without CME, (3) neither CME nor IRF. Visual acuity (VA) and total central retinal thickness (CRT) on OCT at baseline, year 1, and year 2. Among 1131 participants with images of sufficient quality for determining CME and IRF at baseline, 92 (8.1%) had CME, 766 (67.7%) had IRF without CME, and 273 (24.1%) had neither. At baseline, eyes with CME had worse mean VA (letters) than eyes with IRF without CME and eyes with neither CME nor IRF (52 vs. 60 vs. 66 letters, P macular edema seems to be a marker for poorer visual outcomes in nAMD because of underlying baseline retinal dysfunction and subsequent scarring. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic multiresolution age-related macular degeneration detection from fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Mickaël.; Hurtut, Thomas; Ben Tahar, Houssem; Cheriet, Farida

    2014-03-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of legal blindness. As the disease progress, visual loss occurs rapidly, therefore early diagnosis is required for timely treatment. Automatic, fast and robust screening of this widespread disease should allow an early detection. Most of the automatic diagnosis methods in the literature are based on a complex segmentation of the drusen, targeting a specific symptom of the disease. In this paper, we present a preliminary study for AMD detection from color fundus photographs using a multiresolution texture analysis. We analyze the texture at several scales by using a wavelet decomposition in order to identify all the relevant texture patterns. Textural information is captured using both the sign and magnitude components of the completed model of Local Binary Patterns. An image is finally described with the textural pattern distributions of the wavelet coefficient images obtained at each level of decomposition. We use a Linear Discriminant Analysis for feature dimension reduction, to avoid the curse of dimensionality problem, and image classification. Experiments were conducted on a dataset containing 45 images (23 healthy and 22 diseased) of variable quality and captured by different cameras. Our method achieved a recognition rate of 93:3%, with a specificity of 95:5% and a sensitivity of 91:3%. This approach shows promising results at low costs that in agreement with medical experts as well as robustness to both image quality and fundus camera model.

  15. Hypomethylation of IL17RC Promoter Associates with Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lai; Liu, Baoying; Tuo, Jingsheng; Shen, Defen; Chen, Ping; Li, Zhiyu; Liu, Xunxian; Ni, Jia; Dagur, Pradeep; Sen, H. Nida; Jawad, Shayma; Ling, Diamond; Park, Stanley; Chakrabarty, Sagarika; Meyerle, Catherine; Agron, Elvira; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; McCoy, J. Philip; Blum, Emily; Francis, Peter J.; Klein, Michael L.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Baird, Paul N.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly population worldwide. While recent studies have demonstrated strong genetic associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms within a number of genes and AMD, other modes of regulation are also likely to play a role in its etiology. We identified a significantly decreased level of methylation on the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients. Further, we showed that hypomethylation of the IL17RC promoter in AMD patients led to an elevated expression of its protein and mRNA in peripheral blood as well as in the affected retina and choroid, suggesting that the DNA methylation pattern and expression of IL17RC may potentially serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of AMD and likely plays a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23177625

  16. Age-related macular degeneration: Effects of a short-term intervention with an oleaginous kale extract--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christin; Jentsch, Susanne; Dawczynski, Jens; Böhm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial degenerative disease of the retina, which accounts for slowly progressive visual impairment in the elderly. An increased dietary intake of xanthophylls is suggested to be inversely related to the risk of macular disease. The present study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel trial examining the influence of a short-term intervention with an oleaginous extract of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica L. (kale) on plasma xanthophyll concentrations and the optical density of the macular pigment xanthophylls (MPOD). Twenty patients with non-exudative AMD were recruited for a 10-wk study period (2-wk run-in, 4-wk intervention, 4-wk washout). All participants received 50 mL of a beverage containing either an oleaginous extract of kale (kale) or refined rapeseed oil (placebo). The verum product provides 10 mg lutein and 3 mg zeaxanthin per day. The concentrations of the xanthophylls in plasma and the MPOD increased significantly in the kale group after 4 wk of intervention. The successive washout period resulted in a significant decline of the values in plasma and macula. The values at the end of the study were still significantly higher than the initial values. Nevertheless, the improvements did not persist over 4 wk of washout. The distribution of the xanthophylls in the macula seems to be more dynamic than originally assumed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectral domain OCT versus time domain OCT in the evaluation of macular features related to wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isola V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Luisa Pierro1, Elena Zampedri1, Paolo Milani2, Marco Gagliardi1, Vincenzo Isola2, Alfredo Pece21Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 2Fondazione Retina 3000, Milano, ItalyBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the agreement between spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT and time domain stratus OCT (TD OCT in evaluating macular morphology alterations in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: This retrospective study was performed on 77 eyes of 77 patients with primary or recurring subfoveal choroidal neovascularization secondary to AMD. All patients underwent OCT examination using Zeiss Stratus OCT 3 (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA and Opko OTI Spectral SLO/OCT (Ophthalmic Technologies Inc, Toronto, Canada. In all radial line scans, the presence of intraretinal edema (IRE, serous pigment epithelium detachment (sPED, neurosensory serous retinal detachment (NSRD, epiretinal membrane (EM, inner limiting membrane thickening (ILMT, and hard exudates (HE were evaluated. The degree of matching was quantified by Kappa measure of agreement.Results: The percentage distribution of TD OCT findings versus SD OCT findings was: IRE 36.3% versus 77.9%, sPED 57.1% versus 85.7%, NSRD 38.9% versus 53.2%, EM 10.5% versus 26.3%, ILMT 3.8% versus 32.4%, and HE 6.4% versus 54.5%. The agreement was as follows: sPED: kappa value 0.15; NSRD: kappa value 0.61; IRE: kappa value 0.18; EM: kappa value 0.41; ILMT: kappa value 0.02; HE: kappa value 0.06.Conclusion: The agreement in the evaluation of macular lesions between the two techniques is poor and depends on the lesion considered. SD OCT allows better detection of the alterations typically related to choroidal neovascularization such as IRE, PED, ILM thickening, and HE. Consequently its use should be strongly considered in patients with wet AMD.Keywords: spectral domain, OCT, time domain, macular degeneration, AMD

  18. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Noda, Yasuko.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  19. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Noda, Yasuko

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  20. THICKNESS OF THE MACULA, RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER, AND GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER IN THE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: The Repeatability Study of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Il-Hwan; Lee, Woo-Hyuk; Lee, Jong-Joo; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2018-02-01

    To determine the repeatability of measuring the thickness of the central macula, retinal nerve fiber layer, and ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (Cirrus HD-OCT) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. One hundred and thirty-four eyes were included. The measurement repeatability was assessed by an experienced examiner who performed two consecutive measurements using a 512 × 128 macular cube scan and a 200 × 200 optic disk cube scan. To assess changes in macular morphology in patients with age-related macular degeneration, the patients were divided into the following three groups according to the central macular thickness (CMT): A group, CMT 300 μm. Measurement repeatability was assessed using test-retest variability, a coefficient of variation, and an intraclass correlation coefficient. The mean measurement repeatability for the central macular, retinal nerve fiber layer, and GC-IPL thickness was high in the B group. The mean measurement repeatability for both the central macula and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was high in the A and C groups, but was lower for the GC-IPL thickness. The measurement repeatability for GC-IPL thickness was high in the B group, but low in the A group and in the C group. The automated measurement repeatability for GC-IPL thickness was significantly lower in patients with age-related macular degeneration with out of normal CMT range. The effect of changes in macular morphology should be considered when analyzing GC-IPL thicknesses in a variety of ocular diseases.

  1. Single-Chain Antibody Fragment VEGF Inhibitor RTH258 for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holz, Frank G; Dugel, Pravin U.; Weissgerber, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of different doses of RTH258 applied as single intravitreal administration compared with ranibizumab 0.5 mg in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Six-month, phase 1/2, prospective, multicenter, double-masked, randomized...

  2. cGAS drives noncanonical-inflammasome activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerur, Nagaraj; Fukuda, Shinichi; Banerjee, Daipayan; Kim, Younghee; Fu, Dongxu; Apicella, Ivana; Varshney, Akhil; Yasuma, Reo; Fowler, Benjamin J; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Marion, Kenneth M; Huang, Xiwen; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Hirano, Yoshio; Serbulea, Vlad; Ambati, Meenakshi; Ambati, Vidya L; Kajiwara, Yuji; Ambati, Kameshwari; Hirahara, Shuichiro; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kim, Kyung Bo; Hinton, David R; Leitinger, Norbert; Cambier, John C; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Kenney, M Cristina; Jazwinski, S Michal; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hara, Isao; West, A Phillip; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Sadda, SriniVas R; Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2018-01-01

    Geographic atrophy is a blinding form of age-related macular degeneration characterized by retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) death; the RPE also exhibits DICER1 deficiency, resultant accumulation of endogenous Alu-retroelement RNA, and NLRP3-inflammasome activation. How the inflammasome is activated in this untreatable disease is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that RPE degeneration in human-cell-culture and mouse models is driven by a noncanonical-inflammasome pathway that activates caspase-4 (caspase-11 in mice) and caspase-1, and requires cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)-dependent interferon-β production and gasdermin D-dependent interleukin-18 secretion. Decreased DICER1 levels or Alu-RNA accumulation triggers cytosolic escape of mitochondrial DNA, which engages cGAS. Moreover, caspase-4, gasdermin D, interferon-β, and cGAS levels were elevated in the RPE in human eyes with geographic atrophy. Collectively, these data highlight an unexpected role of cGAS in responding to mobile-element transcripts, reveal cGAS-driven interferon signaling as a conduit for mitochondrial-damage-induced inflammasome activation, expand the immune-sensing repertoire of cGAS and caspase-4 to noninfectious human disease, and identify new potential targets for treatment of a major cause of blindness.

  3. Automated Segmentation Methods of Drusen to Diagnose Age-Related Macular Degeneration Screening in Retinal Images

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2018-01-01

    Existing drusen measurement is difficult to use in clinic because it requires a lot of time and effort for visual inspection. In order to resolve this problem, we propose an automatic drusen detection method to help clinical diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration. First, we changed the fundus image to a green channel and extracted the ROI of the macular area based on the optic disk. Next, we detected the candidate group using the difference image of the median filter within the ROI. We...

  4. Risk Factors and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in a Mediterranean-Basin Population: The PAMDI (Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Italy) Study--Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermarocchi, Stefano; Tognetto, Daniele; Piermarocchi, Rita; Masetto, Morena; Monterosso, Gianluca; Segato, Tatiana; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Turrini, Aida; Peto, Tunde

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association of diet and other modifiable risk factors with the prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) in rural and urban communities of a Mediterranean population in the northeast of Italy. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted among subjects aged over 60 years. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess the consumption of different food categories, i.e., protective (P), risky (R), lutein-rich (L) and neutral (N). Smoking habit and alcohol intake were also examined. Macular pigment was measured by Raman spectroscopy. P food intake reduced the risk of large drusen (ARM2; OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.89-0.96) within the rural community. In this sub-group, R foods resulted in a slight association with large drusen, though the R/P food ratio was highly correlated with ARM2 (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.12-1.31). Raman measures showed an age-dependent decrease but did not correlate with lutein intake. Smoking habit showed a positive association with ARM2 among women (OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.54-3.75), whereas alcohol consumption resulted in protective odds (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.60-0.86). FFQ analysis confirmed the role of P and R foods and the benefit of a Mediterranean diet in ARMD. Moderate alcohol consumption showed a beneficial effect, whereas the deleterious role of a smoking habit was more evident in females. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  6. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...

  7. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buschini E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Buschini, Antonio M Fea, Carlo A Lavia, Marco Nassisi, Giulia Pignata, Marta Zola, Federico M Grignolo Ospedale Oftalmico, Ophthalmic Section, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD, also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%, dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6 are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1 reduce or block drusen formation, 2 reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3 lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4 reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5 improve choroidal perfusion, 6 replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7 develop a target gene therapy. Keywords: dry AMD, geographic atrophy, new AMD therapy

  8. Increased Expression of CD200 on Circulating CD11b+ Monocytes in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads K; Hviid, Thomas V F

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dysregulation of retinal microglial activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Microglia activity can be regulated through the membrane protein CD200 and its corresponding receptor, the CD200 receptor (CD200R). Because both...... with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and 44 age-matched controls without AMD. METHODS: The participants were aged 60 years or older, had no history of immune dysfunction or cancer, and were not receiving immune-modulating therapy. All participants were subjected to a structured interview......: Patients with neovascular AMD had a higher percentage of CD11b+CD200+ monocytes and CD200+ monocytes compared with controls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the intergroup differences observed were independent of age. Moreover, an age-related increment in CD200 expression on monocytes...

  9. Protective role of the apolipoprotein E2 allele in age-related disease traits and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Raghavachari, Nalini; Arbeev, Konstantin G

    2016-01-01

    , which can link this allele with age-related phenotypes. We focused on age-related macular degeneration, bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia, stroke, creatinine, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diseases of heart (HD), cancer, and survival. Our analysis......-related mechanism is also sensitive to gender. The LDL-C-related mechanism appears to be independent of these factors. Insights into mechanisms linking ε2 allele with age-related phenotypes given biodemographic structure of the population studied may benefit translation of genetic discoveries to health care...

  10. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  11. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decreased as compared with the eyes of control dark-adapted C57BL/6J mice. In addition, exposure to intense light correlated with higher levels of prostaglandin G2 in the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Intense light exposure also lowered DHA levels in the eyes of wild-type C57BL/6J mice without discernible retinal degeneration. Analysis of human serum from patients with AMD recapitulated these dysregulated DHA levels and revealed dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) levels as well (∼32% increase in patients with AMD compared with average levels in healthy individuals). From these observations, we then built a statistical model that included levels of DHA and AA from human serum. This model had a 74% probability of correctly identifying patients with AMD from controls. Addition of a genetic analysis for one of the most prevalent amino acid substitutions in the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene linked to AMD, Ala(69)→Ser, did not improve the statistical model. Thus, we have characterized a reliable method with the potential to detect AMD without a genetic component, paving the way for a larger-scale clinical evaluation. Our studies on mouse models along with the analysis of human serum suggest that our small molecule-based model may serve as an effective tool to estimate the risk of developing AMD. © FASEB.

  12. New approaches in the management of choroidal neovascular membrane in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Lalit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly population. The prevalence is reported to be 1.2-1.4% in several population-based epidemiological studies. Currently 25-30 million people worldwide are blind due to AMD. With the aging world population it is bound to increase significantly, and could become a significant public health problem in next two decades, with serious socio-economic implications. Several strategies are today available to treat the wet form of AMD, which is responsible for significant visual loss. These were until recently confined to laser photocoagulation, and subretinal surgery, but today two other modalities, namely, radiation and photodynamic therapy, are available. These treatment modalities however, are aimed at preservation of vision only, and not at reversing the process of the disease. Further research on antiangiogenic drugs and gene therapy could significantly help AMD patients.

  13. Natural history of drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment in age-related macular degeneration: Age-Related Eye Disease Study Report No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine; Agrón, Elvira; Klein, Michael L; Ferris, Frederick L; Chew, Emily Y; Gensler, Gary; Wong, Wai T

    2010-03-01

    To describe the natural history of eyes with drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments (DPEDs) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Multicenter, clinic-based, prospective cohort study. Among 4757 participants enrolled in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), 255 were identified as having DPED in at least 1 eye and having 5 or more years of follow-up after the initial detection of the DPED. Baseline and annual fundus photographs were evaluated for the evolution of the fundus features and the development of advanced AMD in the forms of central geographic atrophy (CGA) or neovascular (NV) AMD. Kaplan-Meier analyses of progression to advanced AMD and of moderate vision loss (> or =15 letters compared with baseline) were performed. Rate of progression to advanced AMD and change in visual acuity from baseline (in terms of mean letters lost and proportion losing > or =15 letters). A total of 311 eyes (from 255 participants) with DPED were followed for a median follow-up time of 8 years subsequent to the initial detection of a DPED. Of the 282 eyes that did not have advanced AMD at baseline, advanced AMD developed within 5 years in 119 eyes (42%) (19% progressing to CGA and 23% progressing to NV-AMD). In the remaining eyes that did not develop advanced AMD (n=163), progressive fundus changes, typified by the development of calcified drusen and pigmentary changes, were detected. Visual decline was prominent among study eyes, with approximately 40% of all eyes decreasing in visual acuity by > or =15 letters at 5 years follow-up. Mean visual acuity decreased from 76 letters ( approximately 20/30) at baseline to 61 letters ( approximately 20/60) at 5 years. Five-year decreases in mean visual acuity averaged 26 letters for eyes progressing to advanced AMD and 8 letters for non-progressing eyes. The natural history of eyes containing DPED is characterized by a high rate of progression to both CGA and NV-AMD. Among eyes not progressing to advanced AMD

  14. New research progress on the epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xing Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis a kind of age-related blinding degenerative fundus lesions, totally about 30 million patients suffering from AMD all over the world, with about 500 000 people blind for it yearly. As the development of economy and the aging of the population intensified, incidence of AMD indicates a trend of rising year by year, being the third major cause of blindness in our country. At present, the pathogenesis of AMD is not fully clear, as reported it may be related to oxidative stress, inflammatory immune response, VEGF and genetic manipulation. Clinical treatments mainly include photodynamic therapy, drug therapy, radiation therapy, laser photocoagulaory operation, the pupil warm treatments, Chinese medicine and intravitreous injection VEGF antagonists such as Ranibizumab, Conbercept and so on. In this issue, we mainly expound on the progress in the epidemiological studies of AMD, especially elaborate the progress made on genetic manipulation in recent years.

  15. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  16. Extramacular drusen are highly associated with age-related macular degeneration, but not with CFH and ARMS2 genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersoy, L.; Schick, T.; Graft, D. de; Felsch, M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.; Liakopoulos, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the association of extramacular drusen (EMD) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and with complement factor H (CFH rs1061170) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2 rs10490924) polymorphisms in individuals with and without AMD. METHODS: In this

  17. Development of facile drug delivery platform of ranibizumab fabricated PLGA-PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles for age-related macular degeneration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Peng, Xifeng; Cai, Yulian; Cong, Wendong

    2018-06-01

    The present anti-angiogenic therapies for neovascular age-related macular degeneration require effective drug delivery systems for transfer drug molecules. Ranibizumab is an active humanized monoclonal antibody that counteracts active forms of vascular endothelial growth factor A in the neovascular age-related macular degeneration therapy. The development of ranibizumab-related therapies, we have designed the effective drug career with engineered magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 ) as a facile platform of ranibizumab delivery for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Ranibizumab conjugated iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 )/PEGylated poly lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA) was successfully designed and the synthesized materials are analyzed different analytical techniques. The microscopic techniques (Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) & Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)) are clearly displayed that spherical nanoparticles into the PEG-PLGA matrix and presence of elements and chemical interactions confirmed by the results of energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier trans-form infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods. The in vitro anti-angiogenic evaluation of Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterial efficiently inhibits the tube formation in the Matrigel-based assay method by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Ranibizumab treated Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterials not disturbed cell proliferation and the results could not display the any significant differences in human endothelial cells. The present investigated results describe that Fe 3 O 4 /PEG-PLGA polymer nanomaterials can be highly favorable and novel formulation for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). METHODS: A prospective study consisting of patients...... with active nAMD enrolled in the Distance of Choroid Study at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Patients underwent three 12×9 mm macular raster scans using the deep range imaging (DRI) OCT-1 SS-OCT (Topcon) device in a single imaging session. Retinal and choroidal thicknesses were calculated for the ETDRS...... macular subfields. Repeatability was calculated according to methods described by Bland and Altman. RESULTS: 39 eyes of 39 patients with nAMD were included with a mean (±SD) age of 73.9 (±7.2) years. The mean (±SD) retinal thickness of the central macular subfield was 225.7 μm (±12.4 μm...

  19. Update on the role of genetics in the onset of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter James; Klein, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), akin to other common age-related diseases, has a complex pathogenesis and arises from the interplay of genes, environmental factors, and personal characteristics. The past decade has seen very significant strides towards identification of those precise genetic variants associated with disease. That genes encoding proteins of the (alternative) complement pathway (CFH, C2, CFB, C3, CFI) are major players in etiology came as a surprise to many but has already lead to the development of therapies entering human clinical trials. Other genes replicated in many populations ARMS2, APOE, variants near TIMP3, and genes involved in lipid metabolism have also been implicated in disease pathogenesis. The genes discovered to date can be estimated to account for approximately 50% of the genetic variance of AMD and have been discovered by candidate gene approaches, pathway analysis, and latterly genome-wide association studies. Next generation sequencing modalities and meta-analysis techniques are being employed with the aim of identifying the remaining rarer but, perhaps, individually more significant sequence variations, linked to disease status. Complementary studies have also begun to utilize this genetic information to develop clinically useful algorithms to predict AMD risk and evaluate pharmacogenetics. In this article, contemporary commentary is provided on rapidly progressing efforts to elucidate the genetic pathogenesis of AMD as the field stands at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. PMID:21887094

  20. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernández-Zimbrón

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the “dry” and the “wet” form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD progression, and they are taking relevance to understand how AMD develops: (1 advanced age and the exposition to environmental factors inducing high levels of oxidative stress damaging the macula and (2 this damage, which causes inflammation inducing a vicious cycle, altogether causing central vision loss. There is neither a cure nor treatment to prevent AMD. However, there are some treatments available for the wet form of AMD. This article will review some molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the onset of AMD focusing on feasible treatments for each related factor in the development of this pathology such as vascular endothelial growth factor, oxidative stress, failure of the clearance of proteins and organelles, and glial cell dysfunction in AMD.

  1. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Paradigms for Treatment and Management of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zimbrón, Luis Fernando; Zamora-Alvarado, Ruben; Ochoa-De la Paz, Lenin; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a well-characterized and extensively studied disease. It is currently considered the leading cause of visual disability among patients over 60 years. The hallmark of early AMD is the formation of drusen, pigmentary changes at the macula, and mild to moderate vision loss. There are two forms of AMD: the "dry" and the "wet" form that is less frequent but is responsible for 90% of acute blindness due to AMD. Risk factors have been associated with AMD progression, and they are taking relevance to understand how AMD develops: (1) advanced age and the exposition to environmental factors inducing high levels of oxidative stress damaging the macula and (2) this damage, which causes inflammation inducing a vicious cycle, altogether causing central vision loss. There is neither a cure nor treatment to prevent AMD. However, there are some treatments available for the wet form of AMD. This article will review some molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the onset of AMD focusing on feasible treatments for each related factor in the development of this pathology such as vascular endothelial growth factor, oxidative stress, failure of the clearance of proteins and organelles, and glial cell dysfunction in AMD.

  2. Technology needs for tomorrow's treatment and diagnosis of macular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubrane, Gisèle

    2008-02-01

    Retinal imaging is the basis of macular disease's diagnosis. Currently available technologies in clinical practice are fluorescein and indocyanin green (ICG) angiographies, in addition to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is an in vivo "histology-like" cross-sectional images of the retina. Recent developments in the field of OCT imaging include Spectral-Domain OCT. However OCT remains a static view of the macula with no direct link with dynamic observation obtained by angiographies. Adaptative optics is an encouraging perspective for fundus analysis in the future, and could be linked to OCT or angiographies. Treatments of macular disease have exploded these past few years. Pharmacologic inhibition of angiogenesis represents a novel approach in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. The major action explored is the direct inhibition of the protein VEGF with antibody-like products. New anti-VEGF drugs are in development aiming at the VEGF receptors or synthesis of VEGF. But various components of the neovascular cascade, including growth factor expression, extracellular matrix modulation, integrin inhibition represent potential targets for modulation with drugs. Intra-vitreal injections are nowadays the main route of administration for these new treatments but they are potentially responsible of side effects such as endophtalmitis. Development of other routes of treatment would require new formulation of used drugs. The improvement of retinal imaging leads to a better understanding of macular disease mechanisms and will help to develop new routes and targets of treatment.

  3. [Quality of life in patients with age-related macular degeneration - medical and social problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka-Woźniak, Maria; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Wesolowska, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness over the age of 50 in western countries. People with AMD are suffering from serious vision-related disability and their social life is compromised. The aim of our study was to assess quality of life (QoL) in patients with exudative AMD. The study group was 100 patients treated for AMD, the control group were 30 age and sex matched subjects without ophthalmic disorders. Patients were treated with anti-VEGF therapy, by means of National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25). As well as visual function, the NEI-VFQ investigates social functioning, mental health and dependency. There was statistically significant difference in QoL overall score between study group and control group. Patients with AMD obtained 51.1 (+/- 20.5 ) overall score, control group reached 83.7 (+/- 11.7) overall score, p = 0.001. Detailed analysis of study group revealed low acceptance of the disease and strong dependency. QoL in patients with AMD assessed with NEI VFQ-25, is significantly impaired. Low quality of life and difficulties in performing daily activities point at the need of formal psychological and social care.

  4. Automatic Drusen Quantification and Risk Assessment of Age-related Macular Degeneration on Color Fundus Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Ginneken, B. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Theelen, T.; Sanchez, C.I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate a machine learning algorithm that allows for computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of non-advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing an accurate detection and quantification of drusen location, area and size. METHODS: Color fundus photographs of 407 eyes without AMD

  5. Long-term longitudinal study of patients treated with ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the current literature regarding long-term treatment beyond 2 years with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). RECENT FINDINGS: Only few studies of anti-VEGF treatment for nv-AMD exist beyond...

  6. Association of age and macular pigment optical density using dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Verônica Castro; Rosen, Richard B; Prata, Tiago Santos; Dorairaj, Syril; Spielberg, Leigh; Maia, Mauricio; Sallum, Juliana M

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that macular pigment may play a protective role against age-related macular degeneration, but the influence of age on macular pigment density levels remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between age and the normal distribution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) values surrounding the fovea. Consecutive healthy subjects with no evidence of ocular disease were enrolled in this study. After inclusion, MPOD values were measured at specific eccentricities (0.5, 1, and 2 degrees) from the foveal center using a dual-wavelength autofluorescence method employing a modified confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Whenever both eyes were eligible, one was randomly selected for analysis. The correlation between age and MPOD values was investigated using regression analysis. Thirty subjects (30 eyes) were included (mean age 48.6 ± 16.4 [range 23-77] years). Significant differences were found between MPOD values measured at 0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the center of the fovea (0.49 ± 0.12 density units, 0.37 ± 0.11 density units, and 0.13 ± 0.05 density units, respectively, P < 0.05). Significant correlations between age and MPOD values at 0.5 and 1 degree were found (P ≤ 0.02). Values measured at 2 degrees did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.06). In healthy subjects, MPOD values were highest near the foveal center. These values appeared to increase during adulthood (peak at 45-50 years), followed by a gradual reduction after 60 years of age.

  7. INTRAVITREAL DEXAMETHASONE IMPLANT AS ADJUVANT TREATMENT FOR BEVACIZUMAB- AND RANIBIZUMAB-RESISTANT NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikian, Anita; Salti, Haytham; Safar, Ammar; Mahfoud, Ziyad R; Bashshur, Ziad F

    2017-07-01

    To study the benefit of intravitreal dexamethasone implant in the management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration resistant to bevacizumab and ranibizumab. Patients with persistent macular fluid on optical coherence tomography despite monthly treatment with at least three consecutive bevacizumab injections followed by at least three ranibizumab injections were prospectively enrolled. A single dexamethasone implant was administered followed by intravitreal ranibizumab 1 week later. Ranibizumab was continued afterward on an as-needed basis. Main outcomes were improvement in central retinal thickness and best-corrected visual acuity. Nineteen patients (19 eyes) were enrolled. There was no significant change in best-corrected visual acuity over 6 months. Greatest reduction in mean central retinal thickness, from 295.2 μm to 236.2 μm, occurred 1 month after dexamethasone implant (P macular intraretinal fluid in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration resistant to bevacizumab and ranibizumab. However, this treatment had a limited duration.

  8. Gut microbiota modify risk for dietary glycemia-induced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Sheldon; Taylor, Allen

    2018-03-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness world-wide. Although the etiology of AMD is multifactorial, diet and nutrition have strong epidemiologic associations with disease onset and progression. Recent studies indicate a role for gut microbiota in development of AMD in mouse models and in some forms of human AMD. We previously found that consuming lower glycemia diets is associated with protection against AMD in humans and switching from higher to lower glycemia diets arrests AMD phenotypes in mice. Gut microbiota populations and circulating microbial cometabolites were altered in response to dietary carbohydrates, indicating a gut-retina axis. Here we explore additional gut microbiota-AMD interactions that point toward pathogenic roles for some gut microbiota families, including Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae, and individual members of Turicibacteraceae, Clostridiaceae, and Mogibacteriaceae. We also speculate on potential mechanisms by which gut microbiota influence AMD, with the objective of devising new AMD diagnoses and treatments.

  9. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Carneiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  10. Influence of new societal factors on neovascular age-related macular degeneration outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey; Chbat, Elige; Darugar, Adil; Morel, Christophe; Morin, Bruno; Conrath, John; Devin, François

    2018-02-01

    To assess the impact of unstudied societal factors for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) on functional outcomes after anti-VEGFs. Charts of 94 nAMD patients treated in the Monticelli-Paradis Centre, Marseille, France, were reviewed. Phone interviews were conducted to assess societal factors, including transportation, living status, daily reading and social security scheme (SSS). Primary outcome was the impact of family support and disease burden on functional improvement in nAMD. Between baseline and month 24 (M24), 42.4% of the variability in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was explained by the cumulative effect of the following societal factors: intermittent out-patient follow-up, marital status, daily reading, transportation type, commuting time. No isolated societal factor significantly correlated with ETDRS BCVA severity at M24. A trend to correlation was observed between the EDTRS score at M24 and the SSS (P = 0.076), economic burden (P = 0.075), time between diagnosis and treatment initiation (P = 0.070). A significant correlation was found for the disease burdensome on the patient (P = 0.034) and low vision rehabilitation (P = 0.014). Societal factors could influence functional outcomes in nAMD patients treated with anti-VEGFs. They could contribute to the healing process or sustain disease progression.

  11. Specialist report : Dry eye disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, M.M.A.; Kort, H.S.M.; Murphy, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The common ocular pathologies relating to the aging eye, such as cataract, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or macular degeneration, are all known to reduce visual functioning. Less wellknown is the effect of common, age-related dry eye disease (DED). The impact of DED on daily activities can be

  12. The macular xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shazia S; Lott, McGregor N; Marcus, Dennis M

    2005-01-01

    The macular pigments are predominantly composed of three carotenoids: lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin. These carotenoids are concentrated and distributed in a selective manner. The properties of these pigments are further explored along with their methods of uptake, stabilization, and storage. The dual nature of these pigments as filters and antioxidants are elaborated upon in relation to their protective effects upon the macula, specifically in age-related macular degeneration. Evidence suggests that increased levels of macular pigment are correlated with a decreased risk of age-related macular degeneration. Many have sought to exploit this therapeutic relation. Studies reveal that oral supplementation with lutein and zeaxanthin can increase the levels of macular pigments in the retina and plasma. The effects of such supplementation on actual ocular function have yet to be fully addressed. New and standardized methods of assessing macular pigment density are discussed and future areas of research to further our understanding of macular xanthophylls as they pertain to age-related macular degeneration are highlighted.

  13. Retinal vascular caliber, iris color, and age-related macular degeneration in the Irish Nun Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Amy; Silvestri, Giuliana; Moore, Evelyn; Silvestri, Vittorio; Patterson, Christopher C; Maxwell, Alexander P; McKay, Gareth J

    2014-12-18

    To evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular caliber (RVC), iris color, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in elderly Irish nuns. Data from 1233 participants in the cross-sectional observational Irish Nun Eye Study were assessed from digital photographs with a standardized protocol using computer-assisted software. Macular images were graded according to the modified Wisconsin Age-related Maculopathy Grading System. Regression models were used to assess associations, adjusting for age, mean arterial blood pressure, body mass index, refraction, and fellow RVC. In total, 1122 (91%) participants had gradable retinal images of sufficient quality for vessel assessment (mean age: 76.3 years [range, 56-100 years]). In an unadjusted analysis, we found some support for a previous finding that individuals with blue iris color had narrower retinal venules compared to those with brown iris color (P < 0.05), but this was no longer significant after adjustment. Age-related macular degeneration status was categorized as no AMD, any AMD, and late AMD only. Individuals with any AMD (early or late AMD) had significantly narrower arterioles and venules compared to those with no AMD in an unadjusted analysis, but this was no longer significant after adjustment. A nonsignificant reduced risk of any AMD or late AMD only was observed in association with brown compared to blue iris color, in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Retinal vascular caliber was not significantly associated with iris color or early/late AMD after adjustment for confounders. A lower but nonsignificant AMD risk was observed in those with brown compared to blue iris color. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  14. Macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer comparison in different stages of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Gagliardi, Marco; Castellino, Niccolò; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    To employ optical coherence tomography (OCT) to analyze the morphologic changes in the inner retina in different categories of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Observational cross-sectional study. Single-center study. Inclusion criteria were age over 50, diagnosis of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) category 2 and 3, naïve neovascular AMD, and atrophic AMD. Healthy patients of similar age acted as a control group. Primary outcome measures were the changes in ganglion cell complex (GCC) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Secondary outcomes included modifications of rim area and cup-to-disc ratio. One hundred and thirty eyes of 130 patients were recruited: 26 eyes for AREDS category 2, 26 for AREDS category 3, 26 for neovascular AMD, 26 with atrophic AMD, and 26 controls. Mean peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in neovascular AMD, compared to controls (P = .004); peripapillary RNFL did not significantly vary among AREDS category 2 and 3 and atrophic AMD groups, compared to controls. Mean GCC thickness was higher in the control group, becoming progressively thinner up to neovascular and atrophic AMD groups (P < .0001). Rim area was significantly thinner in the neovascular AMD group compared with controls (P = .047); cup-to-disc ratio was higher in the neovascular AMD group compared with the control group (P = .047). This study demonstrates that eyes with neovascular AMD display reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. RNFL is partially spared in atrophic advanced AMD. The identification of alteration in RNFL and GCC thickness may reveal useful for future therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards the application of precision medicine in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Raffaella; Strafella, Claudia; Caputo, Valerio; Errichiello, Valeria; Zampatti, Stefania; Milano, Filippo; Potenza, Saverio; Mauriello, Silvestro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Cusumano, Andrea; Giardina, Emiliano

    2018-03-01

    The review essentially describes genetic and non-genetic variables contributing to the onset and progression of exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in Italian population. In particular, AMD susceptibility within Italian population is contributed to by genetic variants, accounting for 23% of disease and non-genetic variants, accounting for 10% of AMD. Our data highlighted prominent differences concerning genetic and non-genetic contributors to AMD in our cohort with respect to worldwide populations. Among genetic variables, SNPs of CFH, ARMS2, IL-8, TIMP3, SLC16A8, RAD51B, VEGFA and COL8A1 were significantly associated with the risk of AMD in the Italian cohort. Surprisingly, other susceptibility variants described in European, American and Asiatic populations, did not reach the significance threshold in our cohort. As expected, advanced age, smoking and dietary habits were associated with the disease. In addition, we also describe a number of gene-gene and gene-phenotype interactions. In fact, AMD-associated genes may be involved in the alteration of Bruch's membrane and induction of angiogenesis, contributing to exacerbate the damage caused by aging and environmental factors. Our review provides an overview of genetic and non-genetic factors characterizing AMD susceptibility in Italian population, outlining the differences with respect to the worldwide populations. Altogether, these data reflect historical, geographic, demographic and lifestyle peculiarities of Italian population. The role of epigenetics, pharmacogenetics, comorbities and genetic counseling in the management of AMD patients have been described, in the perspective of the application of a "population-specific precision medicine" approach addressed to prevent AMD onset and improve patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Autofluorescence Lifetimes in Geographic Atrophy in Patients With Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2016-05-01

    To investigate fluorescence lifetime characteristics in patients with geographic atrophy (GA) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration and to correlate the measurements with clinical data and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings. Patients with GA were imaged with a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope. Retinal autofluorescence lifetimes were measured in a short and a long spectral channel (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Mean retinal fluorescence lifetimes were analyzed within GA and the surrounding retina, and data were correlated with best corrected visual acuity and OCT measurements. Fluorescence lifetime maps of 41 eyes of 41 patients (80 ± 7 years) with GA were analyzed. Mean lifetimes within areas of atrophy were prolonged by 624 ± 276 ps (+152%) in the short spectral channel and 418 ± 186 ps (+83%) in the long spectral channel compared to the surrounding tissue. Autofluorescence lifetime abnormalities in GA occurred with particular patterns, similar to those seen in fundus autofluorescence intensity images. Within the fovea short mean autofluorescence lifetimes were observed, presumably representing macular pigment. Short lifetimes were preserved even in the absence of foveal sparing but were decreased in patients with advanced retinal atrophy in OCT. Short lifetimes in the fovea correlated with better best corrected visual acuity in both spectral channels. This study established that autofluorescence lifetime changes in GA present with explicit patterns. We hypothesize that the short lifetimes seen within the atrophy may be used to estimate damage induced by atrophy and to monitor disease progression in the context of natural history or interventional therapeutic studies.

  17. A Proinflammatory Function of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium as a Novel Target for Reducing Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lili; Ju, Meihua; Lee, Kei Ying V; Mackey, Ashley; Evangelista, Mariasilvia; Iwata, Daiju; Adamson, Peter; Lashkari, Kameran; Foxton, Richard; Shima, David; Ng, Yin Shan

    2017-10-01

    Current treatments for choroidal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness for patients with age-related macular degeneration, treat symptoms but not the underlying causes of the disease. Inflammation has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization. We examined the inflammatory role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 was robustly expressed by the retinal pigment epithelium in mouse and human eyes, both normal and with macular degeneration/choroidal neovascularization. Nuclear localization of NF-κB, a major downstream target of TLR2 signaling, was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium of human eyes, particularly in eyes with advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration. TLR2 antagonism effectively suppressed initiation and growth of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization in a mouse model, and the combination of anti-TLR2 and antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 yielded an additive therapeutic effect on both area and number of spontaneous choroidal neovascularization lesions. Finally, in primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium cells, ligand binding to TLR2 induced robust expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and end products of lipid oxidation had a synergistic effect on TLR2 activation. Our data illustrate a functional role for TLR2 in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization, likely by promoting inflammation of the retinal pigment epithelium, and validate TLR2 as a novel therapeutic target for reducing choroidal neovascularization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its high concentration in the retina and role as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review of studies that investigated dietary inta...

  19. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Iannaccone

    Full Text Available We investigated sera from elderly subjects with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD for presence of autoantibodies (AAbs against human macular antigens and characterized their identity.Sera were collected from participants in the Age-Related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA Study, a cross-sectional investigation ancillary to the Health ABC Study, enriched with participants from the general population. The resulting sample (mean age: 79.2±3.9 years old included subjects with early to advanced AMD (n = 131 and controls (n = 231. Sera were tested by Western blots for immunoreactive bands against human donor macular tissue homogenates. Immunoreactive bands were identified and graded, and odds ratios (OR calculated. Based on these findings, sera were immunoprecipitated, and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis (GE. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used to identify the targets recognized by circulating AAbs seen on 2D-GE, followed by ELISAs with recombinant proteins to confirm LC-MS/MS results, and quantify autoreactivities.In AMD, 11 immunoreactive bands were significantly more frequent and 13 were significantly stronger than in controls. Nine of the more frequent bands also showed stronger reactivity. OR estimates ranged between 4.06 and 1.93, and all clearly excluded the null value. Following immunoprecipitation, 2D-GE and LC-MS/MS, five of the possible autoreactivity targets were conclusively identified: two members of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family, HSPA8 and HSPA9; another member of the HSP family, HSPB4, also known as alpha-crystallin A chain (CRYAA; Annexin A5 (ANXA5; and Protein S100-A9, also known as calgranulin B that, when complexed with S100A8, forms calprotectin. ELISA testing with recombinant proteins confirmed, on average, significantly higher reactivities against all targets in AMD samples compared to controls.Consistent with other evidence supporting the role of inflammation and the

  20. Predictors of 1-year visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration following intravitreal ranibizumab treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; la Cour, Morten; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe predictors of visual outcome in patients treated with intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Retrospective review of 279 patients with CNV in AMD who fulfilled MARINA/ANCHOR study eligibility criteria...

  1. Domains of health-related quality of life in age-related macular degeneration: a qualitative study in the Chinese cultural context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wei; Wan, Junli; Smith, Graeme; Li, Shiying; Tan, Mingqiong; Zhou, Fengjiao

    2018-01-01

    Objective To explore which areas of health-related quality of life were affected in Chinese patients, and to identify whether the areas are well covered by validated questionnaires. Design A qualitative study based on semistructured interviews was conducted. A qualitative thematic analysis following the approach of Colaizzi was used to analyse the interview data for significant statements and phrases. The themes and subthemes organised from the analysis were then compared by using the following current instruments: National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25), Macular Disease Quality of life Questionnaire (MacDQoL) and Low-Luminance Questionnaire (LLD). Participants and setting Twenty-one patients with age-related macular degeneration were recruited from the eye clinic of Southwest Eye Hospital in Chongqing, mainland China. Results The mean age of the participants was 69.8 years (range 57–82 years) and the duration of the disease ranged from 3 months to 6 years. The qualitative analysis revealed nine important domains including symptoms, difficulties with daily activities, depending on others, depression and uncertainty, optimism and hope, social isolation, role change, family support and financial burden. However, all the three questionnaires were insufficient to capture the full extent of quality of life issues of Chinese patients with AMD, and MacDQoL covered more domains when compared with NEI-VFQ-25 and LLD. Conclusion The domains of concepts important to people with AMD in the Chinese culture are not fully represented in the three widely used questionnaires. Nine important domains were identified for the assessment of quality of life and should be considered when assessing the impact of AMD on Chinese individuals. Further studies are needed to develop an AMD quality of life questionnaire, better tailored to the needs and culture of Chinese patients. PMID:29666126

  2. LAST II: Differential temporal responses of macular pigment optical density in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration to dietary supplementation with xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Stuart; Devenport, Jenny; Lang, John C

    2007-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in aging Western societies. The objective of the Lutein Antioxidant Supplementation Trial (LAST) was to determine whether specific dietary interventions increased macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and visual function in patients with atrophic ARMD. The current objective of LAST II is to discern those specific characteristics that increase MPOD, i.e., that might differentiate a responder from a nonresponder. The LAST study was a prospective, 12-month, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial conducted at an urban midwestern Veterans Administation Hospital from August 1999 to May 2001. Ninety patients with atrophic ARMD entered the study and were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups. Patients in group 1 received 10 mg lutein; in group 2, 10 mg lutein in combination with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants; and in group 3, maltodextrin placebo. Changes in macular MPOD over time were evaluated. Characteristics potentially influencing MPOD included age, weight (body mass index), initial baseline values of macular pigment, and combining xanthophylls with other nutrients. MPOD increased with supplementation and declined slightly without supplementation (regression slopes not equal to zero in supplemented groups, P < 0.02). The highest increases in MPOD over time occurred in patients with lower baseline values of MPOD. Statistically significant increases in MPOD density were observed in the lutein group for patients with baseline MPOD

  3. Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikel, Karen A; Taylor, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/wk of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available. PMID:22503690

  4. Involvement of a gut-retina axis in protection against dietary glycemia induced age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in developed nations. AMD is characterized by retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) dysfunction and loss of photoreceptor cells. Epidemiologic studies indicate important contributions of dietary patterns on risk for AMD, but th...

  5. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  6. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  7. Preferred retinal locus in macular disease: characteristics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Vivienne C; Santos, Rodrigo A V; Tsang, Stephen H; Smith, R Theodore; Barile, Gaetano R; Seiple, William

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull's eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function.

  8. Drusen Volume and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Abnormal Thinning Volume Predict 2-Year Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgar, Francisco A; Yuan, Eric L; Sevilla, Monica B; Chiu, Stephanie J; Farsiu, Sina; Chew, Emily Y; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the value of novel measures of retinal pigment epithelium-drusen complex (RPEDC) volume to predict 2-year disease progression of intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Prospective, observational study. Three hundred forty-five AMD and 122 non-AMD participants enrolled in the Age Related Eye Disease Study 2 Ancillary Spectral-Domain (SD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) study. High-density SD OCT macular volumes were obtained at yearly study visits. The RPEDC abnormal thickening (henceforth, OCT drusen) and RPEDC abnormal thinning (RAT) volumes were generated by semiautomated segmentation of total RPEDC within a 5-mm-diameter macular field. Volume change and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for progression to advanced AMD with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or central geographic atrophy (GA). Complete volumes were obtained in 265 and 266 AMD eyes and in 115 and 97 control eyes at baseline and at year 2, respectively. In AMD eyes, mean (standard deviation) OCT drusen volume increased from 0.08 mm(3) (0.16 mm(3)) to 0.10 mm(3) (0.23 mm(3); P < 0.001), and RAT volume increased from 8.3 × 10(-4) mm(3) (20.8 × 10(-4) mm(3)) to 18.4 × 10(-4) mm(3) (46.6 × 10(-4) mm(3); P < 0.001). Greater baseline OCT drusen volume was associated with 2-year progression to CNV (P = 0.002). Odds of developing CNV increased by 31% for every 0.1-mm(3) increase in baseline OCT drusen volume (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63; P = 0.013). Greater baseline RAT volume was associated with significant 2-year increase in RAT volume (P < 0.001), noncentral GA (P < 0.001), and progression to central GA (P < 0.001). Odds of developing central GA increased by 32% for every 0.001-mm(3) increase in baseline RAT volume (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.14-1.53; P < 0.001). In non-AMD eyes, all volumes were significantly lower than AMD eyes and showed no significant 2-year change. Macular OCT drusen and RAT volumes increased significantly in AMD eyes over 2 years

  9. Influence of UV and blue-light sun radiation to developing of age-related macular degeneration on Croatian Island Rab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnikovic, Bozo; Coklo, Miran; Ranogajec-Komor, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Croatian island Rab has one of the highest solar radiation in geographical area of Europe. The aim of this clinical trial was to estimate correlation between incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the exposure to sunlight in different population on island Rab. In the first group agriculturists and fishermen were collected, in the second group members of the urban population were involved. 1753 individuals were investigated. The age in this population was between 40 and 73 years. The incidence of AMD in the first group was 19% while in the urban population only 2% showed AMD. It can be concluded that a very significant incidence exists between chronic exposure to sunlight and appearance of age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  10. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye : clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H; van Dijk, Elon H C; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Hoyng, Carel B; Boon, Camiel J F

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  11. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye: clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H.; van Dijk, Elon H. C.; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K.; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Boon, Camiel J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. Patients and methods: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  12. Genetics of Unilateral and Bilateral Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severity Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Tina; Altay, Lebriz; Viehweger, Eva; Hoyng, Carel B; den Hollander, Anneke I; Felsch, Moritz; Fauser, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common disease causing visual impairment and blindness. Various gene variants are strongly associated with late stage AMD, but little is known about the genetics of early forms of the disease. This study evaluated associations of genetic factors and different AMD stages depending on unilateral and bilateral disease severity. In this case-control study, participants were assigned to nine AMD severity stages based on the characteristics of each eye. 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and attempted to correlate with AMD severity stages by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses and trend analyses. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were calculated. Of 3444 individuals 1673 were controls, 379 had early AMD, 333 had intermediate AMD and 989 showed late AMD stages. With increasing severity of disease and bilateralism more SNPs with significant associations were found. Odds ratios, especially for the main risk polymorphisms in ARMS2 (rs10490924) and CFH (rs1061170), gained with increasing disease severity and bilateralism (exemplarily: rs1061170: unilateral early AMD: OR = 1.18; bilateral early AMD: OR = 1.20; unilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.28; bilateral intermediate AMD: OR = 1.39, unilateral geographic atrophy (GA): OR = 1.50; bilateral GA: OR = 1.71). Trend analyses showed pstages was lowest for unilateral early AMD (AUC = 0.629) and showed higher values in more severely and bilaterally affected individuals being highest for late AMD with GA in one eye and neovascular AMD in the other eye (AUC = 0.957). The association of known genetic risk factors with AMD became stronger with increasing disease severity, which also led to an increasing discriminative ability of AMD cases and controls. Genetic predisposition was also associated with the disease severity of the fellow-eye, highlighting the importance of both eyes in AMD patients.

  13. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Honda, Kaoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of low-dose radiation on choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since Chakravarthy reported the benefits from administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for CNV, many studies have demonstrated that irradiation could have a beneficial treatment effect, whereas several reports have not. In our hospital, 12 eyes with AMD received 10 Gy of 4 MV photons and the other 9 eyes received 20 Gy. Another 4 eyes were untreated as control. After 6 months of treatment, visual acuity was maintained in 11 eyes, improved in 5 eyes, and deteriorated in 5 eyes of treated patients. In control group, visual acuity was maintained in 1 eye and deteriorated in 3 eyes. The size of CNV regressed in 10 eyes, remained stationary in 2 eyes and progressed in 2 eyes of treated patients, while in control group CNV regressed in 2 eyes and remained stationary in 1 eye. After 12 months some CNV progressed. Although the present result seems to be better than those in previous reports, whether or not the treatment is beneficial has to be awaited. (author)

  14. Radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Honda, Kaoru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of low-dose radiation on choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since Chakravarthy reported the benefits from administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for CNV, many studies have demonstrated that irradiation could have a beneficial treatment effect, whereas several reports have not. In our hospital, 12 eyes with AMD received 10 Gy of 4 MV photons and the other 9 eyes received 20 Gy. Another 4 eyes were untreated as control. After 6 months of treatment, visual acuity was maintained in 11 eyes, improved in 5 eyes, and deteriorated in 5 eyes of treated patients. In control group, visual acuity was maintained in 1 eye and deteriorated in 3 eyes. The size of CNV regressed in 10 eyes, remained stationary in 2 eyes and progressed in 2 eyes of treated patients, while in control group CNV regressed in 2 eyes and remained stationary in 1 eye. After 12 months some CNV progressed. Although the present result seems to be better than those in previous reports, whether or not the treatment is beneficial has to be awaited. (author)

  15. T-cell differentiation and CD56+ levels in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Yousif; Nielsen, Marie Krogh; Molbech, Christopher Rue; Oishi, Akio; Singh, Amardeep; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2017-11-20

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are prevalent age-related diseases characterized by exudative changes in the macula. Although they share anatomical and clinical similarities, they are also distinctly characterized by their own features, e.g. vascular abnormalities in PCV and drusen-mediated progression in neovascular AMD. PCV remains etiologically uncharacterized, and ongoing discussion is whether PCV and neovascular AMD share the same etiology or constitute two substantially different diseases. In this study, we investigated T-cell differentiation and aging profile in human patients with PCV, patients with neovascular AMD, and age-matched healthy control individuals. Fresh venous blood was prepared for flow cytometry to investigate CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell differentiation (naïve, central memory, effector memory, effector memory CD45ra + ), loss of differentiation markers CD27 and CD28, and expression of aging marker CD56. Patients with PCV were similar to the healthy controls in all aspects. In patients with neovascular AMD we found significantly accelerated T-cell differentiation (more CD28 - CD27 - cells) and aging (more CD56 + cells) in the CD8 + T-cell compartment. These findings suggest that PCV and neovascular AMD are etiologically different in terms of T cell immunity, and that neovascular AMD is associated with T-cell immunosenescence.

  16. Repair mechanism of retinal pigment epithelial tears in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Ryo; Sato, Taku; Kishi, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    To investigate repair mechanisms of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears in age-related macular degeneration. The authors retrospectively studied 10 eyes with age-related macular degeneration that developed RPE tears during follow-up or after treatment with an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drug or photodynamic therapy combined with ranibizumab. After development of the RPE tears, all follow-ups exceeded 13 months. Spectral domain or swept-source optical coherence tomography have been used to examine consecutive retinal changes where the RPE tears developed and attempted to determine the repair mechanisms. Retinal pigment epithelial tears developed during the natural course (n = 4) after ranibizumab treatment (n = 2) and after photodynamic therapy and ranibizumab (n = 4). Subretinal fluid persisted for more than 6 months after the RPE tears developed (n = 4), with the area where the RPE was lost found to be covered with thickened proliferative tissue. In 6 eyes where the subretinal fluid was absorbed within 2 months, optical coherence tomography showed the outer retina appeared to be directly attached to Bruch membrane, and there was attenuation of the normal hyperreflective band attributable to normal RPE during follow-up. Results suggest that two repair processes may be present in the area where RPE tears developed. Persistent subretinal fluid may lead to repair with thick proliferative tissue, while the outer retina appears to attach to Bruch membrane when there is early subretinal fluid resolution after RPE tear development.

  17. Genetic and functional dissection of HTRA1 and LOC387715 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglin Yang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common haplotype on 10q26 influences the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and encompasses two genes, LOC387715 and HTRA1. Recent data have suggested that loss of LOC387715, mediated by an insertion/deletion (in/del that destabilizes its message, is causally related with the disorder. Here we show that loss of LOC387715 is insufficient to explain AMD susceptibility, since a nonsense mutation (R38X in this gene that leads to loss of its message resides in a protective haplotype. At the same time, the common disease haplotype tagged by the in/del and rs11200638 has an effect on the transcriptional upregulation of the adjacent gene, HTRA1. These data implicate increased HTRA1 expression in the pathogenesis of AMD and highlight the importance of exploring multiple functional consequences of alleles in haplotypes that confer susceptibility to complex traits.

  18. Submacular hemorrhage in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: A synthesis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu-Segall, Dinu; Balta, Florian; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Large submacular hemorrhage, an uncommon manifestation of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, may also occur with idiopathic polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Submacular hemorrhage damages photoreceptors owing to iron toxicity, fibrin meshwork contraction, and reduced nutrient flux, with subsequent macular scarring. Clinical and experimental studies support prompt treatment, as tissue damage can occur within 24 hours. Without treatment the natural history is poor, with a mean final visual acuity (VA) of 20/1600. Reported treatments include retinal pigment epithelial patch, macular translocation, pneumatic displacement, intravitreal or subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs, and combinations thereof. In the absence of comparative studies, we combined eligible studies to assess the VA change before and after each treatment option. The greatest improvement occurred after combined pars plana vitrectomy, subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, with VA improving from 20/1000 to 20/400. The best final VA occurred using combined intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator, gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, with VA improving from 20/200 to 20/100. Both treatments had an acceptable safety profile, but most studies were small, and larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine both safety and efficacy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Perspectives of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Age-Related Retinal Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, Vladimir; Hermankova, Barbora; Kossl, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, which include age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, mostly affect the elderly population and are the most common cause of decreased quality of vision or even blindness. So far, there is no satisfactory treatment protocol to prevent, stop, or cure these disorders. A great hope and promise for patients suffering from retinal diseases is represented by stem cell-based therapy that could replace diseased or missing retinal cells and support regeneration. In this respect, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be obtained from the particular patient and used as autologous cells have turned out to be a promising stem cell type for treatment. Here we show that MSCs can differentiate into cells expressing markers of retinal cells, inhibit production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by retinal tissue, and produce a number of growth and neuroprotective factors for retinal regeneration. All of these properties make MSCs a prospective cell type for cell-based therapy of age-related retinal degenerative diseases.

  20. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vaughn Emerson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available M Vaughn Emerson, Andreas K LauerCasey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of vision loss in the industrialized world. In the last few decades, the mainstay of treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to AMD has been thermal laser photocoagulation. In the last decade, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin extended treatment for more patients. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, improvement in visual acuity is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of AMD-related CNV. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF have both shown promising results with improvements in visual acuity with either agent. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analogue, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF agents and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Steroids, including anecortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, have shown promise in controlled trials. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived growth factor that has been administered via an adenoviral vector has shown promising initial results. In some patients ciliary

  1. The role of free-radical processes in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kolesnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available the modern ideas of the role of free radical processes in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD are consid- ered. Data of large randomized clinical trials on application of antioxidants for prevention and therapy AMD are provided. Possibility of the differential application of antioxidants depending on the genetic status of patients is discussed.

  2. A comprehensive survey of sequence variation in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene in Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A; White, K; Stöhr, H; Steiner, K; Hemmrich, N; Grimm, T; Jurklies, B; Lorenz, B; Scholl, H P; Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Weber, B H

    2000-10-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is a common autosomal recessive maculopathy of early and young-adult onset and is caused by alterations in the gene encoding the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ABCA4). We have studied 144 patients with STGD and 220 unaffected individuals ascertained from the German population, to complete a comprehensive, population-specific survey of the sequence variation in the ABCA4 gene. In addition, we have assessed the proposed role for ABCA4 in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of late-onset blindness, by studying 200 affected individuals with late-stage disease. Using a screening strategy based primarily on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, we have identified in the three study groups a total of 127 unique alterations, of which 90 have not been previously reported, and have classified 72 as probable pathogenic mutations. Of the 288 STGD chromosomes studied, mutations were identified in 166, resulting in a detection rate of approximately 58%. Eight different alleles account for 61% of the identified disease alleles, and at least one of these, the L541P-A1038V complex allele, appears to be a founder mutation in the German population. When the group with AMD and the control group were analyzed with the same methodology, 18 patients with AMD and 12 controls were found to harbor possible disease-associated alterations. This represents no significant difference between the two groups; however, for detection of modest effects of rare alleles in complex diseases, the analysis of larger cohorts of patients may be required.

  3. Preliminary study of Conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the preliminary efficacy of conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration(wAMD.METHODS:Seventeen wAMD patients(18 eyeswere selected to receive conbercept injection. All patients were given a single conbercept injection every month, 3 times. Before and after 1, 2, 3mo of the injection, the best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure(IOP, measured by Non-contact tonometer, fundus photography, fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, indocyanine green angiography(ICG, optical coherence tomography(OCTexamination and the complications incidence were compared.RESULTS:Three months after conbercept injection, the BCVA improved in 15 eyes(83%, stable in 3 eyes(17%. Before treatment, the average central macular thickness was 421.72±54.43μm, at 1 and 2 and 3mo after treatment, the average central macular thickness was 337.89±25.88μm, 293.56±26.87μm, 266.89±19.10μm respectively. There were significant differences compared with before and after injection(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection conbercept for wAMD can significantly improve the visual function, reduce the macular edema and the leakage with higher safety and less complications. However the prolonged efficacy needs further observation.

  4. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab or aflibercept in the same large clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Sander, Birgit; Larsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study visual outcome and number of annual injections in treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) before and after a change in first-line therapy from ranibizumab to aflibercept in a high-volume clinical practice. METHODS: This was a retrospective...

  5. RECURRENCE OF CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION LESION ACTIVITY AFTER AFLIBERCEPT TREATMENT FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakazono, Tomotaka; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oishi, Akio; Ooto, Sotaro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Hata, Masayuki; Takahashi, Ayako; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-11-01

    To examine the recurrence rate of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesion activity in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated factors after 1-year aflibercept treatment. Age-related macular degeneration eyes with 1-year aflibercept fixed-regimen treatment and a follow-up period of at least 18 months from the initial aflibercept injection for treatment-naive exudative AMD were retrospectively evaluated. The recurrence rate was examined. Age, gender, visual acuity, AMD subtype, greatest linear dimension, and retinal and choroidal thicknesses at the 12th month examination were compared between eyes with and without recurrence. Presence of remnant polyps and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) morphology were also compared in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) eyes. Of the 98 eyes studied, 69 displayed a dry macula at the 12th month examination; 43.7% exhibited recurrence during the subsequent 12-month period in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Although no factors associated with recurrence were detected in AMD, remnant polyps and pigment epithelial detachment morphology at the 12th month examination were significantly associated with recurrence in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (P = 0.018 and 0.048, respectively). Continuous, proactive treatment would be considered overtreatment for more than half of the AMD eyes that achieved a dry macula. Angiography and optical coherence tomography analyses may be useful for predicting recurrence in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy eyes.

  6. [Neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration --current management in Poland and in Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper, Sławomir; Nowińska, Anna; Lyssek-Boroń, Anita; Wylegała, Edward

    2014-07-01

    Currently in Poland neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors--ranibizumab, aflibercept and bevacizumab. Photodynamic therapy is still refunded, although it is very rarely used. It can be estimated that only small minority (about 5-10%) of cases are properly treated due to mainly refunding restrictions in Poland. In countries with wider access to treatment 50% reduction in AMD-related blindness incidence was noted. Low-cost off-label anti-VEGF agent bevacizumab is almost inaccessible in Polish public health system because of law regulations. In order to increase availability of anti-VEGF injections vials of all mentioned drugs are divided which raises safety concerns. Despite new potent drug in the market aflibercept, cost of treatment remains very high. The optimal treatment regimen includes three monthly injections, after which is usually used pro re nata therapy based primarily on the outcome of macular optical coherence tomography. Routinely recommended antibiotic prophylaxis of injection-related endophthalmitis probably has no meaning apart from the generation of resistance.

  7. Intravitreal bevacizumab has initial clinical benefit lasting eight weeks in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P William Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available P William Conrad, David N Zacks, Mark W JohnsonDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USAPurpose: To determine whether the effect of a single initial intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD persists for 8 weeks.Methods: We reviewed the records of 25 consecutive patients with neovascular AMD treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Patients were included (n = 15 if follow up data were available from 4 and 8 week visits after a single initial injection. Additionally, optical coherence tomography (OCT images were graded qualitatively in a masked fashion by a single reader.Results: Baseline mean visual acuity was 20/200, improving to 20/125 at 4 weeks (p = 0.0153 and 20/100 at 8 weeks (p = 0.0027. Mean central retinal thickness was 316 ± 107 µm at baseline and decreased to 223 ± 70 µm and 206 ± 45 µm at 4 and 8 weeks post-injection, respectively (p = 0.0003 and 0.0005. By masked OCT grading, macular fluid was resolved in 10/15 (66.7% and 11/15 (73.3% eyes at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, and 3/15 (20% eyes had continued reduction in residual macular fluid between 4 and 8 weeks.Conclusions: A single initial bevacizumab injection has persistent clinical benefit lasting 8 weeks in most eyes with neovascular AMD. Results of prospective randomized studies are needed before changes in treatment regimens can be recommended.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, choroidal neovascular membrane, optical coherence tomography

  8. The prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in Italy (PAMDI) study: report 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermarocchi, Stefano; Segato, Tatiana; Scopa, Pasquale; Masetto, Morena; Ceca, Stela; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Peto, Tunde

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to estimate prevalence and risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) in an Italian population and to analyze differences between urban and rural communities. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study among elderly residents in Northeast Italy. Participants were divided into urban and rural groups based on whether they lived in the city of Padova or the villages of Teolo and Torreglia, respectively. Fundus photographs were graded according to the International Classification for Age-related Maculopathy. A total of 1162 randomly selected subjects aged 61 years or more were invited to participate in the study. We examined 885 subjects, and 845 were eligible for fundus photograph grading. ARMD was estimated to affect 62.7% of the whole population (drusen 63-124 μm = 48.3%; drusen ≥125 μm = 10.4%; advanced ARMD = 4.1%). Age was confirmed as a risk factor for drusen ≥125 μm and advanced ARMD (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.28-1.69 and OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.05, respectively, for a 5-year increase in age). The rural group appeared to be at a higher risk of developing large drusen compared to the urban sample (OR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.01-2.63) when adjusting for age and gender. The results confirmed that ARMD affects a high percentage of the elderly population in Italy. This study does not support the hypothesis that living in a rural environment or belonging to a population of the Mediterranean basin may be protective against the intermediate stages of the disease.

  9. Radiotherapy for age-related macular degeneration: preliminary results of a potentially new treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berson, Anthony M.; Finger, Paul T.; Sherr, David L.; Emery, Richard; Alfieri, Alan A.; Bosworth, Jay L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Neovascular macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe blindness in North America today. Limited treatments are available for this disease process. A Phase I/II study was performed to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external beam radiotherapy in patients with age-related subfoveal neovascularization. Methods and Materials: Between March 1994 and June 1995, 52 patients with a mean age of 80 (60-92) were enrolled. These patients were either not eligible or were poor candidates for laser photocoagulation, primarily because of the subfoveal location of the neovascularization. Initial visual acuities ranged from 20 out of 32 to finger counting at 3 feet. All patients underwent fluorescein angiographic evaluation and documentation of their neovascular disease prior to irradiation. Patients were treated with a single lateral 4- or 6-MV photon beam, to a dose of 14-15 Gy in eight fractions over 10 days. The field size averaged 5 x 3 cm. Results: No significant acute morbidity was noted. All patients underwent ophthalmic examinations and repeat angiography at 1 and 3 months posttreatment and then at 3-month intervals. With a mean follow-up of 7 months (3-18 months), 41 patients (79%) are within two lines of their pretreatment visual acuity. On angiographic imaging, there was stabilization of subfoveal neovascular membranes in 34 patients (65%). New neovascular membranes have been noted in five patients. Conclusions: It appears that radiotherapy can affect active subretinal neovascularization, but it is unlikely to prevent new neovascular events produced by this chronic disease. Further investigation is warranted

  10. Severe Macular Edema in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Related Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Paroli

    2013-01-01

    unilateral macular edema. OCT revealed massive macular thickening (range from 550 μm to 1214 μm. Conclusions. Macular edema appeared in female adolescent patients in eyes with long-dating CAU submitted to cataract surgery. In such patients, in presence of age-related microvascular changes due to the enhancer effect of sex hormones, cataract extraction should be a factor triggering the retinal complication.

  11. Age-related macular degeneration: the importance of family history as a risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Humma; Khan, Jane C; Cipriani, Valentina; Sepp, Tiina; Matharu, Baljinder K; Bunce, Catey; Harding, Simon P; Clayton, David G; Moore, Anthony T; Yates, John R W

    2012-03-01

    Family history is considered a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). With the advent of effective therapy for the disease, the importance of family history merits further investigation. This study quantifies the risk associated with family history, first, by a case-control study of reported family history and, second, by examining the siblings of AMD cases. The authors recruited cases with advanced AMD, spouses and siblings. All subjects were carefully phenotyped. Clinical findings in the siblings were compared with spouses. Information about family history was collected. The ORs for reported family history of AMD were calculated. Analyses were adjusted for age, smoking and genotype. 495 AMD cases, 259 spouses and 171 siblings were recruited. The OR for AMD was 27.8 (CI 3.8 to 203.0; p=0.001) with a reported family history of an affected parent and 12.0 (CI 3.7 to 38.6; p<0.0001) with a history of an affected sibling. ORs adjusted for age and smoking were higher. Examination of siblings confirmed their increased risk with 23% affected by AMD and an OR of 10.8 (4.5 to 25.8; p<0.0001). Adjusting for age increased the OR to 16.1 (6.2 to 41.8). The risk of AMD is greatly increased by having an affected first-degree relative. Those at risk need to be made aware of this and AMD patients should advise siblings and children to seek prompt ophthalmological advice if they develop visual symptoms of distortion or reduced vision.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Monthly versus Quarterly Ranibizumab Treatment in Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration: The EXCITE Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Eldem, Bora; Guymer, Robyn; Korobelnik, Jean-Franc̦ois; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Wiedemann, Peter; Simader, Christian; Gekkieva, Margarita; Weichselberger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate noninferiority of a quarterly treatment regimen to a monthly regimen of ranibizumab in patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: A 12-month, multicenter, randomized, double-masked,

  13. Cosegregation and functional analysis of mutant ABCR (ABCA4) alleles in families that manifest both Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroyer, N F; Lewis, R A; Yatsenko, A N; Wensel, T G; Lupski, J R

    2001-11-01

    Mutations in ABCR (ABCA4) have been reported to cause a spectrum of autosomal recessively inherited retinopathies, including Stargardt disease (STGD), cone-rod dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa. Individuals heterozygous for ABCR mutations may be predisposed to develop the multifactorial disorder age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We hypothesized that some carriers of STGD alleles have an increased risk to develop AMD. We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of families that manifest both STGD and AMD. With a direct-sequencing mutation detection strategy, we found that AMD-affected relatives of STGD patients are more likely to be carriers of pathogenic STGD alleles than predicted based on chance alone. We further investigated the role of AMD-associated ABCR mutations by testing for expression and ATP-binding defects in an in vitro biochemical assay. We found that mutations associated with AMD have a range of assayable defects ranging from no detectable defect to apparent null alleles. Of the 21 missense ABCR mutations reported in patients with AMD, 16 (76%) show abnormalities in protein expression, ATP-binding or ATPase activity. We infer that carrier relatives of STGD patients are predisposed to develop AMD.

  14. Increased levels of circulating CD34+ cells in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: relation with clinical and OCT features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Caner; Özdal, Pınar Ç; Beyazyıldız, Emrullah; Özcan, Nurgül E; Teke, Mehmet Y; Vural, Gülden; Öztürk, Faruk

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the levels of circulating CD34+ stem cells in patients with neovascular type age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and its relation with clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings. The study consisted of 55 patients: 28 patients (18 male and 10 female) with neovascular type AMD as a study group and 27 patients (12 male and 15 female) scheduled for cataract surgery as a control group. The level of CD34+ stem cells was measured by flow cytometry. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. The mean ages of patients in the study and control groups were 71 ± 8 and 68 ± 6 years, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of age, sex, or systemic disease association between study and control groups. However, smoking status was significantly higher in the study group (67.9% vs 37.0%; p = 0.02). Stem cell levels were significantly higher in the study group (1.5 ± 0.9 vs 0.5 ± 0.3; p<0.001), but there was no relation between stem cell levels and clinical and OCT findings. Increased circulating CD34+ stem cell levels were observed in patients with choroidal neovascular membrane associated with AMD, but no significant relation was found between cell levels and clinical and OCT findings.

  15. Association of age and macular pigment optical density using dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima VC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Verônica Castro Lima,1,2 Richard B Rosen,1,3 Tiago Santos Prata,2 Syril Dorairaj,4 Leigh Spielberg,1 Mauricio Maia,2 Juliana M Sallum21Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Several lines of evidence suggest that macular pigment may play a protective role against age-related macular degeneration, but the influence of age on macular pigment density levels remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between age and the normal distribution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD values surrounding the fovea.Methods: Consecutive healthy subjects with no evidence of ocular disease were enrolled in this study. After inclusion, MPOD values were measured at specific eccentricities (0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the foveal center using a dual-wavelength autofluorescence method employing a modified confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Whenever both eyes were eligible, one was randomly selected for analysis. The correlation between age and MPOD values was investigated using regression analysis.Results: Thirty subjects (30 eyes were included (mean age 48.6 ± 16.4 [range 23–77] years. Significant differences were found between MPOD values measured at 0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the center of the fovea (0.49 ± 0.12 density units, 0.37 ± 0.11 density units, and 0.13 ± 0.05 density units, respectively, P < 0.05. Significant correlations between age and MPOD values at 0.5 and 1 degree were found (P ≤ 0.02. Values measured at 2 degrees did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.06.Conclusion: In healthy subjects, MPOD values were highest near the foveal center. These values appeared to increase during adulthood (peak at 45–50 years, followed by a gradual reduction

  16. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA, type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5±1.8 and 1.6±2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4±2.8 and 3.6±2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits, and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  17. Development of age-related maculopathy: a histochemical and molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Lambooij (Antoinette)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAge-related maculopathy (ARM) is a severe threat to the visual ability of people over 65 years of age. In the late stages of ARM, called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), photoreceptor cells gradually disappear. New vessels growing beneath the retina may complicateb the disease;

  18. Prevalence of Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Older Persons with and without Age-Related Macular Degeneration, by Multimodal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubina, Anna V; Neely, David C; Clark, Mark E; Huisingh, Carrie E; Samuels, Brian C; Zhang, Yuhua; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A

    2016-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) in older adults with healthy maculas and early and intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using multimodal imaging. Cross-sectional study. A total of 651 subjects aged ≥60 years enrolled in the Alabama Study of Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration from primary care ophthalmology clinics. Subjects were imaged using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) of the macula and optic nerve head (ONH), infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, and color fundus photographs (CFP). Eyes were assessed for AMD presence and severity using the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 9-step scale. Criteria for SDD presence were identification on ≥1 en face modality plus SD OCT or on ≥2 en face modalities if absent on SD OCT. Subretinal drusenoid deposits were considered present at the person level if present in 1 or both eyes. Prevalence of SDD in participants with and without AMD. Overall prevalence of SDD was 32% (197/611), with 62% (122/197) affected in both eyes. Persons with SDD were older than those without SDD (70.6 vs. 68.7 years, P = 0.0002). Prevalence of SDD was 23% in subjects without AMD and 52% in subjects with AMD (P maculae and in more than half of persons with early to intermediate AMD, even by stringent criteria. The prevalence of SDD is strongly associated with AMD presence and severity and increases with age, and its retinal topography including peripapillary involvement resembles that of rod photoreceptors. Consensus on SDD detection methods is recommended to advance our knowledge of this lesion and its clinical and biologic significance. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality of optometry referrals to neovascular age-related macular degeneration clinic: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Muen, Wisam J; Hewick, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the quality of referrals to a neovascular age-related macular degeneration clinic from optometrists using the standard Rapid Access Referral Form (RARF) from the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. Design A prospective study. Prospective data were gathered from all optometry referrals using the RARF, between the periods of December 2006 to August 2009. These were assessed for accuracy of history, clinical signs and final diagnosis as compared to a macula expert. Setting ...

  20. Combining macula clinical signs and patient characteristics for age-related macular degeneration diagnosis: a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccaro, Paolo; Nicolo, Massimo; Bonetto, Monica; Giacomini, Mauro; Weller, Peter; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Prosperi, Mattia; OSullivan, Dympna

    2015-01-27

    To investigate machine learning methods, ranging from simpler interpretable techniques to complex (non-linear) "black-box" approaches, for automated diagnosis of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Data from healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with AMD or other retinal diseases were collected during routine visits via an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. Patients' attributes included demographics and, for each eye, presence/absence of major AMD-related clinical signs (soft drusen, retinal pigment epitelium, defects/pigment mottling, depigmentation area, subretinal haemorrhage, subretinal fluid, macula thickness, macular scar, subretinal fibrosis). Interpretable techniques known as white box methods including logistic regression and decision trees as well as less interpreitable techniques known as black box methods, such as support vector machines (SVM), random forests and AdaBoost, were used to develop models (trained and validated on unseen data) to diagnose AMD. The gold standard was confirmed diagnosis of AMD by physicians. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) were used to assess performance. Study population included 487 patients (912 eyes). In terms of AUC, random forests, logistic regression and adaboost showed a mean performance of (0.92), followed by SVM and decision trees (0.90). All machine learning models identified soft drusen and age as the most discriminating variables in clinicians' decision pathways to diagnose AMD. Both black-box and white box methods performed well in identifying diagnoses of AMD and their decision pathways. Machine learning models developed through the proposed approach, relying on clinical signs identified by retinal specialists, could be embedded into EHR to provide physicians with real time (interpretable) support.

  1. Review of graft rejection in age-related macular degeneration replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ying Mao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis the leading cause of blindness among the elderly worldwide. AMD is classified as either neovascular(wetor non-neovascular(dry. The dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelial(RPEcells is regarded as the main pathological changes of AMD. The recent development of regenerative medicine has witnessed RPE cell-replacement therapy as a new approach to treat AMD, resulting in obvious visual improvement in various studies. However, there are still many problems and challenges that remain unsolved, including graft rejection. This review introduces subretinal immune environment under both normal and AMD condition, putting emphasis on immune response to allogeneic RPE. Lastly, strategies to prevent graft rejection are discussed.

  2. Joint Assessment of Intended and Unintended Effects of Medications: An Example Using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitors for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian R. Levy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the net health benefits of pegaptanib and ranibizumab by considering the impact of visual acuity and unintended effects (cardiovascular and hemorrhagic events on quality-of-life among persons with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods. We designed a probabilistic decision-analytic model using published data. It employed 17 visual health states and three for unintended effects. We calculated incremental net health benefits by subtracting the harms of each medication from the benefit using the quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Results. In a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 75-year olds with new-onset bilateral age-related macular degeneration followed for ten years, the mean QALYs per patient is 3.7 for usual care, 4.2 for pegaptanib, and 4.3 for ranibizumab. Net benefits decline with increasing baseline rates of unintended effects. Interpretation. Net health benefits present a quantitative, potentially useful tool to assist patients and ophthalmologists in balancing the benefits and harms of interventions for age-related macular degeneration.

  3. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Andrew T; Blighe, Alan J; Webb, Ben S; McGraw, Paul V

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach.

  4. Copy number variation in VEGF gene as a biomarker of susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration

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    Norshakimah Md Bakri

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies in various populations have been conducted to determine candidate genes that could contribute to age-related macular degeneration (AMD pathogenesis. Objective: The present study was undertaken to determine the association of high temperature requirement A-1 (HTRA1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and very-low-density receptor (VLDR genes with wet AMD subjects in Malaysia. Methods: A total of 125 subjects with wet AMD and 120 subjects without AMD from the Malaysian population were selected for this study. Genomic DNA was extracted and copy number variations (CNVs were determined using quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR and comparison between the two groups was done. The demographic characteristics were also recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out using software where a level of P  0.05. Conclusion: Observations of an association between CNVs of VEGF gene and wet AMD have revealed that the CNVs of VEGF gene appears to be a possible contributor to wet AMD subjects in Malaysia. Keywords: Age-related macular degeneration, Copy number variations, VEGF, HTRA1, VLDR genes and Malaysia

  5. Estudo macular na doença de Stargardt Macula study in Stargardt's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacílio de Oliveira Maia Júnior

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar dano estrutural macular na doença de Stargardt por meio da tomografia de coerência óptica, correlacionando-o com acuidade visual e duração da doença. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos portadores da doença de Stargardt, submetidos à medida da acuidade visual (logMAR e exames complementares (retinografia, angiofluoresceinografia e tomografia de coerência óptica. Todos os casos foram reexaminados para confirmação diagnóstica, sendo determinada duração da doença. O grupo controle foi composto pelo mesmo número de casos, pareados por sexo, idade e sem qualquer alteração oftalmológica. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi composta por 22 pacientes (44 olhos, sendo 11 (50% do sexo masculino e 11 (50%, do feminino. A duração da doença variou de 3 a 21 anos (média de 11,4 ± 5,3 anos. Os grupos não apresentaram diferença significante na idade (p=0,98 e no sexo. O grupo caso apresentou valores de espessura macular na tomografia de coerência óptica significativamente menores em relação ao grupo controle (pPURPOSE: To evaluate de macular structural damage in Stargardt's disease by optical coherence tomography, correlating with visual acuity and disease duration. METHODS: Patients with Stargardt's disease were included and submitted to visual acuity (logMAR measurement and complementary examinations performed were color fundus photographs, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography. All cases were reexamined for diagnostic confirmation and the duration of symptoms was determined. The control group was composed of the same number of subjects, matched by sex and age, without any ophthalmologic alteration. RESULTS: The sample was composed of 22 patients (44 eyes with Stargardt's disease, 11 (50% males and 11 (50% females. The duration of the disease varied from 3 to 21 years (mean of 11.4 ± 5.3 years. The groups did not show significant differences in age (p= 0.98 and sex. Concerning the macular thickness in optical

  6. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stefan N.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cataract (Cataracta senilis is the most frequent eye disease of elderly people worldwide. In Germany, the cataract operation - with currently 450,000 interventions each year the most frequent operation in ophthalmology – can be seen as routine surgery. The age related macular degeneration (AMD is a further one of the most common, age-related eye diseases and the most frequent cause of blindness of elderly people in industrial nations. Due to demographic changes an increasing number of patients will suffer from cataract and AMD at the same time. This coincidence leads to a greater interest in the question of a mutual influence of both diseases, respectively their therapies, on each other. Objectives: The aim of this report was the evaluation of the medical and health economic effects of cataract operations on the development and progression of an age related macular degeneration (AMD. It was differentiated between first manifestations of AMD, progression of early stages of AMD and influence on further impairment in late stages of AMD. Methods: The relevant publications for this report were identified by DIMDI via structured database enquiry as well as common, self-made enquiry and were evaluated, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. The present report included German and English literature published since 1983. Results: The database enquiry generated a record of 2769 issue-related publications. Eight medical publications were eligible for analysis in the course of the present HTA report. No relevant studies on health economical, ethical, social or legal issues could be included. Three epidemiological cohort studies provided some evidence for a promoting influence of cataract extractions on the progression of early types of AMD. Two of the epidemiological studies assessed the risk of first manifestation of AMD after cataract extraction. Both came up with up with increased incidences that did not reach statistical

  7. Common variants near FRK/COL10A1 and VEGFA are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yi); T. Bhangale (Tushar); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Ripke (Stephan); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); P.L. Tan (Perciliz); E.H. Souied (Eric); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); R. Reynolds (Robyn); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); K.A. Chin (Kimberly); L. Sobrin (Lucia); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); P.H. Lee (Phil); N. Leveziel (Nicolas); D.J. Zack (Donald); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); R.T. Smith (Theodore); G.R. Barile (Gaetano); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); R. Hogg (Ruth); U. Chakravarthy (Usha); L.D. Robman (Luba); O. Gustafsson (Omar); H. Sigurdsson (Haraldur); W. Ortmann (Ward); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); R. Allikmets (Rando); M.A. Brantley (Milam); P.N. Baird (Paul); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); R.R. Graham (Robert); J.M. Seddon (Johanna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDespite significant progress in the identification of genetic loci for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), not all of the heritability has been explained. To identify variants which contribute to the remaining genetic susceptibility, we performed the largest meta-analysis of

  8. Dissecting microRNA dysregulation in age-related macular degeneration: new targets for eye gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askou, Anne Louise; Alsing, Sidsel; Holmgaard, Andreas; Bek, Toke; Corydon, Thomas J

    2018-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression in humans. Overexpression or depletion of individual miRNAs is associated with human disease. Current knowledge suggests that the retina is influenced by miRNAs and that dysregulation of miRNAs as well as alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery are involved in retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that the vitreous has a specific panel of circulating miRNAs and that this panel varies according to the specific pathological stress experienced by the retinal cells. MicroRNA (miRNA) profiling indicates subtype-specific miRNA profiles for late-stage AMD highlighting the importance of proper miRNA regulation in AMD. This review will describe the function of important miRNAs involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and pathological neovascularization, the key molecular mechanisms leading to AMD, and focus on dysregulated miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in AMD. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in different stages of Age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna; Chew, Emily Y; Ferris, Frederick L; Klein, Michael L

    2014-12-08

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in older adults. Anti-retinal autoantibodies (AAbs) have been found in individuals with AMD. The goal of the study was to determine the AAb specificity in different stages of AMD, and determine whether there is a prevalent AAb signature. Sera of 134 participants in the Age-related Eye Disease Study were analyzed for anti-retinal AAbs by western blotting. The subjects were classified by diagnostic subgroups based upon their clinical classification: No AMD, Intermediate AMD, and Late AMD - geographic atrophy (GA) and Late AMD - neovascular (NV). The presence of anti-retinal AAb was detected in 58% patients with Intermediate and Late AMD, and 54% of those with no AMD. AAbs bound to fifteen different retinal antigens. Most individuals had 1 specific AAbs (67%), with the remainder having 2 to 4 different AAbs. Over 40% of patients with Intermediate AMD, and 46% of those with GA had anti-enolase AAbs, compared with 29% of individuals with NV and 29% with no AMD. Different AAbs signatures related to NV as compared to GA and/or Intermediate AMD were distinguished. Anti-40-kDa (10%) and 42-kDa (16%) autoantibodies were associated with Intermediate AMD, while anti-30-kDa AAbs (23%) were primarily present in GA. Anti-32-kDa (12%), 35-kDa (21%), and 60-kDa (8%) AAbs were more frequent in NV AMD. A unique AAb pattern for each of the disease subgroups was present when AMD progressed from the intermediate to the late forms of severity. Differences in the frequency of specific AAbs between AMD subgroups suggested that they may participate in pathogenicity of AMD. Further studies are necessary to confirm these observations in the larger cohort and individual AMD patients over time.

  10. Plasma levels of hypoxia-regulated factors in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna, Zygoula; Christian, Schori; Christian, Grimm; Daniel, Barthelmes

    2018-02-01

    Various hypoxia-related proteins are differentially expressed in the retina and secreted to the vitreous and/or aqueous humor of patients affected by dry or neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). To determine whether these conditions alter concentrations of cytokines also in the systemic circulation, we measured plasma levels of six hypoxia-related proteins. Plasma was prepared from EDTA blood that was collected from patients affected by dry AMD (n = 5), nAMD (n = 11), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR; n = 9), and patients with an epiretinal membrane (ERM; n = 11). ERM samples served as negative controls, PDR samples as positive controls. Protein concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), placental growth factor (PlGF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of PlGF was significantly increased in plasma of patients affected by nAMD. Although no statistically significant differences were found for EPO, ANGPTL4, PlGF, TNF-α, and PEDF, the mean concentration of VEGF was lowest in the nAMD group. Plasma concentrations of the six factors did not correlate with gender or age of patients. nAMD may increase plasma concentrations of PlGF, making it a candidate as a biomarker for the neovascular form of AMD. Other factors, however, were not differentially regulated, suggesting that their systemic concentrations are not generally increased in hypoxia-related retinal diseases.

  11. Imaging Protocols in Clinical Studies in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Recommendations from Classification of Atrophy Consensus Meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, F.G.; Sadda, S.R.; Staurenghi, G.; Lindner, M.; Bird, A.C.; Blodi, B.A.; Bottoni, F.; Chakravarthy, U.; Chew, E.Y.; Csaky, K.; Curcio, C.A.; Danis, R.; Fleckenstein, M.; Freund, K.B.; Grunwald, J.; Guymer, R.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jaffe, G.J.; Liakopoulos, S.; Mones, J.M.; Oishi, A.; Pauleikhoff, D.; Rosenfeld, P.J.; Sarraf, D.; Spaide, R.F.; Tadayoni, R.; Tufail, A.; Wolf, S.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To summarize the results of 2 consensus meetings (Classification of Atrophy Meeting [CAM]) on conventional and advanced imaging modalities used to detect and quantify atrophy due to late-stage non-neovascular and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to provide

  12. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement: the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, N.; Colijn, J.M.; Kifley, A.; Lee, K.E.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Klein, B.E.; Myers, C.E.; Meuer, S.M.; Tan, A.G.; Holliday, E.G.; Attia, J.; Liew, G.; Iyengar, S.K.; Jong, p de; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.; Mitchell, P.; Klaver, C.C.W.; Klein, R.; Wang, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. DESIGN: Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. METHODS:

  13. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement : the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, Nichole; Colijn, Johanna Maria; Kifley, Annette; Lee, Kristine E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Klein, Barbara E K; Myers, Chelsea E; Meuer, Stacy M; Tan, Ava G; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Liew, Gerald; Iyengar, Sudha K; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klaver, Caroline C W; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. DESIGN: Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. METHODS:

  14. Autologous Translocation of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Choroid in the Treatment of Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J.M. Maaijwee (Kristel Johanna Maria)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most important cause of irreversible legal blindness in elderly persons in industrialized countries. AMD has two forms: atrophic (dry) and exudative (wet). In the wet form, abnormal blood vessels, arising from the choriocapillaris (choroidal

  15. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye: clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung WH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wing H Chung,1 Elon H C van Dijk,1 Danial Mohabati,1 Greet Dijkman,1 Suzanne Yzer,2 Eiko K de Jong,3 Sascha Fauser,4 Reinier O Schlingemann,5–7 Carel B Hoyng,3 Camiel J F Boon1,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Rotterdam Eye Hospital, Rotterdam, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 4Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Ocular Angiogenesis Group, Departments of Ophthalmology and Cell Biology and Histology, Academic Medical Center, 7Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. Patients and methods: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes included Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and change in central retinal thickness (CRT. These parameters were reviewed at baseline, first follow-up visit, and after 6, 12, and 24 months. Results: Out of 381 patients, 29 cases (8% were included (of whom 3 had polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy [PCV] who were treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapy which was supplemented by photodynamic therapy (PDT in the PCV patients. Overall, no statistically significant change in mean BCVA was observed during follow-up. BCVA improved or remained stable (defined as a gain in BCVA, a stable BCVA, or a loss of <5 ETDRS letters in 22 patients (76%, and 7 patients (23% had lost ≥5 ETDRS letters at final follow-up. A gain of ≥15 ETDRS letters at final follow-up was seen in 5 patients (17%. Mean CRT had decreased significantly with 99 µm (P<0.001 at 24 months after the

  16. Further mapping of 10q26 supports strong association of HTRA1 polymorphisms with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel; Yang, Zhenglin; Constantine, Ryan; Ma, Xiang; Camp, Nicola J; Yang, Xian; Chen, Hayou; Jorgenson, Adam; Hau, Vincent; Dewan, Andrew; Zeng, Jiexi; Harmon, Jennifer; Buehler, Jeanette; Brand, John M; Hoh, Josephine; Cameron, D Joshua; Dixit, Manjusha; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2008-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder with genetic and environmental influences. The genetic influences affecting AMD are not well understood and few genes have been consistently implicated and replicated for this disease. A polymorphism (rs11200638) in a transcription factor binding site of the HTRA1 gene has been described, in previous reports, as being most significantly associated with AMD. In this paper, we investigate haplotype association and individual polymorphic association by genotyping additional variants in the AMD risk-associated region of chromosome 10q26. We demonstrate that rs11200638 in the promoter region and rs2293870 in exon 1 of HTRA1, are among the most significantly associated variants for advanced forms of AMD.

  17. Blood expression levels of chemokine receptor CCR3 and chemokine CCL11 in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the CCR3/CCL11 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularisation, a common feature of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CCR3 and its ligand CCL11 in peripheral blood in patients...

  18. Early changes in macular optical coherence tomography parameters after Ranibizumab intravitreal injection in patients with exsudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Nicole Antunes; de Souza, Osias Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of the impact of different macular optical coherence parameters on visual acuity as early as 1 day after injection of ranibizumab in patients with subfoveal exsudative age-related macular degeneration. This was an interventional, non randomized, open label prospective study, where we evaluated 20 eyes of 20 patients affected by exudative age-related macular degeneration. These patients were treated with injections of ranibizumab between February 2013 and January 2015. The primary endpoint of this study was to evaluate the early changes in optical coherence tomography parameters (retinal thickness, central and total retinal volume) and impact on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) obtained by logarithm of minimum resolution using ETDRS protocol in patients treated with a single dose intravitreal injection of ranibizumab (0.5 mg/0.05 mL) during the first month of follow. The patients were evaluated on the first day, them at 7 and 30 days after the treatment. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire was applied during the study period to assess early perception of ranibizumab injection effectiveness. The adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Central retinal thickness values at 1 (464.0 ± 97.8 µm), 7 (379.9 ± 107.8 µm) and 30 days (365.5 ± 95.1 µm) after ranibizumab injection showed a statically significant reduction when compared with baseline results ( P  = 0.01, P  = 0.001, P  = 0.001, respectively). Similar alterations were observed in central and total retinal volume, which were detected early on the first day of evaluation, after the measurement at baseline (central: 0.36 ± 0.07 vs. 0.40 ± 0.10 mm 3 , P  = 0.01; total: 9.62 ± 1.10 vs. 9.99 ± 2.56 mm 3 , P  = 0.002) and remained steady at 7 ( P  = 0.001, P  = 0.002, respectively) and 30 days ( P  = 0.001, P  = 0.004, respectively) with slight variations without losing their gains in these parameters. The best

  19. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fields

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  20. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  1. Analysing the Progression Rates of Macular Lesions with Autofluorescence Imaging Modes in Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Olcay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study we aimed to compare the sensitivity of blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF and near-infrared autofluorescence (NI-AF imaging for determining the progression rates of macular lesions in dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Materials and Methods: The study was designed retrospectively and included patients diagnosed with intermediate and advanced stage dry AMD. Best corrected visual acuities and FAF and NI-AF images were recorded in 46 eyes of 33 patients. Lesion borders were drawn manually on the images using Heidelberg Eye Explorer software and lesion areas were calculated by using Microsoft Excel software. BCVA and lesion areas were compared with each other. Results: Patients’ mean follow-up time was 30.98±13.30 months. The lesion area progression rates were 0.85±0.93 mm2/y in FAF and 0.93±1.01 mm2/y in NI-AF, showing statistically significant correlation with each other (r=0.883; p<0.01. Both imaging methods are moderately correlated with visual acuity impairment (r=0.362; p<0.05 and r=0.311; p<0.05, respectively. In addition, larger lesions showed higher progression rates than smaller ones in both imaging methods. Conclusion: NI-AF imaging is as important and effective as FAF imaging for follow-up of dry AMD patients.

  2. Role of antioxidant enzymes and small molecular weight antioxidants in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    Cells in aerobic condition are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may induce damage to biomolecules, including proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. In normal circumstances, the amount of ROS is counterbalanced by cellular antioxidant defence, with its main components-antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair and small molecular weight antioxidants. An imbalance between the production and neutralization of ROS by antioxidant defence is associated with oxidative stress, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many age-related and degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting the macula-the central part of the retina. The retina is especially prone to oxidative stress due to high oxygen pressure and exposure to UV and blue light promoting ROS generation. Because oxidative stress has an established role in AMD pathogenesis, proper functioning of antioxidant defence may be crucial for the occurrence and progression of this disease. Antioxidant enzymes play a major role in ROS scavenging and changes of their expression or/and activity are reported to be associated with AMD. Therefore, the enzymes in the retina along with their genes may constitute a perspective target in AMD prevention and therapy.

  3. Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahawita, Shyalle K; Casson, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for an association between Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). A literature search was performed in 5 databases with no restrictions on language or date of publication. Four studies involving 10292 individuals examining the association between aspirin and ARMD met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was carried out by Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software (Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). The pooled odd ratios showed that Aspirin use was associated with early ARMD (pooled odds ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.88). There is a small but statistically significant association between Aspirin use and early ARMD, which may warrant further investigation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Fritsche (Lars); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.N. Cooke Bailey (Jessica N.); F. Grassmann (Felix); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); Burdon, K.P. (Kathryn P.); S.J. Hebbring (Scott J.); Wen, C. (Cindy); M. Gorski (Mathias); I.K. Kim (Ivana); Cho, D. (David); Zack, D. (Donald); E.H. Souied (Eric); H.P.N. Scholl (Hendrik); E. Bala (Elisa); ELee, K. (Kristine); D. Hunter (David); Sardell, R.J. (Rebecca J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); F. Cipriani (Francesco); Hoffman, J.D. (Joshua D.); T. Schick (Tina); Y.T.E. Lechanteur (Yara T. E.); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); Y. Jiang; C.M. Stanton (Chloe); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); X. Zhan (Xiaowei); Kwong, A.M. (Alan M.); A. Boleda (Alexis); M. Brooks (Matthew); L. Gieser (Linn); R. Ratna Priya (Rinki); K.E. Branham (Kari); Foerster, J.R. (Johanna R.); J.R. Heckenlively (John); M.I. Othman (Mohammad); B.J. Vote (Brendan J.); Liang, H.H. (Helena Hai); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); McAllister, I.L. (Ian L.); T. Isaacs (Timothy); Hall, J. (Janette); Lake, S. (Stewart); D.A. Mackey (David); Constable, I.J. (Ian J.); J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); Yang, Z. (Zhenglin); Su, Z. (Zhiguang); Luo, H. (Hongrong); Chen, D. (Daniel); Ouyang, H. (Hong); K. Flagg (Ken); Lin, D. (Danni); Mao, G. (Guanping); H.A. Ferreyra (Henry); K. Stark (Klaus); C. von Strachwitz (Claudia); Wolf, A. (Armin); C. Brandl (Caroline); Rudolph, G. (Guenther); M. Olden (Matthias); M.A. Morrison (Margaux); D.J. Morgan (Denise); M. Schu (Matthew); Ahn, J. (Jeeyun); G. Silvestri (Giuliana); E.E. Tsironi (Evangelia); Park, K.H. (Kyu Hyung); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); A. Orlin (Anton); Brucker, A. (Alexander); X. Li (Xiaohui); C.A. Curcio (Christine A.); Mohand-Sa'd, S. (Saddek); J.-A. Sahel (José-Alain); I. Audo (Isabelle); M. Benchaboune (Mustapha); A.J. Cree (Angela); Rennie, C.A. (Christina A.); Goverdhan, S.V. (Srinivas V.); M. Grunin (Michelle); S. Hagbi-Levi (Shira); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); J.-B. Holz; F. Blond (Frédéric); Blanché, H. (Hél'ne); Deleuze, J.-F. (Jean-Fran'ois); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); B.J. Truitt (Barbara); N.S. Peachey (Neal ); S.M. Meuer (Stacy); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); Moore, E.L. (Emily L.); R. Klein (Ronald); M.A. Hauser (Michael); E.A. Postel (Eric); M.D. Courtenay (Monique D.); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); J.L. Kovach (Jaclyn); W.K. Scott (William); Liew, G. (Gerald); Tan, A.G. (Ava G.); B. Gopinath (Bamini); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); T. Smith (Tim); J.C. Khan (Jane); M. Shahid (Mohammad); A.T. Moore (Anthony); J.A. McGrath (J Allie); R. Laux (Reneé); M.A. Brantley (Milam); A. Agarwal (Anita); L. Ersoy (Lebriz); A. Caramoy (Albert); T. Langmann (Thomas); N.T.M. Saksens (Nicole T.); Jong, E.K. (Eiko Kde); C. Hoyng (Carel); M.S. Cain (Melinda); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); T.M. Martin (Tammy M.); J. Blangero (John); D.E. Weeks (Daniel); Dhillon, B. (Bal); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly); Romm, J. (Jane); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hayward (Caroline); Gorin, M.B. (Michael B.); M.L. Klein (Michael); P.N. Baird (Paul); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); Fauser, S. (Sascha); WYates, J.R. (John R.); R. Allikmets (Rando); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); D.A. Schaumberg (Debra); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.A. Hagstrom (Stephanie); Y. Chowers (Yehuda); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); T. Léveillard (Thierry); K. Zhang (Kang); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); A.W. Hewit (Alex); A. Swaroop (Anand); Chew, E.Y. (Emily Y.); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); M.M. DeAngelis (Margaret); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.L. Haines (Jonathan); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I.M. Heid (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients

  5. Five-year progression of unilateral age-related macular degeneration to bilateral involvement: the Three Continent AMD Consortium report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joachim, Nichole; Colijn, Johanna Maria; Kifley, Annette; Lee, Kristine E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Myers, Chelsea E.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Tan, Ava G.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Attia, John; Liew, Gerald; Iyengar, Sudha K.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the 5-year progression from unilateral to bilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associated risk factors. Design Pooled data analyses of three prospective population-based cohorts, the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Beaver Dam Eye Study and Rotterdam Study. Methods Retinal

  6. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, A.; Gorgels, T.G.M.F.; ten Brink, J.B.; van der Spek, P.J.; Bossers, K.; Heine, V.M.; Bergen, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  7. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles : Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; van der Spek, Peter J; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  8. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new

  9. Endophenotypes for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Extending Our Reach into the Preclinical Stages of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Michael B; Weeks, Daniel E; Baron, Robert V; Conley, Yvette P; Ortube, Maria C; Nusinowitz, Steven

    2014-11-28

    The key to reducing the individual and societal burden of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-related vision loss, is to be able to initiate therapies that slow or halt the progression at a point that will yield the maximum benefit while minimizing personal risk and cost. There is a critical need to find clinical markers that, when combined with the specificity of genetic testing, will identify individuals at the earliest stages of AMD who would benefit from preventive therapies. These clinical markers are endophenotypes for AMD, present in those who are likely to develop AMD, as well as in those who have clinical evidence of AMD. Clinical characteristics associated with AMD may also be possible endophenotypes if they can be detected before or at the earliest stages of the condition, but we and others have shown that this may not always be valid. Several studies have suggested that dynamic changes in rhodopsin regeneration (dark adaptation kinetics and/or critical flicker fusion frequencies) may be more subtle indicators of AMD-associated early retinal dysfunction. One can test for the relevance of these measures using genetic risk profiles based on known genetic risk variants. These functional measures may improve the sensitivity and specificity of predictive models for AMD and may also serve to delineate clinical subtypes of AMD that may differ with respect to prognosis and treatment.

  10. Endophenotypes for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Extending Our Reach into the Preclinical Stages of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Gorin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key to reducing the individual and societal burden of age-related macular degeneration (AMD-related vision loss, is to be able to initiate therapies that slow or halt the progression at a point that will yield the maximum benefit while minimizing personal risk and cost. There is a critical need to find clinical markers that, when combined with the specificity of genetic testing, will identify individuals at the earliest stages of AMD who would benefit from preventive therapies. These clinical markers are endophenotypes for AMD, present in those who are likely to develop AMD, as well as in those who have clinical evidence of AMD. Clinical characteristics associated with AMD may also be possible endophenotypes if they can be detected before or at the earliest stages of the condition, but we and others have shown that this may not always be valid. Several studies have suggested that dynamic changes in rhodopsin regeneration (dark adaptation kinetics and/or critical flicker fusion frequencies may be more subtle indicators of AMD-associated early retinal dysfunction. One can test for the relevance of these measures using genetic risk profiles based on known genetic risk variants. These functional measures may improve the sensitivity and specificity of predictive models for AMD and may also serve to delineate clinical subtypes of AMD that may differ with respect to prognosis and treatment.

  11. The Societal Impact of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Use of Social Support Resources Differs by the Severity of the Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Mark; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Stuen, Cynthia; Rubio, Roman; Oestreicher, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among persons aged 50 years and older and is most prevalent among individuals of European descent aged 65 and older (Friedman et al., 2004; Rosenthal & Thompson, 2003). By affecting central vision, AMD interferes with such tasks as reading, driving, and activities…

  12. Visual loss related to macular subretinal fluid and cystoid macular edema in HIV-related optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, David; Rabier, Valérie; Jallet, Ghislaine

    2012-01-01

    Optic nerve involvement may occur in various infectious diseases, but is rarely reported after infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We report the atypical case of a 38-year-old patient in whom the presenting features of HIV infection were due to a bilateral optic neuropathy associ...... associated with macular subretinal fluid and cystoid macular edema, which responded well to antiretroviral therapy....

  13. Consecutive case series of 244 age-related macular degeneration patients undergoing implantation with an extended macular vision IOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad A; Robbie, Scott J; Hengerer, Fritz H; Auffarth, Gerd U; Conrad-Hengerer, Ina; Artal, Pablo

    2018-03-01

    To determine safety and visual outcomes in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) implanted with a novel intraocular lens (IOL) that delivers an optimized retinal image to all macular areas within 10 degrees of retinal eccentricity. This was a consecutive case series of 244 eyes with dry/stable wet AMD and logMAR visual acuity ≥0.3 implanted with iolAMD Eyemax mono TM (London Eye Hospital Pharma), a single-piece, injectable, hydrophobic acrylic IOL sited in the capsular bag. Primary outcome was safety. Secondary outcomes were changes in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and corrected near visual acuity (CNVA) (logMAR). Mean age at surgery was 80 years. Mean duration of follow-up was 3 months (range 1-16 months). No eyes had worsening of CDVA. Frequency of perioperative complications was equivalent to standard IOL implantation. Postoperative refractive outcomes were within ±1 D of the target refraction in 88% of cases. Mean preoperative CDVA improved from 1.06 to 0.71 postoperatively (mean of differences -0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.3886 to -0.3223; p<0.0001), equating to an approximate Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study gain of 18 letters. Mean preoperative CNVA (N-point; logMAR conversion) improved from 1.36 to 0.88 postoperatively (mean of differences -0.48; 95% CI -0.53 to -0.44; p<0.0001). This novel IOL appears safe in the short to medium term. Improvements in postoperative CDVA and CNVA exceed those observed with standard implants.

  14. Macular function and morphologic features in juvenile stargardt disease: longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Melillo, Paolo; Di Iorio, Valentina; Orrico, Ada; Attanasio, Marcella; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate disease progression in a cohort of patients with a clinical and genetic diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Longitudinal cohort study. A total of 56 selected patients with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of Stargardt disease, an early age of onset, and a median follow-up length of 2 years. Patients underwent routine examination, including full-field electroretinography, microperimetry, and optical coherence tomography. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), mean retinal sensitivity, fixation stability, preferred retinal locus, inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction loss, and atrophic lesion area. A total of 56 patients with a mean age at disease onset of 15.3 years (range, 3-28 years), a mean disease duration of 12.1 years, and a mean age at baseline of 27.4 years were analyzed. The median BCVA was 20/200 in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography parameters (IS/OS alteration and retinal pigment epithelium lesion area) were obtained in only 49 patients because the signal quality was poor in the remaining 7 patients. Optical coherence tomography revealed a mean retinal pigment epithelium lesion area of 2.6 mm(2), preserved foveal IS/OS in 4.1% of patients, loss of foveal IS/OS in 59.2% of patients, and extensive loss of macular IS/OS in 36.7% of patients. Microperimetric findings showed a reduced macular sensitivity (mean, 10 decibels [dB]) and an unstable fixation in half of the patient cohort. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant progressive reduction of BCVA and macular sensitivity (at an estimated rate of 0.04 decimals and 1.19 dB/year, respectively) associated with a significant enlargement of retinal pigment epithelium lesion area (0.282 mm(2)/year). No significant changes in ophthalmoscopic findings and electroretinographic responses were detected. This study highlights the importance of microperimetry and optical coherence tomography in monitoring patients with Stargardt disease. Quantifying the decline of visual functionality and

  15. Kilovoltage radiosurgery with gold nanoparticles for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD): a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, D.; Zygmanski, P.; Arnoldussen, M.; Hanlon, J.; Chell, E.; Sajo, E.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.; Ngwa, W.

    2015-12-01

    This work uses Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to assess the potential benefits of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clinically, a 100 kVp x-ray beam of 4 mm diameter is aimed at the macula to deliver an ablative dose in a single fraction. In the transport model, AuNP accumulated at the bottom of the macula are targeted with a source representative of the clinical beam in order to provide enhanced dose to the diseased macular endothelial cells. It is observed that, because of the AuNP, the dose to the endothelial cells can be significantly enhanced, allowing for greater sparing of optic nerve, retina and other neighboring healthy tissue. For 20 nm diameter AuNP concentration of 32 mg g-1, which has been shown to be achievable in vivo, a dose enhancement ratio (DER) of 1.97 was found to be possible, which could potentially be increased through appropriate optimization of beam quality and/or AuNP targeting. A significant enhancement in dose is seen in the vicinity of the AuNP layer within 30 μm, peaked at the AuNP-tissue interface. Different angular tilting of the 4 mm beam results in a similar enhancement. The DER inside and in the penumbra of the 4 mm irradiation-field are almost the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field leading to normal tissue sparing. The prescribed dose to macular endothelial cells can be delivered using almost half of the radiation allowing reduction of dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve by 49% when compared to a treatment without AuNP.

  16. Kilovoltage radiosurgery with gold nanoparticles for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD): a Monte Carlo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brivio, D; Zygmanski, P; Makrigiorgos, G M; Ngwa, W; Arnoldussen, M; Hanlon, J; Chell, E; Sajo, E

    2015-01-01

    This work uses Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation to assess the potential benefits of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with stereotactic radiosurgery. Clinically, a 100 kVp x-ray beam of 4 mm diameter is aimed at the macula to deliver an ablative dose in a single fraction. In the transport model, AuNP accumulated at the bottom of the macula are targeted with a source representative of the clinical beam in order to provide enhanced dose to the diseased macular endothelial cells. It is observed that, because of the AuNP, the dose to the endothelial cells can be significantly enhanced, allowing for greater sparing of optic nerve, retina and other neighboring healthy tissue. For 20 nm diameter AuNP concentration of 32 mg g −1 , which has been shown to be achievable in vivo, a dose enhancement ratio (DER) of 1.97 was found to be possible, which could potentially be increased through appropriate optimization of beam quality and/or AuNP targeting. A significant enhancement in dose is seen in the vicinity of the AuNP layer within 30 μm, peaked at the AuNP-tissue interface. Different angular tilting of the 4 mm beam results in a similar enhancement. The DER inside and in the penumbra of the 4 mm irradiation-field are almost the same while the actual delivered dose is more than one order of magnitude lower outside the field leading to normal tissue sparing. The prescribed dose to macular endothelial cells can be delivered using almost half of the radiation allowing reduction of dose to the neighboring organs such as retina/optic nerve by 49% when compared to a treatment without AuNP. (paper)

  17. Safety and Efficacy of a Flexible Dosing Regimen of Ranibizumab in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The SUSTAIN Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, Frank G.; Amoaku, Winfried; Donate, Juan; Guymer, Robyn H.; Kellner, Ulrich; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Weichselberger, Andreas; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of individualized ranibizumab treatment in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Design: Twelve-month, phase III, multicenter, open-label, single-arm study. Participants: A total of 513 ranibizumab-naive SUSTAIN patients.

  18. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsche, L.G.; Igl, W.; Bailey, J.N.; Grassmann, F.; Sengupta, S; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Burdon, K.P.; Hebbring, S.J.; Wen, C.; Gorski, M.; Kim, I.K.; Cho, D.; Zack, D.; Souied, E.; Scholl, H.P.; Bala, E.; Lee, K.E.; Hunter, D.J.; Sardell, R.J.; Mitchell, P.; Merriam, J.E.; Cipriani, V.; Hoffman, J.D.; Schick, T.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Guymer, R.H.; Johnson, M.P.; Jiang, Y.; Stanton, C.M.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Zhan, X.; Kwong, A.M.; Boleda, A.; Brooks, M.; Gieser, L.; Ratnapriya, R.; Branham, K.E.; Foerster, J.R.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Othman, M.I.; Vote, B.J.; Liang, H.H.; Souzeau, E.; McAllister, I.L.; Isaacs, T.; Hall, J.; Lake, S.; Mackey, D.A.; Constable, I.J.; Craig, J.E.; Kitchner, T.E.; Yang, Z; Su, Z.; Luo, H.; Chen, D.; Ouyang, H.; Flagg, K.; Lin, D.; Mao, G.; Ferreyra, H.; Stark, K.; Strachwitz, C.N. von; Wolf, A.; Brandl, C.; Rudolph, G.; Olden, M.; Morrison, M.A.; Morgan, D.J.; Schu, M.; Ahn, J.; Silvestri, G.; Tsironi, E.E.; Park, K.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Orlin, A.; Brucker, A.; Li, M.; Curcio, C.A.; Mohand-Said, S.; Sahel, J.A.; Audo, I.; Benchaboune, M.; Cree, A.J.; Rennie, C.A.; Goverdhan, S.V.; Grunin, M.; Hagbi-Levi, S.; Campochiaro, P.; Katsanis, N.; Holz, F.G.; Blond, F.; Blanche, H.; Deleuze, J.F.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Truitt, B.; Peachey, N.S.; Meuer, S.M.; Myers, C.E.; Moore, E.L.; Klein, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Saksens, N.T.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jong, E.K.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832

  19. Memory deficit associated with worse functional trajectories in older adults in low-vision rehabilitation for macular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Heather E; Whitaker, Diane; Sanders, Linda L; Potter, Guy G; Cousins, Scott W; Ansah, Deidra; McConnell, Eleanor; Pieper, Carl F; Landerman, Lawrence; Steffens, David C; Cohen, Harvey J

    2012-11-01

    To examine whether performance on a brief memory test is related to functional outcomes in older individuals undergoing low-vision rehabilitation (LVR) for macular disease. Observational cohort study of individuals receiving outpatient LVR. Academic center. Ninety-one individuals (average age 80.1) with macular disease. Memory was assessed at baseline using a 10-word list; memory deficit was defined as immediate recall of two or fewer words. Vision-related function was measured using the 25-item Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) administered at baseline and during subsequent interviews (mean follow-up, 115 days). Linear mixed models were constructed to compare average trajectories of four VFQ-25 subscales: near activities, distance activities, dependency, and role difficulty. The 29.7% of participants with memory deficits tended to decline in ability to accomplish activities that involved near vision. Controlling for age, sex, and education, the functional trajectory of participants with memory deficit differed significantly from that of those with better memory (P = .002), who tended to report improvements in ability to accomplish near activities. Of older adults receiving LVR for macular disease, those with memory deficits experienced worse functional trajectories in their ability to perform specific visually mediated tasks. A brief memory screen may help explain variability in rehabilitation outcomes and identify individuals who might require special accommodations. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Fixation stability and implication for multifocal electroretinography in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration after anti-VEGF treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Sjølie, Anne Katrin; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify fixation stability in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) at baseline, 3 and 6 months after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment and furthermore asses the implications of an unsteady fixation for multifocal...

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography Predictors of Risk for Progression to Non-Neovascular Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Karim; Veerappan, Malini; Winter, Katrina P; McCall, Michelle N; Yiu, Glenn; Farsiu, Sina; Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci; Toth, Cynthia A

    2017-12-01

    Appearance of geographic atrophy (GA) on color photography (CP) is preceded by specific features on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We aimed to build SD OCT-based risk assessment models for 5-year new onset of GA and central GA on CP. Prospective, longitudinal study. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Ancillary SD OCT study participants with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with bilateral large drusen or noncentral GA and at least 1 eye without advanced disease (n = 317). For 1 eye per participant, qualitative and quantitative SD OCT variables were derived from standardized grading and semiautomated segmentation, respectively, at baseline. Up to 7 years later, annual outcomes were extracted and analyzed to fit multivariate logistic regression models and build a risk calculator. New onset of CP-visible GA and central GA. Over a follow-up median of 4.0 years and among 292 AMD eyes (without advanced disease at baseline) with complete outcome data, 46 (15.8%) developed central GA. Among 265 eyes without any GA on baseline CP, 70 (26.4%) developed CP-visible GA. Final multivariate models were adjusted for age. In the model for GA, the independent predicting SD OCT factors (P segment loss, RPE drusen complex volume, and RPE drusen complex abnormal thinning volume. For central GA, the factors (P segmentation, drusen characteristics, and retinal pathology-for progression to CP-visible GA over up to 5 years. This calculator may simplify SD OCT grading and with future validation has a promising role as a clinical prognostic tool. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  2. Smoking,serum antioxidant vitamin levels and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezen Akkaya Çakir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate associations between the grades of age related macular degeneration(AMDand serum levels of antioxidant vitamins(vitamin A, C and Eand smoking. METHODS: Fifty-three AMD patients and 31 individuals having ages matching with the patient group were enrolled the study. Colored fundus photographs of the macula were used to place participants(n=84into one of the five groups(Grade I-Vbased on the frequency and severity of the lesions associated with AMD. Serum antioxidant vitamin levels were measured using High Performance Liquid Chromatography(HPLC. Smoking status was classified as non-smoker, ex-smoker and current smoker. Total number of packs smoked per year, was defined.RESULTS: The distribution of vitamin A, E, and C levels were 0.874±0.326mg/L, 10.739±4.874mg/L, 1.737±0.447mg/L in control group and 0.880±0.305mg/L, 9.487±6.060mg/L, 1.870±2.191mg/L in AMD group, respectively. The difference between AMD and control group was not statistically significant for vitamin A, E and C levels(P>0.05. There were no significant differences between subgroups of AMD for vitamin A(P=0.881and vitamin E(P=0.293but there was a contradicting rise of vitamin C levels(P=0.044with increasing levels of the disease. There were no significant differences between AMD and control group regarding smoking status, but there was a significant difference for total number of packs smoked per year(P=0.02. An increase of number of total packs smoked per year was determined along with the rising grade of AMD(P=0.007. CONCLUSION: We found no relation between AMD and serum levels of vitamin A and E but vitamin C levels was increase with AMD grades unexpectedly. We found dose-response relationship between smoking and AMD.

  3. Predictive models of long-term anatomic outcome in age-related macular degeneration treated with as-needed Ranibizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Buendia, Lucia; Delgado-Tirado, Santiago; Sanabria, M Rosa; Fernandez, Itziar; Coco, Rosa M

    2017-08-18

    To analyze predictors and develop predictive models of anatomic outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with as-needed ranibizumab after 4 years of follow-up. A multicenter consecutive case series non-interventional study was performed. Clinical, funduscopic and OCT characteristics of 194 treatment-naïve patients with AMD treated with as-needed ranibizumab for at least 2 years and up to 4 years were analyzed at baseline, 3 months and each year until the end of the follow-up. Baseline demographic and angiographic characteristics were also evaluated. R Statistical Software was used for statistical analysis. Main outcome measure was final anatomic status. Factors associated with less probability of preserved macula were diagnosis in 2009, older age, worse vision, presence of atrophy/fibrosis, pigment epithelium detachment, and geographic atrophy/fibrotic scar/neovascular AMD in the fellow eye. Factors associated with higher probability of GA were presence of atrophy and greater number of injections, whereas male sex, worse vision, lesser change in central macular thickness and presence of fibrosis were associated with less probability of GA as final macular status. Predictive model of preserved macula vs. GA/fibrotic scar showed sensibility of 77.78% and specificity of 69.09%. Predictive model of GA vs. fibrotic scar showed sensibility of 68.89% and specificity of 72.22%. We identified predictors of final macular status, and developed two predictive models. Predictive models that we propose are based on easily harvested variables, and, if validated, could be a useful tool for individual patient management and clinical research studies.

  4. Memory Deficit is Associated with Worse Functional Trajectories Among Older Adults in Low Vision Rehabilitation for Macular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Heather E.; Whitaker, Diane; Sanders, Linda L.; Potter, Guy G.; Cousins, Scott W.; Ansah, Deidra; McConnell, Eleanor; Pieper, Carl F.; Landerman, Lawrence; Steffens, David C.; Cohen, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Older adults with macular disease are at increased risk of memory decline and incident dementia. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) aims to preserve independence in people with irreversible vision loss, but comorbid memory problems could limit the success of rehabilitation. This study examined whether performance on a brief memory test is related to functional outcomes among older patients undergoing LVR for macular disease. Design Observational cohort study of patients receiving outpatient LVR Setting Academic center Participants 91 seniors (average age 80.1 years) with macular disease Measurements Memory was assessed at baseline with a 10-word list; memory deficit was defined as immediate recall of ≤ two words. Vision-related function was measured with the 25-item Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25)administered at baseline and during subsequent interviews (mean length of follow up = 115 days). Linear mixed models (LMMs) were constructed to compare average trajectories of four VFQ-25 subscales: near activities, distance activities, dependency, and role difficulty. Results The 29.7% of patients with memory deficit tended to decline in ability to accomplish activities that involve near vision. Controlling for age, sex, and education, the functional trajectory of participants with memory deficit differed significantly from that of participants with better memory (p=0.002), who tended to report improvements in ability to accomplish near activities. Conclusion Among older adults receiving LVR for macular disease, those with memory deficit experienced worse functional trajectories in their ability to perform specific visually mediated tasks. A brief memory screen may help explain variability in rehabilitation outcomes and identify patients who might require special accommodations. PMID:23126548

  5. Macular function and morphological features in juvenile Stargardt disease: Longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Melillo, Paolo; Iorio, Valentina Di; Orrico, Ada; Attanasio, Marcella; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to evaluate disease progression in a cohort of patients with clinical and genetic diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Design longitudinal cohort study. Subjects 56 selected patients with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of Stargardt disease, an early age of onset and a median follow-up length of two years. Methods patients underwent routine examination including full-field electroretinography, microperimetry and optical coherence tomography. Main Outcome Measures best corrected visual acuity, mean retinal sensitivity, fixation stability, preferred retinal locus, inner-outer segment (IS/OS) junction loss, atrophic lesion area. Results 56 patients with a mean age of disease onset of 15.3 years (range: 3 - 28 years), a mean disease length of 12.1 years and a mean age at baseline of 27.4 years were analyzed. The median best corrected visual acuity was 20/200 in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography parameters (IS/OS alteration and retinal pigment epithelium lesion area) were obtained in 49 patients because signal quality was poor in the remaining 7 patients. Optical coherence tomography revealed a mean retinal pigment epithelium lesion area of 2.6 mm2, preserved foveal IS/OS in 4.1% of patients, loss of foveal IS/OS in 59.2%, and extensive loss of macular IS/OS in 36.7%. Microperimetric findings showed a reduced macular sensitivity (mean 10 dB) and an unstable fixation in half of the patient cohort. The longitudinal analysis showed a significant progressive reduction of best corrected visual acuity and macular sensitivity (at an estimated rate of 0.04 decimals and 1.19 dB per year, respectively) associated with a significant enlargement of retinal pigment epithelium lesion area (0.282 mm2 per year). No significant changes in ophthalmoscopic findings and electroretinographic responses were detected. Conclusions this study highlights the importance of microperimetry and optical coherence tomography in monitoring Stargardt patients. In fact, quantifying the

  6. Circulating vitamin D concentration and age-related macular degeneration: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annweiler, Cedric; Drouet, Morgane; Duval, Guillaume T; Paré, Pierre-Yves; Leruez, Stephanie; Dinomais, Mickael; Milea, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D may be involved in ocular function in older adults, but there is no current consensus on a possible association between circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and the occurrence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our objective was to systematically review and quantitatively assess the association of circulating 25OHD concentration with AMD. A Medline search was conducted in November 2015, with no date limit, using the MeSH terms "Vitamin D" OR "Vitamin D deficiency" OR "Ergocalciferols" OR 'Cholecalciferol' combined with "Age-related macular degeneration" OR "Macular degeneration" OR "Retinal degeneration" OR "Macula lutea" OR "Retina". Fixed and random-effects meta-analyses were performed to compute (i) standard mean difference in 25OHD concentration between AMD and non-AMD patients; (ii) AMD risk according to circulating 25OHD concentration. Of the 243 retrieved studies, 11 observational studies-10 cross-sectional studies and 1 cohort study-met the selection criteria. The number of participants ranged from 65 to 17,045 (52-100% women), and the number with AMD ranged from 31 to 1440. Circulating 25OHD concentration was 15% lower in AMD compared with non-AMD on average. AMD was inversely associated with the highest 25OHD quintile compared with the lowest (summary odds ratio (OR)=0.83 [95%CI:0.71-0.97]), notably late AMD (summary OR=0.47 [95%CI:0.28-0.79]). Circulating 25OHD<50nmol/L was also associated with late-stage AMD (summary OR=2.18 [95%CI:1.34-3.56]), an association that did not persist when all categories of AMD were considered (summary OR=1.26 [95%CI:0.90-1.76]). In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides evidence that high 25OHD concentrations may be protective against AMD, and that 25OHD concentrations below 50nmol/L are associated with late AMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of age-related macular degeneration study supplements in the UK: combined trial and real-world outcomes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron Y; Butt, Thomas; Chew, Emily; Agron, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Egan, Catherine A; Lee, Cecilia S; Tufail, Adnan

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 1 & 2 supplements in patients with either bilateral intermediate age-related macular degeneration, AREDS category 3, or unilateral neovascular age-related macular degeneration AMD (nAMD), AREDS category 4. A patient-level health state transition model based on levels of visual acuity in the better-seeing eye was constructed to simulate the costs and consequences of patients taking AREDS vitamin supplements. UK National Health Service (NHS). The model was populated with data from AREDS and real-world outcomes and resource use from a prospective multicentre national nAMD database study containing 92 976 ranibizumab treatment episodes. Two treatment approaches were compared: immediate intervention with AREDS supplements or no supplements. quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs were accrued for each strategy, and incremental costs and QALYs were calculated for the lifetime of the patient. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were employed to test the uncertainty of the model. For AREDS category 3, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £30 197. For AREDS category 4 compared with no intervention, AREDS supplements are more effective (10.59 vs 10.43 QALYs) and less costly (£52 074 vs 54 900) over the lifetime of the patient. The recommendation to publicly fund AREDS supplements to category 3 patients would depend on the healthcare system willingness to pay. In contrast, initiating AREDS supplements in AREDS category 4 patients is both cost saving and more effective than no supplement use and should therefore be considered in public health policy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Statins for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2015-02-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the included studies. Two RCTs with 144 total participants met the selection criteria

  9. Segmentation error and macular thickness measurements obtained with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography devices in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosang Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate frequency and severity of segmentation errors of two spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT devices and error effect on central macular thickness (CMT measurements. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven eyes of 25 patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, examined using the Cirrus HD-OCT and Spectralis HRA + OCT, were retrospectively reviewed. Macular cube 512 × 128 and 5-line raster scans were performed with the Cirrus and 512 × 25 volume scans with the Spectralis. Frequency and severity of segmentation errors were compared between scans. Results: Segmentation error frequency was 47.4% (baseline, 40.7% (1 month, 40.7% (2 months, and 48.1% (6 months for the Cirrus, and 59.3%, 62.2%, 57.8%, and 63.7%, respectively, for the Spectralis, differing significantly between devices at all examinations (P < 0.05, except at baseline. Average error score was 1.21 ± 1.65 (baseline, 0.79 ± 1.18 (1 month, 0.74 ± 1.12 (2 months, and 0.96 ± 1.11 (6 months for the Cirrus, and 1.73 ± 1.50, 1.54 ± 1.35, 1.38 ± 1.40, and 1.49 ± 1.30, respectively, for the Spectralis, differing significantly at 1 month and 2 months (P < 0.02. Automated and manual CMT measurements by the Spectralis were larger than those by the Cirrus. Conclusions: The Cirrus HD-OCT had a lower frequency and severity of segmentation error than the Spectralis HRA + OCT. SD-OCT error should be considered when evaluating retinal thickness.

  10. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  11. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  12. Efficacy of vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, III, John; Patel,Shyam

    2015-01-01

    John O Mason III,1,2 Shyam A Patel11Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Retina Consultants of Alabama, Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital, Birmingham, AL, USAObjective: To study the efficacy of epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD).Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patient charts on 17 eyes (16 patients) that underwent ERM peeling with a concurrent diagnosis of dry AMD.Results: Eyes w...

  13. A novel source of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in retina: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kee Dong; Yamamoto, Kazunori; Ueda, Keiko; Zhou, Jilin; Sparrow, Janet R

    2012-01-01

    Aging of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye is marked by accumulations of bisretinoid fluorophores; two of the compounds within this lipofuscin mixture are A2E and all-trans-retinal dimer. These pigments are implicated in pathological mechanisms involved in some vision-threatening disorders including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Studies have shown that bisretinoids are photosensitive compounds that undergo photooxidation and photodegradation when irradiated with short wavelength visible light. Utilizing ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) we demonstrate that photodegradation of A2E and all-trans-retinal dimer generates the dicarbonyls glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG), that are known to modify proteins by advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation. By extracellular trapping with aminoguanidine, we established that these oxo-aldehydes are released from irradiated A2E-containing RPE cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA) revealed that the substrate underlying A2E-containing RPE was AGE-modified after irradiation. This AGE deposition was suppressed by prior treatment of the cells with aminoguanidine. AGE-modification causes structural and functional impairment of proteins. In chronic diseases such as diabetes and atherosclerosis, MG and GO modify proteins by non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation reactions. AGE-modified proteins are also components of drusen, the sub-RPE deposits that confer increased risk of AMD onset. These results indicate that photodegraded RPE bisretinoid is likely to be a previously unknown source of MG and GO in the eye.

  14. Dietary fatty acids and lipoproteins on progression of age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S.; Naranjo, M.C.; Bermúdez, B.; López, S.; Abia, R.; Muriana, F.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition of central loss vision and blindness. Numerous studies have revealed that changes on certain dietary fatty acids (FAs) could have useful for AMD management. This review summarizes the effects of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, MUFAs, and SFAs, and lipoproteins on AMD. Findings are consistent with the beneficial role of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, while the effects of dietary MUFAs and SFAs appeared to be ambiguous with respect to the possible protection from MUFAs and to the possible adverse impact from SFAs on AMD. Some of the pathological mechanisms associated with lipoproteins on AMD share those observed previously in cardiovascular diseases. It was also noticed that the effects of FAs in the diet and lipoprotein on AMD could be modulated by genetic variants. From a population health perspective, the findings of this review are in favour of omega-3 long-chain FAs recommendations in a preventive and therapeutic regimen to attain lower AMD occurrence and progression rates. Additional long-term and short-term nutrigenomic studies are required to clearly establish the role and the relevance of interaction of dietary FAs, lipoproteins, and genes in the genesis and progression of AMD. [es

  15. Dietary fatty acids and lipoproteins on progression of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Montserrat-de la Paz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a medical condition of central loss vision and blindness. Numerous studies have revealed that changes on certain dietary fatty acids (FAs could have useful for AMD management. This review summarizes the effects of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, MUFAs, and SFAs, and lipoproteins on AMD. Findings are consistent with the beneficial role of dietary omega-3 long-chain PUFAs, while the effects of dietary MUFAs and SFAs appeared to be ambiguous with respect to the possible protection from MUFAs and to the possible adverse impact from SFAs on AMD. Some of the pathological mechanisms associated with lipoproteins on AMD share those observed previously in cardiovascular diseases. It was also noticed that the effects of FAs in the diet and lipoprotein on AMD could be modulated by genetic variants. From a population health perspective, the findings of this review are in favour of omega-3 long-chain FAs recommendations in a preventive and therapeutic regimen to attain lower AMD occurrence and progression rates. Additional long-term and short-term nutrigenomic studies are required to clearly establish the role and the relevance of interaction of dietary FAs, lipoproteins, and genes in the genesis and progression of AMD.

  16. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2...

  17. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2a...

  18. Longterm effects of radiation treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo; Miyamoto, Hideki; Hiroshiba, Naoko; Kimura, Hideya; Ogura, Yuichiro; Honda, Yoshihito [Kyoto Univ. Graduated School of Medicine (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke

    1998-04-01

    We reviewed the longterm effect of radiation on age-related macular degeneration in 30 eyes. All the patients were aged 60 years or over. As the criteria for entering the study, all eyes had to show tendency for exacerbation during the past 6 months and the presence of choroidal neovascularization had to be verified by fluorescein angiography. One group of 15 eyes received a total of 10 Gy divided in 5 fractions. The other group of 15 eyes received a total of 20 Gy divided in 10 fractions. Another group of untreated 16 eyes with similar lesions were restrospectively assessed. The irradiated eyes showed beneficial tendencies as compared with the untreated. Final visual acuity of 20/200 was attained in 20% of eyes receiving 10 Gy, 53% of eyes receiving 20 Gy and in no eye which did not receive radiation. The difference was significant (p<0.01). When deterioration of visual acuity is defined as twice of the visual angle, stability or improvement in visual acuity was attained in 47% of eyes treated by 20 Gy and in 13% of untreated eyes. The difference was significant (p<0.01). (author)

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of carboxyethylpyrrole-modified proteins: mediators of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Gu, Xiaorong; Hong, Li; Laird, James; Jaffe, Keeve; Choi, Jaewoo; Crabb, John; Salomon, Robert G

    2009-11-01

    Protein modifications in which the epsilon-amino group of lysyl residues is incorporated into a 2-(omega-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) are mediators of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). They promote both angiogenesis into the retina ('wet AMD') and geographic retinal atrophy ('dry AMD'). Blood levels of CEPs are biomarkers for clinical prognosis of the disease. To enable mechanistic studies of their role in promoting AMD, for example, through the activation of B- and T-cells, interaction with receptors, or binding with complement proteins, we developed an efficient synthesis of CEP derivatives, that is especially effective for proteins. The structures of tryptic peptides derived from CEP-modified proteins were also determined. A key finding is that 4,7-dioxoheptanoic acid 9-fluorenylmethyl ester reacts with primary amines to provide 9-fluorenylmethyl esters of CEP-modified proteins that can be deprotected in situ with 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene without causing protein denaturation. The introduction of multiple CEP-modifications with a wide variety of CEP:protein ratios is readily achieved using this strategy.

  20. Diagnosis of non-exudative (DRY) age related macular degeneration by non-invasive photon-correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Franz Ii; Ott, Maria; Munteanu, Mihnea

    2016-01-01

    Photon-correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy) allows the non-invasively reveal of local dynamics and local heterogeneities of macromolecular systems. The capability of this technique to diagnose the retinal pathologies by in-vivo investigations of spatial anomalies of retinas displaying non-exudative senile macular degeneration was evaluated. Further, the potential use of the technique for the diagnosis of the macular degeneration was analyzed and displayed by the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC). The maculae and the peripheral retina of 73 normal eyes and of 26 eyes afflicted by an early stage of non-exudative senile macular degeneration were characterized by time-correlation functions and analyzed in terms of characteristic decay times and apparent size distributions. The characteristics of the obtained time-correlation functions of the eyes afflicted with nonexudative macular degeneration and of normal eyes differed significantly, which could be referred to a significant change of the nano- and microstructure of the investigated pathologic maculas. Photon-correlation spectroscopy is able to assess the macromolecular and microstructural aberrations in the macula afflicted by non-exudative, senile macular degeneration. It has been demonstrated that macromolecules of this disease show a characteristic abnormal behavior in the macula.

  1. Clinical risk factors for age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western countries. Numerous risk factors have been reported but the evidence and strength of association is variable. We aimed to identify those risk factors with strong levels of evidence which could be easily assessed by physicians or ophthalmologists to implement preventive interventions or address current behaviours. Methods A systematic review identified 18 prospective and cross-sectional studies and 6 case control studies involving 113,780 persons with 17,236 cases of late AMD that included an estimate of the association between late AMD and at least one of 16 pre-selected risk factors. Fixed-effects meta-analyses were conducted for each factor to combine odds ratio (OR and/or relative risk (RR outcomes across studies by study design. Overall raw point estimates of each risk factor and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results Increasing age, current cigarette smoking, previous cataract surgery, and a family history of AMD showed strong and consistent associations with late AMD. Risk factors with moderate and consistent associations were higher body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and higher plasma fibrinogen. Risk factors with weaker and inconsistent associations were gender, ethnicity, diabetes, iris colour, history of cerebrovascular disease, and serum total and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Conclusions Smoking, previous cataract surgery and a family history of AMD are consistent risk factors for AMD. Cardiovascular risk factors are also associated with AMD. Knowledge of these risk factors that may be easily assessed by physicians and general ophthalmologists may assist in identification and appropriate referral of persons at risk of AMD.

  2. Baseline Predictors of Visual Acuity Outcome in Patients with Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyuan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the leading causes of severe vision loss in people over 60 years. Wet AMD (wAMD causes more severe visual acuity (VA loss compared with the dry form due to formation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF agents such as ranibizumab and aflibercept are now the standard of care treatment for wAMD. Unfortunately, up to a quarter of anti-VEGF-treated wAMD patients might not fully benefit from intravitreal injections and CNV activity may not respond to the treatment and these patients are called anti-VEGF nonresponders. This article aims to discuss the baseline factors associated with VA outcome such as age, initial VA, lesion types, disease duration, optical coherence tomography (OCT features, fundus autofluorescence findings, and the presence of particular genotype risk alleles in patients with wAMD. Recommendations are provided regarding when to consider discontinuation of therapy because of either success or futility. Understanding the predictive factors associated with VA outcome and treatment frequency response to anti-VEGF therapy may help retina specialists to manage patients’ expectations and guide treatment decisions from the beginning of treatment on the basis of “personalized medicine.”

  3. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is not associated with coronary heart disease in a Chinese Population: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching; Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Kao, Li-Ting

    2017-11-01

    This case-control study aimed to explore the association between prior coronary heart disease (CHD) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using a population-based data set in Taiwan. We analysed data sourced from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. The study consisted of 1970 patients with neovascular AMD as cases and 5910 age- and sex-matched controls. We performed a conditional logistic regression to examine the odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for previously diagnosed CHD between cases and controls. Of the 7880 sampled patients, 24.5% had a prior history of CHD; CHD was found in 25.7% of cases and in 22.7% of controls (p = 0.008). The conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that the OR for prior CHD for cases was 1.17 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.32] compared to the controls. However, after adjusting for patient's monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level, age, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension, we failed to observe an association between prior CHD and AMD (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.91-1.17). Additionally, the medical comorbidities of hyperlipidaemia (adjusted OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.15-1.45), hypertension (adjusted OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.05-1.37) and diabetes (adjusted OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.32-1.65) were significantly associated with AMD. This study presented no significant difference in the odds of prior CHD between patients with AMD and those without AMD after adjusting for comorbidities and sociodemographic characteristics in a Chinese population. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased proportion of CD56(+) T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Singh, Amardeep; Krüger Falk, Mads

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association between age-related changes in the T-cell compartment and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Case-control study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 117 AMD cases and 106 controls were included prospectively. METHODS: Fresh-drawn peripheral blood...... samples were processed for flow cytometric analysis of T-cell populations. Plasma samples were analyzed for anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin (Ig)G and complement factor H (CFH) Y402H genotype. The diagnosis of AMD was made according to the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System. MAIN...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between frequency of aged T cells and prevalence of AMD. RESULTS: The prevalence of AMD was associated with distinct age-related changes in the T-cell compartment. Specifically, the patients with AMD had an increased frequency of CD28(-) T cells that expressed the CD56...

  5. Cytokine concentration in aqueous humour of eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jost B; Tao, Yong; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2012-08-01

    To measure the concentration of cytokines in the aqueous humour of eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The clinical interventional study included a study group of 18 patients with exudative AMD and a control group of 20 patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Age did not vary significantly (p = 0.36) between study group (80.8 ± 6.4 years) and control group (77.0 ± 9.9 years), nor did gender (p = 0.75). During the interventions, aqueous humour samples were obtained, in which the concentration of cytokines was measured using a solid-phase chemiluminescence immunoassay. Macular thickness was measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the study group as compared to the control group, significantly higher concentrations were measured for epithelial growth factor (EGF) (p = 0.017), human growth factor (HGF) (p= 0.048), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) (p = 0.028), interleukin 12p40 (IL12p40) (p = 0.009), interleukin 1a2 (IL1a2) (p = 0.01), interleukin 3 (IL3) (p = 0.02), interleukin 6 (IL6) (p = 0.006), interleukin 8 (IL8) (p = 0.02), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (p = 0.048), monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG) (p = 0.016), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) (p = 0.004) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) (p = 0.006). Macular thickness was significantly associated with the concentrations of EGF (p = 0.001), HGF (p = 0.02), ICAM1 (p = 0.001), interleukin 12p40 (p = 0.006), IL 1a2 (p = 0.002), MIG (p = 0.001), MMP9 (p < 0.001) and PAI1 (p = 0.01). Interleukin 6 and MCP-1 showed significant associations with the height of retinal pigment epithelium detachment. Numerous cytokines are associated with the presence and the amount of exudative AMD. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  6. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--Novel targets for designing treatment options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Felix; Fauser, Sascha; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the central retina and the main cause of legal blindness in industrialized countries. Risk to develop the disease is conferred by both individual as well as genetic factors with the latter being increasingly deciphered over the last decade. Therapeutically, striking advances have been made for the treatment of the neovascular form of late stage AMD while for the late stage atrophic form of the disease, which accounts for almost half of the visually impaired, there is currently no effective therapy on the market. This review highlights our current knowledge on the genetic architecture of early and late stage AMD and explores its potential for the discovery of novel, target-guided treatment options. We reflect on current clinical and experimental therapies for all forms of AMD and specifically note a persisting lack of efficacy for treatment in atrophic AMD. We further explore the current insight in AMD-associated genes and pathways and critically question whether this knowledge is suited to design novel treatment options. Specifically, we point out that known genetic factors associated with AMD govern the risk to develop disease and thus may not play a role in its severity or progression. Treatments based on such knowledge appear appropriate rather for prevention than treatment of manifest disease. As a consequence, future research in AMD needs to be greatly focused on approaches relevant to the patients and their medical needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Risks of newly onset hemorrhagic stroke in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Ju Annabelle; Cheng, Ching-Lan; Lee, Cheng-Han; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye disease causing blindness in the elderly. It shares many common possible pathogenic mechanisms with cardiovascular diseases. Many studies have discussed the association between AMD and stroke, but the results were inconsistent. Our aim was to determine the associations between neovascular AMD and the risk of stroke in the Taiwanese population. This is a retrospective cohort study. We used claims data from National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients aged more than 45 years without stroke, myocardial infarction, or any AMD were selected from 2001 to 2008 and followed until 2010. The index date was defined as the date of nAMD diagnosis (ICD-9 code, 362.52). The comparison group was patients without an nAMD diagnosis with age- and sex-matched to nAMD subjects at a ratio of up to 10 to 1. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were used. The incidence of stroke events (ICD-9 codes, 430-434) and their subtypes (hemorrhagic and ischemic) were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included acute myocardial infarction (AMI), composite AMI/stroke, and all-cause mortality. Patients with nAMD had a higher risk of developing stroke, with an adjusted HR of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.01-1.68). A higher risk for hemorrhagic stroke (HR, 1.70, 95% CI, 1.03-2.83) was also found. No significant differences were observed in ischemic stroke, the composite of AMI/stroke, and all-cause mortality. Patients with nAMD had a significantly higher risk of developing stroke, which was driven mainly by the increased risk of developing the hemorrhagic subtype. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Is age-related macular degeneration associated with stroke among elderly americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-03-08

    To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Population-based cohort study. The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common antecedents between stroke and AMD.

  9. The emotional and physical impact of wet age-related macular degeneration: findings from the wAMD Patient and Caregiver Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varano M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monica Varano,1 Nicole Eter,2 Steve Winyard,3 Kim U Wittrup-Jensen,4 Rafael Navarro,5 Julie Heraghty6 On behalf of the wAMD Patient and Caregiver Survey Committee members 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fondazione GB Bietti-IRCCS, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 3Department of Policy and Campaigns, Royal National Institute of Blind People, London, UK; 4Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany; 5Instituto de Microcirugia Ocular, Barcelona, Spain; 6Macular Disease Foundation Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia Objectives: This was a cross-sectional survey to evaluate the physical and emotional impact of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD on a global cohort of patients who were receiving (or had previously received antivascular endothelial growth factor injections, and caregivers (paid and unpaid.Methods: The survey was performed in nine countries using an ophthalmologist-devised questionnaire.Results: A total of 910 patients and 890 caregivers completed the questionnaire. Most patients had been diagnosed and receiving antivascular endothelial growth factor injections for more than 1 year (74.7% and 63.8%, respectively, and many patients (82.1% received support from a caregiver (usually a child/grandchild [47.3%] or partner [23.3%]. wAMD had a negative impact on most patients (71.6%; many rated fear (44.9%, sadness (39.9%, frustration (37.3%, and depression (34.0% as common. It was linked to physical consequences, such as difficulty in reading (61.1%. Many effects were significantly greater in patients with a longer duration of disease or with wAMD in both eyes. Some caregivers (unpaid also reported that caregiving had a negative impact on them (31.1%; many reported emotions such as sadness (34.9% and depression (24.4%, but many also felt useful (48.4%. Overall, 27.2% of caregivers (unpaid rated caregiving as inconvenient; this was linked to days of employment/personal obligations missed

  10. Current Treatment Limitations in Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Future Approaches Based on Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Robredo, P.; Sancho, A.; Johnen, S.; Recalde, S.; Gama, N.; Thumann, G.; Groll, J.; García-Layana, A.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. With an ageing population, it is anticipated that the number of AMD cases will increase dramatically, making a solution to this debilitating disease an urgent requirement for the socioeconomic future of the European Union and worldwide. The present paper reviews the limitations of the current therapies as well as the socioeconomic impact of the AMD. There is currently no cure available for AMD, and even palliative treatments are rare. Treatment options show several side effects, are of high cost, and only treat the consequence, not the cause of the pathology. For that reason, many options involving cell therapy mainly based on retinal and iris pigment epithelium cells as well as stem cells are being tested. Moreover, tissue engineering strategies to design and manufacture scaffolds to mimic Bruch's membrane are very diverse and under investigation. Both alternative therapies are aimed to prevent and/or cure AMD and are reviewed herein. PMID:24672707

  11. Next-generation sequencing analysis of the ARMS2 gene in Turkish exudative age-related macular degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardak, H; Gunay, M; Ercalik, Y; Bardak, Y; Ozbas, H; Bagci, O

    2017-01-23

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. It is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. To improve clinical management of this condition, it is important to develop risk assessment and prevention strategies for environmental influences, and establish a more effective treatment approach. The aim of the present study was to investigate age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) gene sequences among Turkish patients with exudative AMD. In addition to 39 advanced exudative AMD patients, 250 healthy individuals for whom exome sequencing data were available were included as a control group. Patients with a history of known environmental and systemic AMD risk factors were excluded. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood and analyzed using next-generation sequencing. All coding exons of the ARMS2 gene were assessed. Three different ARMS2 sequence variations (rs10490923, rs2736911, and rs10490924) were identified in both the patient and control group. Within the control group, two further ARMS2 gene variants (rs7088128 and rs36213074) were also detected. Logistic regression analysis revealed a relationship between the rs10490924 polymorphism and AMD in the Turkish population.

  12. Targeted Vision Function Goals and Use of Vision Resources in Ophthalmology Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry W.; Fontenot, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study characterizes self-reported functional vision goals and the use of low vision resources (for example, services and devices) in ophthalmology clinic patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods: From July 2009 to February 2013, we assessed 188 consecutive patients (age 65+;…

  13. Conceitos atuais e perspectivas na prevenção da degeneração macular relacionada à idade Current concepts and perspectives in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogil José de Almeida Torres

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores fazem revisão bibliográfica a respeito dos principais antioxidantes utilizados na prática diária atualmente para prevenção da progressão da degeneração macular relacionada com a idade (DMRI, enfatizando o mecanismo de ação de cada substância bem como as possíveis complicações relacionadas ao uso excessivo destes componentes.The authors prepare a literature review about the main antioxidants used in daily practice for the prevention of age-related macular degeneration progression (AMD, emphasizing the mechanism of action of each substance as well as the possible complications related to the overuse of such components.

  14. Netrin-1 - DCC Signaling Systems and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available We conducted a nested candidate gene study and pathway-based enrichment analysis on data from a multi-national 77,000-person project on the molecular genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD to identify AMD-associated DNA-sequence variants in genes encoding constituents of a netrin-1 (NTN1-based signaling pathway that converges on DNA-binding transcription complexes through a 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-calcineurin (cAMP-CN-dependent axis. AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs existed in 9 linkage disequilibrium-independent genomic regions; these included loci overlapping NTN1 (rs9899630, P ≤ 9.48 x 10(-5, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer--the gene encoding a primary NTN1 receptor (rs8097127, P ≤ 3.03 x 10(-5, and 6 other netrin-related genes. Analysis of the NTN1-DCC pathway with exact methods demonstrated robust enrichment with AMD-associated SNPs (corrected P-value = 0.038, supporting the idea that processes driven by NTN1-DCC signaling systems operate in advanced AMD. The NTN1-DCC pathway contains targets of FDA-approved drugs and may offer promise for guiding applied clinical research on preventive and therapeutic interventions for AMD.

  15. Is Coffee Consumption associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy?

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    Neelam Kumari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Coffee is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between coffee consumption and risk of systemic diseases; however, there is paucity of data in relation to coffee consumption and risk of eye diseases.  This study aims to examine the relationship between coffee consumption and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic retinopathy (DR in multiethnic population of Singapore.   Materials and MethodsWe analyzed the data from 4121 study participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program to examine the relationship of coffee to prevalence of AMD and DR.  A standardized questionnaire that included information about the habitual amount of coffee consumed was completed by all study participants.  Presence and severity of AMD and DR was assessed on fundus photographs using the Mutiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Grading Protocol. ResultsThe prevalence of AMD and DR in our population was 5.4% and 32.0%, respectively. A positive history of coffee consumption was present in 77.5% of AMD population and 76.1% of DR population with majority of participants consuming 1-2 cups of coffee daily.  No statistically significant association was observed between coffee consumption and odds of AMD or DR after adjusting for confounding factors [AMD: Odds Ratio (OR = 1.27, Confidence Interval (CI = 0.88-1.83, p = 0.20; DR: OR = 1.36, CI = 0.69-2.69, p = 0.37.  ConclusionThis epidemiological study of a large multiethnic population data set do not support the hypothesis that habitual intake of coffee and caffeine is associated with an altered risk of AMD and DR among Asians.

  16. The role of the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in protecting against age-related macular degeneration: a review based on controversial evidence.

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    Mozaffarieh, Maneli; Sacu, Stefan; Wedrich, Andreas

    2003-12-11

    A review of the role of the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, and their function in altering the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Medline and Embase search. Recent evidence introduces the possibility that lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids found in a variety of fruits and vegetables may protect against the common eye disease of macular degeneration. This potential and the lack to slow the progression of macular degeneration, has fueled high public interest in the health benefits of these carotenoids and prompted their inclusion in various supplements. The body of evidence supporting a role in this disease ranges from basic studies in experimental animals to various other clinical and epidemiological studies. Whilst some epidemiological studies suggest a beneficial role for carotenoids in the prevention of AMD, others are found to be unrelated to it. Results of some clinical studies indicate that the risk for AMD is reduced when levels of the carotenoids are elevated in the serum or diet, but this correlation is not observed in other studies. Published data concerning the toxicity of the carotenoids or the optimum dosage of these supplements is lacking. An intake of dietary supplied nutrients rich in the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, appears to be beneficial in protecting retinal tissues, but this is not proven. Until scientifically sound knowledge is available we recommend for patients judged to be at risk for AMD to: alter their diet to more dark green leafy vegetables, wear UV protective lenses and a hat when outdoors. Future investigations on the role of nutrition, light exposure, genetics, and combinations of photodynamic therapy with intravitreal steroid (triamcinolone-acetonide) injections hold potential for future treatment possibilities.

  17. Towards early detection of age-related macular degeneration with tetracyclines and FLIM

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    Szmacinski, Henryk; Hegde, Kavita; Zeng, Hui-Hui; Eslami, Katayoun; Puche, Adam; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Lengyel, Imre; Thompson, Richard B.

    2018-02-01

    Recently, we discovered microscopic spherules of hydroxyapatite (HAP) in aged human sub-retinal pigment epithelial (sub-RPE) deposits in the retinas of aged humans (PMID: 25605911), and developed evidence that the spherules may act to nucleate the growth of sub-RPE deposits such as drusen. Drusen are clinical hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We found that tetracycline-family antibiotics, long known to stain HAP in teeth and bones, also stained the HAP spherules, but in general the HAP-bound fluorescence excitation and emission spectra overlapped with the well-known autofluorescence of the RPE overlying drusen, making them difficult to resolve. However, we also found that certain tetracyclines exhibited substantial increases in fluorescence lifetime upon binding to HAP, and moreover these lifetimes were substantially greater than those previously observed (Dysli, et al., 2014) for autofluorescence in the human retina in vivo. Thus we were able to image the HAP spherules by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in cadaveric retinas of aged humans. These findings suggest that FLIM imaging of tetracycline binding to HAP could become a diagnostic tool for the development and progression of AMD.

  18. Macular Atrophy Development and Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treated Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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    Zarubina, Anna V; Gal-Or, Orly; Huisingh, Carrie E; Owsley, Cynthia; Freund, K Bailey

    2017-12-01

    To explore the association between presence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) at baseline in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) with the development of macular atrophy (MA) during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. There were 74 eyes without pre-existing MA receiving anti-VEGF therapy for nAMD for 2 years or longer analyzed. At least two image modalities that included spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography, and color fundus photos were used to assess for SDD presence, phenotype (dot and ribbon), and location, neovascularization type, and MA. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations assessed the association between SDD and the development of MA adjusting for age, neovascularization type, and choroidal thickness. SDD were present in 46 eyes (63%) at baseline. MA developed in 38 eyes (51%) during the mean of 4.7 ± 1.2 years of follow-up. Compared with eyes without SDD, those with SDD at baseline were 3.0 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-8.5, P = 0.0343) more likely to develop MA. Eyes with SDD present in the inferior macula and inferior extramacular fields at baseline were 3.0 times and 6.5 times more likely to develop MA at follow-up than eyes without SDD in these locations (95% CI 1.0-8.9, P = 0.0461 and 95% CI 1.3-32.4, P = 0.0218, respectively). MA development was not associated with a specific SDD phenotype. MA frequently developed in eyes during anti-VEGF treatment. SDD were independently associated with MA development. The extension of SDD into the inferior fundus, particularly in the inferior extramacular field, conferred higher odds of subsequent MA development.

  19. The effect of non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration on face recognition performance.

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    Taylor, Deanna J; Smith, Nicholas D; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P

    2018-04-01

    There is a well-established research base surrounding face recognition in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, much of this existing research does not differentiate between results obtained for 'wet' AMD and 'dry' AMD. Here, we test the hypothesis that face recognition performance is worse in patients with dry AMD compared with visually healthy peers. Patients (>60 years of age, logMAR binocular visual acuity 0.7 or better) with dry AMD of varying severity and visually healthy age-related peers (controls) completed a modified version of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT). Percentage of correctly identified faces was used as an outcome measure for performance for each participant. A 90% normative reference limit was generated from the distribution of CFMT scores recorded in the visually healthy controls. Scores for AMD participants were then specifically compared to this limit, and comparisons between average scores in the AMD severity groups were investigated. Thirty patients (median [interquartile range] age of 76 [70, 79] years) and 34 controls (median age of 70 [64, 75] years) were examined. Four, seventeen and nine patients were classified as having early, intermediate and late AMD (geographic atrophy) respectively. Five (17%) patients recorded a face recognition performance worse than the 90% limit (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.46) set by controls; four of these had geographic atrophy. Patients with geographic atrophy identified fewer faces on average (±SD) (61% ± 22%) than those with early and intermediate AMD (75 ± 11%) and controls (74% ± 11%). People with dry AMD may not suffer from problems with face recognition until the disease is in its later stages; those with late AMD (geographic atrophy) are likely to have difficulty recognising faces. The results from this study should influence the management and expectations of patients with dry AMD in both community practice and hospital clinics.

  20. Psychosocial Adaptation to Visual Impairment and Its Relationship to Depressive Affect in Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Tolman, Jennifer; Hill, Robert D.; Kleinschmidt, Julia J.; Gregg, Charles H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we examined psychosocial adaptation to vision loss and its relationship to depressive symptomatology in legally blind older adults with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Design and Methods: The 144 study participants were outpatients of a large regional vision clinic that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of…

  1. Changes in Fundus Autofluorescence after Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor According to the Type of Choroidal Neovascularization in Age-related Macular Degeneration.

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    Lee, Ji Young; Chung, Hyewon; Kim, Hyung Chan

    2016-02-01

    To describe the changes of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) in patients with age-related macular degeneration before and after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor according to the type of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and to evaluate the correlation of FAF with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) parameters and vision. This was a retrospective study. Twenty-one treatment-naïve patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration were included. Study eyes were divided into two groups according to the type of CNV. Fourteen eyes were type 1 CNV and seven eyes were type 2 CNV. All eyes underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including an assessment of best-corrected visual acuity, SD-OCT, fluorescein angiography, and FAF imaging, before and 3 months after intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection. Gray scales of FAF image for CNV areas, delineated as in fluorescein angiography, were analyzed using the ImageJ program, which were adjusted by comparison with normal background areas. Correlation of changes in FAF with changes in SD-OCT parameters, including CNV thickness, photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction disruption length, external limiting membrane disruption length, central macular thickness, subretinal fluid, and intraretinal fluid were analyzed. Eyes with both type 1 and type 2 CNV showed reduced FAF before treatment. The mean gray scales (%) of type 1 and type 2 CNV were 52.20% and 42.55%, respectively. The background values were 106.72 and 96.86. After treatment, the mean gray scales (%) of type 1 CNV and type 2 CNV were changed to 57.61% (p = 0.005) and 57.93% (p = 0.008), respectively. After treatment, CNV thickness, central macular thickness, and inner and outer segment junction disruption length were decreased while FAF increased. FAF was noted to be reduced in eyes with newly diagnosed wet age-related macular degeneration, but increased after anti

  2. Subretinal hyper-reflective material seen on optical coherence tomography as a biomarker for disease monitoring in age-related macular degeneration

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    Lee, H. B.; Ong, B. B.; Katta, M.; Yvon, C.; Lu, L.; Zakri, R.; Patel, N.

    2018-03-01

    Subretinal hyper-reflective material (SHRM) seen on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is thought to be a collection of fibrous tissues and vascular networks that are identified in age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). We have carried out a retrospective analysis of 91 OCT scans of neovascular ARMD subtypes including classic and occult choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). All three subtypes received ranibizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (Anti-VEGF) intravitreal injections on an as-needed basis following the loading doses. Volumes of SHRM were calculated using caliper measurements of maximal height and length of SHRM seen on OCT. The ellipsoid formula derived from tumour models was used to calculate the volume. It was found that occult CNV and RAP have larger SHRM volumes than those of classic CNV. SHRM volumes reduced overall following loading doses of Anti-VEGF injections at 4 months in all three subtypes. However, a rebound increase in volume was noticed in both occult CNV and RAP cohort at 12 months despite the initial, steeper reductions in the subtypes. These findings were consistent with the data seen in volume measurement using Topcon's automated segmentation algorithm in a smaller cohort of patients. We propose that SHRM should be used as a potential biomarker to quantify both disease progression and prognosis of neovascular ARMD alongside other conventional methods.

  3. Baseline data from a multicenter, 5-year, prospective cohort study of Japanese age-related macular degeneration: an AMD2000 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Nakanishi, Hideo; Nakatani, Eiji; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2018-03-01

    To report research participants' baseline characteristics in the AMD2000 study, a prospective, multicenter, 5-year, observational cohort study of Japanese age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The characteristics were determined using multimodal imaging. Patients with AMD were recruited at 18 clinical sites in Japan between April 2006 and March 2009. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (Landolt chart), indirect ophthalmoscopy, slit-lamp biomicroscopy with a contact lens, optical coherence tomography imaging, fundus photography, and fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Four hundred sixty participants (326 men [70.9%]) were included in the study. At enrollment, 131 eyes (28.5%) had hard drusen and 125 eyes (27.2%) had soft drusen in the macular area. A total of 455 eyes (98.9%) were diagnosed as having wet AMD, and 5 eyes (1.1%), as having dry AMD. Of the 455 eyes with wet AMD, 209 eyes (45.4%) had typical AMD, 228 eyes (49.6%) had polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), and 18 eyes (3.9%) had retinal angiomatous proliferation. The size of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was significantly smaller with indocyanine green angiography than with fluorescein angiography (P macular edema, older age, scar, extrafoveal macular edema, subfoveal CNV, large branching vascular network, and hard exudates. Japanese patients with AMD are predominantly male, lack drusen, and have a high rate of PCV.

  4. Automated age-related macular degeneration classification in OCT using unsupervised feature learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhuizen, Freerk G.; van Ginneken, Bram; Bloemen, Bart; van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Philipsen, Rick; Hoyng, Carel; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2015-03-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a common eye disorder with high prevalence in elderly people. The disease mainly affects the central part of the retina, and could ultimately lead to permanent vision loss. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is becoming the standard imaging modality in diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of its progression. However, the evaluation of the obtained volumetric scan is time consuming, expensive and the signs of early AMD are easy to miss. In this paper we propose a classification method to automatically distinguish AMD patients from healthy subjects with high accuracy. The method is based on an unsupervised feature learning approach, and processes the complete image without the need for an accurate pre-segmentation of the retina. The method can be divided in two steps: an unsupervised clustering stage that extracts a set of small descriptive image patches from the training data, and a supervised training stage that uses these patches to create a patch occurrence histogram for every image on which a random forest classifier is trained. Experiments using 384 volume scans show that the proposed method is capable of identifying AMD patients with high accuracy, obtaining an area under the Receiver Operating Curve of 0:984. Our method allows for a quick and reliable assessment of the presence of AMD pathology in OCT volume scans without the need for accurate layer segmentation algorithms.

  5. Evaluation of cardiovascular biomarkers in patients with age-related wet macular degeneration

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    Keles S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sadullah Keles,1 Orhan Ates,1 Baki Kartal,2 Hamit Hakan Alp,3 Metin Ekinci,4 Erdinc Ceylan,2 Osman Ondas,5 Eren Arpali,2 Semih Dogan,6 Kenan Yildirim,7 Mevlut Sait Keles8 1Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Regional Training and Research Hospital, Erzurum, Turkey; 3Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey; 4Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, Turkey; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Erbaa Government Hospital, Tokat, Turkey; 6Department of Ophthalmology, Kolan Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 7Department of Ophthalmology, Igdir Government Hospital, Igdir, Turkey; 8Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey Aim: To evaluate levels of homocysteine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, and nitric oxide (NO, as well as activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: The levels of homocysteine, ADMA, and NO and activity of eNOS in patients who were diagnosed with wet AMD by fundus fluorescein angiography (n=30 were compared to a control group with no retinal pathology (n=30.Results: Levels of homocysteine and ADMA were found to be significantly higher in the wet AMD group than in the control group (P<0.001, whereas NO levels and eNOS activity were higher in the control group (P<0.001. In the wet AMD group, we detected a 2.64- and 0.33-fold increase in the levels of ADMA and homocysteine, respectively, and a 0.49- and 2.41-fold decrease in the eNOS activity and NO level, respectively.Conclusion: Elevated levels of homocysteine and ADMA were observed in patients with wet AMD. Increased ADMA may be responsible for the diminished eNOS activity found in these patients, which in turn contributes to the decrease in NO levels, which likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Keywords: age-related macular

  6. Novel grid combined with peripheral distortion correction for ultra-widefield image grading of age-related macular degeneration

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    Oellers P

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Oellers,1,* Inês Laíns,1,2,* Steven Mach,1 Shady Garas,1 Ivana K Kim,1 Demetrios G Vavvas,1 Joan W Miller,1 Deeba Husain,1 John B Miller1 1Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD often harbor pathological changes in the retinal periphery and perimacular region. These extramacular changes have not been well classified, but may be phenotypically and functionally relevant. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a novel grid to systematically study peripheral retinal abnormalities in AMD using geometric distortion-corrected ultra-widefield (UWF imaging.Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational case series. Consecutive patients with AMD without any other coexisting vitreoretinal disease and control patients over age 50 without AMD or any other vitreoretinal disease were imaged using Optos 200 Tx. Captured 200° UWF images were corrected for peripheral geometric distortion using Optos transformation software. A newly developed grid to study perimacular and peripheral abnormalities in AMD was then projected onto the images.Results: Peripheral and perimacular changes such as drusen, retinal pigment epithelium changes and atrophy were found in patients with AMD. The presented grid in conjunction with geometric distortion-corrected UWF images allowed for systematic study of these peripheral changes in AMD.Conclusion: We present a novel grid to study peripheral and posterior pole changes in AMD. The grid is unique in that it adds a perimacular zone, which may be important in characterizing certain phenotypes in AMD. Our UWF images were corrected for geometric peripheral distortion to accurately reflect the anatomical dimensions of the retina. This grid offers a reliable and reproducible foundation

  7. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Measurement with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Simon K. Law

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT and Age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods: Patients >60 years of age without glaucoma or record of intraocular pressure >21 mmHg and no systemic or intraocular diseases or treatment or surgical intervention that affected the RNFL underwent OCT measurement of the RNFL. The severity of AMD was staged with the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System. The relationship between RNFL measurements and AMD stages of one eye per patient was analyzed. Results: Eighty-six eyes (46 patients with AMD and no glaucoma or other exclusion criteria received OCT RNFL measurements. Nine eyes (10.5% were excluded because of distorted peripapillary anatomy from exudative AMD (7 eyes or failure of the RNFL segmentation algorithm (2 eyes. Mean age ± S.D. of the 43 patients analyzed was 81.2 ± 7.3 years. The mean stage ± S.D. of AMD of the 77 eyes was 3.77 ± 1.05. Higher stages of AMD were statistically significantly associated with lower average RNFL and inferior sector RNFL (p = 0.049, 0 0015, respectively. The association of inferior sector RNFL and AMD stage remained statistically significant after adjusting for age. Conclusions: Spectral domain OCT is generally useful in measuring the peripapillary RNFL in eyes with different stages of AMD. Higher stage of AMD is associated with thinner peripapillary RNFL, which may masquerade as early glaucomatous damage.

  8. Differential Disease Progression in Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Late-Onset Stargardt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Moritz; Lambertus, Stanley; Mauschitz, Matthias M; Bax, Nathalie M; Kersten, Eveline; Lüning, Anna; Nadal, Jennifer; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Schmid, Matthias; Holz, Frank G; Hoyng, Carel B; Fleckenstein, Monika

    2017-02-01

    To compare the disease course of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy secondary to age-related macula degeneratio (AMD) and late-onset Stargardt disease (STGD1). Patients were examined longitudinally by fundus autofluorescence, near-infrared reflectance imaging, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Areas of RPE atrophy were quantified using semi-automated software, and the status of the fovea was evaluated based on autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance images. Mixed-effects models were used to compare atrophy progression rates. BCVA loss and loss of foveal integrity were analyzed using Turnbull's estimator. A total of 151 patients (226 eyes) with RPE atrophy secondary to AMD and 38 patients (66 eyes) with RPE atrophy secondary to late-onset STGD1 were examined for a median time of 2.3 years (interquartile range, 2.7). Mean baseline age was 74.2 years (SD, 7.6) in AMD and 63.4 (SD, 9.9) in late-onset STGD1 (P = 1.1 × 10-7). Square root atrophy progression was significantly faster in AMD when compared with late-onset STGD1 (0.28 mm/year [SE, 0.01] vs. 0.23 [SE, 0.03]; P = 0.030). In late-onset STGD1, the median survival of the fovea was significantly longer when compared with eyes with AMD (8.60 vs. 3.35 years; P = 0.005) with a trend to a later BCVA loss of ≥3 lines (5.97 vs. 4.37 years; P = 0.382). These natural history data indicate differential disease progression in AMD versus late-onset STGD1. The results underline the relevance of refined phenotyping in elderly patients presenting with RPE atrophy in regard to prognosis and design of interventional trials.

  9. Age-related macular degeneration: using morphological predictors to modify current treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohammed; Souka, Ahmed; Adelman, Ron A

    2018-03-01

    To assess predictors of treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in an attempt to develop a patient-centric treatment algorithm. We conducted a systematic search using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science for prognostic indicators/predictive factors with the key words: 'age related macular degeneration', 'neovascular AMD', 'choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV)', 'anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF)', 'aflibercept', 'ranibizumab', 'bevacizumab', 'randomized clinical trials', 'post-hoc', 'prognostic', 'predictive', 'response' 'injection frequency, 'treat and extend (TAE), 'pro re nata (PRN)', 'bi-monthly' and 'quarterly'. We only included studies that had an adequate period of follow-up (>1 year), a single predefined treatment regimen with a predetermined re-injection criteria, an adequate number of patients, specific morphological [optical coherence tomography (OCT)] criteria that predicted final visual outcomes and injection frequency and did not include switching from one drug to the other. We were able to identify seven prospective studies and 16 retrospective studies meeting our inclusion criteria. There are several morphological and demographic prognostic indicators that can predict response to therapy in wet AMD. Smaller CNV size, subretinal fluid (SRF), retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and response to therapy at 12 weeks (visual, angiographic or OCT) can all predict good visual outcomes in patients receiving anti-VEGF therapy. Patients with larger CNV, older age, pigment epithelial detachment (PED), intraretinal cysts (IRC) and vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) achieved less visual gains. Patients having VMA/VMT required more intensive treatment with increased treatment frequency. Patients with both posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and SRF require infrequent injections. Patients with PED are prone to recurrences of fluid activity with a reduction in visual acuity (VA). A regimen that involves less intensive

  10. Exploring the cross talk between ER stress and inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Samira Kheitan

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is implicated in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease. However the cross talk between these cellular mechanisms has not been clearly and fully understood. The present study investigates a possible intersection between ER stress and inflammation in AMD. In this study, we recruited two collections of involved protein markers to retrieve their interaction information from IMEx-curated databases, which are the most well- known protein-protein interaction collections, allowing us to design an intersection network for AMD that is unprecedented. In order to find expression activated subnetworks, we utilized AMD expression profiles in our network. In addition, we studied topological characteristics of the most expressed active subnetworks to identify the hubs. With regard to topological quantifications and expressional activity, we reported a list of the most pivotal hubs which are potentially applicable as probable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, we introduced MAPK signaling pathway as a significantly involved pathway in the association between ER stress and inflammation, leading to promising new directions in discovering AMD formation mechanisms and possible treatments.

  11. Exploring the cross talk between ER stress and inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheitan, Samira; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease. However the cross talk between these cellular mechanisms has not been clearly and fully understood. The present study investigates a possible intersection between ER stress and inflammation in AMD. In this study, we recruited two collections of involved protein markers to retrieve their interaction information from IMEx-curated databases, which are the most well- known protein-protein interaction collections, allowing us to design an intersection network for AMD that is unprecedented. In order to find expression activated subnetworks, we utilized AMD expression profiles in our network. In addition, we studied topological characteristics of the most expressed active subnetworks to identify the hubs. With regard to topological quantifications and expressional activity, we reported a list of the most pivotal hubs which are potentially applicable as probable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, we introduced MAPK signaling pathway as a significantly involved pathway in the association between ER stress and inflammation, leading to promising new directions in discovering AMD formation mechanisms and possible treatments.

  12. DYNAMISM OF DOT SUBRETINAL DRUSENOID DEPOSITS IN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION DEMONSTRATED WITH ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Godara, Pooja; Zhang, Tianjiao; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the natural history of dot subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) in age-related macular degeneration, using high-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Six eyes of four patients with intermediate age-related macular degeneration were studied at baseline and 1 year later. Individual dot SDD within the central 30° retina were examined with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography. A total of 269 solitary SDD were identified at baseline. Over 12.25 ± 1.18 months, all 35 Stage 1 SDD progressed to advanced stages. Eighteen (60%) Stage 2 lesions progressed to Stage 3 and 12 (40%) remained at Stage 2. Of 204 Stage 3 SDD, 12 (6.4%) disappeared and the rest remained. Twelve new SDD were identified, including 6 (50%) at Stage 1, 2 (16.7%) at Stage 2, and 4 (33.3%) at Stage 3. The mean percentage of the retina affected by dot SDD, measured by the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, increased in 5/6 eyes (from 2.31% to 5.08% in the most changed eye) and decreased slightly in 1/6 eye (from 10.67% to 10.54%). Dynamism, the absolute value of the areas affected by new and regressed lesions, ranged from 0.7% to 9.3%. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy reveals that dot SDD, like drusen, are dynamic.

  13. An exploratory study evaluating the effects of macular carotenoid supplementation in various retinal diseases

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    Crosby-Nwaobi R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Crosby-Nwaobi, Philip Hykin, Tunde Peto, Sobha Sivaprasad NIHR Clinical Research Facility, NIHR Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of daily oral supplementation with Macushield (10 mg/d meso-zeaxanthin, 10 mg/d lutein, and 2 mg/d zeaxanthin on eye health in patients with retinal diseases by assessing the macular pigment (MP profile, the visual function, and the quality of life. Methods: Fifty-one patients with various retinal diseases were supplemented daily and followed up for 6 months. The MP optical density was measured using the customized heterochromatic flicker photometry and dual-wavelength autofluorescence. Visual function was evaluated by assessing the change in best corrected visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and glare sensitivity in mesopic and photopic conditions. Vision-related and general quality of life changes were determined using the National Eye Insititute- Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI-VFQ-25 and EuroQoL-5 dimension questionnaires. Results: A statistically significant increase in the MP optical density was observed using the dual-wavelength autofluorescence (P=0.04 but not with the customized heterochromatic flicker photometry. Statistically significant (P<0.05 improvements in glare sensitivity in low and medium spatial frequencies were observed at 3 months and 6 months. Ceiling effects confounded other visual function tests and quality of life changes. Conclusion: Supplementation with the three carotenoids enhances certain aspects of visual performance in retinal diseases. Keywords: macular pigment optical density, diabetes, central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration

  14. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Xueyu Chen

    Full Text Available We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs and standardized mean differences (SMD of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled.In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56. The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13.Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  15. Serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyu; Jhanji, Vishal; Chen, Chupeng; Chen, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology abstracts were searched to identify studies investigating the serological association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with age-related macular degeneration. The quality of original studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Heterogeneity was explored with meta-regression. The odds ratios (ORs) and standardized mean differences (SMD) of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection between AMD patients and controls were pooled. In total, 9 studies met the inclusion criteria using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale scores ranging from 4 to 9. There was heterogeneity among studies due to a difference in the study designs and measurement of exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. The overall OR of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with AMD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.57, P = 0.56). The overall SMD of antibody titer between AMD and control was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: -0.12 to 0.99, P = 0.13). Evidence from the current published literature suggested no statistically significant association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and AMD.

  16. Repressed SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway and mitochondrial disintegration in iPSC-derived RPE disease model of age-related macular degeneration.

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    Golestaneh, Nady; Chu, Yi; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Cao, Hong; Poliakov, Eugenia; Berinstein, Daniel M

    2016-12-20

    Study of age related macular degeneration (AMD) has been hampered by lack of human models that represent the complexity of the disease. Here we have developed a human in vitro disease model of AMD to investigate the underlying AMD disease mechanisms. Generation of iPSCs from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of AMD donors, age-matched normal donors, skin fibroblasts of a dry AMD patient, and differentiation of iPSCs into RPE (AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE, normal RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE, respectively). Immunostaining, cell viability assay and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under oxidative stress conditions, electron microscopy (EM) imaging, ATP production and glycogen concentration assays, quantitative real time PCR, western blot, karyotyping. The AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE present functional impairment and exhibit distinct disease phenotypes compared to RPE-iPSC-RPE generated from normal donors (Normal RPE-iPSC-RPE). The AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE show increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under stress in accordance with recent reports. The susceptibility to oxidative stress-induced cell death in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and Skin-iPSC-RPE was consistent with inability of the AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and Skin-iPSC-RPE to increase SOD2 expression under oxidative stress. Phenotypic analysis revealed disintegrated mitochondria, accumulation of autophagosomes and lipid droplets in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE. Mitochondrial activity was significantly lower in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin-iPSC-RPE compared to normal cells and glycogen concentration was significantly increased in the diseased cells. Furthermore, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function was repressed, and lower expression levels of NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin1 (SIRT1) were found in AMD RPE-iPSC-RPE and AMD Skin

  17. Ex Vivo Confocal Spectroscopy of Autofluorescence in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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    Joel Kaluzny

    Full Text Available We investigated the autofluorescence (AF signature of the microscopic features of retina with age-related macular degeneration (AMD using 488 nm excitation.The globes of four donors with AMD and four age-matched controls were embedded in paraffin and sectioned through the macula. Sections were excited using a 488 nm argon laser, and the AF emission was captured using a laser scanning confocal microscope (496-610 nm, 6 nm resolution. The data cubes were then analyzed to compare peak emission spectra between the AMD and the controls. Microscopic features, including individual lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin granules, Bruch's Membrane, as well macroscopic features, were considered.Overall, the AMD eyes showed a trend of blue-shifted emission peaks compared with the controls. These differences were statistically significant when considering the emission of the combined RPE/Bruch's Membrane across all the tissue cross-sections (p = 0.02.The AF signatures of ex vivo AMD RPE/BrM show blue-shifted emission spectra (488 nm excitation compared with the control tissue. The magnitude of these differences is small (~4 nm and highlights the potential challenges of detecting these subtle spectral differences in vivo.

  18. Subfoveal choroidal thickness predicts macular atrophy in age-related macular degeneration: results from the TREX-AMD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; Abdelfattah, Nizar Saleh; Uji, Akihito; Lei, Jianqin; Ip, Michael; Sadda, SriniVas R; Wykoff, Charles C

    2018-03-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between subfoveal choroidal thickness (SCT) and development of macular atrophy (MA) in eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This was a prospective, multicenter study. Sixty participants (120 eyes) in the TREX-AMD trial (NCT01648292) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD (NVAMD) in at least one eye were included. SCT was measured by certified reading center graders at baseline using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). The baseline SCT was correlated with the presence of MA at baseline and development of incident MA by month 18. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for information from both eyes. Baseline SCT in eyes with MA was statistically significantly less than in those without MA in both the dry AMD (DAMD) (P = 0.04) and NVAMD (P = 0.01) groups. Comparison of baseline SCT between MA developers and non-MA developers revealed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.03). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis showed the cut-off threshold of SCT for predicting the development of MA in cases without MA at baseline was 124 μm (AUC = 0.772; Sensitivity = 0.923; Specificity = 0.5). Among eyes without MA at baseline, those with baseline SCT ≤124 μm were 4.3 times more likely to develop MA (Odds ratio: 4.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.6-12, P = 0.005) than those with baseline SCT >124 μm. Eyes with AMD and MA had less SCT than those without MA. Eyes with less baseline SCT also appear to be at higher risk to develop MA within 18 months.

  19. Cone photopigment in older subjects: decreased optical density in early age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Burns, Stephen A.; Weiter, John J.

    2002-01-01

    We measured changes to cone photoreceptors in patients with early age-related macular degeneration. The data of 53 patients were compared with normative data for color matching measurements of long- and middle-wavelength-sensitive cones in the central macula. A four-parameter model quantified cone photopigment optical density and kinetics. Cone photopigment optical density was on average less for the patients than for normal subjects and was uncorrelated with visual acuity. More light was needed to reduce the photopigment density by 50% in the steady state for patients. These results imply that cone photopigment optical density is reduced by factors other than slowed kinetics.

  20. The role of the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, in protecting against age-related macular degeneration: A review based on controversial evidence

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    Sacu Stefan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A review of the role of the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, and their function in altering the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods Medline and Embase search. Results Recent evidence introduces the possibility that lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids found in a variety of fruits and vegetables may protect against the common eye disease of macular degeneration. This potential and the lack to slow the progression of macular degeneration, has fueled high public interest in the health benefits of these carotenoids and prompted their inclusion in various supplements. The body of evidence supporting a role in this disease ranges from basic studies in experimental animals to various other clinical and epidemiological studies. Whilst some epidemiological studies suggest a beneficial role for carotenoids in the prevention of AMD, others are found to be unrelated to it. Results of some clinical studies indicate that the risk for AMD is reduced when levels of the carotenoids are elevated in the serum or diet, but this correlation is not observed in other studies. Published data concerning the toxicity of the carotenoids or the optimum dosage of these supplements is lacking. Conclusion An intake of dietary supplied nutrients rich in the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, appears to be beneficial in protecting retinal tissues, but this is not proven. Until scientifically sound knowledge is available we recommend for patients judged to be at risk for AMD to: alter their diet to more dark green leafy vegetables, wear UV protective lenses and a hat when outdoors. Future investigations on the role of nutrition, light exposure, genetics, and combinations of photodynamic therapy with intravitreal steroid (triamcinolone-acetonide injections hold potential for future treatment possibilities.

  1. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Yafeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007. High levels of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05. The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05. The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions.

  2. Assessing quality of life in the treatment of patients with age-related macular degeneration: clinical research findings and recommendations for clinical practice

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    Yuzawa M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuko Yuzawa,1 Kyoko Fujita,1 Erika Tanaka,2 Edward C Y Wang21Department of Ophthalmology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Surugadai, Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bayer Yakuhin Ltd, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The importance of incorporating quality-of-life (QoL assessments into medical practice is growing as health care practice shifts from a “disease-based” to a “patient-centered” model. The prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD is increasing in today’s aging population. The purpose of this paper is: (1 to discuss, by reviewing the current literature, the impact of AMD on patients’ QoL and the utility of QoL assessments in evaluating the impact of AMD and its treatment; and (2 to make a recommendation for incorporating QoL into clinical practice.Methods: We conducted a PubMed and an open Internet search to identify publications on the measurement of QoL in AMD, as well as the impact of AMD and the effect of treatment on QoL. A total of 28 articles were selected.Results: AMD has been found to cause a severity-dependent decrement in QoL that is comparable to systemic diseases such as cancer, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. QoL impairment manifests as greater social dependence, difficulty with daily living, higher rates of clinical depression, increased risk of falls, premature admission to nursing homes, and suicide. The National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25 is the most widely used eye disease-specific QoL instrument in AMD. It has been shown to correlate significantly with visual acuity (VA. QoL reflects aspects of AMD including psychological well-being, functional capacity, and the ability to perform patients’ valued activities, which are not captured by a single, numerical VA score.Conclusion: The literature shows that the adverse impact of AMD on QoL is comparable to serious systemic disease. Eye disease

  3. Automated detection of exudative age-related macular degeneration in spectral domain optical coherence tomography using deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, Maximilian; Lauermann, Jost Lennart; Eter, Nicole

    2018-02-01

    Our purpose was to use deep learning for the automated detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A total of 1112 cross-section SD-OCT images of patients with exudative AMD and a healthy control group were used for this study. In the first step, an open-source multi-layer deep convolutional neural network (DCNN), which was pretrained with 1.2 million images from ImageNet, was trained and validated with 1012 cross-section SD-OCT scans (AMD: 701; healthy: 311). During this procedure training accuracy, validation accuracy and cross-entropy were computed. The open-source deep learning framework TensorFlow™ (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA) was used to accelerate the deep learning process. In the last step, a created DCNN classifier, using the information of the above mentioned deep learning process, was tested in detecting 100 untrained cross-section SD-OCT images (AMD: 50; healthy: 50). Therefore, an AMD testing score was computed: 0.98 or higher was presumed for AMD. After an iteration of 500 training steps, the training accuracy and validation accuracies were 100%, and the cross-entropy was 0.005. The average AMD scores were 0.997 ± 0.003 in the AMD testing group and 0.9203 ± 0.085 in the healthy comparison group. The difference between the two groups was highly significant (p deep learning-based approach using TensorFlow™, it is possible to detect AMD in SD-OCT with high sensitivity and specificity. With more image data, an expansion of this classifier for other macular diseases or further details in AMD is possible, suggesting an application for this model as a support in clinical decisions. Another possible future application would involve the individual prediction of the progress and success of therapy for different diseases by automatically detecting hidden image information.

  4. Very early disease manifestations of macular telangiectasia type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, P.C.; Heeren, T.F.C.; Kupitz, E.H.; Holz, F.G.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.

    Background: To report very early morphologic and functional alterations in patients with macular telangiectasia type 2. Methods: Patients with asymmetric disease manifestations, in whom retinal alterations characteristic for macular telangiectasia type 2 were present in one but not in the apparently

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency in Community-Dwelling Elderly Is Not Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Merle, Bénédicte M J; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Féart, Catherine; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2015-08-01

    Elderly persons are at elevated risk of vitamin D deficiency, which is involved in various health problems. However, its relation with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is debated. We investigated factors associated with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] deficiency and the associations between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations and AMD in elderly subjects. Antioxydants, Lipides Essentiels, Nutrition et maladies OculaiRes (ALIENOR) is a population-based study on eye diseases performed in elderly residents of Bordeaux, France. Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were assessed from blood samples and categorized as D status were examined with multinomial logistic regression analysis. Associations between AMD and plasma 25(OH)D status were estimated using generalized estimating equation logistic regressions. Six hundred ninety-seven subjects with complete data were included. The prevalence of plasma 25(OH)D deficiency and insufficiency were 27.3% and 55.9%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly associated with older age (P = 0.0007), females (P = 0.0007), absence of physical activity (P = 0.01), absence of vitamin D supplementation (P D insufficiency or deficiency (OR: 0.71, P = 0.12; OR: 0.73, P = 0.23, respectively) or with late AMD (OR: 1.04, P = 0.93; OR: 0.74, P = 0.59, respectively). These findings underline the very high prevalence of plasma 25(OH)D deficiency in this elderly population but do not support a specific role for vitamin D in AMD. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Analysis of rare variants in the CFH gene in patients with the cuticular drusen subtype of age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvvari, M.R.; Saksens, N.T.M.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Jong-Hesse, Y. de; Schick, T.; Nillesen, W.M.; Fauser, S.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jong, E.K.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cuticular drusen (CD), a clinical subtype of AMD, have been linked to genetic variants in the complement factor H (CFH) gene. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of rare variants in the CFH gene in 180 cases with CD. In addition,

  7. Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Associated with Stroke Among Elderly Americans?§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Design: Population-based cohort study. Participants: The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Methods: Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. Main Outcome Measures: In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Results: Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. Conclusion: The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common

  8. Do Nutritional Supplements Have a Role in Age Macular Degeneration Prevention?

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    Maria D. Pinazo-Durán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD, as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX and omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and ω-3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTARED (Spain. Results. High dietary intakes of ω-3 and macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin are associated with lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS showed a beneficial effect of high doses of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and zinc/copper in reducing the rate of progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with one-sided late AMD. The AREDS-2 study has shown that lutein and zeaxanthin may substitute beta-carotene because of its potential relationship with increased lung cancer incidence. Conclusion. Research has proved that elder people with poor diets, especially with low AOX and ω-3 micronutrients intake and subsequently having low plasmatic levels, are more prone to developing AMD. Micronutrient supplementation enhances antioxidant defense and healthy eyes and might prevent/retard/modify AMD.

  9. Reprint of: Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahawita, Shyalle K; Casson, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for an association between Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). A literature search was performed in 5 databases with no restrictions on language or date of publication. Four studies involving 10292 individuals examining the association between aspirin and ARMD met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was carried out by Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software (Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). The pooled odd ratios showed that Aspirin use was associated with early ARMD (pooled odds ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.88). There is a small but statistically significant association between Aspirin use and early ARMD, which may warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evaluation of new and established age-related macular degeneration susceptibility genes in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess whether established and newly reported genetic variants, independent of known lifestyle factors, are associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among women participating in the Women's Health Initiative Sight Exam (WHI-SE) Genetic Ancillary Study. This is a multice...

  11. EFFECT OF INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB ON GANGLION CELL COMPLEX AND PERIPAPILLARY RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION USING SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Cicinelli, Maria V; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Gagliardi, Marco; Accardo, Agostino; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the changes in ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, in central macular thickness and choroidal thickness on spectral domain optical coherence tomography in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injections. All consecutive patients with untreated neovascular age-related macular degeneration received loading phase of three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, followed by retreatments on a pro re nata protocol for 12 months. changes in ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer at the end of follow-up. Secondary outcome: changes in best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, and choroidal thickness at the end of follow-up. Choroidal thickness was measured at 500 μm, 1000 μm, and 1,500 μm intervals nasally, temporally, superiorly, and inferiorly to the fovea, respectively, on horizontal and vertical line scans centered on the fovea. Twenty-four eyes were included. Ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness did not show statistically significant changes through 12 months (55.6 ± 18.5 and 81.9 ± 9.9 μm at baseline, 52.7 ± 19.3 and 84.6 ± 15.5 μm at month 12, P > 0.05). Central macular thickness showed progressive decrease from baseline to month 12, with maximum reduction at month 3 (P macular thickness was significantly reduced at the end of treatment. Further studies, with larger sample, longer follow-up, and greater number of injections, are warranted.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration in a Turkish population

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    Yunus Bulgu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To assess the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene.METHODS: The patients who were diagnosed with AMD were included in this prospective study. Three SNPs (rs1413711, rs2146323, and rs3025033 of the VEGF gene were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples of the 82 patients and 80 controls.RESULTS: The genotype frequencies of rs1413711 and rs2146323 were not significantly different between the study group and the control group (P=0.072 and P=0.058. However, there was a significant difference in the genotype frequencies of these SNPs between the wet type AMD and dry type AMD (P=0.005 and P=0.010, respectively. One of the SNPs (rs1413711 was also found to be associated with the severity of AMD (P=0.001 with significant genotype distribution between early, intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. The ancestral alleles were protective for both SNPs while the polymorphic alleles increased the risk for dry AMD.CONCLUSION: VEGF SNPs rs1413711 and rs2146323 polymorphisms are significantly associated with AMD subtypes in our population.

  13. Effect of lutein intervention on visual function in patients with early age-related macular degeneration

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    Chan Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effect of lutein intervention on visual function of patients with early age-related macular degeneration(AMD. METHODS: Totally 200 early AMD patients were divided into lutein intervention group(20mg/dand placebo group by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trail. Questionnaire investigation, serum lutein concentration and visual function were conducted at baseline, 12, 24, 36 and 48wk respectively. RESULTS: The serum lutein concentration in lutein intervention group was higher than the baseline(PPPPP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Lutein intervention can improve the visual function of patients with early AMD.

  14. Changes in visual function and thickness of macula after photodynamic therapy for age-related macular degeneration

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    Kyoko Okada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Kyoko Okada, Mariko Kubota-Taniai, Masayasu Kitahashi, Takayuki Baba, Yoshinori Mitamura, Shuichi YamamotoDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanPurpose: To determine the correlation between the changes in the central retinal sensitivity and the changes in the foveal thickness (FT after photodynamic therapy (PDT for age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: Nineteen eyes of 19 patients with choroidal neovasularizations (CNVs secondary to AMD were studied. The pretreatment values of the central retinal sensitivity determined by Micro Perimeter 1 (MP1; Nidek Technologies, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and optical coherence tomography (OCT-determined FT were compared to the postoperative values at three and six months after PDT.Results: At six months, the retinal sensitivity within the central 10° was significantly improved (P = 0.02 and the FT was significantly thinner (P = 0.016. The BCVA, however, did not change significantly (P = 0.80. The changes in the retinal sensitivities were significantly correlated with the changes in the decrease in the FT (r = -0.59, P = 0.012 within the central 10° at six months after PDT.Conclusion: Significant improvements in retinal sensitivities within the central 10° and a decrease in FT were observed even though the BCVA was not significantly improved. The measurement of retinal sensitivity by MP1 may be a better method to assess central visual function than the conventional visual acuity after PDT.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, fundus-related microperimetry, optical coherence tomography, photodynamic therapy

  15. Joint Analysis of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Variants in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Novel Loci TRPM1 and ABHD2/RLBP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persad, P.J.; Heid, I.M.; Weeks, D.E.; Baird, P.N.; Jong, E.K.; Haines, J.L.; Pericak-Vance, M.A.; Scott, W.K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Presently, 52 independent nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (nSNPs) have been associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but their effects do not explain all its variance. Genetic interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genome may unearth additional genetic

  16. Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal and Choroidal Thickness Metric Repeatability in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2016-01-01

    : Enrolled patients underwent repeated SDOCT imaging using the Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). A single technician certified for clinical trials took 3 macular volume scans. Retinal thicknesses were calculated for each of the 9 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS...... was 34.7 μm (95% CI 33.7-35.7 μm). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that a change of greater than 31 μm in Spectralis SDOCT-derived retinal thickness measurement of the central macular subfield and 35 μm in subfoveal choroidal thickness is necessary to detect true clinical change associated with disease...

  17. Visual acuity loss associated with excessive “dry macula” in exudative age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi H

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hidenori Takahashi,1–3 Yuji Inoue,1,2 Xue Tan,2,3 Satoru Inoda,1 Shinichi Sakamoto,1 Yusuke Arai,1 Yasuo Yanagi,4–6 Yujiro Fujino,2,3 Hidetoshi Kawashima1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Japan Community Health Care Organization Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center, Shinjuku, Japan; 4Medical Retina, Singapore National Eye Centre, 5Medical Retina, Singapore Eye Research Institute, 6Eye-ACP, Duke NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore Purpose: To investigate the correlation between visual acuity and central macular thickness (CMT and choroidal thickness (CCT in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods: In this retrospective analysis, 14 eyes that received >10 ranibizumab injections (based on pro re nata [PRN] regimen and maintained initial visual acuity gain were analyzed. The following 5 parameters were measured at the foveal center: CMT (distance from the inner limiting membrane [ILM] to Bruch’s membrane; central retinal thickness (CRT; distance from the ILM to the inner limit of the retinal pigment epithelium or subretinal fluid [SRF]; SRF thickness (SRFT; pigment epithelium detachment thickness (PEDT; and CCT. The correlation between the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and the 5 parameters was examined with generalized estimating equations. Results: CMT, CRT, and CCT were negatively correlated with logMAR BCVA (P=0.031, 0.023, and 0.036, respectively when only CMT values less than the thickness that maximized visual acuity for each eye were used for the analysis. Each 100-µm reduction in CMT, CRT, or CCT improved logMAR BCVA by -0.1, -0.08, or -0.07, respectively. SRFT and PEDT were not correlated with BCVA. The median CMT that maximized the visual acuity was 230 µm. Conclusion: Dry macula with CMT <230 µm was

  18. Characteristics of choroidal neovascularization in the complications of age-related macular degeneration prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Maureen G; Alexander, Judith; Fine, Stuart L

    2008-09-01

    To describe the characteristics of incident choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in observed and treated eyes in the Complications of Age-related Macular Degeneration Prevention Trial (CAPT). Cross-sectional descriptive study within a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients who developed CNV during CAPT follow-up. Inclusion criteria for CAPT specified bilateral large drusen (>or=10 drusen at least 125 micro), visual acuity >or=20/40 in each eye, and age >or=50. Exclusion criteria included CNV and geographic atrophy >1 Macular Photocoagulation Study (MPS) disc area or within 500 micro of the foveal center. One eye of each person was selected randomly for low-intensity laser treatment and the contralateral eye was observed. Fluorescein angiography was performed at baseline, annually for >or=5 years, and whenever there were symptoms of CNV. Trained readers at the CAPT Photograph Reading Center assessed color stereo photographs and angiogram negatives to identify CNV. Choroidal neovascularization was classified by type (predominantly classic CNV, minimally classic CNV, occult only CNV, or scar), location, and area. Visual acuity was measured by certified examiners. Symmetry of characteristics between eyes of bilaterally affected patients was examined. Choroidal neovascularization developed in 282 eyes of 225 patients. At the time of detection, 192 (68%) of the lesions were occult only, 153 (54%) were subfoveal, and 157 (56%) were or=20/40 in 123 (69%) of 179 eyes with visual acuity measured at the time of detection. Choroidal neovascularization developed in both eyes in 57 patients (25%) during CAPT follow-up. Lesions in eyes of bilaterally affected patients were no more similar to each other than affected eyes in 2 different patients. When patients are monitored closely, many CNV lesions can be detected outside of the fovea and when they are relatively small. Early detection may lead to improved long-term visual acuity.

  19. Roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in protein quality control and signaling in the retina: implications in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accumulation of damaged or postsynthetically modified proteins and dysregulation of inflammatory responses and angiogenesis in the retina/RPE are thought be etiologically related to formation of drusen and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). T...

  20. Evidence of association of APOE with age-related macular degeneration - a pooled analysis of 15 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Gareth J.; Patterson, Chris C.; Chakravarthy, Usha; Dasari, Shilpa; Klaver, Caroline C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Ho, Lintje; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Young, Ian S.; Seland, Johan H.; Rahu, Mati; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vioque, Jesus; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sofat, Reecha; Dean, Michael; Sawitzke, Julie; Seddon, Johanna M.; Peter, Inga; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Yates, John R.W.; Cipriani, Valentina; Fritsche, Lars G.; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Keilhauer, Claudia N.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Ennis, Sarah; Klein, Michael L.; Francis, Peter J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Orlin, Anton; Gorin, Michael B.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Swaroop, Anand; Othman, Mohammad; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Chen, Wei; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Wright, Alan F.; Hayward, Caroline; Baird, Paul N.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Attia, John; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Silvestri, Giuliana

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of incurable visual impairment in high-income countries. Previous studies report inconsistent associations between AMD and apolipoprotein E (APOE), a lipid transport protein involved in low-density cholesterol modulation. Potential interaction between APOE and sex, and smoking status, has been reported. We present a pooled analysis (n=21,160) demonstrating associations between late AMD and APOε4 (OR=0.72 per haplotype; CI: 0.65–0.74; P=4.41×10−11) and APOε2 (OR=1.83 for homozygote carriers; CI: 1.04–3.23; P=0.04), following adjustment for age-group and sex within each study and smoking status. No evidence of interaction between APOE and sex or smoking was found. Ever smokers had significant increased risk relative to never smokers for both neovascular (OR=1.54; CI: 1.38–1.72; P=2.8×10−15) and atrophic (OR=1.38; CI: 1.18–1.61; P=3.37×10−5) AMD but not early AMD (OR=0.94; CI: 0.86–1.03; P=0.16), implicating smoking as a major contributing factor to disease progression from early signs to the visually disabling late forms. Extended haplotype analysis incorporating rs405509 did not identify additional risks beyondε2 and ε4 haplotypes. Our expanded analysis substantially improves our understanding of the association between the APOE locus and AMD. It further provides evidence supporting the role of cholesterol modulation, and low-density cholesterol specifically, in AMD disease etiology. PMID:21882290

  1. Contextual cueing impairment in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringswald, Franziska; Herbik, Anne; Hoffmann, Michael B; Pollmann, Stefan

    2013-09-12

    Visual attention can be guided by past experience of regularities in our visual environment. In the contextual cueing paradigm, incidental learning of repeated distractor configurations speeds up search times compared to random search arrays. Concomitantly, fewer fixations and more direct scan paths indicate more efficient visual exploration in repeated search arrays. In previous work, we found that simulating a central scotoma in healthy observers eliminated this search facilitation. Here, we investigated contextual cueing in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who suffer from impaired foveal vision. AMD patients performed visual search using only their more severely impaired eye (n = 13) as well as under binocular viewing (n = 16). Normal-sighted controls developed a significant contextual cueing effect. In comparison, patients showed only a small nonsignificant advantage for repeated displays when searching with their worse eye. When searching binocularly, they profited from contextual cues, but still less than controls. Number of fixations and scan pattern ratios showed a comparable pattern as search times. Moreover, contextual cueing was significantly correlated with acuity in monocular search. Thus, foveal vision loss may lead to impaired guidance of attention by contextual memory cues.

  2. Tachyphylaxis after intravitreal bevacizumab for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forooghian, Farzin; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2009-06-01

    To describe tachyphylaxis to intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 59 consecutive patients treated with IVB at the National Eye Institute over a 14-month period and identified cases demonstrating loss of treatment efficacy as revealed by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. We defined tachyphylaxis as a loss of therapeutic response to IVB 28 +/- 7 days after administration in an eye that had previously demonstrated a therapeutic response in the same time interval. Five patients (six eyes) were identified as developing tachyphylaxis after repeated treatment with IVB. High-dose IVB (2.50 mg) did not restore therapeutic response in these patients. Bilateral tachyphylaxis to IVB was seen after an episode of unilateral postinjection anterior uveitis. After the first treatment of IVB, the median time taken to develop tachyphylaxis was 100 weeks (range: 31-128 weeks), and the median number of IVB treatments to the development of tachyphylaxis was 8 treatments (range: 5-10 treatments). Tachyphylaxis can occur after long-term intravitreal use of bevacizumab in patients with AMD. The precise mechanism of tachyphylaxis is unclear, but both local and/or systemic factors may be involved.

  3. Radiation therapy for wet type age-related macular degeneration. Long term follow-up results

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    Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Michiyo; Takahashi, Masayo; Honda, Yoshihito [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Between April, 1994 and July, 1995, 33 patients with occult type choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with or without the classical type CNV of the wet type age-related macular degeneration ARMD were treated with radiation therapy (10 Gy/5 fx/1 week or 20 Gy/10 fx/2 weeks). This phase I/II study showed that radiation therapy seems to be useful for CNV during the first 12 months. Some eyes which initially showed good response to irradiation began to lose their visual acuity. However, the dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions seemed useful to maintain the visual acuity better than 0.1 in this long term follow-up study (24 months). (author)

  4. HTRA1 promoter polymorphism predisposes Japanese to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tsunehiko; DeWan, Andrew; Zhang, Hong; Sakamoto, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Haru; Minami, Masayoshi; Obazawa, Minoru; Mizota, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Saito, Yoshihiro; Takagi, Ikue; Hoh, Josephine; Iwata, Takeshi

    2007-04-04

    To study the effect of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 10q26, recently shown to be associated with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Chinese and Caucasian cohorts, in a Japanese cohort. Using genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood of wet AMD cases and age-matched controls, we genotyped two SNPs, rs10490924, and rs11200638, on chromosome 10q26, 6.6 kb and 512 bp upstream of the HTRA1 gene, respectively, using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) and direct sequencing. Association tests were performed for individual SNPs and jointly with SNP complement factor H (CFH) Y402H. The two SNPs, rs10490924 and rs11200638, are in complete linkage disequilibrium (D'=1). Previous sequence comparisons among seventeen species revealed that the genomic region containing rs11200638 was highly conserved while the region surrounding rs10490924 was not. The allelic association test for rs11200638 yielded a p-value fashion: Odds ratio was 10.1 (95% CI 4.36, 23.06), adjusted for SNP CFH 402, for those carrying two copies of the risk allele, whereas indistinguishable from unity if carrying only one risk allele. The HTRA1 promoter polymorphism, rs11200638, is a strong candidate with a functional consequence that predisposes Japanese to develop neovascular AMD.

  5. Gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated vectors for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: 1 year follow-up of a phase 1 randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P; Lai, Chooi-May; Magno, Aaron L; Wikstrom, Matthew E; French, Martyn A; Pierce, Cora M; Schwartz, Steven D; Blumenkranz, Mark S; Chalberg, Thomas W; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Constable, Ian J

    2015-12-12

    Neovascular, or wet, age-related macular degeneration causes central vision loss and represents a major health problem in elderly people, and is currently treated with frequent intraocular injections of anti-VEGF protein. Gene therapy might enable long-term anti-VEGF therapy from a single treatment. We tested the safety of rAAV.sFLT-1 in treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration with a single subretinal injection. In this single-centre, phase 1, randomised controlled trial, we enrolled patients with wet age-related macular degeneration at the Lions Eye Institute and the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (Nedlands, WA, Australia). Eligible patients had to be aged 65 years or older, have age-related macular degeneration secondary to active subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation, with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 3/60-6/24 and 6/60 or better in the other eye. Patients were randomly assigned (3:1) to receive either 1 × 10(10) vector genomes (vg; low-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group) or 1 × 10(11) vg (high-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group), or no gene-therapy treatment (control group). Randomisation was done by sequential group assignment. All patients and investigators were unmasked. Staff doing the assessments were masked to the study group at study visits. All patients received ranibizumab at baseline and week 4, and rescue treatment during follow-up based on prespecified criteria including BCVA measured on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (EDTRS) scale, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. The primary endpoint was ocular and systemic safety. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01494805. From Dec 16, 2011, to April 5, 2012, we enrolled nine patients of whom eight were randomly assigned to receive either intervention (three patients in the low-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group and three patients in the high-dose rAAV.sFLT-1 group) or no treatment (two patients in the control group). Subretinal injection of r

  6. Fluorescent angiography and optical coherence tomography with angiography of the ocular fundus in patients with "the wet" form of an age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virsta A.M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the informative value of fluorescent angiography (FA and optical coherence tomography with fundus angiography (angio-OCT in the diagnosis of "wet" form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Material and methods. The present study included 20 patients (20 eyes diagnosed with degeneration of macula and posterior pole of the eye, the "wet" form (late stage age-related macular degeneration, AREDS category 4. The study used machines: optical coherence tomography, Spectralis HRA+OCT (Heidelberg Engeneering, Germany, optical со- herence tomography-angiography CIRRUS HD-OCT MODEL 5000 (Carl Zeiss, Germany. Results. When conducting the FA, in 11 patients found the ill-defined zone of small leakage of dye in 7 patients revealed a clearly defined area of hyperfluorescence in the early phase, and marked leakage of dye in the late phase, 2 patients — uncertain indices. In connection with the received data questionable PHAGE in 11 patients, all were held angio-OCT, to clarify the localization of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. When performing angio-OCT in 11 patients revealed that "wet" form of AMD with occult choroidal neovascularization. In 7 patients there had been discovered classic CNV in 2 patients combined. Conclusion. Angio-OCT gives a clearer picture about the presence of a choroidal neovascular membrane that plays a significant role in determining the course of treatment of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration.

  7. Three-month outcome of ziv-aflibercept for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Chhablani, Jay; Antonios, Rafic S; Yogi, Rohit; Younis, Muhammad H; Dakroub, Rola; Chahine, Hasan

    2016-12-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies did not detect toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium cells using intravitreal ziv-aflibercept. Our purpose is to ascertain the 3-month safety and efficacy in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with intravitreal ziv-aflibercept. Prospectively, consecutive patients with wet AMD underwent ziv-aflibercept intravitreal injection (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) from March 2015 to November 2015. Monitoring of best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular inflammation, cataract progression and by spectral domain optical coherence tomography were carried out at baseline day 1, 1 week, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months after injections. 30 eyes were treated (22 Caucasians, 8 Indians; 16 men, 14 women; 14 right eyes and 16 left eyes) with mean age of 74.3 years with 11 treatment-naïve cases and 19 having had treatment-non-naïve. Best-corrected visual acuity improved from baseline logMAR 1.08-0.74 at 1 week, 0.72 at 1 month, 0.67 at 2 months and 0.71 at 3 months (p<0.001 for all time periods). Central macular thickness in microns decreased from 332.8 to 302.0 at 1 week, 244.8 at 1 month, 229.0 at 2 months and 208.2 at 3 months (p<0.001 for all time periods). There were no signs of intraocular inflammation, or change in lens status or increase in intraocular pressure throughout the study. Off label use of ziv-aflibercept improves visual acuity, without detectable ocular toxicity and offers a cheaper alternative to the same molecule aflibercept, especially in low/middle-income countries and in countries where aflibercept (Eylea) is not available. NCT02486484. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Are Practice Guidelines Based on Systematic Reviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, Kristina; Li, Tianjing; Ssemanda, Elizabeth; Virgili, Gianni; Dickersin, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Are existing systematic reviews of interventions for age-related macular degeneration incorporated into clinical practice guidelines? High-quality systematic reviews should be used to underpin evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and clinical care. We examined the reliability of systematic reviews of interventions for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and described the main findings of reliable reviews in relation to clinical practice guidelines. Eligible publications were systematic reviews of the effectiveness of treatment interventions for AMD. We searched a database of systematic reviews in eyes and vision without language or date restrictions; the database was up to date as of May 6, 2014. Two authors independently screened records for eligibility and abstracted and assessed the characteristics and methods of each review. We classified reviews as reliable when they reported eligibility criteria, comprehensive searches, methodologic quality of included studies, appropriate statistical methods for meta-analysis, and conclusions based on results. We mapped treatment recommendations from the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Preferred Practice Patterns (PPPs) for AMD to systematic reviews and citations of reliable systematic reviews to support each treatment recommendation. Of 1570 systematic reviews in our database, 47 met inclusion criteria; most targeted neovascular AMD and investigated anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interventions, dietary supplements, or photodynamic therapy. We classified 33 (70%) reviews as reliable. The quality of reporting varied, with criteria for reliable reporting met more often by Cochrane reviews and reviews whose authors disclosed conflicts of interest. Anti-VEGF agents and photodynamic therapy were the only interventions identified as effective by reliable reviews. Of 35 treatment recommendations extracted from the PPPs, 15 could have been supported with reliable systematic reviews; however, only 1

  9. Systems-level analysis of age-related macular degeneration reveals global biomarkers and phenotype-specific functional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness that affects the central region of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), choroid, and neural retina. Initially characterized by an accumulation of sub-RPE deposits, AMD leads to progressive retinal degeneration, and in advanced cases, irreversible vision loss. Although genetic analysis, animal models, and cell culture systems have yielded important insights into AMD, the molecular pathways underlying AMD's onset and progression remain poorly delineated. We sought to better understand the molecular underpinnings of this devastating disease by performing the first comparative transcriptome analysis of AMD and normal human donor eyes. Methods RPE-choroid and retina tissue samples were obtained from a common cohort of 31 normal, 26 AMD, and 11 potential pre-AMD human donor eyes. Transcriptome profiles were generated for macular and extramacular regions, and statistical and bioinformatic methods were employed to identify disease-associated gene signatures and functionally enriched protein association networks. Selected genes of high significance were validated using an independent donor cohort. Results We identified over 50 annotated genes enriched in cell-mediated immune responses that are globally over-expressed in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes. Using a machine learning model and a second donor cohort, we show that the top 20 global genes are predictive of AMD clinical diagnosis. We also discovered functionally enriched gene sets in the RPE-choroid that delineate the advanced AMD phenotypes, neovascular AMD and geographic atrophy. Moreover, we identified a graded increase of transcript levels in the retina related to wound response, complement cascade, and neurogenesis that strongly correlates with decreased levels of phototransduction transcripts and increased AMD severity. Based on our findings, we assembled protein-protein interactomes that highlight functional networks likely to be

  10. PPAR-α Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol del V Cano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR's are members of the steroid/thyroid nuclear receptor, superfamily of transcription factors. There are currently three known PPAR subtypes, α, β, and γ. The PPARs are now recognized participants in a number of biological pathways some of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. These include immune modulation, lipid regulation, and oxidant/antioxidant pathways important to the onset and progression of “dry” AMD, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mediated pathways that stimulate choroidal neovascularization (CNV, characteristic of “wet” AMD. PPAR-α is found in retina and also on vascular cells important to formation of CNV. At this time, however, relatively little is known about potential contributions of PPAR-α to the pathogenesis of dry and wet AMD. This review examines current literature for potential roles of PPAR-α in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of AMD with emphasis on prevention and treatment of wet AMD.

  11. Autophagy and exosomes in the aged retinal pigment epithelium: possible relevance to drusen formation and age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of loss of central vision in the elderly. The formation of drusen, an extracellular, amorphous deposit of material on Bruch's membrane in the macula of the retina, occurs early in the course of the disease. Although some of the molecular components of drusen are known, there is no understanding of the cell biology that leads to the formation of drusen. We have previously demonstrated increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and decreased DNA repair enzyme capabilities in the rodent RPE/choroid with age. In this study, we found that drusen in AMD donor eyes contain markers for autophagy and exosomes. Furthermore, these markers are also found in the region of Bruch's membrane in old mice. By in vitro modeling increased mtDNA damage induced by rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, in the RPE, we found that the phagocytic activity was not altered but that there were: 1 increased autophagic markers, 2 decreased lysosomal activity, 3 increased exocytotic activity and 4 release of chemoattractants. Exosomes released by the stressed RPE are coated with complement and can bind complement factor H, mutations of which are associated with AMD. We speculate that increased autophagy and the release of intracellular proteins via exosomes by the aged RPE may contribute to the formation of drusen. Molecular and cellular changes in the old RPE may underlie susceptibility to genetic mutations that are found in AMD patients and may be associated with the pathogenesis of AMD in the elderly.

  12. Macular Morphology and Visual Acuity in the Second Year of the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Toth, Cynthia A; Daniel, Ebenezer; Grunwald, Juan E; Maguire, Maureen G; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Martin, Daniel F; Jaffe, Glenn J

    2016-04-01

    To describe the association between morphologic features on fundus photography (FP), fluorescein angiography (FA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and visual acuity (VA) in the second year of the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. Participants in the CATT. Study eye eligibility required angiographic and OCT evidence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and VA between 20/25 and 20/320. Treatment was assigned randomly to ranibizumab or bevacizumab with 3 different dosing regimens over a 2-year period. Fluid type, location, and thickness; retina and subretinal tissue complex thickness on OCT; size and lesion composition on FP and FA; and VA. Among 1185 CATT participants, 993 (84%) had fluid on OCT at baseline and completed 2 years of follow-up. At 2 years, intraretinal fluid (IRF), subretinal fluid (SRF), sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fluid, and subretinal tissue complex thickness decreased in all treatment groups. Ranibizumab monthly was best able to resolve each type of fluid. Eyes with SRF in the foveal center on OCT had better mean VA than eyes with no SRF (72.8 vs. 66.6 letters; P = 0.006). Eyes with IRF in the foveal center had worse mean VA than eyes without IRF (59.9 vs. 70.9 letters; P 212 μm (59.4 vs. 71.3 vs. 70.3 letters; P < 0.0001). At 2 years, the mean VA (letters) of eyes varied substantially by the type of subfoveal pathology on FP and FA: 70.6 for no pathology; 74.1 for fluid only; 73.3 for CNV or pigment epithelial (RPE) detachment; 68.4 for nongeographic atrophy; and 62.9 for geographic atrophy, hemorrhage, RPE tear, or scar (P < 0.0001). The associations between VA and morphologic features identified through year 1 were maintained or strengthened during year 2. Eyes with foveal IRF, abnormally thin retina, greater thickness of the subretinal tissue complex on OCT, and subfoveal

  13. Complement inhibitors for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A; McKay, Gareth J; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2014-01-15

    Given the relatively high prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and the increased incidence of AMD as populations age, the results of trials of novel treatments are awaited with much anticipation. The complement cascade describes a series of proteolytic reactions occurring throughout the body that generate proteins with a variety of roles including the initiation and promotion of immune reactions against foreign materials or micro-organisms. The complement cascade is normally tightly regulated, but much evidence implicates complement overactivity in AMD and so it is a logical therapeutic target in the treatment of AMD. To assess the effects and safety of complement inhibitors in the prevention or treatment of advanced AMD. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 11), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (January 1990 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 21 November 2013. We also performed handsearching of proceedings, from 2012 onwards, of meetings and conferences of specific professional organisations. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with

  14. Observation of curative effect of intravitreal injection of conbercept in wet age-related macular degeneration: Optical coherence tomography analysis after injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Tan, Ying; Li, Chaowei; Liu, Yi; Lu, Guohua

    2018-04-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of intravitreal injection of conbercept in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was observed to measure the changes of anatomical changes of central macular thickness (CMT) and the area and volume of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) uplift. Fifteen patients (15 eyes) with wet AMD were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent intravitreal injection of conbercept of 0.05 mL once. After 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months, OCT and BCVA were used to examine and to compare with the preoperative and postoperative central macular thickness and RPE uplift area. BCVA (median) increased respectively from 0.12 ± 0.13 to 0.21 ± 0.15 at 1 week, to 0.90 ± 0.25 at 1 month, to 0.38 ± 0.17 at 3 months (p macular decreased from 500 ± 25 μm to 256 ± 19 μm, 221 ± 29 μm, and 215 ± 14 μm, respectively. The normal physiological structure and stratification of the macular area were clear gradually. Conbercept treatment of wet AMD can significantly improve visual acuity, after 1 month up to the plateau, 3 months of continuous drug injection can make the vision maintained at a high stage, and macular retinal normal structural morphology recovery is good, the treatment has no obvious adverse reactions, and with good security. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Correlation of Macular Focal Electroretinogram with Ellipsoid Zone Extension in Stargardt Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Abed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stargardt disease (STGD1 is the most common cause of inherited juvenile macular degeneration. This disease is characterized by a progressive accumulation of lipofuscin in the outer retina and subsequent loss of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cone photoreceptor function and structure in STGD1. Macular function was assessed by visual acuity measurement and focal electroretinogram (FERG recording while spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT imaging was performed to evaluate the integrity of photoreceptors. FERG amplitude was significantly reduced in patients with Stargardt disease (p<0.0001. The amplitude of FERG showed a negative relationship with interruption of ellipsoid zone (EZ (R2=0.54, p<0.0001 and a positive correlation with average macular thickness (AMT. Conversely, visual acuity was only weakly correlated with central macular thickness (CMT (R2=0.12, p=0.04. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FERG amplitude is a reliable indicator of macular cone function while visual acuity reflects the activity of the foveal region. A precise assessment of macular cone function by FERG recording may be useful to monitor the progression of STGD1 and to select the optimal candidates to include in future clinical trials to treat this disease.

  16. Fully Automated Robust System to Detect Retinal Edema, Central Serous Chorioretinopathy, and Age Related Macular Degeneration from Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maculopathy is the excessive damage to macula that leads to blindness. It mostly occurs due to retinal edema (RE, central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR, or age related macular degeneration (ARMD. Optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging is the latest eye testing technique that can detect these syndromes in early stages. Many researchers have used OCT images to detect retinal abnormalities. However, to the best of our knowledge, no research that presents a fully automated system to detect all of these macular syndromes is reported. This paper presents the world’s first ever decision support system to automatically detect RE, CSCR, and ARMD retinal pathologies and healthy retina from OCT images. The automated disease diagnosis in our proposed system is based on multilayered support vector machines (SVM classifier trained on 40 labeled OCT scans (10 healthy, 10 RE, 10 CSCR, and 10 ARMD. After training, SVM forms an accurate decision about the type of retinal pathology using 9 extracted features. We have tested our proposed system on 2819 OCT scans (1437 healthy, 640 RE, and 742 CSCR of 502 patients from two different datasets and our proposed system correctly diagnosed 2817/2819 subjects with the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity ratings of 99.92%, 100%, and 99.86%, respectively.

  17. Human Plasma Metabolomics Study across All Stages of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Potential Lipid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laíns, Inês; Kelly, Rachel S; Miller, John B; Silva, Rufino; Vavvas, Demetrios G; Kim, Ivana K; Murta, Joaquim N; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Miller, Joan W; Husain, Deeba

    2018-02-01

    To characterize the plasma metabolomic profile of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using mass spectrometry (MS). Cross-sectional observational study. We prospectively recruited participants with a diagnosis of AMD and a control group (>50 years of age) without any vitreoretinal disease. All participants underwent color fundus photography, used for AMD diagnosis and staging, according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study classification scheme. Fasting blood samples were collected and plasma was analyzed by Metabolon, Inc. (Durham, NC), using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution MS. Metabolon's hardware and software were used to identify peaks and control quality. Principal component analysis and multivariate regression were performed to assess differences in the metabolomic profiles of AMD patients versus controls, while controlling for potential confounders. For biological interpretation, pathway enrichment analysis of significant metabolites was performed using MetaboAnalyst. The primary outcome measures were levels of plasma metabolites in participants with AMD compared with controls and among different AMD severity stages. We included 90 participants with AMD (30 with early AMD, 30 with intermediate AMD, and 30 with late AMD) and 30 controls. Using UPLC and MS, 878 biochemicals were identified. Multivariate logistic regression identified 87 metabolites with levels that differed significantly between AMD patients and controls. Most of these metabolites (82.8%; n = 72), including the most significant metabolites, belonged to the lipid pathways. Analysis of variance revealed that of the 87 metabolites, 48 (55.2%) also were significantly different across the different stages of AMD. A significant enrichment of the glycerophospholipids pathway was identified (P = 4.7 × 10 -9 ) among these metabolites. Participants with AMD have altered plasma metabolomic profiles compared with controls. Our data suggest

  18. A circulating microrna profile is associated with late-stage neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

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    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe vision impairment in Western populations over 55 years. A growing number of gene variants have been identified which are strongly associated with an altered risk to develop AMD. Nevertheless, gene-based biomarkers which could be dysregulated at defined stages of AMD may point toward key processes in disease mechanism and thus may support efforts to design novel treatment regimens for this blinding disorder. Circulating microRNAs (cmiRNAs which are carried by nanosized exosomes or microvesicles in blood plasma or serum, have been recognized as valuable indicators for various age-related diseases. We therefore aimed to elucidate the role of cmiRNAs in AMD by genome-wide miRNA expression profiling and replication analyses in 147 controls and 129 neovascular AMD patients. We identified three microRNAs differentially secreted in neovascular (NV AMD (hsa-mir-301-3p, pcorrected = 5.6*10-5, hsa-mir-361-5p, pcorrected = 8.0*10-4 and hsa-mir-424-5p, pcorrected = 9.6*10-3. A combined profile of the three miRNAs revealed an area under the curve (AUC value of 0.727 and was highly associated with NV AMD (p = 1.2*10-8. To evaluate subtype-specificity, an additional 59 AMD cases with pure unilateral or bilateral geographic atrophy (GA were analyzed for microRNAs hsa-mir-301-3p, hsa-mir-361-5p, and hsa-mir-424-5p. While we found no significant differences between GA AMD and controls neither individually nor for a combined microRNAs profile, hsa-mir-424-5p levels remained significantly higher in GA AMD when compared to NV (pcorrected<0.005. Pathway enrichment analysis on genes predicted to be regulated by microRNAs hsa-mir-301-3p, hsa-mir-361-5p, and hsa-mir-424-5p, suggests canonical TGFβ, mTOR and related pathways to be involved in NV AMD. In addition, knockdown of hsa-mir-361-5p resulted in increased neovascularization in an in vitro angiogenesis assay.

  19. Macular pigment density in relation to serum and adipose tissue concentrations of lutein and serum concentrations of zeaxanthin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, W.M.R.; Berendschot, T.T.J.R.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Vries, A.J. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Poppel, G. van

    2002-01-01

    Background: Macular pigment (MP), concentrated in the central area of the retina, contains the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. A low MP density could be a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration. Little information is available regarding MP density in relation to serum lutein and

  20. A prospective, observational, open-label, multicentre study to investigate the daily treatment practice of ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, F. van; Evers-Birkenkamp, K.U.; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Jong-Hesse, Y. de; Hoppenreijs, V.P.T.; Hommersom, R.F.; Scholten, A.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The HELIOS (Health Economics with Lucentis in Observational Settings) study was designed on request of the Dutch Health Authority for an observational study to assess the effectiveness and safety of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) in daily practice.

  1. Investigating the CFH Gene Polymorphisms as a Risk Factor for Age-related Macular Degeneration in an Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanejad, Mojgan; Moein, Hamidreza; Akbari, Mohammad R; Badiei, Azadeh; Yaseri, Mehdi; Soheilian, Masoud; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder which results in irreversible vision loss and progressive impairment of central vision. Disease susceptibility is influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the complement factor H gene are the most important genetic risk factors. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association four SNPs (dbSNP ID: rs800292, rs1061170, rs2274700 and rs3753395) of CFH gene with AMD in the Iranian population. We recruited 100 AMD patients and 100 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Direct sequencing for three SNPs (rs800292, rs2274700 and rs3753395) and restriction fragment length polymorphism utilized for rs1061170. Allele and genotype frequencies of SNPs were calculated and tested for departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium using the Chi-square test. An allelic and genotypic association was compared by logistic regression analysis using the SNPassoc. According to our results, the frequencies of risk allele for all SNPs (G, G, A, and C alleles of rs800292, rs2274700, rs3753395 and rs1061170, respectively) were significantly higher in AMD patients (p value prevention and treatment of AMD.

  2. Mediterranean Diet Score and Its Association with Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The European Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna; Young, Ian S; Vioque, Jesus L; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2017-01-01

    To examine associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in countries ranging from Southern to Northern Europe. Cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study. Of 5060 randomly sampled people aged 65 years or older from 7 study centers across Europe (Norway, Estonia, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Greece, and Spain), full dietary data were available in 4753. The mean age of participants was 73.2 years (standard deviation, 5.6), and 55% were women. Participants underwent an eye examination and digital retinal color photography. The images were graded at a single center. Dietary intake during the previous 12 months was assessed by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). A previously published Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was used to classify participants according to their responses on the FFQ. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of the MDS score and AMD, taking account of potential confounders and the multicenter study design. Images were graded according to the International Classification System for age-related maculopathy and stratified using the Rotterdam staging system into 5 exclusive stages (AMD 0-4) and a separate category of large drusen (≥125 μm). Age-related macular degeneration 4 included neovascular AMD (nvAMD) and geographic atrophy (GA). Increasing MDS was associated with reduced odds of nvAMD in unadjusted and confounder-adjusted analysis. Compared with the lowest MDS adherence (≤4 score), those in the highest category MDS adherence (>6 score) showed lower odds of nvAMD (odds ratio, 0.53; 0.27-1.04; P trend = 0.01). The association with MDS did not differ by Y204H risk allele (P = 0.89). For all early AMD (grade 1-3), there was no relationship with MDS (P trend = 0.9). There was a weak trend (P = 0.1) between MDS and large drusen; those in the highest category of MDS had 20% reduced odds compared with those in

  3. A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study of Saffron Supplementation in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Sustained Benefits to Central Retinal Function

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    M. Piccardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In a previous randomized clinical trial (Falsini et al. (2010, it was shown that short-term Saffron supplementation improves retinal flicker sensitivity in early age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the observed functional benefits from Saffron supplementation may extend over a longer follow-up duration. Design. Longitudinal, interventional open-label study. Setting. Outpatient ophthalmology setting. Participants. Twenty-nine early AMD patients (age range: 55–85 years with a baseline visual acuity >0.3. Intervention. Saffron oral supplementation (20 mg/day over an average period of treatment of 14 (±2 months. Measurements. Clinical examination and focal-electroretinogram-(fERG- derived macular (18° flicker sensitivity estimate (Falsini et al. (2010 every three months over a followup of 14 (±2 months. Retinal sensitivity, the reciprocal value of the estimated fERG amplitude threshold, was the main outcome measure. Results. After three months of supplementation, mean fERG sensitivity improved by 0.3 log units compared to baseline values (P<0.01, and mean visual acuity improved by two Snellen lines compared to baseline values (0.75 to 0.9, P<0.01. These changes remained stable over the follow-up period. Conclusion. These results indicate that in early AMD Saffron supplementation induces macular function improvements from baseline that are extended over a long-term followup.

  4. KUS121, an ATP regulator, mitigates chorioretinal pathologies in animal models of age-related macular degeneration

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    Yuki Muraoka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of blindness among elderly people. The appearance of drusen is a clinical manifestation and a harbinger of both exudative and atrophic AMD. Recently, antibody-based medicines have been used to treat the exudative type. However, they do not restore good vision in patients. Moreover, no effective treatment is available for atrophic AMD. We have created small chemicals (Kyoto University Substances; KUSs that act as ATP regulators inside cells. In the present study, we examined the in vivo efficacy of KUS121 in C-C chemokine receptor type 2-deficient mice, a mouse model of AMD. Systemic administration of KUS121 prevented or reduced drusen-like lesions and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and then substantially mitigated chorioretinal pathologies with significant preservation of visual function. Additionally, we confirmed that long-term oral administration of KUS121 caused no systemic complications in drusen-affected monkeys. ATP regulation by KUSs may represent a novel strategy in the treatment of drusen and prevention of disease progression in AMD.

  5. Tachyphylaxis Following Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forooghian, Farzin; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To describe tachyphylaxis to intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 59 consecutive patients treated with IVB at the National Eye Institute over a 14 month period, and identified cases demonstrating loss of treatment efficacy as revealed by spectral domain optical coherence tomography. We defined tachyphylaxis as a loss of therapeutic response to IVB 28±7 days after administration in an eye which had previously demonstrated a therapeutic response in the same time interval. Results Five patients (6 eyes) were identified as developing tachyphylaxis following repeated treatment with IVB. High-dose IVB (2.50mg) did not restore therapeutic response in these patients. Bilateral tachyphylaxis to IVB was seen following an episode of unilateral post-injection anterior uveitis. After the first treatment of IVB, the median time taken to develop tachyphylaxis was 100 weeks (range: 31-128 weeks), and the median number of IVB treatments to the development of tachyphylaxis was 8 treatments (range: 5-10). Conclusion Tachyphylaxis can occur following long-term intravitreal use of bevacizumab in patients with AMD. The precise mechanism of tachyphylaxis is unclear, but both local and/or systemic factors may be involved. PMID:19516114

  6. Automated Segmentation Methods of Drusen to Diagnose Age-Related Macular Degeneration Screening in Retinal Images

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    Young Jae Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing drusen measurement is difficult to use in clinic because it requires a lot of time and effort for visual inspection. In order to resolve this problem, we propose an automatic drusen detection method to help clinical diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration. First, we changed the fundus image to a green channel and extracted the ROI of the macular area based on the optic disk. Next, we detected the candidate group using the difference image of the median filter within the ROI. We also segmented vessels and removed them from the image. Finally, we detected the drusen through Renyi’s entropy threshold algorithm. We performed comparisons and statistical analysis between the manual detection results and automatic detection results for 30 cases in order to verify validity. As a result, the average sensitivity was 93.37% (80.95%~100% and the average DSC was 0.73 (0.3~0.98. In addition, the value of the ICC was 0.984 (CI: 0.967~0.993, p<0.01, showing the high reliability of the proposed automatic method. We expect that the automatic drusen detection helps clinicians to improve the diagnostic performance in the detection of drusen on fundus image.

  7. Why AMD is a disease of ageing and not of development: mechanisms and insights

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    Kaushal eSharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is retinal degenerative disorder which starts with the progression of age. Metabolism plays important role in initiation of ageing related diseases. The cholesterol metabolism components and their oxidized products like 7-ketocholesterol have been shown impact on RPE cells degeneration. These molecules can initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic process and also influenced the complements factors and expression of angiogenic proteins like VEGF etc. In this review we have suggested that AMD is ageing disorder not developmental which has been substantiated with disrupted cholesterol metabolism as described in several age related degenerative diseases.

  8. A prospective, observational, open-label, multicentre study to investigate the daily treatment practice of ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asten, Freekje; Evers-Birkenkamp, Kim U.; van Lith-Verhoeven, Janneke J. C.; de Jong-Hesse, Yvonne; Hoppenreijs, Vincent P. T.; Hommersom, Richard F.; Scholten, Agnes M.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Johannes H. J.; Klaver, J. H. J.; Hoyng, C. B.; Raijmakers, A. J.; van Lith-Verhoeven, J. J. C.; Rulo, A. H. F.; Verbraak, F. D.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Hommersom, C. F.; de Jong-Hesse, Y.; Bosch-Driessen, E. H.; Smeets, M. H.; Gonçalves, A.; Klomp, H. J.; Hoppenreijs, V. P. T.; Dito, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The HELIOS (Health Economics with Lucentis in Observational Settings) study was designed on request of the Dutch Health Authority for an observational study to assess the effectiveness and safety of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) in daily practice. The HELIOS

  9. Pilot evaluation of short-term changes in macular pigment and retinal sensitivity in different phenotypes of early age-related macular degeneration after carotenoid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvi, Federico; Souied, Eric H; Falfoul, Yousra; Georges, Anouk; Jung, Camille; Querques, Lea; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the response of carotenoid supplementation in different phenotypes of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and retinal sensitivity. Consecutive patients with only medium/large drusen and only reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled. At baseline, participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), MPOD and retinal sensitivity. Patients were put on vitamin supplementation (lutein 10 mg/day, zeaxanthin 2 mg/day) and 3 months later underwent a repeated ophthalmological examination. Twenty patients with medium/large drusen, 19 with RPD and 15 control subjects were included. At baseline, in controls, mean MPOD and BCVA were significantly higher compared with RPD (p=0.001 and p=0.01) but similar to medium/large drusen (p=0.9 and p=0.4). Mean retinal sensitivity was significantly higher in controls compared with RPD and medium/large drusen (for all p<0.0001). After 3 months of carotenoid supplementation the mean MPOD significantly increased in RPD (p=0.002), thus showing no more difference compared with controls (p=0.3); no significant changes were found in mean retinal sensitivity and BCVA (p=0.3 and p=0.7). Medium/large drusen did not show significant changes on MPOD, retinal sensitivity and BCVA (p=0.5, p=0.7 and p=0.7, respectively). Patients with early AMD, especially RPD phenotype, show lower macular sensitivity and MPOD than controls. After supplementation, MPOD significantly increased in RPD. These results suggest different pathophysiology for RPD as compared with medium/large drusen and may open new ways to identifying further therapeutic targets in this phenotype of early AMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Associations Between Vitamin D Intake and Progression to Incident Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Bénédicte M J; Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M

    2017-09-01

    There is growing evidence of the importance of nutrition in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but no prospective studies have explored the impact of vitamin D. We evaluated the association between vitamin D intake and progression to advanced AMD. Among 2146 participants (3965 eyes), 541 (777 eyes) progressed from early or intermediate AMD to advanced disease (mean follow-up: 9.4 years) based on ocular imaging. Nutrients were log transformed and calorie adjusted. Survival analysis was used to assess associations between incident advanced disease and vitamin D intake. Neovascular disease (NV) and geographic atrophy (GA) were evaluated separately. Combined effects of dietary vitamin D and calcium were assessed based on high or low consumption of each nutrient. There was a lower risk of progression to advanced AMD in the highest versus lowest quintile of dietary vitamin D intake after adjustment for demographic, behavioral, ocular, and nutritional factors (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.83; P trend = 0.0007). Similar results were observed for NV (HR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.39-0.89; P trend = 0.005) but not GA (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.53-1.30; P trend = 0.35). A protective effect was observed for advanced AMD among participants with high vitamin D and low calcium compared to the group with low levels for each nutrient (HR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.50-0.88; P = 0.005). When supplement use was considered, the effect was in the protective direction but was not significant. A diet rich in vitamin D may prevent or delay progression to advanced AMD, especially NV. Additional exploration is needed to elucidate the potential protective role of vitamin D and its contribution to reducing visual loss.

  11. Prevalence of subretinal drusenoid deposits in older persons with and without age-related macular degeneration, by multimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubina, Anna V.; Neely, David C.; Clark, Mark E.; Huisingh, Carrie E.; Samuels, Brian C.; Zhang, Yuhua; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) in older adults with healthy maculas and early and intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using multimodal imaging. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants A total of 651 subjects aged ≥60 years enrolled in the Alabama Study of Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration from primary care ophthalmology clinics. Methods Subjects were imaged using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of the macula and optic nerve head (ONH), infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, and color fundus photographs (CFP). Eyes were assessed for AMD presence and severity using the AREDS 9-step scale. Criteria for SDD presence were identification on ≥1 en-face modality plus SD-OCT or on ≥2 en-face modalities if absent on SD-OCT. SDD were considered present at the person-level if present in 1 or both eyes. Main outcomes measures Prevalence of SDD in participants with and without AMD. Results Overall prevalence of SDD was 32% (197/611), with 62% (122/197) affected in both eyes. Persons with SDD were older than those without SDD (70.6 vs. 68.7 years, p =0.0002). Prevalence of SDD was 23% in subjects without AMD and 52% in subjects with AMD (pmaculae and in more than half of persons with early to intermediate AMD, even by stringent criteria. The prevalence of SDD is strongly associated with AMD presence and severity and increases with age, and its retinal topography including peripapillary involvement resembles that of rod photoreceptors. Consensus on SDD detection methods is recommended to advance our knowledge of this lesion and its clinical and biologic significance. PMID:26875000

  12. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  13. Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Hegel, Mark T.; Massof, Robert W.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Ho, Allen C.; Tasman, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavior activation (BA) + low vision rehabilitation (LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) + LVR to prevent depressive disorders in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized, clinical trial with outcome assessment at 4 months. Participants Patients with AMD and subsyndromal depressive symptoms attending retina practices (n = 188). Interventions Before randomization, all subjects had 2 outpatient LVR visits, and were then randomized to in-home BA+LVR or ST+LVR. Behavior activation is a structured behavioral treatment that aims to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Main Outcome Measures The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV defined depressive disorder based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (primary outcome), Activities Inventory, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire–25 plus Supplement (NEI-VFQ), and NEI-VFQ quality of life (secondary outcomes). Results At 4 months, 11 BA+LVR subjects (12.6%) and 18 ST+LVR subjects (23.4%) developed a depressive disorder (relative risk [RR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27–1.06; P = 0.067). In planned adjusted analyses the RR was 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27–0.98; P = 0.04). A mediational analysis suggested that BA+LVR prevented depression to the extent that it enabled subjects to remain socially engaged. In addition, BA+LVR was associated with greater improvements in functional vision than ST+LVR, although there was no significant between-group difference. There was no significant change or between-group difference in quality of life. Conclusions An integrated mental health and low vision intervention halved the incidence of depressive disorders relative to standard outpatient LVR in patients with AMD. As the population ages, the number of persons with AMD and the adverse effects of comorbid

  14. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in Nakuru, Kenya: a cross-sectional population-based study.

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    Wanjiku Mathenge

    Full Text Available Diseases of the posterior segment of the eye, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, have recently been recognised as the leading or second leading cause of blindness in several African countries. However, prevalence of AMD alone has not been assessed. We hypothesized that AMD is an important cause of visual impairment among elderly people in Nakuru, Kenya, and therefore sought to assess the prevalence and predictors of AMD in a diverse adult Kenyan population.In a population-based cross-sectional survey in the Nakuru District of Kenya, 100 clusters of 50 people 50 y of age or older were selected by probability-proportional-to-size sampling between 26 January 2007 and 11 November 2008. Households within clusters were selected through compact segment sampling. All participants underwent a standardised interview and comprehensive eye examination, including dilated slit lamp examination by an ophthalmologist and digital retinal photography. Images were graded for the presence and severity of AMD lesions following a modified version of the International Classification and Grading System for Age-Related Maculopathy. Comparison was made between slit lamp biomicroscopy (SLB and photographic grading. Of 4,381 participants, fundus photographs were gradable for 3,304 persons (75.4%, and SLB was completed for 4,312 (98%. Early and late AMD prevalence were 11.2% and 1.2%, respectively, among participants graded on images. Prevalence of AMD by SLB was 6.7% and 0.7% for early and late AMD, respectively. SLB underdiagnosed AMD relative to photographic grading by a factor of 1.7. After controlling for age, women had a higher prevalence of early AMD than men (odds ratio 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9. Overall prevalence rose significantly with each decade of age. We estimate that, in Kenya, 283,900 to 362,800 people 50 y and older have early AMD and 25,200 to 50,500 have late AMD, based on population estimates in 2007.AMD is an important cause of visual

  15. Visual Acuity is Related to Parafoveal Retinal Thickness in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, Robert J.; Gaudio, Alexander R.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence and effect on visual acuity of macular cysts in a large cohort of patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods In 316 patients with typical forms of retinitis pigmentosa, we measured visual acuities with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, detected macular cysts with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified retinal thicknesses by OCT. We used the FREQ, LOGISTIC, and GENMOD procedures of SAS to evaluate possible risk factors for cyst prevalence and the MIXED procedure to quantify the relationships of visual acuity to retinal thickness measured at different locations within the macula. Results We found macular cysts in 28% of the patients, 40% of whom had cysts in only one eye. Macular cysts were seen most often in patients with dominant disease and not at all in patients with X-linked disease (p = 0.006). In eyes with macular cysts, multiple regression analysis revealed that visual acuity was inversely and independently related to retinal thickness at the foveal center (p = 0.038) and within a ring spanning an eccentricity of 5° to 10° from the foveal center (p = 0.004). Conclusions Macular cysts are a common occurrence in retinitis pigmentosa, especially among patients with dominantly-inherited disease. Visual acuity is influenced by edema in the parafovea, as well as in the fovea. PMID:18552390

  16. Lack of association of CFD polymorphisms with advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiexi; Chen, Yuhong; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhou, Xinrong; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Kevin; Hughes, Guy; Kasuga, Daniel; Bedell, Matthew; Lee, Clara; Ferreyra, Henry; Kozak, Igor; Haw, Weldon; Guan, Jean; Shaw, Robert; Stevenson, William; Weishaar, Paul D; Nelson, Mark H; Tang, Luosheng; Zhang, Kang

    2010-11-03

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible central vision loss worldwide. Research has linked AMD susceptibility with dysregulation of the complement cascade. Typically, complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), and complement component 3 (C3) are associated with AMD. In this paper, we investigated the association between complement factor D (CFD), another factor of the complement system, and advanced AMD in a Caucasian population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1683564, rs35186399, rs1683563, rs3826945, rs34337649, and rs1651896, across the region covering CFD, were chosen for this study. One hundred and seventy-eight patients with advanced AMD and 161 age-matched normal controls were genotyped. Potential positive signals were further tested in another independent 445 advanced AMD patients and 190 controls. χ2 tests were performed to compare the allele frequencies between case and control groups. None of the six SNPs of CFD was found to be significantly associated with advanced AMD in our study. Our findings suggest that CFD may not play a major role in the genetic susceptibility to AMD because no association was found between the six SNPs analyzed in the CFD region and advanced AMD.

  17. The Role of mf-ERG in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Electrophysiological Features of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini

    2018-01-01

    Age-related macular cegeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual dysfunction worldwide, affecting 9-25% of individuals between 65 and 75 years old. We have reviewed the published articles investigating the role of multifocal electroretinogram (mf-ERG) in the diagnosis and treatment of AMD. Visual evoked potentials have revealed decreased amplitudes and higher latencies in patients with AMD, while the degeneration of photoreceptors and abnormalities of retinal pigment epithelium can be identified by electro-oculogram recordings. Moreover, ERG can detect the functional abnormalities observed in AMD and evaluate each therapeutic approach. The record of local electrophysiological responses coming from different retinal areas can be accurately performed by mfERG. The accuracy of mfERG in detecting the degeneration of photoreceptors, as well the disturbances of macular function, could be useful both in the early diagnosis of AMD and the assessment of treatment efficacy.

  18. Critical Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the methodological quality of age-related macular degeneration (AMD clinical practice guidelines (CPGs. Methods. AMD CPGs published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO and Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCO were appraised by independent reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II instrument, which comprises six domains (Scope and Purpose, Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Clarity of Presentation, Applicability, and Editorial Independence, and an Overall Assessment score summarizing methodological quality across all domains. Results. Average domain scores ranged from 35% to 83% for the AAO CPG and from 17% to 83% for the RCO CPG. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the reliability of mean scores for the AAO and RCO CPGs were 0.74 and 0.88, respectively. The strongest domains were Scope and Purpose and Clarity of Presentation. The weakest were Stakeholder Involvement (AAO and Editorial Independence (RCO. Conclusions. Future AMD CPGs can be improved by involving all relevant stakeholders in guideline development, ensuring transparency of guideline development and review methodology, improving guideline applicability with respect to economic considerations, and addressing potential conflict of interests within the development group.

  19. Drusen regression is associated with local changes in fundus autofluorescence in intermediate age-related macular degeneration.

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    Toy, Brian C; Krishnadev, Nupura; Indaram, Maanasa; Cunningham, Denise; Cukras, Catherine A; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association of spontaneous drusen regression in intermediate age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with changes on fundus photography and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging. Prospective observational case series. Fundus images from 58 eyes (in 58 patients) with intermediate AMD and large drusen were assessed over 2 years for areas of drusen regression that exceeded the area of circle C1 (diameter 125 μm; Age-Related Eye Disease Study grading protocol). Manual segmentation and computer-based image analysis were used to detect and delineate areas of drusen regression. Delineated regions were graded as to their appearance on fundus photographs and FAF images, and changes in FAF signal were graded manually and quantitated using automated image analysis. Drusen regression was detected in approximately half of study eyes using manual (48%) and computer-assisted (50%) techniques. At year-2, the clinical appearance of areas of drusen regression on fundus photography was mostly unremarkable, with a majority of eyes (71%) demonstrating no detectable clinical abnormalities, and the remainder (29%) showing minor pigmentary changes. However, drusen regression areas were associated with local changes in FAF that were significantly more prominent than changes on fundus photography. A majority of eyes (64%-66%) demonstrated a predominant decrease in overall FAF signal, while 14%-21% of eyes demonstrated a predominant increase in overall FAF signal. FAF imaging demonstrated that drusen regression in intermediate AMD was often accompanied by changes in local autofluorescence signal. Drusen regression may be associated with concurrent structural and physiologic changes in the outer retina. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Microcurrent stimulation in the treatment of dry and wet macular degeneration

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    Chaikin L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Laurie Chaikin,1 Kellen Kashiwa,2 Michael Bennet,2 George Papastergiou,3 Walter Gregory4 1Private practice, Alameda, CA, USA; 2Retina Institute of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; 3California Retinal Associates, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Clinical Trials Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of the application of transcutaneous (transpalpebral microcurrent stimulation to slow progression of dry and wet macular degeneration or improve vision in dry and wet macular degeneration. Methods: Seventeen patients aged between 67 and 95 years with an average age of 83 years were selected to participate in the study over a period of 3 months in two eye care centers. There were 25 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (DAMD and six eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (WAMD. Frequency-specific microcurrent stimulation was applied in a transpalpebral manner, using two programmable dual channel microcurrent units delivering pulsed microcurrent at 150 µA for 35 minutes once a week. The frequency pairs selected were based on targeting tissues, which are typically affected by the disease combined with frequencies that target disease processes. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study or Snellen visual acuity (VA was measured before and after each treatment session. All treatment was administered in a clinical setting. Results: Significant increases were seen in VA in DAMD (P=0.012, Wilcoxon one-sample test, but in WAMD, improvements did not reach statistical significance (P=0.059. In DAMD eyes, twice as many patients showed increase in VA (52% compared to those showing deterioration (26%, with improvements being often sizeable, whereas deteriorations were usually very slight. In WAMD eyes, five of six (83% patients showed an increase and none showed deterioration. Conclusion: The substantial changes observed over this period, combined with continued improvement for

  1. Age-Related Eye Diseases and Visual Impairment Among U.S. Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chiu-Fang; Cotch, Mary Frances; Vitale, Susan; Zhang, Xinzhi; Klein, Ronald; Friedman, David S.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Saaddine, Jinan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Visual impairment is a common health-related disability in the U.S. The association between clinical measurements of age-related eye diseases and visual impairment in data from a national survey has not been reported. Purpose To examine common eye conditions and other correlates associated with visual impairment in the U.S. Methods Data from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 5222 Americans aged ≥40 years were analyzed in 2012 for visual impairment (presenting distance visual acuity worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye), and visual impairment not due to refractive error (distance visual acuity worse than 20/40 after refraction). Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were assessed from retinal fundus images; glaucoma was assessed from two successive frequency-doubling tests and a cup-to-disc ratio measurement. Results Prevalence of visual impairment and of visual impairment not due to refractive error was 7.5% (95% CI=6.9%, 8.1%) and 2.0% (1.7%, 2.3%), respectively. The prevalence of visual impairment not due to refractive error was significantly higher among people with AMD (2.2%) compared to those without AMD (0.8%), or with DR (3.5%) compared to those without DR (1.2%). Independent predictive factors of visual impairment not due to refractive error were AMD (OR=4.52, 95% CI=2.50, 8.17); increasing age (OR=1.09 per year, 95% CI=1.06, 1.13); and less than a high school education (OR=2.99, 95% CI=1.18, 7.55). Conclusions Visual impairment is a public health problem in the U.S. Visual impairment in two thirds of adults could be eliminated with refractive correction. Screening of the older population may identify adults at increased risk of visual impairment due to eye diseases. PMID:23790986

  2. Ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a 5-year follow-up

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    Cvetkova NP

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadezhda P Cvetkova, Kristina Hölldobler, Philipp Prahs, Viola Radeck, Horst Helbig, David Märker Department of Ophthalmology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany Purpose: Our aim was to evaluate an optical coherence tomography (OCT and visual acuity (VA-guided, variable-dosing regimen with intravitreal ranibizumab injection for treating patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD from 2007 to 2012. Design: This was a retrospective clinical study of 5 years follow-up in a tertiary eye center. Patients and methods: In this study, 66 patients with neovascular AMD (mean age of 74 years, SD 8.7 years were included. We investigated the development of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, the number of intravitreal injections, and the central retinal thickness measured with OCT (OCT Spectralis over 5 years of intravitreal treatment. Results: The mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections over 5 years was 8.8. The mean BCVA before therapy was 0.4 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR. After 5 years of therapy, the mean BCVA was 0.6 logMAR. In all, 16% of treated patients had stable VA over 5 years and 10% of study eyes approved their VA. The mean OCT-measured central retinal thickness at the beginning of this study was 295 µm; after 5 years of treatment, the mean central retinal thickness was 315 µm. There was an increase in central retinal thickness in 47.5% of examined eyes. Conclusion: Other studies showed VA improvement in OCT-guided variable-dosing regimens. Our study revealed a moderate decrease in VA after a total mean injection number as low as 8.8 injections over 5 years. In OCT, an increase in central retinal thickness over 5 years could be observed. Probably, this is due to deficient treatment when comparing the total injection number to other treatment regimens. Anti-VEGF therapy helps to keep the VA stable for a period of time, but cannot totally stop the progression of

  3. Prevalence of and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration in a multiethnic Asian cohort.

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    Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Tai, E Shyong; Kawasaki, Ryo; Tay, Wan Ting; Lee, Jeannette L; Hamzah, Haslina; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a multiethnic Asian cohort of Chinese, Malay, and Indian persons. In this population-based study, 3172 persons of Chinese, Malay, and Indian ethnicities 40 years and older were included. Participants underwent comprehensive systemic and ocular examination, retinal photography, and laboratory investigations. Early and late AMD signs were graded from retinal photographs. Age-standardized prevalence estimates were calculated using the 2010 Singapore adult population as the standard population. Association with a range of systemic risk factors was analyzed. Of 3172 participants, AMD was present in 211 subjects. Age-standardized prevalence of AMD was 7.0% in persons 40 years and older. The age-standardized prevalence was similar in all 3 Asian ethnic groups: Chinese, 7.3%; Malay, 7.7%; and Indian, 5.7% (P value = .44). The prevalence increased with age and was higher in men. Of the range of risk factors evaluated, only myopic refractive error (Chinese men. The prevalence of AMD was similar in the 3 major ethnic groups in Asia and comparable with white populations. Myopic refractive error was associated with reduced risk of AMD in Chinese men.

  4. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  5. Treatment satisfaction of patients undergoing ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a real-life setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohil R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rishma Gohil,1,2 Roxanne Crosby-Nwaobi,1,2 Angus Forbes,2 Ben J Burton,3 Philip Hykin,1 Sobha Sivaprasad1,4 1National Institute for Health Research Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, 2Diabetes Nursing, King’s College London, London, 3Ophthalmology Department, James Paget University Hospital, Great Yarmouth, 4Laser and Retinal Research Unit, King’s College Hospital, London, UK Context: Treatment satisfaction with a loading phase of monthly injections for 3 months followed by a pro-re-nata regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD remains unclear.Aims: The aim was to evaluate the treatment satisfaction of persons with nAMD treated with ranibizumab in a real-life setting.Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was conducted across three eye clinics within the National Health Service in the UK, where treatment is provided free at point of contact.Materials and methods: A total of 250 patients were selected randomly for the study. Treatment satisfaction was assessed using the Macular Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected on satisfaction of the service provided (Client Service Questionnaire-8 and the patients’ demographic and quality of life and treatment history. Factors governing treatment questionnaire were determined.Results: The most important factors that determined the satisfaction were the service provided at the clinic (Client Service Questionnaire-8, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3L, and duration of AMD. Visual acuity changes were rated as less important than one would have expected.Conclusion: The study result suggested that treatment satisfaction for nAMD was governed by the perception of being reviewed and injected regularly over a long period of time than the actual change in visual acuity from the treatment. Keyword: macular treatment satisfaction questionnaire, patient related outcome measure, treatment history, quality of life 

  6. Familial trends in a population with macular holes.

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    Kay, Christine Nichols; Pavan, Peter Reed; Small, Laurie Buccina; Zhang, Tao; Zamba, Gideon K D; Cohen, Steven Myles

    2012-04-01

    To determine if patients with macular hole report an increased family history of macular hole compared with control patients and compare the report of family history between patients with unilateral and bilateral macular holes. This was a multicenter case-control study. Charts of patients coded with diagnosis of macular hole were reviewed, and the diagnosis of idiopathic full-thickness macular hole was ascertained in 166 patients. The control group comprised 136 patients without macular hole or trauma who presented with senile cataract. Family history was obtained from all patients through a telephone interview. Six of 166 (3.6%) macular hole patients surveyed reported a history of macular hole in a primary relative compared with none of 136 (0.0%) control patients (odds ratio is infinity, with 95% confidence interval 1.295 to infinity); however, this finding may be explained by confounders such as age and number of family members. Two of the 142 (1.4%) patients with unilateral holes versus 4 of the 24 (16.7%) patients with bilateral holes reported a family history (odds ratio is 0.0714, with 95% confidence interval 0.0063 to 0.5537), and this finding remains significant when logistic regression is performed to evaluate variables of age and number of family members as potential confounders. There is an increased report of familial occurrence of macular hole in patients with macular holes compared with control patients; however, logistic regression relates this finding to variables of age and number of family members. Patients with bilateral macular holes are more likely to report a family history of macular hole than patients with unilateral macular holes, and this finding remains significant in the presence of age and number of family members. These findings may suggest a familial component to macular hole.

  7. Loosely coupled level sets for retinal layers and drusen segmentation in subjects with dry age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Jelena; Wang, Ziyuan; de Jong, Henk; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to produce high-resolution three-dimensional images of the retina, which permit the investigation of retinal irregularities. In dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic eye disease that causes central vision loss, disruptions such as drusen and changes in retinal layer thicknesses occur which could be used as biomarkers for disease monitoring and diagnosis. Due to the topology disrupting pathology, existing segmentation methods often fail. Here, we present a solution for the segmentation of retinal layers in dry AMD subjects by extending our previously presented loosely coupled level sets framework which operates on attenuation coefficients. In eyes affected by AMD, Bruch's membrane becomes visible only below the drusen and our segmentation framework is adapted to delineate such a partially discernible interface. Furthermore, the initialization stage, which tentatively segments five interfaces, is modified to accommodate the appearance of drusen. This stage is based on Dijkstra's algorithm and combines prior knowledge on the shape of the interface, gradient and attenuation coefficient in the newly proposed cost function. This prior knowledge is incorporated by varying the weights for horizontal, diagonal and vertical edges. Finally, quantitative evaluation of the accuracy shows a good agreement between manual and automated segmentation.

  8. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration.

  9. [Prevention and preventive therapy of age-related macular degeneration through the beneficial effect of treatment of endothelial dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2006-12-24

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) - a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown -, endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, anti-adhesive and anti-inflammatory functions. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive - taking into consideration all possible side effects - ACE-inhibitor and/or AR-blocker and statin and aspirin treatment: 1) those without maculopathy but being over the age of 50 and having risk factors inducing endothelial dysfunction; 2) those, who already developed AMD in one eye as a prevention in the second, unaffected eye; and 3) those patients who developed AMD in both eyes in order to ameliorate or merely slow the progression of the disease. Besides, it is advisory to inhibit AMD risk factors inducing oxidative stress with consecutive endothelial dysfunction.

  10. Plasma long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and macular pigment in subjects with family history of age-related macular degeneration: the Limpia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Bénédicte M J; Buaud, Benjamin; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Bron, Alain; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Savel, Hélène; Vaysse, Carole; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Delcourt, Cécile

    2017-12-01

    In numerous epidemiological studies, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been associated with a decreased risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Beyond their structural, functional and neuroprotective roles, omega-3 PUFAs may favour the retinal accumulation of lutein and zeaxanthin and thus increase macular pigment optical density (MPOD). We examined the associations of MPOD with plasma omega-3 PUFAs in subjects with family history of AMD. The Limpia study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective randomized clinical trial performed in 120 subjects. Subjects with at least one parent treated for neovascular AMD, aged 40-70, with a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >20/25, free of late AMD and other major eye conditions and with no use of supplement containing lutein or zeaxanthin the preceding year were recruited in Bordeaux and Dijon, France. At baseline, MPOD within 1° of eccentricity was measured by modified Heidelberg retinal analyser (Heidelberg, Germany) and plasma omega-3 PUFAs by gas chromatography. Medical history and lifestyle data were collected from a standardized questionnaire. Associations of MPOD with plasma omega-3 PUFAs were assessed at the baseline examination, using mixed linear models adjusted for age, gender, centre, body mass index, smoking, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and lutein+zeaxanthin. After multivariate adjustment, high MPOD was significantly associated with higher level of plasma docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (β = 0.029, 95% CI: 0.003, 0.055; p = 0.03). Plasma alpha linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were not significantly associated with MPOD. In the Limpia study, high MPOD within 1° was significantly associated with higher plasma levels of omega-3 DPA. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Use of Intravitreal Aflibercept in the Treatment of Wet Type of Age